Episode 1 Animal Park


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Episode 1

Ben Fogle and Kate Humble explore life behind the scenes at Longleat Estate and Safari Park. Keepers perform an emergency caesarean on Imogen the giraffe.


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Hello, and welcome to a brand-new series of Animal Park.

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-I'm Kate Humble.

-And I'm Ben Fogle.

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It's a momentous year here at Longleat, as the safari park is celebrating its 40th anniversary.

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We'll be getting close up, not just to the giraffes but to the 40 other species of animal who live here.

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Telling stories from all parts of the estate both on land and on water.

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And of course we'll be meeting Lord Bath

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and exploring his magnificent house and its extraordinary contents.

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Here's what's coming up on today's programme.

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A life and death struggle when things go very wrong for Imogen the pregnant giraffe.

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There's monkey mischief afoot after we hide their breakfast.

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And there are new babies in the lions' den.

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We'll be there to capture rare footage of ther latest cubs

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as they're actually being born.

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First, we're going up to the giraffe house where, recently, there were some dramatic events.

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When babies arrive, it's not always good news

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because sometimes the miracle of birth can go horribly wrong.

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Imogen's ten-years-old, everyone was pleased for her

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because, after several years of trying, she finally managed to carry a baby to term.

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With giraffes, that's 15 months.

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When it looked like her time had come, one of the first there was keeper Bev Evans.

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It was really exciting when we came in

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and she was starting to go into labour,

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but obviously with that came the complications.

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From really exciting to really worrying in quite a short space of time, actually.

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When Imogen's labour went on for over a day,

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it was clear to Andy Hayton, the keeper in charge of the giraffes, that something was wrong.

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Sunday morning, a vet came out, looked at her

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and the decision was taken - we would probably have to pull the calf.

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The calf was badly presented. We thought possibly it could have been a breach birth,

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or the head was tilted back so she just couldn't push it out.

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Pulling the calf out by hand would be the only way to help,

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but to do that, Imogen would have to be sedated with an anaesthetic.

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And that's always a risky business, as vet Duncan Williams knows.

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Anaesthetic-wise, I think giraffes are the most dangerous.

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The literature of reports are, basically,

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one in three anaesthetics with giraffes ended in fatalities.

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But if they didn't do something, Imogen and the baby would certainly die.

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Nevertheless, deputy head warden Ian Turner didn't like the odds.

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The last thing you want to do is knock out a giraffe.

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Even worse is knock out a giraffe that's got a baby inside.

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So it was a last resort. We hadn't got any choice in the matter.

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We'd waited until the last minute and it was just fingers crossed from then on.

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A whole team of vets and staff has been urgently summoned to help.

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Nothing like this has ever been done here before, and Ian is concerned to record every detail,

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so he and his keepers are going to film whatever happens.

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The anaesthetic is administered using a syringe on the end of a pole.

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Andy's dreading what will happen next.

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When they go, sometimes what they'll do is force themselves into a corner and try to prop themselves up.

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What can happen is they'll flip themselves straight back over

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where they just can't fight any more and are out on their feet, almost, and just collapse.

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The big worry for us is if she goes over straight backwards, she could break her spine.

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Um...

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The boxes are all lined out with large bales of hay to soften it as much as we can do.

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The straw on the floor has also been piled up to cushion the impact.

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The next minutes will be critical,

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and we'll be back very soon to find out if Imogen and her baby survive.

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Longleat is home to a troop of over 80 rhesus macaque monkeys.

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The species is found all across Asia, from the tropics right up to the chilly foothills of the Himalayas.

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So they're quite happy to live outside in Wiltshire all year round,

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just as long as they've got something to keep them occupied and plenty to eat.

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I'm up at Monkey Jungle with keeper Kevin Knibbs,

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and we're trying a bit of an experiment this morning, Kev?

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Yes. We've come here this morning with the dry food.

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I was looking at this, because don't you usually feed them fruit and vegetables and things?

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Yep, they get the fruit and veg in the afternoons. We feed this in the mornings.

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-We've got primate pellets here.

-OK.

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It's pretty much like Weetabix, muesli, that we have in the mornings.

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-It gets them going for the rest of the day.

-OK, so what's the experiment?

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We've noticed a lot of birds around this time of year.

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They tend to steal all the monkeys' food, so we're feeding them twice as much food as what we need to.

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This winter has been cold.

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We've moved the buffalo out of the jungle, where they needed a bit more shelter.

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-We've got a spare shelter here now.

-This is where the buffalo hang out when they want shelter?

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We've put loads of straw in here. Wewant to put the food in the straw and the bedding,

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-kick fresh straw over the top and let the monkeys help themselves.

-So they can forage for it?

-Absolutely.

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-Brilliant idea. So shall I just put handfuls out?

-Yeah, throw it anywhere you want.

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-Throw it around in the straw.

-Yes, that's it.

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-We'll just come over afterwards and kick fresh straw over the top so it's hidden.

-OK.

