Episode 7 Animal Park


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Episode 7

In a special programme from Kenya, Safari Park keepers are on a dangerous mission with anti-poachers. Can they pull off a successful ambush and make it back safely?


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Hello and welcome to Animal Park. I'm Kate Humble.

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And I'm Ben Fogle and this is Longleat Safari Park,

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which opened its doors in 1966 - the very first of its kind in the country.

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And this year it celebrates its 40th anniversary.

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We've been following life at the safari park

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for the last seven years and every year brings new exciting stories. Here's what's coming up today.

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We're off to Kenya with the staff from Longleat...

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These brave men and their faithful hounds

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risk their lives to protect endangered species.

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HE SHOUTS

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We go out on patrol with the anti-poaching unit.

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After a boisterous dust bath, it's time for baby's bottle.

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And one of Longleat's largest lions

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comes a little too close for comfort...

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I think we've got someone biting the tyre!

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Bit of panic in the back there, I think!

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When Longleat first opened its gates as a safari park 40 years ago,

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the lions were the main attraction.

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Now they share the limelight with over 50 species.

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But they're still a favourite with the visitors.

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Today I'm going down to lion country

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to set up a brand new challenge for Charlie's pride.

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This is the way to start the day, halfway up a ladder

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in the lion enclosure putting out chunks of meat.

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I'm here with Bob Trollope, keeper of the lions.

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Why are we putting meat up trees, Bob?

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It's basically a bit of enrichment for the lions.

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OK, so... Cos usually they're fed from the back of a feed truck.

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Yeah. We normally stimulate them by having them chase the feed wagon, simulating a hunt.

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We thought we'd do a different angle on it.

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See how good they are at finding the food.

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Cos they're gonna have to use their senses to pick it out

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and climb up the trees and all sorts of things.

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-OK. Do you want to...

-Just get some more?

-..get me another bit and I'll put some out here.

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So, Brian, you're also putting meat out here.

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Do you think that they'll find it fairly easily or do you think that it'll take them a while?

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-Are they quite a clever lot?

-I think they'll find it straight away, to be honest.

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They're gonna smell it.

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Obviously, we're gonna have a few pieces dotted on the floor

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just in case one of them gets hold of a piece and they all run after it and cause a rumpus.

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So we need to have a few pieces around, which they can find easily.

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Now, it's... I was standing here.

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That's quite high. That one's really high.

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I know that leopards are good climbers, but what about lions?

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Lions do climb trees pretty well,

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so I imagine they should stretch to get it or go up the tree and get it.

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And we've also put a piece on the top of the scratching post up there.

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I mean, Bob, I can't see how they're possibly gonna get to that.

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The rope runs out halfway down.

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This is quite slippery plastic.

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Well, hopefully, they'll use their initiative and pounce on it

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-and then that would...

-Oh, really? So you think that they'll actually push against it?

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As soon as they know it's up there, they will be determined to get it,

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whether they climb up and pull it or...

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It's well within their reach.

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That's nine or ten feet.

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-They can stretch...

-Found a better place. >

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-..10 or 11 feet.

-Don't you dare, Brian!

-This is a good place

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-to hide some.

-Can we hide it in the tree here?

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That'll make it more exciting for everyone.

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I'll just leave that there. No-one's gonna notice.

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I think it's a very bad idea! I think we'll put some over here.

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Keep an eye on you now. Shall I put one in here?

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-Do you think...

-Put them right in.

-Do you think...

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I mean, obviously, this is great for us to see this sort of unusual behaviour.

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This isn't taunting the lions in any way, is it?

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No. No, of course not.

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It's gonna be good for them. It's totally different.

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As we come through with the feed, just drop it on the floor. They pick it up.

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This way, they've gotta work for it a bit,

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try and find it, and, you know, hopefully, it's gonna be good.

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OK, well, we will be back a little bit later on

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to see how the lions cope and whether they can find their meal or not.

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I'm going to go and just check the Land Rover and make sure there isn't any in there.

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Now we're off to Kenya, to visit the Tusk Trust.

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Tusk is a charity dedicated to conserving

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the wildlife and habitats of Africa.

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They run 25 conservation projects in 15 countries.

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As a donor, Longleat Safari Park has enjoyed a close working relationship

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with the trust in recent years.

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This collaboration means Tusk has invited Safari Park staff to develop

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their professional expertise by visiting the conservancies it supports in Kenya.

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This year, deputy head warden, Ian Turner, is taking

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four lucky staff on a work trip they've all been looking forward to.

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I mean, this is a... You know, a lifetime opportunity to go out to Africa.

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OK, we're working, but you're getting to do stuff you want to do.

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It's a job, but you're going to Africa to see wildlife as it should be.

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Their first stop is the Lewa conservancy.

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5,000 acres of land on the slopes of Mount Kenya.

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In the 1970s and early '80s,

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Kenya's elephant and rhino were almost wiped out by poaching.

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At that time, Lewa was a farm.

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But when he saw what was happening to the animals,

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owner Ian Craig became convinced he had to do something to help them.

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Probably the single incident that made the biggest impression

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on me was watching...

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eight armed guys killing elephants one evening.

