22/01/2017 Breakfast


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22/01/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Rachel Burden and Roger

:00:00.:00:00.

Theresa May will be the first world leader to meet President Trump.

:00:07.:00:19.

His spokesman confirms they will meet on Friday.

:00:20.:00:21.

A trade deal and Brexit are expected to be on the agenda.

:00:22.:00:24.

As hundreds of thousands take to the streets in protest

:00:25.:00:27.

against the new President, the White House goes to war over

:00:28.:00:30.

reports of the numbers who attended Friday's Inauguration.

:00:31.:00:32.

We had a massive field of people. You saw them, packed. I get up this

:00:33.:00:41.

morning, I turn on one of the networks, and they show an empty

:00:42.:00:42.

field. Good morning, it is

:00:43.:00:53.

Sunday 22 January. Also ahead: After reports that

:00:54.:00:56.

a Trident missile test went wrong, the Ministry of Defence says it

:00:57.:00:59.

has absolute confidence A cancer charity calls for more

:01:00.:01:01.

to be done to encourage women In sport: Britain's Andy Murray

:01:02.:01:09.

is being made to fight hard in the last 16 of

:01:10.:01:14.

the Australian Open. The world number one lost the first

:01:15.:01:16.

set to Germany's Mischa Zverev. Also, is this the first public

:01:17.:01:21.

statue of Jane Austen? We report on why it proved to be

:01:22.:01:24.

such a challenge for the artist. Good morning. It is another cold,

:01:25.:01:40.

frosty start. I see in a few spots as well because there are some

:01:41.:01:43.

showers around. That means those of us today it will be cloudier than

:01:44.:01:47.

yesterday. For others, though, still some sparkling sunshine on offer.

:01:48.:01:52.

All the details coming up in the next half an hour.

:01:53.:01:54.

First, our main story: Theresa May will become the first foreign leader

:01:55.:01:58.

to meet the new US President in Washington.

:01:59.:02:00.

They are due to have talks on Friday.

:02:01.:02:02.

The announcement was made during Donald Trump's first day

:02:03.:02:05.

in office, which also saw a series of protests

:02:06.:02:07.

against his administration and an onslaught against the media

:02:08.:02:10.

Our US correspondent David Willis has more.

:02:11.:02:18.

Donald Trump has got to go! In the nation's capital, they have rarely

:02:19.:02:26.

seen a rally quite like this. Not since the Vietnam War have so many

:02:27.:02:30.

people come together in defence of women's rights and minority rights,

:02:31.:02:34.

liberties these people believe could be imperilled by the presidency of

:02:35.:02:38.

Donald Trump. The man himself was visiting the headquarters of the

:02:39.:02:44.

CIA, while that rally was under way. Less concerned about secrets, it

:02:45.:02:50.

appeared, then crowd sizes, in particular reports of the attendants

:02:51.:02:54.

at his inauguration the previous day. I made a speech. I looked out,

:02:55.:03:01.

the field was... It looked like a million, a million people. They

:03:02.:03:06.

showed a field where there was practically nobody standing there.

:03:07.:03:10.

That theme was echoed in an unscheduled news conference a short

:03:11.:03:16.

while later, before confirming that Britain's Theresa May would be the

:03:17.:03:19.

first foreign leader to visit resident Trump, the new White House

:03:20.:03:23.

press works in railed against reports that Mr Trump had failed to

:03:24.:03:28.

attract as large crowd to his inauguration as Barack Obama. This

:03:29.:03:32.

was the largest audience to ever witnessed an inauguration, period.

:03:33.:03:35.

These attempts to lessen the inauguration doormat enthusiasm of

:03:36.:03:39.

the inauguration are shameful and wrong. Official estimates of crowd

:03:40.:03:44.

sizes are not released, but aerial photographs appear to contradict the

:03:45.:03:49.

Trump administration's assessment. Nonetheless, Mr Spicer, in his first

:03:50.:03:54.

reading at the White House, went on the issue a thinly veiled threat to

:03:55.:03:58.

reporters covering the Trump presidency. Were going to hold the

:03:59.:04:01.

press accountable as well. He will take his message directly to the

:04:02.:04:05.

American people, where his focus will always be. Size clearly matters

:04:06.:04:11.

greatly to Donald Trump, and regardless of the inauguration

:04:12.:04:14.

crowds, the crowd at yesterday's protest was so large that a march on

:04:15.:04:18.

the White House proved impossible because there were so many people

:04:19.:04:23.

present. It is a question which will ultimately prove the most

:04:24.:04:26.

unpalatable to the new administration, the messenger or the

:04:27.:04:28.

message. Our political correspondent

:04:29.:04:29.

Susana Mendonca is in our central Susana, what more do we know

:04:30.:04:31.

about the Prime Minister's visit? Quite a coup for Downing Street. We

:04:32.:04:44.

understand that they are going to be focusing on trade and the EU. A

:04:45.:04:49.

whole Brexit issue. In terms of trade, they wouldn't be in a

:04:50.:04:52.

position to do a trade deal at this stage, because Britain is to leave

:04:53.:04:56.

the European Union before it can actually do trade deals, but for

:04:57.:04:59.

Theresa May this is an opportunity to put out that message, really, at

:05:00.:05:03.

the EU, ahead of those EU negotiations, that she has a close

:05:04.:05:07.

relationship, that special relationship, with the United

:05:08.:05:10.

States. Of course, if you look back at the previous president, Barack

:05:11.:05:14.

Obama, he said that Britain would be at the back of the queue in any

:05:15.:05:18.

trade deals with the US. So certainly this is a coup for Theresa

:05:19.:05:22.

May, the fact that she has managed to, it seems, will be one of the

:05:23.:05:26.

first leaders to meet with the new president, Donald Trump, after his

:05:27.:05:30.

inauguration. Of course, it was embarrassing for her back in

:05:31.:05:33.

November when we saw Nigel Farage, the former UKIP leader, being the

:05:34.:05:38.

first politician, the first British politician, to meet Donald Trump. So

:05:39.:05:41.

this certainly has turned that around for her and her

:05:42.:05:44.

administration here will certainly be very happy that they are getting

:05:45.:05:47.

this opportunity to meet Donald Trump.

:05:48.:05:47.

In around half an hour's time, we will speak to protestors

:05:48.:05:50.

who attended one of yesterday's anti-Trump demonstrations.

:05:51.:05:56.

The Ministry of Defence has insisted it has full confidence

:05:57.:05:58.

in the Trident nuclear defence system, despite reports that a rare

:05:59.:06:01.

The Sunday Times says a missile fired from a submarine

:06:02.:06:05.

in the Atlantic Ocean veered off course and in the direction

:06:06.:06:08.

This is what the launch of a Trident missile looks like. It is an

:06:09.:06:31.

expensive business. Even an unarmed missile costs around ?70 million, so

:06:32.:06:36.

it doesn't happen very often. No video has been released of last

:06:37.:06:40.

year's launch, because, says the Sunday Times, it went badly wrong.

:06:41.:06:46.

According to the paper, the ship was stationed about 200 miles off the

:06:47.:06:50.

coast of Florida. It was due to fire the missile 5600 miles to a location

:06:51.:06:55.

off the west coast of Africa. Instead the rocket veered off

:06:56.:06:59.

target, heading towards the US. All this was just a few weeks before a

:07:00.:07:04.

crucial vote in Parliament to spend ?40 billion on building a new

:07:05.:07:10.

generation of Trident submarines. One Labour former Defence Minister

:07:11.:07:14.

is now calling for an enquiry. The government hasn't denied that the

:07:15.:07:17.

missile from HMS vengeance may have veered off course, but it said the

:07:18.:07:22.

capability and effectiveness of the Trident missile was unquestionable.

:07:23.:07:31.

In the a statement, the spokesman added...

:07:32.:07:37.

The government and the Prime Minister are now expect to face

:07:38.:07:43.

further questions about what exactly did happen with the Trident launch

:07:44.:07:44.

last year. Long delays in assessing the needs

:07:45.:07:47.

of patients are fuelling a bed-blocking crisis in hospitals,

:07:48.:07:50.

according to the watchdog Research seen by the BBC's 5

:07:51.:07:53.

Live Investigates programme suggests many social care assessments

:07:54.:08:04.

are failing to happen The Department of Health has said

:08:05.:08:06.

it is investing ?900 million of additional funding

:08:07.:08:11.

into the system over two years. The former president of The Gambia,

:08:12.:08:13.

Yahya Jammeh, has flown into exile, 22 years after taking control

:08:14.:08:17.

of the West African state in a coup. He sparked a political crisis

:08:18.:08:20.

when he refused to accept the outcome of the country's

:08:21.:08:23.

election, but finally agreed to hand over power to the winner,

:08:24.:08:26.

Adama Barrow, after the leaders of neighbouring countries

:08:27.:08:29.

threatened military action. French voters will begin the process

:08:30.:08:35.

of choosing a presidential candidate for the ruling

:08:36.:08:38.

Socialist party today. The current President,

:08:39.:08:40.

Francois Hollande, announced last month that he won't be

:08:41.:08:42.

standing for re-election. Our correspondent Hugh

:08:43.:08:44.

Schofield is in Paris. How does this fit into the way

:08:45.:08:46.

the French presidential election Well, it means that in this

:08:47.:09:05.

socialist party primary, that the sort of government candidate, if you

:09:06.:09:09.

like, the person who is going to be defending the record of the last few

:09:10.:09:13.

years, is not going to be the President but is going to be the

:09:14.:09:17.

Prime Minister, or the former prime minister, who stood down in order to

:09:18.:09:22.

do this, a few weeks ago. So we have him representing the kind of

:09:23.:09:26.

continuity, and broadly the right wing of the Socialist party, up

:09:27.:09:33.

against other characters. People much more aligned with the left wing

:09:34.:09:39.

of the Socialist party, and in this first round what we should see is a

:09:40.:09:44.

right-winger, probably Manuel Valls, and a left-winger emerging and there

:09:45.:09:47.

will probably be a run-off between those two in a week's time. One has

:09:48.:09:52.

to say that the whole of the Socialist party primary, which would

:09:53.:09:54.

normally be an extremely important event because it might well

:09:55.:09:58.

designate the left-wing contender in the presidential election, a good,

:09:59.:10:03.

50- 50 chance of winning, it has been thrown into total disarray by

:10:04.:10:06.

the unpopularity of the Socialist party, and the other figures on the

:10:07.:10:10.

left, including the whiz kid of the government, the liberal, these are

:10:11.:10:15.

characters who have a greater chance of representing the left in the

:10:16.:10:19.

upcoming election. It will be interesting to watch. Thank you very

:10:20.:10:20.

much indeed. The number of women being tested

:10:21.:10:25.

for cervical cancer is at a nine-year low,

:10:26.:10:27.

as women delay or avoid check-ups, Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust found

:10:28.:10:30.

embarrassment and worries about pain Our health reporter

:10:31.:10:34.

Smitha Mundasad has more details. A smear of lipstick to encourage

:10:35.:10:41.

women not to ignore their smear test. They are offered to women aged

:10:42.:10:49.

25 to 64, to help prevent cervical cancer. Last year's campaign drew

:10:50.:10:54.

celebrity support. From the model car at the Levine to reality star

:10:55.:10:59.

