21/01/2017 Breakfast


21/01/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Steph

:00:00.:00:00.

The first full day in office for the new president

:00:00.:00:15.

of the United Sates, Donald Trump, pledges

:00:16.:00:16.

He's already signed his first orders as President,

:00:17.:00:20.

including changes to Barack Obama's healthcare act, which Mr Trump said

:00:21.:00:23.

We want to make America great again, and we will.

:00:24.:00:33.

Inauguration day ended with a series of balls,

:00:34.:00:35.

before the President and First Lady returned to the White House to spend

:00:36.:00:39.

Good morning, it's Saturday the 21st of January.

:00:40.:00:59.

We'll look back on President Trump's inauguration, and what's in store

:01:00.:01:02.

Also ahead, three more survivors have been pulled out of the debris

:01:03.:01:09.

of a hotel, almost 72 hours after it was swamped

:01:10.:01:12.

Leaders of Europe's right wing parties gather in Germany

:01:13.:01:19.

to discuss their opposition to the European Union,

:01:20.:01:21.

thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate.

:01:22.:01:33.

In sport, a woman on a roll, and Yohanna Konta is aiming

:01:34.:01:37.

to keep her winning run going, by knocking out a former world

:01:38.:01:40.

number one out of the Australian open.

:01:41.:01:42.

I've been training with the British long speed skating team,

:01:43.:01:47.

who's sport has been revived in the Netherlands.

:01:48.:01:50.

The weekend is getting off to a frosty start. A hard frost in some

:01:51.:02:00.

parts. Patchy fog around as well. A mostly dry day, and I've got all

:02:01.:02:05.

your weekend weather in the next half an hour.

:02:06.:02:06.

President Donald Trump has wasted no time in getting to work.

:02:07.:02:12.

Shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge

:02:13.:02:15.

signed an executive order to begin dismantling

:02:16.:02:17.

Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare.

:02:18.:02:19.

In his first speech as President, Mr Trump promised to take power

:02:20.:02:22.

from the establishment in Washington and give it back to the people.

:02:23.:02:26.

Last night the President and First Lady attended a number

:02:27.:02:28.

of traditional balls held to thank his supporters.

:02:29.:02:30.

Here's our Washington reporter, Laura Bicker.

:02:31.:02:39.

And now, the president and first Lady of the United States will take

:02:40.:02:50.

their first dance. Never has a song been more appropriate for a

:02:51.:02:56.

president. Donald Trump got here by doing things very differently, a

:02:57.:03:03.

trait he shows no sign of losing our Scamander in chief. Should I keep

:03:04.:03:15.

the Twitter going or not? I think so -- losing as Commander in Chief. He

:03:16.:03:24.

was smiling, class the hand of his wife and first Lady. In the balls

:03:25.:03:29.

are part of the political choreography of this day, and he

:03:30.:03:34.

invited supporters from across the country. Well, we did it. We began

:03:35.:03:45.

this journey, and I said we, we and me. We didn't have a chance, but we

:03:46.:03:50.

knew we were going to win. And we won. As he shuffled around the

:03:51.:03:59.

floor, word spread that he had already made his first executive

:04:00.:04:02.

move, an action that will help repeal Obamacare. His predecessor's

:04:03.:04:09.

signature healthcare law. Across the country, gatherings of a more

:04:10.:04:13.

hostile nations spread out from coast to coast. -- hostile nature.

:04:14.:04:22.

Over 200 people were arrested in Washington after a handful of small

:04:23.:04:27.

rallies turned violent. In Chicago, hundreds peacefully voiced their

:04:28.:04:33.

concerns at Donald Trump's agenda. In Seattle, they marched through the

:04:34.:04:36.

streets. Though the demonstrations are planned over the weekend. But

:04:37.:04:44.

the new president will shrug off this criticism, just as he did

:04:45.:04:49.

during the campaign. Surrounded by family and friends, he is taking

:04:50.:04:58.

time to enjoy this pageantry before the real work begins.

:04:59.:05:04.

We'll be speaking to veteran White House correspondent

:05:05.:05:08.

Connie Lawn from Washington in around ten minutes' time.

:05:09.:05:11.

Women in 32 countries will stage protest marches today to mark

:05:12.:05:14.

the first day of Donald Trump's presidency of the United States.

:05:15.:05:17.

This one in Sydney, Australia, is already underway and hundreds

:05:18.:05:20.

more are due to take place around the world,

:05:21.:05:22.

Around 200,000 people are expected to attend a march on the American

:05:23.:05:27.

capital to highlight the need for women's rights.

:05:28.:05:30.

Italian firefighters say three more survivors have been pulled out

:05:31.:05:32.

of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on Wednesday.

:05:33.:05:36.

Four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday.

:05:37.:05:38.

Attempts are continuing to rescue two more known survivors,

:05:39.:05:41.

but at least 15 people remain unaccounted for.

:05:42.:05:43.

As darkness fell on the third night since the avalanche, a six-year-old

:05:44.:05:58.

girl was pulled from the rubble, cold but apparently well. Soon after

:05:59.:06:03.

came another child, a boy. One of four children who have so far been

:06:04.:06:07.

rescued from the rubble of the hotel. They survived in the kitchen,

:06:08.:06:12.

protected by concrete walls that also silenced their cries for help.

:06:13.:06:16.

After these images were filmed, another three adults were also

:06:17.:06:25.

rescued. All survivors were flown to hospital. They are said to be cold

:06:26.:06:29.

and dehydrated, but otherwise in remarkably good condition. For some

:06:30.:06:34.

relatives who have endured a long wait for news, there was huge

:06:35.:06:40.

relief. Can't you see it on my face? Doesn't it show how happy I am? It's

:06:41.:06:45.

great, I can't describe it. I'd like to see him. For now he is safe, and

:06:46.:06:49.

I hope his parents have managed to survive. Or other relatives, the

:06:50.:06:54.

anxious wait goes on. Rescuers believe there are at least two more

:06:55.:06:58.

people alive and trapped under the snow. They haven't managed to get to

:06:59.:07:04.

them yet. Some bodies have been recovered, at least 15 people are

:07:05.:07:06.

unaccounted for. The former President of the Gambia

:07:07.:07:09.

has finally agreed to step down Yayya Jammeh had been clinging

:07:10.:07:12.

on to power despite losing Troops from several West African

:07:13.:07:16.

countries had threatened to depose him by force

:07:17.:07:19.

if necessary. The leaders of some of your's

:07:20.:07:29.

right-wing populist parties will gather in a German city Goal Attack

:07:30.:07:41.

to discuss Marine Le Pen. The Dutch minister is also planning to attend.

:07:42.:07:45.

Thousands of protesters are expected to demonstrate outside the event --

:07:46.:07:47.

in a German city today. The Mexican drug lord Joaquin

:07:48.:07:50.

Guzman, also known as El Chapo,

:07:51.:07:52.

appeared in a US court after a surprise

:07:53.:07:55.

extradition from Mexico. Guzman pleaded not guilty to charges

:07:56.:07:56.

that he headed the world's largest drug-trafficking organisation,

:07:57.:08:00.

the Sin-a-loa cartel, He's accused of drug trafficking,

:08:01.:08:01.

kidnapping, murder and conspiracy. The Brazilian football

:08:02.:08:09.

club, Chapecoense, will play its first match tonight

:08:10.:08:10.

after nearly all of its players were killed in a plane crash

:08:11.:08:13.

in Columbia. The club made 20 new signings

:08:14.:08:16.

following the disaster, Our reporter, Julia

:08:17.:08:18.

Carneiro has more. The match will be a friendly, and

:08:19.:08:34.

will raise money for the victim's families.

:08:35.:08:36.

Let's get back to our top story and it's the first full day

:08:37.:08:40.

Our correspondent Laura Bicker is in in Washington.

:08:41.:08:45.

Laura, the new President has already got to work,

:08:46.:08:47.

There is no escaping the fact that his tone and Tamina have suggested

:08:48.:09:02.

this is a very different presidency? Never has there been such a contrast

:09:03.:09:06.

between an incoming and outgoing president. Here, we have President

:09:07.:09:17.

Trump, as is seem behind me, he has been at three inaugural balls behind

:09:18.:09:26.

me -- as you've seen behind me. He was forthright, opinionated and

:09:27.:09:29.

himself, even joking about his Twitter account. I think I said in

:09:30.:09:34.

the piece you played earlier, never was a song more appropriate. My Way.

:09:35.:09:40.

Just as he was as a candidate, Donald Trump is intending to do it

:09:41.:09:48.

his way. He is already intending to repeal Obamacare, the affordable

:09:49.:09:51.

care act that gives people healthcare and health insurance.

:09:52.:09:56.

That was initiated by President Obama. It was a campaign promise.

:09:57.:10:00.

Some Republicans have told him to slow down. Donald Trump is pushing

:10:01.:10:07.

ahead with these moves to repeal Obamacare. And other moves as well.

:10:08.:10:11.

We wonder what will come next. The whole White House system has been

:10:12.:10:18.

reset. We are now looking at a new era in US politics. For the moment,

:10:19.:10:20.

thank you. Connie Lawn is a journalist who's

:10:21.:10:23.

covered the White House for nearly five decades, seeing 10 different

:10:24.:10:28.

Presidents in that time. Thank you very much for joining us.

:10:29.:10:37.

We were talking about change, this is a big change from President Obama

:10:38.:10:42.

leaving. One of the big themes was of course putting America first. How

:10:43.:10:48.

do you think his speech compared to those you've seen over the years?

:10:49.:10:53.

It's really tough. This is one American who is delighted to talk to

:10:54.:10:58.

you. It is amazing. I am sure the Allied leaders, traders and

:10:59.:11:03.

merchants are very nervous because he is almost declaring a trade war

:11:04.:11:09.

on most of the world. He didn't talk about the Mexican wall in depth, but

:11:10.:11:14.

he did talk about the Middle East. He used the term, radical Islamist

:11:15.:11:19.

terrorists. The Obama Administration did not use the term Islamic for

:11:20.:11:27.

that. There is a lot of change in tone. The press wondered if we were

:11:28.:11:32.

going to be able to function as White House press. I have been

:11:33.:11:37.

functioning since 1968. I don't know if we will be able to get back into

:11:38.:11:41.

the White House on Monday. He has done a few things. He has named two

:11:42.:11:49.

generals. He has got to people in place. --2. Tomorrow he goes to the

:11:50.:11:55.

CIA and it is going to be interesting, he has criticised that

:11:56.:11:59.

organisation. There is going to be a huge march which I understand you

:12:00.:12:03.

have in London as well. As you said, there is a huge change in tone. A

:12:04.:12:10.

lot of the same rhetoric from the campaign was not there. The idea of

:12:11.:12:14.

taking away from the politicians and giving back to forgotten people. How

:12:15.:12:18.

do you think that is going to play out now that he is a politician?

:12:19.:12:23.

Tougher, edgy, a bit shocking when you consider him standing on the

:12:24.:12:26.

podium with the former president around him. Not as many supporters

:12:27.:12:33.

as President Obama had when he was sworn in. But it was very shocking,

:12:34.:12:37.

people were very surprised about it. What you think success is going to

:12:38.:12:41.

look like? How is he going to judged? It is too early to tell, but

:12:42.:12:47.

the country is divided. You can see that with the demonstration. These

:12:48.:12:51.

are not just protests, these are anarchists. There has been quite a

:12:52.:12:57.

bit of damage today in Washington. Over 217 people have been arrested

:12:58.:13:06.

for smashing and burning things. It is one thing to object to what you

:13:07.:13:13.

think are his policies, but if you are going to protest without a

:13:14.:13:17.

focus, you lose your point. We don't know what is going to happen. But he

:13:18.:13:22.

does have a lot of followers. I predicted last, that he probably

:13:23.:13:26.

would win the presidency, because he says things that people are afraid

:13:27.:13:31.

to say. People who are voting for him wouldn't admit they are going to

:13:32.:13:34.

vote for him. He represents a lot of hatred in this country. As you said,

:13:35.:13:39.

he has said a lot of things that other people are afraid to say. Now

:13:40.:13:43.

he has to follow through on all of that. As you mentioned, he has a

:13:44.:13:50.

meeting with the CIA today. He has been very critical of the

:13:51.:13:53.

intelligence services. How is that going to go down? It will be an

:13:54.:13:59.

interesting meeting. Most of what he wants, he will get, it was he has a

:14:00.:14:04.

Republican house and Senate. He has hundreds of judges who he could

:14:05.:14:11.

nominate, including those in the Supreme Court. He is pretty much

:14:12.:14:14.

going to get his way. It is a totally new era and goodness knows

:14:15.:14:21.

what is going to happen to relations with the UK, Germany, Nato, trade

:14:22.:14:26.

could deteriorate with a lot of countries. We don't know what will

:14:27.:14:30.

happen with North Korea, Russia, China, the Middle East. Very serious

:14:31.:14:35.

changes. Thank you very much for your time.

:14:36.:14:41.

The time is just coming up to 6:15am. Let's have a look at the

:14:42.:14:51.

weather. It is a cold start to the weekend. If you are watching from

:14:52.:14:55.

underneath the duvet, that is not a bad start to be. It is called a van

:14:56.:15:03.

yesterday in rural southern England, -8, you can see the extent into

:15:04.:15:07.

Northern Ireland, in fact, widespread, more so than recent

:15:08.:15:13.

mornings. The frost avoiding coastal parts of northern and western

:15:14.:15:17.

island, not just a case of frost as well. We have frost for eastern

:15:18.:15:23.

England, Northern Ireland, eastern Scotland, some of it might be slow

:15:24.:15:26.

to clear. It is quite wintry looking. It is fine and dry ahead.

:15:27.:15:36.

More clout for Cornel and Devon. The frosty start, temperatures lower in

:15:37.:15:42.

rural start, with fog affecting central and eastern England, into

:15:43.:15:47.

the Welsh Marches, eastern Scotland, but you can see this frosty blue

:15:48.:15:51.

across the map, although there is no rain to show, we are dry for the

:15:52.:15:56.

start of the day and it will be like that for most of us at the end of

:15:57.:16:00.

the day as well. As we move through, it is a case of looking out for

:16:01.:16:04.

cloud compared to first thing, with plenty of sunshine. More cloud

:16:05.:16:07.

pushing into south-east England and Northern Ireland, but this cloud

:16:08.:16:11.

will invade north-east England, the Midlands and north-west England. The

:16:12.:16:16.

closer to the north-east coast, patchy light rain, and single figure

:16:17.:16:20.

temperatures. It is a cold feeling day. The frost is more patchy in

:16:21.:16:26.

nature because there is more cloud around. In northern England,

:16:27.:16:30.

Scotland, delivering patchy, light rain, sleet and snow over the hills,

:16:31.:16:36.

not amounting to much, showers into south-west England and Wales, and

:16:37.:16:39.

they could be wintry over the hills. You might see the frost coming and

:16:40.:16:44.

going with the cloud overnight, some patchy fog into tomorrow morning

:16:45.:16:47.

possible, the best sunshine tomorrow, you can see it, East

:16:48.:16:51.

Anglia, the Midlands, elsewhere it is cloudier, with showers patchy

:16:52.:16:57.

rain in Scotland, wintry flurry especially on the hills, because it

:16:58.:17:00.

is cold enough for single figure temperatures once again. Start of

:17:01.:17:06.

next week, Monday, Tuesday, it is quiet, although there might be some

:17:07.:17:10.

troublesome fog around, and we will hear more about that as we approach

:17:11.:17:16.

the weekend. Troublesome fog to look out for, OK. Thank you very much.

:17:17.:17:18.

We'll be back with a summary of the news at 6:30am.

:17:19.:17:21.

Now it's time for the Film Review with Jane Hill and Mark Kermode.

:17:22.:17:38.

Hello, and welcome to the Film Review on BBC News.

:17:39.:17:41.

To take us through this week's cinema releases,

:17:42.:17:43.

as ever, Mark Kermode is with me, and what will you be telling us

:17:44.:17:47.

We have Jackie, in which Natalie Portman plays the First Lady.

:17:48.:17:53.

We have Split, a psychological thriller from M Night Shyamalan.

:17:54.:17:56.

And Lion, the true story of a little boy lost.

:17:57.:18:05.

So this is directed by Chilean film-maker Pablo Larrain,

:18:06.:18:11.

and it's the story of the assassination and aftermath

:18:12.:18:13.

of John F Kennedy, as seen through the eyes of Jackie Kennedy,

:18:14.:18:16.

played, as everyone will know, by Natalie Portman.

:18:17.:18:22.

There's been an awful lot of interest in her performance,

:18:23.:18:25.

lots and lots of nominations, and the film plays out

:18:26.:18:27.

It's essentially juggling a series of different time frames that

:18:28.:18:31.

are all meant to be representing her fragmented state of mind,

:18:32.:18:34.

so we have the motorcade in Dallas, the aftermath in Washington,

:18:35.:18:37.

we have the funeral, the huge sort of funeral

:18:38.:18:39.

arrangements, and we also have a wrap round which is

:18:40.:18:42.

Jackie Kennedy being interviewed by a journalist who,

:18:43.:18:44.

in the film is unnamed, but it's obviously inspired

:18:45.:18:47.

At the very beginning of the interview she says to him,

:18:48.:18:53.

"Just remember I'm editing this conversation."

:18:54.:18:55.

And he says, "OK, it's going to be your version of events."

:18:56.:18:59.

You'll have to share something personal eventually.

:19:00.:19:04.

People won't stop asking until you do.

:19:05.:19:09.

And if I don't, they'll interpret my silence

:19:10.:19:11.

"Her brow furrows, her lips are drawn.

:19:12.:19:15.

She holds back her tears but she can't hide her anger."

:19:16.:19:22.

This article will bring you a great deal of attention.

:19:23.:19:32.

Are you afraid I'm about to cry again?

:19:33.:19:43.

No, I'd say you're more likely to scream?

:19:44.:19:46.

And interesting, because people might think we know everything

:19:47.:19:54.

there is to know about that story, is there anything new in this,

:19:55.:19:57.

What it does is, it attempts to portray her, firstly as somebody

:19:58.:20:09.

going through an horrendous personal crisis, and we do

:20:10.:20:12.

have the assassination, and it is shocking, as it should be.

:20:13.:20:15.

But also somebody who, in the period immediately

:20:16.:20:17.

afterwards, is constructing the legacy, is basically building

:20:18.:20:19.

the Camelot story, which then became the story everybody told about JFK.

:20:20.:20:22.

Jackie is portrayed very much as First Lady of the televisual age,

:20:23.:20:25.

somebody who is a master of the printed word and also

:20:26.:20:28.

Some of the things - you may have noticed from that

:20:29.:20:32.

clip her performance is very arch, very stagey, very mannered,

:20:33.:20:35.

and when I first saw the film I actually found that alienating.

:20:36.:20:38.

It was only later on, and I have seen it twice now,

:20:39.:20:41.

She is alienated from her surroundings.

:20:42.:20:45.

Because the film has this kaleidescopic and necessarily

:20:46.:20:47.

fragmentary structure, it is possible that it may not gel,

:20:48.:20:50.

that it may not engage you emotionally.

:20:51.:20:52.

The key to it doing the emotional engagement is Mica Levi's score,

:20:53.:20:55.

which is absolutely brilliant, and it's one of those films

:20:56.:20:58.

in which the music is the thing that pulls it all together.

:20:59.:21:01.

Pulls all these different fragments, shards, elements together,

:21:02.:21:03.

and involves you in the story emotionally.

:21:04.:21:05.

I think Natalie Portman's performance is very peculiar,

:21:06.:21:07.

very strange, but it's because she is performing a performance.

:21:08.:21:10.

She is playing somebody on a stage, also somebody in the eye of a storm.

:21:11.:21:14.

The music for me is what made it, you know, cohere, what made it gel,

:21:15.:21:18.

what made it into something other than just a kind of arch

:21:19.:21:21.

and slightly abstract exercise in revisiting history.

:21:22.:21:36.

Well, we will find out next week whether she has been nominated

:21:37.:21:39.

James McAvoy, great British actor back on the screen.

:21:40.:21:47.

Yes, so this is a new film from M Night Shyamalan,

:21:48.:21:49.

who I think is still best known for The Sixth Sense,

:21:50.:21:53.

and had a run of critically acclaimed films and then made some

:21:54.:21:56.

real stinkers, and kind of came back recently with a sort of stripped

:21:57.:21:59.

This is, I think it's an interesting story.

:22:00.:22:03.

James McAvoy plays somebody who has 23 separate personalities.

:22:04.:22:05.

At the beginning of film we see him kidnapping some young women,

:22:06.:22:08.

one of them is played by Anya Taylor-Joy,

:22:09.:22:11.

who was so brilliant in The Witch, who realises pretty early on the key

:22:12.:22:14.

to her survival is going to be negotiating with different

:22:15.:22:17.

personalities that seem to be existing within this

:22:18.:22:19.

Now, McAvoy has real fun with the role.

:22:20.:22:22.

On the one hand, he is playing someone who is a fashion designer,

:22:23.:22:27.

another is a young child with a lisp, and there's a veyr

:22:28.:22:30.

prim, proper woman called Patricia, and all these controlling elements,

:22:31.:22:33.

and they keep talking about the Beast, the Beast,

:22:34.:22:35.

this thing called the Beast, which may or may not surface.

:22:36.:22:38.

Shyamalan, I think, is not the - is not quite the master of the genre

:22:39.:22:42.

Sometimes the screenplay is very clunky, some of the direction

:22:43.:22:48.

is a little bit creaky and the story is preposterous,

:22:49.:22:50.

but in a way which is - but if you saw it as like

:22:51.:22:54.

an old fashioned B-movie, when you kind of think,

:22:55.:22:57.

OK, it's one of those films, it kind of functions OK,

:22:58.:23:00.

but it is held shoulder high by McAvoy's performance,

:23:01.:23:02.

and also by the fact that if you accept that the set up

:23:03.:23:06.

is fairly preposterous, and what you're going to get

:23:07.:23:08.

shouldn't be taken too seriously, there are certain joys about it.

:23:09.:23:22.

It is much better than the films he was making a few years ago,

:23:23.:23:26.

when he really did seem to be somebody, who,

:23:27.:23:28.

having started with, you know, brilliant work like Sixth Sense,

:23:29.:23:31.

had then just gone completely out of control, and was making

:23:32.:23:34.

And described as horror film when I've read about it.

:23:35.:23:37.

It's a psychological thriller with some horror elements, yes.

:23:38.:23:41.

I think he would like to describe it as a mystery.

:23:42.:23:45.

I would describe it as a clunky B-movie, raised shoulder high

:23:46.:23:48.

by the central performance, which of course is several central

:23:49.:23:51.

This whole thing about truth is stranger than fiction.

:23:52.:23:57.

The story of a young boy in the mid 80s, from Kandahar,

:23:58.:24:00.

who got onto a train on which he was trapped,

:24:01.:24:03.

which then travelled 1600 kilometres, and by the time he got

:24:04.:24:06.

off it he was away from home, couldn't speak the language,

:24:07.:24:09.

didn't know how to describe how to get himself back home,

:24:10.:24:12.

and ended up in the hands of the authorities and ended up

:24:13.:24:15.

being adopted by a couple in Tasmania.

:24:16.:24:17.

Decades later, the taste of an Indian sweet food suddenly

:24:18.:24:20.

sends him into a reverie, which takes him back

:24:21.:24:22.

to his childhood and he suddenly becomes obsessed with trying to find

:24:23.:24:25.

the life that he lost, and had almost forgotten about.

:24:26.:24:28.

Do you have any idea what it's like knowing my real brother

:24:29.:24:48.

and mother spend every day of their lives looking for me?

:24:49.:24:53.

How every day my real brother screams my name?

:24:54.:24:59.

Can you imagine the pain they must be in, not knowing where I am?

:25:00.:25:03.

Why didn't you tell me that was happening for you?

:25:04.:25:12.

We swan about in our privileged lives.

:25:13.:25:16.

I mean, he's a hugely likeable actor, Dev Patel.

:25:17.:25:27.

He is absolutely brilliant in this, and also the film itself does a very

:25:28.:25:31.

good job of not becoming what you think it might be,

:25:32.:25:34.

which is the film in which somebody looks something up on Google Earth.

:25:35.:25:38.

It's a film which has real emotional resonance.

:25:39.:25:40.

The opening scenes with the young boy, the five-year-old boy getting

:25:41.:25:43.

lost in the train station has a Spielbergy element to it.

:25:44.:25:46.

The young kid with the enormous machinery of these train stations.

:25:47.:25:50.

Nicole Kidman as Saroo's his adoptive mother does a very,

:25:51.:25:57.

very good job of an understated performance, which manages

:25:58.:25:59.

Firstly anguish, but she also manages to demonstrate love,

:26:00.:26:03.

which is a really hard thing to act on screen,

:26:04.:26:06.

I have seen this twice now, both times I confess I have been

:26:07.:26:14.

I think you would have to be pretty hard hearted not to.

:26:15.:26:19.

It is a really, really moving story, and it is told in a way

:26:20.:26:23.

which is populist and accessible, but also, I think, profoundly

:26:24.:26:25.

touching, and even second time around, even when I knew,

:26:26.:26:28.

because the first time round I didn't know anything

:26:29.:26:30.

about the story, I saw it completely cold.

:26:31.:26:33.

Even second time round when I did, I found it a very overwhelming

:26:34.:26:36.

Best out - I have a feeling I know what you might pick?

:26:37.:26:47.

The biggest problem La La Land has is, everyone says La La Land

:26:48.:26:51.

is brilliant, so now there is almost a backlash,

:26:52.:26:54.

people saying "Oh, surely it can't be as good as that."

:26:55.:26:57.

It's a modern musical that owes a debt to The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

:26:58.:27:02.

and Singin' in the Rain, but also to Casablanca and New York,

:27:03.:27:05.

And the big crowd scenes, the big numbers are quite something.

:27:06.:27:09.

And I've heard some people say "Oh, there's not a memorable tune in it."

:27:10.:27:12.

I could be singing that soundtrack endlessly since seeing the film.

:27:13.:27:17.

I thnk Damien Chazelle has done an absolutely brilliant job.

:27:18.:27:21.

It does have a strong poignant thread of sadness,

:27:22.:27:28.

which is what makes the joyful element more joyful.

:27:29.:27:30.

So Kubo and the Two Strings is an animated film,

:27:31.:27:38.

stop motion animation film, and, I mean, I'm a huge animation fan,

:27:39.:27:41.

not least because it's such a diverse genre.

:27:42.:27:43.

What I loved about this is the animation itself

:27:44.:27:46.

is breathtaking, you can just watch it over and over again,

:27:47.:27:49.

which is why it's lovely to have it for home viewing.

:27:50.:27:52.

It's a lovely complicated multi-layered story,

:27:53.:27:53.

which is told through words, actions, but also through music,

:27:54.:27:56.

and it's one of those films I think genuinely audiences of all ages can

:27:57.:28:00.

watch, and a film which treats its audience with respect.

