Episode 1 Animal Park


Episode 1

At Longleat Safari Park presenters Ben Fogle and Kate Humble learn to tell a spur-thighed from a Hermann in a tortoise challenge. Imogen the giraffe has the keepers worried.


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Transcript


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Longleat is home to 12 of these incredible Rothschild's giraffes,

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and the keepers are busily preparing for more.

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After months of waiting, one of them is about to give birth very soon.

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We'll be bringing you all of the news on today's Animal Park.

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Coming up on today's Animal Park...

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Some ferocious new arrivals bring terror to Longleat.

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The baby otters learn some new tricks.

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And, there's a battle brewing in Pets' Corner.

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I'm so going to be the winner.

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-There's no competition in there.

-That's complete rubbish!

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The giraffes in the safari park are a highly endangered sub-species called Rothschild.

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There are only about 300 left in the world, so the keepers

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are doing their best to keep this threatened species alive.

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A pregnancy is usually a cause for celebration,

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but the latest one has only caused concern.

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That's because the expectant mother is Imogen,

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and the last time she tried to give birth, it almost killed her.

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She's due any day, so the keeper in charge of the giraffes, Andy Hayton,

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has been watching her closely.

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This morning, he's got two vets out with him - Duncan Williams and Paul Higgs.

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They were all there when things went so badly wrong for Imogen.

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It's been almost two years since these dramatic scenes in the giraffe house. When Imogen went into labour,

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everything seemed normal, but, as the hours passed,

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it became clear she was in distress.

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Sunday morning, the vet looked at her and the decision was taken -

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we would probably have to pull the calf.

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We thought possibly it could have been a breach birth

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or the head was tilted back so she couldn't physically push it out.

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In order to help, they had no choice but to put her under anaesthetic,

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but resident vet Duncan knew how risky that could be.

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Anaesthetic-wise I think giraffes probably are the most dangerous really, in terms of,

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basically, one in three anaesthetics with giraffes ending in fatalities.

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When the anaesthetic took effect, the team could get to work.

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There were four vets including a special anaesthetist, and keepers came from all over the park to help.

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Sadly, Duncan's internal examination

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revealed that the unborn calf was already dead

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and it soon became clear that it was dangerously stuck inside the womb.

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Imogen's life was now balancing on a knife edge.

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For any chance of her survival, they had to get the dead calf out.

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We're gonna attempt a caesarean just to give her a go.

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We can't just decide we're gonna put her down and quit here.

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Even if it doesn't come out the right outcome that we want, we've got to at least try it.

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The vets worked as quickly as possible to remove the dead calf.

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As the minutes turned to hours, Deputy Head Warden Ian Turner began to lose hope for Imogen too.

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We've just taken a baby giraffe out of her stomach which is a six-foot odd baby.

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So the stitches we're talking like that sort of size and

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she's got two lots of internal stitching, plus the external stitching.

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She's now been under for four hours plus,

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and if the giraffe survived,

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it would be a miracle.

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The stitches had to be made very strong because giraffes must never lie down for too long.

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If they do, the pressure of their own 600kg weight can cause muscle damage.

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So when it was time to revive Imogen from the anaesthetic it was vital that she just got straight up.

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It didn't look good. Sick giraffes have been known to lie down, give up and just die.

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It's one of these difficult situations of how much do you intervene?

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Do you let her do it herself, and...

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You always worry that you don't do enough and something bad happens and you're blaming yourself.

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But a minute later, somehow Imogen found the strength to sit up...

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And, finally, to try to stand.

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Slowly, over the months that followed, Imogen made a full recovery.

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As every Rothschild calf is so vital for keeping the species going,

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Duncan, the vet, decided that as long as there was careful monitoring, Imogen could try again.

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Sure enough, she fell pregnant.

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Having had one Caesarean doesn't automatically mean

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that she'll have a Caesarean every time but you can never say it's a certainty, that's the problem.

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She's looking big, actually. She's looking

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like she's gonna do something fairly soon. Her udder's developing well.

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She seems really happy in herself and it's really fingers crossed that

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everything goes smoothly. We'll just have to wait and see, really.

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With the baby due any time, and as a first-time mum,

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it's important for Imogen to be watched round the clock.

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So an infra-red CCTV camera has been erected in the giraffe house to monitor her progress day and night.

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We'll back to find out more later on.

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There are over 900 animals at the safari park.

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Many animals within a species look alike

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so it's very important that the keepers know each one individually.

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For some residents that's obvious, but with others it's much more difficult.

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We're up at Pets' Corner with Head of Section, Darren Beasley

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and I gather, Darren, that you've got a bit of a challenge for the two of us.

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Yeah, we know you both like a bit of fun and we think you can recognise your animals, hopefully.

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We'll we're gonna try and set you a little challenge today that we have

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-to be able to tell all our animals apart.

-Yeah.

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Parrots, up in the top they do lions and down here tortoises.

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-Well that's easy they've got numbers on their shells!

-Yeah, it's not gonna be as easy as that!

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We have different species and different sub-species in here and, in fact, they're all individual animals.

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They've all got their own pet names and they have their own characters.

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We number them for ease, but we're gonna try and show you some differences in the shell patterns

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and hopefully you guys will go away and come back and learn their names,

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and what type of tortoise they are, with a bit of luck.

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I'm so going to be the winner. There's no competition in there.

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-That's complete rubbish!

-Who's my tutor?

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You're gonna go off with Sarah and she's pretty hot on the tortoises.

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She'll give you some good coaching, but we are gonna win because I'm gonna coach Kate, I'm afraid.

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-Yeah.

-I'm gonna go and swot up.

-No way will you win, Fogle. Right,

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OK, Darren, so each tortoise has an individual shell, is that right?

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Yeah, it's really just like our thumb print, really.

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Lots of animals have individual markings.

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The shell on the back of the tortoise has a different pattern,

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colouring, shapes, size - it's the way we identify them, actually.

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We take special photographs of them and it's a good way of keeping security of who's who.

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So there's an awful lot of tortoises in here.

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Am I gonna have to learn, I can't even count them...

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No, I think some of the keepers have been here many years and they still

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-can't do it, which is why we put Tippex numbers on the shell.

-Right.

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That helps them to tell them apart.

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Some of them are very similar.

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It doesn't affect... Is it a bit like wearing nail varnish?

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It doesn't stop them breathing out of the shell or anything like that?

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No, I mean, you sort of hit the nail on the head there.

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It is living tissue, that shell.

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What we do is put the Tippex there and it does block a few holes.

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This has got thousands and thousands of little holes in,

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which is for their heat regulation, they soak up the sun.

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On this one, there's some very faint lines down here. Can you see these?

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Oh yes, almost like rings on a tree.

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Totally, and that's really what they are but they don't get a ring

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every single year, it depends on the food availability, the temperature,

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whether they've hibernated, so it's not an accurate way of ageing a tortoise by any means, but for

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every season or growth spurt

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they usually get another layer of growth around that shell.

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Will size be an indication of how old a tortoise is?

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Not really. We say the females are generally bigger than the boys.

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-Right.

-But, in fact, age isn't the thing.

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You've got two fairly old tortoises next to each other there.

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-Look at the size difference.

-Totally different.

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Size isn't an issue really.

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So it will grow with its shell, it won't shed

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the shell like a hermit crab or something like that, it won't move in or grow another bigger shell.