Lauren Pope. And the charity behind it says this year their message has

:11:00.:11:05.

never been more important. At the moment, in England, for example, the

:11:06.:11:09.

number of women who attend cervical screening is at a 19 year low. That

:11:10.:11:13.

is hugely concerning because if it carries on we are going to see more

:11:14.:11:17.

women diagnosed, we are sadly going to see more women passing away, and

:11:18.:11:21.

we just don't want that to happen. The charity's latest survey suggests

:11:22.:11:25.

half of women aged 25 to 29 have put off getting a smear test. The

:11:26.:11:29.

reasons, more than a quarter said they were too embarrassed. A similar

:11:30.:11:33.

number said they were worried about pain. And almost one in ten said

:11:34.:11:38.

they had never had the test at all. NHS England says it is particular

:11:39.:11:42.

worried about the fall in young women getting smears in the last few

:11:43.:11:46.

years, because that has been linked to a rise in women under 35 getting

:11:47.:11:52.

cervical cancer. It says it is working on projects to encourage

:11:53.:11:56.

more young women to take up the tests.

:11:57.:11:58.

The time new cars are allowed on Britain's roads before requiring

:11:59.:12:01.

an MOT could rise from three to four years, under Government proposals.

:12:02.:12:04.

The period before the annual safety check is needed could change

:12:05.:12:07.

in 2018, after a public consultation.

:12:08.:12:09.

The Department for Transport said safer technology and improved

:12:10.:12:11.

manufacturing means new vehicles stay roadworthy for longer.

:12:12.:12:14.

The move would bring Britain into line with Northern Ireland

:12:15.:12:16.

It sounds like the plot to a classic American road-trip movie.

:12:17.:12:24.

Five young adventurers make a perilous coast-to-coast journey,

:12:25.:12:26.

Well, now it has happened in real life, to a group of baby raccoons.

:12:27.:12:32.

They were born in a truck in Florida, which was driven to

:12:33.:12:35.

The driver only discovered his stowaways four days later.

:12:36.:12:42.

You will be pleased to know the creatures are now being cared

:12:43.:12:45.

for at a local zoo, until a new, more permanent home is found.

:12:46.:12:55.

They are unbelievably sweet creatures, really friendly as well.

:12:56.:13:02.

Let's have a quick runs through some of the front pages of the Sunday

:13:03.:13:07.

newspapers. We will start with the Sunday Times, unsurprisingly Donald

:13:08.:13:10.

Trump is on the front page of most of the papers today. The rallies

:13:11.:13:13.

here, the demonstrations, a picture of resident Trump and his wife at

:13:14.:13:18.

the top and the story about the Trident missile misfire, which is

:13:19.:13:22.

there on the front page of the Sunday Times. The British Prime

:13:23.:13:27.

Minister, Theresa May, likely to go and meet Donald Trump next week on

:13:28.:13:31.

Friday. The Sunday Telegraph is talking about a new deal full

:13:32.:13:35.

Britain which will be top of the agenda. The possibility post Brexit

:13:36.:13:43.

forming a trade association with the United States. The stories regarding

:13:44.:13:47.

the new American President, both the protests and the -- Theresa May's

:13:48.:13:57.

visit. Cut out your sexist insults, Mr President. Curious to know how

:13:58.:14:01.

this will work. Theresa May is apparently going to challenge or

:14:02.:14:04.

somehow raise President Putin's attitude to women and comments he

:14:05.:14:09.

has raised previously when she met him. I wonder how all in what

:14:10.:14:14.

context she will do that. Yes, President Trump. His comments have

:14:15.:14:18.

made headlines. He now currently calls Theresa May my Maggie, harking

:14:19.:14:25.

back of course the Ronald Reagan, another former Republican President,

:14:26.:14:28.

and his relationship with Margaret Thatcher all those years ago.

:14:29.:14:29.

You are watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:14:30.:14:31.

The main stories this morning: Theresa May will be the first

:14:32.:14:34.

foreign leader to meet Donald Trump since he was sworn in as US

:14:35.:14:38.

Meanwhile, Mr Trump has accused the media of lying about the size

:14:39.:14:41.

of the crowds at his inauguration, as more than a million people joined

:14:42.:14:45.

protests against the new President in cities around the world.

:14:46.:14:48.

Also coming up in the programme: With pride, and some prejudice,

:14:49.:14:51.

many towns and cities have tried to claim Jane Austen as their own.

:14:52.:14:54.

But, as plans for the first statue of the author are revealed,

:14:55.:14:58.

we will find out why Basingstoke appears to have the ultimate

:14:59.:15:00.

A pretty cold start in many places this morning. Scraping the highs off

:15:01.:15:21.

the windscreen. Your picture confirms the point. -- ice. Good

:15:22.:15:27.

morning. If you wanted to know how cold air is outside, especially if

:15:28.:15:32.

you are still stuck under the blanket, the lowest temperatures in

:15:33.:15:37.

rural south-east England and East Anglia at the moment. Well below

:15:38.:15:40.

freezing. Some places in highland Scotland below freezing. Belfast,

:15:41.:15:47.

Edinburgh, as well. A bit more cloud around for some of us compared with

:15:48.:15:50.

yesterday morning. Even some precipitation. I say that because it

:15:51.:15:58.

is in the form of rain, sleet, and even snow. Brush and Northern

:15:59.:16:02.

Ireland to begin the day. It is clipping the West Midlands as well.

:16:03.:16:08.

Not amounting to much. It could turn things icy in a few spots. Not too

:16:09.:16:17.

many fog patches around. Where we have the clearest skies in

:16:18.:16:21.

south-east England and East Anglia today is where we will see sparkling

:16:22.:16:25.

sunshine. Absolutely gorgeous in the afternoon. Some brighter breaks.

:16:26.:16:30.

Some sunshine into Northern Ireland. The northern part of south-west

:16:31.:16:34.

England, Wales, northern England, and especially Scotland, cloudy at

:16:35.:16:39.

times. The potential for some light showers. A few flurries in Scotland.

:16:40.:16:44.

A call today but not as cold as in Wales and south-west England. The

:16:45.:16:49.

frost comes back. One or two showers. Some fog patches

:16:50.:16:54.

developing. We are concerned about the extent and density of the fog in

:16:55.:16:59.

England and Wales. By no means will everyone get that. There will be

:17:00.:17:04.

dense and freezing fog patches to start the day tomorrow in parts of

:17:05.:17:08.

England and Wales. And potentially on Tuesday morning as well. There is

:17:09.:17:13.

a risk of some disruption from that. Please check things before heading

:17:14.:17:16.

out in the morning. Those areas tomorrow in England and Wales start

:17:17.:17:21.

with some of the biggest fog and may see it linger even into the

:17:22.:17:24.

afternoon. That will make things very cold. Variable cloud and sunny

:17:25.:17:28.

spells elsewhere. Mainly dry, though. Single figures. The emphasis

:17:29.:17:32.

is on cold weather as the week begin. England and Wales, and for

:17:33.:17:40.

Scotland and Northern Ireland, the breeze will pick up. Outbreaks of

:17:41.:17:43.

rain later in the week as things start to change and we lose

:17:44.:17:47.

high-pressure and low pressure begins to come in. That is how it is

:17:48.:17:52.

looking at the moment. Very atmospheric. Thank you very much

:17:53.:17:56.

indeed. We will be back with a summary of the news at half past

:17:57.:18:03.

six. Now it is time for the Film Review.

:18:04.:18:29.

Hello, and welcome to the Film Review on BBC News.

:18:30.:18:32.

To take us through this week's cinema releases,

:18:33.:18:34.

as ever, Mark Kermode is with me, and what will you be telling us

:18:35.:18:37.

We have Jackie, in which Natalie Portman plays the First Lady.

:18:38.:18:42.

We have Split, a psychological thriller from M Night Shyamalan.

:18:43.:18:45.

And Lion, the true story of a little boy lost.

:18:46.:18:48.

So this is directed by Chilean film-maker Pablo Larrain,

:18:49.:18:52.

and it's the story of the assassination and aftermath

:18:53.:18:55.

of John F Kennedy, as seen through the eyes of Jackie Kennedy,

:18:56.:18:58.

played, as everyone will know, by Natalie Portman.

:18:59.:19:00.

There's been an awful lot of interest in her performance,

:19:01.:19:03.

lots and lots of nominations, and the film plays out

:19:04.:19:06.

It's essentially juggling a series of different time frames that

:19:07.:19:17.

are all meant to be representing her fragmented state of mind,

:19:18.:19:20.

so we have the motorcade in Dallas, the aftermath in Washington,

:19:21.:19:23.

we have the funeral, the huge sort of funeral

:19:24.:19:25.

arrangements, and we also have a wrap round which is

:19:26.:19:28.

Jackie Kennedy being interviewed by a journalist who,

:19:29.:19:31.

in the film is unnamed, but it's obviously inspired

:19:32.:19:34.

At the very beginning of the interview she says to him,

:19:35.:19:38.

"Just remember I'm editing this conversation."

:19:39.:19:40.

And he says, "OK, it's going to be your version of events."

:19:41.:19:43.

You'll have to share something personal eventually.

:19:44.:19:46.

People won't stop asking until you do.

:19:47.:19:48.

And if I don't, they'll interpret my silence

:19:49.:19:50.

"Her brow furrows, her lips are drawn.

:19:51.:19:53.

She holds back her tears but she can't hide her anger."

:19:54.:19:56.

This article will bring you a great deal of attention.

:19:57.:20:08.

Are you afraid I'm about to cry again?

:20:09.:20:18.

No, I'd say you're more likely to scream?

:20:19.:20:20.

And interesting, because people might think we know everything

:20:21.:20:31.

there is to know about that story, is there anything new in this,

:20:32.:20:34.

What it does is, it attempts to portray her, firstly as somebody

:20:35.:20:38.

going through an horrendous personal crisis, and we do

:20:39.:20:41.

have the assassination, and it is shocking, as it should be.

:20:42.:20:44.

But also somebody who, in the period immediately

:20:45.:20:46.

afterwards, is constructing the legacy, is basically building

:20:47.:20:48.

the Camelot story, which then became the story everybody told about JFK.

:20:49.:20:51.

Jackie is portrayed very much as First Lady of the televisual age,

:20:52.:20:55.

somebody who is a master of the printed word and also

:20:56.:20:58.

Some of the things - you may have noticed from that

:20:59.:21:05.

clip her performance is very arch, very stagey, very mannered,

:21:06.:21:08.

and when I first saw the film I actually found that alienating.

:21:09.:21:12.

It was only later on, and I have seen it twice now,

:21:13.:21:15.

She is alienated from her surroundings.

:21:16.:21:21.

Because the film has this kaleidescopic and necessarily

:21:22.:21:23.

fragmentary structure, it is possible that it may not gel,

:21:24.:21:25.

that it may not engage you emotionally.

:21:26.:21:27.

The key to it doing the emotional engagement is Mica Levi's score,

:21:28.:21:31.

which is absolutely brilliant, and it's one of those films

:21:32.:21:33.

in which the music is the thing that pulls it all together.

:21:34.:21:37.

Pulls all these different fragments, shards, elements together,

:21:38.:21:39.

and involves you in the story emotionally.

:21:40.:21:45.

I think Natalie Portman's performance is very peculiar,

:21:46.:21:47.

very strange, but it's because she is performing a performance.

:21:48.:21:50.

She is playing somebody on a stage, also somebody in the eye of a storm.

:21:51.:21:54.

The music for me is what made it, you know, cohere, what made it gel,

:21:55.:21:58.

what made it into something other than just a kind of arch

:21:59.:22:01.

and slightly abstract exercise in revisiting history.

:22:02.:22:09.

Well, we will find out next week whether she has been nominated

:22:10.:22:12.

James McAvoy, great British actor back on the screen.

:22:13.:22:21.

Yes, so this is a new film from M Night Shyamalan,

:22:22.:22:24.

who I think is still best known for The Sixth Sense,

:22:25.:22:27.

and had a run of critically acclaimed films and then made some

:22:28.:22:30.

real stinkers, and kind of came back recently with a sort of stripped

:22:31.:22:35.