:28:01.:28:03.

It imagines that its audience is smart enough to keep up

:28:04.:28:05.

with the story, is emotionally engaged enough to understand

:28:06.:28:08.

the deeper themes of the story, and are also willing for the story

:28:09.:28:12.

I thought it was wonderful, and several nominations.

:28:13.:28:17.

I think it's a film which really deserves repeat viewing.

:28:18.:28:20.

I can imagine, I have the Blu-ray of this, I can imagine going back

:28:21.:28:23.

to it time and time again, and every time you see it seeing

:28:24.:28:27.

Mark, great to see you, as ever, thank you very much.

:28:28.:28:35.

Just a reminder, you can find more film news and reviews

:28:36.:28:38.

from across the BBC online, including you can see

:28:39.:28:40.

We were talking about Natalie Portman, find out who has

:28:41.:28:50.

been nominated for the Oscars on our special programme coming

:28:51.:28:56.

on Tuesday, 1:15pm lunchtime, on the BBC News channel.

:28:57.:28:58.

Join me and the film critic Jason Solomons for all of that.

:28:59.:29:01.

That's it for this week, though, thanks for watching.

:29:02.:29:05.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern.

:29:06.:29:28.

Coming up before seven, Nick will have the weather.

:29:29.:29:30.

But first, a summary of this morning's main news.

:29:31.:29:33.

President Donald Trump has wasted no time in getting to work.

:29:34.:29:36.

Shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge

:29:37.:29:39.

signed an executive order to begin dismantling

:29:40.:29:41.

Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare.

:29:42.:29:51.

And now, the President and first Lady of the United States will take

:29:52.:29:57.

their first dance. The President and First Lady also

:29:58.:30:09.

attended a number of traditional balls held to celebrate

:30:10.:30:14.

the inauguration. They danced to 'My Way' just hours

:30:15.:30:15.

after thousands gathered to see him take the oath of office

:30:16.:30:19.

and hear his inaugural address. People that were so nice to me were

:30:20.:30:26.

saying that we did a really good job today. They had to do it, but they

:30:27.:30:30.

did it. And I respect that -- weren't. You're going to see things

:30:31.:30:34.

happening over the next few weeks. Oh, you're going to be so happy.

:30:35.:30:42.

Because you know, they are very elegant people tonight, but they are

:30:43.:30:45.

also very political people, writes? We want to see great things happen

:30:46.:30:53.

for our country. We want to make America a great again, and we will.

:30:54.:30:55.

And we will. Italian firefighters say three more

:30:56.:31:03.

survivors have been pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped

:31:04.:31:06.

by an avalanche on Wednesday. Four children were among those

:31:07.:31:09.

pulled from the remains yesterday. Attempts are continuing to rescue

:31:10.:31:11.

two more known survivors, but at least 15 people

:31:12.:31:14.

remain unaccounted for. The former President of the Gambia

:31:15.:31:20.

has finally agreed to step down Yayya Jammeh had been clinging

:31:21.:31:23.

on to power despite losing Troops from several West African

:31:24.:31:27.

countries had threatened to depose him by

:31:28.:31:30.

force if necessary. The leaders of some of Europe's

:31:31.:31:33.

right-wing populist parties will gather in the German

:31:34.:31:36.

city of Koblenz today to discuss their shared opposition

:31:37.:31:39.

to the European Union. The leader

:31:40.:31:42.

of the French National Front, Marine Le Pen, and the Dutch

:31:43.:31:44.

politician Geert Wilders are among Thousands of protestors are expected

:31:45.:31:47.

to demonstrate outside the event. The Brazilian football

:31:48.:32:00.

club, Chapecoense, will play its first match tonight

:32:01.:32:05.

after nearly all of its players were killed in a plane crash

:32:06.:32:08.

in Columbia. The club has made 20

:32:09.:32:10.

new signings since the disaster, The friendly against current

:32:11.:32:13.

champions Palmeiras will raise money Those

:32:14.:32:17.

are the main stories this morning. Time to talk sport. It's been

:32:18.:32:24.

brilliant at the Australian Open for the Brits, hasn't it? Yes, it is.

:32:25.:32:40.

Johanna Konta has won her eights match. -- eighth.

:32:41.:32:47.

Johanna Konta has breezed into the fourth round of the Australian

:32:48.:32:50.

She just beaten former World Number One Caroline Wozniacki,

:32:51.:32:58.

in straight sets in an hour and fifteen minutes.

:32:59.:33:00.

Konta's been in fantastic form this year , winning a title

:33:01.:33:03.

in Sydney in the build up to the big Grand Slam in Melbourne,

:33:04.:33:07.

and Wozniacki simply had no answer to Britain's number one.

:33:08.:33:11.

Wozniacki, who's seeded 17, only managed to win four games,

:33:12.:33:14.

as Konta cruised to an eighth straight victory.

:33:15.:33:16.

She'll now play Ekaterina Makarova, in the fourth round.

:33:17.:33:19.

Liverpool and Tottenham, will be looking to narrow the gap,

:33:20.:33:21.

on top of the table Chelsea, in the Premier League today.

:33:22.:33:25.

They are seven points ahead, at the moment.

:33:26.:33:26.

And there are seven matches today, with the leaders

:33:27.:33:29.

Spurs are involved in the late kick off, they are away

:33:30.:33:33.

at Manchester City, who you might remember got hammered

:33:34.:33:36.

Liverpool are the early kick off at home to Swansea City,

:33:37.:33:40.

who were also beaten 4-0 last weekend.

:33:41.:33:42.

They lost to Arsenal, but the Liverpool manager

:33:43.:33:44.

Jurgen Klopp says results aren't everything.

:33:45.:33:46.

We saw the last resort, of course, it could have been an easy game for

:33:47.:33:52.

Arsenal. It it was a bit of an opposite of an easy game. It was

:33:53.:33:55.

really difficult for them. We were good, but Swansea also had a lot of

:33:56.:34:02.

chances. But that's what this is for. We don't watch results, we

:34:03.:34:09.

watch performance. They are good side and we are going to have to

:34:10.:34:13.

defend well, not dissimilar to what we did in the first 30 minutes

:34:14.:34:18.

against Arsenal. We had our chances against Arsenal. If we get those

:34:19.:34:22.

against Liverpool, we need to take them. And we need to be more

:34:23.:34:24.

consistent. Steven Gerrard is heading back

:34:25.:34:25.

to Liverpool, to be a youth coach. The former Liverpool

:34:26.:34:28.

and England captain, who made his Liverpool debut

:34:29.:34:34.

in 1998, said the move feels He played 710 times for the Reds,

:34:35.:34:37.

winning nine trophies, and left Anfield nearly 2 years ago

:34:38.:34:43.

to join MLS side LA Galaxy. He retired as a player

:34:44.:34:47.

in November. We're into the business end

:34:48.:34:49.

of the January transfer window, and in the last 12 hours,

:34:50.:34:51.

a couple more Premier League players West Ham United have signed

:34:52.:34:55.

the Southampton defender Jose Font for a fee starting at 8million

:34:56.:35:03.

pounds, and Saido Berahino is to move from West Bromwich Albion

:35:04.:35:05.

to Stoke City for 12 million pounds. The striker, is 23 and played

:35:06.:35:09.

for England at under 21 level, but he hasn't played for West Brom

:35:10.:35:12.

since the 10th September. He's had a strained relationship

:35:13.:35:15.

with the club since a bid from Tottenham was turned down

:35:16.:35:18.

in the summer of 2015 and he responded with angry

:35:19.:35:21.

words on social media. In the 4th round of

:35:22.:35:28.

the Scottish Cup, what a day for Bonnyrigg Rose Athletic,

:35:29.:35:31.

who will be trying to take down last And if you are wondering

:35:32.:35:34.

who they are, they are based just south of Edinburgh,

:35:35.:35:41.

and they're the current champions That's one of the three

:35:42.:35:44.

o clock kick-offs. Before that, last year's beaten

:35:45.:35:47.

finalist Rangers take on Motherwell. Elsewhere Formartine United,

:35:48.:35:50.

from the Highland Football League have a trip to top flight

:35:51.:35:52.

Partick Thistle. Brighton have gone two points clear,

:35:53.:35:55.

at the top of the Championship after a 2-1 win over

:35:56.:35:59.

Sheffield Wednesday Two goals

:36:00.:36:00.

from Anthony Knockaert, including the winner

:36:01.:36:03.

five minutes from time, There were though three red cards

:36:04.:36:05.

in the match and Wednesday missed In rugby union, Northampton,

:36:06.:36:17.

suffered a fourth European Champions Cup defeat of the campaign,

:36:18.:36:22.

as they were beaten Saints already knew

:36:23.:36:25.

they couldn't progress, but the French side can go through,

:36:26.:36:27.

in a best runner-up spot if other And in the European challenge cup,

:36:28.:36:31.

Edinburgh, comfortably beat Romanian Leinster

:36:32.:36:36.

boosted their chances of securing a home quarter-final,

:36:37.:36:40.

with a thrilling 24-all Leinster came back from seven

:36:41.:36:42.

points down at half-time, Only a massive win for Connacht,

:36:43.:36:45.

away to Toulouse tomorrow, would deprive them

:36:46.:36:49.

of home advantage. Jonny Bairstow will replace

:36:50.:37:09.

Alex Hales in England's twenty20 Hales will miss the remainder

:37:10.:37:11.

of the tour, after suffering The opener damaged it

:37:12.:37:15.

during the second one-day England play the final game,

:37:16.:37:18.

of their three-match one series tomorrow, before the twenty20 series

:37:19.:37:23.

starts on Thursday. Barry Hawkins has denied world

:37:24.:37:26.

number one Mark Selby the chance to hold the World, UK and Masters

:37:27.:37:29.

crowns at the same time after beating him 6-3

:37:30.:37:32.

in their Masters semi final. Neither player was at his best

:37:33.:37:54.

in a nervy match at Alexandra But at 4 frames to 3,

:37:55.:37:56.

Hawkins won two in a row, to book his place

:37:57.:38:00.

in the last four. He'll will play Joe Perry,

:38:01.:38:02.

who eased past Ding Jun hui by six The other semi final

:38:03.:38:06.

is between Ronnie O'Sullivan If there had been television 100

:38:07.:38:14.

years ago, we might have been reporting on household names. The

:38:15.:38:18.

stars of speedskating back in the day, they had amazing nicknames like

:38:19.:38:23.

Fish. But as the climate changed,

:38:24.:38:31.

the sport almost died out, Where once the worldtop speed

:38:32.:38:43.

skaters would draw a huge crowd... In the second half of the 20th

:38:44.:38:48.

century, it seems like this and the ice itself were both sin on the

:38:49.:38:53.

ground. By the 1990s, British long track speedskating had all but gone.

:38:54.:38:56.

Three years ago, the British programme was reborn here in the

:38:57.:39:01.

Netherlands. The country that now dominates this sport. Looking more

:39:02.:39:08.

like a stadium than an ice rink, the Netherlands responded to warmer

:39:09.:39:14.

winters by nodding 17 of these arenas with 400 metre tracks. For

:39:15.:39:17.

the British people that come here, it is home.

:39:18.:39:24.

On a rink as big as this, there enough space for the team to build

:39:25.:39:32.

their stamina and speed, alongside hundreds of leisure skaters who use

:39:33.:39:36.

it everyday. It's been reborn in the Netherlands mainly because we don't

:39:37.:39:40.

have a facility like this in the UK. An absolute tragedy. In the very

:39:41.:39:47.

beginning, we were in the development. We only have short

:39:48.:39:53.

track figure skating rink is, which are a maximum of 60 metres long in

:39:54.:40:03.

the UK. We quickly run out of space. First steps with the British team.

:40:04.:40:08.

These are a bit more difficult than when you go out for leisure, because

:40:09.:40:18.

they are only 1.2 millimetres thick. Get nice and low, low shoulders. I

:40:19.:40:23.

needed a body suit. To learn the moves, the British team pact is at

:40:24.:40:31.

home. -- practice. At least in long track, it's a time trail. Supposedly

:40:32.:40:36.

about pure speed rather than a race with the risk of others taking you

:40:37.:40:42.

down. To help you on your way, special boots are hinged to give you

:40:43.:40:47.

extra leverage. I feel like I'm part of the wind. You really need to

:40:48.:40:52.

explode to get the speed up. Then you can accelerate and really finish

:40:53.:41:01.

your stride. As she was keen to prove, in our debut time trail.

:41:02.:41:07.

Races can be up to 10,000 metres. For me, 100 metres was a mouth on.

:41:08.:41:12.

She finished in just over 12 seconds and had time to put on some tea

:41:13.:41:21.

before I came over in 46 seconds. The faces of the crowd really struck

:41:22.:41:26.

me. They thought I was some kind of British competitor. Their faces...

:41:27.:41:35.

It was a bit like that. It is something that shows the investment

:41:36.:41:40.

is working in benevolence. At the last Olympics, they won 23 from 36

:41:41.:41:47.

medals in that area. It is making a difference to the British team, they

:41:48.:41:51.

are hoping to get to the Olympics in 2022. Thank you very much. The time

:41:52.:41:58.

now is 641. Going back to our main story. Donald Trump's inauguration,

:41:59.:42:05.

which happened yesterday. Tens of thousands of supporters witnessed

:42:06.:42:08.

him being sworn in as president in Washington. You can see them walking

:42:09.:42:14.

down Pennsylvania Avenue -- 6:41am. That was following the inauguration

:42:15.:42:18.

speech. The eyes of the world very much on Donald Trump. This was the

:42:19.:42:23.

procession immediately after his inauguration speech. He waved to

:42:24.:42:28.

onlookers and well-wishers. Away from Capitol Hill, there were

:42:29.:42:31.

violent clashes between police and protesters. Our international

:42:32.:42:37.

correspondence by the day meeting people on both sides of the

:42:38.:42:38.

argument. Praising unity. When American

:42:39.:42:49.

presidents are sworn in, it is usually a time used to talk about

:42:50.:42:55.

human divisions. But few have had such divided States to try and

:42:56.:43:00.

reunite. On one side is team Trump. Hundreds of thousands of them turned

:43:01.:43:05.

out from across the land. Once people see, give him a year. They'll

:43:06.:43:10.

see they have more money in their pockets, and thou be lack, while,

:43:11.:43:15.

this is a good deal. We don't need anybody else like talking, blah,

:43:16.:43:23.

blah. I feel it's like, asking President Trump, hoping that he

:43:24.:43:30.

fails, that is like being on a plane and hoping it crashes. He is the

:43:31.:43:34.

President, you have to vote for the best. An underground movement

:43:35.:43:37.

rallied around the Trump campaign. Today they came from parts of the

:43:38.:43:41.

country that many feel has been forgotten. It into the dawning of a

:43:42.:43:46.

very different day in America. I think it's going to bring a new era

:43:47.:43:50.

of hope and prosperity for our country. The thing I like about

:43:51.:43:55.

Donald Trump is he as an alpha male, as opposed to our previous command

:43:56.:44:02.

in chief. Here's an alpha male, a mover and shaker. He has no agenda

:44:03.:44:06.

other than to do the right thing, basically. We loved it. We are

:44:07.:44:16.

conservative, we love America. This is ridiculous. You don't think they

:44:17.:44:24.

have a right to object and protest? At the right time. Not this. There

:44:25.:44:30.

is no class in this. They may have lost the election, but don't expect

:44:31.:44:35.

divisions to heal anytime soon. I feel a bit afraid for my community.

:44:36.:44:40.

What are you apprehensive about? I think there are a lot of people who

:44:41.:44:44.

are vulnerable in our country who are going to suffer under this

:44:45.:44:52.

presidency. From anger to violence. Some businesses were attacked by a

:44:53.:44:56.

small group of protesters. Dozens were arrested. It seems Donald Trump

:44:57.:45:03.

will have to work hard to be president of the United States of

:45:04.:45:05.

America. Here's Nick with a look

:45:06.:45:10.

at this morning's weather. Yesterday you talked about it

:45:11.:45:18.

looking quiet over the next couple of days. Is it still the case?

:45:19.:45:22.

Absolutely right, with high pressure in control. We had a bit of frost,

:45:23.:45:29.

well, a lot of frost around to start the day. It is cold. The last few

:45:30.:45:34.

mornings have been called a stint rule, southern England, which is the

:45:35.:45:39.

case today, but the extent of Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland --

:45:40.:45:50.

mornings have been called. One or two patches elsewhere. Some of it

:45:51.:45:54.

might linger into the first part of the afternoon. Yes, frosty, for he

:45:55.:46:02.

may be, but plenty of dry weather. More cloud around south-west England

:46:03.:46:07.

compared to elsewhere, you can see the fog at nine o'clock this

:46:08.:46:11.

morning. Cloud coming in from the North Sea into eastern England. For

:46:12.:46:15.

Northern Ireland, sunshine will be best this morning. But a sunny day

:46:16.:46:21.

across more of Scotland compared to recent days after the cold start.

:46:22.:46:26.

Not so cold in the northern and Western Isles. As we go through the

:46:27.:46:30.

day they will be a bit of cloud increasing across south-west

:46:31.:46:35.

England, into Northern Ireland, but this area of cloud will extend into

:46:36.:46:40.

eastern England, the Midlands, and into north-west England as well, and

:46:41.:46:45.

may produce patchy drizzle. Temperatures, well, single figures,

:46:46.:46:49.

mid single figures, the cold feel to the weather after the frosty start.

:46:50.:46:53.

If you are looking for the frosty blue tonight, that is more patchy in

:46:54.:46:58.

nature with the cloud producing showers into south-west England and

:46:59.:47:04.

Wales. And patchy rain in northern England and Scotland producing sleet

:47:05.:47:08.

and snow over the high ground. It won't amount to much. It is looking

:47:09.:47:14.

fairly light. And tomorrow it is quiet. There is more cloud around.

:47:15.:47:19.

You might encounter more showers. Wintry over the hills of Scotland.

:47:20.:47:24.

The best of the sunshine into central, eastern and southern

:47:25.:47:27.

England is it will be feeling cold and that is how all of the weekend

:47:28.:47:32.

is looking. So, keep your jumpers on still, thank you very much. See you

:47:33.:47:34.

later on. We'll be back with

:47:35.:47:36.

the headlines at 7am. 5:45am on Sunday, 19th October 2014,

:47:37.:47:38.

19 miles above New Mexico, and the type of sunrise that not

:47:39.:48:13.

many people have ever seen. It's the view from a test flight

:48:14.:48:20.

which is preparing to take tourists While all the attention has been

:48:21.:48:23.

focused on space tourism using rockets and space planes,

:48:24.:48:34.

we've got exclusive access to one company in the Arizona

:48:35.:48:37.

desert that's been quietly It's really the way to do space

:48:38.:48:39.

tourism, because you want to go and spend time and look at the view

:48:40.:48:50.

and have a gentle ride up I mean, look, the rocket rides

:48:51.:48:54.

are going to be great, I'm sure, but for me,

:48:55.:48:58.

I want to sit there with my glass of champagne and my

:48:59.:49:02.

best friend and look. Tickets are currently selling

:49:03.:49:04.

for $75,000 each for a two-hour ascent in a pressurised capsule

:49:05.:49:07.

to an altitude of 100,000 feet. Today, one of World View's

:49:08.:49:20.

co-founders and his team are showing me a small piece

:49:21.:49:22.

of the balloon's material, a secret blend of polyethylene

:49:23.:49:25.

and other materials. I can't help but notice you have,

:49:26.:49:27.

I think, the world's biggest table. Tell me you use this

:49:28.:49:31.

for Christmas dinners. Absolutely, you should see

:49:32.:49:33.

the parties we have on this table! And, seriously, are you going

:49:34.:49:38.

to make a balloon that covers So full-scale balloons

:49:39.:49:43.

for heavy-lift flights, so like a Voyager flight,

:49:44.:49:45.

use the entire table. If you want to take a payload

:49:46.:49:48.

that is 10,000 pounds to 105,000 feet, it takes a balloon the size

:49:49.:49:53.

of this entire table, so you could take a football field

:49:54.:49:58.

and spin it inside the balloon Contrary to what I thought,

:49:59.:50:01.

as the helium expands, it doesn't cause the

:50:02.:50:07.

material to stretch. Instead, the gas just occupies more

:50:08.:50:12.

of the initially empty balloon. Can you navigate

:50:13.:50:15.

when you are up there? Or are you subject to whichever

:50:16.:50:17.

way the wind blows? So it turns out that

:50:18.:50:22.

in the stratosphere you very often get counter-flowing winds,

:50:23.:50:25.

the stratosphere and the troposphere going different directions,

:50:26.:50:28.

and in that interface So by guiding my altitude up

:50:29.:50:30.

and down, I can sort of sail the stratosphere, much like a ship

:50:31.:50:38.

uses the currents and winds And then there's the question of how

:50:39.:50:40.

you get back down again, They go into what's pretty close

:50:41.:50:48.

to freefall for something like ten seconds, so it feels very light,

:50:49.:50:58.

like going over the top of a roller-coaster,

:50:59.:51:01.

just feeling light, and then we come back to about 1G, 12

:51:02.:51:03.

or 15 seconds later, so we're just gaining some speed,

:51:04.:51:06.

and then it feels like a normal But you have to be finished

:51:07.:51:09.

your champagne by then. One of our requirements was that

:51:10.:51:13.

you don't spill your champagne, literally, when that happens,

:51:14.:51:16.

and so I think we are going to have a little cup

:51:17.:51:19.

on the champagne. The person who will make sure

:51:20.:51:25.

you don't spill your booze, or any other fluid for that

:51:26.:51:28.

matter, is the pilot. It's a unique job, and that's why

:51:29.:51:31.

an ex-Nasa test pilot and astronaut will be the one pulling

:51:32.:51:34.

the strings, as it were. When you are on a parafoil

:51:35.:51:38.

or something like that, you have this left-right thing

:51:39.:51:44.

going on, is that what you've You can think of it that way,

:51:45.:51:47.

but in reality the spacecraft We've got a parachute that's

:51:48.:51:51.

the size of a basketball court, so we couldn't physically, you know,

:51:52.:51:56.

have enough force to pull on it. So we are actually controlling it

:51:57.:52:04.

probably with a joystick, we're still designing exactly

:52:05.:52:07.

what it's going to look like, but that joystick or that whatever

:52:08.:52:10.

controller is controlling motors that are pulling on lines

:52:11.:52:12.

on the parachute, just like you would if you were

:52:13.:52:15.

skydiving, but just on a much, What will this look like when it's

:52:16.:52:18.

kitted out for passengers? When it's kitted out for passengers,

:52:19.:52:22.

it will have these tremendous windows, at least four of them,

:52:23.:52:25.

four big ones and then There will be seats for everybody,

:52:26.:52:28.

there will be a bar, who wants a spacecraft

:52:29.:52:34.

without a bar? And it will have a bathroom,

:52:35.:52:37.

it's a five-hour flight, at least, so you need

:52:38.:52:39.

a bathroom on board too. And you say this is the first

:52:40.:52:42.

spacecraft you've flown with a bar, so you've flown other

:52:43.:52:46.

spacecraft, then? So I've flown on both the US

:52:47.:52:48.

Space Shuttle and I flew How do you think this

:52:49.:52:55.

will compare to that? It'll be a different experience,

:52:56.:53:01.

I can tell you that, you know, when we came

:53:02.:53:06.

back with the Soyuz, for instance, we hurtle

:53:07.:53:09.

through the atmosphere on fire It's a very violent,

:53:10.:53:11.

very dynamic, lots of G forces, you're getting thrown all over

:53:12.:53:16.

the place in the cockpit, you feel the heat, you're

:53:17.:53:19.

labouring to breathe. This will be a lot more gentle,

:53:20.:53:24.

a lot more relaxing, and frankly it will enable people

:53:25.:53:28.

to take in the experience It's not like you're wondering

:53:29.:53:31.

whether you're going to survive World View's boss, Jane Poynter,

:53:32.:53:36.

is a developer of technologies And she hopes that the view from 20

:53:37.:54:08.

miles up will give passengers a unique perspective

:54:09.:54:13.

on the fragility of our planet. And curiously, this project was born

:54:14.:54:15.

out of a view that was pretty much the opposite - when its two founders

:54:16.:54:19.

took part in a two-year study of how age humans, plus animals and plants,

:54:20.:54:23.

would interact and survive You come from a space background,

:54:24.:54:26.

but really interesting, in the early 90s, you shut

:54:27.:54:30.

yourself away in Biosphere 2 Oh, my gosh, so Biosphere 2

:54:31.:54:33.

was actually an inspiration for World View, so when we

:54:34.:54:39.

were in the biosphere, one of the most extraordinary

:54:40.:54:42.

experiences that I had, and I think most of the people

:54:43.:54:44.

in there had, was the experience of really being part

:54:45.:54:48.

of our biosphere, and you really get this sense of the unity

:54:49.:54:51.

of the biosphere that we are in, that is on such a huge scale,

:54:52.:54:54.

but in normal life we can't even And it's a very similar idea

:54:55.:54:58.

to the experience that astronauts having the earth from space,

:54:59.:55:02.

and it was that experience that we wanted to give people,

:55:03.:55:04.

because of the experience that we've So I guess it's easy to imagine

:55:05.:55:07.

that we are all looking at you guys in the biosphere, but I suppose

:55:08.:55:13.

you're looking out from a unique That is right, so both truths

:55:14.:55:16.

are true, so we had people walk around the outside of the biosphere,

:55:17.:55:21.

and I got e-mails from people I've been hearing about the fact

:55:22.:55:24.

that this planet is a finite place for some many years,

:55:25.:55:29.

and I never understood until I walked around this miniature

:55:30.:55:31.

version of our planet. And suddenly I got it,

:55:32.:55:45.

I could see its boundaries, I knew that you guys that

:55:46.:55:48.

were living inside only had what you had in there,

:55:49.:55:51.

which is exactly the same as we have right here on planet earth,

:55:52.:55:55.

on spaceship earth. Emotions certainly run high in that

:55:56.:55:57.

kind of environment, One of the other Biosphere 2

:55:58.:55:59.

crewmembers was Taber MacCallum, He's explaining how,

:56:00.:56:03.

although a balloon can't technically get you into the vacuum of space,

:56:04.:56:07.

the conditions in the stratosphere are similar enough, with very low

:56:08.:56:10.

air pressure and extremes of temperature in the sun and shade,

:56:11.:56:13.

to mean that World View's balloons are already carrying scientific

:56:14.:56:16.

equipment up in so-called stratolites, which can hang over one

:56:17.:56:18.

location for days at a time. So there's satellites in low earth

:56:19.:56:25.

orbit that are whizzing around at 17,000 mph, there are satellites

:56:26.:56:28.

in geostationary orbit that are very far away, have a hard time

:56:29.:56:31.

focusing in on things. And then below that we have

:56:32.:56:41.

aircraft, that can carry cameras and drones, and where we sit is sort

:56:42.:56:44.

of between all those. We can sit over a piece,

:56:45.:56:47.

persist over a piece of land for a while, and we have a close

:56:48.:56:50.

view, because we are only about 20 miles up, but we don't

:56:51.:56:54.

have the speed and expense of being a rocket, and we don't have

:56:55.:56:57.

all of the fuel burn of flying It is a compelling argument,

:56:58.:57:01.