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A herd of 100-odd elephant. We were sitting on a hill.

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We saw these guys open fire on them.

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They killed eight elephant whilst we were there. Then it got dark.

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We continued to watch them throughout the night

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and brought the government in in the morning.

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Ian made the decision to convert his farm to a conservancy in 1983.

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Today, Lewa is a safe haven for wildlife,

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including more than 75 endangered rhino.

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But despite a world-wide ban, trade in elephant tusks and rhino horn

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can still be a lucrative business.

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Desperate poachers still pose a constant threat.

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So, to protect the animals, Lewa has 74 rangers,

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and an anti-poaching unit of 17 armed guards.

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The unit's commander is Michael Tosho.

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He and his team must be constantly vigilant.

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Last year, they were called out 65 times to protect the animals.

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In the northern part, this is the only place you can get rhinos.

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Yeah? Black and white.

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They are still in high demand.

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When a poacher thinks of poaching in this particular region,

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he should first think about Lewa.

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"Lewa has rhinos. How can I get in there?"

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Two years ago, the unit got a new weapon

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in the fight to track down poachers -

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a pair of bloodhounds.

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These dogs' sense of smell is thousands of times more sensitive

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than our own, and they can follow a trail where no human could.

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Before we get these dogs, this job was quite difficult.

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Sometimes we lost foot marks.

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Sometimes something is just there and we take a long time to get that particular thing.

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And nowadays, we save time.

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It surprises me because sometimes when we are following those poachers,

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we got...rain

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and at the same time we still followed them.

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At the end, you see, "These are the right people we've been following."

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But if it was just us without dogs, once it rains, that's the end

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of tracking these people.

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The anti-poaching unit's job is to track down and arrest illegal poachers.

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But many poachers are armed and dangerous.

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If necessary, the unit will fight.

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Even the bloodhounds can become targets.

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When you meet with these armed people,

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you know, their target is to destroy whatever they can,

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either the dogs or the guides.

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So, what we do is we have to ensure that these dogs are well protected.

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We assign some people just for the protection of the dogs

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and others to attack the poachers.

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We have in our minds that the dogs may be targeted at any time.

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Today, the anti-poaching unit is preparing for a training exercise.

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To gain insight into the work being done at Lewa,

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Longleat keepers Bev Evans and Andy Hayton will be taking part.

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They'll pretend to be poachers, and will be tracked by the dogs.

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It's not a task for the faint-hearted.

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For me, personally, the stuff I can see,

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the elephants, giraffes, rhino - that doesn't concern me at all.

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I'm a big animal person. That's what I've always done.

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It's the little things that you can't see that bite you and do you a real mischief.

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Snakes and stuff - I'll be a total girl on top of an Acacia tree, I tell you!

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I cannot stand snakes!

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On foot, they set off as fast as they can

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across the wide open bush of Lewa.

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With them are two rangers disguised as poachers and an armed guard, just in case.

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I've heard stories already about people walking across lions,

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through elephants, that kind of thing.

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So, it's a little bit... You know, your heart's racing a little bit.

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The whole thing of being chased, when someone's after you.

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A little bit nerve-racking!

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The poachers will have 30 minutes head start before the bloodhounds are put on their scent.

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We'll be keeping track of their progress.

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-Back in Wiltshire...

-Din-dins!

-..the lions have been let loose.

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Charlie!

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Good girl.

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I'm out in the lion enclosure with Charlie's pride

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and head of section Brian and keeper Bob.

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The lions have just been let out for the morning.

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Earlier we hid meat around here, there's some up the tree.

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There's some on top of the scratching post.

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We've got a camera up that tree,

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which is hopefully going to capture shots of the lions

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actually climbing up the tree to get the meat that we hid up there.

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Now, this isn't something that you do every day, Brian?

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No, we wouldn't do this every day.

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But this is, you think, very good for them.

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It's very good for them cos they've got to try and find it.

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Hopefully, stretch even up to the tree,

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which would be good for them and their claws as well.

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If we look at Charlie here, he's obviously smelt the meat...

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Oh, look at that. Straight in.

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Oh, look. Look at that.

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-Brilliant.

-So that was a combination of eyesight and smell then.

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She knew it was there, but couldn't spot it.

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It's amazing getting this really close view of them eating.

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It's actually quite a delicate process.

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I mean, given the size of their jaw, and the size of their teeth,

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you'd think they'd just smash into the meat.

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But it actually looks like they're almost fastidious about it.

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They are, aren't they?

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They're pulling pieces off and chewing pieces.

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What they'll do is, when they get down to the bone,

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they'll use their tongues to lick off the meat

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and lick off the sinews because the tongue is course.

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-Oh, oh!

-No, she's going to smell something.

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LIONS GROWL

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That looked very aggressive,

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but actually neither of them touched each other.

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It was all mouth and no trousers.

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Noise mainly. Just get off that bit of meat. I want it.

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This is what would happen in the wild.

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They would fight over best places on the kill.

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You can't step in too soon and split them up.

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It's better to let them sort it out.

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Ooh, I think we've got someone biting the tyre.

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Oi, Charlie!

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-Charlie!

-I can hear hissing.