This is, I think it's an interesting story.

:22:36.:22:38.

James McAvoy plays somebody who has 23 separate personalities.

:22:39.:22:41.

At the beginning of film we see him kidnapping some young women,

:22:42.:22:44.

one of them is played by Anya Taylor-Joy,

:22:45.:22:46.

who was so brilliant in The Witch, who realises pretty early on the key

:22:47.:22:50.

to her survival is going to be negotiating with different

:22:51.:22:53.

personalities that seem to be existing within this

:22:54.:22:55.

Now, McAvoy has real fun with the role.

:22:56.:23:01.

On the one hand, he is playing someone who is a fashion designer,

:23:02.:23:06.

another is a young child with a lisp, and there's a veyr

:23:07.:23:09.

prim, proper woman called Patricia, and all these controlling elements,

:23:10.:23:12.

and they keep talking about the Beast, the Beast,

:23:13.:23:14.

this thing called the Beast, which may or may not surface.

:23:15.:23:17.

Shyamalan, I think, is not the - is not quite the master of the genre

:23:18.:23:22.

Sometimes the screenplay is very clunky, some of the direction

:23:23.:23:28.

is a little bit creaky and the story is preposterous,

:23:29.:23:31.

but in a way which is - but if you saw it as like

:23:32.:23:35.

an old fashioned B-movie, when you kind of think,

:23:36.:23:37.

OK, it's one of those films, it kind of functions OK,

:23:38.:23:40.

but it is held shoulder high by McAvoy's performance,

:23:41.:23:42.

and also by the fact that if you accept that the set up

:23:43.:23:46.

is fairly preposterous, and what you're going to get

:23:47.:23:55.

shouldn't be taken too seriously, there are certain joys about it.

:23:56.:23:58.

It is much better than the films he was making a few years ago,

:23:59.:24:02.

when he really did seem to be somebody, who,

:24:03.:24:04.

having started with, you know, brilliant work like Sixth Sense,

:24:05.:24:07.

had then just gone completely out of control, and was making

:24:08.:24:10.

And described as horror film when I've read about it.

:24:11.:24:14.

It's a psychological thriller with some horror elements, yes.

:24:15.:24:17.

I think he would like to describe it as a mystery.

:24:18.:24:22.

I would describe it as a clunky B-movie, raised shoulder high

:24:23.:24:25.

by the central performance, which of course is several central

:24:26.:24:27.

This whole thing about truth is stranger than fiction.

:24:28.:24:47.

The story of a young boy in the mid 80s, from Kandahar,

:24:48.:24:50.

who got onto a train on which he was trapped,

:24:51.:24:53.

which then travelled 1600 kilometres, and by the time he got

:24:54.:24:56.

off it he was away from home, couldn't speak the language,

:24:57.:24:59.

didn't know how to describe how to get himself back home,

:25:00.:25:02.

and ended up in the hands of the authorities and ended up

:25:03.:25:05.

being adopted by a couple in Tasmania.

:25:06.:25:07.

Decades later, the taste of an Indian sweet food suddenly

:25:08.:25:10.

sends him into a reverie, which takes him back

:25:11.:25:12.

to his childhood and he suddenly becomes obsessed with trying to find

:25:13.:25:15.

the life that he lost, and had almost forgotten about.

:25:16.:25:18.

Do you have any idea what it's like knowing my real brother

:25:19.:25:25.

and mother spend every day of their lives looking for me?

:25:26.:25:28.

How every day my real brother screams my name?

:25:29.:25:30.

Can you imagine the pain they must be in, not knowing where I am?

:25:31.:25:34.

Why didn't you tell me that was happening for you?

:25:35.:25:41.

We swan about in our privileged lives.

:25:42.:25:44.

I mean, he's a hugely likeable actor, Dev Patel.

:25:45.:26:03.

He is absolutely brilliant in this, and also the film itself does a very

:26:04.:26:07.

good job of not becoming what you think it might be,

:26:08.:26:10.

which is the film in which somebody looks something up on Google Earth.

:26:11.:26:13.

It's a film which has real emotional resonance.

:26:14.:26:16.

The opening scenes with the young boy, the five-year-old boy getting

:26:17.:26:18.

lost in the train station has a Spielbergy element to it.

:26:19.:26:22.

The young kid with the enormous machinery of these train stations.

:26:23.:26:25.

Nicole Kidman as Saroo's his adoptive mother does a very,

:26:26.:26:30.

very good job of an understated performance, which manages

:26:31.:26:32.

Firstly anguish, but she also manages to demonstrate love,

:26:33.:26:40.

which is a really hard thing to act on screen,

:26:41.:26:43.

I have seen this twice now, both times I confess I have been

:26:44.:26:53.

I think you would have to be pretty hard hearted not to.

:26:54.:26:59.

It is a really, really moving story, and it is told in a way

:27:00.:27:02.

which is populist and accessible, but also, I think, profoundly

:27:03.:27:05.

touching, and even second time around, even when I knew,

:27:06.:27:08.

because the first time round I didn't know anything

:27:09.:27:10.

about the story, I saw it completely cold.

:27:11.:27:12.

Even second time round when I did, I found it a very overwhelming

:27:13.:27:16.

Best out - I have a feeling I know what you might pick?

:27:17.:27:21.

The biggest problem La La Land has is, everyone says La La Land

:27:22.:27:26.

is brilliant, so now there is almost a backlash,

:27:27.:27:28.

people saying "Oh, surely it can't be as good as that."

:27:29.:27:31.

It's a modern musical that owes a debt to The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

:27:32.:27:37.

and Singin' in the Rain, but also to Casablanca and New York,

:27:38.:27:40.

And the big crowd scenes, the big numbers are quite something.

:27:41.:27:46.

And I've heard some people say "Oh, there's not a memorable tune in it."

:27:47.:27:50.

I could be singing that soundtrack endlessly since seeing the film.

:27:51.:27:55.

I thnk Damien Chazelle has done an absolutely brilliant job.

:27:56.:27:59.

It does have a strong poignant thread of sadness,

:28:00.:28:05.

which is what makes the joyful element more joyful.

:28:06.:28:08.

So Kubo and the Two Strings is an animated film,

:28:09.:28:16.

stop motion animation film, and, I mean, I'm a huge animation fan,

:28:17.:28:19.

not least because it's such a diverse genre.

:28:20.:28:21.

What I loved about this is the animation itself

:28:22.:28:23.

is breathtaking, you can just watch it over and over again,

:28:24.:28:26.

which is why it's lovely to have it for home viewing.

:28:27.:28:29.

It's a lovely complicated multi-layered story,

:28:30.:28:31.

which is told through words, actions, but also through music,

:28:32.:28:34.

and it's one of those films I think genuinely audiences of all ages can

:28:35.:28:37.

watch, and a film which treats its audience with respect.

:28:38.:28:40.

It imagines that its audience is smart enough to keep up

:28:41.:28:43.

with the story, is emotionally engaged enough to understand

:28:44.:28:46.

the deeper themes of the story, and are also willing for the story

:28:47.:28:49.

I thought it was wonderful, and several nominations.

:28:50.:28:57.

I think it's a film which really deserves repeat viewing.

:28:58.:29:00.

I can imagine, I have the Blu-ray of this, I can imagine going back

:29:01.:29:03.

to it time and time again, and every time you see it seeing

:29:04.:29:07.

Mark, great to see you, as ever, thank you very much.

:29:08.:29:13.

Just a reminder, you can find more film news and reviews

:29:14.:29:16.

from across the BBC online, including you can see

:29:17.:29:18.

We were talking about Natalie Portman, find out who has

:29:19.:29:25.

been nominated for the Oscars on our special programme coming

:29:26.:29:28.

on Tuesday, 1:15pm lunchtime, on the BBC News channel.

:29:29.:29:30.

Join me and the film critic Jason Solomons for all of that.

:29:31.:29:33.

That's it for this week, though, thanks for watching.

:29:34.:29:43.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Rachel Burden and Roger

:29:44.:29:58.

Coming up before 7:00am, Nick will have the weather.

:29:59.:30:02.

But first, at 6:30am, a summary of this morning's main news.

:30:03.:30:05.

The Prime Minster is due to become the first foreign leader to hold

:30:06.:30:08.

Theresa May will meet Donald Trump in Washington on Friday.

:30:09.:30:13.

Trade, security and the future of the European Union

:30:14.:30:15.

are all expected to be high on the agenda.

:30:16.:30:23.

Millions of people around the world have taken part in protests

:30:24.:30:26.

against President Trump's new administration.

:30:27.:30:27.

The demonstrations during his first full day in office had originally

:30:28.:30:31.

been planned to highlight women's rights.

:30:32.:30:32.

The crowd at the Washington event surpassed the numbers who turned out

:30:33.:30:35.

The Ministry of Defence has insisted it has full confidence

:30:36.:30:42.

in the Trident nuclear defence system, despite reports that a rare

:30:43.:30:45.

The Sunday Times says a missile fired from a submarine

:30:46.:30:49.

in the Atlantic Ocean veered off-course, and in the direction

:30:50.:30:52.

Long delays in assessing the needs of patients are fuelling

:30:53.:31:02.

a bed-blocking crisis in hospitals, according to the watchdog

:31:03.:31:04.

Research seen by the BBC's 5 Live Investigates programme suggests

:31:05.:31:08.

many social care assessments are failing to happen

:31:09.:31:10.

in the recommended time of six weeks.

:31:11.:31:16.

NHS England says at the end of November last year nearly 7000

:31:17.:31:26.

hospital beds were occupied by patients who should have been

:31:27.:31:30.

discharged. It says one in three remained in hospital because of

:31:31.:31:34.

delays in assessment and care package is not being in place.

:31:35.:31:38.

Healthwatch England has investigated how widespread delays in social care

:31:39.:31:43.

assessments are, both in the community and in hospitals. The

:31:44.:31:46.

longest reported delay in the community was nearly two years. It

:31:47.:31:51.

said that data from local authorities on waiting times for

:31:52.:31:55.

assessments was incredibly patchy. Not only that, it also found

:31:56.:31:59.

assessment reviews which according to the care act should be done every

:32:00.:32:02.

12 months to assess changing needs simply aren't being done. The

:32:03.:32:07.

Department of Health said it was investing ?900 million of additional

:32:08.:32:11.

funding into adult social care over the next two years, and will

:32:12.:32:15.

continued to challenge local authorities that fail to carry out

:32:16.:32:17.

timely assessments. The former president of The Gambia,

:32:18.:32:19.

Yahya Jammeh, has flown into exile, 22 years after taking control

:32:20.:32:23.

of the West African state in a coup. He sparked a political crisis

:32:24.:32:26.

when he refused to accept the outcome of the country's

:32:27.:32:29.

election, but finally agreed to hand over power to the winner,

:32:30.:32:32.

Adama Barrow, after the leaders of neighbouring countries

:32:33.:32:35.

threatened military action. A charity says many local

:32:36.:32:41.

authorities and clinical commissioning groups in England

:32:42.:32:43.

are doing too little to encourage Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust says

:32:44.:32:46.

that, over the past five years, there has been a 3% drop

:32:47.:32:50.

in the number of women The time new cars are allowed

:32:51.:32:53.

on Britain's roads before they need an MOT could go up from three

:32:54.:32:59.

to four years, under The Department for Transport said

:33:00.:33:03.

safer technology and improved manufacturing means new vehicles

:33:04.:33:07.

stay roadworthy for longer. The change, which could come

:33:08.:33:09.

in from 2018, would bring Britain in line with Northern Ireland

:33:10.:33:12.

and many other European countries. Lots of live sport to keep an eye on

:33:13.:33:31.

as well, the tennis this morning. Yes, a great chance for Andy Murray

:33:32.:33:36.

to win his first Australian Open, Novak Djokovic is out. But it is not

:33:37.:33:41.

going his way at the moment, he is losing 2-1 against the German Zverev

:33:42.:33:43.

who is ranked world number 50. So Andy Murray certainly hasn't had

:33:44.:33:45.

it all his own way at the Australian He was in a good position

:33:46.:33:49.

in that opening set, The world number one

:33:50.:33:52.

bounced back in the second. Zverev has just taken the third set

:33:53.:33:56.

