13/07/2017 BBC News at One


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13/07/2017

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


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The Prime Minister tells the BBC she became tearful when she learned

:00:00.:00:00.

on election night that she'd lost her majority.

:00:07.:00:10.

In a frank and personal interview, Theresa May described her shock

:00:11.:00:13.

But Mrs May said she didn't regret calling the election,

:00:14.:00:32.

as it was "the right thing to do at the time".

:00:33.:00:35.

The Government publishes the Repeal Bill, a key part

:00:36.:00:38.

The parents of terminally-ill baby Charlie Gard walk out

:00:39.:00:45.

of a High Court hearing that's been asked to review his treatment.

:00:46.:00:48.

Donald Trump arrives in France for talks with President Macron,

:00:49.:00:50.

and to attend Bastille Day celebrations.

:00:51.:00:55.

And Konta's big test - she faces Venus Williams this

:00:56.:00:57.

afternoon in her attempt to be the first British woman

:00:58.:00:59.

And coming up in the sport on BBC News: Aside from Johanna Konta,

:01:00.:01:07.

plenty of British interest today at Wimbledon - including

:01:08.:01:09.

Gordon Reid, who starts the defence of his wheelchair singles title.

:01:10.:01:36.

Good afternoon and welcome to the BBC News at One.

:01:37.:01:39.

In a candid interview with the BBC, Theresa May has said she "shed

:01:40.:01:42.

a little tear" on hearing of the exit poll on election night,

:01:43.:01:45.

predicting that she'd lost the Conservative majority she'd

:01:46.:01:47.

She said she'd known the campaign hadn't been going

:01:48.:01:52.

in her words "perfectly", and said she felt devastated

:01:53.:01:54.

The Prime Minister declined to say how long she will stay in power,

:01:55.:01:59.

and reissued her call for opposition parties to work with

:02:00.:02:01.

She's been speaking to BBC Radio 5 Live's Emma Barnett.

:02:02.:02:12.

It started so well. All of that talk was about how much you are going to

:02:13.:02:18.

win by, how big the extra majority would be. When did you first have an

:02:19.:02:25.

inkling it might not be going according to plan? I think the

:02:26.:02:30.

campaign was going on I realised everything wasn't going perfectly

:02:31.:02:34.

but, throughout the campaign, the expectation still was that the

:02:35.:02:37.

result would be a different one, a better one for us than it was. We

:02:38.:02:41.

didn't see the results that came coming. When was the moment of

:02:42.:02:49.

realisation? It was when I heard the exits poll. To be honest, I didn't

:02:50.:02:55.

watch the Exeter poll myself. I'm supers -- I'm superstitious about

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things like that. My husband came and told me. And I was shocked at

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the result in the exits pole. It took a few minutes for it to sink

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in, what that was telling me. My husband gave me a hug. And then I

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got on the phone to the headquarters, the Conservative

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Party. When you had a hug, did you have a cry? How did you feel? I

:03:18.:03:24.

suppose I felt devastated. Enough to shed a tear? Yes, a little tear. At

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that moment? Yes. You had no idea this was going to go like this.

:03:36.:03:40.

You've explained how the campaign worked. Why should people feel

:03:41.:03:44.

confident you are any good at reading the mood music, especially

:03:45.:03:47.

when you go to Brussels on the deal on the basis that you have an idea

:03:48.:03:52.

that your campaign wasn't going well? I've said that I knew the

:03:53.:03:58.

campaign wasn't going perfectly, so I'm not sitting here... It's rather

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more dramatic than that. I'm not sitting here saying it was going

:04:04.:04:06.

swimmingly. I knew it wasn't a perfect campaign. But what I also

:04:07.:04:10.

knew was that I was doing the job that I thought was important at the

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time. That was talking to people about the challenges the country

:04:17.:04:20.

faces. You have to get Brexit through the Commons. Can you

:04:21.:04:25.

guarantee you'll get the numbers that you personally are able,

:04:26.:04:27.

political mouse, to do the necessary deals to get Brexit through the

:04:28.:04:37.