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Exactly that. When they're in the egg, when we hatch them out, they're folded in half.

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They hatch out, that shell straightens, goes tough and hard

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and just grows throughout their whole life.

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There's a lot to learn, and luckily for Kate, there's plenty of time for swotting

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because in tiger territory, all hell's about to break loose.

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For almost 20 years, three Bengal tigers have lived here together like a settled family.

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There was Shandi, the famous white tigress.

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Kadu, the playful female and Sona, the male.

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But last year, old age and cancer caught up with Shandi.

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Then, just two months ago, Sona passed away.

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Now Kadu is the only one left.

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At 21, she's already outlived the normal lifespan of a tiger

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in captivity and keeper Bob Trollope is keen to make sure she's happy in the autumn of her days.

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She hasn't been the same since Sona died.

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Kadu was, for the first day or two, obviously I wouldn't like to use

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the word "mourning" but she was aware that she was the only one left.

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She did pine for a little bit.

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Tigers are solitary animals so they do spend a lot of time on their own.

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But having had a partner for 18 years,

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you know, she missed him.

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But life never stands still.

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Now two vans have just arrived in the safari park.

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They've travelled from Mulhouse Zoo in Alsace, France,

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and it's taken an incredible two days to get here.

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On board are three very rare tigers.

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They've come to live at Longleat.

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It's an historic moment, and a tense one.

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Just getting them unloaded into the tiger house is going to be a challenge.

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No-one knows how they'll react.

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The three tigers are young, little more than a year old.

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They're all sisters from the same litter born at the zoo in France.

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The slide is up, but there seems to be a communication problem.

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What's the French for "Go on"?

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"Vous etes arrive a la maison"!

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-Deputy Head Warden, Ian Turner, spots the obvious solution.

-We could

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turn the box round.

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It's just as well for the team that these are only youngsters.

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Tigers are the largest kind of cat in the world.

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The males can reach three metres from their nose to the tip of their tails.

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Sandari is surprisingly placid - because she's the first,

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it takes a while before she bucks up the courage to enter the tiger house.

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One down, two to go, but it's amazing how different sisters can be.

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Next it's Svetli.

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A bit more spirit, this one.

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Bob's been looking after tigers for 25 years, but even he is shocked

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by these fierce youngsters.

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Er, one of them's fine so far.

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One of them's in a grumpy old mood.

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Luckily, Chowri, the third sister, isn't in such a bad mood.

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In terms of temperament, she seems to be somewhere between the other two...

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..or maybe not.

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While all this has been going on,

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Kadu has been in a separate pen at the other end of the house.

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Tigers are territorial animals,

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and could fight to the death to protect their own space.

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As soon as he gets a moment, Bob checks to see how Kadu is taking things.

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She doesn't seem that bothered about it.

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She's quite happy, she just thinks she's got noisy neighbours.

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She's purring away as normal in there.

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She's just thinking that something's a bit strange, a bit noisy next door.

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I think they'll be a bit too boisterous for mixing, that's for sure.

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Safari park vet Duncan has also come to check on the new arrivals.

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I think they look absolutely superb, they're beautiful animals and they're a little bit feisty.

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They're certainly not what we're used to in our other tigers.

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I think the best thing we can do, I mean, they've had a lot of stress travelling today,

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if we can leave them alone. The sooner we do that, the better,

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-because they are pretty wound up, I think.

-The three sisters

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are going to keep Duncan busy for the next few months.

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As they've come from France, the tigers will now have to do six months' quarantine.

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But how will these ferocious young tigresses adapt with being cooped up

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and how will the keepers cope with them?

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There's nearly 40 tortoises in Pets' Corner and to care for them properly

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the keepers need to be able to tell them apart.

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Today we've been challenged to do the same and Ben thinks he's got it all under control.

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Kate, this is how you learn tortoise recognition.

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Sarah, teach me everything you know. Who have we got here, first of all?

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Here we've got Ronay.

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-OK.

-We've got Winky,

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the one with the wheel. Big Ted.

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-Yeah.

-This is Amos and that's Lady.

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Now were you doing that just by the numbers

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or are there characteristics that you're looking for?

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-I was doing that by the numbers.

-Were you?

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I know that I'm not allowed to do that. What sort of things should I look out for?

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-I think we know him because he's got the wheel because I know he lost a leg, didn't he?

-Yes.

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OK, who was this again?

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This is Ronay, this is quite a good one actually for you to learn the difference.

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-If you look closely at the centre of her shell, each of these sections are called scoots.

-OK.

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They don't actually line up like a lot.

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No, they've got little bits that go up the sides.

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It's a really odd shaped shell that she's got.

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-OK.

-That's quite a good one for you to pick out.

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I've noticed that these two shells are very different.

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Does that mean that they're different types of tortoises?

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-Yes, these three here are Herman's tortoises.

-OK.

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Basically, their shell tends to be more gold in colour

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and they've got more of a distinctive difference between the black and the gold colours and their shell tends

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to be a little bit more wider and shorter to the ground.

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Whereas, these two are spur-thighed tortoises.

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So, basically, they're got more of a domed shell and they tend to be a bit darker in colour.

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While we're talking about the shells, can they feel that?

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They can, yeah, they do have feeling in their shell.

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They have a blood supply through it so they can feel temperature, pressure and pain in their shell.

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This might sound like a daft question, do they have unique characteristics?

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Are there any that stand out in your mind?

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Some of them are quite feisty and they'll charge around the garden when the sun's out.

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There are a few characteristics that are different between them as well.

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-So we'll go through one more time, we've got...

-Amos.

-Amos.

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-Winky.

-Yeah.

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Charlie?

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Ronay. Yeah. She's the one with the irregular pattern down the middle.

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-That's Lady, number three.

-Lady.

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-And Big Ted.

-Big Ted.

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That's the biggest one of the group, that's quite an easy one to remember.

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Big Ted, we've got to win this competition, honestly.

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Kate, you don't stand a chance.

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Tortoises are Darren's pride and joy but he was over the moon

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when the first baby otters in 30 years were born in Pets' Corner.

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So imagine his reaction when a second litter was born only months later.

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I'm never gonna understand it.

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In all the years I've worked with animals, it's odd that we go such

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a long time without anything at all, and we really wanted baby otters

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before now, and, lo and behold,

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we got two complete beautiful litters in quick successions.

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The only thing is - what's gonna happen now?

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Are we gonna have two litters every year? We're gonna have to expand, aren't we?

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We're gonna have to have rubber walls here, but it's a wonderful position to be in and we're really happy.

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The four youngest pups are now eight months old and nearly fully grown,

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though they're still learning some basic skills, like getting to grips with their food.

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What we're feeding them at the moment is some guinea fowl eggs.

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We collect these as surplus from the draft reserve, which is great.

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We boil them up.

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They've all got very good appetites, they're all very playful and they all juggle. Oh! They all like to play.

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And Darren is hoping the family will keep on growing.

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Obviously, the plans now really are all for the future.

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We've heard of wild groups of Asian otters living in groups of up to 20,

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and so we'll try and do that. We'll increase the space of this pool.

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We've got to plan for the future and say, "Look, if mum has another two litters, at what point do we stop it?

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"What point do we stop her having babies?

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"And can we keep supplying enough food to keep these going?"