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I think the spare tyre has been punctured by Charlie.

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A bit of a panic in the back there, I think.

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This is our director and researcher

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and sound man all looking a little nervous.

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Charlie's now come round here and he's sniffing round

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the bottom of the post.

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I didn't think anything was going to happen, but...

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Is he going to the tree or is he...?

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He has spotted the tree.

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Right, let's see what he does.

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He's just figuring out...

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Yeah, where do I go? What do I do?

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The males are lazier anyway.

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He'd rather the females knocked them down

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and just pinch them off the females.

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One of the females has spotted it.

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This is Satellite, having a look.

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She's one of the older females, isn't she? Look at that! Wow!

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One bound and she's there.

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That's amazing.

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When you see the size of her forepaw holding on to that branch,

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you suddenly realise what a big cat you're dealing with.

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She's having a go at the tree.

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-Wow, yes!

-She's going after the camera, isn't she?

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No, she's getting a bit. Oh, brilliant. That was brilliant.

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She put her head right back to grab the meat.

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All the other lionesses are going, "We'll have a bit of that now."

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Does this mean there's going to be a scrap? Yeah, she's off.

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She's paying for her ingenuity now, isn't she?

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Well, the lions are now in retreat.

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So how do you think that went?

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Extremely well. I'm pleased with that.

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They all showed a lot of interest. It was great.

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Thank you both very, very much indeed.

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We'll let the lions go off and rest

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after that exhausting use of their brains.

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Back at the Lewa Conservancy in Kenya,

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Longleat keepers Andy Hayton and Bev Evans are on the run.

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They are pretending to be poachers, as part of a training exercise for Lewa's armed anti-poaching unit.

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They've had a 30-minute head start.

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Now they must try to avoid being found by one of Lewa's canine constabulary.

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Being chased, across the bush in tropical heat.

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Yes, it's gonna be exciting.

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At the base, the anti-poaching team is ready to go.

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One of Lewa's two bloodhounds is harnessed

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and put on the tracks of Andy and Bev.

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Their colleagues Ian Turner, Darren Beasley and Jo Hawthorne join the hunt.

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A bloodhound's nose can detect even minute traces of scent left on the grass and earth.

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One sniff of the pretend poachers' tracks, and it's off!

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The poacher team's trail leads deep into the bush,

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right into the path of some of the reserve's wild residents.

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It's mid-summer and over 40 degrees.

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The heat and dust are oppressive.

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But that's not the only problem.

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One of the poachers' team thinks he sees lions in the distance.

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Now they are in danger of being hunted by more deadly foes than the anti-poaching unit.

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He says that they saw two lions on top

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of this hill.

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There. The green tree on top of the hill.

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They are lying down. They are two.

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I think when they saw us, they are trying to cover themselves -

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not to be seen.

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And also, that's a good place for them to look for their food.

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Julius isn't worried, so I'm not worried. I'll just stick next to Julius.

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But, yeah, the thought of lions sat up there looking at us and watching us...

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It's such an alien environment for us cos we're always sat in a vehicle or they're behind bars or whatever...

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But, yeah, it's cool. Really good.

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The lions are far enough away for the poachers' team to press on,

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but they must be constantly on guard.

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Julius has just pointed out there's a lion's pugmark there.

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-Just in here.

-I think they are the ones who climb up the hill.

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But we are not going to climb up.

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We are just going behind these trees and hide ourselves

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and look back where we came from.

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Behind them, the gap is closing.

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Even at a trot, the bloodhound never loses their scent in the long grass.

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Meanwhile, with lions above and trackers closing in below,

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the poachers have found a hiding place.

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From here, we're actually keeping an eye out.

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We can spot them coming down, but before that,

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we actually saw a single giraffe run really fast across the plain.

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Zebras flying everywhere, so they spotted the dogs

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and the men just before we did. Then they spotted the guys

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and they're actually going at quite a pace and then squatting down and then carrying on.

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So it's like... It makes your heart race a bit.

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When the bloodhounds start sniffing at the air rather than the ground,

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the trackers know they're close to their target.

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They are just behind these bushes. Of course, their dogs have started to look ahead, no longer smelling

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at the foot marks. Now we have to be very tactical here.

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Cos walking very fast, you might just get into a place that you did not want to get.

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The anti-poaching unit carefully encircles the poachers,

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adopting a flanking formation before closing in.

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It's time for the Longleat keepers to take a breather.

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That was horrendous.

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I felt like the little weak zebra at the back waiting to be picked off...

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further up the field.

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I'm too old for this!

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I tell you now, we wouldn't beat

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the poachers on the other end if this was...

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Good God! Such a pace!

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They wouldn't get away.

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These guys are athletes and they've got all their kit on.

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Yeah. All the gear on and not one of them's broke into a sweat.

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No! They haven't.

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- It's about 110. - A tad warm here.

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-We'll get 'em, though. Look out.

-Definitely. We're coming.

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If there were real armed poachers ahead, this would be dangerous.

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The dog is withdrawn for its own safety,

0:20:490:20:51

while the assault team moves up to attack.

