24/01/2017 Breakfast


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24/01/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:00:00.:00:00.

Judgement day as the Supreme Court decides who has

:00:00.:00:08.

the power to officially begin Brexit.

:00:09.:00:11.

should be allowed to start the process without a vote.

:00:12.:00:17.

But campaigners who've brought the case say Parliament must

:00:18.:00:19.

I will be live at The Supreme Court where the levy and senior judges are

:00:20.:00:35.

prepared to pass their judgement and examines in -- examining the process

:00:36.:00:39.

of taking Britain out of the European Union.

:00:40.:00:48.

Good morning, it's Tuesday 24th January.

:00:49.:00:53.

Tougher penalties are on their way for drivers caught well

:00:54.:00:57.

Liberty Media complete their ?6.4 billion take over of Formula One

:00:58.:01:10.

and remove Bernie Ecclestone as chief executive, ending his 40

:01:11.:01:13.

A surge in cyber crime pushed the cost of fraud above ?1

:01:14.:01:18.

And it's getting worse despite attempts to tackle it.

:01:19.:01:21.

I'm looking at why and what more needs to be done.

:01:22.:01:24.

And we're going to be talking about the happiest children

:01:25.:01:27.

Studies suggest they live in the Netherlands.

:01:28.:01:29.

We'll meet two mums now living there who've been trying to find

:01:30.:01:35.

Carol is always happy and she has got the weather. Good morning.

:01:36.:01:47.

Across England and Wales, dense, patchy fog. Some spots of reasoning.

:01:48.:01:55.

Scotland and Northern Ireland, much more mild. Patches of rain but

:01:56.:01:57.

later, some sunshine. The Supreme Court will rule today

:01:58.:01:58.

on whether it's up to Parliament or Government to start the process

:01:59.:02:03.

for exiting the European Union. The government argues that ministers

:02:04.:02:07.

have the power to trigger But opponents say they need

:02:08.:02:09.

Parliament's approval The judgement is significant,

:02:10.:02:13.

as it goes to the heart of where power lies

:02:14.:02:18.

in the UK and could disrupt the Prime Minister's Brexit

:02:19.:02:21.

timetable as our political The European Union ignites strong

:02:22.:02:38.

passions. Almost seven weeks ago, protesters gathered outside The

:02:39.:02:43.

Supreme Court as the 11 most senior judges in the land gathered inside.

:02:44.:02:50.

Power after power of dense legal argument followed on the biggest

:02:51.:02:55.

question in politics. Where does power light? Is it behind the door

:02:56.:03:02.

here in Downing Street? Or inside here in Parliament? The Prime

:03:03.:03:07.

Minister says she can start the UK's divorce from the EU herself but

:03:08.:03:12.

campaigners, led by the businesswoman Jean Miller, says MPs

:03:13.:03:17.

and peers have to have a say first. This morning, we will find out who

:03:18.:03:22.

has won. If the government loses, they will also lose complete control

:03:23.:03:25.

of the timetable for starting the process of leaving the European

:03:26.:03:30.

Union. It will have to rush its planned through Parliament in the

:03:31.:03:33.

next few weeks. Today is not about whether Brexit should or will happen

:03:34.:03:40.

but who gets to press go. That is why it matters and that is why there

:03:41.:03:44.

was a lot of interest here in what the judges had to say. Chris Mason,

:03:45.:03:53.

BBC News, Westminster. We will be focusing on that through the day.

:03:54.:03:55.

Let's speak to our political correspondent, Carole Walker

:03:56.:03:57.

who is outside The Supreme Court this morning.

:03:58.:03:59.

Is there any indication yet about what the judges

:04:00.:04:02.

The expectation widely as the judgement will go against the

:04:03.:04:11.

government, that Theresa May will be told she must seek the approval of

:04:12.:04:15.

Parliament before she can trigger Article 50 which will begin the

:04:16.:04:20.

formal process of those negotiations to take Britain out of the European

:04:21.:04:25.

Union. Nobody expects MPs or peers to try to block that process but

:04:26.:04:30.

they will try to amend any legislation that she tries to get

:04:31.:04:34.

through Parliament, to try to affect her whole approach to those

:04:35.:04:38.

negotiations. That could delay the process. As you mentioned, Theresa

:04:39.:04:44.

May wants to trigger Article 50 by the end of March. If there are a

:04:45.:04:48.

series of different boats which go against her, that could delay the

:04:49.:04:51.

whole proceeding. It will throw an extra light as well onto the Labour

:04:52.:04:56.

Party amid some confusion as to exactly what their position is on

:04:57.:05:00.

this whole process. Another important issue which the judges

:05:01.:05:03.

will be deciding today is whether the government has to take account

:05:04.:05:09.

of the devolved administration of Scotland and Northern Ireland and

:05:10.:05:14.

Wales. Scotland is demanding to have position to stay -- permission to

:05:15.:05:18.

stay in the single market but pending elections in Northern

:05:19.:05:21.

