Episode 3 Animal Park


Episode 3

Kate Humble and Ben Fogle look behind the scenes at Longleat Safari Park. A rhino's arthritis and a giraffe's bad leg are examined. Plus meet the otter family's new arrivals.


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Transcript


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This is a thermal imaging camera,

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and we're going to be looking at some of the animals here

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in a way we've never done before.

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Look at these amazing images.

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This camera will reveal things about the animals we never normally see.

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So stand by for a unique perspective of them and us on today's show.

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Coming up,

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everyday Head of Section, Mark Tie, has over 900 hungry mouths to feed.

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We find out just how he does it.

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Could the latest technology save the life of Winston, the OAP rhino?

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And there's a lotta, lotta otter going on in Pets' Corner

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with some surprise new arrivals.

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But first we're going to look at some hot new technology,

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or should that be cool new technology?

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Whichever it is, these images of animals are taken

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using a cutting edge camera, which shows areas of heat in the body.

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For the very first time, this technology,

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otherwise known as thermal imaging,

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has been brought to the park to give the keepers and us

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a unique perspective on the park.

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But this is no gimmick; these cameras are being increasingly used

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to help diagnose conditions

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from sprains and arthritis to even cancer.

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We'll be using this amazing camera throughout the show

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to reveal some of the animals' best-kept secrets.

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We are tucked in the shelter at the East Africa Reserve.

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It's a little bit wet, but we are not deterred because we are here

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with a man called Dave Blain who is a thermal imaging specialist.

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Now, Dave, can you just tell us what this piece of kit does?

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Right, the thermal imaging camera is the latest technology.

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It's very much used in industry now, for medical and military purposes,

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and of course the local police force, Fire Brigade use it.

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And what does it actually show?

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What it does is actually picks up heat and radiation, and we use it

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very much for looking at body temperature in the medical field.

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You're then looking at the hot spots,

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or it can be reverted to look at cold spots.

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So the white areas are the hottest, closely followed by the red, while

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the blue and green colours indicate the coldest parts of the animal.

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We're here with the Head of Section, Andy Hayton.

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Andy, how do you think this is going to be useful for you

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looking at the animals in the East Africa Reserve?

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Possibly rheumatism, if an animal's lame we could possibly look to see if

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there's heat in the muscles,

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heat in joints for rheumatism, arthritis, things like that.

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And Andy, certainly a unique perspective for you.

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Looking at that, Dave, on this camel here, we've got a very hot head,

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but lots of the neck, it looks like just near the head,

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it's actually a lot colder than the rest of the body.

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Yeah, it's the thickness of the fur,

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so the blue is actually the hair, the body hair.

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Right, and then if we look at the giraffes that obviously

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don't have as much covering of hair,

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lots and lots of heat there.

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If you look from the head, down the neck, the neck is very hot.

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There's obviously a good blood supply up there,

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and like us, a lot of veins in the neck close to the surface,

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so possibly that's what's giving off that heat signature there.

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But what is interesting is that clearly in the places

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where you haven't got a great blood supply going through, the horns,

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that very horny place on the front of their head,

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-are giving off hardly any heat at all.

-That's solid bone.

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If we could look at that big female there, Jolly,

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and we know she's on arthritic drugs.

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-Look at that.

-The difference in the legs.

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You can clearly see on her right leg, it's a lot hotter than the other.

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Presumably you could then use this evidence, if we can use that word,

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when the vet, Duncan, comes along.

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You can say, "We saw this, could that reaffirm what you thought?"

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And help you with your diagnosis and treatment.

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This gives us another tool to help us look after our animals better,

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and the more tools we have to make their life more comfortable is good.

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And interestingly vets are using this technique more and more,

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as indeed will we later in the programme

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when we go around the safari park with Dave and his camera.

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Keeping the safari park running smoothly seven days a week,

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52 weeks a year, is a massive logistical operation.

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There are over 100 members of staff, responsible for everything

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from caring for the animals to maintaining the grounds.