Commons? -- with political mouse. The first thing is to get a good

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deal from the European Union. But you can't do it without the Commons,

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so can you guarantee you'll get it through? I want to get a good deal

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from the European Union, and I'd hope that people from across the

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House of Commons, regardless of party, will see the importance of

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that deal for the future of Britain. I have said before that I'm a

:04:57.:05:00.

feminist. And I believe it's important that women genuinely have

:05:01.:05:07.

equal opportunities. So why do you think that it's important that -- I

:05:08.:05:15.

do think that so many women voted for a 68-year-old man, in the form

:05:16.:05:21.

of generally common? -- in the form of Jeremy Corbyn? Why do they not

:05:22.:05:26.

see you as their leader? One thing that I have been involved in my

:05:27.:05:29.

career is trying to get more women into Parliament, but on the basis

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that I don't want people to think, I'm going to vote for a woman or a

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man. If you don't see somebody doing well, -- doing the role, you don't

:05:40.:05:43.

believe it's possible. It can be inspirational. It can be. When I

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became Prime Minister, I heard a lovely story of a friend whose

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six-year-old daughter said, money, I didn't realise a girl could do that

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job. -- mummy. If she'd got 18, the stats show she would have voted for

:06:00.:06:05.

Jeremy Corbyn. For some young people, there were issues. There

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were issues the students around their fees and university education.

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Just say to me now, sitting in this office, you have been on a long

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journey to get to this point. What would you say to your younger self?

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Oh, gosh, this is one of those, what would I write to a 16-year-old

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Theresa May? I think what I would write to my

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younger self is, believe in yourself. Always do the right thing.

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And, you know, work hard to tackle injustice when you see it.

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We'll be talking about that interview any moment with our

:06:53.:06:54.

assistant political editor. The Government has published a key

:06:55.:06:55.

part of its Brexit strategy. The Repeal Bill will convert EU

:06:56.:06:58.

legislation into British law after Brexit, giving UK parliaments

:06:59.:07:00.

the power to change them. The Brexit Secretary, David Davis,

:07:01.:07:03.

says the legislation will ensure we have a "fully functioning legal

:07:04.:07:05.

system" on leaving the EU. But opposition parties are warning

:07:06.:07:09.

they will vote against it, Our political correspondent, Ben

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Wright, reports from Westminster. Power is shifting. Brexit will end

:07:12.:07:27.

the supremacy of EU law in the UK. But in tangling 40 years of rules

:07:28.:07:34.

and regulations will be context and contentious. The bill published

:07:35.:07:40.

today will eventually repeal this, the 1972 European Communities Act.

:07:41.:07:45.

It will also copy and paste existing EU law into UK legislation. We

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believe that, to deliver a smooth and orderly exit, we need to ensure

:07:51.:07:55.

people know they face the same laws and rules and regulations on the day

:07:56.:07:59.

after we leave as the day before, so there is no step change and people

:08:00.:08:03.

can be confident the law will continue to operate, but parliament

:08:04.:08:08.

will have control. So the new bill is crucial and, without it, there

:08:09.:08:11.

would be legal chaos on the day that Britain left the EU. But the task is

:08:12.:08:17.

huge. Thousands of existing rules and regulations will be copied

:08:18.:08:21.

across into domestic UK law. Parliament needs to pass this bill

:08:22.:08:26.

by the time the UK leave the EU in March 2019 and, because time is

:08:27.:08:30.

short, ministers plan to change some laws without a vote by MPs, which is

:08:31.:08:35.

controversial. Is the government sticking to what it said it would

:08:36.:08:38.

do, using the powers to make technical changes, or is it changing

:08:39.:08:42.

the law importantly? That will be one flash point. Presentation of

:08:43.:08:50.

Bill, Mr secretary Davis... The government's job will be made harder

:08:51.:08:54.

because it doesn't have a majority in the House of Commons, and

:08:55.:08:58.

opposition parties are clear they plan to battle the government we

:08:59.:09:02.

want to bring EU law into British law and we would do it properly. At

:09:03.:09:06.

the moment, this bill doesn't do that. So we find that the government

:09:07.:09:10.

intends to make changes behind closed doors, they may put sunset

:09:11.:09:15.

clauses or deadlines in, they are not being reasonable with this is --

:09:16.:09:19.

with the devolved administrations, we don't know how they intend to

:09:20.:09:22.

deal with disputes. They need to answer those questions. This

:09:23.:09:28.

morning, Jeremy Corbyn and his team headed for Brussels for talks with

:09:29.:09:32.

the EU's negotiators, clear the party would derail the government's

:09:33.:09:36.

new bill unless changes are made. And the Liberal Democrats have

:09:37.:09:40.

warned ministers the government faces hell trying to get the Repeal

:09:41.:09:45.