6-2 as well. It is a fascinating contest,

:33:57.:34:03.

with Murray really being challenged by Zverev's

:34:04.:34:06.

serve-and-volley tactics. Britain's Dan Evans is also

:34:07.:34:14.

in action in Melbourne. It is the first time he has made it

:34:15.:34:18.

to the fourth round of a Grand Slam. He is facing the 12th seed,

:34:19.:34:23.

Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, and in the opening set

:34:24.:34:25.

it is going with serve. Wayne Rooney has become

:34:26.:34:28.

Manchester United's Yesterday he hit his 250th goal

:34:29.:34:34.

for the club, an equaliser against Stoke City, to surpass

:34:35.:34:37.

Sir Bobby Charlton's record. Patrick Gearey has been looking back

:34:38.:34:40.

at his Manchester United career. Wayne Rooney, with the ball at his

:34:41.:34:53.

feet. It is a sensational goal! Wayne Rooney, recordbreaker. That is

:34:54.:35:00.

number 250. Wayne Rooney, master of timing, Master of placement. The

:35:01.:35:06.

goal was a point and yet were far more than that. In the grand scheme

:35:07.:35:10.

of things it is a huge honour for me, and something I never expected

:35:11.:35:14.

when I joined the club. I'm delighted, and really proud. Rooney

:35:15.:35:20.

arrived at Old Trafford in 2004. ?27 million worth of teenage potential.

:35:21.:35:23.

He paid the first instalment rack with a hat-trick on his debut and

:35:24.:35:27.

was united's top scorer in his first season. The passion that fuelled

:35:28.:35:31.

Rooney sometimes ignited in those early years but he became United's

:35:32.:35:37.

effervescent centre. That is absolutely fantastic! Capable of

:35:38.:35:40.

turning any game upside down. He was part of a side which won five

:35:41.:35:45.

Premier League, a Champions League, and the FA Cup, and yet twice he

:35:46.:35:49.

wanted to leave. Some questioned whether he really led red. He has

:35:50.:35:55.

followed in past United royalty. Sir Bobby Charlton admitted today he was

:35:56.:35:58.

disappointed to lose his record but was delighted for the man he has

:35:59.:36:03.

handed it on to. Comparison between the man is tricky. Sir Bobby

:36:04.:36:06.

Charlton's goals came at a slower rate at a longer period of time, but

:36:07.:36:10.

he was a midfielder, really is a forward. Charlton's goals a recent

:36:11.:36:15.

in the imagination. He survived the Munich air crash and led the club's

:36:16.:36:20.

recovery. Rooney may never received such rocksolid legendary status, but

:36:21.:36:24.

in terms of facts, in terms of goals, no one at Manchester United

:36:25.:36:26.

is above Wayne Rooney. Premier League leaders Chelsea

:36:27.:36:28.

will be happy with the results The teams chasing them

:36:29.:36:31.

gained little ground. Liverpool suffered a shock

:36:32.:36:34.

defeat to Swansea City, and Manchester City

:36:35.:36:36.

and Tottenham Hotspur drew. Ben Croucher wraps

:36:37.:36:38.

up the day's action. Saturday wasn't a good day to manage

:36:39.:36:49.

a top six side, if you played, that is. Along with Manchester United,

:36:50.:36:53.

the other three in action couldn't muster a win between them. Liverpool

:36:54.:36:58.

are yet to win in the league in 2017, struggling Swansea had never

:36:59.:37:05.

won in the league at Anfield, but Llorente put them ahead. Liverpool

:37:06.:37:10.

couldn't hang on. It is going to come to Sigurdsson, Swansea back in

:37:11.:37:15.

front! And holding on for a 3-2 win, Clements' first as Swansea manager.

:37:16.:37:20.

The Liverpool slipup presented Manchester City and told them the

:37:21.:37:24.

chance to move clear of them. City looked on course when two mistakes

:37:25.:37:28.

allowed them to go two dolls up, only for Spurs to then score with

:37:29.:37:31.

their only two shots on target. Gabrielle's thwarted one with his

:37:32.:37:36.

first shot in a city shirt. One slight problem. It is not easy being

:37:37.:37:42.

a football manager, is it? Look at the agony. If it is tough near the

:37:43.:37:49.

top, try being at the bottom. That is where Moyes's Sunderland find

:37:50.:37:53.

themselves after losing 2-0 at West Brom. Chris Brunt scored the pick of

:37:54.:37:58.

the goals. If the Moyes magic hasn't rubbed off on Sunderland, Sam's

:37:59.:38:02.

sorcery is lacking at Little Palace as well. A la dice is still without

:38:03.:38:06.

a Premier League win at his new club. Seamus Coleman's led strikes

:38:07.:38:11.

or Everton relegate Palace into the bottom three. One man on the upper

:38:12.:38:15.

right now is Andy Carroll. He followed up his wonder goal last

:38:16.:38:20.

weekend with two more in West Ham's 3-1 victory at Middlesbrough.

:38:21.:38:23.

Elsewhere, Bournemouth came from behind twice to salvage a draw

:38:24.:38:26.

against Watford, and you can see there confirmation of that draw

:38:27.:38:29.

between Stoke City and Manchester United.

:38:30.:38:30.

League leaders Chelsea play Hull City later,

:38:31.:38:32.

Rangers came from behind to beat Motherwell 2-1 and reach the fifth

:38:33.:38:40.

Rangers left it late, but Kenny Miller scored twice

:38:41.:38:44.

at Ibrox, to ensure last season's beaten finalists

:38:45.:38:46.

There was no fairytale for the minnows.

:38:47.:38:49.

Bonnyrigg Rose were thrashed by cup holders Hibs.

:38:50.:38:52.

Highland League side Formartine United lost 4-0

:38:53.:38:54.

The upset of the day was at Dundee, who were beaten at home

:38:55.:38:59.

by Championship strugglers St Mirren, 2-0.

:39:00.:39:00.

A full rundown of results can be found on the BBC Sport website.

:39:01.:39:10.

European Champions Cup Holders Saracens narrowly beat Toulon 10-3,

:39:11.:39:13.

to top their pool and secure themselves a home quarter-final.

:39:14.:39:15.

In a low-scoring contest, Chris Ashton, who is joining Toulon

:39:16.:39:18.

at the end of the season, scored the game's only try

:39:19.:39:21.

The result of the day, though, came at Welford Road,

:39:22.:39:35.

where Glasgow hammered Leicester 43-0, to reach the quarter-finals

:39:36.:39:38.

for the first time in the club's history.

:39:39.:39:40.

Elsewhere, Exeter are out, after a heavy defeat at Clermont

:39:41.:39:43.

Ronnie O'Sullivan will face Joe Perry in the final

:39:44.:39:48.

of Snooker's Masters, at Alexandra Palace in north

:39:49.:39:50.

O'Sullivan had to recover from 4-3 in his semi-final with Marco Fu.

:39:51.:39:55.

And having to replace the tip of his cue.

:39:56.:39:58.

He won three frames in a row to seal a 6-4 win.

:39:59.:40:04.

I just felt, like, all the way through that match I felt I can win

:40:05.:40:11.

this but I have to play well, and I can't make many mistakes, and a

:40:12.:40:14.

little shop was missable. I thought it is a tap against me, but I can do

:40:15.:40:20.

this. When I did it I was so relieved, because now I have another

:40:21.:40:21.

day to get used to the tip. Joe Perry trailed Barry Hawkins 5-2

:40:22.:40:27.

in their semi-final before The game hinged on this snooker

:40:28.:40:32.

in the eighth frame. He then went on to win

:40:33.:40:39.

four frames in a row. And will now try to stop O'Sullivan

:40:40.:40:42.

winning a seventh Masters title. In golf, England's Tyrell Hatton

:40:43.:40:48.

takes a one-shot lead into today's final round at the Abu

:40:49.:40:51.

Dhabi Championship. He is 13-under-par, after a round of

:40:52.:40:58.

four-under-par 68 yesterday. But he is faced with an intimidating

:40:59.:41:04.

chasing pack, including US Open

:41:05.:41:07.

champion Dustin Johnson England's Tommy Fleetwood's also

:41:08.:41:09.

in that group at 12-under. English pair Ross Fisher

:41:10.:41:14.

and Lee Westwood are two And the third one dayer

:41:15.:41:17.

between England and India gets under England have already lost

:41:18.:41:27.

the three-match series, And Andy Murray has gone a

:41:28.:41:45.

breakdown. Keeping an eye on Dan Evans as well. He has knocked out

:41:46.:41:57.

Cilic, Tomic, the home favourite. He is a great shot today. This is when

:41:58.:42:04.

you realise you are getting old, when you can't read the score! He

:42:05.:42:10.

has definitely been broken, first game in the fourth set.

:42:11.:42:17.

The Brazilian football club, Chapecoense have played their first

:42:18.:42:19.

match since after nearly all of its players were killed

:42:20.:42:22.

In an emotional return to the field, the side,

:42:23.:42:26.

mostly made of of players on-loan from other clubs,

:42:27.:42:28.

met the country's current champions for a friendly.

:42:29.:42:30.

Our reporter Julia Carniero was there.

:42:31.:42:34.

It is kick-off time for the new Chapecoense.

:42:35.:42:38.

The fans have crowded the Conda Arena to watch their comeback.

:42:39.:42:43.

With fresh new signings, the team is taking a big step back

:42:44.:42:46.

The flight carrying the Chapecoense squad crashed in the mountains,

:42:47.:42:50.

close to the city of Medellin, in November.

:42:51.:42:54.

Investigators in Colombia found it had run out of fuel.

:42:55.:42:58.

Defender Neto was the last person to be pulled from the wreckage.

:42:59.:43:01.

TRANSLATION: They told me the truth three days before I came

:43:02.:43:06.

I asked about my team-mates, and the doctors said

:43:07.:43:13.

Ahead of today's match, the families of the crash victims

:43:14.:43:20.

were given medals in the players' honour.

:43:21.:43:23.

The survivors received the Copa Sudamericana trophy,

:43:24.:43:26.

a tribute to the final they didn't get to play.

:43:27.:43:36.

It was an emotional moment for everyone.

:43:37.:43:40.

I feel very great because, I guess, this is the dream of my father,

:43:41.:43:44.

my father's dream, and I think we need to keep coming

:43:45.:43:47.

I don't know what to say, I'm very emotional right now.

:43:48.:43:51.

It is 71 minutes into the game, and the match has stopped

:43:52.:43:54.

to remember the 71 victims of the crash.

:43:55.:43:56.

Instead of a minute of silence, a moment of sheer energy.

:43:57.:44:00.

The match is a draw, but the Chapecoense scored twice,

:44:01.:44:02.

filling fans with hope, as the new team strives

:44:03.:44:05.

Julia Carniero, BBC News, Chapeco, Brazil.

:44:06.:44:13.

An emotional return to the pitch today.

:44:14.:44:19.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:44:20.:44:21.

Theresa May will be the first foreign leader to meet Donald Trump

:44:22.:44:25.

since he was sworn in as US President.

:44:26.:44:27.

Meanwhile, Mr Trump has accused the media of lying about the size

:44:28.:44:31.

of the crowds at his inauguration, as more than a million people joined

:44:32.:44:34.

protests against the new President in cities around the world.