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They're eating machines.

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But otter keeper, Rob Savin is happy to oblige by spending more time feeding them.

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I'll go and get them things from the lake occasionally.

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We've got some scallops for them right now which they open very, very easily.

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They'll use their skills on them, especially the adults.

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The youngsters will learn off of Mum and Dad and the older children.

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Also when they're searching for their food they've got very nimble paws.

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What they'll do, if they've got any gaps in rocks, or logs, or branches,

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or anything like that they'll put their paws down and feel around.

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They can't see what they're doing. Their head is usually up here and they're feeling for their food.

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-It's great.

-Now there are so many, it's getting harder for Rob to know which is which.

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These four are gonna be really, really tricky.

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I'm gonna take lots and lots of ID photos and then scroll through

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on a computer and try and find little differences in their faces.

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All of them, bar Dad, have got a pink nose.

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At least two of the little ones look like their mum.

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I was looking at them the other day and I thought, "You look just like your mum, and when you're bigger,

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"it's gonna be very difficult to tell you apart."

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They are, at the moment, just very slightly smaller, just recently been named, actually.

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We've got Cormay, Rugan, Tika,

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and somewhere over the back, we've got Malaya as well.

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Understandably, the otter family are proving a favourite in Pets' Corner,

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not just with the public, but also with the keepers.

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This really, to be honest, is one of the many bonuses, you know.

0:21:550:21:59

My hobby is my job and I've said that before and I'll say it again, it's great fun coming here.

0:21:590:22:03

This is what we do. You have so many sad things working with animals that happen sometimes, these are what keep

0:22:030:22:10

you going for the next day and the next day and the next day.

0:22:100:22:12

My way of thinking, seeing this happy family group of otters, this really is well worth...

0:22:120:22:17

it's worth getting out of bed and coming to work every morning just to see this.

0:22:170:22:21

Time for Darren to tear himself away from his beloved otters.

0:22:230:22:27

He's been called on to judge the tortoise showdown

0:22:270:22:31

and see whether we can tell them apart.

0:22:310:22:34

Well, we're here at Pets' Corner. It's very tense.

0:22:360:22:40

We're here with head of section, Darren Beasley and keeper, Sarah,

0:22:400:22:43

and we've been swotting up furiously to see if we can identify one tortoise from another.

0:22:430:22:49

It's the moment of truth, Darren.

0:22:490:22:50

-Okey dokey.

-Do you want to start?

0:22:500:22:52

We will start. One's coming straight across here.

0:22:520:22:55

Now remember we had the numbers on, so I'm hiding the numbers.

0:22:550:22:57

OK. This is a big one, it's got quite a domey shell,

0:22:570:23:01

-so I would say it's a spur-thigh.

-That's good.

0:23:010:23:05

Quite high ridges on this shell with a dent here,

0:23:050:23:09

so I would say this is Tom.

0:23:090:23:11

Not gonna give you the answer yet.

0:23:110:23:13

OK.

0:23:130:23:15

My turn. Are you gonna pick one out for me?

0:23:150:23:18

OK. Let's have a look.

0:23:210:23:24

A bit smaller than the rest.

0:23:240:23:28

Come on, Fogle!

0:23:280:23:32

I remember, this is where the shell doesn't meet up

0:23:320:23:35

and it's got a little bit of shell that goes inbetween which means this is Romey...

0:23:350:23:40

Are you allowed to tell me now?

0:23:400:23:42

-I don't know, am I?

-No.

0:23:420:23:45

OK, well, you keep tabs. OK?

0:23:450:23:47

-Your turn.

-OK. Right, they're both pretty much the same size,

0:23:470:23:53

but Sandra was the one with the brighter shell,

0:23:530:23:56

and Dawn was the one with the very pronounced rings on the shell.

0:23:560:24:01

So I think that's Sandra and that's Dawn.

0:24:010:24:05

-Beat that, Fogle!

-OK, Sarah, give me another one.

0:24:050:24:08

-OK.

-I can't believe you got that one!

0:24:100:24:12

It's the one with the wheel.

0:24:120:24:14

I don't have to be as scientific as you, Kate. With a wheel, er, Wonky?

0:24:140:24:20

Winky? Er, Wheelie?

0:24:200:24:24

Erm...

0:24:240:24:25

Don't look at me! I'm not gonna win your competition for you.

0:24:250:24:29

-Wheelie.

-Another big one but with a very different shell shape, slightly tips up at the back here.

0:24:290:24:37

It's also a very different colour.

0:24:370:24:38

This isn't a spur-thigh tortoise.

0:24:380:24:41

-It's a Herman's tortoise.

-Brilliant.

0:24:410:24:43

And this is Topsy.

0:24:430:24:46

I wonder who was teacher's pet at school? OK, Sarah.

0:24:460:24:49

Come on, next one.

0:24:490:24:51

OK... Now, this shell is not as dark as the other one...

0:24:510:24:57

and it looks like a Lady. Lady.

0:24:570:25:00

-I'm gonna go for Lady.

-OK.

0:25:000:25:03

OK.

0:25:030:25:04

-Well, I've only got one left, Darren.

-Last one.

0:25:040:25:08

This one has got to be George and the reason that I say that is that George was the one with this classic

0:25:080:25:14

kind of starburst or paint-drop on the top of the shell, but it's much smoother than Tom's shell.

0:25:140:25:21

So, I think this one is George.

0:25:210:25:23

OOH! OK, Sarah, there are two more to go, I think. Right.

0:25:230:25:27

-They're quite similar, these.

-Yeah.

0:25:270:25:30

Can I just do a quick comparison?

0:25:300:25:33

I think this is Amos and this here...

0:25:330:25:37

is Big Ted.

0:25:370:25:40

Please, please...

0:25:400:25:42

-Doesn't he look like a Big Ted to you?

-He does. Definitely.

0:25:450:25:48

He's probably called Winky, though, or Wheelie or Wonky.

0:25:480:25:52

OK. So, Sarah, how did Ben do?

0:25:520:25:55

Very well.

0:25:550:25:57

A couple nearly got right, but, more or less, five out of five.

0:25:570:26:01

More or less five out of five, what does that mean?!

0:26:010:26:03

-He got there in the end.

-I got there in the end.

0:26:030:26:06

Beat that, Humble.

0:26:060:26:07

Well, five tortoises, tricky job...

0:26:070:26:10

outstanding, top of the class.

0:26:100:26:12

Gold star, names exactly right, pronounced right.

0:26:120:26:15

The winner and the champion of the tortoise identification test is our Kate. Well done.

0:26:150:26:20

-Favouritism.

-Thank you, Darren.

0:26:200:26:23

Thank you both very much, indeed.

0:26:230:26:25

We will never ever fail to identify these tortoises ever again.

0:26:250:26:29

Will we, guys? Especially you.

0:26:290:26:31

Which one's this one again?

0:26:310:26:33

I'm racing up to the giraffery after an urgent call from Andy

0:26:390:26:42

with some dramatic news about Imogen.

0:26:420:26:45

Last time she tried to give birth, she nearly died.

0:26:450:26:49

With her new baby due any day now, everyone's been desperately worried.

0:26:490:26:53

The entire park is on tenterhooks.

0:26:530:26:56

The keepers have been up all night and I'm really anxious to know what's happened.

0:26:560:27:01

Hopefully good news, Andy...?