Bill through. In the months to come, some Tory MPs may be tempted to vote

:09:46.:09:49.

with opposition parties to significantly shape the way that

:09:50.:09:52.

Brexit happens, through this bill and others. Its parliament where

:09:53.:09:55.

Theresa May's weakened position will be tested.

:09:56.:09:58.

Our assistant political editor, Norman Smith, is in Westminster.

:09:59.:10:04.

First, about the Repeal Bill. Then write suggested the government could

:10:05.:10:12.

be facing hell over this. Is that fair? We have learned is that

:10:13.:10:16.

Theresa May is facing a titanic battle to get wrecks it through

:10:17.:10:23.

Parliament, because this bill is the legislative linchpin of exit,

:10:24.:10:29.

because it transfers from EU law all those bits of legislation into

:10:30.:10:35.

British law. Without it, frankly we are in legislative limbo land. It is

:10:36.:10:40.

a meltdown moment. And yet, all morning, opposition MPs have been

:10:41.:10:43.

lining up to say that they are now prepared to vote against this bill

:10:44.:10:47.

and, significantly, the Labour Party, which until now has backed

:10:48.:10:52.

the government on key Brexit votes, saying that it is ready to vote

:10:53.:10:56.

against this bill. If Labour and other opposition parties, plus Tory

:10:57.:10:59.

rebels, vote against it, it could be defeated, which could potentially

:11:00.:11:09.

derail Brexit itself. Norman, going back to the interview Theresa May

:11:10.:11:14.

gave to the BBC, we don't normally see this site to her. She is a

:11:15.:11:19.

private politician, she doesn't go in for the personal stuff. This

:11:20.:11:23.

morning, we got a glimpse of the more personal Mrs May, with some of

:11:24.:11:27.

her reflections on the election campaign, particularly the moment

:11:28.:11:32.

that the exit poll came out on election night and her husband had

:11:33.:11:37.

to break the bad news and, in her words, she shed a tear. Some

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Conservatives will think, if Mrs May had shown more of that personal side

:11:42.:11:44.

during the campaign, the result might have been different. And I

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suppose others may hope that maybe Mrs May can present a new face, she

:11:50.:11:53.

can be more open, a less private sort of politician. The difficulty,

:11:54.:11:59.

I suspect, is probably many people have already made up their mind

:12:00.:12:00.

about Mrs May. The parents of the terminally ill

:12:01.:12:02.

baby Charlie Gard have walked out of the High Court on the second day

:12:03.:12:05.

of a hearing centred Their lawyers have been presenting

:12:06.:12:08.

what they claim is new evidence showing that an experimental

:12:09.:12:12.

treatment could help him. Doctors at Great Ormond Street

:12:13.:12:14.

Hospital, where the little boy is in intensive care,

:12:15.:12:17.

say the therapy won't work. Our correspondent Sophie

:12:18.:12:21.

Hutchinson reports. Arriving at court this morning,

:12:22.:12:24.

parents Connie Yates and Chris Gard determined to continue their fight

:12:25.:12:28.

to keep their son alive. Charlie Gard has been in intensive

:12:29.:12:33.

care at Great Ormond Street Hospital He has an extremely

:12:34.:12:38.

rare genetic condition. It's left him severely brain-damaged

:12:39.:12:41.

and unable to breathe Ever since his birth 11

:12:42.:12:44.

months ago there have been numerous legal battles,

:12:45.:12:51.

escalated to the highest level All the courts have agreed

:12:52.:12:55.

that the baby is so ill But his parents have persuaded

:12:56.:13:00.

the original judge they should be permitted to present what they say

:13:01.:13:05.

is new scientific evidence today, suggesting an experimental treatment

:13:06.:13:08.

could help their son. My understanding is they've got

:13:09.:13:13.

letters from up to seven doctors and scientists,

:13:14.:13:16.

and it demonstrates that there's up to a 10% chance of this

:13:17.:13:20.

ground-breaking treatment working, and they would know within a period

:13:21.:13:23.

of two to eight weeks whether or not And the treatment is noninvasive -

:13:24.:13:28.

it's not an operation. It's actually a food

:13:29.:13:35.

additive into his food. Charlie's parents have received

:13:36.:13:40.

offers of help from the Vatican and the United States,

:13:41.:13:43.

but the judge, Mr Justice Francis, has made it clear any new evidence

:13:44.:13:47.

must be presented swiftly, due to concerns about prolonging

:13:48.:13:51.

the little boy's suffering. Our Medical Correspondent,

:13:52.:13:53.