0:20:510:20:54

Stop! HE SHOUTS

0:20:560:20:59

SHOUTING

0:20:590:21:02

HE SPEAKS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE

0:21:040:21:06

It's all over in seconds.

0:21:100:21:13

This was just practice and the rifles were empty,

0:21:130:21:17

but in real life they would be loaded.

0:21:170:21:21

-Really scary.

-Michael comes bursting round the corner pointing the gun at you. You kind of want to quit.

0:21:210:21:26

-I mean, that's it.

-He really made me jump. Oh, God!

0:21:260:21:28

Lions one side of you, guys with seriously big guns the other side of you. It's...

0:21:280:21:34

It's fantastic. Really good.

0:21:340:21:36

Yeah, the noise of them coming in and shouting, you know, guns just pointing at you...

0:21:360:21:41

If there was gunfire as well... I mean, it's just...

0:21:410:21:44

This is what they do to protect wildlife.

0:21:440:21:47

They could get killed doing it.

0:21:470:21:50

I think probably the best thing for me was the guy acting...

0:21:500:21:53

He's still there acting dead.

0:21:530:21:55

We've got a dead guy here.

0:21:550:21:57

I think we'll leave him here all day, probably.

0:21:570:22:00

Last year, Michael's anti-poaching team made 22 arrests using bloodhounds.

0:22:020:22:08

They recovered two machine guns and nearly 40 stolen livestock.

0:22:080:22:13

Lewa has still not lost a single animal to poachers.

0:22:130:22:17

The poachers themselves, you know, they are just in the communities or in the towns.

0:22:170:22:22

They hear that we have the dogs.

0:22:220:22:24

So I'm sure some of them have changed their minds and do something else apart from poaching.

0:22:240:22:28

Respect animals instead.

0:22:280:22:30

Back at Longleat, there was recently a crisis at pets' corner.

0:22:380:22:42

Gladys the green iguana became ill and stopped eating her food.

0:22:430:22:48

Her keepers were worried that she might starve to death.

0:22:520:22:56

-This bit on her tail is quite prominent.

-That's her pelvic bones.

0:22:560:23:00

She's certainly losing quite a bit of weight.

0:23:000:23:03

An X-ray revealed that she was carrying a clutch of eggs,

0:23:050:23:08

but she was too weak to lay them.

0:23:080:23:10

She was rushed into the operating theatre before her condition became fatal.

0:23:100:23:16

The vet successfully removed the eggs from her belly.

0:23:160:23:21

But then there was a problem.

0:23:210:23:22

Gladys wouldn't come round from the anaesthetic.

0:23:220:23:25

Come on, I need you to breathe.

0:23:270:23:28

I haven't done all that work for nothing, mate.

0:23:280:23:31

It was touch and go, but finally Gladys started to breathe normally.

0:23:310:23:37

It was a huge relief for everyone involved.

0:23:390:23:42

Today, Ben's going down to see how she's getting on.

0:23:430:23:46

I've come down to the hothouse with keeper Sarah Clayson

0:23:480:23:51

and Gladys the iguana who's being reintroduced

0:23:510:23:53

-after a bit of an absence.

-It's quite major surgery.

0:23:530:23:57

-And how many eggs were removed?

-There was roughly 53.

0:23:570:24:01

-53?!

-When we counted them, yeah.

0:24:010:24:03

And have you any idea why she was retaining them?

0:24:030:24:05

Um, there are several factors that can cause it.

0:24:050:24:08

It could be the levels of calcium,

0:24:080:24:10

but we did do a blood test and they were fine.

0:24:100:24:13

So the other explanation is probably down to age,

0:24:130:24:16

cos she is one of the older ones.

0:24:160:24:18

-She is getting on a bit now.

-How old is she?

0:24:180:24:20

She's about nine, ten years old now.

0:24:200:24:22

Which in iguana years...?

0:24:220:24:24

-What do they live to in captivity?

-They can get to 14, 15 years old.

0:24:240:24:28

-OK, so she's a ripe old age.

-She is, yeah.

0:24:280:24:30

You mention calcium. How would an iguana like Gladys get her calcium?

0:24:300:24:36

We give it in supplements on their food, but also we've

0:24:360:24:39

actually got these special lights for them

0:24:390:24:42

and that encourages them to bask and they absorb all the UV rays

0:24:420:24:46

and it helps with the absorption of calcium,

0:24:460:24:48

so it's good for their bones.

0:24:480:24:50

Now, Sarah, I can't help but notice we're surrounded by iguanas.

0:24:500:24:54

There's one just up by the window there

0:24:540:24:56

and I've noticed there's a couple on the top.

0:24:560:24:59

-How many are in here in total?

-We've got seven altogether.

0:24:590:25:02

-One male, and the rest are females.

-With an absence of two months,

0:25:020:25:06

-how are the others going to take her return?

-They should be OK.

0:25:060:25:11

It might seem a bit strange to her, but once she's settled she should be all right

0:25:110:25:15

-and we will keep a close eye on her.

-Cos is there a hierarchy?

0:25:150:25:19

There is, and she was quite high up.

0:25:190:25:21

-She's been here a long time.

-Is that an age factor?