0:27:060:27:09

-What's happened?

-We've got a baby giraffe, Imogen's actually done it.

0:27:090:27:14

Oh, that's fantastic!

0:27:220:27:24

I know you don't really want us to go in at this stage.

0:27:240:27:27

Yep, we always err on the side of caution and let Mum and baby bond, especially in this situation.

0:27:270:27:32

She's a first-time mum. Let her get on with it and bond with the baby

0:27:320:27:36

but she's doing brilliantly. It's just total textbook.

0:27:360:27:40

That's such good news, and the camera, did it get anything?

0:27:400:27:43

-Yes, it did. We can actually see the birth.

-Can I have a look?

0:27:430:27:46

Yes, sure. Just turn the TV on.

0:27:460:27:48

Turn the TV on. OK, let's see.

0:27:480:27:50

This is truly a special moment,

0:27:520:27:55

as it's the first time the keepers have filmed a giraffe giving birth alone.

0:27:550:27:59

There she is. No sign of baby yet, but clearly looking quite restless.

0:27:590:28:05

Yeah, you can see her going around in circles and agitated. She's quite a calm female anyway.

0:28:050:28:10

Women, when they're about to give birth, do feel quite restless, quite uncomfortable.

0:28:100:28:15

Presumably, it's sort of alleviating that discomfort?

0:28:150:28:19

They don't give a huge amount away.

0:28:190:28:21

-Right.

-Because instinctively if they're flailing round and looking

0:28:210:28:26

-like they're distressed, every predator within the vicinity is gonna go like, "Oh, cool."

-Absolutely.

0:28:260:28:31

-They've got to hide it.

-They've got to hide it.

0:28:310:28:34

A couple of hours later and things are really starting to happen.

0:28:340:28:39

So is this sort of like, again, the human equivalent of waters breaking?

0:28:410:28:45

-Absolutely, yeah.

-This is it. And sure enough, just minutes later, the baby is on its way.

0:28:450:28:51

There's a leg. There you go. You can just see a leg come there.

0:28:510:28:53

-Look at that. That's amazing.

-Here's the calf, look.

0:28:530:28:56

You've got two front legs now.

0:28:560:28:58

-Look at that!

-There's the head.

-Oh, my goodness.

0:28:580:29:00

It does seem extraordinary that giraffes give birth standing up.

0:29:000:29:05

It's a big drop for a baby.

0:29:050:29:07

-It's a kind of a smack on the bum.

-It is.

0:29:070:29:09

If the bag hits, if the bag is still around the nose it will break the bag and also as the calf hits the ground

0:29:090:29:15

we have heard them, "Huh!" as they hit the ground.

0:29:150:29:17

So it's like a human baby where they'll slap them on the back.

0:29:170:29:19

-Absolutely. There you go.

-There it goes.

0:29:190:29:22

Oh, my goodness, that's fantastic.

0:29:220:29:24

-Wow.

-Let's see Imogen's reaction to the calf.

0:29:240:29:28

This is a crucial time, presumably.

0:29:280:29:31

This is the time where you're really nervous because will this

0:29:310:29:34

very first reaction tell you whether Imogen's gonna be a good mum or not?

0:29:340:29:37

Yeah, I mean, you want her to get in there pretty quick.

0:29:370:29:40

She didn't freak out. She kind of knows what to do.

0:29:400:29:43

-It looks like she's licking it.

-This is all important, Kate.

0:29:430:29:46

-All this stimulation, the licking, the cleaning of the calf, the bonding...

-Is he just...

0:29:460:29:51

is he...

0:29:510:29:54

-There he is.

-There he is.

-The first kind of wobbly steps.

0:29:540:29:56

Oh! Look at him.

0:29:560:29:58

She's just standing there so calmly, so cool.

0:29:580:30:01

Not fretting, not jumping around. He's trying to feed now, actually.

0:30:010:30:05

He is. And, again, that first suckle - absolutely crucial?

0:30:050:30:09

Absolutely, yeah. Sometimes you'll get a problem with young females.

0:30:090:30:12

She's actually trying to pull him in underneath her.

0:30:120:30:14

She knows so well what to do and this is the amazing thing,

0:30:140:30:18

it's an instinctive thing she learnt by watching the others, what she has to do and she positions herself...

0:30:180:30:22

-Look at her.

-..over him so he can feed.

0:30:220:30:24

This is absolutely incredible.

0:30:240:30:26

-It's lovely.

-It's so nice.

0:30:260:30:28

It's so nice to see, it really is.

0:30:280:30:31

This is kind of what it's all about.

0:30:310:30:33

It really is, and Imogen of all of them.

0:30:330:30:36

That is amazing, Andy, congratulations.

0:30:360:30:40

Really, really good news and I hope they continue to do really well.

0:30:400:30:44

I can't wait to see them. We will, of course, be keeping you updated with this little ones progress.

0:30:440:30:49

You've got to think of a name, of course.

0:30:490:30:51

-And it's H this year as well.

-It's an H year. OK.

0:30:510:30:53

Not Humble!

0:30:530:30:55

-LAUGHTER

-Thanks, Andy, really good news.

0:30:550:30:58

I'm out in the new area with deputy head of section, Kevin Nibbs.

0:31:040:31:08

This extraordinary sight of your three rhino just sunbathing...

0:31:080:31:13

Exactly, we've crept up on them really quickly but they haven't moved an inch, really.

0:31:130:31:18

I have to say in all my time here I don't think I've ever seen them quite so laid back.

0:31:180:31:22

-Is that the heat?

-Partly, yes. They do like to sunbathe.

0:31:220:31:25

When it gets really hot they'll just lay down and chill out.

0:31:250:31:27

They've found a nice spot without much grass there, so

0:31:270:31:30

that means the insects won't jump out and get them too much.

0:31:300:31:33

I think they've found a nice spot there to lie down and have a sleep.

0:31:330:31:36

Does this mimic what they might do out in the wild in Africa when it gets very hot?

0:31:360:31:41

Exactly, yeah, they're more active in the morning and late afternoon and in

0:31:410:31:44

the heat of the day they'll just lie down.

0:31:440:31:47

Sometimes under the trees, sometimes just here just to chill out and have a bit of a snooze.

0:31:470:31:51

They seem incredibly docile allowing us to get this close

0:31:510:31:54

to them but these are potentially very dangerous animals, aren't they?

0:31:540:31:57

Exactly. They've been with us for about three years now.

0:31:570:32:00

When they came they were very, very boisterous.

0:32:000:32:02

They've calmed down a lot in that time.

0:32:020:32:04

They're happy with each other's company and they don't mind cars.

0:32:040:32:07

They've seen the cars and they've seen us every day. Again,

0:32:070:32:09

they're very happy just being here, chilling out.

0:32:090:32:11

So they're well at home in the West country?

0:32:110:32:14

-Exactly, yeah.

-Kevin, thank you very much.

0:32:140:32:16

Here's what's still to come on today's programme.

0:32:160:32:18

Three ferocious sisters get up close and personal.

0:32:180:32:23

They are so powerful and so quick, they'd kill you in seconds.

0:32:230:32:28

The water buffaloes are under attack...

0:32:280:32:31

Shall I go for this one, as well?

0:32:310:32:32

-Do you trust my aim?

-I do, yeah.