Fergus Walsh, is at the High Court Tell us more about what happened in

:13:54.:14:12.

court. I think two key exchanges, Rita, one about the size of

:14:13.:14:21.

Charlie's skull. If, as the hospital maintains, Charlie had irreversible

:14:22.:14:24.

brain damage, then it would show that his brain isn't growing, and

:14:25.:14:30.

they claim that his skull size, is head circumference hasn't altered in

:14:31.:14:33.

the last three months. Lawyers for the parents this morning said that

:14:34.:14:38.

Connie Yates, his mother, admitted Charlie's head this morning and the

:14:39.:14:42.

reading was two centimetres greater than that of the hospital. But the

:14:43.:14:49.

judge said to their lawyer, if you are telling me that the records of a

:14:50.:14:53.

world-famous hospital are inaccurate, I need more than you

:14:54.:14:56.

just telling me. He said it was absurd that this critical case, the

:14:57.:15:02.

science behind it was being infected by the inability to measure a

:15:03.:15:07.

child's skull. He said he wanted this matter resolved by tomorrow

:15:08.:15:10.

morning, so that just shows that both sides really are not agreeing

:15:11.:15:14.

on anything. And what caused the parents to walk out of court was

:15:15.:15:19.

when the judge said, you accept that Charlie's quality of life at the

:15:20.:15:24.

moment isn't worth sustaining, and Connie Yates said, he isn't

:15:25.:15:26.

suffering, he isn't in pain, and then they walked out.

:15:27.:15:33.

The system for deciding how quickly ambulances in England should reach

:15:34.:15:35.

Currently a quarter of blue-light vehicles are stood down

:15:36.:15:39.

after setting off, because several are sent to the same 999 call.

:15:40.:15:41.

Under the new rules, 90% of the most serious calls

:15:42.:15:44.

will need to be reached within 15 minutes.

:15:45.:15:46.

NHS England says it will lead to quicker responses

:15:47.:15:48.

Our Health Correspondent, Jane Dreaper, has the details.

:15:49.:15:52.

A vital emergency service working under a broken system.

:15:53.:15:54.

Some patients with less serious problems are having to wait many

:15:55.:15:57.

And too many crews are being sent to the same 999 call,

:15:58.:16:01.

The new way of working will mean that we can identify and get

:16:02.:16:09.

All patients will get the best response, rather

:16:10.:16:15.

And importantly those unacceptable long delays will be reduced.

:16:16.:16:22.

Now the most serious calls, when people aren't breathing,

:16:23.:16:24.

for example, will need to be reached within 15 minutes.

:16:25.:16:28.

But it's expected these patients will actually be reached

:16:29.:16:31.

Patients with less serious problems, like chest pain, will wait longer -

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an average of 18 minutes, and possibly up to 40.

:16:38.:16:42.

This is the biggest shake-up of England's Ambulance Service

:16:43.:16:46.

in decades, and it's being introduced before

:16:47.:16:48.

what is bound to be another busy winter.

:16:49.:16:51.

It's happening because the old targets weren't being met,

:16:52.:16:54.

and patients were having to wait too long.

:16:55.:16:58.

The new system has been tested, and there were no safety

:16:59.:17:01.

problems found across 14 million ambulance calls.

:17:02.:17:05.

Leading charities agree that the current targets have

:17:06.:17:06.

Some stroke patients were sent a motorbike,

:17:07.:17:12.

And then another vehicle needed to come out to take them to hospital.

:17:13.:17:18.

And actually some were classified as non-urgent, in which case there

:17:19.:17:21.

And we know with stroke, it is a medical emergency.

:17:22.:17:26.

Wales has led the way by classing fewer 999 calls

:17:27.:17:33.

Scotland updated its system last year.

:17:34.:17:41.

Ambulance services remain stretched, but these changes are designed

:17:42.:17:44.

to help their most important task - saving lives.