I suppose - that rockets are dangerous, and they are

:57:02.:57:05.

expensive, and they are rather And if you want to send

:57:06.:57:08.

something up close to space, and you can do it with

:57:09.:57:15.

a balloon, why wouldn't you? It's also a compelling argument

:57:16.:57:18.

that the more people who see the earth from way up there,the more

:57:19.:57:21.

people may have the kind of transcendental shifting viewpoint

:57:22.:57:25.

that seems to be striving It changes the way you embed

:57:26.:57:27.

yourself in our biosphere, the way you think about our place

:57:28.:57:34.

in this biosphere that we inhabit. I mean, it clearly changes the way

:57:35.:57:37.

many people have gone about developing our

:57:38.:57:40.

environmental movement. It changes the way we think

:57:41.:57:43.

about communication around the planet, collaborating

:57:44.:57:45.

with people around the planet. It really does strip away

:57:46.:57:49.

the notion of boundaries, of national boundaries,

:57:50.:57:51.

because we think of this as an entity that we

:57:52.:57:54.

all inhabit at once. What has changed is my definition

:57:55.:58:01.

of the word "home", and when we had the re-entry of the Soyuz

:58:02.:58:04.

spacecraft, we initially hit the ground, flipped and rolled over,

:58:05.:58:07.

and now my window was pointing down at the ground, and I remember

:58:08.:58:10.

looking at the window and seeing a rock, a flower and a blade

:58:11.:58:13.

of grass, and I remember thinking, What was really interesting

:58:14.:58:17.

about that thought is I was home, but I was in Kazakhstan,

:58:18.:58:32.

and so to me my home wasn't just in Houston, Texas, where at the time

:58:33.:58:36.

I lived with my family - my home expanded to include earth,

:58:37.:58:39.

and I think our definition of that word home has profound implications

:58:40.:58:43.

for how we problems on our planet, how we treat each other,

:58:44.:58:46.

how we treat our planet, and I think that is one

:58:47.:58:49.

of the things that we're trying That is it for the short shortcut of

:58:50.:59:04.

Click. There is much more in the full-length version, which you can

:59:05.:59:09.

find on iPlayer now. Follow us on Twitter for lots of backstage photos

:59:10.:59:14.

and fun too. Thanks for watching and I will see you soon.

:59:15.:00:00.

with Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern.

:00:01.:00:04.

The first full day in office for the new president

:00:05.:00:07.

Donald Trump, pledges to fulfill his campaign promises.

:00:08.:00:12.

He's already signed his first orders as President,

:00:13.:00:15.

including changes to Barack Obama's healthcare act, which Mr Trump said

:00:16.:00:18.

We want to make America great again, and we will.

:00:19.:00:28.

Inauguration day ended with a series of balls,

:00:29.:00:31.

before the President and First Lady returned to the White House to spend

:00:32.:00:35.

Good morning, it's Saturday the 21st of January.

:00:36.:00:54.

We'll look back on President Trump's inauguration, and what's in store

:00:55.:00:57.

Also ahead: Three more survivors have been pulled out of the debris

:00:58.:01:06.

of an Italian hotel, almost 72 hours after it was swamped

:01:07.:01:09.

Leaders of Europe's right wing parties gather in Germany

:01:10.:01:13.

to discuss their opposition to the European Union,

:01:14.:01:15.

thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate.

:01:16.:01:26.

In sport, Yohanna Konta is aiming to keep her winning run going,

:01:27.:01:29.

by knocking out a former world number one out of

:01:30.:01:32.

I've been training with the British long speed skating team,

:01:33.:01:37.

who's sport has been revived in the Netherlands.

:01:38.:01:39.

The weekend is getting off to a frosty start.

:01:40.:01:48.

Most places will see the sun shine, with a dry day ahead.

:01:49.:02:00.

President Donald Trump has wasted no time in getting to work.

:02:01.:02:07.

Shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge

:02:08.:02:10.

signed an executive order to begin dismantling

:02:11.:02:12.

Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare.

:02:13.:02:15.

In his first speech as President, Mr Trump promised to take power

:02:16.:02:19.

from the establishment in Washington and give it back to the people.

:02:20.:02:28.

Last night the President and First Lady attended a number

:02:29.:02:31.

of traditional balls held to thank his supporters.

:02:32.:02:33.

Here's our Washington reporter, Laura Bicker.

:02:34.:02:35.

And now, the President and First Lady of the United States

:02:36.:02:38.

Never has a song been more appropriate for a president.

:02:39.:02:50.

Donald Trump got here by doing things very differently,

:02:51.:02:54.

a trait he shows no sign of losing as commander in chief.

:02:55.:03:02.

Should I keep the Twitter going or not?

:03:03.:03:06.

I think so. I think so!

:03:07.:03:16.

He beamed at people across Washington, clasping the hand

:03:17.:03:18.

Inaugural balls are part of the political choreography

:03:19.:03:23.

of this day, and he invited supporters from across the country.

:03:24.:03:26.

We began this journey, and they said we, we and me,

:03:27.:03:39.

we didn't have a chance, but we knew we were going to win.

:03:40.:03:42.

As he shuffled around the floor, word spread that he had already

:03:43.:03:52.

made his first executive move, an action that will help repeal

:03:53.:03:55.

Obamacare, his predecessor's signature healthcare law.

:03:56.:04:01.

Across the country, gatherings of a more hostile nature spread out

:04:02.:04:03.

Over 200 people were arrested in Washington after a handful

:04:04.:04:16.

of small anti-Trump rallies turned violent.

:04:17.:04:20.

In Chicago, hundreds peacefully voiced their concerns

:04:21.:04:21.

And in Seattle, they marched through the streets,

:04:22.:04:29.

further demonstrations are planned over the weekend.

:04:30.:04:33.

But the new president will shrug off this criticism,

:04:34.:04:35.

Surrounded by family and friends, he is taking time to enjoy this

:04:36.:04:41.

pageantry before the real work begins.

:04:42.:04:54.

Laura Bicker is in Washington for us this morning.

:04:55.:05:02.

He got there by doing things differently, but now Donald Trump

:05:03.:05:09.

has got down to -- has to get down to work and start fulfilling the

:05:10.:05:12.

promises he gave in his speech yesterday. Yes, he is pressing the

:05:13.:05:16.

White House reset button and he's doing it very, very quickly. Not

:05:17.:05:22.

only has the White House changed its entire website, he started signing

:05:23.:05:26.

executive orders. That campaign pledge that he made, there was a cry

:05:27.:05:33.

throughout the campaign from him and Republicans to repeal and replace

:05:34.:05:39.

Obamacare, that was not the biggest shifts in healthcare since the

:05:40.:05:42.

1960s, that President Obama introduced. It means 20 million more

:05:43.:05:47.

people have health insurance, but it also means that for many, insurance

:05:48.:05:52.

premiums have gone up. It has proved controversial. Donald Trump said he

:05:53.:05:56.

would find a replacement and repeal it quickly and that's exactly what

:05:57.:06:00.

he will do. Doesn't mean it will be repealed by him and now, but it does

:06:01.:06:07.

set in the motion. He also has his two cabinet picks in place, or a

:06:08.:06:12.

start, there are still more challenges ahead. You have seen some

:06:13.:06:17.

of the protests that have sprung up. He will no doubt shrug it off and

:06:18.:06:20.

carry on regardless. Thank you. The Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson

:06:21.:06:30.

has told the BBC he remains positive about the prospect of a new trade

:06:31.:06:35.

deal with the US. The new president has made it very clear that he wants

:06:36.:06:40.

to put Britain at the front of the line for a new trade deal and

:06:41.:06:43.

obviously that's extremely exciting and important, and he is very keen

:06:44.:06:47.

to get it done as fast as possible, very optimistic that it can be done

:06:48.:06:51.

soon. I think he said within a short period, after the exit from the EU

:06:52.:06:58.

and that's great. But it has got to have a -- got to work for the UK as

:06:59.:07:03.

well, but there is every reason to be optimistic.

:07:04.:07:04.

Protest marches to demand women's rights will take place in more

:07:05.:07:07.

than 30 countries to mark Donald Trump's first day in office.

:07:08.:07:10.

This one in Sydney, Australia, is already underway and hundreds

:07:11.:07:13.

more are due to take place around the world,

:07:14.:07:15.

Around 200,000 people are also expected to attend a march

:07:16.:07:21.

Italian firefighters say four more survivors have been pulled out

:07:22.:07:30.

of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on Wednesday.

:07:31.:07:33.

Four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday.

:07:34.:07:36.

Attempts are continuing to rescue two more known survivors,

:07:37.:07:40.

but at least 15 people remain unaccounted for.

:07:41.:07:42.

As darkness fell on the third night since the avalanche,

:07:43.:07:49.

a six-year-old girl was pulled from the rubble, cold

:07:50.:07:52.

Soon after came another child, a boy.

:07:53.:07:56.

One of four children who have so far been rescued from the rubble

:07:57.:08:00.

They're saiad to have survived in the kitchen,

:08:01.:08:06.

protected by concrete walls that also silenced their cries for help.

:08:07.:08:11.

After these images were filmed, another three adults

:08:12.:08:14.

, two women and a man were also rescued.

:08:15.:08:21.

All survivors were flown to hospital.

:08:22.:08:22.

They are said to be cold and dehydrated, but otherwise

:08:23.:08:25.

For some relatives who have endured a long wait for news,

:08:26.:08:30.

TRANSLATION: Can't you see it from my face?

:08:31.:08:38.

For now the boy is safe, and I hope his parents have

:08:39.:08:47.

But, for other relatives, the anxious wait goes on.

:08:48.:08:52.

The rescuers say they believe there are at least two more people

:08:53.:08:55.

They haven't managed to get to them yet.

:08:56.:08:59.

Some bodies have been recovered, at least 15 people

:09:00.:09:01.

A Hungarian coach has crashed in northern Italy,

:09:02.:09:09.

The coach was on its way back from a mountain resort

:09:10.:09:14.

in France when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city

:09:15.:09:17.

According to reports, the coach was carrying a large

:09:18.:09:21.

The leaders of some of Europe's right-wing populist parties

:09:22.:09:27.

will gather in the German city of Koblenz today

:09:28.:09:29.

to discuss their shared opposition to the European Union.

:09:30.:09:35.

The leader of the French National Front, Marine Le Pen,

:09:36.:09:38.

and the Dutch politician Geert Wilders are among those

:09:39.:09:40.

Thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate outside the event.

:09:41.:09:44.

The Brazilian football club Chapecoense will play its first

:09:45.:09:46.

match tonight after nearly all of its players

:09:47.:09:48.

were killed in a plane crash in Columbia.

:09:49.:09:51.

The club made 20 new signings following the disaster,

:09:52.:09:54.

Our reporter Julia Carneiro has more.

:09:55.:10:04.

These pictures travelled the world. Sheer joy as the Chapacoense

:10:05.:10:11.

football team qualified for the final of the cup last year. The

:10:12.:10:18.

dressing room now stands silent. Their finest moment sent them to

:10:19.:10:24.

play in Colombia on the doomed flight that killed 19 players, as

:10:25.:10:28.

well as directors and members of the coaching staff. The flight crashed

:10:29.:10:33.

on a mountainous area close to the area where it was headed. A

:10:34.:10:36.

preliminary report by Colombian authorities said the plane had

:10:37.:10:42.

insufficient fuel and human error was to blame. Only six people

:10:43.:10:46.

survived the crash. This defender only managed to walk again last

:10:47.:10:54.

week. TRANSLATION: They told me three days before I came back. It

:10:55.:11:00.

was the saddest day of my life. I ask about my teammates and the

:11:01.:11:04.

doctors said they won't here any more. The seats have been empty for

:11:05.:11:10.

almost two months now. But today the fans will return to the arena to

:11:11.:11:16.

cheer on a new Chapecoense, with new players and new hopes for a

:11:17.:11:19.

successful future are striving to live up to the past.

:11:20.:11:28.

We will have all of the weather and sport coming up later.

:11:29.:11:33.

Anyone who predicted Trump the world leader would differ in rhetoric

:11:34.:11:36.

from Trump the candidate would have been proven wrong by his first

:11:37.:11:39.

In his inaugural address, he vowed to end what he called

:11:40.:11:43.

the "carnage" of modern America and reiterated his promise to "make

:11:44.:11:46.

Let's discuss this with Republican commentator

:11:47.:11:49.

and former speech-writer for George W Bush, Anneke Green.

:11:50.:11:51.

Thank you very much for staying up late for us. After what has been a

:11:52.:12:05.

momentous 12 hours or so. Can you just briefly give us your thoughts

:12:06.:12:08.

with the White House immediately behind you, a new resident in place?

:12:09.:12:17.

Like you said, it is momentous. It has been quite a long day for those

:12:18.:12:21.

of us in Washington, DC covering the inauguration and watching to see how

:12:22.:12:25.

the crowds respond to the speech, what's in the speech itself. It was

:12:26.:12:29.

a short speech, I thought it was a good speech, although it had some

:12:30.:12:33.

very colourful language at times. But that certainly made it

:12:34.:12:40.

memorable. I was at one of the inaugural balls today. There are

:12:41.:12:43.

still people out returning from these parties and I saw them even

:12:44.:12:48.

coming into the studio tonight. We will talk about the language you

:12:49.:12:51.

mentioned a moment ago. Let's have a clip from one of the passages in the

:12:52.:12:56.

inaugural speech. Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our

:12:57.:13:03.

inner cities. Rusted out factories scattered like tombstones across the

:13:04.:13:07.

landscape of our nation. An education system flushed with cash,

:13:08.:13:14.

but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all

:13:15.:13:16.

knowledge. Let's pick up on some of that

:13:17.:13:24.

language. A lot of people say there is quite a lot of bleak language,

:13:25.:13:29.

rusted factories, American carnage, the word decay cropped up. What did

:13:30.:13:34.

you make of the language? I actually thought the line rusted out

:13:35.:13:38.

factories dotting the landscape like tombstones was one of the most

:13:39.:13:42.

beautiful lines in the speech, but it is bleak, it isn't hopeful. His

:13:43.:13:47.

speech was set up so that in the beginning he said, today, how is

:13:48.:13:52.

being transferred from Washington to you, the people, but before this

:13:53.:13:57.

moment what you've been experiencing is... And then we heard the language

:13:58.:14:00.

you played. It delivered the audience to a place and then he

:14:01.:14:06.

said, no more. Now you can have hope again, you can dream again, you will

:14:07.:14:10.

not be forgotten. So get into that place of saying where things are

:14:11.:14:14.

now, he did describe things very bleakly and that was in keeping with

:14:15.:14:18.

the speech we heard at the Republican National Convention,

:14:19.:14:20.

where he spoke about death and destruction. He was keen to place

:14:21.:14:25.

himself as the anti- establishment president if there can be such a

:14:26.:14:27.

thing. The establishment protected itself

:14:28.:14:40.

but not the citizens of our country. Their victories have not been your

:14:41.:14:45.

victories, their triumphs have not been your triumphs, and while they

:14:46.:14:50.

celebrated in our nation's capital, there was little to celebrate for

:14:51.:14:55.

struggling families all across our land. Many people wondered whether

:14:56.:15:03.

in his speeches, in the weeks and months to come, he would be true to

:15:04.:15:07.

what he said during the campaign trail. Yes, and he was making clear

:15:08.:15:13.

in his address as president that he is not going to be like the

:15:14.:15:18.

politicians that have jaded many members of the American public who

:15:19.:15:22.

make campaign promises, who sound one way when it is a primary and

:15:23.:15:27.

then when they are running in a more general election they start to

:15:28.:15:30.

moderate, and when they get to Washington, DC, the perceptions of

:15:31.:15:34.

many voters, they don't get to come through on these promises and the

:15:35.:15:38.

way we saw the cycle coming out with 18 candidates for Republican

:15:39.:15:42.

nomination and then Donald Trump, the one person who was not a

:15:43.:15:46.

politician, he was a businessman, making it to the top, becoming

:15:47.:15:51.

president, is a reflection of people being set up. You mentioned being at

:15:52.:15:56.

one of the events, one of the balls that followed, I was mindful

:15:57.:15:59.

watching a clip of President Trump as he is now speaking at one of the

:16:00.:16:05.

balls in which the quote was, his words, they said we and me couldn't

:16:06.:16:14.

do it and we won. To my mind, that sounds like the man on election

:16:15.:16:18.

night, it sounds like the man who is still crowing on about beating the

:16:19.:16:22.

opposition when a lot of people were hoping at this point in time for a

:16:23.:16:26.

unifying message. Why hasn't he changed that mantra? He is speaking

:16:27.:16:31.

to his supporters. People who attend these balls gave money. Even though

:16:32.:16:37.

one of the distinctive is was he had many small donors, it was an

:16:38.:16:42.

historic number supporting him, he was not the deep pocketed candidate,

:16:43.:16:46.

so I don't think it is unusual to see a president at this point at

:16:47.:16:50.

these balls thanking his supporters and saying, we have accomplished

:16:51.:16:55.

something, we are in office and looking forward, we will be working.

:16:56.:16:59.

It is important to know audience, that is not a comment that is nation

:17:00.:17:07.

facing. You will be familiar with cloud boards people have put up

:17:08.:17:11.

together, which crops up often in the speech. I think we can see the

:17:12.:17:15.

cloud boards. You can see and America, one of the things from

:17:16.:17:21.

looking outside the USA, politicians drawing attention to it, is how

:17:22.:17:29.

American it was, the simple rules, purchase American, higher American,

:17:30.:17:34.

is it a hostile message to the rest of the world and preaching to those

:17:35.:17:39.

in the US, but necessarily something that is alarming to the rest of the

:17:40.:17:44.

world? I don't think I appreciate how much this would sound

:17:45.:17:49.

reminiscent to the rest of the world of some of the things that predated

:17:50.:17:53.

World War Two, for example, appeasement language, that kind of

:17:54.:17:58.

thing, until tonight, talking with people who are European, and hearing

:17:59.:18:03.

the message, I don't think President Trump is thinking about it that way,

:18:04.:18:06.

and I would say most Americans hearing that would think, well, it

:18:07.:18:11.

makes sense to focus on what is good for the nation and then the rest of

:18:12.:18:15.

the world instead of being focused on the rest of the world first,

:18:16.:18:19.

which was one of the accusations that President Obama faced. Thank

:18:20.:18:23.

you for speaking to us and for staying up so late in Washington

:18:24.:18:31.

this evening. Thank you. Let's find out what is happening with the

:18:32.:18:35.

weather. What a beautiful picture. There will be Sunrisers is across

:18:36.:18:41.

parts of England, we expect sunshine but it is foggy and frosty to start.

:18:42.:18:45.

The hardest has been in rural southern England, -7 in Hampshire.

:18:46.:18:52.

You can see a hard frost in parts of Wales, Northern Ireland, into

:18:53.:18:57.

Scotland, especially in the east. More widespread frost to start the

:18:58.:19:01.

day. It is called to come, with settled weather. There is some fault

:19:02.:19:07.

in eastern Scotland, Northern Ireland, Yorkshire, Lincolnshire,

:19:08.:19:11.

into east Wales, fog patches possible just about anywhere. It may

:19:12.:19:17.

be a problem for the next couple of hours. South-west England has more

:19:18.:19:23.

clout around. Cornwall and Devon. We have cloud coming from the North Sea

:19:24.:19:28.

across eastern England, running eventually into the Midlands. You

:19:29.:19:32.

can see the extent of the frost and the clear whether to begin the day.

:19:33.:19:36.

That is the case into Northern Ireland and Scotland. More of us

:19:37.:19:40.

will get to see the sunshine can head to recent days. On through the

:19:41.:19:45.

day, it the emphasis is dry and sunny weather to start the weekend.

:19:46.:19:50.

More cloud pushing into south-west England, eventually into Northern

:19:51.:19:53.

Ireland, but this is the significant area of cloud, that will be into

:19:54.:19:58.

Norfolk and the Midlands, eventually north-west England. It might be

:19:59.:20:02.

drizzly to the North Sea coast as well. Temperatures mostly 3- six

:20:03.:20:09.

degrees. So a definite chill after a frosty start. Not so frosty tonight.

:20:10.:20:13.

It will come and go as cloud moves around. It is more patchy. Still

:20:14.:20:19.

some fog patches. Damp weather, northern England, southern Scotland,

:20:20.:20:23.

showers for south-west England and Wales. And all it means is not as

:20:24.:20:32.

much sunshine around. Some showers, wintry on the hills, patchy rain and

:20:33.:20:36.

drizzle into Scotland, flurries on the high ground, none of that wet

:20:37.:20:41.

weather amounts to much and you can see where the best weather will be

:20:42.:20:45.

for the Midlands, East Anglia and south-east England and single figure

:20:46.:20:48.

temperatures, it doesn't get warmer going into next week and we are

:20:49.:20:52.

worried about the extent of fog on Monday and Tuesday, which could

:20:53.:20:58.

cause some problems, so we will keep an eye on that and we will update

:20:59.:21:02.

you as we get closer to Monday and Tuesday. Thank you very much. The

:21:03.:21:05.

time is 7:20am. There have been more dramatic scenes

:21:06.:21:08.

in Italy as firefighters there confirmed three more people

:21:09.:21:11.

have been pulled from the debris of a hotel, buried by

:21:12.:21:14.

an avalanche on Wednesday. Rescue workers in the Abruzzo region

:21:15.:21:16.

managed to pull six people from the wreckage yesterday

:21:17.:21:19.

and crews are continuing to work to reach at least

:21:20.:21:22.

two other survivors. Let's speak to Alistair Read from

:21:23.:21:24.

Mountain Rescue England and Wales. Good morning. I am sure that like

:21:25.:21:38.

everyone else, with your expert knowledge, you have been looking at

:21:39.:21:41.

the images coming out of Italy and this rescue operation is under way

:21:42.:21:45.

as we speak but they have been pulling people out of that

:21:46.:21:51.

avalanche, and this is 70 hours after the event. I think that is

:21:52.:21:57.

exceptional. With a pure avalanche you would expect poor survival times

:21:58.:22:02.

but with this case, with a building, there is more chance of survival. It

:22:03.:22:07.

is an extra of disaster that we seek with the earthquakes and avalanches.

:22:08.:22:13.

We are looking at some of the imagery here and there were a number

:22:14.:22:16.

of children brought out from the situation. What are you seeing in

:22:17.:22:20.

terms of the rescue operation itself? Quite a range of people

:22:21.:22:28.

working. You have got rescue workers who are able to work inside the

:22:29.:22:32.

building, surrounding them are the people who help to get there and

:22:33.:22:37.

also to transport the survivors of way, so it is quite an operation.

:22:38.:22:43.

What are the stages of the rescue? Initially, the response to getting

:22:44.:22:47.

there on Wednesday evening, I think that was quite challenging, with the

:22:48.:22:52.

snow, not able to fly helicopters with the application, and then the

:22:53.:22:55.

first stage of trying to work out where people were in the building,

:22:56.:22:59.

how to gain access to it, and at the same time they were bringing more

:23:00.:23:04.

people so that when they start digging, if they meet the

:23:05.:23:07.

structures, they can penetrate through. It looks fascinating, how

:23:08.:23:12.

they have built tunnels in the snow, because there must be danger in

:23:13.:23:16.

getting it right, so how do they know? You do the best you can. Snow

:23:17.:23:21.

itself doesn't hold much weight but the avalanche snow sets hard once it

:23:22.:23:25.

has moved, so then you have to dig through the building, which can be

:23:26.:23:29.

quite difficult work, and they will be guided by the best routes given

:23:30.:23:33.

what you know about the building, but they will be searching for

:23:34.:23:38.

people, trying to listen for them, using dogs to see if they can detect

:23:39.:23:42.

them through smell, and hopefully they will get cameras in to put in

:23:43.:23:48.

to see if anyone is surviving. Reports we are getting from some who

:23:49.:23:52.

have been brought out suggest they took refuge between a collapsed part

:23:53.:23:57.

of the building, a pocket where they are not affected at trapped within,

:23:58.:24:04.

but they say they possibly lit a fire to keep warm. If you are in

:24:05.:24:10.

that situation, horrendous situation, you are trapped,

:24:11.:24:13.

presumably they have access to things and getting cold is possibly

:24:14.:24:16.

the most dangerous thing at that point? If there is a lot of snow,

:24:17.:24:23.

then hypothermia is a great risk, he would be surrounded by cold snow and

:24:24.:24:27.

cool off quickly, so you want to keep warm, and so it you have access

:24:28.:24:32.

to materials to generate heat, you have a better chance of survival.

:24:33.:24:37.

One of the challenges is if you are in a pocket which is cut off from

:24:38.:24:40.

free-flowing air, you could asphyxiate yourself and cause more

:24:41.:24:46.

problems. You have been involved in avalanche rescues in north Wales.

:24:47.:24:50.

What is it like to be on one of those teams. It is quite a

:24:51.:24:55.

challenge. We get short notice, we try to get people into look for the

:24:56.:24:59.

victims of the avalanche. We have hard work to get a lot of people in

:25:00.:25:05.

and we generally do the best we can to find the person, but it is for

:25:06.:25:09.

our that they tend not to be that successful. We have seen pictures of

:25:10.:25:13.

you in Croatia at which is where you have been out helping and training

:25:14.:25:18.

as well, haven't you? Yes, I have been out a number of times to help

:25:19.:25:22.

the Croatian mountain rescue, we were involved in some of the biggest

:25:23.:25:27.

rescue incidents about 10 years ago. It is ongoing and even after this

:25:28.:25:31.

length of time there is still hope that people will be a live. They

:25:32.:25:36.

will hold out hope, the hotel structure will give voyage when

:25:37.:25:41.

people can survive. I think temperatures, the snow is like an

:25:42.:25:45.

igloo, it won't protect you from the extreme cold outside, but people

:25:46.:25:50.

will be cold and I think they will also get weak as they get dehydrated

:25:51.:25:54.

and get more and more hungry if they are surviving. Thank you very much.

:25:55.:25:59.

We will see you later on in the morning.

:26:00.:26:03.

Now, we are going to talk about a coin hall.

:26:04.:26:11.

It was an obsession that lasted 30 years for two metal detector

:26:12.:26:14.

enthusiasts, but eventually their search paid off

:26:15.:26:16.

when they discovered one of the largest hoards of Celtic

:26:17.:26:19.

The last of nearly 70,000 coins, worth millions of pounds,

:26:20.:26:23.

have now been removed from the site in Jersey,

:26:24.:26:25.

as Robert Hall has been finding out.

:26:26.:26:28.