0:32:320:32:34

And find out what happens when our new arrival ventures out for the first time.

0:32:340:32:39

Back at the tiger house the three youngsters from France are being kept in quarantine.

0:32:420:32:48

Only a handful of staff were allowed to have contact with the tigers

0:32:520:32:56

and once a week, Duncan the vet, comes to do a health check.

0:32:560:32:59

So I have to check them every week, make sure that they're all healthy, really.

0:33:020:33:06

Not showing any signs of illness, such as rabies.

0:33:060:33:10

They're in rabies quarantine because they've come from a country that's got rabies. They came from France.

0:33:120:33:16

They have to have a six month quarantine

0:33:160:33:18

period because the incubation for rabies is quite a long time.

0:33:180:33:21

It can be even longer than that. So that's the reason.

0:33:210:33:25

Kadu, the elderly tiger who's lived here for nearly 20 years, has also had to go into quarantine.

0:33:250:33:33

She's been kept in her own pen and not yet misxed with the youngsters,

0:33:330:33:38

but Bob is pleased as to how she's coped so far.

0:33:380:33:41

Well, Kadu is Kadu.

0:33:410:33:44

She's our little favourite.

0:33:440:33:46

We had a couple of months when she was on her own while we were waiting for these to come.

0:33:460:33:52

Now she's got three new friends.

0:33:540:33:57

Because quarantine restrictions are so strict, our crew must stay outside the tiger house.

0:33:590:34:05

Right... See what we're doing here.

0:34:140:34:17

Hello, Doo-doos.

0:34:180:34:21

Hello, Doos...

0:34:220:34:24

This is why I've got the camera because we've got the film crew out there, who aren't allowed in.

0:34:280:34:34

Next door is Sandari.

0:34:340:34:37

The three have kept the names they were given in France where they were born.

0:34:370:34:40

What have you got there? Oh, ho, ho...

0:34:400:34:42

Sandari is turning out to be a big kitten.

0:34:420:34:44

There you are.

0:34:440:34:47

-Further along are the two ugly sisters, Svetli and Chowri.

-Hello, my darlings.

0:34:500:34:56

They were very grumpy when they arrived five months ago and their characters haven't really changed.

0:34:560:35:03

No, sit... Sit.

0:35:030:35:06

You're fogging up the lens now.

0:35:060:35:08

This is Svetli. I know.

0:35:080:35:11

Back with Sandari, Bob wants to get a good, close shot of her claws.

0:35:150:35:20

I want to see your claws. Softee...

0:35:200:35:25

These tigers have claws like knives, four centimetres long

0:35:250:35:29

so that they can rip their prey to sheds in seconds.

0:35:290:35:32

May be quick.

0:35:320:35:34

But Sandari is just not that kind of girl.

0:35:370:35:41

HE LAUGHS

0:35:410:35:44

What are you doing, silly? Eh?

0:35:440:35:47

Good girl.

0:35:510:35:53

What's this? Something to eat?

0:35:530:35:57

Bob needs to build up a bond with all the newcomers and one way to do that is with food.

0:35:570:36:03

We'll be back to see if they bite the hand that feeds them a little later on.

0:36:030:36:07

I'm down at Pets' Corner with deputy head warden, Ian Turner,

0:36:270:36:30

and this extraordinary bit of kit, which is what?

0:36:300:36:33

It's a scratching post. It literally started off...

0:36:330:36:36

we had some lion cubs up the yard which I used to look after and we got this scratching post in for them.

0:36:360:36:40

-Right.

-They got bigger, they went away.

0:36:400:36:42

-Yeah.

-So I took it home, my six cats...

0:36:420:36:46

and it's been at home for 20 years.

0:36:460:36:48

-Right.

-I've just lost the last cat now so now we're donating it to Pets' Corner for the ferrets.

0:36:480:36:53

So it's got a lot of cat smell and stuff on it, so hopefully it should be quite good for them.

0:36:530:36:56

OK, do you want me to help you get it in? Is it quite heavy?

0:36:560:37:00

It's not that bad but it's quite bulky.

0:37:000:37:02

Right, where shall I put it, Ian? Right at the front here?

0:37:020:37:06

Put it down there and then the public can get a view of them.

0:37:060:37:08

I'll just move one from underneath.

0:37:080:37:10

There we are, already inquisitive ferrets.

0:37:100:37:14

Why is it important to bring new things into the enclosure?

0:37:140:37:17

-They're not exactly short of stuff. They've got lots to play with.

-It's just to keep them active.

0:37:170:37:22

They're a very inquisitive animal, very intelligent and they just like to play in things.

0:37:220:37:28

It's all environmental enrichment for them.

0:37:280:37:30

It gives them something else to do besides what they've already got in the pen.

0:37:300:37:33

They've got tubes.

0:37:330:37:35

They love climbing through tubes.

0:37:350:37:36

This is just an added extra bit.

0:37:360:37:38

Different smells on it to give them a bit more to do and look at.

0:37:380:37:42

So it's all about keeping brains active, body active and that means a healthier animal?

0:37:420:37:47

-Correct. Absolutely right, yeah.

-No-one's coming over yet.

0:37:470:37:50

-Shall I see if I can get one and see what they think?

-There's one just over there.

-Come on.

0:37:500:37:54

Let's have a look and see what you think of this.

0:37:540:37:58

Are they climbers, ferrets?

0:37:580:38:00

Yeah, they're good at climbing down drainpipes.

0:38:000:38:03

-This is why we've got pipes in here.

-Right.

0:38:030:38:05

It's all the next smells, look.

0:38:050:38:07

Ferrets aren't actually a wild animal, are they?

0:38:070:38:11

No, they're domesticated. Aren't you?

0:38:110:38:13

So their closest rival... look at that.

0:38:130:38:16

So the closest wild relative of a ferret would be what?

0:38:160:38:20

A bit like mink.

0:38:200:38:22

But these were bred specifically for hunting, mainly...?

0:38:220:38:26

Yeah, for going after rabbits.

0:38:260:38:28

Do they make good pets or are they high maintenance animals to keep? Are they good animals to keep?

0:38:280:38:33

-They make good pets if you look after them properly.

-Right.

0:38:330:38:35

You need to handle them a lot because otherwise they can be quite aggressive.

0:38:350:38:39

-Yeah.

-They've got a nasty bite when they want to.

0:38:390:38:41

And they like lots of space, presumably?

0:38:410:38:43

Lots of space, lots of things to do, lots of playing stuff to do and they like to be handled a lot.

0:38:430:38:48

The more you handle them the better.

0:38:480:38:49

-I say, look, they're good at climbing.

-Yes, it's fantastic.

0:38:490:38:52

They're incredibly agile, aren't they?

0:38:520:38:54

As you say, very athletic, they love to kind of move around and get into things. These amazing lithe bodies.

0:38:540:39:02

I'm just gonna pick you up, sorry, I know you are just exploring.

0:39:020:39:06

Look at this. They do literally bend in half, don't they?

0:39:060:39:09

That's right, yeah. Any little nooks and crannies they go down,

0:39:090:39:13

down your tops, your jumpers, they'll crawl into anywhere.

0:39:130:39:17

Are they one of the favourites at Pets' Corner, do you think?

0:39:170:39:19

-Do people love them?

-Definitely - love them and they can handle them. People just love to handle animals.