:17:45.:17:49.

The Prime Minister tells the BBC she became tearful when she learned

:17:50.:17:57.

on election night that she'd lost her majority.

:17:58.:18:00.

All change at the Natural History Museum, as a new exhibit

:18:01.:18:04.

of the skeleton of a giant blue whale takes centre stage.

:18:05.:18:09.

Coming up on Sport: Rory McIlroy says he needs to find form

:18:10.:18:12.

at the Scottish Open to give him any chance at the Open

:18:13.:18:15.

He hasn't had a top ten finish since April.

:18:16.:18:27.

Donald Trump is on a two-day trip to Paris, where he'll hold talks

:18:28.:18:30.

with President Macron and attend Bastille Day celebrations.

:18:31.:18:34.

They're expected to discuss joint action in Syria and Iraq

:18:35.:18:38.

against the so-called Islamic State group.

:18:39.:18:40.

Despite differences between the two leaders, Mr Macron has indicated

:18:41.:18:43.

he will work to reaffirm longstanding ties between the two

:18:44.:18:45.

They're the two most talked about leaders on the world stage.

:18:46.:18:55.

The only thing missing in the first awkward meeting was an arm wrestle,

:18:56.:18:59.

as Donald Trump and Emmanuel Macron gripped each other's hands

:19:00.:19:02.

so firmly their knuckles almost turned white.

:19:03.:19:08.

A very complicated relationship, with disagreement over trade

:19:09.:19:11.

and climate change, seemed to have gained grudging respect

:19:12.:19:14.

by the time they met again at the recent G20 summit.

:19:15.:19:19.

Hillary Clinton said during the campaign in 2016 that

:19:20.:19:22.

Trump was a big bully, and he needed to be treated as such.

:19:23.:19:27.

It sounds to me like somebody at the Elysee listened to that,

:19:28.:19:31.

to that sentence of hers, and advised Macron to act

:19:32.:19:35.

So while Britain dithered over whether or not to invite

:19:36.:19:48.

Donald Trump this year or next, President Macron jumped in and has

:19:49.:19:51.

made the American leader and the First Lady guests of honour

:19:52.:19:53.

at this week's Bastille Day celebrations.

:19:54.:19:58.

But as the President arrived in Paris, more potentially damaging

:19:59.:20:01.

video emerged at home, showing then-businessman Trump

:20:02.:20:06.

in 2013 meeting some of the same Russians accused of colluding

:20:07.:20:09.

with his election campaign last year.

:20:10.:20:14.

Anxious to set the agenda, Donald Trump and his French host

:20:15.:20:18.

are expected to focus on international terror

:20:19.:20:20.

and defeating so-called Islamic State, a year

:20:21.:20:23.

after the devastating Nice attack in which 86 people were killed

:20:24.:20:27.

But this is, above all, a feel-good visit, with Melania Trump already

:20:28.:20:35.

And with American soldiers marching down the Champs-Elysees as part

:20:36.:20:41.

of a Bastille Day parade, the hope in Paris is that

:20:42.:20:45.

Donald Trump will be charmed by the occasion,

:20:46.:20:47.

the pomp and the honour - returning home with a warm and fuzzy

:20:48.:20:51.

Let's go live now to Paris and Hugh Schofield.

:20:52.:21:02.

There does seem to be a change in the atmosphere between these two

:21:03.:21:10.

leaders? It's a very odd relationship, isn't it? On the face

:21:11.:21:13.

of it, though that lewdly nothing that would bind the two men. One man

:21:14.:21:18.

is almost twice the age of the other, they have no interests in

:21:19.:21:22.

common, their politics are a world apart and yet somehow they do seem

:21:23.:21:27.

to have built up some kind of if not chemistry, at least a relationship.

:21:28.:21:31.

Part of but I think is the Macron ineffable charm. He could charm his

:21:32.:21:38.

Pluto out of Hades, they say here. It also goes back to that handshake,

:21:39.:21:43.

where he asserted himself, he thought or said I'm here to show

:21:44.:21:48.

that France is back, and in some way that did, as Wyre Davies was saying,

:21:49.:21:54.

inside -- it led to the grudging respect on the part of Donald Trump.

:21:55.:21:58.