:44:35.:44:44.

And now for a look at this morning's weather. Much cold out there today.

:44:45.:44:52.

A frost for many of us this morning. Not everyone. It is eight degrees in

:44:53.:45:00.

Cornwall. -8 in rural Hampshire. Just above freezing in Cardiff,

:45:01.:45:05.

Belfast, and Edinburgh. Some area of rain and some sleet and snow as well

:45:06.:45:10.

for some people. Very light in nature. Parts of Scotland has thick

:45:11.:45:17.

cloud and the far east of Northern Ireland, but especially wet weather

:45:18.:45:20.

in parts of Wales, clipping the West Midlands, and for some in west

:45:21.:45:25.

England. A lot of this is patchy and light rain. Some sleet and snow as

:45:26.:45:30.

well. Turning things quite icy out there this morning. And we have a

:45:31.:45:35.

hard frost in parts of East Anglia and south-east England. This is

:45:36.:45:38.

where we have the clearest skies. Mist the in some spots. This is

:45:39.:45:44.

where we will see the best of the sunshine. Some sunny spells in

:45:45.:45:47.

Northern Ireland as well. Some brighter breaks elsewhere. Thicker

:45:48.:45:50.

cloud for parts of south-west England, Wales, northern England,

:45:51.:45:55.

and especially into Scotland. Potential for light showers,

:45:56.:45:58.

especially in Scotland. Flurries in places. Not quite as cold in Wales

:45:59.:46:04.

and south-west England as it has been. Through tonight, frost

:46:05.:46:08.

developing for many of us. The odd light show it initially.

:46:09.:46:13.

Particularly in parts of England and Wales, dense and even freezing fog

:46:14.:46:17.

patches around. By no means for everyone, as Monday begins. But the

:46:18.:46:22.

risk is highest in England and Wales. For some people, that could

:46:23.:46:26.

be causing disruption to tomorrow morning and Tuesday as well. It is

:46:27.:46:30.

worth checking before heading out in the morning. Dense and freezing fog

:46:31.:46:36.

could linger even into the afternoon. That could hold

:46:37.:46:40.

temperatures down where that holds on. Elsewhere, variable cloud, sunny

:46:41.:46:46.

spells, yes, a chilly feel to things, but not as cold as were that

:46:47.:46:50.

fog lingered. 5- seven degrees in the most hard. Some of that will

:46:51.:46:56.

hang around into England and Wales. The week ahead, England hangs on to

:46:57.:47:02.

be settled and cold weather but Scotland and Northern Ireland will

:47:03.:47:05.

notice the change. Wind will pick up, temperatures will pick up.

:47:06.:47:09.

Eventually we will see outbreaks of rain. The Atlantic weather system is

:47:10.:47:13.

coming our way. That is the change in the week ahead initially across

:47:14.:47:17.

northern part of the UK where it will turn more unsettled by the end

:47:18.:47:21.

of the week. That should go elsewhere by this time next week to

:47:22.:47:24.

be that is how your Sunday weather is shaping up. A gloomy outlook but

:47:25.:47:28.

we will forgive you. Thank you very much. Delivered with a smile,

:47:29.:47:30.

though. From Los Angeles to Chicago,

:47:31.:47:31.

in the US and in cities across the world, millions

:47:32.:47:34.

of anti-Donald Trump protesters have More than 500,000 people

:47:35.:47:36.

turned out in Washington, a larger crowd than that

:47:37.:47:39.

which attended the new President's We'll be talking about the marches

:47:40.:47:42.

in a moment, but first, this is what some of the famous

:47:43.:47:46.

faces at the protests had to say. Good did not win this election. But

:47:47.:48:04.

good will win in the end. Donald Trump takes power! BOOING. I don't

:48:05.:48:16.

think so! Here is the power. Here is the majority of American right here!

:48:17.:48:26.

We are the majority! This is the upside of the downside. This is an

:48:27.:48:33.

outpouring of energy and tree democracy like I have never seen in

:48:34.:48:43.

my very long life. -- true. Feet on the ground. Not backing down! MUSIC

:48:44.:48:50.

PICKS UP. This girl is on fire! Charlotte Ward is a Briton living

:48:51.:48:57.

in Chicago who attended the anti-Trump protest

:48:58.:49:00.

there yesterday. Good morning. Thank you very much

:49:01.:49:12.

for staying up late for us. This is very much a time for the anti-Trump

:49:13.:49:20.

protesters to be out. Is this not disrespectful to the democratic

:49:21.:49:24.

process? To turn out like this just after the election? You say

:49:25.:49:29.

anti-Trump protest, but for me, it was a woman's March. Obviously it is

:49:30.:49:35.

off the back of the election. My personal motivation was that I have

:49:36.:49:40.

watched this whole election process, and I was very upset, and, umm, just

:49:41.:49:50.

some of the things that Donald Trump said to women during the election

:49:51.:49:53.

process, some of the things that came out, I just could not believe

:49:54.:49:59.

it. It offended me greatly. And then to have him still go on to be

:50:00.:50:02.

president was just extremely shocking. And I think for me and for

:50:03.:50:07.

lots of women, we just feel a bit dismayed. And I... I think this

:50:08.:50:14.

whole woman's march, we were all feeling like there wasn't much we

:50:15.:50:18.

could do. There was not really a way. Everyone has a rant on social

:50:19.:50:23.

media but it does not really achieve anything. And arguing on social

:50:24.:50:27.

media with people is never going to do anything. So I think it really

:50:28.:50:33.

kind of spark a thought for some women when this happened because

:50:34.:50:36.

there was an opportunity to get out there and make your voice heard to

:50:37.:50:40.

be so, for me, I was not trying to be disrespectful. There are just

:50:41.:50:45.

issues that I do not feel are very high on his administration agenda.

:50:46.:50:50.

And I also... I am a mother. I have a son who is 18 months old. This is

:50:51.:50:55.

going to be his president in America. I really want him to have a

:50:56.:51:00.

role model. I want to stand up and say... You have children, but some

:51:01.:51:05.

people would say you are a Brit in America and have no right to take

:51:06.:51:11.

part in this. But also, many are saying they do not want to be

:51:12.:51:18.

lectured to by the likes of Madonna. There is a disconnect between a good

:51:19.:51:23.

proportion of the voters and the world of celebrity they feel does

:51:24.:51:26.

not represent them. I really do not feel that... I feel I am getting

:51:27.:51:31.

involved in a movement that will unite people. Today I was listening

:51:32.:51:36.

to the speeches and it was all about basically is similar to what Obama

:51:37.:51:40.

said in his farewell address. He was saying, you know, do not argue with

:51:41.:51:44.

people, do not be rude about people, get out there, meet those people,

:51:45.:51:49.

and listen to them. So, a lot of those messages today were very

:51:50.:51:53.

positive saying, you know, do not argue with people on social media,

:51:54.:51:57.

just get out there and go and find somebody who disagrees with you and

:51:58.:52:01.

talk to them. Thank you very much for your time. Joining us from

:52:02.:52:03.

Chicago today. Let's now speak to Leslie Vinjamuri

:52:04.:52:04.

who's a US foreign policy analyst She joins us from our

:52:05.:52:10.

Central London newsroom. Good morning to you. Thank you for

:52:11.:52:19.

coming in joining us this morning. You were in a protest that took

:52:20.:52:24.

place in London yesterday. I will ask for your professional foreign

:52:25.:52:27.

policy analysis in a minute. But to speak up on the tenor of what she

:52:28.:52:31.

was speaking about, Donald Trump, you know, he is the right leg,

:52:32.:52:36.

freely elected President of the United States. Should we leave what

:52:37.:52:40.

happened in the past behind and judge him on what happened in

:52:41.:52:55.

office? Protesting is legitimate. Lots of what's Donald Trump has done

:52:56.:53:01.

has been incredibly contentious. I was in London where there were

:53:02.:53:05.

estimated between 80000 and 100,000 people marching across many

:53:06.:53:11.

different groups. It was by no means solely women. There were handicapped

:53:12.:53:18.

people representing their rights. There were LGBT people. All sorts of

:53:19.:53:25.

different groups. It was quiet here in London, but committed. So, it

:53:26.:53:32.

wasn't American. There were plenty of Americans, though. It was a very

:53:33.:53:35.

international audience. Certain rights and freedoms need to be

:53:36.:53:39.

respected during the course of this presidency. That is now what we can

:53:40.:53:44.

consider if you don't mind. Already he has started to make changes.

:53:45.:53:49.

Obamacare is the first thing he has started to address. What are we

:53:50.:53:54.

expecting for him may be over the next first 100 days that people are

:53:55.:54:00.

looking out over this key period of analysis. It is a key period. Going

:54:01.:54:06.

back to FDR. That is from when we started looking at the first 100

:54:07.:54:10.

days, the honeymoon period, where he can, he or she, he so far, can get

:54:11.:54:17.

more legislation through Congress and tend to pass a number of

:54:18.:54:22.

executive orders. It is real as opposed to symbolic, though there is

:54:23.:54:25.

some symbolism. The symbolism of what happens in the first 100 days

:54:26.:54:29.

is extremely symbolic. The first thing President Trump did was to

:54:30.:54:33.

make it possible for he is Defence Secretary to take up that offers by

:54:34.:54:39.

signing a waiver that he had to be out of uniform for seven years,

:54:40.:54:44.

which has been the norm. And James Mattis has not been. That was the

:54:45.:54:48.

first thing. Obamacare has been something that Republicans broadly,

:54:49.:54:51.

but also Donald Trump, have wanted to repeal and replaced. There was an

:54:52.:54:56.

executive order that he signed immediately saying there will not be

:54:57.:55:01.

any further implementation of Obamacare if it entails fiscal

:55:02.:55:05.

spending. So there is no plan in place right now for replacing

:55:06.:55:08.

Obamacare, but we will probably see a repeal of that copy it is going to

:55:09.:55:14.

be very politically difficult, even if there is support in Congress, to

:55:15.:55:20.

get this through. There are 20 million Americans benefiting from

:55:21.:55:25.

Obama's healthcare at the moment. On a wider scale, obviously, his

:55:26.:55:29.

inaugural address, he talked a lot about the domestic agenda and

:55:30.:55:34.

putting America first. Over the years, since the Second World War,

:55:35.:55:37.

America has become the pre-eminent force in the world. There has been a

:55:38.:55:43.

world order which America has constructive. Is he going to start

:55:44.:55:46.

dismantling that by turning away from Ed? Yeah. I feel this is the

:55:47.:55:52.

big fear. It was reflected in his speech. That is why so many people

:55:53.:55:56.

across the world were protesting and marching yesterday. In Donald

:55:57.:56:01.

Trump's speech and policy, we are seeing the biggest walk back from

:56:02.:56:06.

liberal internationalism that America has made over the decades.

:56:07.:56:11.

The rhetoric of America first was very strong. The foreign policy

:56:12.:56:17.

agenda, the number one item on the foreign policy agenda, is now

:56:18.:56:24.

countering Islamic terrorism, not counter-terrorism, but Islamic

:56:25.:56:26.

terrorism, has been named. Moving away from America's support for

:56:27.:56:34.

multi lateral trade deals to negotiating bilateral trade deals. A

:56:35.:56:39.

very hard line of American interests and jobs and buying American first.

:56:40.:56:45.

This is of tremendous interest to America's allies. Just a few days

:56:46.:56:53.

ago, Donald Trump said that Nato was obsolete. The commitment he will

:56:54.:56:56.

have to alliances is very much at stake. Now, Theresa May will be

:56:57.:57:02.

meeting with Donald Trump in just a few days, on Friday. And I think the

:57:03.:57:07.

agenda will be to try to secure first a trade deal, to begin a

:57:08.:57:13.

negotiation on a US- UK trade deal. But also to highlight that Nato is

:57:14.:57:17.

important for European security and America needs to remain committed.