0:39:190:39:24

They say the more you handle them the better. And they are so bendy.

0:39:240:39:28

One of the things about ferrets that is a common criticism is they do have quite a strong smell.

0:39:280:39:34

You can smell a ferret from quite a long way off.

0:39:340:39:37

There's a definite odour to them.

0:39:370:39:38

It's not as bad as wolf, I can tell you. There is a strong smell.

0:39:380:39:42

-You wouldn't want them in your house, probably.

-Right.

0:39:420:39:45

You'd want to keep them in a pen outside and then you can bring them in to play with inside.

0:39:450:39:48

It's amazing, it's almost like they're trying to dig through and uncover what's underneath, isn't it?

0:39:480:39:54

Well, we've brought in this lovely new scratching post but if you have

0:39:540:39:58

a look at Gary, our sound man here, he seems to be much more interesting than the scratching post.

0:39:580:40:03

Gary, you've been besieged!

0:40:030:40:06

The scratching post isn't nearly as interesting as the crew.

0:40:060:40:08

The same difference, all new smells.

0:40:080:40:11

They've never smelt the crew before, they've all got different smells on

0:40:110:40:13

from their wives and families and stuff - all something new to them.

0:40:130:40:16

I think they're gonna be very happy ferrets with their new toy.

0:40:160:40:20

Ian, thank you very much indeed.

0:40:200:40:21

We're gonna leave these ferrets to explore.

0:40:210:40:25

Imogen's first baby, who we witnessed being dramatically born

0:40:350:40:39

on camera in the middle of the night, is doing well.

0:40:390:40:43

It's a boy and he's been named Henry.

0:40:430:40:47

He's spending his first few days in a small paddock next to the giraffe

0:40:520:40:56

house with his mum and Jollie, the granny of the herd.

0:40:560:40:59

Part of the reason for having them up here to start with before they go out

0:41:100:41:13

into the drivethrough is we really want to see the calf and mum bond.

0:41:130:41:17

You know, be right on her heels because out in the drivethrough, there are other animals around.

0:41:170:41:23

In a giraffe environment we're pretty confident no harm will come

0:41:230:41:27

to the youngster, but we can't guarantee that when you have zebra that sometime hare around.

0:41:270:41:32

There's ostrich, camels, llamas out there.

0:41:320:41:35

So what we want to see is that calf following Mum everywhere and really seeing its mum as its protector.

0:41:350:41:42

Its whole world is centred around its mum.

0:41:420:41:46

The calf is four days old and so far he's been doing all the right things.

0:41:460:41:51

So now the time has come for him to go out and meet the gang in the East Africa reserve.

0:41:510:41:57

# Baby I love you But if you want to leave Take good care

0:41:570:42:02

# Hope you'll make a lot of nice friends out there

0:42:020:42:05

# Just remember there's a lot of bad and beware

0:42:050:42:09

# Oh, baby, baby, it's a wild world

0:42:130:42:17

# It's a hard to get by just upon a smile

0:42:190:42:23

# Oh, baby, baby, it's a wild world

0:42:250:42:29

# I'll always remember you Like a child, girl... #

0:42:290:42:36

Because there are so many potential dangers on his first day out,

0:42:370:42:40

keeper Carinne Hill is keeping an extra special eye on him.

0:42:400:42:45

It's just lovely to see him out and about with Mum.

0:42:450:42:47

All the other giraffes are taking an interest in him.

0:42:470:42:51

Giving him a bit of attention and stuff, it's absolutely lovely.

0:42:510:42:54

After her Caesaerian and things we weren't sure how things would go,

0:42:550:42:59

but absolutely lovely to know she can carry full-term, have a normal, healthy little calf,

0:42:590:43:05

and that she's showing really good maternal responses as well,

0:43:050:43:10

because it's her first time.

0:43:100:43:12

Really, really good. Really, really thrilled.

0:43:120:43:14

She's a really cool mum, actually,

0:43:140:43:18

but then she's seen a lot, she's an older mum.

0:43:180:43:20

She's starting quite late breeding, so she's seen a lot of babies born.

0:43:200:43:26

She knows the score.

0:43:260:43:29

It's another Rothschild giraffe.

0:43:290:43:31

There's 300 left.

0:43:310:43:34

They're very endangered. He's a pure Rothschild giraffe. He's a male.

0:43:340:43:40

He's gonna be a breeding male in the future. He's important, you know.

0:43:400:43:45

This was why the risk was taken with Imogen to breed her

0:43:450:43:48

because every animal we get out of this particular group, this herd,

0:43:480:43:53

are important to Rothschild in general.

0:43:530:43:55

I'm still out on patrol with deputy head of section, Kevin Nibbs,

0:44:100:44:14

and I'm about to help out with an important mission with the water buffalo.

0:44:140:44:20

-Kevin, what's the plan?

-This time of year when the summer's just starting,

0:44:200:44:24

we get a lot of flies around here and the poor buffalo get them around their eyes and we also get a lot

0:44:240:44:29

of horseflies as well and when they bite they leave a big mark on them.

0:44:290:44:32

It's more protection for the buffalo than anything, really.

0:44:320:44:35

So what we're gonna do is try and help them out with a little bit of insecticide.

0:44:350:44:38

OK, is it just the three you've got here?

0:44:380:44:41

That's right, we've got one male and two females...

0:44:410:44:44

In fact we've got a monkey on the back, we've got a couple of monkeys on the back of one of them.

0:44:440:44:48

-Is that normal?

-It's very normal for us, yeah.

0:44:480:44:50

They get along very well.

0:44:500:44:52

So they're basking in the sun, presumably in a good place to do this?

0:44:520:44:56

-That's right.

-How do we do this?

0:44:560:44:58

What we need to do first is try and get them over here.

0:44:580:45:00

-We've got a little bit of their feed here.

-Right.

0:45:000:45:02

So we'll split this into three bowls.

0:45:020:45:05

-We'll split this fairly between the three?

-Yeah.

0:45:050:45:07

Bearing in mind that we're in monkey jungle, are we gonna be pestered by lots and lots of monkeys?

0:45:070:45:11

Hopefully not, they tend not to like this truck so whilst we're on here we're pretty safe.

0:45:110:45:16

-So here we have.

-If we can just drop this over the side of the truck and we'll get our first volunteer.

0:45:160:45:21

OK. So just one, we're gonna drop one at a time, are we?

0:45:210:45:24

I reckon, yeah, see who comes down. They may all come down.

0:45:240:45:27

Then one comes over and you've got a special liquid here like an insecticide?

0:45:270:45:31

-That's right. This is just a simple insecticide that most farm animals would have during the summer.

-Yep.

0:45:310:45:36

We need to suck a little bit out. If you could hold that for me.

0:45:360:45:40

Of course. Presumably we're wearing gloves because you don't really want to get this all over ourselves.

0:45:400:45:44

That's right. It is purely for animals.

0:45:440:45:45

It's not really good for us.

0:45:450:45:48

Is it just normal flies that they're pestered by?

0:45:480:45:50

I can see quite a few on its back there just between the horns.

0:45:500:45:54

Normal flies round their eyes, that does annoy them.

0:45:540:45:57

Sometimes we get horseflies round here quite a lot and they actually bite quite hard.

0:45:570:46:01

-Horsefly bites are not nice.

-They're not nice at all.