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So we can literally... I suppose hiding it quite well

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-is better for the monkeys, makes them work harder for it.

-Exactly.

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It's very good enrichment for them and it's like a natural behaviour.

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In the wild they'd forage through leaf mould and leaf litter, for bugs

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and bits of fruit and veg. This is just recreating that, really.

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Lucky monkeys.

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Right. We're nearly done here.

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We'll get out of the way. Shall we kick that over there like that?

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Yep.

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Join us later to see if the monkeys like their new experiment.

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Last year, new blood arrived at Longleat -

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Kabir the Barbary lion.

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He was brought from Port Lympne animal park in Kent

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to try to establish a new pride.

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The hope was that this would, in time, a real family with cubs to raise.

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Kabir's intended mates were a couple of young sisters - Luna

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and Yendi. They settled down straightaway

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and it seemed to be a match made in heaven.

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In fact encouraging behaviour was soon spotted

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but would it lead to anything?

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We just had to wait and see.

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Now keeper Brian Kent has some wonderful news.

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We've got a lion cub born

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so that's really exciting cos it's Kabir's.

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There's a new lion here and he's been here, what, seven months?

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So he's produced some goods.

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The new cub is a little girl.

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She's Yendi's first baby

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but that's a worry because sometimes new lion mothers don't know how to look after their young.

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But, so far, Yendi's been doing all the right things.

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Basically we've noticed her caring for her and licking her,

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making sure she's clean.

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The cub's now seven weeks old so she's still on milk

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and also starting to eat food, as well,

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so she's doing well.

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And, hopefully, her sister - who's on the other side -

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is due as well for some cubs.

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I thought she was going to have them last week

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but no such luck.

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So it's just a matter of waiting at the moment.

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While her sister Yendi had one cub,

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Luna is looking large.

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They think she may be carrying more.

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Lions normally have between two and four at a time.

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But lions are secretive and only have their cubs

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when they're alone - usually the middle of the night.

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It's a rare event that's almost never been seen. Certainly no-one here has ever been lucky enough.

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So we've called in Andy Milk. He's a specialist cameraman.

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He's had a lot of experience finding ways to film the unfilmable.

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We're hoping he'll help us to witness the miracle of birth for the very first time.

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I've just fitted the brackets up and got all that ready.

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I'm just now doing the final connection

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and, hopefully, it's in the right place

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and we're not going to be obscured by the wire on the cage.

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What I've done is installed everything outside

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and there's nothing in the cage at all so the lion can't get to it,

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can't touch anything and it's all quite safe.

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The spy camera works like a CCTV system

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so it won't disturb Luna at all.

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And it can get pictures in complete darkness

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by using infra-red lamps.

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Infra-red is just basically light of a different wavelength to what the human eye can respond to.

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Um, I don't think a lion will see it

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although they're not actually that concerned about light at all so it wouldn't matter.

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But if we were to come in at night,

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the picture on here would be fine but we wouldn't be able to see anything in the cage itself.

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The system can record continuously for up to ten hours.

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So, as night approaches, it's turned on.

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We'll be back later to find out

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if our spy camera really can capture these precious moments -

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the very first minutes of life.

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Back in the giraffe house,

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the process of giving birth seems more like a nightmare.

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Vet Duncan Williams has just given Imogen an injection of anaesthetic.

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The trouble is, with giraffes, the anaesthetic itself can be the most dangerous thing.

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I think the big problem is, you know, a massive animal,

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when they fall down, you've got the risk of regurgitation of stomach contents -

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it can go up the oesophagus and get swallowed into the lungs.

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So, as quickly as possible, an air tube needs to be inserted

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all the way down that long throat, to the top of the lungs.

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That's the most important thing to do.

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That didn't quite go according to plan.

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Just as we were getting the tube down, she regurgitated, but luckily the tube was just down in time.

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One of the four vets on the team is an anaesthetist

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from Bristol University's veterinary school - Pamela Murison.

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She's responsible for the air tube and life support.

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They're so big!

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I'm used to anaesthetising large animals,

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but they're very long with long legs, long necks,

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and you know in the back of your mind all the time that it is such a risky procedure.

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With Imogen anaesthetised, Duncan can start his examination.

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He needs to find out what state the calf is in, and how it's lying, just by feel.

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The ropes are essential for everyone's safety, and it takes a lot of hands to hold them secure.

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Ian's called in staff from all over the safari park to help.

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There's 30 odd people around, so if the giraffe kicks,

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somebody's going to end up seriously injured or even worse.

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If they kicked a lion, for instance, it would be dead.

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I've actually been trampled on by a giraffe and it's not really pleasant.

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They've got really big hooves.

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You've got that big swing from a distance,

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and they don't know they're doing it.

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If you imagine a leg going like that back and you're just in the wrong place, it sends you flying.

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Not recommended.

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Duncan's internal examination has revealed some sad news.

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The calf inside is already dead.

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It may have been dead for some time.

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Keeper Bev Evans had been looking forward to having a new baby in the giraffe house.

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It was quite sad to lose the calf.