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But of all the jobs,

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one of the most important is just keeping the animals well fed.

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With 900 animals in the park, there's a lot of mouths to feed,

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about 90 species, it's a big operation.

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Mark Tie is the keeper in charge of looking after the lake animals.

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He's also responsible for supplying food to the entire safari park.

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We have to make sure it's all done and ordered and delivered on time.

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Animals don't wait for anybody; they expect their food on time,

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at the right time, and in the right way.

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So we have to make sure we're on the ball and get it sorted it every day.

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Hardly a day goes by without a food delivery of some sort.

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With so many different species, each with their own dietary requirement,

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lake animals' keeper, Michelle Stephens,

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also has a lot on her plate.

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This is the feed store, is where it all happens.

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We make the feed up for the whole park, and distribute it to everyone.

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And it's important to keep the pantry organised.

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Dog biscuits and whole maize, which are given to the monkeys.

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Bran in this one, which is given to the giraffe.

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We've got some primate pellets; this is very good specialist diet

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for the monkeys and our gorilla as well.

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This is called Caswell Crunch, what some of the hoof stock have as well.

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Over here we've got the fruit and veg.

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The monkeys in particular are obviously big fruit eaters,

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and we get a lot of boxes of apples and oranges a year,

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obviously just for those alone.

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In this bin here, we've got the flamingo food,

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so a specialist diet for flamingos, it's got a colouring agent in it,

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which keeps the flamingos nice and pink.

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In the wild, flamingos go pink because of

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a natural substance in their food, but here they need that supplement.

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Over here we've got the linseed lozenges,

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it's what we give to the giraffe, just as a supplementary diet.

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We have chinchilla pellets.

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The other major thing is the fish delivery, which obviously

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is important to me for my animals, the sea lions and pelicans.

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We get this every six to eight weeks.

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It's a fair amount, keeps us going for a little while.

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Also here as well I've got some salt licks and some copper licks,

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given to the hoof stock, just a bit of vitamin boost for them really.

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We've got large mixed nuts, walnuts, brazil nuts, that sort of thing.

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And the parrots absolutely love these,

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so it's like a treat they get.

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And that's basically the whole feed room.

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Every year, between them, the animals consume 44 tons of meat...

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13 tons of fish...

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..42 tons of high fibre food, 8,000 bales of hay, 3,600 apples,

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29,000 oranges, 23,000 bananas,

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21,000 cabbages and 1,500 lettuces,

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plus a whole host of other fruit, vegetables,

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nuts, maize, bran, corn,

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biscuits and some very juicy bugs.

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First thing every morning,

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Mark loads up his van and heads off round the park.

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All the sections are keen to get their food as early as they can,

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so obviously we've got to get in early

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and get it all delivered as quick as possible.

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-Anything else you need?

-That's all.

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That's all. All right, cheers, then.

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People just expect their food to arrive every morning,

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and sometimes don't appreciate what it takes to get it there.

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There's a lot of work that goes into making sure it's delivered on time.

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It's quite a big job to make sure that we don't forget anything,

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because if we do then it's on our heads be it, you know.

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We'll be back with Mark and Michelle later

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to discover who's the greediest feeder,

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and to find out about some of the strange things that animals eat.

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Down in the otter enclosure for over 30 years, the keepers have waited

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for the pitter-patter of tiny paws, but sadly none have come.

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Then earlier this season, to everyone's delight,

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Rosie produced her first litter and baby fever hit town.

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Just months later, there were more celebrations

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when a second litter arrived, and we've heard there's even more news,

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-so Ben's heading down to meet keeper, Rob Savin.

-Morning, Rob.

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-Good morning.

-So, tell me what's happened.

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It's brilliant stuff. We've got two new additions to the big family, yes.

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And the big family is huge already.

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Huge already, yes, eight already, and now an extra two little ones.

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So when was this?

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Only just under two weeks ago,

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so very small at the minute. Shall we go and have a little look at them?

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-They're inside, are they?

-Yes, I check them every morning.