:57:18.:57:23.

For your time this morning. A fellow on the US programme. Just after

:57:24.:57:29.

eight o'clock we will talk to the Conservative MP about the planned

:57:30.:57:35.

meeting of Theresa May with Donald Trump which our guest was just

:57:36.:57:39.

referring to at the end of a week. A word on the tennis. Andy Murray has

:57:40.:57:42.

won his first game against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga. Great news.

:57:43.:57:45.

Jane Austen is one of Britain's favourite authors, but there's

:57:46.:57:48.

lots of debate about what she actually looked like.

:57:49.:57:50.

Only one portrait was taken of her when she was a alive,

:57:51.:57:54.

That was one of the challenges facing the artist who's been tasked

:57:55.:57:59.

with creating what's thought to be the first public statue

:58:00.:58:01.

of the writer to mark 200 years since her death.

:58:02.:58:04.

PIANO MUSIC. How quick come the reasons for approving what we like.

:58:05.:58:25.

Jane Austen in her novel, Persuasion. It is hoped the town of

:58:26.:58:32.

Basingstoke will echo that sentiment over a bronze statue of the author.

:58:33.:58:37.

It is like she is walking down the stairs and someone says good morning

:58:38.:58:41.

and she says good morning back. She was a real person, a headstrong

:58:42.:58:46.

woman of her time, living in her time. She is relevant for us today

:58:47.:58:52.

walking past her. The statue has taken shape from Adam's early

:58:53.:58:57.

sketches, but finding a real likeness of Jane Austen has

:58:58.:59:01.

historically been a problem as only two portraits were ever done. I have

:59:02.:59:05.

to go back and study from life. I have to read between the lines of

:59:06.:59:09.

what was written about her and I have to put together a real face.

:59:10.:59:12.

She was born just a few miles outside of Basingstoke in Stevenson.

:59:13.:59:18.

And Basingstoke is staking its claim. Jane Austen new Basingstoke

:59:19.:59:25.

well. She even attended social gatherings at the assembly hall here

:59:26.:59:29.

in Market Square where it hurts that you will go. It was all just such a

:59:30.:59:34.

great influence on her that he/she wrote the first draft to ride

:59:35.:59:39.

prejudice. Many have tried to claim Jane Austen. On the 200th

:59:40.:59:46.

anniversary of her death we want a prominent memorial to the fact she

:59:47.:59:54.

is our most famous of resident Naman Ojha. It has taken two years and

:59:55.:59:57.

almost ?100,000 to bring this forward. Everyone we have discussed

:59:58.:00:04.

this with has come on board. Really, the association with Basingstoke is

:00:05.:00:07.

not as well-known as it should be. That is what we want to celebrate,

:00:08.:00:12.

that Jane Austen spent time here and lived and shopped and danced in

:00:13.:00:19.

raising six. The final and rather delicate work has now been done and

:00:20.:00:23.

it will be cast in April, leaving this town with a sense of pride, not

:00:24.:00:25.

prejudice. The people there will be delighted.

:00:26.:00:36.

Stay with us, the headlines are coming up next.

:00:37.:00:53.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Rachel Burden and Roger

:00:54.:00:56.

Theresa May will be the first world leader to meet President Trump.

:00:57.:01:06.

His spokesman confirms they will meet on Friday.

:01:07.:01:08.

A trade deal and Brexit are expected to be on the agenda.

:01:09.:01:12.

As hundreds of thousands take to the streets in protest

:01:13.:01:15.

against the new President, the White House goes to war over

:01:16.:01:18.

reports of the numbers who attended Friday's inauguration.

:01:19.:01:20.

I get up this morning, I turn on one of the networks,

:01:21.:01:29.

Good morning, it is Sunday 22 January.

:01:30.:01:46.

Also ahead: After reports that a Trident missile test went wrong,

:01:47.:01:49.

the Ministry of Defence says it has absolute confidence

:01:50.:01:51.

A cancer charity calls for more to be done to encourage women

:01:52.:02:02.

In sport: Britain's Andy Murray is up against it in the last 16

:02:03.:02:07.

The world number one is 2-1 down against Germany's Mischa Zverev.

:02:08.:02:13.

Icy in a few spots, too, because there

:02:14.:02:22.

That means for most of us today will be cloudier than yesterday.

:02:23.:02:27.

For others, though, still some sparkling sunshine on offer.

:02:28.:02:29.

All the details coming up in the next half an hour.

:02:30.:02:32.

First, our main story: Theresa May will become the first foreign leader

:02:33.:02:36.

to meet the new US President in Washington.

:02:37.:02:39.

They are due to have talks on Friday.

:02:40.:02:41.

The announcement was made during Donald Trump's first day

:02:42.:02:43.

in office, which also saw a series of protests

:02:44.:02:46.

against his administration, and an onslaught against the media

:02:47.:02:48.

Our US correspondent David Willis has more.

:02:49.:02:54.

In the nation's capital, they have rarely seen a rally

:02:55.:03:01.

Not since the Vietnam War have so many people come together,

:03:02.:03:05.

in defence of women's rights and minority rights,

:03:06.:03:12.

liberties these people believe could be imperilled

:03:13.:03:14.

The man himself was visiting the headquarters of the CIA

:03:15.:03:28.

whilst that rally was underway, less concerned about secrets,

:03:29.:03:30.

it appeared, than crowd sizes, in particular reports

:03:31.:03:33.

of the attendance at his inauguration the previous day.

:03:34.:03:35.

It looked like a million, 1.5 million people.

:03:36.:03:42.

They showed a field where there was practically

:03:43.:03:47.

That theme was echoed in an unscheduled news conference

:03:48.:03:51.

Before confirming that Britain's Theresa May would be

:03:52.:03:55.

the first foreign leader to visit President Trump,

:03:56.:03:59.

the new White House press spokesman railed against reports that Mr Trump

:04:00.:04:02.

had failed to attract as large a crowd to his inauguration

:04:03.:04:05.

This was the largest audience to ever witness

:04:06.:04:12.

These attempts to lessen the enthusiasm of the inauguration

:04:13.:04:19.

Official estimates of crowd sizes are not released,

:04:20.:04:22.

but aerial photographs appear to contradict

:04:23.:04:25.

the Trump administration's assessment.

:04:26.:04:28.

Nonetheless, Mr Spicer, in his first briefing

:04:29.:04:30.

at the White House, went on to issue a thinly veiled threat to reporters

:04:31.:04:34.

We're going to hold the press accountable as well.

:04:35.:04:42.

He will take his message directly to the American people,

:04:43.:04:44.

Size clearly matters greatly to Donald Trump,

:04:45.:04:48.

and regardless of the inauguration crowds, the crowd at yesterday's

:04:49.:04:51.

protest was so large that a march on the White House proved

:04:52.:04:55.

impossible, because there were so many people present.

:04:56.:04:59.

It is a question of which will ultimately prove the most

:05:00.:05:02.

unpalatable to the new administration, the messenger

:05:03.:05:04.

Our political correspondent Susana Mendonca is in our central

:05:05.:05:14.

Susana, what more do we know about the Prime Minister's visit?

:05:15.:05:21.

To Downing Street to get this meeting with President Trump. How

:05:22.:05:30.

much can they achieve initial contact? This is an opportunity for

:05:31.:05:35.

Theresa May to meet Donald Trump, and that is very symbolic, and the

:05:36.:05:39.

fact that she will be the first leader to do so is something that

:05:40.:05:43.

Downing Street will be very happy about. It is something they have

:05:44.:05:46.

been working towards since Donald Trump was elected and Nigel Farage,

:05:47.:05:50.

the UKIP leader, was the first edition politician to meet Donald

:05:51.:05:53.

Trump in the days which followed his election back in November and that

:05:54.:05:57.

was viewed, really, with irritation by Theresa May and by Downing Street

:05:58.:06:02.

so the fact that she will be getting to meet Donald Trump is certainly a

:06:03.:06:06.

good thing for them. What will they be discussing? Well, we expect them

:06:07.:06:10.

to discuss a potential trade deal and also the European Union, also

:06:11.:06:15.

NATO. She will talk about issues of concern for her so in terms of the

:06:16.:06:20.

trade deal, at this stage it is not going to be a case of deciding a

:06:21.:06:24.

trade deal, because written can't do that until it leaves the European

:06:25.:06:27.

Union but it certainly strengthens her hand in view of those

:06:28.:06:31.

negotiations with the EU which are to follow -- Britain.

:06:32.:06:35.

The Ministry of Defence has insisted it has full confidence

:06:36.:06:37.

in the Trident nuclear defence system, despite reports that a rare

:06:38.:06:40.

The Sunday Times says a missile fired from a submarine

:06:41.:06:44.

in the Atlantic Ocean veered off-course, and in the direction

:06:45.:06:47.

This is what the launch of a Trident missile looks like.

:06:48.:06:57.

Even an unarmed missile costs around ?70 million,

:06:58.:07:04.

No video has been released of last year's launch,

:07:05.:07:11.

because, says the Sunday Times, it went badly wrong.

:07:12.:07:16.

According to the paper, HMS Vengeance was stationed

:07:17.:07:18.

about 200 miles off the coast of Florida.

:07:19.:07:22.

It was due to fire the missile 5,600 miles, to a location off the west

:07:23.:07:26.

Instead the rocket veered off-target, heading towards the US.

:07:27.:07:32.

All this was just a few weeks before a crucial vote in Parliament

:07:33.:07:36.

to spend ?40 billion on building a new generation

:07:37.:07:38.

One Labour former defence minister is now calling for an inquiry.

:07:39.:07:46.

The Government hasn't denied that the missile from HMS Vengeance

:07:47.:07:49.

may have veered off-course, but it said the capability

:07:50.:07:51.

and effectiveness of the Trident missile was unquestionable.

:07:52.:07:56.

The Government and the Prime Minister are now expect to face

:07:57.:08:11.

further questions about what exactly did happen with the Trident

:08:12.:08:14.

The former president of The Gambia, Yahya Jammeh, has flown into exile,

:08:15.:08:22.

22 years after taking control of the West African state in a coup.

:08:23.:08:26.

He sparked a political crisis when he refused to accept

:08:27.:08:28.

the outcome of the country's election, but finally agreed to hand

:08:29.:08:31.

over power to the winner, Adama Barrow, after the leaders

:08:32.:08:34.

of neighbouring countries threatened military action.

:08:35.:08:41.

French voters will begin the process of choosing a presidential candidate

:08:42.:08:44.

for the ruling Socialist party today.

:08:45.:08:46.

The current President, Francois Hollande, announced last

:08:47.:08:48.

month that he won't be standing for re-election.

:08:49.:08:50.

Our correspondent Hugh Schofield is in Paris.

:08:51.:08:52.

How does this fit into the way the French presidential election

:08:53.:08:55.

Good morning to you. The Socialists face the problem of trying to

:08:56.:09:08.

actually win the election once they have a candidate, but what does Mr

:09:09.:09:13.

Hollande not standing do in that section of the process? What it

:09:14.:09:18.

means and usually is that there isn't an outgoing President to take

:09:19.:09:21.

the banner forward and try and get re-elected and that Downer has

:09:22.:09:25.

passed to the man who was his Prime Minister for three years, Manuel

:09:26.:09:29.

Valls, representing a kind of continuity with the right wing of

:09:30.:09:32.

the Socialist party. He is up against a number of characters on

:09:33.:09:36.

the left of the party, two need to be pointed out in particular, Arnaud

:09:37.:09:42.