0:25:210:25:24

Yeah, probably, and also the fact

0:25:240:25:26

that she was one of the original females in here.

0:25:260:25:29

So she should click back in with everyone.

0:25:290:25:32

She should do, yeah. She'll let them know that she's the boss, I think.

0:25:320:25:36

Sarah, thank you very much.

0:25:360:25:38

Welcome back, Gladys.

0:25:380:25:40

Here's what's still to come on today's programme.

0:25:400:25:43

This baby black rhino is one of the rarest animals in Africa,

0:25:460:25:50

so he needs extra special care.

0:25:500:25:52

I'l be making sure

0:25:550:25:56

I don't get between the eland and their evening meal.

0:25:560:25:59

Is it true that they're as aggressive as people say.

0:25:590:26:02

If they want to be they can certainly be very aggressive.

0:26:020:26:05

It would be foolish to try and put food down with these animals in.

0:26:050:26:09

And we'll me meeting some of Kenya's most persecuted porkers.

0:26:090:26:14

Why do you think they're this shy?

0:26:140:26:17

Cos they're ugly.

0:26:170:26:18

But first...

0:26:220:26:23

Back at the Lewa Conservancy, breeding programmes

0:26:230:26:27

form a vital part of their conservation strategy.

0:26:270:26:29

No programme is more important than breeding the critically endangered Black Rhino.

0:26:290:26:37

David Parkinson is Lewa's Deputy Director.

0:26:370:26:41

Very important to understand that the Black Rhino as a species is very, very rare.

0:26:410:26:46

In Kenya, there's only about 460 animals.

0:26:460:26:49

But I must admit, that number is going up, from a low about ten years ago of no more than 250.

0:26:490:26:56

So the breeding programme is doing quite well.

0:26:560:27:00

These two young Black Rhino are Lewa's latest success story.

0:27:000:27:05

Two year old Tula, and six month old baby Jack are sister and brother.

0:27:050:27:09

To ensure their survival,

0:27:090:27:11

they had to be separated from their mother at an early age.

0:27:110:27:15

They're born to the same mother who's partially blind.

0:27:150:27:19

This mother's had four children.

0:27:190:27:21

The first one we had to take away because she lost it, literally.

0:27:210:27:25

She couldn't find the baby and then we couldn't either.

0:27:250:27:28

The second child was actually... she lost it again.

0:27:280:27:32

And it was taken by a leopard, killed, and of course we found it up a tree.

0:27:320:27:36

And therefore at that point, we made the decision

0:27:360:27:38

that the mother was unable to look after her children.

0:27:380:27:41

Now the keepers at Lewa are rearing the two young rhino by hand.

0:27:430:27:48

Longleat's Deputy Head Warden, Ian Turner, has helped rear several baby White Rhino himself.

0:27:480:27:54

But today he will get his first chance to give a baby Black Rhino a bottle-feed.

0:27:540:28:00

I'd like you to take the milk and he's definitely hungry.

0:28:000:28:05

Adult Black Rhino would browse on trees and bushes, but young Jack is still on milk.

0:28:050:28:11

He has quite an appetite.

0:28:130:28:15

Two pints, five times a day.

0:28:150:28:18

He's got a massive suck on him.

0:28:200:28:22

-He knows what's in there.

-Yeah.

0:28:220:28:26

When he was born, we hoped the mother would be able to look after him, but after two days,

0:28:260:28:32

the mother lost Jack, and in fact, we lost Jack as well.

0:28:320:28:35

We had almost the entire staff of Lewa

0:28:350:28:37

out looking for Jack in the bush.

0:28:370:28:39

Now he's pretty much fine and, like Tula, will be released into the wild as soon as he's able to cope.

0:28:390:28:47

That's it. Breakfast over.

0:28:470:28:50

-Have a play.

-Now I'll go and beat up my half sister.

0:28:500:28:54

Thank you very much.

0:28:540:28:56

You can see how boisterous they can get.

0:29:010:29:03

And when they want food and it's finished, that's when it starts getting a bit out of hand.

0:29:030:29:09

But absolutely gorgeous.

0:29:090:29:11

As adults, female Black Rhino live happily side by side,

0:29:140:29:18

but males will battle each other for dominance.

0:29:180:29:21

Jack will have to learn to look after himself,

0:29:210:29:25

so this play-fighting is vital for his survival.

0:29:250:29:28

Tula won't hopefully have to be fighting

0:29:280:29:30

for territory, whereas young Jack, that's going to be his life. He's going to have to fight for his turf.

0:29:300:29:37

After dinner, it's bath time,

0:29:370:29:39

and a chance for Ian to compare notes with David.

0:29:390:29:43

It's really good to be able to see them wallowing like this, isn't it?

0:29:430:29:47

One of the problems we've got is they're fine in the summer,

0:29:470:29:50

but when it comes to winter, they don't like to do this cos it's cold.

0:29:500:29:54

We've got to do mud baths on them,

0:29:540:29:56

and that's when their skin starts to look a bit cracked and not nice.

0:29:560:30:00

It's really great here because we've got a temperature

0:30:000:30:03

which is similar all year round on the equator.

0:30:030:30:06

-They don't have any trepidation about getting into a cold pool.