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The vets and everybody couldn't do anything about that.

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We couldn't have done anything, so there's no point worrying too much about that

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but, yeah, it's such a shame that we lost him. It was a little boy.

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Now all their efforts are concentrated just on trying to save Imogen.

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They have to get the dead calf out

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but there's been a complication.

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Unfortunately, the drug that we gave her

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to relax the uterus

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has made her body think that she's stopped being in labour,

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so she's actually closing her cervix down.

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So a cervix that's capable of holding in a baby giraffe

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is obviously quite a strong muscle, so that's closed down.

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What we're trying to do is pull something this big

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out of something that big, which isn't happening.

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You can see the amount of effort that the guys are putting in trying to pull the calf.

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There was no way that it was going to come,

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because everything had closed down again.

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We did quite a major pull on it and it just wasn't shifting, unfortunately.

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Duncan and the team must come up with a new plan, and fast,

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because now Imogen's life is balanced on a knife-edge.

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We'll return to the giraffe house very soon.

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I'm back in Monkey Jungle with keeper Kevin Knibbs.

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Earlier we spread food out, hidden in the straw in that shelter.

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The monkeys are just starting to come around, Kev.

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They've obviously...

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Do you think they knew what we were up to?

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Do they smell it? How do you think they know that there's food around?

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They're very curious as a species,

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so anything we do, they're there straightaway.

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As soon as they find food they'll make little noises to each other,

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communicating that they've found some food.

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So all the rest of the troupe? There are monkeys scattered around in the dead wood up there,

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and they are beginning to head over this way.

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They pick up these signals.

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"Oi, there's food over here!"

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Yes. This is great.

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This is perfect natural behaviour.

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This big guy at the front is Timmy, our dominant male.

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-He's there straightaway.

-Right.

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As he would be in the wild.

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Obviously that food, we buried it quite well, and the little maize pellets are tiny.

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How are they finding it? Are they using smell or sight or everything?

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Mostly, it's sight. They'll dig through it with their hands.

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If they see something they can eat, they'll put it into their mouth,

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bite it. If they can eat it, great, if they can't they'll throw it away.

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They sniff things well. They've got a very good sense of smell.

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They're just going to fill up their cheek pouches.

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They get bigger cheeks on them, and off they go.

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That's brilliant, that one, sliding down the pole!

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They are just fantastic to watch, aren't they?

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They've blown it. I was going to say I'm quite surprised how calm they all are.

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-There's no fighting, presumably that's because there's enough to go round.

-Yeah, definitely.

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They all know their role as well.

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Occasionally you get a very brave little one coming in to try and steal some food,

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and that's not acceptable in monkey society, and they get told very quickly it's not acceptable.

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But it is amazing. If you just saw that scene,

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it would be very difficult to tell which one is dominant.

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We've got some very small ones in there,

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and it seems to be they've got the society quite well worked out.

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Exactly.

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The males are the big dominant ones and the females come after that.

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-Normally the females rule it. They're very clever.

-Are they?

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They make sure nothing happens, and the males lay back and do their bit.

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MONKEY SQUEAKS

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When you get a squeak like that, is that a warning?

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"Just be careful." Look at that.

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Is this Timmy at the front?

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This one's called Maggie, a female.

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She's always on the lookout for people and likes to make faces at people. This is a threat.

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So she's pulling a face at our cameraman?

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Yeah, because we're looking at her - she's threatening us to stay away from the food.

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Do you think, now, this might be something you repeat?

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-Has this been a successful experiment?

-Yes. I'd like to do this every day, if we can.

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Every morning we'll do this until they get bored. If they do, we'll think of something else.

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Come up with another idea. Kev, thank you very, very much.

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It's just a fantastic sight.

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Monkeys everywhere!

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With Imogen's baby not only dead but also hopelessly stuck,

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there's only one way left to try to save her life,

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despite the fact that, as senior keeper Andy Hayton knows, there's little chance of success.

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We're gonna attempt a Caesarean, just to give her a go.

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We can't just decide we're going to put her down and quit here.

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We've got to... Like I say, even if it doesn't come out

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the right decision or the right outcome that we want,

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we've got to at least try it.

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So we're going to attempt a Caesarean now and see how we go.

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This will be the first Caesarean that's ever been performed on a giraffe at Longleat.

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Duncan Williams is the vet in charge of the team.

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'We do Caesareans in cattle all the time.

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'The actual operation itself is very much similar to a cow.'

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But it is different... She was lying down, cows are normally standing up.

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'We don't normally have quite so many people helping.'

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I've never done anything like that in a giraffe at all. No.

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Imogen has now been under anaesthetic for over two hours.

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For a giraffe, that's a dangerously long time.

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It's up to Pam Murison, the veterinary anaesthetist, to monitor her condition.

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'We monitored her blood-pressure, making sure

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'that that was within normal range and not too high, not too low.