A good story needs the right ingredients. This one has a legend

:26:29.:26:36.

of buried treasure and two lifelong friends who never gave up the

:26:37.:26:40.

search. I can still remember the first time we went to the fields and

:26:41.:26:46.

I was probably early 20s, I suppose, late teens, early 20s at the time,

:26:47.:26:49.

and we arrived at the field expecting to find the coins

:26:50.:26:53.

instantly. But of course it didn't happen like that. It is a strange

:26:54.:26:57.

feeling because there was something that drew us to it. Every time we

:26:58.:27:02.

drove by on a Sunday to go out to a field we would stop and say, the

:27:03.:27:06.

field is empty, and we would go and give it another try. The treasure

:27:07.:27:09.

they were searching for had come to Jersey with kilted tribesman well

:27:10.:27:15.

over 2000 years ago. Their coins kept turning up, convincing Reg

:27:16.:27:19.

Meade and Richard Miles there wasn't even a larger hall to be found here.

:27:20.:27:26.

In 2012, somebody was at the top of the field and they shouted, got one,

:27:27.:27:30.

or words to that effect, and that is when the story took off. Reg got

:27:31.:27:34.

down with the shovel and just scooped out some more earth. On the

:27:35.:27:39.

end of it was five points. So I shouted out, Reg, haul. Reg, Richard

:27:40.:27:46.

at a team of excited archaeologists had no idea what the 30 year surge

:27:47.:27:50.

had actually uncovered. Everybody thought it was going to be a pot of

:27:51.:27:56.

coins, so we had some bandage to put around it and we thought we would be

:27:57.:28:01.

out at the end of the first day, and then it became incredibly exciting

:28:02.:28:04.

because we knew how big it was, but it also became a worry because no

:28:05.:28:08.

one had actually got something like this out of the ground safely in one

:28:09.:28:12.

piece before. In this story there were secrets within secrets. The

:28:13.:28:21.

70,000 coins in folded even more precious treasures. What we have

:28:22.:28:24.

even more of these gold neck talks which would have been warned by a

:28:25.:28:28.

very important people in these Celtic tribes, thin sheet gold over

:28:29.:28:33.

an iron core and then probably would around that, and they made it into

:28:34.:28:38.

halves so they would originally sort of click apart and go back together.

:28:39.:28:42.

Week after week, month after month, more treasures have emerged. After

:28:43.:28:47.

three years' work, the final coin has now been removed. Dismantling

:28:48.:28:52.

the port has left many mysteries unsolved. How did it come to be

:28:53.:28:59.

here? Was it buried as a tribute to the gods or hidden enemies? And does

:29:00.:29:05.

a large number of objects indicate a hidden presents? There is so much

:29:06.:29:10.

study to do with the horde itself and what we can learn about events

:29:11.:29:15.

and Times 2000 years ago, but in a much broader context, what else is

:29:16.:29:21.

beneath the ground? It is as if the horde found us, we didn't find the

:29:22.:29:25.

horde. Maybe there is a reason for it in the future. Robert Hall, BBC

:29:26.:29:26.

News, Jersey. 30 years! And they think that it

:29:27.:29:34.

found them, rather than them finding the horde. It is the kind of thing

:29:35.:29:38.

that makes people go out today with their metal detector, thinking, this

:29:39.:29:42.

will be the big one. Let's hope so, yeah. Headlines coming up in just a

:29:43.:29:46.

moment. This is Breakfast,

:29:47.:30:26.

with Charlie Stayt and Steph Coming up before 8am,

:30:27.:30:29.

Nick will have the weather. But first, a summary of this

:30:30.:30:33.

morning's main news. President Donald Trump has wasted no

:30:34.:30:36.

time in getting to work. Shortly after his inauguration

:30:37.:30:39.

parade ended, the new man in charge signed an executive order

:30:40.:30:42.

to begin dismantling Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act,

:30:43.:30:48.

known as Obamacare. And now the president and first lady

:30:49.:31:03.

of the United States will take their first dance.

:31:04.:31:05.

The President and First Lady also attended a number of

:31:06.:31:07.

traditional balls held to celebrate the inauguration.

:31:08.:31:09.

They danced to 'My Way' just hours after thousands gathered to see him

:31:10.:31:13.

take the oath of office and hear his inaugural address.

:31:14.:31:19.

People that weren't so nice to me were saying that we did a really

:31:20.:31:22.

They hated to do it, but they did it.

:31:23.:31:34.

You're going to see things happening over the next few weeks.

:31:35.:31:38.

Because, you know, they're very elegant people tonight,

:31:39.:31:52.

but they're also very political people, right?

:31:53.:31:54.

We want to see great things happen for our country.

:31:55.:31:57.

We want to make America great again, and we will.

:31:58.:32:00.

Reacting to President Trump's inaugural speech to put America

:32:01.:32:06.

first, the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson told the BBC he remains

:32:07.:32:09.

positive about the prospect of a new trade deal with the US.

:32:10.:32:17.

The new President has made it very clear that he wants to put Britain

:32:18.:32:22.

at the front of the line for a new trade deal and obviously

:32:23.:32:25.

that's extremely exciting and important, and he is very keen

:32:26.:32:28.

to get it done as fast as possible, very optimistic that it can

:32:29.:32:32.

I think he said within a short period after the exit from the EU,

:32:33.:32:40.

But it has got to work for the UK as well,

:32:41.:32:44.

but there is every reason to be optimistic.

:32:45.:32:46.

In other news, Italian firefighters say four more survivors have been

:32:47.:32:49.

pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped

:32:50.:32:52.

Four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday.

:32:53.:32:56.

Attempts are continuing to rescue two more known survivors,

:32:57.:32:58.

but at least 15 people remain unaccounted for.

:32:59.:33:04.

A Hungarian coach has crashed in northern Italy killing

:33:05.:33:06.

The coach was on its way back from a mountain resort

:33:07.:33:11.

in France when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city

:33:12.:33:14.

According to reports, the coach was carrying a large

:33:15.:33:19.

The former President of The Gambia has finally agreed to step down

:33:20.:33:27.

Yayya Jammeh had been clinging on to power despite losing

:33:28.:33:31.

Troops from several West African countries had threatened

:33:32.:33:34.

The leaders of some of Europe's right-wing populist parties

:33:35.:33:40.

will gather in the German city of Koblenz today

:33:41.:33:42.

to discuss their shared opposition to the European Union.

:33:43.:33:48.

The leader of the French National Front, Marine Le Pen,

:33:49.:33:50.

and the Dutch politician Geert Wilders are among

:33:51.:33:53.

Thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate outside the event.

:33:54.:33:58.

The Brazilian football club Chapecoense

:33:59.:34:01.

will play its first match tonight, after nearly all of its players

:34:02.:34:05.

were killed in a plane crash in Columbia.

:34:06.:34:08.

The club has made 20 new signings since the disaster,

:34:09.:34:10.

The friendly against current champions Palmeiras will raise money

:34:11.:34:16.

That is going to be a very emotional moment.

:34:17.:34:30.

Absolutely. 22 new players and three survivors watching on from that

:34:31.:34:33.

tragedy, which has changed the club forever. If all that happens they

:34:34.:34:38.

were relatively unknown outside of the country. They shot to fame, the

:34:39.:34:42.

underdogs, and now they are known all over the world. So a very

:34:43.:34:46.

different time for them. There have to play at some point, but it will

:34:47.:34:49.

never be easy to play football again. Take us through the sports

:34:50.:34:53.

news. Well, Johanna Konta, Dan Evans, and

:34:54.:34:59.

Johanna Konta is obliterating the former world number one!

:35:00.:35:03.

That picture tells the story. How far can she go? Catchy do better

:35:04.:35:09.

than last year, which got to the semifinals? -- can she do.

:35:10.:35:12.

She just beaten former world number one Caroline Wozniacki

:35:13.:35:14.

in straight sets in an hour and 15 minutes.

:35:15.:35:17.

Konta's been in fantastic form this year, winning a title in Sydney

:35:18.:35:20.

in the build up to the big Grand Slam in Melbourne,

:35:21.:35:23.

and Wozniacki simply had no answer to Britain's number one.

:35:24.:35:26.

Wozniacki, who's now seeded 17, only managed to win four games,

:35:27.:35:33.

as Konta cruised to an eighth win in a row.

:35:34.:35:36.

She'll now play Ekaterina Makarova, in the fourth round.

:35:37.:35:38.

Liverpool and Tottenham will be looking to narrow the gap

:35:39.:35:41.

on top of the table Chelsea in the Premier League today.

:35:42.:35:44.

Chelsea are seven points ahead at the moment.

:35:45.:35:46.

And there are seven matches today, with the leaders

:35:47.:35:49.

Spurs are involved in the late kick off.

:35:50.:35:52.

They are away at Manchester City, who you might

:35:53.:35:55.

remember got hammered 4-0 at Everton last weekend.

:35:56.:35:58.

Liverpool are involved in the early kick off at home to Swansea City,

:35:59.:36:01.

who were also beaten 4-0 last weekend.

:36:02.:36:03.

But the Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp says results

:36:04.:36:07.

Interesting thing in the Premier Li, I don't know when it started, but

:36:08.:36:18.

only finals. Only finals since I don't know where. Swansea have been

:36:19.:36:24.

playing in the league. We play for whatever, but each game, especially

:36:25.:36:31.

in the European, it decides the whole season. That's really intense.

:36:32.:36:36.

We are really looking forward to the opportunity.

:36:37.:36:39.

They are good side and we are going to have to defend well,

:36:40.:36:42.

not dissimilar to what we did in the first 30 minutes against

:36:43.:36:45.

If we get those against Liverpool, we need to take them.

:36:46.:36:50.

We're into the business end of the January transfer window,

:36:51.:36:56.

and in the last 12 hours a couple more Premier League players

:36:57.:36:59.

West Ham United have signed the Southampton defender Jose Font

:37:00.:37:11.

for a fee of around ?8 million, and Saido Berahino

:37:12.:37:16.

is to move from West Bromwich Albion to Stoke City for ?12 million.

:37:17.:37:20.

The striker is 23 and played for England at under 21 level,

:37:21.:37:23.

but he hasn't played for West Brom since the 10th September.

:37:24.:37:26.

He's had a strained relationship with the club since a bid

:37:27.:37:29.

from Spurs was turned down in the summer of 2015,

:37:30.:37:32.

and he responded with angry words on social media.

:37:33.:37:34.

In the fourth round of the Scottish Cup, what a day

:37:35.:37:37.

for Bonnyrigg Rose Athletic, who will be trying to take down last

:37:38.:37:41.

And if you are wondering who they are, they are based

:37:42.:37:44.

just south of Edinburgh, and they're the current champions

:37:45.:37:47.

That's one of the 3pm kick-offs today.

:37:48.:37:51.

Before that, last year's beaten finalist Rangers take on Motherwell.

:37:52.:37:54.

Elsewhere, Formartine United, from the Highland Football League,

:37:55.:37:56.

have a trip to top flight Partick Thistle.

:37:57.:38:01.

That'll be tough, but a great day out.

:38:02.:38:03.

Brighton have gone two points clear at the top of the Championship

:38:04.:38:06.

after a 2-1 win over Sheffield Wednesday.

:38:07.:38:09.

Two goals from Anthony Knockaert, including the winner

:38:10.:38:14.

There were though three red cards in the match and Wednesday missed

:38:15.:38:21.

In rugby union, Northampton suffered a fourth European Champions

:38:22.:38:25.

Cup defeat of the campaign, as they were beaten

:38:26.:38:27.

Saints already knew they couldn't progress,

:38:28.:38:36.

but the French side can go through still in a best runner-up

:38:37.:38:39.

spot if other results go their way this weekend.

:38:40.:38:42.

Leinster boosted their chances of securing a home quarter-final,

:38:43.:38:44.

with a thrilling 24-24 draw at Castres.

:38:45.:38:46.

Leinster came back from seven points down at half-time

:38:47.:38:49.

Only a massive win for Connacht away to Toulouse tomorrow

:38:50.:38:55.

could deprive them of home advantage in the last eight.

:38:56.:38:58.

Jonny Bairstow will replace Alex Hales in England's Twenty20

:38:59.:39:00.

Hales will miss the remainder of the tour, after suffering

:39:01.:39:06.

The opener damaged it during the second one-day

:39:07.:39:09.

England play the final game of their three-match one series

:39:10.:39:17.

tomorrow, before the Twenty20 series starts on Thursday.

:39:18.:39:23.

Barry Hawkins has denied world number one Mark Selby the chance

:39:24.:39:30.

to hold the World, UK and Masters snookers crowns at the same time,

:39:31.:39:33.

after beating him 6-3 in their Masters semi final.

:39:34.:39:36.

Neither player was at his best in a nervy match at Alexandra

:39:37.:39:40.

But at 4 frames to 3, Hawkins won two in a row,

:39:41.:39:46.

He'll will play Joe Perry, who eased past Ding Jun hui by six

:39:47.:39:52.

The other semi final is between Ronnie O'Sullivan

:39:53.:39:56.

Just a word that, -- the tennis. There was a word between Dan Evans

:39:57.:40:11.

and he spotted his favourite cricketer and asked if he could have

:40:12.:40:16.

a selfie. He got the palm away. So, Dan Evans tweeted Peterson and said,

:40:17.:40:23.

you denied me a picture! Kevin Pietersen has apologised. He said he

:40:24.:40:29.

couldn't even remember his own name at the time! He has apologised and

:40:30.:40:32.

of course they will now arrange a photo.

:40:33.:40:36.

Yes, it never good to do a drunken picture.

:40:37.:40:41.

Let's tease this up. Can we see these pictures? You have been

:40:42.:40:45.

iceskating? Yes, the British iceskating team are now based in the

:40:46.:40:50.

Netherlands because they dominate the sport. This was a day of

:40:51.:40:54.

international competition and there I was. I took on one of the best

:40:55.:40:58.

young Brits in front of that crowd, who were rather we will do it. They

:40:59.:41:03.

were watching these top racers and suddenly this buffoon comes on. We

:41:04.:41:08.

will find out more about that later, at about 8:30am and 9:30am. You

:41:09.:41:14.

always do everything in style! Thanks very much.

:41:15.:41:18.

Millions of people around the world watched Donald Trump being sworn

:41:19.:41:22.

Breakfast's John Maguire joined one group of American

:41:23.:41:27.

students here in the UK for an inauguration party

:41:28.:41:29.

to see what they thought of the occasion.

:41:30.:41:36.

Every four years we gather on these steps... Right across the United

:41:37.:41:41.

States and around the world, Americans gathered to witness an

:41:42.:41:45.

event that so many had predicted couldn't and wouldn't happen. Aya,

:41:46.:41:50.

Donald John Trump, do solemnly swear... That I will faithfully

:41:51.:41:59.

execute... That I will faithfully execute... The office of president

:42:00.:42:03.

of the United States. The office of president of the United States.

:42:04.:42:07.

These students, studying in London, are thousands of miles from home,

:42:08.:42:12.

yet witnessed every second of Donald Trump's inauguration, as if they

:42:13.:42:16.

have a front row seat on Capitol Hill. In Washington, the atmosphere

:42:17.:42:22.

was serious, momentous, even, so in London we decided to lighten the

:42:23.:42:25.

mood. Folks, we are going to play Trump Dingo, top trumps, whatever

:42:26.:42:31.

you want to call it. We are going to give you this valuable and rare ABC

:42:32.:42:35.

breakfast queue cards. I want you to each choose for words, phrases and

:42:36.:42:42.

mannerisms. -- BBC. As the president makes his speech you have to mark

:42:43.:42:46.

each time it comes along and whoever gets the most at the end will win a

:42:47.:42:50.

prize. Or at least will win, how does that sound? Me, along with the

:42:51.:42:55.

global audience, hung on every word and luckily every hand gesture. We

:42:56.:43:02.

are transferring power from Washington, DC and giving it back to

:43:03.:43:08.

you. I did terribly. I only got three. Three mentions of the words

:43:09.:43:15.

strong? OK. I got dirty, 29 OK gestures and one beautiful. -- 30.

:43:16.:43:22.

We will make America safe again and, yes, together with will make America

:43:23.:43:27.

great again. An inaugural speech should differ from campaign rhetoric

:43:28.:43:33.

and lacks the policy details of the State of the Union Address. So how

:43:34.:43:38.

did President Trump said? Based on his crowd I think it is something

:43:39.:43:42.

they would have liked, but for an inaugural address I don't think it's

:43:43.:43:46.

a good job. It seems like he was still in campaign mode, talking

:43:47.:43:50.

about the issues and why he is the one to fix them, but it seemed like

:43:51.:43:54.

he sold himself to the people and he won the election, now he should talk

:43:55.:43:58.

more about healing and more ambiguous overall themes about going

:43:59.:44:03.

forward. We are going to make America great again. He only said it

:44:04.:44:08.

once, but at the same time he spoke about healing the country, making

:44:09.:44:13.

compromises, not just the country but the whole world, and I thought

:44:14.:44:18.

that was paradoxical. So far the man who has just become the 45th

:44:19.:44:22.

resident has confounded history, politics, convention and, if he

:44:23.:44:27.

governs in the same vein, then as the 40th president used to declare,

:44:28.:44:29.

you ain't seen nothing yet. Clearly not the most important of

:44:30.:44:38.

issues, but that body land which is fascinating, analysing the hand

:44:39.:44:40.

gestures. -- Wadi language. Here's Nick with a look

:44:41.:44:42.

at this morning's weather. Where are you? Another fabulous

:44:43.:44:52.

picture. Good morning. Lots of hand gestures. I am exhausting the back

:44:53.:44:58.

catalogue of photos until the Weather Watchers pictures coming. It

:44:59.:45:03.

is a cold start but there is plenty of sunshine around. The hardest

:45:04.:45:09.

frost has been in rural southern England, but we found -5 in

:45:10.:45:14.

Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland. More widespread frost and fog

:45:15.:45:19.

around. It is showing up here. Eastern Scotland, Northern Ireland,

:45:20.:45:23.

Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, and patches elsewhere. So, bear that in mind if

:45:24.:45:29.

you are planning an early journey. Let's have a look at 9am this

:45:30.:45:34.

morning. It isn't cold in Cornwall with the cloud around. It is the

:45:35.:45:39.

same for the North Yorkshire Coast, six degrees at the moment. Not

:45:40.:45:45.

everybody has a frost. More sunshine for Northern Ireland and Scotland is

:45:46.:45:50.

the flipside to the cold night, with clear whether an sunshine to begin.

:45:51.:45:55.

Frost in the northern and Western Isles with six or seven degrees to

:45:56.:46:01.

start. On through the day, plenty of sunshine, cloud increasing across

:46:02.:46:06.

south-west England, for example, into Northern Ireland, and this

:46:07.:46:09.

North Sea Coast cloud will push further west, so some in north-west

:46:10.:46:13.

England will cloud over after a sunny start, and parts of the

:46:14.:46:18.

Midlands. Temperatures on the cold side after the cold start to the

:46:19.:46:23.

day, but at least we get some time to compensate. From the cloud in

:46:24.:46:27.

northern England, into southern Scotland, patchy light rain or

:46:28.:46:32.

drizzle, flurries of snow over the high ground, and showers into

:46:33.:46:35.

south-west England and Wales. In Wales, wintry on the hills. It isn't

:46:36.:46:45.

amounting too much. Even where the cloud is thick enough. Patchy frost,

:46:46.:46:49.

not as widespread, still some fog patches, not as much sunshine. It is

:46:50.:46:55.

in the Midlands, East Anglia and the south-east, some showers, south-west

:46:56.:46:59.

England and Wales, patchy rain for northern England and southern

:47:00.:47:02.

Scotland, wintry on the hills with flurries in northern Scotland as

:47:03.:47:05.

well, and cold again tomorrow. You are right about the hand gestures, I

:47:06.:47:12.

counted nine. They were all very well delivered, though, which is the

:47:13.:47:14.

main thing. We'll be back with

:47:15.:47:17.

the headlines at 8am. Now it's time for Newswatch

:47:18.:47:19.

with Samira Ahmed. Hello and welcome to Newswatch

:47:20.:47:24.

with me, Samira Ahmed. The Prime Minister reveals more

:47:25.:47:26.

of the government's plans But is the BBC obsessed with

:47:27.:47:32.

the potential downsides of Brexit? And the BBC Trust says a report

:47:33.:47:42.

about Jeremy Corbyn's policies on shoot to kill was inaccurate,

:47:43.:47:45.

but the Corporation's Director First, in the build up

:47:46.:47:48.

to Donald Trump's inauguration on Friday, the BBC broadcast

:47:49.:47:59.

a number of programmes and reports about the 45th President

:48:00.:48:02.

of the United States. Monday's Panorama, for example,

:48:03.:48:08.

asked whether he was the Kremlin's The reporter, John Sweeney,

:48:09.:48:10.

has a habit of "testy" on-air encounters as demonstrated in this

:48:11.:48:14.

programme with an acolyte of President Putin's and in a clip

:48:15.:48:17.

from a 2013 interview with Donald Maybe you're thick,

:48:18.:48:20.

but when you have a signed contract you can't, in this

:48:21.:48:25.

country, just break it. And by the way, John,

:48:26.:48:27.

I hate to do this but I do have that big group of people waiting

:48:28.:48:31.

so I have to leave. One more second, please,

:48:32.:48:35.

tell me about Boris Nemtsov. Can you tell me, can you list

:48:36.:48:41.

the number of American journalists This is a completely stupid

:48:42.:48:59.

kind of conversation. Please, I'm very nice to meet

:49:00.:49:03.

you but I don't like to continue. Ian Shaw was watching that

:49:04.:49:07.

and thought: John Sweeney does an excellent job of irritating

:49:08.:49:10.

people and does very little reporting whatsoever,

:49:11.:49:12.

managing to have two On Monday this was the third

:49:13.:49:33.

headline on BBC's news at six. Also on tonight's programme:

:49:34.:49:36.

Crisis in Stormont. Today Sinn Fein will not re-nominate

:49:37.:49:41.

for the position of Deputy First New elections in Northern Ireland

:49:42.:49:44.

as power-sharing collapses. Some viewers felt that such dramatic

:49:45.:49:52.

and significant political news from Northern Ireland merited more

:49:53.:49:55.

attention from the BBC, which didn't lead with that story

:49:56.:49:57.

on any of its main bulletins, as Kevin Marr put it

:49:58.:50:02.

on Twitter: Both Sky and BBC News Ten O'Clock News programmes

:50:03.:50:05.

have collapse of Northern Ireland power-sharing in third spot,

:50:06.:50:07.

that's how much we're bothered. And Johanna Paulson pointed out:

:50:08.:50:14.

Hey, isn't there something Now since last June's very close

:50:15.:50:17.

and hotly debated referendum, the arguments about how Britain

:50:18.:50:21.

will leave the European Union This week gave us some

:50:22.:50:24.

clarity on the issue with the Prime Minister's speech

:50:25.:50:29.

on Tuesday but it certainly didn't mark an end to the arguments

:50:30.:50:32.

about how easy or successful Parliament will have a vote

:50:33.:50:35.

on the final deal but already If all her optimism of a deal

:50:36.:50:40.

with the European Union didn't work, we would move into a low

:50:41.:50:48.

tax corporate taxation, I'm not prepared for Scotland to be

:50:49.:50:51.

taken down a path that I firmly Now businesses are very worried that

:50:52.:51:00.

getting that deal in principle within two years is pretty

:51:01.:51:06.

unrealistic and that what we might do then is fall off a cliff

:51:07.:51:09.

of regulatory and trade no man's land and people have warned that

:51:10.:51:13.

would be very damaging. This is one day, 24 hours,

:51:14.:51:17.

in what is going to be a long, complicated, fraught

:51:18.:51:21.

and difficult process. And there are people,

:51:22.:51:22.

here in Westminster still, and more importantly, perhaps,

:51:23.:51:25.

on the other side of the negotiating table, those 27 countries,

:51:26.:51:28.

who believe what she's asking Several viewers got in touch with us

:51:29.:51:30.

to complain of what they saw as a lack of balance

:51:31.:51:39.

in the coverage. Elizabeth Miller asked: Does

:51:40.:51:41.

the BBC never get tired Who was the first person to be

:51:42.:51:44.

inviewed at the end of the speech? He is in total denial

:51:45.:52:00.

about the decision to leave the EU and there is no way he is ever

:52:01.:52:04.

likely to be objective The trend has continued

:52:05.:52:08.

with all sorts of experts being wheeled out to say a disaster

:52:09.:52:11.

is about to happen and reports Give negotiations a chance

:52:12.:52:14.

and provide even handed coverage, And other viewers echoed that such

:52:15.:52:18.

as Arthur Smith who e-mailed: Once again the pro-EU BBC managed

:52:19.:52:21.

to put its end is nigh spin You would have thought that

:52:22.:52:24.

Armegeddon was upon us. We had analysis from various

:52:25.:52:28.

reporters all stressing what they regard as the negatives

:52:29.:52:30.

of leaving the EU as if we are As always, very little mention

:52:31.:52:34.

of the positives which lie Well let's talk about this

:52:35.:52:38.

to Katie Serle who, is our editor of BBC political news and she joins

:52:39.:52:42.

from us our Westminster studio. Katie, let's start with

:52:43.:52:46.

the complaints as to who is Many viewers as you heard

:52:47.:52:48.

there saying, too many voices giving initial reaction to May's speech,

:52:49.:52:52.

are hostile to Brexit, and the BBC is rehashing

:52:53.:52:54.

the whole debate that we had I think the job aa journalists,

:52:55.:52:58.

and it is true across other media or indeed the newspapers,

:52:59.:53:02.

is to question and ask for answers that we don't have and we,

:53:03.:53:05.

the country voted for Brexit, but it's really left many,

:53:06.:53:08.

many questions unanswered. Actually, on Tuesday,

:53:09.:53:10.

when the Prime Minister gave her speech, we gave a great

:53:11.:53:12.

deal of coverage to the speech itself, which set out the arguments

:53:13.:53:16.

and the plans for Brexit from the Government but it did leave

:53:17.:53:18.

many, many questions unanswered and you heard there from

:53:19.:53:21.

Jeremy Corbyn and Nicola Sturgeon, with their own questions,

:53:22.:53:24.

so we're not just asking the questions, just from the BBC's

:53:25.:53:27.

point of view, although we would do that as journalists,

:53:28.:53:30.

we are putting the concerns of the other main politicians

:53:31.:53:32.

in this country, to try to get some answers and the answers

:53:33.:53:36.

that we don't have. Part of that concern, though,

:53:37.:53:49.

is about the language Is there too much hypothetical

:53:50.:53:52.

worry, rather than straight reporting of what the

:53:53.:53:57.