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What we have to do first, if I give you a pair of these,

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I'll let you go on in and do it.

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-We're OK going close to them?

-Yeah, you should be all right.

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What I like to do every morning is while I can get the adults out,

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and give them some grub, and they all come out for that,

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I just lock them out, just briefly, just so that I can go in

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and give it a clean.

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-I don't want to be there for too long.

-Of course.

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I check that they're all right, and keep an eye on them.

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So these gloves are so that I don't put my smell anywhere near them?

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Yeah. If you just rummage your hands gently into the straw bedding

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get a bit of the otters' smell on them

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so they know it's nothing to worry about, their babies,

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cos they can't see at the moment,

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they're pretty helpless for a while.

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Just get in there and have a little check.

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Probably somewhere at the back, if I just let you go on in.

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-Just see if the camera can come up.

-Rummage your hands in the straw.

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-Am I OK stepping a bit in here?

-Just gently step in.

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-Just over here.

-Just have a rummage, very gently move some of the straw.

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Oh! You can just see them over in the corner there.

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-They're absolutely tiny.

-They are at the moment.

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And what sort of things...

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Oh, I've just seen some movement, so that's probably...

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They're all right at the moment. They have been so far, so fingers crossed.

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-I don't want to disturb them.

-It's early days at the moment.

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And is this what you do? Shall I put this back now?

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Yeah, gently cover them back over,

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then we'll let mum in and she can come and have a smell and stuff.

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That's what you'll do,

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check they're OK and there's no problems.

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Literally that's it at the moment,

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mum's pretty much doing everything on her own.

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The first time we had the babies in the past

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I was like a worried father, trying to get involved,

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should I intervene? But they know what they're doing,

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they're capable of sorting it out.

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So how long will they be suckling from Rosie?

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It's around 40 days, but to be honest the first time

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she had pups almost two years ago now, everything was by the book.

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It was eyes open 40 days, start eating solids around

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the same sort of time,

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outside at the appropriate time, which was about six or seven weeks.

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Last year it different, she brought them out after two weeks!

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We thought it was too early and were worrying.

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But there's no need to worry, because they grew up perfectly well.

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Are you confident they'll interact with the other otters here OK?

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I think they'll be fine. I mean, the initial thing

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when they start eating the solid food, I'll have to make sure that

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they're getting their fair share,

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and the original big pups aren't being greedy and taking it from them.

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But they should all be helping, the whole family should help.

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-Fantastic, well, congratulations once again.

-Thank you.

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-Thank you for letting me see them.

-No worries.

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Earlier we were looking at some of Longleat's animals

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in a whole new light, through a high-tech thermal imaging camera.

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This provides a temperature map of the animals,

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revealing hot spots, which could be cause for concern.

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It already showed up Jolly the giraffe's arthritic leg,

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so now up in the new area, head of section, Tim Yeo,

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is keen to put it to the test on some of his animals.

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He's asked thermal imaging photographer, David Blain,

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to take a look at Winston,

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the elderly rhino who's a favourite with the keepers and the public.

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Winston's been with us here at the park for a good number of years now,

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and he's a very popular rhino

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with the staff and certainly the public that visit the park.

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He will readily come up to the bars and he likes to be patted,

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and just to have that close contact with people.

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In the wild, rhinos rarely live beyond the age of about 30,

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but Winston's easily surpassed that, reaching the grand old age of 38.

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The keepers have kept him well for many years, but sadly,

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his age is catching up on him, and his health is an increasing concern.

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For a number of years, Winston has suffered with arthritic problems.

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He's getting on in years,

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and has been increasingly a problem to him, and it's been

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rather an upsetting thing to see over that sort of period of time.

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He has good times and particularly bad times,

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and it is certainly worrying because you don't know

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what's round the corner, you don't know what's coming.

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Tim has good reason to be so worried.

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Sadly Winston's condition is all too familiar.

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His long time companion, Babs, also suffered with arthritis.

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Last year at the age of 37,

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her condition worsened and her pain increased.

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So the decision was made to put her to sleep.