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'Also trying to make sure she's adequately anaesthetised,

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'so that she is not either very, very deeply anaesthetised,

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'which is going to cause problems for her organs'

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and reduce the amount of blood getting to them,

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or very, very lightly anaesthetised

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and liable to move or be aware of what's going on.

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Meanwhile, the other three vets are desperately trying to get the dead calf out.

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Even deputy head warden Ian Turner is losing hope.

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I've never seen a Caesarean on a giraffe.

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Literally, if the giraffe survived it would be a miracle.

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Here it comes. Towards me.

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Go on. It should come now. Pull.

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We've just taken a baby giraffe out of her stomach,

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which, as you know, is a 6ft-odd baby, so that's removed.

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So the actual wound, the stitches, we're talking that sort of size stitching.

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She's got two lots of internal stitching plus the external stitching.

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You know, it's going to be touch-and-go whether she survives this operation

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but to go through that time and all this...

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She's been prodded around, poked,

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stitches here and the rigmarole of what's gone on -

0:20:570:21:02

it's quite a traumatic time for her.

0:21:020:21:04

The stitches need to be made very strong, because giraffes

0:21:040:21:08

must always stand up, even when they've got such a massive wound.

0:21:080:21:12

The moment of truth will come when the job is finished and they try to revive Imogen.

0:21:120:21:18

We'll be back to see what happens later on.

0:21:180:21:21

I'm down in Pets Corner with keeper Bev Alan and two very sweet little guinea pigs.

0:21:370:21:42

They're young. How old are they?

0:21:420:21:44

-About nine weeks old now. Two females.

-OK.

0:21:440:21:46

This is Tia and that's Maria.

0:21:460:21:49

I like those names.

0:21:490:21:51

Do guinea pigs of this age take a lot of care?

0:21:510:21:53

They do. You've got to make sure that you feed them the correct diet,

0:21:530:21:57

lots of hay in their diet.

0:21:570:21:59

Also a dry mix as well, and lots of fruit we give ours as well.

0:21:590:22:03

They're obviously very popular pets with children.

0:22:030:22:06

Would you recommend them?

0:22:060:22:08

For younger children I recommend guinea pigs because they're fun.

0:22:080:22:11

Also long-haired, you must groom them often.

0:22:110:22:14

-Do you have to run a brush, a comb, through their hair?

-We do, yeah.

0:22:140:22:17

Haircuts as well now and then.

0:22:170:22:19

Wow. They are very sweet, aren't they?

0:22:190:22:22

-They are.

-How long will they live for?

0:22:220:22:24

-About four to five years, average.

-OK.

0:22:240:22:27

Bev, thank you. Don't go away, because here's what's still to come on today's programme.

0:22:270:22:32

'Ben and I take on a challenge to see if we can become Longleat guides

0:22:320:22:36

'in just one day!'

0:22:360:22:38

Yendi's got her new baby

0:22:400:22:43

but how will it go when Luna gives birth?

0:22:430:22:47

And we'll find out what happens to Imogen.

0:22:480:22:51

But, now, up in Longleat House,

0:22:560:22:58

kate and I are about to face a test that will try us to the limits.

0:22:580:23:02

Every year, a quarter of a million visitors enjoy a tour

0:23:020:23:06

of the magnificent state rooms

0:23:060:23:08

and it's up to the house guides to make sure they go away

0:23:080:23:11

both enlightened and enthralled.

0:23:110:23:14

If you worked in the court of Henry VIII

0:23:140:23:16

you didn't just acquire a few acres of land...

0:23:160:23:19

It's a challenging job

0:23:190:23:21

but then we like a challenge.

0:23:210:23:23

Kate and I have come up into the great house here at Longleat

0:23:260:23:29

with guide Sarah Bartlett and head guide Clare Mound,

0:23:290:23:32

to learn how to become a guide in just one day.

0:23:320:23:35

-Claire, how long have you been a guide at Longleat?

-I've been here for 12 years.

0:23:350:23:39

-OK. We are going to try and absorb 12 years' worth of information in just a day.

-Possibly.

0:23:390:23:46

OK. We're gonna start in this room. Is that right? You and I.

0:23:460:23:49

You and I are going to start here,

0:23:490:23:50

and Ben and Sarah are going to go next door and try and absorb that room.

0:23:500:23:54

OK. We'll get going.

0:23:540:23:56

If somebody wants to be a guide at Longleat, what's the process?

0:23:560:24:00

You start with an interview, we see if we like each other

0:24:000:24:03

and then you start training with other guides

0:24:030:24:06

and you gradually absorb information

0:24:060:24:08

from lots of reference books and lots of hands-on.

0:24:080:24:11

So, how many rooms are open to the public?

0:24:110:24:15

How many rooms do you have to get to know intimately?

0:24:150:24:18

You get to know, we usually say, about a third of the house,

0:24:180:24:21

-sort of 16, 17 rooms.

-Wow.

-That will keep you going.

0:24:210:24:25

Looking at this room, they're just so packed full of things.

0:24:250:24:29

Presumably, the public can ask you about anything.