Prime Minister said? We did a piece that granted

:53:58.:54:07.

about 5.5 minutes for the main Six and Ten O'Clock News

:54:08.:54:10.

for the main programmes, and actually that's a very long

:54:11.:54:12.

piece for news at that point. We did that specifically

:54:13.:54:16.

because we wanted to give the people, the audience, the chance

:54:17.:54:18.

to hear the Prime Minister's case on what was a defining speech

:54:19.:54:21.

from the Government. So I think we did give

:54:22.:54:24.

air time to that. But as I say, there is then

:54:25.:54:26.

the opportunity to say, well hang on a minute,

:54:27.:54:29.

we're trying to do the job for the audience, which is to raise

:54:30.:54:33.

questions they may have in their mind and answer questions

:54:34.:54:35.

that they may think - well, she didn't really explain that

:54:36.:54:39.

- and what does that mean, So it's very much our job

:54:40.:54:42.

as journalists to try to do that To try and get to the answers

:54:43.:54:47.

and try and give some clarity, where there is perhaps an uncoming

:54:48.:54:53.

from the Government. It sounds from some of the viewers'

:54:54.:55:02.

complaints we are getting there, the BBC might say, look,

:55:03.:55:05.

we're dealing with where there are concerns, questions,

:55:06.:55:08.

in a sense you are looking for the drama but perhaps,

:55:09.:55:11.

the BBC News should slightly rethink the tone in which it covers these

:55:12.:55:14.

things and the assumptions made? Certainly, I would agree that tone

:55:15.:55:20.

is absolutely vital and that's true And you know, we think

:55:21.:55:23.

carefully about this. I think we look at our

:55:24.:55:27.

scripts over again. We think about the

:55:28.:55:30.

words that we use. I'd be very careful

:55:31.:55:32.

if we were adopting a tone that was reflected one

:55:33.:55:34.

side or the other. I think, you know, the BBC continues

:55:35.:55:37.

to be committed to impartiality and that's true of the Brexit debate

:55:38.:55:40.

as it is on any other subject. Is it as simple as the BBC more

:55:41.:55:45.

often leaving to caveat, more that we just don't know

:55:46.:55:48.

what a lot of this is going to mean? I think that's absolutely

:55:49.:55:54.

true and we do that. One of the things we've set up

:55:55.:55:57.

in the last couple of years Which is there to try and get

:55:58.:56:00.

to the bottom of those unanswered questions and to try to provide

:56:01.:56:05.

the audience with some clarity Actually, very often,

:56:06.:56:08.

the answer will come, well, there is this evidence

:56:09.:56:12.

and that evidence but in truth, Do you think there might actually be

:56:13.:56:15.

more good news about Brexit out I think we should

:56:16.:56:25.

absolutely do that. We will try and make every effort

:56:26.:56:32.

as the negotiations go on to ask the question, is that a good thing,

:56:33.:56:35.

is that a bad thing. Again, it's part of our job

:56:36.:56:39.

to present every side of that. I would agree that we will be

:56:40.:56:42.

looking for that opportunity as much as highlighting any concerns

:56:43.:56:45.

or problems with it. Finally, Newswatch is only one

:56:46.:56:49.

vehicle that audiences use to voice their objections,

:56:50.:56:53.

and occasionally compliments Complaints can go through a more

:56:54.:56:55.

formal procedure, ending up with a finding by the BBC Trust,

:56:56.:57:07.

that's what happened after this was broadcast in November 2015,

:57:08.:57:10.

following the terror Earlier today, I asked the Labour

:57:11.:57:12.

leader, Jeremy Corbyn, if he were the resident

:57:13.:57:16.

here at Number Ten, whether or not he would be happy for British

:57:17.:57:20.

officers to pull the trigger in the event of

:57:21.:57:22.

a Paris style attack. I'm not happy with a shoot

:57:23.:57:30.

to kill policy in general. I think that is quite

:57:31.:57:33.

dangerous and I think it can I think you have to have security

:57:34.:57:36.

that prevents people firing off There are various degrees

:57:37.:57:49.

of doing things, as we know. But the idea you end up with a war

:57:50.:57:53.

on the streets is not a good thing. But Jeremy Corbyn had in fact been

:57:54.:57:57.

responding there to a question from Laura Kuenssberg

:57:58.:58:01.

about whether he would be happy to order police or military to shoot

:58:02.:58:03.

to kill on Britain's streets, and not specifically

:58:04.:58:06.

regarding a Paris style attack The BBC Trust this week found

:58:07.:58:08.

that the report inaccurately represented the Labour leader's

:58:09.:58:12.

views, breaching the BBC's impartiality and

:58:13.:58:14.

accuracy guidelines. But BBC News rejected that,

:58:15.:58:15.

saying: Mr Corbyn's remarks were not taken out of context,

:58:16.:58:18.

that he fully understood the nature of the questions asked,

:58:19.:58:21.

and were reported accurately John Blair from St Andrew's objected

:58:22.:58:23.

to what he saw as insufficient coverage of the finding on the BBC

:58:24.:58:35.

itself, writing: Incidents of this nature cause irreparable harm

:58:36.:58:38.

to the trust we public place in the professed impartiality

:58:39.:58:40.

of the BBC and attempted to cover up in transgressions, makes

:58:41.:58:44.

for even greater distrust. And Hugh Moony had this response: It

:58:45.:58:46.

seems that the BBC is only worried about fake news it

:58:47.:58:50.

does not agree with. Your own staff managed

:58:51.:58:52.

to keep their jobs, even when they are caught

:58:53.:58:54.

lying to the nation. Thank you for all your

:58:55.:58:56.

comments this week. You too can share your opinions

:58:57.:59:00.

on BBC News and current affairs TV and online, or even

:59:01.:59:03.

appear on the programme. Please call us on: 0370 010 6676

:59:04.:59:10.

or email: [email protected] and you can find us on Twitter

:59:11.:59:13.

at @Newswatchbbc, and do have a look at previous discussions

:59:14.:59:17.

on our website, BBC.co.uk/Newswatch. We'll be back to hear your thoughts

:59:18.:59:19.

about BBC News coverage This is Breakfast, with

:59:20.:59:23.

Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern. The first full day in office

:59:24.:00:03.

for the new president of the United Sates,

:00:04.:00:06.

as Donald Trump pledges to fulfill his campaign promises

:00:07.:00:08.

He's already signed his first orders as President, including changes

:00:09.:00:10.

to Barack Obama's healthcare act, We want to make America great again,

:00:11.:00:12.

and we will. Inauguration day ended

:00:13.:00:25.

with a series of balls, before the President and First Lady

:00:26.:00:27.

returned to the White House to spend on President Trump's inauguration,

:00:28.:00:31.

and what's in store for his Four more survivors have been

:00:32.:00:57.

pulled out of the debris of an Italian hotel,

:00:58.:01:01.

almost 72 hours after it was Leaders of Europe's right wing

:01:02.:01:04.

parties gather in Germany to discuss their opposition

:01:05.:01:09.

to the European Union. Thousands of protestors

:01:10.:01:11.

are expected to demonstrate. In sport, Konta keeps

:01:12.:01:16.

the Brits on top Down Under. Johanna Konta makes it eight wins

:01:17.:01:20.

in a row as she breezes into the 4th round of the Australian Open

:01:21.:01:24.

by knocking out a former world And in from the cold: I've been

:01:25.:01:26.

training with the British long-track speed skating team,

:01:27.:01:36.

whose sport has been The weekend is getting off to a

:01:37.:01:49.

frosty start. Patchy fog around too. Most places will see the sunshine

:01:50.:01:52.

today, with a dry day ahead. All your weather in half an hour.

:01:53.:01:56.

First, our main story: President Donald Trump, has wasted

:01:57.:02:01.

Shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge

:02:02.:02:05.

signed an executive order to begin dismantling Barack Obama's

:02:06.:02:08.

Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare.

:02:09.:02:10.

In his first speech as leader, Mr Trump promised to take power

:02:11.:02:15.

from the establishment in Washington and give it back to the people.

:02:16.:02:19.

Last night the President and First Lady attended a number

:02:20.:02:21.

of traditional balls held to thank his supporters.

:02:22.:02:23.

Our Washington reporter, Laura Bicker, has more.

:02:24.:02:32.

Grip and now, the president and first Lady of the United States will

:02:33.:02:43.

take their first dance. And never has a song be more appropriate for a

:02:44.:02:48.

president. Donald Trump got here by doing things very differently, a

:02:49.:02:53.

trait he shows no sign of losing as commander-in-chief.

:02:54.:03:00.

# I did it my way... #. Should I keep the Twitter going or

:03:01.:03:06.

not? Keep it going? I think so. He beamed as he arrived at Galas across

:03:07.:03:12.

Washington, clasping the hand of his wife and first Lady. In your balls

:03:13.:03:21.

are part of the choreography of this historic day. Well, we did it. We

:03:22.:03:30.

began this journey, and they said we, we, and me, we didn't have a

:03:31.:03:36.

chance, but we knew we were going to win. And we won. As he shuffled

:03:37.:03:46.

around the floor, word spread that he had already made his first

:03:47.:03:49.

executive move, an action that will help repeal or Balmercare, his

:03:50.:03:54.

predecessor's signature health care law. -- Obamacare. Meanwhile,

:03:55.:04:07.

protests broke out from coast-to-coast. People were arrested

:04:08.:04:15.

after a small handful of anti-Trump rallies turned violent. In Chicago,

:04:16.:04:18.

hundreds peacefully voiced their concerns at Donald Trump's agenda,

:04:19.:04:24.

and in Seattle, they marched through the streets. Further demonstrations

:04:25.:04:29.

are planned over the weekend. But the new president will shrug off

:04:30.:04:32.

this criticism, just as he did during the campaign. Surrounded by

:04:33.:04:37.

family and friends, he is taking a moment to enjoy this particular

:04:38.:04:41.

piece of pageantry before the real work begins.

:04:42.:04:53.

And we can speak to Laura now. Good morning to you. In terms of the

:04:54.:05:00.

Donald Trump message in his inauguration speech and later in the

:05:01.:05:04.

evening at those balls, it was uncompromising, wasn't it? This is

:05:05.:05:08.

Donald Trump being Donald Trump. He was uncompromising as a candidate,

:05:09.:05:13.

controversial as some may have found, and he will be uncompromising

:05:14.:05:17.

as a president. That was his message, both as he addressed the

:05:18.:05:20.

crowd that the maul, and that the ball last night. -- at the mall.

:05:21.:05:30.

Although perhaps many have urged him to be more presidential, Donald

:05:31.:05:38.

Trump has said, this is me and this is who I will be in the next four

:05:39.:05:42.

years, and that included hitting the White House reset button. Never has

:05:43.:05:46.

there been such a contrast between an incoming and an outgoing

:05:47.:05:50.

president, and his policies will vary wildly from Barack Obama's.

:05:51.:05:53.

Laura, thank you. Reacting to President

:05:54.:05:58.

Trump's inaugural speech to put America 'first',

:05:59.:05:59.

the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson told the BBC he remains positive

:06:00.:06:02.

about the prospect of a new trade The new president has made it very

:06:03.:06:09.

clear that he wants to put Britain at the front of the line for a new

:06:10.:06:14.

trade deal most obvious, that's extremely exciting and important.

:06:15.:06:18.

And he is very keen to get it done as fast as possible, and optimistic

:06:19.:06:23.

that it can be done soon. He said within a short period after the exit

:06:24.:06:29.

from the EU, and that's great, but it's got to work in the UK as well.

:06:30.:06:32.

Every reason to be positive and optimistic.

:06:33.:06:36.

Protest marches to demand women's rights will take place in more

:06:37.:06:38.

than 30 countries to mark Donald Trump's first day in office.

:06:39.:06:41.

This one in Sydney, Australia, is already underway and hundreds

:06:42.:06:44.

more are due to take place around the world, including

:06:45.:06:46.

Around 200,000 people are also expected to attend a march

:06:47.:06:49.

Italian firefighters say four more survivors have been pulled out

:06:50.:06:56.

of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on Wednesday.

:06:57.:07:00.

Four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday.

:07:01.:07:04.

Attempts are continuing to rescue more survivors,

:07:05.:07:07.

but it's thought at least 15 people remain unaccounted for.

:07:08.:07:09.

As darkness fell on the third night since the avalanche, a six-year-old

:07:10.:07:18.

girl was pulled from the rubble, cold but apparently well.

:07:19.:07:22.

Soon after came another child, a boy, one of four

:07:23.:07:25.

children who have so far been rescued from the rubble of the

:07:26.:07:27.

They are said to have survived in a kitchen, protected by

:07:28.:07:32.

concrete walls that also silenced their cries for help.

:07:33.:07:36.

After these images were filmed, another four

:07:37.:07:38.

adults - two women and two men - were also rescued.

:07:39.:07:42.

The survivors found yesterday were flown to

:07:43.:07:44.

They were said to be cold and dehydrated,

:07:45.:07:50.

For some relatives who had endured a long wait for news,

:07:51.:07:58.

TRANSLATION: Can't you see it from my face?

:07:59.:08:03.

It's great, I can't describe it in words.

:08:04.:08:09.

For now, the boy is safe, and I hope his

:08:10.:08:12.

parents have managed to survive as well.

:08:13.:08:14.

But for other relatives, the anxious wait goes on.

:08:15.:08:17.

Four bodies have been recovered so far.

:08:18.:08:20.

night and day until everyone is accounted for.

:08:21.:08:29.

A Hungarian coach has crashed in northern Italy

:08:30.:08:37.

The coach was on its way back from a mountain resort in France

:08:38.:08:42.

when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city of

:08:43.:08:45.

According to reports, the coach was carrying a large

:08:46.:08:50.

no other vehicles were involved in the incident.

:08:51.:09:00.

The leaders of some of Europe's right-wing populist parties

:09:01.:09:02.

will gather in the German city of Koblenz today to discuss

:09:03.:09:05.

their shared opposition to the European Union.

:09:06.:09:06.

The leader of the French National Front, Marine Le Pen,

:09:07.:09:09.

Our Berlin Correspondent Jenny Hill is in Koblenz for us this morning.

:09:10.:09:15.

Jenny, what are they trying to achieve at this meeting?

:09:16.:09:26.

Good morning. I think today is all about trying to achieve a public

:09:27.:09:33.

display of unity in what is the beginning of an election year for so

:09:34.:09:37.

many other leaders these parties. Marine Le Pen is expected to be

:09:38.:09:42.

here. She is enjoying significant support in her bid to become the

:09:43.:09:54.

next French president. Geert Wilders's Freedom party is polling

:09:55.:10:00.

well ahead of elections in Holland. They share anti-immigrant rhetoric

:10:01.:10:10.

with a German far right party. A public show of strength together.

:10:11.:10:14.

They have all been emboldened by Donald Trump's victory in the

:10:15.:10:16.

States, but they are causing a lot of concern, not just among the

:10:17.:10:23.

political establishment here. There will be thousands of protesters here

:10:24.:10:31.

today. They have banned the German mainstream media from attending,

:10:32.:10:34.

which is causing concern. Make no mistake - the leaders here are going

:10:35.:10:39.

out to target parts of the electorate who have been unnerved by

:10:40.:10:42.

the migrant crisis and who feel let down by the political establishment.

:10:43.:11:05.

He is accused of drug trafficking, kidnapping and conspiracy to murder.

:11:06.:11:17.

Let's get back to our top story, and it's the first full day

:11:18.:11:21.

Our correspondent Laura Bicker is in in Washington.

:11:22.:11:26.

We assembled here today are issuing a new decree to be heard in every

:11:27.:11:32.

city, every foreign capital, and in every hole of power. From this day

:11:33.:11:38.

forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward,

:11:39.:11:48.

it's going to be only America first. America first.

:11:49.:11:56.

Stephen Hurst is a reader in politics and US foreign policy

:11:57.:11:59.

from Manchester Metropolitan University.

:12:00.:12:00.

America was the keyword that was said so often - what does this mean

:12:01.:12:12.

now for following policy, do you think? -- foreign policy? It's not a

:12:13.:12:18.

unique, brand-new message, this notion of America first. The phrases

:12:19.:12:23.

from the 1920s, Charles Lindbergh used it on the American right, this

:12:24.:12:31.

tradition of seeing cooperation and multilateralism as something that

:12:32.:12:39.

restrains the United States. It is not new. But it is something which

:12:40.:12:45.

has not dominated American foreign policy since the end of the Second

:12:46.:12:50.

World War. Most American presidents since then have accepted that

:12:51.:12:54.

America needs to work with other nations. George Bush is part of the

:12:55.:12:59.

exception here. This is, to some extent, I'm trodden ground, and the

:13:00.:13:03.

implications are uncertain and it is not clear how it will go. It is

:13:04.:13:07.

reason for concern, I think, for lots of America's allies. Lots of

:13:08.:13:16.

people are saying that this was not a conciliatory speech, not one

:13:17.:13:22.

drawing people together. He was very much preaching to the converted, but

:13:23.:13:28.

with the overview saying, if you are being patriotic, everything is OK.

:13:29.:13:36.

Yes, I mean, it was... Surprising and unsurprising. Unsurprising in

:13:37.:13:40.

the sense that it was entirely of a piece with everything he said in the

:13:41.:13:47.

campaign, surprising in the sense that at an inaugural address it is a

:13:48.:13:52.

time when you try to heal the wounds of the campaign, and he did the

:13:53.:13:55.

opposite. He said the same things he had said throughout the campaign,

:13:56.:14:01.

and actually, making those divisions deeper rather than trying to heal

:14:02.:14:05.

them, which was a strange thing to do. He dammed everybody in

:14:06.:14:11.

Washington for what they have done so far, people he will have to work

:14:12.:14:15.

with. The Republican party people were in there as those people who

:14:16.:14:19.

have done nothing for everybody after the last -- over the past

:14:20.:14:27.

however many years. He has abused the establishment from the most

:14:28.:14:32.

prominent position he could. And the messages are all about giving it

:14:33.:14:35.

back to the people, which is what he said throughout his campaign. What

:14:36.:14:38.

do you think are the areas of concern? You talked about foreign

:14:39.:14:47.

policy. From our point of view, if you are a European, the Nato issue

:14:48.:14:53.

is the thing. I don't think the United States will leave Nato. It is

:14:54.:14:59.

very unlikely. The question is whether Nato has become in some

:15:00.:15:04.

sense a dead letter, if Trump is not committed to it and doesn't see the

:15:05.:15:07.

Europeans as playing their part. What message does that send to

:15:08.:15:13.

Vladimir Putin and eastern Europe? If I lived in a Baltic state right

:15:14.:15:17.

now, I would be very worried. Vladimir Putin has an agenda clearly

:15:18.:15:23.

of weakening the European Union. Nato is a key part of the tearing

:15:24.:15:30.

him from adventurism. That is a big problem, not in the sense that it

:15:31.:15:34.

necessarily means war or anything that dramatic, but if it encourages

:15:35.:15:37.

Putin to do things that are reckless because he thinks he can get away

:15:38.:15:40.

with them, that is a dangerous situation to be in. Thank you very

:15:41.:15:46.

much for your time this morning. Steven Hirst is from Manchester

:15:47.:15:48.

Metropolitan University. You're watching

:15:49.:15:51.

Breakfast from BBC News. Frosty rooftops in Lancaster this

:15:52.:16:11.

morning. If you like your Saturday crisp cold and sunny, this is the

:16:12.:16:21.

day for you. We are as low as minus eight Celsius in Hampshire. A hard

:16:22.:16:29.

frost for some. There are some fog patches around this morning. If you

:16:30.:16:36.

are travelling first thing, bear that in mind, it might slow you down

:16:37.:16:41.

a bit. It's a few hours before some of that will clear. Cornwall and

:16:42.:16:50.

Devon are not quite as cold as other areas this morning. Norfolk is also

:16:51.:16:58.

a few degrees above freezing. A sunny day for Northern Ireland and

:16:59.:17:02.

Scotland. More of us getting the blue sky compared with recent days.

:17:03.:17:06.

A crisp start. Well above freezing in the northern and western isles. A

:17:07.:17:15.

bit more clout pushing into more of south-west England this afternoon,

:17:16.:17:17.

into Northern Ireland, and this area of cloud from the North Sea will

:17:18.:17:22.

expand across northern England and the Midlands, and into Norfolk as

:17:23.:17:26.

well. You may see some drizzle from that, especially close to the coast.

:17:27.:17:37.

Temperatures are 3-6dC. Tonight, not as much frost. There is more cloud

:17:38.:17:45.

around. Some light rain in northern England, moving into Scotland. A

:17:46.:17:49.

Riske patchy fog into tomorrow morning. Sunday, more clout compared

:17:50.:17:56.

with the day. The best of the sunshine likely to be through the

:17:57.:18:00.

Midlands, southern England, East Anglia and into the south-east.

:18:01.:18:04.

Cloudy in parts of south-west England and Wales, delivering a few

:18:05.:18:08.

showers. Patchy rain in northern England and Scotland. Cold enough to

:18:09.:18:15.

see a few wintry flurries on hills. Temperatures will be in single

:18:16.:18:18.

figures, as they will be into the start of next week. It is a crisp

:18:19.:18:27.

and sunny one this weekend. Is it a good time to be out with a

:18:28.:18:32.

metal detector? Well, you won't get rained on.

:18:33.:18:42.

One of the world's largest hoards of Celtic treasure has been removed

:18:43.:18:45.

from a site in Jersey, bringing to an end

:18:46.:18:47.

a 30-year obsession for two metal detectorists.

:18:48.:18:49.

The 70,000 thousand coins are worth millions of pounds,

:18:50.:18:51.

as our correspondent Robert Hall has been finding out.

:18:52.:19:03.

A good story needs the right ingredients. This one has a legend

:19:04.:19:11.

of buried treasure and two lifelong friends who never gave up the

:19:12.:19:15.

search. I can still remember the first time we went to the field. I

:19:16.:19:19.

was probably in my early 20s, I suppose, late teens, early 20s. We

:19:20.:19:24.

expected to find these coins instantly, but of course, it didn't

:19:25.:19:31.

happen like that. It's a strange feeling, because there was something

:19:32.:19:34.

there that drew us to it. Every time we drove by, we would stop and say,

:19:35.:19:40.

the field is empty, and we would go and give it another try. The

:19:41.:19:44.

treasure they were searching for had come to Jersey with Celtic tribesmen

:19:45.:19:48.

well over 2000 years ago. Their quoins kept turning up, convincing

:19:49.:19:54.

Reg and Richard there was an even larger horde to be found here. In

:19:55.:19:59.

2012, someone was up in the top of the field and shouted, got one, or

:20:00.:20:04.

words to that effect, and that's where the story really took off.

:20:05.:20:08.

Dredge got down there with the shovel and scooped out some more. On

:20:09.:20:12.

the end of it was five quoins, so I shouted out, Reg! Reg, Richard and

:20:13.:20:23.

excited archaeologists had no idea what the 30 year search had actually

:20:24.:20:27.

uncovered. Everyone thought it would be a pot of quoins, so I had a sheet

:20:28.:20:33.

of plywood to put it on and a bandaged up a brand it, and we

:20:34.:20:35.

thought we would be out in the first day. No one had ever actually got

:20:36.:20:42.

something like this out of the ground safely in one piece before.

:20:43.:20:49.

In this story, there were secrets within secrets. The horde's 70,000

:20:50.:20:53.

coins enfolded even more precious treasures. We have a lot of these

:20:54.:21:04.

gold items which would have been worn by very important people in

:21:05.:21:08.

these Celtic tribes. They are made into halves, so they would click

:21:09.:21:15.

apart and go back together. Week after week, month after month, more

:21:16.:21:19.

treasures have emerged. After three years of work, the final coin has

:21:20.:21:26.

now been removed. Dismantling the horde has left many mysteries

:21:27.:21:29.

unsolved. How did it come to be here? Was it buried as a tribute to

:21:30.:21:34.

gods or hidden from enemies? And does the large number of objects in

:21:35.:21:39.

a small area indicate a hidden settlement? This story isn't over

:21:40.:21:43.

yet. Never so much study to do with the horde itself and what we can

:21:44.:21:48.

learn about events and times 2000 years ago, but in a broader context,

:21:49.:21:52.

what else is beneath the ground? It's as if horde found us. We didn't

:21:53.:21:59.

find the horde. Maybe there is a reason for it in the future.

:22:00.:22:06.

That is dedication. 30 years and then you get a find like that.

:22:07.:22:10.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:22:11.:22:12.

Time now for a look at the newspapers.

:22:13.:22:16.

Professor Cary Cooper from the University of Manchester

:22:17.:22:20.

is here to tell us what's caught his eye.

:22:21.:22:27.

First, let's look at the front pages.

:22:28.:22:36.

The 45th president of the United States. The Independent has slightly

:22:37.:23:04.

more casual shots just after the inauguration itself. The Daily Mail

:23:05.:23:10.

have taken that image, hand on the Bible in one hand in the air, taking

:23:11.:23:16.

the pledge. Saying, I swear to be the people's

:23:17.:23:22.

president. The Daily Express as this image of Trump, reflecting the idea

:23:23.:23:25.

of bringing power back to the people. Carey, where shall we start?

:23:26.:23:34.

America first is a controversial expression. Charles Lindbergh use

:23:35.:23:36.

that expression to try to prevent the United States entering the

:23:37.:23:43.

Second World War. It has anti-Semitic overtones for quite a

:23:44.:23:46.

lot of the Jewish community, so it is an interesting thing to say. He

:23:47.:23:55.

did mention God a lot. The first thing I am starting on is just what

:23:56.:23:58.

I thought about the whole event, really. I am using here the Daily

:23:59.:24:06.

Mail, where it talks about how everybody thinks he is going to be

:24:07.:24:11.

conciliatory. The country is going to come together - what did he do?

:24:12.:24:17.

He did a Donald Trump. I don't think people understand this man. He is a

:24:18.:24:24.

conviction person, I was going to say politician. He behaved the way

:24:25.:24:28.

he did during the campaign. More important than that, I thought, he

:24:29.:24:38.

actually got at the elite. He said, you guys talk a good game. I'm

:24:39.:24:43.

surprised the cameras didn't go on to Obama, because that is who he was

:24:44.:24:48.

talking about. You have all the former presidents, Barack Obama just

:24:49.:24:52.

a few feet away, and it was fascinating. There was one moment

:24:53.:24:56.

where the camera went to Barack Obama during the speech, and he was

:24:57.:25:03.

giving nothing away. Although Michelle Obama did. During the whole

:25:04.:25:09.

ceremony, I thought, she gave it away. Barack Obama and Hillary

:25:10.:25:18.

Clinton did not react to him very positively, as you might expect.

:25:19.:25:21.

People will be thinking, none of that matters now. That bit is over.

:25:22.:25:28.

Absolutely. In a way, I like what he did because he was true to who he

:25:29.:25:34.

is. He didn't say, yeah, we will all come together under my leadership.

:25:35.:25:38.

He just went and higher ranked all the people, all the institutions and

:25:39.:25:41.

all the things he was going to do. Of course, within two hours, he is

:25:42.:25:49.

starting to enact executive orders. The president doesn't have that much

:25:50.:25:52.

power, I don't think people understand. He can do executive

:25:53.:25:56.

orders, like building the wall, but he can't do it unless he gets money

:25:57.:26:02.

to do it. I Obamacare he can get that. He does have more power than a

:26:03.:26:12.

few of the previous presidents, because he has Congress and the

:26:13.:26:16.