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Now there are signs Winston is displaying similar symptoms

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of arthritis which can be as crippling for animals

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as it is for humans.

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While Winston receives on-going treatment, it's not always easy

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to tell how well they are working.

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It's very difficult by looking at the animal

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to see the severity of the problem.

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All sort of remedies and things have been tried

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to ease the discomfort but he still seems to suffer.

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So, can thermal imaging provide an answer?

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If the arthritic areas can be accurately identified,

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it'd be a massive help for Tim and his team to target their treatment.

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What we would hope to see with arthritis is like...

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if you look at the joints, they'll be white, cos it's warmer.

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What happens is that it draws the blood to the surface to protect it.

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So that's how you can determine,

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cos it's blood obviously being warmer,

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you can see the problem areas.

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It just pinpoints it, spot on, especially on the back leg,

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on that joint you can see it quite clearly.

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And thermal imaging has one other massive benefit, it's non-invasive,

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which means Winston can be examined

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just by the use of the camera and without causing him any stress.

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Well, yes, it's very interesting looking at the pictures

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and actually seeing exactly whereabouts those heat sources are.

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It would be wonderful, I mean, obviously, to do it again

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after a period of time had elapsed to see if there were any changes.

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It's incredible technology, it really is.

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Surely it will help our vet very much

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to see whether these treatments are having any effect at all.

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And the hope is, of course,

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that that sort of technology could help in the future

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with these sort of conditions that are always going to be with us

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as animals advance in years.

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So thanks to this new technology, Tim has the opportunity to treat

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Winston's arthritis in a way they never could with Babs

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and keep him happy and healthy.

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There are about 900 animals at Longleat

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and most of them are quite fussy eaters.

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The keepers of each section make up the meals for each of their animals

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and food at Longleat can be served in any number of ways.

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It can be dropped from the back of a tractor,

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thrown off the side of a boat,

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trailed out of the door of a car, hidden up a tree, dangled from

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a tree, stuffed in a tree

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or even sprinkled on the ground,

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carefully chopped, hand-fed, bottle-fed,

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spoon-fed and even sometimes, just for a change, served up on a plate.

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Down in Pets' Corner, Head of Section Darren Beasley and his team

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have got food preparation down to a fine art.

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We have more animals in Pets' Corner than the rest of the park in total.

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They may be small,

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but they all have dietary requirements.

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We're up against it here, we have so many hungry animals,

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it's a never-ending cycle.

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Here you go guys, breakfast.

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Everything from exotic fruit, from papaya and mango,

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all the way down to whole chickens

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and things like that, you know, it's an incredible amount of food.

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You've got to remember how many animals in that enclosure?

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What time do they need their food?

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How do they need it presented?

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Do they like it with vitamins on it?

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Chopped lengthways or in segments? This is just skimming the surface.

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We tease the poor guys up in the lions' -

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they probably do the most dangerous job in the park,

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but they drive a tractor and chuck meat out - what's the skill in that?!

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Today, in addition to the regular order, keeper Alexa Fairburn has

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asked Mark for some special ingredients for the ferrets.

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We get requests to get things that they don't normally have

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on an everyday basis.

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The ferrets, for example, so we've gone off and had to go round

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the supermarkets looking for the necessary things they require.

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Yes...

0:19:000:19:02

see how much he weighs.

0:19:020:19:04

A few months ago we did have a problem with them

0:19:040:19:06

where a mystery illness swept in basically,

0:19:060:19:09

and a few of them, they did get very poorly. We requested Mark to bring

0:19:090:19:13

a few different treats, to build them up

0:19:130:19:17

that little bit more and hopefully they'll like it.

0:19:170:19:21

Back in the kitchen,

0:19:210:19:22

Alexa has her recipe for today's special -

0:19:220:19:25

ferret food cordon bleu!

0:19:250:19:27

Simply take one finely-chopped cucumber...

0:19:270:19:31

..toss in a smattering of raisins...

0:19:330:19:35

..two spoonfuls of creamy peanut butter...