0:24:290:24:32

They can ask you about anything, but you will start

0:24:320:24:34

by telling them that this is the lower family dining room,

0:24:340:24:38

a little bit about their porcelain, the portraits

0:24:380:24:41

and the wonderful ceilings.

0:24:410:24:43

So we would get to the ceiling, as you say, and it is staggering.

0:24:430:24:46

You can't miss it.

0:24:460:24:48

What sort of information would you give about this?

0:24:480:24:51

Lord Bath's great-grandfather fell in love with Italy.

0:24:510:24:55

He employs a London firm, John Dibblee Crace,

0:24:550:24:58

to put in very dramatic ceilings.

0:24:580:25:00

They're largely copied from the Ducal Palace in Venice.

0:25:000:25:04

-Wow.

-They were put in in the 1870s and early 1880s.

-Yeah.

0:25:040:25:07

OK. There's an awful lot to remember.

0:25:070:25:10

-A lot to learn, but one or two things in each room.

-OK.

-That'll see you through.

0:25:100:25:14

I'll carry on swotting up. Go and see how Ben's getting on.

0:25:140:25:19

While Kate learns about the lower dining room,

0:25:190:25:21

I'm in the breakfast room with Sarah. We've got the type of room right.

0:25:210:25:25

What are the features in here that I need to learn about?

0:25:250:25:28

You need to know the table. That's the important feature.

0:25:280:25:31

It was laid out for the opening of the house on 1st April 1949.

0:25:310:25:39

-So, this is as it was laid on that date?

-Correct.

0:25:390:25:42

What's the significance of that?

0:25:420:25:44

That is the date that the house opened to the general public.

0:25:440:25:47

That was because Lord Bath's grandfather, Thomas...

0:25:470:25:52

-Who's in the portrait above the fireplace, is he?

-Yes.

0:25:520:25:56

That's right. He had died in 1946.

0:25:560:25:58

The family had had to sell vast quantities of the estate

0:25:580:26:02

-to pay the death duties.

-OK.

0:26:020:26:03

The table is all original, is it?

0:26:030:26:05

-Is that the original paper?

-That's the original.

0:26:050:26:08

-The eggshells are the same?

-Probably.

0:26:080:26:11

-Highly probably. Yes.

-What else in this room?

0:26:110:26:14

The ceiling strikes me as amazing.

0:26:140:26:18

-The ceiling is 24 carat gold leaf.

-Is it really?

0:26:180:26:23

There's so much to take in, isn't there?

0:26:230:26:26

How long have you been guiding for?

0:26:260:26:29

-I've been guiding for four years now.

-Right.

0:26:290:26:31

Did you used to take books home, homework, notes and things

0:26:310:26:35

to study for the next day?

0:26:350:26:37

You did, yes. But as you went round the house, you learnt things.

0:26:370:26:41

People asked you questions

0:26:410:26:43

which helps because you have to think what the answer is.

0:26:430:26:46

I think I have a lot to learn. So the ceiling is 24 carat gold.

0:26:460:26:50

-Table 19...

-49.

-49.

0:26:500:26:53

I really do have a lot to take in.

0:26:530:26:54

Join us later when we'll be put through our paces.

0:26:540:26:58

Back at the lion house, we've set up a spy camera

0:27:040:27:07

to try to capture a secret and rarely seen event -

0:27:070:27:09

the moment when a lioness gives birth.

0:27:090:27:13

But, so far, Luna, the lioness in question, is keeping everyone on tenterhooks.

0:27:130:27:18

Still no cubs.

0:27:190:27:21

Keeper Brian Kent has been expecting to find new cubs every morning for the last week.

0:27:210:27:27

She does look very big now so she's going to have them soon.

0:27:270:27:31

It's just a matter of waiting.

0:27:310:27:34

Four days later, in the dead of night, it finally happened.

0:27:340:27:38

Our spy camera was able to get this unique footage.

0:27:390:27:44

Two cubs are out,

0:27:440:27:46

and here's the third.

0:27:460:27:48

Immediately, Luna starts to clean the baby.

0:27:500:27:54

In all the years they've been looking after the lions,

0:27:550:27:59

this is the first time Brian Kent and Bob Trollope have ever witnessed these precious moments.

0:27:590:28:04

The time limit was getting on a bit.

0:28:040:28:06

It was, "Oh, it'll be next week." Never happened.

0:28:060:28:11

No, nature takes its course and eventually, out they come.

0:28:110:28:15

It was great. It was good to see them.

0:28:150:28:18

And to see what I've seen on here now, which is nice.

0:28:180:28:21

All the years I've worked here, not to be able to see...

0:28:210:28:24

and to be able to see something that close up is great.

0:28:240:28:28

Good detail as well.

0:28:280:28:30

Now, with daylight, the camera can get

0:28:300:28:34

better-quality pictures, in colour, of the cubs' first few hours.

0:28:340:28:38

It would normally be impossible to watch this natural behaviour

0:28:380:28:41

because of the way Mum reacts when anyone comes in,

0:28:410:28:45

as Bob and Brian saw first thing this morning.