0:46:010:46:03

So we get it onto their skin across their back, like that, in a nice, big, long line.

0:46:030:46:07

-That was it.

-That's it. She's done.

0:46:070:46:09

OK. The others didn't like the look of that, they've kind of moved off.

0:46:090:46:13

We may struggle a bit next time.

0:46:130:46:15

Now, obviously, in the wild there isn't a nice friendly keeper to do this to water buffalo.

0:46:150:46:20

-What would happen there?

-What they normally do is stay down

0:46:200:46:24

in the cool of the water and hide in the water a lot.

0:46:240:46:27

-Shall I put this down here?

-Just anywhere down there. Hopefully he'll come over.

0:46:270:46:32

-This is Herman, our male, by the way.

-Can I try this?

-Yes!

0:46:320:46:36

Just try and get a nice line down his back if possible.

0:46:360:46:38

So just going back, if in the wild they'd find some water to lie in?

0:46:380:46:41

Exactly, yes. They'd roll in the mud quite a lot and be covered in mud.

0:46:410:46:44

We don't have quite as much mud here as they would in the wild.

0:46:440:46:47

He's very tentative, isn't he, not sure about coming over?

0:46:470:46:50

I think he knows what's gonna happen.

0:46:500:46:52

I'll hide this down a little bit.

0:46:520:46:53

Really skittish today! Is that because they wind each other up a little bit?

0:46:530:46:58

-They do, yeah. They do. She's probably told them what's going on there.

-So who is this?

0:46:580:47:01

-This one's called Brenda, she's our oldest female.

-Oldest being, how old?

0:47:010:47:05

-Nearly 15 or 16 years old, so she's a fairly good age for a buffalo.

-How long would they live for, then?

0:47:050:47:10

Probably 20-25 years, so it's not a bad life for them here.

0:47:100:47:14

I'm intrigued - what's the plan now? We've two water buffalo that don't want to come anywhere near this,

0:47:140:47:20

and we've got the already vaccinated one gobbling up all their food.

0:47:200:47:23

-Do you have to think on your feet here?

-Just patience, I think.

0:47:230:47:26

We might have to move off in a sec.

0:47:260:47:27

-Here's some coming back.

-This is Herman.

-Yeah.

0:47:290:47:33

I'm surprised that it was the female that came in first and that the male, perhaps, wasn't a bit more

0:47:330:47:37

-dominant and went straight to the food.

-That's right, this is slightly different for them.

0:47:370:47:41

Normally we feed them in the morning but this afternoon it's a little bit

0:47:410:47:45

different for them, so they're not quite used to it.

0:47:450:47:48

I mean, looking at their tails now swatting away, that's obviously going for all the flies.

0:47:480:47:52

That's right. They do get bothered by them quite a lot all over their back.

0:47:520:47:55

They're very sensitive so they can feel a lot of flies on them.

0:47:550:47:57

-Tell me when to go.

-You can probably get him now, I reckon.

-Do you think?

0:47:570:48:00

-Yeah. That's brilliant.

-Is that enough on it?

0:48:000:48:05

That's plenty, yeah.

0:48:050:48:07

We've just got one more to go.

0:48:070:48:09

Do you want to fill up?

0:48:090:48:10

Are we gonna drive forward for this one?

0:48:100:48:12

I think we might have to, yeah, she's quite a shy one.

0:48:120:48:14

OK. What am I filling this up to?

0:48:140:48:16

Up to about 10mls, Ben.

0:48:160:48:18

10mls, OK.

0:48:180:48:19

There we go.

0:48:190:48:22

So we're loaded and ready. Put that on the floor.

0:48:220:48:25

So shall I go for this one as well, do you trust my aim?

0:48:250:48:28

-I do, yeah, that should be fine.

-Who is this third one, then?

0:48:280:48:31

-This one's called Anja.

-Anja really isn't sure about it.

0:48:310:48:34

She's the youngest female, but she is very shy of us as well.

0:48:340:48:38

This could be a patience thing or we may be able to get her tomorrow if it doesn't come to it today.

0:48:380:48:43

Is that what being a keeper is all about, thinking on your feet and if it doesn't work first time...

0:48:430:48:47

Then we come up with a plan and change it when it doesn't work, which is quite often at the moment.

0:48:470:48:52

Well, Kevin, thank you very much for helping me out and as we've said we shall return another day.

0:48:520:48:59

Back in Tiger Territory, the three young new arrivals

0:49:030:49:06

are still in quarantine, but have been let out to stretch their legs in a specially constructed paddock.

0:49:060:49:12

It looks like the girls are loving it.

0:49:140:49:17

# We move like caged tigers

0:49:210:49:24

# Oh, we couldn't get closer than this

0:49:240:49:27

# The way we walk, the way we talk

0:49:270:49:30

# The way we stalk, the way we kiss

0:49:300:49:33

# We slip through the streets while everyone sleeps

0:49:330:49:36

# Getting bigger and sleeker and wider and brighter

0:49:360:49:38

# We bite and scratch and scream all night

0:49:380:49:41

# Let's go and throw All the songs we know...

0:49:410:49:43

# The Love Cats! #

0:49:430:49:46

The tigers come into the house at night

0:49:490:49:52

and that gives Bob an opportunity to try to build up their trust.

0:49:520:49:55

He has to teach them to take chunks of meat from a stick

0:49:550:49:59

so if they ever need medication, it can be easily given in their food.

0:49:590:50:05

Good girl.

0:50:050:50:07

It's no surprise that Sandari, the nice sister, has got the hang of it already.

0:50:070:50:13

But now for the two grumpy sisters, Svetli and Chowri.

0:50:130:50:18

Good girl.

0:50:180:50:21

Good girl. That's another achievement.

0:50:210:50:24

A few weeks ago

0:50:240:50:27

they wouldn't come up to us, but now...

0:50:270:50:30

you keep on breathing on that, do you?

0:50:300:50:32

Now, I've found they will all come up and take meat off the stick.

0:50:320:50:37

This is also a good way to give them a dental check-up.

0:50:370:50:41

The teeth are in perfect condition.

0:50:410:50:44

But what about the elderly tiger, Kadu?

0:50:440:50:47

The last survivor of the old gang.

0:50:470:50:49

She's still here in the house, and her teeth are not so good.

0:50:490:50:54

Most of her teeth were left in cars

0:50:540:50:56

that she's bitten over the years, I think. So, we're gonna see her.

0:50:560:51:01

There are so many comparisons.

0:51:010:51:03

You look at Kadu's eyes,

0:51:030:51:06

they're going a bit misty now.

0:51:060:51:08

Everything about the new tigers,

0:51:080:51:12

it's just like a younger version of Kadu.

0:51:120:51:16

It's nice to be able to compare different age spectrums

0:51:160:51:19

from most probably one of the oldest tigers in the country

0:51:190:51:24

to some of the youngest ones.

0:51:240:51:27

Whether any of the three youngsters ever become part of the family remains to be seen,

0:51:290:51:34

but Bob's unlikely to be inviting them round to tea in the near future.

0:51:340:51:38

They'd kill you in seconds. They would, honestly.

0:51:430:51:46

They are so powerful and quick, that's one thing that...

0:51:460:51:50

I suppose to a certain extent, we've been complacent with the old tigers.