0:19:370:19:41

They love peanut butter, but it has to be smooth

0:19:410:19:44

as anything with the chunks can get lodged in their digestive system.

0:19:440:19:48

..gently squeeze on some delicious multi-vitamin paste...

0:19:480:19:52

..add a generous dollop of succulent dog food, stir briskly

0:19:540:20:00

and then the finishing touch, drench with aromatic cod liver oil.

0:20:000:20:05

This is not just ferret food,

0:20:060:20:08

this is a special dietary supplement ferret food.

0:20:080:20:11

And there we go.

0:20:130:20:15

That's all very well, but will they like it?

0:20:150:20:18

There, boys.

0:20:200:20:21

This is brilliant to see. A lot of them are tucking in,

0:20:210:20:25

particularly some of the older ones, which is brilliant,

0:20:250:20:27

they obviously like it.

0:20:270:20:29

We'll keep weighing them every couple of weeks,

0:20:290:20:32

particularly the older ones, like Angus, we'll keep weighing him

0:20:320:20:35

just to make sure he's OK.

0:20:350:20:37

We'll try out another recipe in a couple of weeks,

0:20:370:20:39

see how they get on with that one and then pick out their favourites

0:20:390:20:43

and maybe try and make it into a more regular thing.

0:20:430:20:46

But the ferrets aren't the only ones with special requests.

0:20:460:20:50

The keepers always try to give their animals just what they want,

0:20:500:20:54

whether that's hot potatoes to keep the monkeys warm in winter

0:20:540:20:57

-or blackcurrant squash...

-Nice?

0:20:570:21:00

..dates and natural yoghurt for Nico the gorilla.

0:21:000:21:06

Medicine for Nico has to be disguised so the only way we've found

0:21:060:21:09

to get him to take it every day is to mix it with yoghurt.

0:21:090:21:13

But out of Longleat's 90 species, who has the largest appetite of all?

0:21:130:21:19

In fact, there's no mystery, the biggest eater is the biggest animal,

0:21:190:21:24

Winston the bull rhino weighs two and a half tons

0:21:240:21:27

and every day he consumes 25 kilos of hay

0:21:270:21:32

and up to four and a half kilos of high-fibre pellets.

0:21:320:21:36

But while Winston eats the most food, he's not the greediest.

0:21:360:21:40

In fact, that title goes to the one of the smallest animals here,

0:21:400:21:45

the Egyptian fruit bat. Every day,

0:21:450:21:48

each of them will eat up to 70% of their bodyweight in fruit.

0:21:480:21:53

That's like me eating 53 pineapples or 309 bananas every day!

0:21:530:21:59

After seeing how helpful thermal imaging can be

0:22:040:22:07

for the warm-blooded animals,

0:22:070:22:09

thermal-imaging photographer David Blain

0:22:090:22:12

has brought his camera along to Pets' Corner

0:22:120:22:15

to join Kate and keeper Kim Tucker

0:22:150:22:17

to see what we can learn about a special cold-blooded creature.

0:22:170:22:20

Cold-blooded animals survive

0:22:230:22:25

by absorbing heat from their surroundings.

0:22:250:22:28

So it's essential they're kept at the right temperature.

0:22:280:22:31

-Who's this, Kim?

-This is Khan we've got down here.

0:22:310:22:34

-Khan. Now Khan has just come out of the enclosure...

-He has.

0:22:340:22:37

..so he's lovely and warm to the touch.

0:22:370:22:39

-Let's see what he looks like on the camera.

-Look at that!

0:22:390:22:42

-Oh, you can see!

-He's very red.

0:22:420:22:44

But what's really interesting

0:22:440:22:45

is that he's particularly red around where your hand is, isn't he?

0:22:450:22:49

Yes, he looks to be taking on my heat.

0:22:490:22:51

I'm just wondering if we can take him away from you a bit and see

0:22:510:22:57

-if he starts losing heat, it's a little bit...

-Yes.

0:22:570:23:00

he seems to be sort of cooling off a little bit.