Senate behind him. Remember, they will go with his domestic policy.

:26:17.:26:25.

Things like Obamacare. Illustrated on this chart. It is really great,

:26:26.:26:29.

because it picks out the words that Obama used during his inauguration

:26:30.:26:36.

and the words that Trump use. 33 times he uses America and Americans.

:26:37.:26:42.

Obama only mentioned it eight times in his speech. What I found

:26:43.:26:47.

interesting about this was that Obama used the word piece and the

:26:48.:27:00.

word world. He used -- Trump used the word dreams, wealth, bringing

:27:01.:27:06.

people together, the words together he used a lot. He used the word

:27:07.:27:13.

heart a lot. He also used the word carnage, which you wouldn't expect.

:27:14.:27:20.

Yes. You have been in California in recent weeks. A lot of people are

:27:21.:27:23.

interested now in how this plays out in terms of those who are for and

:27:24.:27:30.

that those who are against. How has that played out in your family? We

:27:31.:27:37.

had a family do, and I come from a working-class background, so I am

:27:38.:27:40.

the first person in my family to go to university. There have been a few

:27:41.:27:43.

more who have gone to university, so the family is divided between

:27:44.:27:50.

working-class and professionals. We had this afternoon together, and my

:27:51.:27:58.

family has normally been Democratic. Almost everybody. Not this time. We

:27:59.:28:03.

had about 60% of them who went for Trump, and about 40% went for

:28:04.:28:12.

Clinton. Why? Because they said BA leak caused the crash and the

:28:13.:28:15.

depression, and we lost jobs and had a lot of problems. -- they said the

:28:16.:28:28.

elite caused the crash. The interesting part is that lots of

:28:29.:28:33.

them said they didn't like Clinton, that she feathers her own nest, that

:28:34.:28:37.

she is part of the a leak. They didn't vote for Trump, but they

:28:38.:28:44.

wouldn't go for Clinton. We are where we are, it's one of those

:28:45.:28:47.

phrases. We will talk more about that in an hour. Great. Good to see

:28:48.:28:52.

you. The headlines are coming up. Hello, this is Breakfast, with

:28:53.:29:27.

Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern. Coming up before nine,

:29:28.:29:30.

Nick will have the weather. But first, a summary of this

:29:31.:29:34.

morning's main news. President Donald Trump has wasted no

:29:35.:29:38.

time in getting to work. Shortly after his inauguration

:29:39.:29:41.

parade ended, the new man in charge signed an executive order to begin

:29:42.:29:45.

dismantling Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act,

:29:46.:29:49.

known as Obamacare. And now the President and First Lady

:29:50.:30:01.

of the United States will take their first dance.

:30:02.:30:05.

# And now the end is near... The President and First Lady

:30:06.:30:08.

also attended a number of traditional balls held

:30:09.:30:11.

to celebrate the inauguration. They danced to My Way just hours

:30:12.:30:13.

after thousands gathered to see him take the oath of office

:30:14.:30:16.

and hear his inaugural address. People that weren't so nice to me

:30:17.:30:29.

were saying that we did a really good job today. They hated to do it,

:30:30.:30:38.

but they did it, and I respect that. You're going to see things happen

:30:39.:30:44.

over the next few weeks - oh, you're going to be so happy. Because there

:30:45.:30:51.

are very elegant people tonight, but there are also very political

:30:52.:30:55.

people, right? We want to see great things happen for our country. We

:30:56.:31:03.

want to make America great again, and we will. And we will.

:31:04.:31:08.

Reacting to President Trump's inaugural speech

:31:09.:31:09.

to put America "first", The Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson

:31:10.:31:11.

told the BBC he remains positive about the prospect of a new trade

:31:12.:31:15.

The new president has made it clear that he wants to put Britain at the

:31:16.:31:26.

front of the line for a new trade deal. Obviously, that is extremely

:31:27.:31:30.

exciting and important. And he is keen to get it done as fast as

:31:31.:31:34.

possible and is optimistic that it can be done soon. He has said within

:31:35.:31:40.

a short period after the exit from the EU, and that is great. It has

:31:41.:31:45.

got to work for the UK as well, but there is every reason to be

:31:46.:31:46.

positive. Italian firefighters say four more

:31:47.:31:47.

survivors have been pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped

:31:48.:31:50.

by an avalanche on Wednesday. Four children were among those

:31:51.:31:54.

pulled from the remains yesterday. Attempts are continuing to rescue

:31:55.:31:56.

two more known survivors, but at least 15 people

:31:57.:32:00.

remain unaccounted for. A Hungarian coach has

:32:01.:32:06.

crashed in northern Italy, The coach was on its way back

:32:07.:32:09.

from a mountain resort in France when it hit a pylon at a motorway

:32:10.:32:13.

exit near the city of According to reports,

:32:14.:32:16.

the coach was carrying a large The leaders of some of Europe's

:32:17.:32:20.

right-wing populist parties will gather in the German city

:32:21.:32:26.

of Koblenz today to discuss their shared opposition

:32:27.:32:29.

to the European Union. The leader of the French National

:32:30.:32:31.

Front, Marine Le Pen, and the Dutch politician

:32:32.:32:34.

Geert Wilders are among Thousands of protestors are expected

:32:35.:32:38.

to demonstrate outside the event. The Brazilian football club,

:32:39.:32:44.

Chapecoense, will play its first match tonight after nearly

:32:45.:32:48.

all of its players were The club has made 20

:32:49.:32:51.

new signings since the disaster, The friendly against current

:32:52.:32:57.

champions Palmeiras will raise money Those are the main

:32:58.:33:01.

stories this morning. Mike is with us with the sport. This

:33:02.:33:14.

is going to be a tough game. Uncharted territory for everybody.

:33:15.:33:18.

20 new players will be on the pitch, three of the survivors watching on

:33:19.:33:21.

after that tragedy, which has changed the club for everybody,

:33:22.:33:24.

because they used to be an underdog. Now they have the spotlight of the

:33:25.:33:29.

world on them. And it is hard to see past this. It was a moment when the

:33:30.:33:35.

football world came together in support. It touched the hearts of

:33:36.:33:40.

everybody. Let's take a look at that picture. That is someone who is on

:33:41.:33:46.

fire right now. Talk about momentum in sport being important. Andy

:33:47.:33:51.

Murray became world number one last year. Johanna Konta has now won

:33:52.:33:54.

eight matches on the trot, and who is to say she can't go all the way

:33:55.:33:58.

at the Australian Open? She got to the semifinals last year. I don't

:33:59.:34:01.

think she could fear anyone, given the way she dispatched Caroline

:34:02.:34:04.

Wozniacki earlier today. Johanna Konta has breezed

:34:05.:34:06.

into the fourth round of She's just beaten former world

:34:07.:34:09.

number one Caroline Wozniacki in straight sets in an hour

:34:10.:34:12.

and fifteen minutes. Konta's been in fantastic form this

:34:13.:34:14.

year, winning a title in Sydney in the build up to the big

:34:15.:34:18.

Grand Slam in Melbourne, and Wozniacki simply had no answer

:34:19.:34:21.

to Britain's number one. Wozniacki, who's seeded

:34:22.:34:25.

17, only managed to win four games, as Konta cruised

:34:26.:34:28.

to an eighth straight victory. She'll now play Ekaterina Makarova,

:34:29.:34:31.

in the fourth round. I'm very happy with the level I was

:34:32.:34:41.

able to maintain throughout that much. From the get go, I knew she

:34:42.:34:47.

was not going to give it to me. Caroline is the kind of player that

:34:48.:34:49.

will make her opponents really earn any point they win against her. I

:34:50.:34:56.

knew that, and I felt I committed to the way I wanted to play and had

:34:57.:35:02.

trust in that, even if it wasn't going to work sometimes, it was

:35:03.:35:05.

going to bring the opportunities. And I am happy that it did that

:35:06.:35:07.

today. And you can see how Konta

:35:08.:35:08.

won her match on a highlights programme at 3 o'clock

:35:09.:35:11.

on BBC Two this afternoon. Before that on your telebox,

:35:12.:35:13.

on BBC One Dan Walker will be popping up with his Football Focus

:35:14.:35:16.

power hour...and a chance today for Liverpool and Spurs to step up

:35:17.:35:18.

the pressure on Chelsea. You don't want to miss the Football

:35:19.:35:23.

Focus power hour. We have got loads on today. Interesting that you talk

:35:24.:35:27.

about Chapecoense, because that is the football story of the weekend

:35:28.:35:31.

for me. Azpilicueta from Chelsea has been one of their best players. He

:35:32.:35:35.

will be talking about them being the league. They play Hull this weekend.

:35:36.:35:47.

George from Boro will be on. He is a secret ukelele player. He mentions

:35:48.:35:52.

it in the interview. He talks about how ah I try to establish themselves

:35:53.:35:57.

as a Premier League side. So it is a real insight into them and the

:35:58.:35:59.

season they are having. We have turned pool speaking to West Brom

:36:00.:36:03.

fan Adrian Chiles. There is a lovely piece on Bonnyrigg. Sean Connery led

:36:04.:36:13.

for them in the 1950s. They may take on Hibs in the Scottish cup. We have

:36:14.:36:17.

James McAvoy doing Premier League predictions as well and Peter Crouch

:36:18.:36:21.

is on the edge of a milestone in terms of the goals he has scored in

:36:22.:36:24.

the Premier League and he has been speaking to Pat Murphy.

:36:25.:36:29.

99 Premier League goals, Manchester United next opponents and your first

:36:30.:36:33.

goal for Stoke was against Manchester United? That's right. I

:36:34.:36:41.

would love to take that again. That would be great. When you get your

:36:42.:36:53.

hundredth Premier League goal, are you going to resurrect the robot? So

:36:54.:36:58.

many people have said to me, if you get your hundredth, you have got to

:36:59.:37:02.

do it. The pressure is taking its toll, let's put it that way. We have

:37:03.:37:13.

got all of that today. And we have Joleon Lescott, Jimmy Floyd

:37:14.:37:15.

Hasselbaink and Mark Schwarzer in the studio. A striker, defender and

:37:16.:37:22.

the goalkeeper. Where are you going to be? On the theme of where you

:37:23.:37:29.

play, please tell me that Sean Connery played with the number

:37:30.:37:39.

sheven on his back! Is it time for me to go?! Clearly, the next time we

:37:40.:37:51.

cover this subject, you two can cover it.

:37:52.:37:54.

In the fourth round of the Scottish Cup, what a day

:37:55.:37:56.

for Bonnyrigg Rose Athletic, who will be trying to take down last

:37:57.:37:59.

And if you are wondering who they are, they are based

:38:00.:38:05.

just south of Edinburgh, and they're the current champions

:38:06.:38:07.

That's one of the three o'clock kick-offs.

:38:08.:38:15.

Before that, last year's beaten finalist Rangers take on Motherwell.

:38:16.:38:17.

Elsewhere, Formartine United, from the Highland Football League

:38:18.:38:19.

have a trip to top flight Partick Thistle.

:38:20.:38:22.

In rugby union, Northampton, suffered a fourth European Champions

:38:23.:38:25.

Cup defeat of the campaign, as they were beaten

:38:26.:38:27.

Saints already knew they couldn't progress, but the French

:38:28.:38:32.

side can go through in a best runner-up spot if other

:38:33.:38:34.

Leinster boosted their chances of securing a home quarter-final,

:38:35.:38:46.

with a thrilling 24-24 draw, at Castres.

:38:47.:38:47.

Leinster came back from seven points down at half-time,

:38:48.:38:49.

Only a massive win for Connacht, away to Toulouse tomorrow,

:38:50.:38:53.

would deprive them of home advantage in the last eight.

:38:54.:39:00.

Jonny Bairstow will replace Alex Hales in England's Twenty20

:39:01.:39:03.

Hales will miss the remainder of the tour, after suffering

:39:04.:39:06.

The opener damaged it during the second one-day

:39:07.:39:09.

England play the final game of their three-match

:39:10.:39:17.

one series tomorrow before the Twenty20 series

:39:18.:39:19.

Barry Hawkins has denied world number one Mark Selby

:39:20.:39:23.

the chance to hold the World, UK and Masters crowns

:39:24.:39:25.

at the same time - after beating him 6-3

:39:26.:39:27.

Neither player was at his best in a nervy match

:39:28.:39:31.

But at 4-3, Hawkins won two in a row,

:39:32.:39:37.

He'll play Joe Perry, who eased past Ding Junhui

:39:38.:39:44.

The other semi-final is between Ronnie O'Sullivan and Marco Fu.

:39:45.:40:00.

In what sport 100 years ago where the household names could take a

:40:01.:40:11.

smart and fish smart? They were cousins. They were too matter of the

:40:12.:40:13.

long track speed skaters from 100 years ago. If you think of Mo Farah,

:40:14.:40:20.

but on ice, they were known as Turkey smart and fish smart.

:40:21.:40:30.

Great Britain started it in the 1870s and for decades,

:40:31.:40:33.

dominated the world of longtrack speed skating - outside

:40:34.:40:36.

But as the climate changed, the sport almost died out...

:40:37.:40:40.

The frozen fans in eastern England, where once the world's top speed

:40:41.:40:57.

skaters would draw huge crowds. But in the second half of the 20th

:40:58.:41:01.

century, scenes like this and the ice itself with him on the ground

:41:02.:41:05.

due to climate change, and by the 90s, British long track speed

:41:06.:41:08.

skating had all but gone. But three years ago, the British long track

:41:09.:41:14.

programme was reborn. Here in the Netherlands, the country that now

:41:15.:41:18.

dominates this sport. Looking more like a stadium than an ice rink, the

:41:19.:41:23.

Netherlands responded to the warmer winters by building 17 of these

:41:24.:41:28.

arenas with their 400 metre tracks. And for the Brits who now come here,

:41:29.:41:40.

it's home from home. On a rink as big as this, there enough space for

:41:41.:41:44.

the team to build their stamina and speed alongside the hundreds of

:41:45.:41:48.

leisure skaters who use every day. It's been reborn in the Netherlands,

:41:49.:41:52.

mainly because we don't have a facility like this in the UK. It's

:41:53.:41:59.

an absolute tragedy. To think we are we were in the beginning of the

:42:00.:42:03.

development in the Fens. We only have short cut figure skating rinks,

:42:04.:42:08.

which are maximum of 60 metres long in the UK. So you quickly run out of

:42:09.:42:17.

space. So first steps with the British team. These are bit more

:42:18.:42:22.

difficult than this case you go on every Christmas once a year just for

:42:23.:42:26.

leisure, because they are just 1.2 millimetres thick. That is why I

:42:27.:42:34.

looked like Bambi. Get nice and low. I obviously needed a body suit, and

:42:35.:42:38.

to learn the moves the British team packed is at home when they can't

:42:39.:42:42.

get out of here. So you do this in the garage? At least a long track is

:42:43.:42:47.

a time trial, supposedly about pure speed rather than a race with the

:42:48.:42:52.

risk of others taking you down. And to help you on your way, the special

:42:53.:42:56.

boots are hinged to give you extra leverage. I feel like I am part of

:42:57.:43:03.

the wind. The first couple of steps, you need to be explosive and get

:43:04.:43:07.

that speed up. Then you can accelerate and finish your stride.

:43:08.:43:13.

As she was keen to prove to me out of the blocks in my debut time trial

:43:14.:43:18.

against her. Races can be 5000, even 10,000 metres. For me, 100 metres

:43:19.:43:28.

was like a marathon. And while Elia finished in 12 seconds, she had time

:43:29.:43:32.

to put the tea on before I came in at 46.6, a personal best.

:43:33.:43:36.

There were about 50 races in all, and I appeared in the middle. The

:43:37.:43:43.

crowd had no idea that I had never skated before. But you didn't fall

:43:44.:43:50.

over. I didn't. But it shows you the power of the investment. The

:43:51.:43:53.

Netherlands were at the same level as the UK. Then they built 17 of

:43:54.:44:02.

those stadiums in the 90s, at a cost of around 13 million euros each, and

:44:03.:44:07.

it has paid dividends. They have won 23 out of 36 medals at the last

:44:08.:44:12.

Winter Olympics. And did you say your ankles hurt? No, your feet,

:44:13.:44:16.

because you are getting used to it. To do 10,000 metres on those skates,

:44:17.:44:21.

you would have to build up to that because of the pain. But you are on

:44:22.:44:28.

your way. You start it out. They are hoping to get someone along to the

:44:29.:44:32.

2022 Winter Olympics for Great Britain. Don't rule it out. See you

:44:33.:44:43.

later. I would try to get you to say seven again in your Sean Connery

:44:44.:44:47.

style. You can never get him to do anything twice.

:44:48.:44:49.

A commuter who suffered months of disruption on Southern trains has

:44:50.:44:52.

had half the cost of his season ticket refunded by his

:44:53.:44:56.

American Express reimbursed the customer nearly ?2,500

:44:57.:45:05.

because they deemed that he didn't receive the service he paid for.

:45:06.:45:08.

Paul Lewis from Radio 4's Money Box programme joins us from London.

:45:09.:45:14.

There have not been many good news stories for commuters lately. This

:45:15.:45:21.

is potentially one of them? It certainly could be. This gentleman,

:45:22.:45:25.

we are calling him Sean, not his real name is he wanted to be

:45:26.:45:29.

anonymous, but he was a commuter from London to Brighton, costing

:45:30.:45:32.

?4800 a year for the privilege. He bought his season ticket and then

:45:33.:45:36.

there was a year of complete disruption, whether it was cancelled

:45:37.:45:41.

services, like trains, overcrowding and a change in timetabling, so many

:45:42.:45:44.

trains were taken off the timetable. And he worked out from records that

:45:45.:45:48.

he got from the train company Southern that more than half of his

:45:49.:45:52.

journeys were disrupted. So instead of claiming direct from the company,

:45:53.:45:55.

he went to his credit card company, American Express. It went into their

:45:56.:46:00.

dispute procedure and within a very short time, he got a very nice

:46:01.:46:08.

payment of ?2400. So, anyone who has been caught up in any of these will

:46:09.:46:13.

be thinking, I will do that? Yes, they will. Underpinning this dispute

:46:14.:46:17.

procedure, there is something called section 75 of the consumer credit

:46:18.:46:21.

act. That makes a credit card provider jointly liable with the

:46:22.:46:24.

supplier of the service if it fails. His case was that it clearly had

:46:25.:46:29.

failed and it wasn't what he bought for ?4800 a year before. So you

:46:30.:46:33.

would have to make that case. This is something for southern

:46:34.:46:38.

passengers, not if your train has been a bit late on a few occasions.

:46:39.:46:41.

You could go to your credit card provider if you paid by credit card,

:46:42.:46:46.

claim under section 75 and even on a debit card, you can claim under a

:46:47.:46:49.

procedure called chargeback, with similar rules. Because of a contract

:46:50.:46:55.

between the contract providers and bees and MasterCard, they are

:46:56.:46:58.

obliged to pay. It is worth trying. You may not get it immediately. The

:46:59.:47:03.

credit card company may try to say it was not really Southern's fault

:47:04.:47:08.

etc. But you can then go to the financial ombudsman service and see

:47:09.:47:11.

if you get a result from them. So for Southern commuters who have

:47:12.:47:14.

suffered more than a year of disruptions, it is worth trying. On

:47:15.:47:19.

a technicality, people will be very interested in this, but Sean, I know

:47:20.:47:25.

it is not his real name, but was he meticulous singer but had he

:47:26.:47:28.

literally recorded each delay? If you write in and say I have been

:47:29.:47:32.

caught up a few times and it has been a bit rubbish, it would have to

:47:33.:47:36.

have a much more detailed plan, wouldn't you? Yes, and he did. He

:47:37.:47:40.

got the records from Southern. They are obliged to publish their records

:47:41.:47:45.

of running. I'm not sure if they are on their website or if he had to

:47:46.:47:48.

apply for them, but he got their records and put his case briefly to

:47:49.:47:51.

American Express, explained about the cancellations and crucially, the

:47:52.:47:55.

timetable operations, because it wasn't just trains that were

:47:56.:47:58.

delayed, some trains disappeared from the timetable. So he couldn't

:47:59.:48:02.

claim for those under the normal delay procedures. So he put in a

:48:03.:48:08.

reasonable case. I have seen it. He had the records behind it, but you

:48:09.:48:11.

can get those from the railway company. So it takes a bit of work,

:48:12.:48:15.

many of these things do, but in this case, half his season ticket money,

:48:16.:48:22.

?2000, is worth having. Will Amex in to try to get the money of Southern

:48:23.:48:27.

rail? We haven't been able to find that out. They would not talk about

:48:28.:48:32.

this case. They have only said it was not section 75, it was their

:48:33.:48:35.

procedure. But that is underpinned by section 70 five. We don't know

:48:36.:48:41.

the answer to that. But certainly, if you went with a debit card

:48:42.:48:45.

through the chargeback procedure, your card company could go to

:48:46.:48:48.

Southern and try and get the money back from them. That would be away

:48:49.:48:51.

for them to get some of the money back. Under section 75, if it is a

:48:52.:48:56.

credit card, they are jointly liable. So really, they have to up.

:48:57.:49:01.

-- they have to pay up. You can hear more on Money Box

:49:02.:49:04.

on Radio 4 at Midday. Nikitin with the weather. Fog seems

:49:05.:49:14.

to be the word of the day? -- nick is here with the weather.

:49:15.:49:19.

This view is from Wales, with temperatures well below freezing in

:49:20.:49:24.

the coldest spots and some thick fog and a hard frost in places. Other

:49:25.:49:29.

spots have the frost, but not the fog. So a sunnier view here. Two

:49:30.:49:34.

things are going on this morning. Either you have plenty of crisp

:49:35.:49:37.

sunshine to start the day, or you are getting some fog patches. Either

:49:38.:49:41.

way, it is a chilly start of the day. This is the extent of that fog

:49:42.:49:48.

through parts of the Midlands and parts of Wales. Summer that will be

:49:49.:49:54.

to clear. Some of it is patchy in nature. There is a lot of sunshine

:49:55.:49:59.

around, although not in the far south-west of England. Here, you

:50:00.:50:02.

start with more clout, but you're not as cold as elsewhere. And

:50:03.:50:05.

similar towards these North Sea coasts. It is a sunnier day on the

:50:06.:50:11.

way for Northern Ireland wants any of your fog clears and more widely

:50:12.:50:15.

across Scotland compared with recent days. No frost in the Northern and

:50:16.:50:20.

Western Isles. Plenty of crisp sunshine once that fog clears. Great

:50:21.:50:24.

weather for getting out and about, although bear in mind that it is

:50:25.:50:29.

chilly. Cloud increasing in south-west England into Northern

:50:30.:50:33.

Ireland. This area of cloud around the North Sea is expanding into the

:50:34.:50:39.

north of East Anglia as well. After temperatures started at several

:50:40.:50:42.

degrees below freezing, we are looking at three to six Celsius for

:50:43.:50:47.

the UK generally. For the cloud running through northern England

:50:48.:50:50.

into southern and central Scotland overnight, some drizzly rain in

:50:51.:50:54.

places. A few wintry flurries on the hills. A few showers in south-west

:50:55.:50:59.

England and Wales. Just a patchy frost tonight. It may tend to come

:51:00.:51:04.

and go wherever you are as the cloud moves around overnight. Still some

:51:05.:51:07.

patchy fog to start Sunday. Here is your part two of the weekend. Not as

:51:08.:51:12.

much sunshine. This will be your sunnier area, where the cloud is

:51:13.:51:16.

thick enough to capture shower. There is a chance of catching sleet

:51:17.:51:20.

or snow out of those showers on the high ground because it is cold, but

:51:21.:51:24.

nothing amounting to very much. It is essentially still a dry weekend.

:51:25.:51:27.

Millions of people around the world watched Donald Trump

:51:28.:51:32.

Breakfast's John Maguire joined one group of American students

:51:33.:51:35.

here in the UK for an inauguration party - to see what they

:51:36.:51:38.

Right across the United States and around the world,

:51:39.:51:55.

Americans gathered to witness an event that so many had predicted

:51:56.:51:58.

I, Donald John Trump, do solemnly swear...

:51:59.:52:01.

The office of president of the United States.

:52:02.:52:09.

These students, studying in London, are thousands of miles from home,

:52:10.:52:16.

yet witnessed every second of Donald Trump's inauguration

:52:17.:52:18.

as if they had a front row seat on Capitol Hill.

:52:19.:52:28.

In Washington, the atmosphere was serious, momentous, even.

:52:29.:52:36.

So in London, we decided to lighten the mood.

:52:37.:52:38.

Folks, we are going to play Trump bingo, top Trumps,

:52:39.:52:41.

We are going to give you these valuable and rare BBC

:52:42.:52:45.

I want you to each choose four words, phrases and mannerisms.

:52:46.:52:49.

As the president makes his speech, you have to mark

:52:50.:52:51.

each time it comes along, and whoever gets the most at the end

:52:52.:52:54.

Or at least will win, how does that sound?

:52:55.:53:00.

We, along with the global audience, hung on every word

:53:01.:53:04.

and, luckily for one, every hand gesture.

:53:05.:53:06.

We are transferring power from Washington, DC and giving it

:53:07.:53:09.

We will make America safe again and, yes, together with will make America

:53:10.:53:27.

An inaugural speech should differ from campaign rhetoric

:53:28.:53:38.

and lacks the policy details of the State of the Union Address.

:53:39.:53:41.

Based on his crowd, I think it's something they would have liked,

:53:42.:53:48.

but for an inaugural address, I don't think he did a good job.

:53:49.:53:52.

It seemed like he was still in campaign mode,

:53:53.:53:54.

talking about the issues and why he is the one to fix them,

:53:55.:53:58.

but it seems like he already sold himself to the people and he won

:53:59.:54:02.

the election, now he should talk more about healing and more

:54:03.:54:05.

ambiguous overall themes about going forward.

:54:06.:54:08.

"We are going to make America great again" -

:54:09.:54:10.

he only said it once, but at the same time he spoke

:54:11.:54:13.

about healing the country, making compromises, not just

:54:14.:54:18.

for the country, but the whole world, and I thought

:54:19.:54:21.

So far, the man who has just become the 45th president has confounded

:54:22.:54:29.

history, politics, convention and, if he governs in the same vein,

:54:30.:54:32.

then, as the 40th president used to declare,

:54:33.:54:34.

Interesting to hear people talk about his style and gestures, but

:54:35.:54:55.

also how he communicates. Donald Trump has embraced social media more

:54:56.:54:59.

than any other president. So it was at that people took to Twitter to

:55:00.:55:00.

give their views. Fellow Republican and former

:55:01.:55:04.

California Governor, Arnold Schwarzenegger,

:55:05.:55:05.

wished President Trump luck and thanked Barack

:55:06.:55:06.