Montebourg and Hamon, they are the main contenders from the left wing

:09:43.:09:45.

of the Socialist party, and what will happen today is probably that

:09:46.:09:50.

we will get Manuel Valls probably representing the right and one of

:09:51.:09:53.

those people representing the left will go through and there will be a

:09:54.:09:58.

run-off next week in which one or two will be chosen to represent the

:09:59.:10:01.

Socialists that the party. I have to say that in normal times this would

:10:02.:10:05.

be a very big deal and the left would be represented by such and

:10:06.:10:09.

such a person in the election. These are not normal times. The Socialist

:10:10.:10:13.

party is in deep disarray and it is possible the main contender will not

:10:14.:10:17.

be from the Socialist party when it comes to the actual election in May.

:10:18.:10:19.

The time new cars are allowed on Britain's roads before they need

:10:20.:10:22.

an MOT could go up from three to four years, under

:10:23.:10:25.

The Department for Transport said safer technology and improved

:10:26.:10:28.

manufacturing means new vehicles stay roadworthy for longer.

:10:29.:10:30.

The change, which could come in from 2018, would bring Britain

:10:31.:10:33.

in line with Northern Ireland and many other European countries.

:10:34.:10:46.

They would have to relax the rules quite a bit from my card not to need

:10:47.:10:53.

one. Eight years, I think it is guaranteed!

:10:54.:10:53.

It sounds like the plot to a classic American road-trip movie.

:10:54.:10:56.

Five young adventurers make a perilous coast-to-coast journey,

:10:57.:10:58.

Well, now it has happened in real life, to a group of baby raccoons.

:10:59.:11:04.

They were born in a truck in Florida, which was driven to

:11:05.:11:07.

The driver only discovered his stowaways four days later.

:11:08.:11:12.

The racoons are now being cared for at a local zoo, until a new,

:11:13.:11:15.

All that climbing around and getting into places they shouldn't be. It is

:11:16.:11:27.

just like Sunday morning in my household. They are much more acute!

:11:28.:11:30.

Raccoons? Yes. If you knew a simple test

:11:31.:11:34.

could help save your life, you would think most

:11:35.:11:37.

of us would take it. But, when it comes to cervical

:11:38.:11:39.

cancer screening, it seems many women are delaying check-ups,

:11:40.:11:42.

or simply ignoring them altogether. Tina Holland knows just

:11:43.:11:45.

how important this is, because she was diagnosed

:11:46.:11:47.

with the early stages of cancer She joins us, along

:11:48.:11:50.

with Robert Music, who is the chief executive of Jo's

:11:51.:11:54.

Cervical Cancer Trust. Thank you very much indeed for

:11:55.:12:08.

coming in. It is good to see you both. We gave a precis of your story

:12:09.:12:14.

there. Flesh it out a little bit for us. Tell us exactly what happened to

:12:15.:12:18.

you. So we had the initial letter around about the age of 25, put it

:12:19.:12:23.

to one side, ignored it. And kept adding reminders and about two years

:12:24.:12:27.

later a friend of mine put on social media that she had early stages of

:12:28.:12:33.

cancer, and urged everyone to go and get their smear test done, which I

:12:34.:12:36.

did. Thinking that is not going to happen to me and it came back that I

:12:37.:12:41.

had the early stages of cervical cancer. How did that diagnosis

:12:42.:12:46.

affect you? You hear that word, cancer, and you think I going to be

:12:47.:12:52.

around to see my grow up? And I was very lucky, very, very lucky, that I

:12:53.:12:58.

caught it early. Why did you put it off initially? It was one of those

:12:59.:13:04.

things that, you know, my arm is not having so I don't need to go to the

:13:05.:13:08.

doctor. I had no symptoms, and it was just one of those things

:13:09.:13:12.

which... Anxiety about the procedure? No, not at all. The

:13:13.:13:16.

procedure itself didn't scare me or daunt me, but it was just a case of

:13:17.:13:21.

making time. How common is that amongst women in terms of the

:13:22.:13:25.

reasons that they don't come to their GP? It is very common. We have

:13:26.:13:30.

commissioned some research among women aged 25 to 29, and I guess the

:13:31.:13:37.

main reasons are that embarrassment, worried it is being painful,

:13:38.:13:40.

interestingly our research as well has shown that they don't attend

:13:41.:13:43.

because they are worried about the result, because they think it is a

:13:44.:13:46.

test to find cancer, rather than prevent cancer. It is a real concern

:13:47.:13:52.

that one in three women aged 25 to 29 are not attending screening and

:13:53.:13:56.

screening generally is at a 19 year low in England and is dropping

:13:57.:14:01.

across the UK. Excuse my ignorance, explain what you mean about what the

:14:02.:14:05.

test is for. Is it not to detect cancer? Again, that is a bit of a

:14:06.:14:11.

misconception. So the thing about cervical screening is to try

:14:12.:14:14.

prevented in the first place so it is looking for any cells in the

:14:15.:14:18.

cervix which may be abnormal and if they are found on the woman is

:14:19.:14:31.

referred for coposcopy. So it is pre-emptive, and burying your head

:14:32.:14:35.

in the sand thinking it won't happen to you is... You may have nothing

:14:36.:14:40.

wrong, but it may be an early indicator to the fact that you could

:14:41.:14:46.

-- Colposcopy. Iraq a whole range of barriers as to why women are not

:14:47.:14:50.

attending, they are very different depending on your age, your

:14:51.:14:55.

ethnicity. But I think we also want to see accessibility improved. Is

:14:56.:15:00.

there an access problem? Because women with busy lives and lots of

:15:01.:15:04.

commitments, making the time, it sounds daft, to get your GP. It is

:15:05.:15:09.

very, very real. It can be hard for women to get time off work or book

:15:10.:15:14.

an appointment at a time that works for them, as well. One of the things

:15:15.:15:18.

that we very much like to see and it has come out in our research is that

:15:19.:15:23.

for a woman to be able to be screened anywhere they like, any

:15:24.:15:26.

GP's surgery. If you live in London but work in Manchester, if you could

:15:27.:15:30.

go into a GP practice around the corner from where you work, and be

:15:31.:15:33.

screened, there is much more chance that you will go rather than trying

:15:34.:15:37.

really hard to book an appointment. Is a painful thing? One of the

:15:38.:15:40.

things people say as they are worried about being painful. No, not

:15:41.:15:45.

at all. More of a tickle. No, it is fine. I mean, a couple of minutes of

:15:46.:15:51.

discomfort compared to, you know, what could be... Discomfort is

:15:52.:15:58.

probably the right word to use and when you think about what other

:15:59.:16:01.

women put themselves through in terms of their beauty regime, in

:16:02.:16:04.

terms of pain, it probably doesn't really compare. I think it is partly

:16:05.:16:08.

the embarrassment as well. It is fine. And ever under the letter, but

:16:09.:16:13.

they? So it is not something you need to necessarily worry about and

:16:14.:16:16.

start knocking the GP's door down. When you are ready, when you need

:16:17.:16:20.

one, you will get a letter. Is that right? You should do, yes. I would

:16:21.:16:25.

say if you don't at the age of 25, ring your GP and get a booked in.

:16:26.:16:32.

You are well now, aren't you? Yes, all clear. Thank you.

:16:33.:16:35.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:16:36.:16:37.

Theresa May will be the first foreign leader to meet Donald Trump

:16:38.:16:41.

since he was sworn in as US President.

:16:42.:16:44.

Meanwhile, Mr Trump has accused the media of lying about the size

:16:45.:16:47.

of the crowds at his inauguration, as more than a million people joined

:16:48.:16:50.

protests against the new President in cities around the world.

:16:51.:16:53.

Here's Nick with a look at this morning's weather.

:16:54.:17:03.

It is chilly, is it? That is right. Good morning. Degrees of chill. The

:17:04.:17:14.

hardest frost is in east. Anglia I will take you to Essex where it is

:17:15.:17:19.

now minus eight Celsius or very close to that. Not too far away from

:17:20.:17:26.

London it is -7 but not that hard frost elsewhere though Cardiff and

:17:27.:17:30.

Edinburgh are just above freezing at the moment. There are areas of cloud

:17:31.:17:36.

around producing light rain, sleet and snow in places. In Scotland and

:17:37.:17:40.

the Far east of Northern Ireland into Wales and the Midlands into

:17:41.:17:44.

south-west England you could have a late shower or regain a few flurries

:17:45.:17:48.

as we start the day. And through the day as well. For some of us here it

:17:49.:17:54.

is a cold start and a little bit icy in a few stops is what will. There

:17:55.:17:58.

are a couple of mist and fog patches, nothing expensive at the

:17:59.:18:02.

moment that the weather is there and the hard frost in East Anglia. This

:18:03.:18:06.

is where we will see the clearest weather in the day. The best of the

:18:07.:18:10.

sunshine. A few sunny breaks elsewhere, Northern Ireland for

:18:11.:18:15.

example but from the far south-west of England, Wales, northern England

:18:16.:18:19.

and especially into Scotland this afternoon where you have thick cloud

:18:20.:18:22.

the chance relied shower and maybe a flurry, not as cold as it has been

:18:23.:18:26.

in Wales in south-west England. Some places scraping into double figures

:18:27.:18:35.

it will get frosty overnight and some fog patches will develop. More

:18:36.:18:39.

of that across England and Wales and paired with recent mornings and so

:18:40.:18:44.

tomorrow morning you can see how extensive that may be, how are dense

:18:45.:18:48.

it could be in places. It could cause disruption again. On Monday

:18:49.:18:53.

morning and Tuesday morning as well. Not everybody will have it but where

:18:54.:18:59.

it pops up, visibility could be very low indeed and it could be very slow

:19:00.:19:03.

to clear, if at all during the day. Where that lingers on, your

:19:04.:19:09.

temperature may be freezing. Elsewhere, variable cloud with sunny

:19:10.:19:13.

spells and the temperature reaches five or seven Celsius. A little

:19:14.:19:19.

higher across the far south-west. A quick word about what we expect this

:19:20.:19:23.

week- high-pressure keeping England and Wales settled. A battle between

:19:24.:19:28.

and low pressure to the north-west of the UK but eventually will take

:19:29.:19:32.

much the week into the Scotland you will see outbreaks of rain later

:19:33.:19:37.

this week. A gradual change on the horizon this week but more frost and

:19:38.:19:44.

fog to come. Thank you very much. Chilly to say the least.

:19:45.:19:46.

When patients are ready to leave hospital but can't because the care

:19:47.:19:56.

they'll need at home isn't in place, it's described as bed-blocking -

:19:57.:19:59.

and it's a problem that costs the NHS in England

:20:00.:20:02.

But although working out what support someone needs

:20:03.:20:05.

is supposed to take weeks, research by the watchdog,

:20:06.:20:07.

Healthwatch England, has found in some cases

:20:08.:20:09.

Here to tell us more about what it all means for patients and hospital

:20:10.:20:14.

staff is Estephanie Dunn from the Royal College of Nursing.

:20:15.:20:17.

Thank you very much for joining us. Could you describe the process by

:20:18.:20:24.

which people are supposed to be discharged from hospital and the

:20:25.:20:27.

plans that are supposed to be laid out for them by social care? We are

:20:28.:20:35.

taught in practice that discharge planning starts in admission. So we

:20:36.:20:39.

have a sense of when people need to go home, what their needs may be. If

:20:40.:20:44.

things take a turn for a worthless and people need to go into nursing

:20:45.:20:48.

or social care to have a plan for that as well. Assessments can take a

:20:49.:20:52.

few weeks, a couple of months and it really does come down to the

:20:53.:20:55.

availability of the right place for them to go, if there is a Baird. Who

:20:56.:21:02.

is in charge? It is not your members? Our members provide

:21:03.:21:07.

continuing care nursing assessments are they decide whether or not

:21:08.:21:11.

someone will need ongoing care and how much of that they might need and

:21:12.:21:14.

if they don't need nursing care, what sort of support they may need

:21:15.:21:19.

in their own home. It is a joint assessment that nurses have to do.