0:23:000:23:02

I mean it's obviously a very warm day today but this is interesting.

0:23:020:23:06

He's got real warmth in the middle of his body...

0:23:060:23:09

That's where all his organs are, so that's where it would produce heat.

0:23:090:23:12

Oh, right.

0:23:120:23:14

That's fascinating.

0:23:140:23:15

What is the mechanism of a cold-blooded animal to warm up?

0:23:150:23:20

Just take on the heat of their surroundings,

0:23:200:23:22

so if they're cold, they'll move to a warmer spot

0:23:220:23:24

and if they're too warm, they move to a cooler spot.

0:23:240:23:27

If I put him on the floor...

0:23:270:23:28

Hope he doesn't shoot up your trouser leg!

0:23:280:23:31

No, let's hope not.

0:23:310:23:33

That's amazing! Look at that, he's cooling almost instantly,

0:23:330:23:37

going yellow, again, around that organ area still keeping warm.

0:23:370:23:41

But the areas where my hands were, look, they've gone.

0:23:410:23:44

-They have.

-The redness has gone.

0:23:440:23:46

So if you were to pick him up again now, shall we just see if...

0:23:460:23:50

-There you go, look.

-Oh, look at that!

0:23:500:23:53

He instantly takes the heat from your hands, you can see.

0:23:530:23:56

It's almost like a thermal fingerprint.

0:23:560:23:59

-Look at that, that's amazing!

-Oh, wow!

0:23:590:24:01

But his head is now completely cooling off.

0:24:010:24:06

How will this help you when you're doing meet the creatures

0:24:060:24:10

with these very delicate animals?

0:24:100:24:12

Hopefully, it could detect, how long we can keep them out for,

0:24:120:24:15

depending on the weather conditions.

0:24:150:24:18

At the moment, on days like today we will keep him out,

0:24:180:24:21

maybe about an hour

0:24:210:24:22

and then on cooler days,

0:24:220:24:23

not quite so long and we do use hot water bottles as well.

0:24:230:24:27

Look at that instant change, as soon as you pick him up,

0:24:270:24:30

it's like he completely changes colour again.

0:24:300:24:33

That's absolutely fascinating.

0:24:330:24:35

-It's brilliant!

-Well, I can see that he clearly loves you, Kim...

0:24:350:24:39

-Oh, I hope so.

-He blushes when he's in your arms.

0:24:390:24:41

Dave, thank you very much, it's been a fascinating afternoon.

0:24:410:24:44

-Kim, thank you...

-Thank you.

0:24:440:24:46

..and Khan, you are a perfect thermal imaging subject.

0:24:460:24:51

Earlier we found out just how much effort goes into feeding

0:24:580:25:02

the 900 hungry residents of Longleat every day.

0:25:020:25:05

But as well as regular meals,

0:25:050:25:08

the keepers are always thinking up new ways of serving up

0:25:080:25:11

some extra tasty treats and today it's the giraffes' turn.

0:25:110:25:16

We are up at the giraffery with deputy head of section, Ryan Hockley

0:25:160:25:20

and it's feeding time for the giraffes, last thing.

0:25:200:25:23

This doesn't look very friendly, though, Ryan.

0:25:230:25:26

Not very appetising to us, Kate, you're right.

0:25:260:25:28

This is a mixture of thistles and stinging nettles today.

0:25:280:25:32

-Do you just not like your giraffes?

-They absolutely love it.

-Really?

0:25:320:25:36

As we're all aware they eat a lot of acacia in the wild...

0:25:360:25:39

-Which have big spines.

-Exactly, so the thistle's no problem.

0:25:390:25:42

The stinging nettles, I'm not quite sure why they find them

0:25:420:25:45

so attractive, but there's a lot of iron, they're packed with goodness.

0:25:450:25:49

Some rather impatient faces -

0:25:490:25:51

-shall we let you get it hung up?

-Thank you.

0:25:510:25:53

I'll hold onto the ladder for you.