0:28:450:28:49

She was very protective of them.

0:28:490:28:52

As soon as we walked in you knew that she'd had them

0:28:520:28:55

because, apart from the noises they were making,

0:28:550:28:58

she was up at the front of the cage trying to see us off.

0:28:580:29:02

When we went in first of all,

0:29:020:29:05

you couldn't quite see how many there was, because she was obviously out there trying to protect them.

0:29:050:29:10

We didn't want to spend an awful lot of time in there.

0:29:100:29:13

It's best just to keep away.

0:29:130:29:14

As long as you've checked them twice a day,

0:29:140:29:17

you don't really need to stay there all day, there's just no need because you can make things worse.

0:29:170:29:23

It's better to stay away and let her get on with it.

0:29:230:29:26

It is amazing to see, because quite often when we go in there

0:29:260:29:30

and find the cubs there, they've either been cleaned or have just been born.

0:29:300:29:34

To actually see how quick it is that they go to the nipple

0:29:340:29:39

and how quick it is between each cub being born...

0:29:390:29:42

And how strong they are.

0:29:420:29:43

-Yeah, amazing.

-You can see them hammering around straightaway.

0:29:430:29:47

That's really great to see.

0:29:470:29:49

Luna's babies are very vulnerable, each weighs little more than a kilo,

0:29:520:29:57

and at this stage they're still blind.

0:29:570:29:59

In the wild, only one in five cubs make it to adulthood,

0:30:010:30:05

and even in captivity the future of these little ones is far from certain.

0:30:050:30:11

You know, you can lose cubs.

0:30:110:30:13

Mum may sit on them by accident. It can happen.

0:30:130:30:18

So you've just got to wait and hope things go well.

0:30:180:30:22

You can't do nothing about it. That's how it goes.

0:30:220:30:26

And hopefully she'll do fine.

0:30:260:30:30

See how it goes.

0:30:300:30:32

Now, with everything looking good,

0:30:320:30:34

we'll leave Luna's cubs on their very first day of life.

0:30:340:30:38

But, of course, we'll be following all developments in the Lion House

0:30:380:30:42

right through the series.

0:30:420:30:44

The emergency Caesarean to try to save Imogen's life

0:30:500:30:54

has taken three and a half hours.

0:30:540:30:56

Her calf was dead inside and it took all the efforts of four vets

0:30:560:31:00

and a whole team of keepers to get it out.

0:31:000:31:03

Now the time has come to try to wake Imogen up,

0:31:030:31:06

and the stress is starting to show.

0:31:060:31:09

'It feels like we've been doing this for about a week.

0:31:090:31:12

'It has been a long day.

0:31:120:31:13

'We've been stood around.

0:31:130:31:16

'It's the vets and anaesthetists that have done all the hard work.'

0:31:160:31:19

The Caesarean was done,

0:31:190:31:21

unfortunately a dead baby, but we were pretty much sure of that.

0:31:210:31:26

Surprisingly, for two days of the calf being dead

0:31:260:31:29

it started to decompose already.

0:31:290:31:31

The big worry is if the calf has decomposed so far,

0:31:310:31:36

that she's infected.

0:31:360:31:39

'Once we'd finished all the operation,

0:31:400:31:42

'Duncan had stitched it all back up and got the stitches done

0:31:420:31:45

'and cleaned the wound up and give it all the antibiotics and stuff,

0:31:450:31:49

'they give it a Revivon. What we do is -'

0:31:490:31:54

Andy, Ryan and a couple of others

0:31:540:31:57

'stayed in there and we moved out with just Ryan and Andy in there.

0:31:570:32:00

'You sit on its neck

0:32:000:32:02

'and wait for it to come round.

0:32:020:32:04

'At the last minute, once it's up, you get off its neck

0:32:040:32:08

'and it sits up.'

0:32:080:32:10

It's an anxious time for Pam, the veterinary anaesthetist.

0:32:100:32:15

To a certain extent, I think you are relieved

0:32:150:32:17

that one part has gone well,

0:32:170:32:19

but still nervous about the part that still has to go.

0:32:190:32:22

It's not completely finished until she's up standing and well.

0:32:220:32:27

For me, particularly, I find that period very nerve-racking,

0:32:270:32:31

because beyond... We've got very little control

0:32:310:32:34

of how she gets up and she could easily injure herself.

0:32:340:32:37

Get out, lads. Get out.

0:32:420:32:44

They were expecting Imogen to at least try to stand up

0:32:490:32:53

as soon as she came round.

0:32:530:32:54

Something is wrong, because lying down is unnatural to a giraffe.

0:32:540:32:58

It's dangerous to their health and can lead them to just give up

0:32:580:33:02

and lose the will to live.

0:33:020:33:04

The longer the anaesthetic, the more likely you are

0:33:060:33:09

to have some of the other problems

0:33:090:33:11

associated with anaesthesia in large animals.