:21:20.:21:21.

Joint between you and social services. The problem here is that

:21:22.:21:28.

social care is not looked after by the NHS. It has been local councils.

:21:29.:21:36.

It always has been. Yes. So we need a better, more joined up system,

:21:37.:21:43.

don't we? Yes. That is what integration and devolution plans are

:21:44.:21:46.

across greater Manchester the greater challenge is the

:21:47.:21:50.

availability of beds, either foregoing home or going into a care

:21:51.:21:55.

home. In the rest of the country where hills powers are not devolved

:21:56.:21:59.

they are still working through integration. It is something that

:22:00.:22:04.

politicians have been talking about for years and we're still waiting to

:22:05.:22:08.

see significant progress. What think is preventing that? Funding,

:22:09.:22:14.

fundamentally. We will do an assessment and find out that

:22:15.:22:17.

somebody needs a bed in a particular home or a level of support in their

:22:18.:22:22.

own home and the coast of that, the package of care, could be

:22:23.:22:24.

significant and social services actually have got a very massive

:22:25.:22:29.

sort of, they have had cuts to their budgets are they struggle to find

:22:30.:22:33.

the muggy to move people into the right bed. The government said it

:22:34.:22:39.

recently announced ?900 million of extra funding for social care over

:22:40.:22:47.

the next two yous. Sorry council will hold a referendum on increasing

:22:48.:22:50.

council tax by 15% to try and find the muggy in their area. Doom moves

:22:51.:22:56.

like that help? That is more muggy, exactly what you say is needed. Some

:22:57.:23:01.

of the levels that people are discussing, that will make a small

:23:02.:23:05.

impact on the amount of muggy that is required. We have an ageing

:23:06.:23:08.

population and people are living longer so we have more older people

:23:09.:23:13.

who need care and need that care for longer. It is made more difficult

:23:14.:23:17.

because they often have more than one long-term condition to manage

:23:18.:23:22.

and the increase in the number of dementia patients and things like

:23:23.:23:26.

that there is a lot of specialist care required that is quite

:23:27.:23:28.

difficult to access. We constantly hear it as a funding problem. Not be

:23:29.:23:34.

this is just about social services not being efficient and effective

:23:35.:23:38.

enough? That would be an unfair assessment because they have had 40%

:23:39.:23:43.

cut to their budget over the over the last few years. They are working

:23:44.:23:49.

really hard to try and find the resources to get people moved on. It

:23:50.:23:55.

is easy to find somebody to blame but the whole system is grossly

:23:56.:23:59.

underfunded, both in hospital and in the community. Thank you very much

:24:00.:24:00.

for your time. And you can hear more on this on BBC

:24:01.:24:07.

5 Live Investigates from 11am today. The Andrew Marr Programme

:24:08.:24:11.

is on BBC One this morning Let us hope so. Ahead of the

:24:12.:24:26.

rendezvous with President Trump I will talk with the Prime Minister. I

:24:27.:24:31.

will also speak to the Shadow Chancellor and the former leader of

:24:32.:24:35.

the Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg plus the wonderful American

:24:36.:24:41.

sopranos. We do like to give you a little music along with the scary

:24:42.:24:48.

bits. Watching the monitor is here and we see that Andy Murray has just

:24:49.:24:53.

lost in that match at the Australian Open in Melbourne against this

:24:54.:24:58.

German opponent. We will find out more in the sports News. What a blow

:24:59.:25:04.

because it was going to be, it looked like this first real chance

:25:05.:25:08.

of winning the Australian Open with Djokovic out. Just goes to show that

:25:09.:25:12.

you cannot take anything for granted.

:25:13.:25:19.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News, it's time

:25:20.:25:21.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News, it's time now for a look

:25:22.:25:25.

Politics lecturer Victoria Honeyman is here to tell us what's

:25:26.:25:28.

First of all we will take a look at the front pages this morning. The

:25:29.:25:40.

Sunday Telegraph, Trump's new deal for England. News that Theresa May

:25:41.:25:44.

will be visiting the White House, the first foreign leader to meet the

:25:45.:25:48.

new president and trade will be top of the agenda, as you would expect

:25:49.:25:52.

when the two of them get together. A front page of the Sunday Express.

:25:53.:25:57.

Theresa May is my Maggie. That is apparently privately what President

:25:58.:26:00.

Trump has referred to the reason may, harking back to the days of

:26:01.:26:05.

Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher. The Observer has pictures from the

:26:06.:26:10.

anti-Trump protests, the women's marches that took place all over the

:26:11.:26:14.

world. Many women wearing pink pussy hats that they had knitted.

:26:15.:26:20.

Thousands marched in Washington, DC. Those photos went across the world.

:26:21.:26:24.

The call that a united voice of defiance against Donald Trump. The

:26:25.:26:29.

next paper talks also about President Trump, asking him to cut

:26:30.:26:33.

out this sexist insult to finesse. Theresa May apparently repaired to

:26:34.:26:39.

tackle him on the comments he has made a and during the election. And

:26:40.:26:43.

in what has been described as a serious malfunction, a tried and

:26:44.:26:52.

malfunction was covered up by Downing Street. That is the lead in

:26:53.:26:56.

the Sunday Times this morning and we will have more full on that in the

:26:57.:27:00.

news for you as well. But stopnow to Victoria about some of the stories

:27:01.:27:04.

she has chosen. This is next to the first story you have chosen, the

:27:05.:27:08.

first picture we have seen a Donald Trump in the oval office but he has

:27:09.:27:12.

already begun work. It is surprising that there is a plethora of Donald

:27:13.:27:18.

Trump, not surprising, I mean. On the side you have the pomp and

:27:19.:27:23.

circumstance of the Oval Office and issues about the rugs and the

:27:24.:27:27.

curtains but realistically the big issue is on the Leicester which is

:27:28.:27:31.

about Obama care. This is one of the first things that Trump has done, he

:27:32.:27:35.

has signed an executive order which is essentially starting to cut back

:27:36.:27:41.

Obama care. He is insisting that no further development in Obama care be

:27:42.:27:44.

made, no further cost incurred. This is President Obama's dig domestic...

:27:45.:27:54.

It was what he wanted to leave. Yes. It brought healthcare to millions of

:27:55.:27:57.

people in America who would otherwise struggled to get it. This

:27:58.:28:02.

is what the Telegraph are describing as a death by 1000 cuts. That we

:28:03.:28:06.

will now see the rolling back of things. They also reference issues

:28:07.:28:10.

relating to climate change and worries over how he will deal with

:28:11.:28:15.

foreign issues relative to China and Russia. So, really, this is the

:28:16.:28:20.

beginning of the Trumpet year and many people are very concerned about

:28:21.:28:24.

this. Many are held in their breath to see what the world will do. The

:28:25.:28:28.

bust of Winston Churchill has been moved back into a prominent place.

:28:29.:28:33.

Barack Obama did not get rid of it that shifted elsewhere. As limited

:28:34.:28:36.

as that may sound it may be an indication of the problems he would

:28:37.:28:43.

give to the Anglo relationship. Obama was very focused on the

:28:44.:28:45.

Asia-Pacific region because he recognised there were many large

:28:46.:28:49.

market out there and many people in need are dealing with in that

:28:50.:28:53.

region. Donald Trump is more European focused, or at least it

:28:54.:28:57.

looks that way. I don't think we should necessarily assume that that

:28:58.:29:00.

will mean a brilliant deal for Britain. He has already said America

:29:01.:29:05.

first. An exclusive on a Sunday Times this morning. They describe it

:29:06.:29:10.

as a nuclear cover-up, what has happened? Trident has been sold to

:29:11.:29:13.

the nation as a big nuclear system that we rely upon and utilise and

:29:14.:29:18.

has been used as part of the negotiations over the renewal of

:29:19.:29:24.

Britain's nuclear Arsenal and will cost hundreds of billions of pounds.

:29:25.:29:29.

What the story says is that around about the time of the EU referendum

:29:30.:29:33.

there was a weapons test and essentially is failed. There was a

:29:34.:29:37.

malfunction. This was not publicly announced in the run-up to the big

:29:38.:29:41.

debate about nuclear reunion all in the House of Commons, even though

:29:42.:29:44.

the Ministry of Defence knew about it a month beforehand. This is a

:29:45.:29:50.

serious issue that undermines our entire nuclear system but,

:29:51.:29:54.

worryingly, it also suggests that the promises and assumptions that

:29:55.:29:57.

have been made by individuals who support the renewal of Trident

:29:58.:30:03.

missile system or the renewal of the nuclear system have been misled that

:30:04.:30:07.

not all of the facts are they are. It pairs of shoes do you own?

:30:08.:30:15.

Plenty. Plenty. More than I can probably estimate. So do men. I am

:30:16.:30:22.

not being judgemental. The Mail on Sunday has this story about a female

:30:23.:30:29.

she aboard soaring to 24 pairs. Yes. I wanted something light and fluffy.

:30:30.:30:36.

I have loads of shoes and I think that, you know particular women like

:30:37.:30:42.

particular things, handbags, some have no interest whatsoever. Some

:30:43.:30:47.

men love shoes. This indicates that apparently 24 is the average. I have

:30:48.:30:54.

way more than 24. How many? I had 60 the last time I countered. Know why!

:30:55.:31:06.

Where do you keep them? I have downsized... The average cost is

:31:07.:31:13.

apparently ?603. Thank you very much. One more, time for one more.

:31:14.:31:24.

We have shoes for the ladies and an Aston Martin for the blokes. This is

:31:25.:31:31.

an Aston Martin that was found in a wood in a particular state. To me

:31:32.:31:35.

looks like the of thing you would walk past that people who know more

:31:36.:31:39.

than meet salvaged it and have sold it in that state for ?305,000. When

:31:40.:31:43.

it is restored it will be about 600,000, they say. That is quite...

:31:44.:31:48.

That is an example of what it may look like. It currently looks like

:31:49.:31:54.

that. Like a complete wreck. Somebody's lucky day finding bad. Or

:31:55.:31:59.

somebody's careless therefore leaving it discarded. I think it was

:32:00.:32:06.

deliberately discarded, I guess. Possibly somebody who did not

:32:07.:32:09.

understand the value of what they had. Thank you very much and we will

:32:10.:32:14.

have more from you in the next hour. We will leave BBC One any moment now

:32:15.:32:18.

and return to BBC News Channel until nine o'clock this morning. Coming up

:32:19.:32:20.

in the next hour... and coming up in the next hour:

:32:21.:32:31.

As the search continues for people still missing at the Italian hotel

:32:32.:32:35.

destroyed by an avalanche, we'll hear what the Red

:32:36.:32:38.

Cross is doing to help. We will meet the record-breaking

:32:39.:32:40.

rally driver who is in a race against time to raise

:32:41.:32:44.

enough money to compete. Having been to most places on earth,

:32:45.:32:46.

this week the Travel Show We'll find out where

:32:47.:32:49.

and when in around All that to come on

:32:50.:32:53.

the BBC News Channel. But this is where we say goodbye

:32:54.:32:56.

to viewers on BBC One. For all the latest

:32:57.:32:59.

political news and debate, tune in

:33:00.:33:11.

to the Sunday Politics at 11, where we'll be analysing

:33:12.:33:14.

the week's big stories and talking to the politicians

:33:15.:33:16.

and commentators who count.

:33:17.:33:20.