-That's right.

0:30:060:30:10

After their mud bath, the young rhinos are straight back into the dust like naughty children.

0:30:140:30:20

It may look dirty, but actually this is how they keep clean.

0:30:200:30:24

The mud traps dead skin and parasites,

0:30:240:30:28

then rolling around rubs it all off.

0:30:280:30:31

They look in marvellous condition. Marvellous.

0:30:310:30:34

When we saw them rolling, that was great with all the mud.

0:30:340:30:37

They look in brilliant condition.

0:30:370:30:39

The pair are inseparable now, but Tula and Jack won't be together

0:30:390:30:44

for much longer as they will have to be reintroduced

0:30:440:30:47

to the wild separately.

0:30:470:30:49

Tula, as a girl, we can reintroduce back into Lewa.

0:30:490:30:52

That's not a great problem, because she's not fighting for territory.

0:30:520:30:55

However, young Jack, when he's able to be re-released,

0:30:550:30:59

he can't come onto Lewa because there's competition for space.

0:30:590:31:03

Already we're having to trans-locate out some of our males, because the space is tight.

0:31:030:31:08

Therefore Jack will probably go to another conservancy,

0:31:080:31:11

probably to El Pejador, which is a new conservancy

0:31:110:31:15

and there's plenty of space for him to be able to find his turf and defend it.

0:31:150:31:19

But for now, Tula and Jack can play on.

0:31:210:31:25

Even for an animal keeper as experienced as Ian,

0:31:250:31:28

seeing them is a valuable experience.

0:31:280:31:30

That was amazing.

0:31:320:31:34

I learned a lot, you know.

0:31:340:31:36

It was such a treat.

0:31:360:31:38

So it's all good stuff, man. Amazing.

0:31:380:31:41

Back in Wiltshire, there are changes afoot for the herd of Cape eland -

0:31:500:31:53

an antelope species from South Africa.

0:31:530:31:56

Ten females live here and earlier this year

0:31:580:32:01

the keepers brought in an eland bull to breed with them.

0:32:010:32:04

Now everyone's looking forward to some new eland calves.

0:32:040:32:07

I'm out in the Safari Park with Tim Yeo, and we're being very quiet

0:32:070:32:13

because we've come to find the rather skittish eland.

0:32:130:32:17

Tim, what are we actually out looking for today?

0:32:170:32:19

Well, Ben, what we're hoping to see is any signs of pregnancy.

0:32:190:32:23

We're very hopeful at the moment that we've got a few pregnancies.

0:32:230:32:27

And this is the first time in quite a long period.

0:32:270:32:31

It is, Ben, yes.

0:32:310:32:33

It's been ten years that we've not seen a little calf running around.

0:32:330:32:38

What sort of signs are you looking for? The obvious distended stomachs, is that the main thing?

0:32:380:32:43

Yeah. Abdominally, the size of the animal is one indicator.

0:32:430:32:48

When an animal calves, it's a bit like

0:32:480:32:51

the calf has to travel through a bottle neck, if you like, through the pelvic girdle,

0:32:510:32:56

and so everything has to slacken up, we're looking for that.

0:32:560:33:02

And potentially how many of these eland could be pregnant?

0:33:020:33:05

At the moment we're thinking in terms of about four of them.

0:33:050:33:10

-Which, presumably, makes it all the more important to keep an eye on them.

-As much as possible.

0:33:100:33:15

The mums-to-be need to be given just the right nutrition

0:33:160:33:20

and it's almost dinner time, so I'm going to give Tim a hand

0:33:200:33:24

over at the eland house.

0:33:240:33:26

Tim, what are we doing now?

0:33:270:33:30

Well, Ben, we've got this rather heavy bag consisting of high-fibre

0:33:300:33:34

cubes and sugar beet pulp, which we're going to give to the eland now.

0:33:340:33:39

We've got four troughs here.

0:33:390:33:41

If you start with this trough.

0:33:410:33:43

Obviously, the eland are still out now, aren't they?

0:33:430:33:46

They're out in the...

0:33:460:33:47

That's right. I mean, they're eager to come in.

0:33:470:33:50

-Is that enough?

-You want a bit more.

0:33:500:33:52

-How's that?

-That's good.

0:33:520:33:54

-That's good.

-Shall we move on to the next one?

0:33:540:33:56

So obviously we've got the eland all hanging on outside there.

0:33:560:34:01

Do you bring them in year round?

0:34:010:34:03

Not year-round. They come in during the winter months,

0:34:030:34:08

so they come in so that we can give them the food

0:34:080:34:12

that we need to.

0:34:120:34:13

And is it true that they're as aggressive as people say?

0:34:130:34:17

Well, yes, they can certainly be very aggressive if they want to be.

0:34:170:34:22

I'm assuming it's their horns that are the danger.

0:34:220:34:25

Very much so. Very much so.

0:34:250:34:27

That's fine. Just keep watching them as you do that.

0:34:270:34:31

Hello, Kev.

0:34:310:34:33

Then if we retreat.

0:34:330:34:35

So we all step back.

0:34:350:34:37

Is the plan that once we're safely outside of the area,

0:34:370:34:40

Kevin will pull the car back and they can come in?