Obama for his service. Former CBS news anchor Dan Rather

:55:07.:55:12.

remarked he had never seen the country so divided, anxious,

:55:13.:55:16.

fearful or uncertain, while after handing over

:55:17.:55:22.

the official Twitter handle Obama tweeted from his old,

:55:23.:55:27.

personal account: And he said he and Michelle

:55:28.:55:29.

would return to work Olly Mann presents The Media

:55:30.:55:38.

Podcast and he joins us It is fair to say that social media

:55:39.:55:54.

was absolutely dominated yesterday by this inauguration. How do you

:55:55.:56:00.

think it went down? Well, the internet is a series of silos now,

:56:01.:56:03.

it is not just one place where you can ask what the internet thought.

:56:04.:56:09.

As Trump's victory clearly illustrates, there are older

:56:10.:56:11.

Republican voters, the kind of people John McCain were trying to

:56:12.:56:15.

woo in 2008, who were not in the internet who are now not only over

:56:16.:56:19.

the internet and social media, but completely distrust the mainstream

:56:20.:56:22.

media and follow things only online. And there are other millennials who

:56:23.:56:30.

only follow things on the internet. Sue you can't generalise and the

:56:31.:56:33.

statistics are not out yet, but I am prepared to say yet they will have

:56:34.:56:36.

been the biggest ever day on Twitter. It was astonishing for them

:56:37.:56:41.

not only to have a president sitting in the White House who is continuing

:56:42.:56:44.

to use their service in a personal capacity, but also to live stream

:56:45.:56:51.

the event in exceptional quality. If you had a look at that, they were

:56:52.:56:55.

broadcasting in high-definition to rival broadcast networks yesterday.

:56:56.:57:00.

It is a really big change from previous inaugurations. What were

:57:01.:57:04.

the main things that stood out to you? There was a lot of humour on

:57:05.:57:08.

there as well as some serious points being made. What were your

:57:09.:57:14.

favourites? Well, like you say, if I am going to generalise about the

:57:15.:57:18.

internet, they do like to take these little moments, which are almost

:57:19.:57:22.

those type of Gogglebox moments, the things everyone is thinking when

:57:23.:57:25.

they are at home sitting on the sofa, but perhaps the news anchors

:57:26.:57:27.

on the broadcast networks are not allowed to say. It is little moments

:57:28.:57:33.

like Baron Trump, Trump's ten-year-old son, appearing to be

:57:34.:57:35.

rather bored during elements of the day, because he is ten and it is a

:57:36.:57:41.

long day. There was the moment Michelle Obama was given that gift

:57:42.:57:44.

by Melania Trump on the steps of the White House, who appeared not to

:57:45.:57:49.

know what to do with it good and that the camera. I saw that

:57:50.:57:54.

contextualised in many amusing ways. And generally also a kind of

:57:55.:57:58.

paranoia about the White House website and what the changes to the

:57:59.:58:06.

White House website might mean about the policies of the administration.

:58:07.:58:10.

There was a lot of analysis about that. The reset button was pressed

:58:11.:58:15.

on the White House website. Energy, foreign policy, military,

:58:16.:58:17.

law-enforcement and growth and jobs were the things that appeared along

:58:18.:58:20.

with the biographies and the like, and then the things that were

:58:21.:58:24.

missing, like climate change, LGBT writes, a lot of people had a lot of

:58:25.:58:29.

things to say about that. Absolutely. If you are someone who

:58:30.:58:33.

is gay and feels that Trump is not going to stand up for you in the

:58:34.:58:37.

same way that the Obama administration did, like the Star

:58:38.:58:42.

Trek actor, George Takei, who tweeted about this, the LGBT page

:58:43.:58:49.

appearing from the -- disappearing from the White House website will be

:58:50.:58:52.

concerning, particularly when gay marriage has only just happened in

:58:53.:58:56.

the United States. The most amusing example, you mentioned the

:58:57.:58:59.

biographies, was on Melania Trump's page. She listed her various

:59:00.:59:03.

credits, and to be fair, her career was as a model. So you would expect

:59:04.:59:07.

it to say she has posed for various magazines. But there was a reference

:59:08.:59:13.

on the White House website last night specifically to their brand of

:59:14.:59:18.

jewellery that you can buy from QVC, with the trademark and everything.

:59:19.:59:22.

That has disappeared overnight, and now says "She also designed a range

:59:23.:59:26.

of jewellery". So it is interesting that even on the day of the

:59:27.:59:29.

inauguration, there are people within the administration who are

:59:30.:59:33.

sensitive to criticism online as people have said, Donald Trump is

:59:34.:59:36.

distancing himself from his business interests so that he can be

:59:37.:59:40.

president. And yet his wife was right there on the website of the

:59:41.:59:44.

White House, advertising her range of jewellery that you can buy and

:59:45.:59:48.

where you can buy it. There is so much analysis and I imagine lots of

:59:49.:59:52.

things will change while they try to get the website right. Thank you

:59:53.:59:57.

very much. Olli Maatta is presenter of the media podcast. -- Olly Mann.

:59:58.:00:30.

This is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern.

:00:31.:00:33.

The first full day in office for the new president

:00:34.:00:36.

of the United Sates, as Donald Trump pledges

:00:37.:00:38.

to fulfill his campaign promises He's already signed his first orders

:00:39.:00:40.

as President, including changes to Barack Obama's healthcare act,

:00:41.:00:43.

We want to make America great again, and we will.

:00:44.:00:47.

Inauguration day ended with a series of balls,

:00:48.:00:49.

before the President and First Lady returned to the White House to spend

:00:50.:00:53.

on President Trump's inauguration, and what's in store for his

:00:54.:01:07.

Four more survivors have been pulled out of the debris

:01:08.:01:16.

of an Italian hotel, almost 72 hours after it was

:01:17.:01:19.

Leaders of Europe's right wing parties gather in Germany

:01:20.:01:25.

to discuss their opposition to the European Union.

:01:26.:01:27.

Thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate.

:01:28.:01:33.

In sport, a woman on a roll, and Johanna Konta is aiming

:01:34.:01:36.

to keep her winning run going by knocking out a former world

:01:37.:01:40.

Johanna Konta breezes into the fourth round of the Australian open

:01:41.:01:45.

by knocking out a former world number one in straight sets.

:01:46.:01:48.

And in from the cold: I've been training with the British

:01:49.:01:51.

long-track speed skating team, whose sport has been

:01:52.:01:53.

The weekend is getting off to a frosty start.

:01:54.:02:02.

Most places will see the sunshine today, with a dry day ahead.

:02:03.:02:09.

First, our main story: President Donald Trump, has wasted

:02:10.:02:20.

Shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge

:02:21.:02:25.

signed an executive order to begin dismantling Barack Obama's

:02:26.:02:28.

Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare.

:02:29.:02:31.

In his first speech as leader, Mr Trump promised to take power

:02:32.:02:33.

from the establishment in Washington and give it back to the people.

:02:34.:02:36.

Last night the President and First Lady attended a number

:02:37.:02:39.

of traditional balls held to thank his supporters.

:02:40.:02:40.

Our Washington reporter, Laura Bicker, has more.

:02:41.:02:53.

And now, the president and First Lady of the United States will

:02:54.:02:56.

Donald Trump got here by doing things very differently, a

:02:57.:03:14.

trait he shows no sign of losing as commander-in-chief.

:03:15.:03:17.

Should I keep the Twitter going or not?

:03:18.:03:21.

He beamed as he arrived at galas across

:03:22.:03:26.

Washington, clasping the hand of his wife and First Lady.

:03:27.:03:33.

Inaugural balls are part of the choreography of this

:03:34.:03:35.

And Mr Trump invited supporters from across the country.

:03:36.:03:45.

We began this journey, and they said we, we,

:03:46.:03:48.

and me, we didn't have a

:03:49.:03:50.

chance, but we knew we were going to win.

:03:51.:03:52.

As he shuffled around the floor, word spread that

:03:53.:04:03.

he had already made his first executive move, an action that will

:04:04.:04:06.

help repeal Obamacare, his predecessor's signature health care

:04:07.:04:08.

Across the country, gatherings of a more hostile nature sprung up from

:04:09.:04:29.

coast-to-coast. In Washington, more than 200 protesters were arrested

:04:30.:04:32.

after a small handful of anti-Trump rallies turned violent.

:04:33.:04:38.

In Chicago, hundreds peacefully voiced their

:04:39.:04:39.

concerns at Donald Trump's agenda, and in Seattle, they marched through

:04:40.:04:42.

Further demonstrations are planned over the weekend.

:04:43.:04:47.

But the new president will shrug off this criticism, just as he did

:04:48.:04:50.

Surrounded by family and friends, he is taking a

:04:51.:04:53.

moment to enjoy this particular piece of pageantry before the real

:04:54.:04:56.

Reacting to President Trump's inaugural speech

:04:57.:05:09.

to put America 'first', the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson

:05:10.:05:12.

told the BBC he remains positive about the prospect of a new trade

:05:13.:05:16.

The new president has made it very clear that he wants to put Britain

:05:17.:05:35.

obviously, that's extremely exciting and important.

:05:36.:05:36.

And he is very keen to get it done as fast as possible, and optimistic

:05:37.:05:40.

He said within a short period after the exit

:05:41.:05:44.

from the EU, and that's great, but it's got to work

:05:45.:05:46.

Every reason to be positive and optimistic.

:05:47.:05:49.

Protest marches to demand women's rights will take place in more

:05:50.:05:52.

than 30 countries to mark Donald Trump's first day in office.

:05:53.:05:54.

This one in Sydney, Australia, is already underway and hundreds

:05:55.:05:57.

more are due to take place around the world, including

:05:58.:05:59.

Around 200,000 people are also expected to attend a march

:06:00.:06:04.

Italian firefighters say four more survivors have been pulled out

:06:05.:06:14.

of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on Wednesday.

:06:15.:06:17.

Four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday.

:06:18.:06:22.

Attempts are continuing to rescue more survivors,

:06:23.:06:24.

but it's thought at least 15 people remain unaccounted for.

:06:25.:06:28.

As darkness fell on the third night since the avalanche, a six-year-old

:06:29.:06:36.

girl was pulled from the rubble, cold but apparently well.

:06:37.:06:40.

Soon after came another child, a boy, one of four

:06:41.:06:43.

children who have so far been rescued from the rubble of the

:06:44.:06:45.

They are said to have survived in a kitchen, protected by

:06:46.:06:52.

concrete walls that also silenced their cries for help.

:06:53.:06:54.

After these images were filmed, another four

:06:55.:06:57.

adults - two women and two men - were also rescued.

:06:58.:07:03.

The survivors found yesterday were flown to

:07:04.:07:05.

They were said to be cold and dehydrated,

:07:06.:07:11.

For some relatives who had endured a long wait for news,

:07:12.:07:18.

TRANSLATION: Can't you see it from my face?

:07:19.:07:21.

It's great, I can't describe it in words.

:07:22.:07:25.

For now, the boy is safe, and I hope his

:07:26.:07:28.

parents have managed to survive as well.

:07:29.:07:30.

But for other relatives, the anxious wait goes on.

:07:31.:07:32.

Four bodies have been recovered so far.

:07:33.:07:34.

The Italian rescue services say they will work

:07:35.:07:40.

night and day until everyone is accounted for.

:07:41.:07:43.

A Hungarian coach has crashed in northern Italy

:07:44.:07:53.

The coach was on its way back from a mountain resort in France

:07:54.:07:57.

when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city of

:07:58.:08:00.

According to reports, the coach was carrying a large

:08:01.:08:03.

The leaders of some of Europe's right-wing populist parties

:08:04.:08:17.

will gather in the German city of Koblenz today to discuss

:08:18.:08:20.

their shared opposition to the European Union.

:08:21.:08:23.

The leader of the French National Front, Marine Le Pen,

:08:24.:08:25.

Our Berlin Correspondent Jenny Hill is in Koblenz for us this morning.

:08:26.:08:37.

This is certainly a controversial meeting, thousands of people

:08:38.:08:41.

protesting potentially outside of this. What are they trying to

:08:42.:08:48.

achieve inside the meeting? In essence, we are expecting the

:08:49.:08:51.

leaders to arrive any minute, but what they want to achieve is a

:08:52.:08:54.

public display of unity at the beginning of what is for some of

:08:55.:08:57.

them is an important electing the year. -- election year. Marine Le

:08:58.:09:07.

Pen is making her bed to be France's next president. Geert Wilders is

:09:08.:09:14.

leading the polls in the Netherlands. They will be joined by

:09:15.:09:19.

Germany's right-wing anti-Islam party, which is also polling well

:09:20.:09:23.

and is expected to take seats for the first time in the national

:09:24.:09:27.

parliament here in Germany's general election in the autumn. It is

:09:28.:09:31.

controversial, as you say. Some of these leaders have already

:09:32.:09:35.

threatened to pull their countries out of the EU should they succeed,

:09:36.:09:42.

and many of them share the same anti-Islam fears and anti-immigrant

:09:43.:09:46.

rhetoric. There are expected to be large demonstrations here today,

:09:47.:09:51.

also because of the fact that the German mainstream press has been

:09:52.:09:56.

excluded from this meeting, lots of newspapers and television stations

:09:57.:10:01.

are ignoring this meeting, which is alarming not just the establishment

:10:02.:10:02.

but much of the German public. The Mexican drug lord

:10:03.:10:09.

Joaquin Guzman, also known as El Chapo, appeared in a US court

:10:10.:10:11.

after a surprise Guzman pleaded not guilty to charges

:10:12.:10:13.

that he headed the world's largest drug-trafficking organisation,

:10:14.:10:17.

the Sinaloa cartel, in a criminal He's accused of drug trafficking,

:10:18.:10:19.

kidnapping, murder and conspiracy. The Brazilian football club chapter

:10:20.:10:34.

Quincey bookplates first match tonight after its players were

:10:35.:10:42.

killed in an air crash. They will play against the current champions

:10:43.:10:45.

and the match will raise money for the victims' families.

:10:46.:10:53.

All the sport and weather coming up for you shortly.

:10:54.:11:02.

Donald Trump's Furst 's speech included an important message to the

:11:03.:11:09.

world. Let's listen. We are issuing a new decree to be heard in every

:11:10.:11:13.

city, every foreign capital, and in every hole of power. From this day

:11:14.:11:20.

forward, a new version will govern our land. From this day forward, it

:11:21.:11:27.

is going to be only America first. America first. Let's get the view of

:11:28.:11:37.

the former UK ambassador to the US, Sir Christopher Maher. Thank you for

:11:38.:11:44.

joining us. Give us your thoughts on that theme, the America first theme.

:11:45.:11:51.

One thing I would say is, when has American foreign policy in the world

:11:52.:11:54.

not been about America first? What we really need to find out, and we

:11:55.:11:59.

won't know until Trump's administration need bolts, is what

:12:00.:12:02.

he really means by that. I would suggest that on his paper of --

:12:03.:12:11.

piece of paper, there are only two other markings - China and Mexico.

:12:12.:12:17.

He thinks China have been cheating in world trade, and Mexico because

:12:18.:12:24.

jobs have gone to Mexico by virtue of the North American Free Trade

:12:25.:12:26.

Agreement. What it will mean for other countries, for the United

:12:27.:12:32.

Kingdom, all of this at the moment is unclear. Looking at a couple of

:12:33.:12:41.

the other themes - on Islamic terror, he said, I will eradicate

:12:42.:12:44.

completely Islamic terrorism from the face of the Earth. What do you

:12:45.:12:52.

make of those comments? That is a massively ambitious statement of

:12:53.:12:56.

intent which I would be happy to bet he will not achieve. Personally, I

:12:57.:12:59.

would have preferred him to have talked about terrorism, not just

:13:00.:13:09.

Islamic terrorism, but that is the ambition he has set himself. I bet

:13:10.:13:15.

you, for years from now, he will not have achieved it. -- four years from

:13:16.:13:25.

now. He said he had to make simple rules: By American and higher

:13:26.:13:33.

American. -- by American products and higher American people. --

:13:34.:13:42.

purchase American products and employee American people. It is

:13:43.:13:52.

above all a reference to the departure of jobs from the United

:13:53.:13:58.

States to Mexico, because of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

:13:59.:14:02.

As far as a trade agreement with the writer King is concerned, we can

:14:03.:14:06.

always expect the Americans to be very, very, very, and I emphasise

:14:07.:14:12.

this, tough negotiators. They will drive a hard bargain. But Donald

:14:13.:14:18.

Trump is the man of the deal. He advertises himself as a man who can

:14:19.:14:22.

make deals. It will be possible for the UK, for Theresa May and Donald

:14:23.:14:32.

Trump to reach a good, mutually advantageous trade agreement, but I

:14:33.:14:36.

don't think it happen any time. There has been a suggestion that

:14:37.:14:41.

Theresa May might go to America as early next week to meet Donald

:14:42.:14:45.

Trump, but certainly she hopes the goal there soon - what do you think

:14:46.:14:49.

her message to Donald Trump will be, and what will be the tone of that

:14:50.:14:53.

first meeting, do you think? The tone will be friendly, and it will

:14:54.:15:00.

be pretty frank as well, because we need to forget for a moment all this

:15:01.:15:06.

gaffe and wispy stuff about the special relationship. -- all this

:15:07.:15:13.

nonsense and wispy stuff. There are important things at stake in the UK

:15:14.:15:18.

- US relationship, and the advantage in Theresa May getting over to the

:15:19.:15:24.

US early is to put the British fix in on a whole series of issues that

:15:25.:15:28.

have come up in the presidential campaign - the future of Nato, the

:15:29.:15:33.

future of relations with Vladimir Putin, the future of the nuclear

:15:34.:15:40.

agreement with Iran, the supply of the advanced multirole fighter, the

:15:41.:15:47.

F 35, which Donald Trump has criticised, which is destined for

:15:48.:15:50.

the two new big aircraft carriers we will be putting into service soon.

:15:51.:15:56.

There is a whole range of staff, nuclear nonproliferation, global

:15:57.:16:00.

trade, on which Theresa May will have very firm views and she will

:16:01.:16:04.

want to register them with Trump and his closest advisers. It is an

:16:05.:16:08.

important visit, but people should stop wittering on about the special

:16:09.:16:14.

relationship. This is about hard British interests being negotiated

:16:15.:16:18.

with the US. Without wishing you to wear Toronto much more, the special

:16:19.:16:27.

relationship -- without wishing you to twitter on ... After George W

:16:28.:16:52.

Bush's inauguration in 2001 when the UK was the first European country

:16:53.:17:02.

whose Prime Minister met the new president, so there is a bit of a

:17:03.:17:10.

race on. There is an importance, a real national importance, for our

:17:11.:17:13.

Prime Minister to make her views very clearly known to the president

:17:14.:17:20.

before opinions inside the new US administration start to coagulate

:17:21.:17:24.

anyway, so she needs to get her fix in. I have no doubt that this

:17:25.:17:29.

relationship will work pretty well, because I think it is fair to say

:17:30.:17:35.

that Trump is well disposed towards the United Kingdom, rather likes

:17:36.:17:39.

Brexit, doesn't like the EU, and he's upset lots of our European

:17:40.:17:43.

friends and partners by saying other people are going to follow the UK

:17:44.:17:50.

out of the EU. There is quite good, fertile ground on which Theresa May

:17:51.:17:55.

will be able to conduct our talks with President Trump. Thank you very

:17:56.:17:59.

much for your time this morning. Good to speak to you.

:18:00.:18:09.

Some wise words. It is 18 minutes past nine. Let's find out what is

:18:10.:18:11.

happening with the weather. Thank you very much for this

:18:12.:18:30.

gorgeous view. Some are as our waking up to sunshine and a hard

:18:31.:18:35.

frost. There will be a fair amount of sunshine on offer today, any fog

:18:36.:18:43.

gradually clearing. This area of cloud is expanding across parts of

:18:44.:18:50.

Wales and the Midlands. It is also cloudy in Cornwall and Devon, and

:18:51.:18:53.

that will feed along the south coast through the afternoon. Some decent

:18:54.:18:57.

sunshine in between the two areas of cloud. Northern Ireland and

:18:58.:19:03.

Scotland, much more sunshine then in recent days. Some cloud into parts

:19:04.:19:11.

of eastern Scotland. Maybe a few lingering fog patches, even into the

:19:12.:19:16.

early part of the afternoon. Their eBay a bit Apache rain or drizzle

:19:17.:19:26.

developing across parts of northern England. It feeds towards north-east

:19:27.:19:30.

Wales and into the Midlands as well. It will be a cold start of the

:19:31.:19:41.

weekend. -- there may be a bit of patchy rain. Wales in south-west

:19:42.:19:54.

England may see some showers. Some patchy rain and drizzle in northern

:19:55.:19:59.

England and Scotland. There may be some sleet and snow on the hills out

:20:00.:20:07.

of this weather. It is very light. 12-mac showers here and there

:20:08.:20:30.

tomorrow. -- one or two. I pressure is in control next week. That's how

:20:31.:20:31.

it looks. You're watching

:20:32.:20:40.

Breakfast from BBC News. Time now for a look

:20:41.:20:42.

at the newspapers. Professor Cary Cooper

:20:43.:20:44.

from the University of Manchester is here to tell us

:20:45.:20:46.

what's caught his eye. You have had a look through some of

:20:47.:21:02.

the inside pages harass. The first thing I found was in the Daily Mail.

:21:03.:21:08.

Look at the Obama inauguration event in 2009, and then look at the Trump

:21:09.:21:12.

and how many people came in comparison. That is about the

:21:13.:21:17.

divisiveness and the nature of what has gone on, who Trump has alienate

:21:18.:21:24.

it - the west Coast, East Coast, the a leaked and all that. -- the elite.

:21:25.:21:36.

Could you just argue that those who are most vociferous in their support

:21:37.:21:38.

for Donald Trump just don't travel that much? Yes, it's more what the

:21:39.:21:45.

Americans call blue-collar workers. They wouldn't travel if they came

:21:46.:21:49.

from Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, whatever. It says that even though

:21:50.:21:57.

he has got the grassroots going, they didn't actually turn up in big

:21:58.:22:03.

numbers. There is a change in media, in how people watch this. A lot of

:22:04.:22:08.

people might not have gone but would be watching it. The next one is...

:22:09.:22:17.

We have talked before about the political and policy things, but how

:22:18.:22:25.

can someone like Hillary Clinton turn up and feel what she felt. She

:22:26.:22:31.

certainly demonstrated her disenchantment, her kind of

:22:32.:22:37.

attitude, visually. You can see the nonverbals of her and Bill, and a

:22:38.:22:41.

bit from Michelle Obama as well. This picture, I think it epitomises

:22:42.:22:47.

it, to some extent. Everybody was looking, won't they? The other one

:22:48.:22:58.

was the bit about Melania. The minute I saw her dressed in that

:22:59.:23:02.

outfit, I remembered Jackie Kennedy wearing that thing. Is it pastel

:23:03.:23:08.

blue? Yes, it is slightly different fashion for the times, but it made

:23:09.:23:15.

me wonder about what kind of first Lady she will be. Jackie Kennedy was

:23:16.:23:20.

not active. John Kennedy was active, she was not at all until he died,

:23:21.:23:26.

then she became more active, strangely enough. So what is our

:23:27.:23:30.

role? She is not even moving into the White House. You picked this up

:23:31.:23:40.

from the times. I like this. This is a great guy - Kissinger. Henry

:23:41.:23:46.

Kissinger said, and he was the Secretary of State under Nixon, I

:23:47.:23:54.

never really liked Nixon. He told colleagues, he won't be around in a

:23:55.:23:59.

month. He got that wrong. I like that he then said, Nixon was a very

:24:00.:24:03.

conceptual thinker and a student of world politics. Trump is much more

:24:04.:24:10.

instinctual, and he beat 16 professional politicians to the

:24:11.:24:15.

nomination and pursued a strategy universally decried as hopeless, and

:24:16.:24:20.

he prevailed. A person who can do that is a leader of some

:24:21.:24:26.

significance. So don't dismissing? Yes. Then he goes on to say, him

:24:27.:24:31.

ally in himself with Russia might be a good thing. -- aligning himself

:24:32.:24:40.

with Russia. He is probably doing the right thing. We need to get

:24:41.:24:48.

close with Russia, not in terms of election manipulation or anything,

:24:49.:24:51.

but politically, we need to get closer. He also is talking about

:24:52.:24:55.

what he is going to do in the first few days. He is an action man, isn't

:24:56.:25:02.

he? He has got executive orders when he doesn't have to go to Congress,

:25:03.:25:06.

and he has already issued them. Parts of the Obamacare Bill, things

:25:07.:25:13.

on climate change, where he is going retrograde. He is pulling money out

:25:14.:25:20.

so that they can do roads, bridges, rail. That is what he is going to

:25:21.:25:26.

do, and he will get jobs for the rust belt by doing all of that. In a

:25:27.:25:33.

way, the US needs to do that. Surely the processes that if you are a

:25:34.:25:36.

Trump support around you want change, fantastic, he can do things

:25:37.:25:40.

from day one. If you're one of those who are worried, the thought of him

:25:41.:25:47.

being able to do things fast, and with the backing of the Congress and

:25:48.:25:52.

Senate, that will worry you. Yellow that he will get lots of these

:25:53.:25:57.

domestic economic things through, for sure. When it comes to

:25:58.:26:01.

international things, even his own party will stop him in Congress. --

:26:02.:26:14.

he will get lots of these domestic economic things through. What would

:26:15.:26:22.

you doing yesterday? Drinking a cup of tea? I was observing. I am a

:26:23.:26:30.

psychologist. Come on, Charlie! I had a cup of tea, I am sitting there

:26:31.:26:35.

thinking, I wonder how Clinton is going to react when he comes up and

:26:36.:26:41.

kisses her on the cheek? Everyone is looking at everyone. Everyone is

:26:42.:26:49.

doing the same. Nice to see you. It is 26 minutes past nine. We are on

:26:50.:26:53.

BBC One until ten o'clock this morning.

:26:54.:26:58.

when Matt Tebbutt takes over in the Saturday kitchen.

:26:59.:27:00.

We have Liz Carr, from Silent Witness. Let's Talk About Your Idea

:27:01.:27:18.

Of Food Heaven? Crab Claws. Food Hell? Keen Wire Or Anything Healthy.

:27:19.:27:32.

Fernando Makes A Welcome Return. Lots to look forward to. We will see

:27:33.:27:49.

you at ten. All this makes me hungry watching

:27:50.:27:51.

that. Still to come: to Elton John, he's recorded

:27:52.:28:06.

with many of the musical greats and is soon to be inducted

:28:07.:28:10.

into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Rick Wakeman's here to tell us more

:28:11.:28:14.

about it before nine. This is Breakfast, with Charlie

:28:15.:29:10.