So though there are huge divergences between the two countries it does

:21:59.:22:04.

seem there is a relationship and a desire to turn this visit into a

:22:05.:22:07.

success, by concentrating on the areas where they do agree and above

:22:08.:22:11.

all there for one security. Thank you, Hugh Schofield.

:22:12.:22:13.

The parent company of Southern Rail has been fined ?13.4 million,

:22:14.:22:16.

after widespread delays and cancellations to services.

:22:17.:22:18.

The Department for Transport says the amount would have been much

:22:19.:22:21.

higher, but most of the problems were down to strike action and high

:22:22.:22:24.

Our transport correspondent Richard Westcott is at

:22:25.:22:26.

How do you assess the level of this fine? Well, I think a lot of people

:22:27.:22:42.

will say actually in the scheme of things that's not an awful lot of

:22:43.:22:47.

money. ?30 million doesn't buy you a huge number of improvements, if you

:22:48.:22:50.

bear in mind the government has just given Network Rail ?300 million to

:22:51.:22:55.

improve the same lines, that's how much money it basically takes -- ?13

:22:56.:23:00.

million doesn't buy you a huge number of improvements. Aslef, who

:23:01.:23:03.

represent the drivers, they've balloted all the drivers on whether

:23:04.:23:06.

they would be prepared to take strike action over pay and we've

:23:07.:23:11.

just heard that 60% of them say they would. So that doesn't necessarily

:23:12.:23:14.

mean there will be more strikes. It doesn't necessarily mean they will

:23:15.:23:18.

name dates, but it gives the union mandate for yet more strikes on this

:23:19.:23:20.

troubled line. Richard, thank you. Now if you've taken a trip

:23:21.:23:23.

to the Natural History Museum recently, you'll have been greeted

:23:24.:23:25.

by Dippy the Diplodocus, Now, another creature is taking

:23:26.:23:27.

the central display - the skeleton of a giant blue whale,

:23:28.:23:31.

suspended from the ceiling. But fans of Dippy need not fear -

:23:32.:23:34.

the dinosaur will soon be heading on a tour of the UK,

:23:35.:23:38.

as our science correspondent It's the biggest creature that's

:23:39.:23:40.

known to have existed. Now if you've taken a trip

:23:41.:23:46.

to the Natural History Museum It's the biggest creature that's

:23:47.:23:53.

known to have existed. Once driven to the point

:23:54.:23:55.

of extinction, but now saved The blue whale is the Natural

:23:56.:23:57.

History Museum's new iconic display. Hope represents the ability of man

:23:58.:24:01.

to use rational evidence and good science in making decisions that

:24:02.:24:07.

will affect the future We think that's a message that's

:24:08.:24:09.

really important at this time. Hence the reason to call her Hope -

:24:10.:24:14.

hope for the future, hope we'll make the right decisions

:24:15.:24:17.

based on good science, The whale was beached off

:24:18.:24:20.

the coast of Wexford It's been on display in one

:24:21.:24:26.

of the museum's galleries for more than 100 years and it's been a huge

:24:27.:24:33.

engineering challenge to move it. The 25 metre skeleton of this young

:24:34.:24:39.

female fills the entire length Its skull alone weighs more

:24:40.:24:43.

than a tonne and its lower jawbone is the single longest bone of any

:24:44.:24:50.

animal on the planet. As visitors arrive they're greeted

:24:51.:24:54.

by it swooping down towards them, as if they're the tiny krill that

:24:55.:24:58.

whales feed upon. The whale replaces the much loved

:24:59.:25:03.

Dippy the dinosaur, which has Let's see if we can find

:25:04.:25:06.

out how long it is. I think it's great that we're

:25:07.:25:15.

going to take Dippy round on tour. We want to engage people

:25:16.:25:18.

all around the UK. We're hoping for at least 5 million

:25:19.:25:21.

new people to become engaged when they see Dippy and they learn

:25:22.:25:24.

more about the history The museum staff believe that Hope

:25:25.:25:27.

the whale takes the same place Pallab Ghosh, BBC News, at the

:25:28.:25:32.

Natural History Museum in London. And you can see more

:25:33.:25:40.

on the new exhibit at the Natural History Museum

:25:41.:25:43.

on Horizon, tonight Johanna Konta is aiming to become

:25:44.:25:44.

the first British woman in 40 years to reach a Wimbledon final,

:25:45.:25:52.

when she takes on five-time champion Venus Williams

:25:53.:25:54.

on Centre Court this afternoon. Ahead of the match, Konta,

:25:55.:25:58.

who's the sixth seed and who's rated Let's go live now to

:25:59.:26:01.