0:34:400:34:44

Eland are the largest species of antelope,

0:34:440:34:47

and despite their innocent appearance,

0:34:470:34:50

Tim has learned that it's best not

0:34:500:34:51

to get between them and their dinner.

0:34:510:34:54

It would be very foolish to put food down

0:34:540:34:56

with these animals there. They'll come straight over.

0:34:560:35:00

So is there any particular animal that's going to come in first?

0:35:000:35:03

Is there one particular eland that is dominant?

0:35:030:35:07

It depends who is coming first

0:35:070:35:08

as to whether it's one of the animals that needs to be kept out.

0:35:080:35:12

We've got two animals here that we would keep out,

0:35:120:35:16

or Kev will keep out, and that is due to fighting.

0:35:160:35:20

There's a pecking order and...

0:35:200:35:22

from time to time,

0:35:220:35:24

some of these females get picked on by the others.

0:35:240:35:28

So Kevin knows which ones to try and keep out now

0:35:280:35:31

-and that's why he's moving...?

-Exactly.

0:35:310:35:33

You can see he's going to stop this one here, she's walking away,

0:35:330:35:37

and the other animal behind her can come in.

0:35:370:35:40

It's very clever, the way you do this.

0:35:400:35:42

And the two that have to be separated,

0:35:420:35:45

they'll be fed later on, will they?

0:35:450:35:48

Well, they'll be fed very shortly, actually.

0:35:480:35:51

There's a hut up in the distance there.

0:35:510:35:53

That's where they'll be fed and where they're housed during the night.

0:35:530:35:57

Great. Tim, thank you very much.

0:35:570:35:59

Another successful feed. I think we should leave them to it.

0:35:590:36:02

Back in Kenya, head of the East Africa Reserve,

0:36:130:36:16

Andy Hayton is on a fact-finding mission.

0:36:160:36:19

Longleat is about to become host to a new species,

0:36:210:36:24

Phacochoerus africanus, otherwise known as warthogs.

0:36:240:36:29

In the wild, warthogs live happily alongside the animals

0:36:310:36:34

that make up the East Africa Reserve at Longleat.

0:36:340:36:37

The keepers are keen to complement their Africa collection

0:36:370:36:40

and bring these eccentric creatures to Wiltshire.

0:36:400:36:44

Andy's never looked after warthogs before, so Guide Peter Kiyaa

0:36:440:36:49

is going to share some of his extensive experience.

0:36:490:36:53

I've always liked warthogs.

0:36:530:36:55

I think they're just a real good character animal

0:36:550:36:58

to have around, a bit like our ostrich.

0:36:580:37:00

But when we came here last year to Kenya,

0:37:000:37:02

that really kind of, yeah, I really wanted to push.

0:37:020:37:06

I've pushed really hard.

0:37:060:37:07

We're getting them now, so that's going to be really good fun.

0:37:070:37:11

It's important that Andy learns as much as he can about their behaviour

0:37:130:37:18

and habitat before they turn up in Wiltshire.

0:37:180:37:21

Our intention, back at Longleat, at our safari park,

0:37:210:37:24

is we are going to bring in three male warthogs - three brothers.

0:37:240:37:27

And we will have those living together and exhibit them

0:37:270:37:31

and they'll be with the giraffe.

0:37:310:37:33

Hopefully, there will be no problem. Do you see any problems

0:37:330:37:37

with having the three males together?

0:37:370:37:40

I mean, there will be no females, so...

0:37:400:37:43

They will probably live together.

0:37:430:37:45

I think as long as there are no females,

0:37:450:37:47

there is not going to be much competition.

0:37:470:37:50

They prefer this kind of open savanna and the woodland,

0:37:500:37:53

especially around the sun.

0:37:530:37:55

Is that so they can hide away from predators or see predators coming?

0:37:550:38:00

Yeah, they can see predators coming and they also feed

0:38:000:38:04

on this short grass, so this is basically a good habitat for them.

0:38:040:38:07

Despite their formidable appearance, warthogs are very wary of humans.

0:38:070:38:13

There they go. Running.

0:38:130:38:15

Oh, yes, they're shy.

0:38:150:38:18

Why do you actually think they are this shy? Is it predators, or...?

0:38:180:38:22

Uh, because they're ugly.

0:38:220:38:24

But when threatened by other animals,

0:38:280:38:31

they can look after themselves.

0:38:310:38:33

I think if you find it in an enclosed place

0:38:330:38:36

and it has to protect itself, they are very strong.

0:38:360:38:39

Even lions are very careful when they want to attack warthogs

0:38:390:38:42

because they are really strong and they can be aggressive.

0:38:420:38:46

They use their tusks and they can even bite

0:38:460:38:48

and they're quite powerful, so they can be aggressive

0:38:480:38:53

if you corner them.

0:38:530:38:55

We have had incidences of somebody walking

0:38:550:38:59

in front of their burrow and the warthog has to get out and run away.

0:38:590:39:04

It can come out and break your leg,

0:39:040:39:07

so you usually have to be very careful.