Stayt and Steph McGovern. Now a summary of this morning's menus. --

:29:11.:29:15.

main news. President Donald Trump has wasted no

:29:16.:29:17.

time in getting to work. Shortly after his inauguration

:29:18.:29:19.

parade ended, the new man in charge signed an executive order to begin

:29:20.:29:22.

dismantling Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act,

:29:23.:29:24.

known as Obamacare. And now the President and First Lady

:29:25.:29:26.

of the United States will take their The President and First Lady

:29:27.:29:29.

also attended a number of traditional balls held

:29:30.:29:37.

to celebrate the inauguration. They danced to My Way just hours

:29:38.:29:41.

after thousands gathered to see him take the oath of office

:29:42.:29:48.

and hear his inaugural address. People that weren't so nice to me

:29:49.:29:51.

were saying that we did They hated to do it,

:29:52.:29:56.

but they did it, and I respect that. You're going to see things happen

:29:57.:30:07.

over the next few weeks - Because there are very

:30:08.:30:10.

elegant people tonight, but there are also very

:30:11.:30:19.

political people, right? We want to see great things

:30:20.:30:25.

happen for our country. We want to make America

:30:26.:30:28.

great again, and we will. Reacting to President

:30:29.:30:32.

Trump's inaugural speech to put America "first",

:30:33.:30:40.

The Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson told the BBC he remains positive

:30:41.:30:43.

about the prospect of a new trade The new president has made it clear

:30:44.:30:46.

that he wants to put Britain at the front of the line

:30:47.:30:51.

for a new trade deal. Obviously, that is extremely

:30:52.:30:54.

exciting and important. And he's keen to get it done as fast

:30:55.:30:59.

as possible and is optimistic he's said within a short

:31:00.:31:02.

period after the exit It's got to work for the UK

:31:03.:31:08.

as well, but there is every Italian firefighters say four more

:31:09.:31:17.

survivors have been pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped

:31:18.:31:24.

by an avalanche on Wednesday. Attempts are continuing to rescue

:31:25.:31:31.

one more known survivor, but at least 15 people

:31:32.:31:33.

remain unaccounted for. I am joined by a witness thereby.

:31:34.:31:45.

Can you bring us up-to-date on how many have been rescued so far? I am

:31:46.:31:57.

talking to you from an operation centre. The rescues are in progress

:31:58.:32:02.

at the hotel. The resort collapsed under the avalanche, as you

:32:03.:32:08.

reported. Nine persons have been rescued alive in total. And there

:32:09.:32:18.

are four children. In addition, we can confirm that there are five

:32:19.:32:26.

persons alive - sorry. After more than 48 hours since the tragedy, we

:32:27.:32:40.

know that there are at least 135 responders who are working with

:32:41.:32:47.

specialist tools. They will carry on all day. It is impossible to know

:32:48.:33:00.

how many are inside the rubble. Do not forget that the ruins of the

:33:01.:33:06.

hotel are covered by the snow and the temperature is very low. In the

:33:07.:33:23.

night, it is -16 degrees. Since Wednesday, the Italian emergency

:33:24.:33:30.

teams have confirmed the number of dead. Now the snow remains the real

:33:31.:33:38.

enemy, especially in the small villages. Thank you for your time.

:33:39.:33:44.

That was Alessandro Marchetti, talking about the avalanche which

:33:45.:33:48.

happened at a hotel in Italy, where nine people have been pulled out

:33:49.:33:54.

alive. At least one survivor is still in the rubble and four bodies

:33:55.:33:58.

have been found as well. That rescue operation is continuing.

:33:59.:34:02.

A Hungarian coach has crashed in northern Italy,

:34:03.:34:04.

The coach was on its way back from a mountain resort in France

:34:05.:34:12.

when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city of

:34:13.:34:15.

According to reports, the coach was carrying a large

:34:16.:34:19.

The Brazilian football club, Chapecoense, will play

:34:20.:34:24.

its first match tonight after nearly all of its players were

:34:25.:34:27.

The club has made 20 new signings since the disaster,

:34:28.:34:34.

The friendly against current champions Palmeiras will raise money

:34:35.:34:40.

Mike is here with the sport. It is going to be such a tough game for

:34:41.:34:52.

them. Dan was talking about it as well and they will talk about it in

:34:53.:34:57.

Football Focus. The eyes of the world are on them and the arms of

:34:58.:35:01.

the world are around them. Unprecedented territory. They were a

:35:02.:35:06.

little-known club, an underdog. But they rose through the ranks and then

:35:07.:35:10.

this terrible tragedy happened. They have recruited 22 new players. Three

:35:11.:35:15.

of the survivors will be there as well, watching. Just the strangest

:35:16.:35:20.

and most emotional night ahead. The football doesn't really matter. I

:35:21.:35:23.

suppose they had to get back to it at some point. For the sake of

:35:24.:35:30.

everybody. Let's talk about sport more generally. We have a picture

:35:31.:35:34.

behind us that is telling a great success story. Johanna Konta,

:35:35.:35:37.

Britain's number one, made the semifinals last year. The way she's

:35:38.:35:40.

going, there is belief that she could go further this time. It will

:35:41.:35:44.

interesting if she gets through her next match. Then it would be Serena

:35:45.:35:49.

Williams potentially in the quarterfinals. She has won eight

:35:50.:35:53.

matches in a row and 16 sets in a row, which is a real sign of

:35:54.:35:58.

someone's form. Her latest match took her just one hour and 15

:35:59.:36:06.

minutes to sweep the high -- sweep aside a former world number one and

:36:07.:36:09.

reach the fourth round of the Australian Open.

:36:10.:36:10.

She's just beaten former world number one Caroline Wozniacki

:36:11.:36:12.

in straight sets in an hour and fifteen minutes.

:36:13.:36:14.

Konta's been in fantastic form this year, winning a title in Sydney

:36:15.:36:17.

in the build up to the big Grand Slam in Melbourne,

:36:18.:36:20.

and Wozniacki simply had no answer to Britain's number one.

:36:21.:36:22.

Wozniacki, who's seeded 17, only managed

:36:23.:36:24.

to win four games, as Konta cruised to an eighth straight victory.

:36:25.:36:27.

She'll now play Ekaterina Makarova, in the fourth round.

:36:28.:36:29.

I'm very happy with the level I was able to maintain

:36:30.:36:32.

From the get-go, I knew that she was not going to give it to me.

:36:33.:36:40.

Caroline is the kind of player that will make her opponents really earn

:36:41.:36:43.

I knew that, and I felt I committed to the way I wanted to play

:36:44.:36:57.

it was going to bring the opportunities.

:36:58.:37:00.

And I am happy that it did that today.

:37:01.:37:02.

Liverpool and Tottenham, will be looking to narrow the gap

:37:03.:37:05.

on top of the table Chelsea, in the Premier League today.

:37:06.:37:07.

They are seven points ahead at the moment.

:37:08.:37:10.

And there are seven matches today, with the leaders amongst

:37:11.:37:12.

Spurs are involved in the late kick off, they are away

:37:13.:37:15.

at Manchester City - who you might remember got hammered

:37:16.:37:18.

Liverpool are the early kick off at home to Swansea City -

:37:19.:37:23.

who were also beaten 4-0 last weekend.

:37:24.:37:24.

They lost to Arsenal, but the Liverpool manager

:37:25.:37:26.

Jurgen Klopp says it'll still be tough.

:37:27.:37:30.

The interesting thing in the Premier League, I don't know when it

:37:31.:37:38.

started, but only finals, since I don't know when, Swansea are playing

:37:39.:37:45.

to stay in the league, we play for whatever. But each game, obviously,

:37:46.:37:57.

it is really intense. But we are really looking forward to this

:37:58.:37:58.

opportunity. In the fourth round of

:37:59.:37:59.

the Scottish Cup, what a day for Bonnyrigg Rose Athletic,

:38:00.:38:02.

who will be trying to take down last And if you are wondering

:38:03.:38:05.

who they are, they are based just south of Edinburgh,

:38:06.:38:08.

and they're the current champions Sean Connery played for them in the

:38:09.:38:20.

50s. We still don't know what position he played. Possibly number

:38:21.:38:24.

sheven. That's one of the three

:38:25.:38:27.

o'clock kick-offs. Before that, last year's beaten

:38:28.:38:29.

finalist Rangers take on Motherwell. Elsewhere, Formartine United

:38:30.:38:34.

from the Highland Football League have a trip to top flight Partick

:38:35.:38:36.

Thistle. In rugby union, Northampton suffered

:38:37.:38:39.

a fourth European Champions Cup defeat of the campaign,

:38:40.:38:42.

as they were beaten Saints already knew they couldn't

:38:43.:38:44.

progress, but the French side can go through in a best

:38:45.:38:48.

runner-up spot if other Leinster boosted their chances

:38:49.:38:51.

of securing a home quarter-final, with a thrilling 24-24

:38:52.:38:55.

draw at Castres. Leinster came back from seven

:38:56.:39:00.

points down at half-time Only a massive win for Connacht away

:39:01.:39:02.

to Toulouse tomorrow would deprive them of home advantage

:39:03.:39:08.

in the last eight. Barry Hawkins has denied world

:39:09.:39:11.

number one Mark Selby the chance to hold the World,

:39:12.:39:13.

UK and Masters crowns at the same time -

:39:14.:39:15.

after beating him 6-3 Neither player was at his

:39:16.:39:17.

best in a nervy match But at 4-3, Hawkins

:39:18.:39:21.

won two in a row, He'll play Joe Perry,

:39:22.:39:25.

who eased past Ding Junhui The other semi-final is between

:39:26.:39:30.

Ronnie O'Sullivan and Marco Fu. Great Britain started it

:39:31.:39:44.

in the 1870s and for decades, dominated the world of longtrack

:39:45.:39:47.

speed skating - outside But as the climate changed,

:39:48.:39:49.

the sport almost died out... The frozen Fens in eastern England,

:39:50.:39:57.

where once the world's top speed But in the second half

:39:58.:40:05.

of the 20th century, scenes like this and indeed the ice

:40:06.:40:21.

itself were thin on the ground due to climate change, and by the '90s,

:40:22.:40:24.

British long track speed But three years ago,

:40:25.:40:27.

the British long track here in the Netherlands,

:40:28.:40:30.

the country that now Looking more like a stadium

:40:31.:40:33.

than an ice rink, the Netherlands responded to the warmer winters

:40:34.:40:39.

by building 17 of these arenas And for the Brits who now come here,

:40:40.:40:42.

it's home from home. On a rink as big as this,

:40:43.:40:55.

there's enough space for the team to build their stamina and speed

:40:56.:40:58.

alongside the hundreds of leisure It's been reborn in the Netherlands

:40:59.:41:03.

mainly because we don't It's an absolute tragedy to think

:41:04.:41:09.

where we were in the beginning We only have short track

:41:10.:41:17.

figure skating rinks, which are a maximum of 60 metres

:41:18.:41:20.

long in the UK. So, first steps with

:41:21.:41:23.

the British team. These are a bit more difficult

:41:24.:41:34.

than the skates you go on every Christmas once a year just

:41:35.:41:37.

for leisure, because they are just That's all that's resting on the

:41:38.:41:41.

ice. I obviously needed a body suit,

:41:42.:41:49.

and to learn the moves, the British team practise at home

:41:50.:41:57.

when they can't get out here. There are all sorts of things you

:41:58.:41:59.

can practise. At least a long track is a time

:42:00.:42:02.

trial, supposedly about pure speed rather than a race with the risk

:42:03.:42:07.

of others taking you down. And to help you on your way,

:42:08.:42:10.

the special boots are hinged The first couple of steps,

:42:11.:42:13.

you need to be explosive Then you can accelerate

:42:14.:42:19.

and finish your stride. As Ellia was keen to prove to me,

:42:20.:42:31.

out of the blocks, in my debut Races can be 5,000,

:42:32.:42:34.

even 10,000 metres. But for me, 100 metres

:42:35.:42:37.

was like a marathon. And while Ellia finished in 12

:42:38.:42:39.

seconds, she had time to put the tea on before I came in at 46.76,

:42:40.:42:46.

albeit a personal best. The less said about my performance,

:42:47.:42:53.

the better. But the British have done well in short track speed

:42:54.:42:59.

skating. That is a race against others. You can have crashes and

:43:00.:43:04.

people can take you down. We are trying to recapture glory in the

:43:05.:43:07.

long track, which has a much bigger track and it is a time trial against

:43:08.:43:12.

the clock. It is the fastest time that wins. It is a long time since

:43:13.:43:15.

Great Britain had any representation in the Olympics in that spot, but

:43:16.:43:20.

thanks to the Netherlands, by 2022, watch this space.

:43:21.:43:26.

There have been more dramatic scenes in Italy as firefighters have

:43:27.:43:28.

confirmed that four more people have been pulled alive from

:43:29.:43:31.

the debris of a hotel buried by an avalanche on Wednesday.

:43:32.:43:34.

Rescue workers managed to rescue nine people

:43:35.:43:35.

from the wreckage yesterday and crews are continuing to try

:43:36.:43:38.

Here to tell us how these rescue operations

:43:39.:43:41.

work is Alistair Read from Mountain Rescue

:43:42.:43:43.

We were just speaking to a correspondent in Italy a moment ago,

:43:44.:43:50.

establishing that as we speak, there is one person they know to be

:43:51.:43:55.

trapped. Presumably, they have communicated, but they can't yet

:43:56.:44:00.

reach? I imagine they will be listening to whichever noises...

:44:01.:44:05.

Hopefully, they will have established voice communication. It

:44:06.:44:07.

will be a challenge to make their way through the remains of the

:44:08.:44:11.

building, especially if there is a lot of snow inside the structure. So

:44:12.:44:15.

slow and steady work, but hopefully they have communication with that

:44:16.:44:19.

person. We have seen pictures of some of the children who were pulled

:44:20.:44:23.

out alive from what is left of the hotel. We heard a bit about the

:44:24.:44:29.

conditions, the wind and snow. What will they be doing to get them out?

:44:30.:44:37.

The first part would be to get as many people safe as they can. But to

:44:38.:44:41.

work in these conditions, you would need a range of different agencies

:44:42.:44:45.

to respond. There is mountain rescue, Fire Service, the police and

:44:46.:44:49.

ambulance. They are all working together to get people into that

:44:50.:44:53.

location, and work their way through the building to try and find voids,

:44:54.:44:57.

listen for other noises. They probably have search dogs as well in

:44:58.:45:00.

case they can pick up sent from people who are trapped. Then there

:45:01.:45:05.

are people with tools for people to dig and break through any concrete

:45:06.:45:08.

structures or walls they may find as part of the evacuation process. The

:45:09.:45:13.

shots from the air give you a sense of the quantity of snow lying on the

:45:14.:45:17.

hotel itself. We saw a moment ago that tunnel that is dropping down

:45:18.:45:20.

almost vertically down. How would they know where to put that tunnel

:45:21.:45:31.

in? Normally, they will see if there is an easy access point and try and

:45:32.:45:35.

dig snow at a location where they can go into the building. There were

:45:36.:45:39.

also put sensors out in the snow and listen for any noise. They will have

:45:40.:45:43.

white periods, so all the rescuers. Work and listen. But every now and

:45:44.:45:51.

again, they will bigger and if they find a location where they can make

:45:52.:45:56.

an entry into the remains of the building, they will. And it is still

:45:57.:46:00.

an ongoing operation and has been for nearly 70 hours, so they will be

:46:01.:46:06.

tired. Yeah, and we have seen already in the photographs in the

:46:07.:46:10.

aerial shots, there are 100 rescuers currently involved. It is going to

:46:11.:46:15.

be 24 hour working, so they will be rotating through people being flown

:46:16.:46:18.

in and flown out, people driving up with vehicles to take heavy

:46:19.:46:22.

equipment in. It is a major operation. Thank you for coming in

:46:23.:46:28.

from mountain rescue England and Wales.

:46:29.:46:30.

Here's Nick with a look at this morning's weather.

:46:31.:46:36.

It is a sunny one. The cold in continental Europe has been

:46:37.:46:42.

spreading across the UK to give a hard frost for many of us to start

:46:43.:46:47.

the day, but there has been a good deal of sunshine. There is cloud

:46:48.:46:50.

through north-east England which will push further towards the

:46:51.:46:55.

Midlands into north-east Wales. Clad towards the south-west of England as

:46:56.:47:00.

well. That will bounce more along the south coast. You can see decent

:47:01.:47:04.

sunshine between these two cloud areas. You may see a few light

:47:05.:47:10.

showers and patchy rain or drizzle around the thicker cloud moving into

:47:11.:47:14.

Yorkshire. More sunshine for Northern Ireland and Scotland

:47:15.:47:16.

compared with recent days. But in the clear areas, there are still fog

:47:17.:47:21.

patches and they will take longer to clear. A dry weather through the day

:47:22.:47:28.

and sunny weather, but cloud will increase in two parts of Northern

:47:29.:47:31.

Ireland. More across the far south of England. This cloudy zone will

:47:32.:47:37.

eventually cover more of the Midlands and northern England to

:47:38.:47:40.

produce light showers. It is cold enough to turn wintry over the tops

:47:41.:47:45.

of the Pennines. Into Scotland overnight, as it starts to push its

:47:46.:47:50.

way further north, it is very light. A few showers are heading into

:47:51.:47:53.

south-west England and Wales. With more cloud around tonight and the

:47:54.:47:59.

cloud tending to come and go, the frost will be more patchy compared

:48:00.:48:03.

with this morning. Tomorrow morning, it will be a cold start with patchy

:48:04.:48:08.

frost and fog. But we will also keep an eye on this cloud, producing a

:48:09.:48:14.

few light showers. Looks like the best of the sunshine will be across

:48:15.:48:19.

the Midlands, the East Anglia and south-east England. Sunshine or

:48:20.:48:22.

cloud, it is not going to feel any warmer, mind you. It is a chilly

:48:23.:48:26.

weekend and it will be into the start of next week.

:48:27.:48:32.

Millions of people around the world watched Donald Trump

:48:33.:48:37.

Breakfast's John Maguire joined one group of American students

:48:38.:48:42.

here in the UK for an inauguration party - to see what they

:48:43.:48:46.

Every four years we gather on these steps...

:48:47.:48:50.

Right across the United States and around the world,

:48:51.:48:55.

Americans gathered to witness an event that so many had predicted

:48:56.:48:58.

I, Donald John Trump, do solemnly swear...

:48:59.:49:03.

The office of President of the United States.

:49:04.:49:14.

These students, studying in London, are thousands of miles from home,

:49:15.:49:19.

yet witnessed every second of Donald Trump's inauguration

:49:20.:49:22.

as if they had a front row seat on Capitol Hill.

:49:23.:49:28.

In Washington, the atmosphere was serious, momentous, even.

:49:29.:49:31.

So in London, we decided to lighten the mood.

:49:32.:49:38.

Folks, we're going to play Trump Bingo, Top Trumps,

:49:39.:49:40.

We're going to give you each one of these valuable and rare BBC

:49:41.:49:51.

I want you to each choose four words, phrases and mannerisms.

:49:52.:49:56.

As the new president makes his speech, you have to mark each

:49:57.:49:59.

time it comes along, and whoever gets the most

:50:00.:50:01.

Or at least will win, how does that sound?

:50:02.:50:07.

We, along with the global audience, hung on every word and,

:50:08.:50:11.

luckily for one person, every hand gesture.

:50:12.:50:17.

We are transferring power from Washington, DC

:50:18.:50:19.

We will make America safe again and, yes, together we will make

:50:20.:50:34.

An inaugural speech should differ from campaign rhetoric and lacks

:50:35.:50:45.

the policy details of the State of the Union Address.

:50:46.:50:48.

Based on his crowd, I think it's something they would have liked,

:50:49.:50:52.

but for an inaugural address, I don't think he did a good job.

:50:53.:50:55.

It seemed like he was still in campaign mode,

:50:56.:51:04.

talking about the issues and why he is the one to fix them,

:51:05.:51:07.

but it seems like he already sold himself to the people and he won

:51:08.:51:11.

the election, now he should talk more about healing and more

:51:12.:51:13.

ambiguous overall themes about going forward.

:51:14.:51:18.

"We are going to make America great again" -

:51:19.:51:20.

he only said it once, but at the same time he spoke

:51:21.:51:28.

about healing the country, making compromises,

:51:29.:51:29.

the country, but the whole world together, and I thought

:51:30.:51:37.

So far, the man who has just become the 45th president

:51:38.:51:41.

has confounded history, politics, convention and,

:51:42.:51:42.

if he governs in the same vein, then, as the 40th president used

:51:43.:51:46.

to declare, you ain't seen nothing yet.

:51:47.:51:51.

There are so much analysis after a big event like that, looking at how

:51:52.:51:57.

people react and the words they use. Let's have a look at this word

:51:58.:52:00.

cloud, because it gives us an indication of what the key themes

:52:01.:52:05.

were in President Trump's speech. You could see that the word America

:52:06.:52:09.

was very dominant. His big message was about putting America first,

:52:10.:52:12.

giving it back to the forgotten people. The themes become very clear

:52:13.:52:19.

when you see them like that. The word world was only mentioned five

:52:20.:52:26.

times, but America or American were the main themes. That is just a

:52:27.:52:30.

snapshot of some of the language used as part of the Trump

:52:31.:52:31.

inauguration speech. He's recorded with everyone

:52:32.:52:35.

from David Bowie to Black

:52:36.:52:37.

Sabbath and Elton John. is to be inducted into the Rock

:52:38.:52:39.

and Roll Hall of Fame himself. And he joins us now. You are without

:52:40.:52:56.

your keyboard at the moment. But there is a story attached to this

:52:57.:53:00.

particular album which you are bringing out. It is linked to David

:53:01.:53:04.

Bowie's death and a moment in time when you went to Radio 2 to pay

:53:05.:53:10.

tribute. That is correct. David died almost a year to the day a couple of

:53:11.:53:16.

weeks ago. And because I did a lot of work with him in the 70s, like

:53:17.:53:20.

Space Oddity and other things, we were really good friends. We were

:53:21.:53:24.

neighbours for a few years. And I was asked to do various press and

:53:25.:53:28.

things to talk about David, which wasn't difficult because it is

:53:29.:53:31.

always nice to talk about somebody who has passed away when you really

:53:32.:53:35.

admire them and they were such a great and clever person. Simon Mayo,

:53:36.:53:40.

who does the Radio 2 drivetime show, I was down in London and he called

:53:41.:53:44.

me up and said, will you, on the programme about David? I said OK, so

:53:45.:53:48.

I went on the show and they had people calling in. It was very

:53:49.:53:54.

nicely done. It came to 6.50, and I said, I have got an idea. In the

:53:55.:54:00.

studio next door was Elton John's piano, because he took it there

:54:01.:54:03.

years ago and somebody would take it back because it was too big. He

:54:04.:54:07.

said, when you play life on Mars? I said OK. So I am walking out of the

:54:08.:54:12.

door and he said, make sure you finish when the pips start, because

:54:13.:54:16.

then we get cut off. I said, how will I know when that is? He said, I

:54:17.:54:20.

will hold a clock up for you. So there was a girl at the end of the

:54:21.:54:25.

piano holding the clock up. Luckily, it wasn't difficult because I know

:54:26.:54:29.

how long it is. And it was a couple of days later when Simon called me

:54:30.:54:33.

and said, there have been millions of hits on this. You should record

:54:34.:54:39.

it. So we recorded it for Macmillan care. We can see a bit of that

:54:40.:54:41.

recording now. So you mentioned a moment ago, you

:54:42.:55:22.

were originally working with David Bowie in the early stages when he

:55:23.:55:27.

was devising those songs. He was great. He was very generous as well.

:55:28.:55:34.

He invited me to his house in the 1970s and said, I want to play you

:55:35.:55:38.

some songs. He had this battered 12 string guitar and he played me the

:55:39.:55:41.

songs and Life On Mars came up and he said, think of this as a piano

:55:42.:55:45.

piece. He said, play it as a piano piece and we will work around you.

:55:46.:55:50.

And that is exactly what we did. He was very generous as a musician. But

:55:51.:55:54.

when you have got such a great song of that, it is not difficult.

:55:55.:55:59.

Sometimes when you were doing sessions for someone back them and

:56:00.:56:02.

the song was rubbish, you have to make something of it. But when you

:56:03.:56:07.

have great songs to work with, it's fantastic. Coming back to the Radio

:56:08.:56:12.

2 show with Simon Mayo, is that what prompted the album? Yeah. I got

:56:13.:56:17.

calls from various record companies and Universal, who I deal with a

:56:18.:56:21.

lot. They have, you need to do a piano album. There are some on the

:56:22.:56:27.

other things you played on in the 70s -- so many other things. They

:56:28.:56:31.

said, it is time you put all of these onto an album. Why have you

:56:32.:56:35.

never done it? Said, no one has ever asked me. They said, well, we are

:56:36.:56:40.

asking you. So I went into a favourite studio near where I live,

:56:41.:56:44.

which has some beautiful concert grand pianos, and we spent five

:56:45.:56:48.

weeks in there doing these pieces. It wasn't a case of going in and

:56:49.:56:52.

editing bits together. I wanted every piece to be a performance.

:56:53.:56:59.

Sometimes, we only got one a day. That is dedication. Let's listen to

:57:00.:57:00.

Space Oddity. It is really interesting listening

:57:01.:57:39.

to that. It works so well done as a piano piece. One I was at the royal

:57:40.:57:46.

college, I had a wonderful orchestration professor who used to

:57:47.:57:50.

give me exercises of taking the music from one composer and doing it

:57:51.:57:53.

in the stars of others and doing variations. That is nothing new,

:57:54.:57:57.

composers have been doing it for years. But the secret is to have a

:57:58.:58:01.

good melody. So I picked some classical pieces as well as modern

:58:02.:58:04.

pieces, the object being that hopefully, if somebody didn't know

:58:05.:58:07.

any of them, they hopefully wouldn't know if the tune was five years or

:58:08.:58:15.

500 years old. You have had such a brilliant, long career. Meaning I am

:58:16.:58:20.

old! In the nicest possible way! How much have you seen music change in

:58:21.:58:24.

that time? It is completely different. I was talking to people

:58:25.:58:29.

last night about it, and it has changed a lot. Some things are for

:58:30.:58:33.

the better. In general, there are more opportunities for young

:58:34.:58:37.

musicians. Instruments have become cheaper. It is much more accessible

:58:38.:58:44.

in many ways. The things we have lost a wonderful record shops and

:58:45.:58:47.

places to go, which were communal places where people talked about

:58:48.:58:51.

music. I would like to see those comeback. And I think they will,

:58:52.:58:55.

because vinyl is now outselling CDs and downloads. I can see the shops

:58:56.:59:01.

coming back. I would love to see record shops selling vinyl, CDs,

:59:02.:59:05.

doing downloads, so there is a place to get all your music. That would be

:59:06.:59:10.

great for young bands. It has been lovely seeing you.

:59:11.:59:12.

Rick Wakeman's new solo piano album Piano Portraits is out now.

:59:13.:59:15.

That's all from Breakfast this morning.

:59:16.:59:34.

Secure your place at the 500 Words Final,

:59:35.:59:38.

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