Wimbledon and our sports Two weeks ago today, Johanna Konta

:26:02.:26:13.

suffered a nasty fall on court at Eastbourne and was doubtful to even

:26:14.:26:17.

play Wimbledon. Well, not only did she play, but she's played

:26:18.:26:21.

extraordinarily well, and now stands on the verge of greatness.

:26:22.:26:23.

Defeat for Andy Murray at Wimbledon tends to mark the end

:26:24.:26:26.

Hampered by injury, title defence over -

:26:27.:26:28.

disappointment for Murray and the nation.

:26:29.:26:30.

But this year hope lives on in the form of Johanna Konta.

:26:31.:26:33.

If the weight of expectation is meant to be heavy,

:26:34.:26:36.

The whole country's going to be watching this match,

:26:37.:26:40.

and the whole country's going to be behind her.

:26:41.:26:43.

And, you know, as a player playing in your home Grand Slam tournament,

:26:44.:26:46.

that really just gives you so much extra strength,

:26:47.:26:48.

It was sad and disappointing to see Andy go out with that hip injury,

:26:49.:26:54.

He'll take some rest, he'll get better, and he'll

:26:55.:26:58.

But now Jo is still here in the draw, and that's

:26:59.:27:02.

It's something they can look forward to, and hope that she can

:27:03.:27:06.

Yesterday, Centre Court was the scene of such home deflation.

:27:07.:27:11.

But 24 hours on, that deflation could turn into celebration

:27:12.:27:15.

with an opportunity which, until fairly recently, would have

:27:16.:27:17.

Only last June, Konta was ranked 146th in the world.

:27:18.:27:24.

She lost in the second round of Wimbledon,

:27:25.:27:26.

and it was the first time she'd even got that far

:27:27.:27:28.

Her rise has impressed the man who spotted her as a junior.

:27:29.:27:35.

I'm not surprised based on her character, and her

:27:36.:27:38.

But I am surprised if you were to look at the previous years' results,

:27:39.:27:50.

Next comes the biggest challenge so far - Venus Williams.

:27:51.:27:54.

At 37, the oldest Grand Slam semifinalist since 1994.

:27:55.:27:58.

Yet in the form of her life, and hunting a sixth Wimbledon title.

:27:59.:28:02.

I think Venus, this year, is playing incredibly.

:28:03.:28:06.

And she's able to start strong, which is something

:28:07.:28:08.

So I think she's the best player of the four left in the draw,

:28:09.:28:14.

And second, because I think Johanna has a lot of tough fight.

:28:15.:28:22.

She's left a lot of energy, and mental energy, also.

:28:23.:28:25.

And at some point, it's going to come back to her

:28:26.:28:28.

and she's not going to play the match expected at some point.

:28:29.:28:32.

Konta was born in Australia, but the UK is home.

:28:33.:28:35.

And victory over Williams would cement her place among

:28:36.:28:37.

A quick score check on the other semifinal in action. Garbine

:28:38.:28:54.

Muguruza is two breaks to the good upon Magdalena Rybarikova in the

:28:55.:28:59.

first set. From the current British number one to a former British and

:29:00.:29:03.

one, Annabel Croft joins me. How big day is this for British tennis? I

:29:04.:29:14.

think it's monumental, actually. -- back in 1997 -- in 1978, there was

:29:15.:29:19.

Virginia Wade. There's a buzz about the championships this year. Tennis

:29:20.:29:24.

she's played has been mesmerising. She's got the weight of the nation

:29:25.:29:27.

on her shoulders but it doesn't seem to bother her. She just needs to

:29:28.:29:30.

keep on applying her formula and doing what she does best. Venus

:29:31.:29:35.

Williams started at Wimbledon in 1997. She is now seeking an eighth

:29:36.:29:41.

grand slam title. What challenge does she posted Johanna Konta today?

:29:42.:29:45.