0:51:500:51:56

They are slow,

0:51:580:52:00

but these, you can walk along the corridor,

0:52:000:52:03

and the nastier ones will just fly at you.

0:52:030:52:06

You get a bit of a shock, because it puts you back into perspective that they are wild animals.

0:52:130:52:18

Their main aim is to get you. You're a food source to them, aren't you?!

0:52:180:52:23

Although the new tigers are exciting, they clearly haven't replaced Kadu in Bob's heart.

0:52:250:52:30

Hello, darling.

0:52:300:52:33

She's still my favourite, no matter how nice these ones are.

0:52:330:52:36

There are lots of new animals at the park,

0:52:440:52:47

but I've come inside to discover some that have been hiding away in the libary for generations.

0:52:470:52:51

Longleat House is over 400 years old and crammed with thousands

0:52:510:52:57

of treasures, many of them behind the scenes where I am now.

0:52:570:53:00

Included in that collection are 40,000 books, many of them still to be catalogued and that job

0:53:000:53:07

falls to assistant librarian Dr Rosemary Foreman. Morning.

0:53:070:53:11

-Good morning.

-How are you?

-Very well, thank you.

-That is a lot of books you've got to go through.

0:53:110:53:16

Yes, I've been working here for 2½ years already and I think I've got about another 15 years to go.

0:53:160:53:21

-So tell me a little bit about this one.

-It's by a Swiss zoologist

0:53:210:53:26

called Conrad Gesner, and it's regarded as the most important book on zoology from its period.

0:53:260:53:32

He tried to bring together a compendium of everything that

0:53:320:53:35

was known about all the animals at that point.

0:53:350:53:39

Here, for example, we've got...

0:53:390:53:41

Some extraordinary things, I can tell that up there must be a giraffe of sorts.

0:53:410:53:47

It's a sort of giraffe, but look at the size of it.

0:53:470:53:49

It's huge.

0:53:490:53:51

And it's called a camelopard because they thought a giraffe,

0:53:510:53:54

which they'd never seen, was a cross between a camel, long neck, and leopard, spots.

0:53:540:53:59

Today there's no confusion about what giraffes like Imogen look like.

0:53:590:54:04

Safari parks mean we can learn about animals from all over the world,

0:54:040:54:08

but 400 years ago, it was a very different matter.

0:54:080:54:13

Wow, look at that. He kind of looks like the lion from the Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe, doesn't he?

0:54:130:54:18

-Yeah.

-So this would have been the very first time

0:54:180:54:21

that any of these creatures were actually documented in print?

0:54:210:54:24

It's the first accurate documentation of them, or as far as they knew.

0:54:240:54:27

What I think is really interesting

0:54:270:54:30

is this book also contains mythological animals like dragons.

0:54:300:54:34

-Can I show you a dragon?

-Yes, please do.

0:54:340:54:36

-This is it?

-Yeah. It's lovely, isn't it?

0:54:370:54:39

-Incredible.

-It's clear that the boundaries between exotic animals, which most people have never seen,

0:54:390:54:45

and mythological animals, like a dragon, were very blurred.

0:54:450:54:48

People believed in dragons just as much as they believed in giraffes.

0:54:480:54:52

There's plenty of exotic animals around the safari park but Dr Rosemary Foreman's

0:54:520:54:57

picked out the best from the library to put them out on show.

0:54:570:55:01

Look at all these different creatures. How did you decide what to put in here?

0:55:050:55:09

I looked for pictures of animals that you can see in a safari park today.

0:55:090:55:13

My eyes are draw to this over here.

0:55:130:55:16

-I'm assuming that's supposed to be a hippopotamus?

-That is a hippopotamus.

0:55:160:55:19

A very scary hippopotamus according to that illustration.

0:55:190:55:23

That dates from 1682.

0:55:230:55:25

And how would they have come up with a drawing like that?

0:55:250:55:28

It looks like a cross between a dragon and a hippopotamus.

0:55:280:55:31

They'd clearly never seen a hippopotamus.

0:55:310:55:33

In fact, one wasn't seen in modern Europe until 1850.

0:55:330:55:36

I suppose looking at it, if you imagine the report came back it was a water dwelling beast with enormous

0:55:360:55:41

teeth which they do have, hence that's how the fangs appeared on the illustration.

0:55:410:55:46

-Yes.

-So how long will these books be on display here?

0:55:460:55:49

About three months, and then we'll change them and put some more out.

0:55:490:55:52

So you get to look through even more books, come up with more stories and

0:55:520:55:57

find more illustrations and the stories that go with them?

0:55:570:55:59

-I hope so.

-Lucky you. Rosemary, thank you very much.

0:55:590:56:03

We're out in the East Africa reserve with head of section, Andy Hayton,

0:56:170:56:20

and just over there, presenting her bottom, Andy, which isn't great, is Imogen, new mum, with little Henry.

0:56:200:56:27

Looking like they're fitting in beautfully.

0:56:270:56:30

To be honest, Imogen is the best giraffe mum I've seen up here.

0:56:300:56:35

-Really.

-Better than Jollie.

-Really?

0:56:350:56:37

She is absolutely incredible.

0:56:370:56:39

I mean, he's such a miracle baby, really. That should never have happened.

0:56:390:56:43

Absolutely, she went through the pregnancy and she's absolutely breezed it.

0:56:430:56:48

It's great, she's a breeding female now.

0:56:480:56:50

It looks like he's slotted beautifully into the rest of the herd.

0:56:500:56:55

Incredibly relaxed, they look like he's just been part of the family for years.

0:56:550:57:01

It's nice, giraffe really love babies.

0:57:010:57:03

They're all like these maiden aunts that all coo and cluck

0:57:030:57:06

over babies and you get all the young females like, "I'm looking after him.

0:57:060:57:09

"I'm hanging round with him." They get all over excited when you first put the babies in.

0:57:090:57:12

Imogen is just the most attentive mum, ever.

0:57:120:57:16

-Aw, it's such a happy scene.

-It really is and Andy, for you, another success story in your book.

0:57:160:57:20

You've had such a fantastic record of breeding here, and this is another one.

0:57:200:57:24

This is the best birth for us, or for me particularly,

0:57:240:57:27

because Imogen's done it. She can go on and have calves now. We know she can do it.

0:57:270:57:33

It's a perfectly healthy little calf and she's a breeding female.

0:57:330:57:36

She's gonna do what she's designed to do.

0:57:360:57:38

Well congratulations to you and everyone at the giraffery, they're a credit to you, they really are.

0:57:380:57:43

Look at that, that is a fantastic scene.

0:57:430:57:47

Well, sadly, that's all we've got time for on today's Animal Park

0:57:470:57:50

but this is what's coming up on the next programme.

0:57:500:57:54

Just moments before letting them out, the new tigers attack.

0:57:540:57:58

-My Gosh!

-Lord Bath takes a Titanic wrong turn.

-We're going the wrong way.

0:58:010:58:06

-And, Winston the rhino kicks up a stink.

-What does this involve?

0:58:060:58:10

This actually involves dung.

0:58:100:58:13

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:190:58:22

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:220:58:25

At Longleat Safari Park presenters Ben Fogle and Kate Humble learn to tell a spur-thighed from a Hermann in a tortoise challenge. Imogen the giraffe has the keepers worried as her due date approaches, and three of the most dangerous cats in the world go into quarantine.


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