0:25:530:25:54

So we've got two up there already, obviously.

0:25:540:25:57

I'm amazed that they're going for those rather than all this

0:25:570:26:00

other yummy food you've put out for them.

0:26:000:26:02

Well, exactly, you know, like I say, they seem absolutely nuts

0:26:020:26:06

on the stingers in particular,

0:26:060:26:08

so sometimes there's no rhyme or reason as to why certain animals

0:26:080:26:11

find things more attractive than the next thing in front of them.

0:26:110:26:14

There are humans that like nettles.

0:26:140:26:16

You can get nettle wine,

0:26:160:26:18

but it does strike me that stinging nettles for giraffes

0:26:180:26:21

might not be my first choice, but then I'm not a giraffe.

0:26:210:26:25

What does seem strange is that,

0:26:250:26:27

obviously they've been out in the enclosure all day, grazing

0:26:270:26:31

and yet you're putting a lot of food out for them at night.

0:26:310:26:35

Is that just to stop them getting bored?

0:26:350:26:37

It all comes under that canopy of environment enrichment.

0:26:370:26:40

Obviously we house these guys at night,

0:26:400:26:43

even this time of year they're spending a lot of their day

0:26:430:26:47

in a house at night, so we have to try and put

0:26:470:26:49

as many things as we can in, really, to amuse them

0:26:490:26:51

-and also things that they can't just go and nail in ten minutes...

-Right.

0:26:510:26:55

things that'll take possibly an hour or two,

0:26:550:26:58

if we're lucky, for them just to pick a little bit.

0:26:580:27:00

It's a lot of work but not much reward. That's how it is in the wild.

0:27:000:27:04

And it's like a jigsaw puzzle,

0:27:040:27:06

we can see them all attempting to get that.

0:27:060:27:08

An hour to finish that, you think?

0:27:080:27:10

Maybe with three of them going at it like that it might be a bit less,

0:27:100:27:14

but certainly the bigger one up there,

0:27:140:27:16

hopefully that should take an hour or two.

0:27:160:27:19

And the other things you're feeding in here,

0:27:190:27:22

you've got a sort of bran mix and pony nuts.

0:27:220:27:25

-Yes, yes, yes.

-So, you feed them similar to a horse?

-Yes.

0:27:250:27:28

The bran, to be honest, we supplement these guys with vitamins, minerals...

0:27:280:27:33

-Right.

-Right.

-..things like that.

0:27:330:27:35

So the bran is just a way of mixing that into the feed and the pony nuts

0:27:350:27:39

there are for fibre and there's also linseed,

0:27:390:27:41

which is good for their coats, the oil.

0:27:410:27:43

That's why they look so shiny and healthy!

0:27:430:27:45

-Thank you.

-Ryan, thank you for letting us help you.

0:27:450:27:48

I think we should leave the giraffes to enjoy their nettles.

0:27:480:27:52

Sadly, we've run out of time,

0:27:520:27:53

but here's what's coming up on the next Animal Park.

0:27:530:27:56

The new wild warthogs take the park by storm,

0:27:560:28:00

shaking the nerves of even the most experienced keepers.

0:28:000:28:04

They are pretty aggressive.

0:28:040:28:05

I do not want one of these guys to get hold of me, they're scary!

0:28:050:28:09

I'll be helping to put up some new toys for the lions,

0:28:090:28:12

proving they're just big pussycats.

0:28:120:28:15

And a Far East food fad

0:28:150:28:17

or a fiendish plot to make the otters work harder.

0:28:170:28:21

So, don't miss the next Animal Park.

0:28:210:28:24

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:28:380:28:42

E-mail [email protected]

0:28:420:28:46

Kate Humble and Ben Fogle look behind the scenes at Longleat Safari Park. Winston the rhino's life-threatening arthritis and Jolly the giraffe's bad leg are just two of the conditions investigated with the aid of a cutting-edge thermal imaging camera. Join Ben and Kate as they look at the animals in a way that has never been done before. Plus meet the otter family's new arrivals!


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