0:39:070:39:10

Despite the risk,

0:39:120:39:13

Andy's keen to see what these warthog burrows look like up close.

0:39:130:39:18

This is just the right time for them to come to their burrows,

0:39:180:39:22

so it's important to walk from behind.

0:39:220:39:25

Is that because the...

0:39:250:39:26

Yeah, they usually get out and run away, but if you look at this,

0:39:260:39:30

I think it's OK. You can actually see.

0:39:300:39:32

You don't see any tracks,

0:39:320:39:33

so I don't think they have used this hole for a number of days.

0:39:330:39:37

-Would these interconnect?

-Yeah. It's actually a tunnel system.

0:39:370:39:41

It's huge, isn't it? There must be about ten different entrances.

0:39:410:39:47

It's quite scary seeing all this. I mean, we've got lovely green grass.

0:39:470:39:51

We'll end up with huge holes everywhere.

0:39:510:39:53

The warthogs' arrival will have a huge impact on staff,

0:39:530:39:58

animals and the ground itself.

0:39:580:40:01

Where we're putting them, the giraffe and zebra

0:40:010:40:04

and all our other stock will be able to see them through a fence,

0:40:040:40:07

so the warthogs can get used to our animals

0:40:070:40:09

and vice versa. It's going to be good.

0:40:090:40:11

We're going to have some problems, as you always do with a new species,

0:40:110:40:15

but it's going to be fun learning.

0:40:150:40:17

Guide Peter Kiyaa has given Andy valuable insights

0:40:170:40:21

into warthog behaviour in the wild, which he will use when he gets home.

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Peter's explained their behaviour - if we see that being replicated

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back at Longleat, then we're doing the right thing.

0:40:300:40:33

You want to see animals acting naturally and most of our animals do.

0:40:330:40:37

So if we can see them here

0:40:370:40:39

and they're doing the same thing, then we're doing good stuff.

0:40:390:40:43

It's the end of the day at the lion house

0:40:520:40:54

and Kate and I have come up with head of section,

0:40:540:40:56

Brian Kent, and keeper Bob Trollope to wish them good night, basically.

0:40:560:41:00

You've got Kabir, the male in here, two females, two cubs.

0:41:020:41:07

Isn't that a problem?

0:41:070:41:09

Don't you get pillow fights?

0:41:090:41:12

Not really. They can be a little bit rough with each other,

0:41:120:41:15

but it's not a problem.

0:41:150:41:17

There's a couple of months between the two youngsters.

0:41:170:41:20

There's about four weeks difference, I think.

0:41:200:41:22

They seem to be getting on fantastically, as do the two mums.

0:41:220:41:25

Both mums get on well as well, so there's no problem.

0:41:250:41:29

And how about Dad? Is it a problem?

0:41:290:41:31

He's a big animal.

0:41:310:41:33

He's sort of running around.

0:41:330:41:35

You do hear about male lions sometimes being quite aggressive...

0:41:350:41:38

-LION GROWLS

-..with their own cubs.

0:41:380:41:42

-Thanks, Kabir, for making my point so beautifully.

-Not in here.

0:41:420:41:46

But there isn't any problems with that?

0:41:460:41:49

Not normally, no. He's pretty good with the cubs,

0:41:490:41:52

so there's no problems whatsoever really.

0:41:520:41:54

It's probably the other way round. The cubs giving him hassle.

0:41:540:41:58

Do the cubs swing off his tail and grab on to the mane.

0:41:580:42:01

They do. They pull tufts of hair out and tug on his tail.

0:42:010:42:04

Presumably the teeth on the cubs

0:42:040:42:06

are getting pretty sharp already, are they?

0:42:060:42:09

I wouldn't want to be bitten by them, that's for sure.

0:42:090:42:12

They look like they're beginning to settle down now.

0:42:120:42:14

The mums are growling at us in a "leave us in peace" way,

0:42:140:42:17

so I think probably we ought to leave them in peace.

0:42:170:42:20

Bob, Brian, thank you very much indeed.

0:42:200:42:23

Sadly that's all we've got time for on today's programme,

0:42:230:42:25

but here's what's coming up on the next Animal Park.

0:42:250:42:28

We're going back to Kenya,

0:42:300:42:31

where conservationists are battling to inoculate

0:42:310:42:34

these endangered Grevy zebra against an outbreak of deadly anthrax.

0:42:340:42:38

At Longleat, I'm going bananas with the boisterous Bactrian camels.

0:42:400:42:45

No, don't, it's not for you.

0:42:450:42:47

Just wait.

0:42:470:42:49

And male lions Makui and Kabir are neighbours

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but if they met, it would be murder. We'll see how the staff keep the peace.

0:42:520:42:56

Calm down!

0:42:560:42:58

That's all coming up on the next Animal Park.

0:42:580:43:02

Subtitles by BBC Broadcast 2006

0:43:200:43:23

E-mail [email protected]

7:43:397:43:43

In a special programme from Kenya, Safari Park keepers are on a dangerous mission with anti-poachers. Can they pull off a successful ambush and make it back safely when they cross paths with a lion? And back at Longleat, Kate and Ben make the lions work for their dinner - but one of the largest gets too close for comfort.