Beers is very at home on Centre Court. It's where she's had her

:29:46.:29:49.

greatest successes -- Venus Williams is very at home on Centre Court. Its

:29:50.:29:53.

the 20th Wimbledon. Even though she's the oldest player in the draw

:29:54.:29:58.

at 37 years of age, she is playing some of our best tennis. She brings

:29:59.:30:02.

enormous strength and aggression to the court, and huge serve, but both

:30:03.:30:05.

of them will be looking to attack each other's second serve. It will

:30:06.:30:11.

be won or lost, I feel, in that department. Annabel Croft, thank

:30:12.:30:14.

you. Konta and Williams will be on court at around 3pm or 4pm. We look

:30:15.:30:22.

forward to it, thank you. What does the weather holds for Centre Court?

:30:23.:30:24.

Here's Nick Miller to tell us. Marvellous weather. There's a fair

:30:25.:30:32.

bit of cloud around but when the sun makes an appearance it will feel

:30:33.:30:34.

quite warm. The temperatures just creeping into the low 20s. That's

:30:35.:30:38.

very much in the comfort zone for the players at Wimbledon today. It

:30:39.:30:41.

is looking fine all the way through the weekend as well, getting warmer.

:30:42.:30:44.

This is the picture across the rest of the UK. Over the past few hours,

:30:45.:30:49.

climate wise, many have seen some sunshine in Northern Ireland and he

:30:50.:30:54.

is evidence of that from one of our Weather Watchers. The cloud has been

:30:55.:30:56.

increasing and looking more threatening, we are going to see

:30:57.:31:00.

some heavier showers moving through. Also finishing later this afternoon

:31:01.:31:02.

into this evening across western parts of Scotland as well.

:31:03.:31:07.

Elsewhere, it's just the odd shower. Some of the heavier downpours moving

:31:08.:31:11.

into Northern Ireland, western Scotland, going into the late

:31:12.:31:13.

afternoon and evening. If you pick up a shower in eastern Scotland and

:31:14.:31:17.

the most others won't, you could find a heavy one. The showers are

:31:18.:31:20.

well scattered across England and way, most of us will avoid them and

:31:21.:31:24.

stay dry. There is more cloud building but also some sunny spells,

:31:25.:31:28.

unlike breeze and temperatures, if you don't like heat, very nice high

:31:29.:31:33.

teens to low 20s. This is through this evening, we will take the

:31:34.:31:35.

showers away from Northern Ireland, run them across western Scotland and

:31:36.:31:41.

northern England overnight. Wales, Midlands, East Anglia, staying

:31:42.:31:45.

mainly dry. Pictures are higher than last night, there will be some spots

:31:46.:31:49.

away from city centres, in Scotland, heading down into single figures.

:31:50.:31:53.

This is Friday's picture. There will be a few showers during the morning

:31:54.:31:57.

but from late morning onwards, for the rest of the day, most others

:31:58.:32:02.

will be dry. There's quite a lot of cloud around, occasionally the sun

:32:03.:32:05.

will make an appearance. The temperatures are very similar, high

:32:06.:32:10.

teens, a few into the low 20s. There is a weather system approaching

:32:11.:32:12.

Northern Ireland and Scotland towards the end of the day. As I run

:32:13.:32:16.

through Friday evening you can see some rain moving in here and the

:32:17.:32:19.

breeze will start to pick up as well. That's Friday evening. I want

:32:20.:32:24.

to show you the big picture for the weekend. Set the scene for the

:32:25.:32:27.

weekend. Quite a flow of moist committee midair for Saturday from

:32:28.:32:33.

the Atlantic. That means a lot of cloud, particularly towards the west

:32:34.:32:36.

of the UK. Some light rain or drizzle particularly coast

:32:37.:32:39.

sandhills. Southern and eastern areas are looking mainly dry. It's

:32:40.:32:43.

breezy over the weekend and for part two of the weekend will feel weak

:32:44.:32:48.

band of cloud, a few spots of rain thinking south England and Wales.

:32:49.:32:51.

Northern England, Scotland and Ireland will be fried -- bright and

:32:52.:32:55.

fresh on Sunday. Next week looks warmer. That's it for now.

:32:56.:33:00.

A reminder of our main story this lunchtime.

:33:01.:33:02.

The Prime Minister tells the BBC she became tearful when she learned

:33:03.:33:05.

on election night that she'd lost her majority.

:33:06.:33:08.

On BBC One we now join the BBC's news teams where you are.

:33:09.:33:15.