0:33:110:33:13

For example, there's pressure on the muscles

0:33:130:33:16

which have been lying in an awkward position

0:33:160:33:18

with 600 kilos of giraffe lying on top of certain areas.

0:33:180:33:23

'It's a difficult situation. How much do you intervene? Do you let her do it herself?'

0:33:230:33:28

You always worry that you don't do enough

0:33:280:33:31

and something bad happens and you'll be blaming yourselves.

0:33:310:33:35

But a few minutes later, Imogen finds the strength to sit up.

0:33:390:33:43

And then, finally, to stand.

0:33:520:33:54

The big step is she didn't die in the operation.

0:34:110:34:14

The next big step is she got up, or woke up and got up.

0:34:140:34:18

If we can... We'll slowly get her eating again.

0:34:180:34:21

It is just tiny little steps all the way.

0:34:210:34:25

It's a miracle that Imogen has come this far,

0:34:260:34:29

but after major surgery on the stable floor,

0:34:290:34:32

infection is a very real danger.

0:34:320:34:35

If she makes it through tonight, tomorrow, and days on after that,

0:34:350:34:40

if she gets to two weeks then we can breathe out.

0:34:400:34:42

We'll return later to find out whether or not Imogen makes it

0:34:420:34:47

through the hours and days ahead.

0:34:470:34:50

I think my brain's going to explode. Ben and I have spent the entire day

0:35:120:35:15

trying to learn how to be guides at Longleat House.

0:35:150:35:18

There is so much to remember I can't tell you. But now is test time.

0:35:180:35:22

I have a willing group. Please come in.

0:35:220:35:25

I shall tell you about the lower dining room.

0:35:250:35:29

I know that this looks like the most fabulously luxurious room,

0:35:290:35:33

but actually this was the day-to-day dining room.

0:35:330:35:36

The family would have eaten here every day.

0:35:360:35:38

The first thing you notice in this room, if you look up,

0:35:380:35:43

is the amazing ceiling.

0:35:430:35:45

This ceiling was put in by the fourth Marquess,

0:35:450:35:48

the present Lord Bath's grandfather.

0:35:480:35:52

He loved Italian - the Italian style.

0:35:520:35:57

This ceiling is actually copied from the Ducal Palace in Venice.

0:35:570:36:02

-How do they clean it?

-Painstakingly. You know your blusher brushes?

0:36:020:36:06

That's what they do.

0:36:060:36:08

They'll stand up on ladders and get into the... It's so delicate, and obviously it's all gilt.

0:36:080:36:13

They will get in and brush it away literally with blusher brushes.

0:36:130:36:19

It's not something you want to do too often.

0:36:190:36:22

How often do they have to repaint it?

0:36:220:36:24

It's done roughly every ten years or so,

0:36:240:36:28

but because it's kept in very good condition and is cleaned,

0:36:280:36:32

it's kept very well so things do stay preserved

0:36:320:36:35

-in this magnificent state.

-It's a good job.

0:36:350:36:40

If you want to go through into this room, my colleague Ben will meet you in there.

0:36:400:36:46

(What a swot!) Follow me in here.

0:36:460:36:48

Now, I would like to welcome you into the breakfast room.

0:36:480:36:52

Please come along, everyone.

0:36:520:36:54

Very impressive.

0:36:540:36:56

Lots of paintings of various Baths along the ceilings,

0:36:560:37:01

all sorts in fact.

0:37:010:37:03

The table is laid still originally from the 1st April 1949,

0:37:030:37:11

believe it or not. All totally original.

0:37:110:37:13

The original newspaper, even the original egg that was left there at that time.

0:37:130:37:18

That was when the fourth Marquess, maybe the fifth,

0:37:180:37:22

in the painting above the fireplace passed away.

0:37:220:37:25

There were incredible death duties that had to be paid,

0:37:250:37:28

so the house had to open to the public

0:37:280:37:30

so that you lucky people could have a look around and see what went on in here.

0:37:300:37:35

Very impressive ceiling.

0:37:350:37:37

In terms of the painting on the ceiling,

0:37:370:37:39

would that have been painted and then set into the ceiling?

0:37:390:37:42

It would very likely have been painted and then put up there, yes.

0:37:420:37:48

Absolutely.

0:37:480:37:50

Any questions from anybody?

0:37:500:37:52

I hope you enjoyed the room. Please join Sarah this way. Thank you very much for coming, everybody.

0:37:540:37:59

(I think I did rather well.)

0:37:590:38:01

-Well done, Ben.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:38:030:38:06

It's been a month now since Imogen underwent an emergency Caesarean.

0:38:100:38:15

The baby was already dead,

0:38:150:38:17

and no-one really thought that Mum had much chance either.

0:38:170:38:21

But here she is, and she's doing fine.

0:38:240:38:27

We had hardly any infection to speak of.

0:38:330:38:37

In fact it was so little infection

0:38:370:38:38

it's not even really worth mentioning.

0:38:380:38:41

Yeah, she's just fantastic.

0:38:410:38:44

I think, the kind of animal she is,

0:38:440:38:47

she's very, very quiet, very laid back.

0:38:470:38:49

I think that stood well in her stead

0:38:490:38:51

because obviously the stress level from the pain and the darting

0:38:510:38:55

and the hassle was very low.

0:38:550:38:57

Obviously she didn't know anything about the op

0:38:570:38:59

because she was completely out,

0:38:590:39:01

but stress will get them in a lot of other ways.

0:39:010:39:04

That didn't affect her.

0:39:040:39:06

Yeah, really, really pleased.

0:39:060:39:08

It's unlikely that Imogen will be allowed to get pregnant again -

0:39:100:39:14

the risks are just too high.

0:39:140:39:16

But with her steady nature, she still has an important role to play.

0:39:160:39:21

She's got a great future in the herd

0:39:210:39:23

because she'll be central to a lot of things.

0:39:230:39:25

Unfortunately, the one thing she possibly isn't going to do

0:39:250:39:28

is have calves of her own.

0:39:280:39:30

But she's got two sisters here.

0:39:300:39:32

So there are going to be offspring from that family,

0:39:320:39:36

and she can just be everybody's dear old maiden aunt

0:39:360:39:39

being a bit dotty in the corner, I suppose.

0:39:390:39:41

Hello, girls.

0:39:470:39:48

Imogen has been getting a lot of visits

0:39:480:39:51

from all the staff that helped that day.

0:39:510:39:54

It's an experience Head Warden Keith Harris won't forget in a hurry.

0:39:540:39:58

I've been involved with giraffes for 30 years ever since I've been here,

0:39:580:40:03

but we've sedated them for foot trimming and lameness,

0:40:030:40:09

that type of problem, but never a Caesarean.

0:40:090:40:14

So for it to actually be successful as well

0:40:140:40:20

is quite something, so we're quietly quite chuffed.

0:40:200:40:23

The operation what she went through,

0:40:250:40:27

fantastic, an absolute miracle of nature that she would recover so well.

0:40:270:40:32

Fantastic it is.

0:40:320:40:35

Makes her extra-special now to have gone through all she's gone through.

0:40:350:40:39

We thought we'd lose her

0:40:390:40:41

in the bottom of our hearts - even though you've got to try these things -

0:40:410:40:45

we thought she was going to die.

0:40:450:40:46

Back up in the house, it's time to find out who's won the guide's challenge -

0:41:040:41:09

Ben or me?

0:41:090:41:10

The judge is Head Guide Claire Mound,

0:41:100:41:14

and I don't know what Ben's been up to,

0:41:140:41:16

but I'm beginning to suspect a hint of bias.

0:41:160:41:19

I think you did brilliantly, Ben. You didn't lose anybody, did you?

0:41:190:41:23

-I hope not!

-No-one's still hidden under the table.

0:41:230:41:26

-Your answered spontaneous questions that might have floored you, and got them right.

-Thank you.

0:41:260:41:31

-It's all sounding very good. What about Kate?

-Kate did all right, too, didn't you?

-I thought I did.

0:41:310:41:38

-You got the grandfathers muddled.

-I did. There are too many grandfathers in this family.

0:41:380:41:43

There are too many Thomases and Johns and things.

0:41:430:41:46

-It was great-grandfather, wasn't it?

-It was. Otherwise...

0:41:460:41:50

No, you were getting there but, by a small whisker,

0:41:500:41:54

I think that Ben got slightly better,

0:41:540:41:59

-and we'll give you a badge.

-No!

0:41:590:42:02

-It does mean we might ask you to do some work now.

-Oh, really? Does that mean bigger groups?

-Yes.

0:42:020:42:07

I've got 30 small children waiting downstairs.

0:42:070:42:10

I'm going to wear that with... What?!

0:42:100:42:12

-How many more rooms do I have to learn about?

-Oh, about 10 more. Yes.

0:42:120:42:17

-Oh, dear. I have my work cut out. Do you want the badge, Kate?

-No, no, no. See you next year.

0:42:170:42:22

Sadly that's all we've got time for on today's programme.

0:42:220:42:25

Here's what's coming up on the next Animal Park.

0:42:250:42:28

There are dramatic developments when Babs the rhino

0:42:300:42:33

takes a turn for the worse.

0:42:330:42:35

Back with the lions,

0:42:380:42:39

it's time to give the youngest cub her injections.

0:42:390:42:42

And down in Pets Corner,

0:42:420:42:45

we'll meet two new bouncing babies -

0:42:450:42:48

the first otter cubs born at Longleat in over 30 years.

0:42:480:42:51

So don't miss the next Animal Park.

0:42:510:42:54

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd - 2006

0:43:160:43:20

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:200:43:24

Ben Fogle and Kate Humble explore life behind the scenes at Longleat Estate and Safari Park. A life-and-death drama unfolds as keepers perform an emergency caesarean on Imogen the giraffe, and a secret camera captures the birth of lion cubs. Ben and Kate learn how to be guides at Longleat House in just one day. Will they impress the staff?