Ireland so it is not clear who she will have to consult, an important

:05:22.:05:25.

judgement today which could have a big effect on that whole process of

:05:26.:05:30.

Britain's departure from the EU. Later on this morning, we will be

:05:31.:05:35.

talking to the former Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg to get his

:05:36.:05:38.

thoughts on The Supreme Court. It will dominate things this morning.

:05:39.:05:40.

Drivers caught driving well above the speed limit will face

:05:41.:05:43.

bigger fines after a review of the sentencing guidelines

:05:44.:05:45.

The changes will allow magistrates to impose much tougher

:05:46.:05:49.

penalties on drivers and are intended to make sure

:05:50.:05:52.

the punishment for speeding is a lot higher for the worst offenders.

:05:53.:05:55.

President Trump has announced that America will formally withdraw

:05:56.:05:59.

from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, one of the major pledges he made

:06:00.:06:02.

The trade deal involving a dozen countries was agreed by Barack

:06:03.:06:07.

President Trump has also cut funding for international groups that

:06:08.:06:11.

provide abortions, and has frozen the hiring of some federal workers.

:06:12.:06:20.

Flood management in England and Wales is still fragmented,

:06:21.:06:23.

inefficient and ineffective according to a group of MPs.

:06:24.:06:25.

Members of the Commons Environment Committee have accused

:06:26.:06:27.

the Government of failing to take simple steps to protect homes

:06:28.:06:30.

after they recommended an overhaul of the system.

:06:31.:06:32.

The government has rejected the criticism, saying that many

:06:33.:06:35.

Sadly not such a rare sight, waging war against the water

:06:36.:06:42.

as roads are transformed into rivers.

:06:43.:06:46.

In recent years there's been severe flooding in Cumbria,

:06:47.:06:51.

Two months ago the nvironmental food and rural affairs committee

:06:52.:07:02.

Defra called for a radical overhaul to what it called the government's

:07:03.:07:05.

Just one of the many criticisms levied at Defra,

:07:06.:07:13.

it hasn't created a national floods commissioner for England.

:07:14.:07:16.

Flooding is a much more regular occurrence affecting many more

:07:17.:07:19.

So the citizens of this country want to see the government protect

:07:20.:07:24.

We've asked some questions and made some recommendations,

:07:25.:07:27.

it's the government's responsibility to protect its citizens.

:07:28.:07:30.

Defra say it's already implementing many of the report suggestions,

:07:31.:07:33.

such as managing water courses across entire catchment areas.

:07:34.:07:37.

But say there is no need for structural changes.

:07:38.:07:40.

Over the next five years the government is investing ?2.5

:07:41.:07:45.

billion on building flood defence schemes across the country,

:07:46.:07:48.

protecting an additional 300,000 homes.

:07:49.:07:58.

But with climate change we're being told to expect more heavy

:07:59.:08:01.

And so for this Select Committee it's unlikely the government's

:08:02.:08:05.

current interventions will be enough.

:08:06.:08:06.

Two men have been arrested after an explosion at a block

:08:07.:08:20.

Four people were taken to hospital and 25 people had to be rescued

:08:21.:08:30.

from the partially-collapsed building in Hornchurch.

:08:31.:08:32.

Transport for London said debris had been scattered across nearby roads.

:08:33.:08:35.

The cause of the explosion is not yet known.

:08:36.:08:37.

The nominations for this year's Academy Awards

:08:38.:08:39.

Critics have tipped modern musical romance, La La Land

:08:40.:08:43.

It's expected to face stiff competition from brooding domestic

:08:44.:08:46.

drama Manchester By The Sea starring Casey Affleck and also

:08:47.:08:49.

from Moonlight, a coming of age drama set in drug-torn Miami.

:08:50.:08:56.

Zookeepers at San Diego Safari Park are caring for a miracle baby

:08:57.:09:08.

a bat delivered by caesarean section.

:09:09.:09:11.

The 12-day-old Rodrigues fruit bat, also known as the flying fox,

:09:12.:09:14.

is being hand-reared following surgery.

:09:15.:09:15.

Staff say he's a fiesty creature, who's quick to let them know

:09:16.:09:18.

I want to know so much more about that. What can you tell me? I have

:09:19.:09:30.

already done some research. One of the most endangered species. They

:09:31.:09:34.

grow a bit of golden hair so they are known as a golden backed. More

:09:35.:09:39.

facts view later. I will also miss -- tell you about when I was set

:09:40.:09:44.

upon by bat at Chester Zoo. It wasn't a nice moment for me my

:09:45.:09:50.

family, I am scarred by it. A big change in Formula 1? It couldn't get

:09:51.:09:56.

much bigger. Imagine held in a position a particular organisation

:09:57.:09:57.

for 40 years. After 40 years in charge

:09:58.:09:59.

of Formula One, Bernie Ecclestone has been replaced as the sport's

:10:00.:10:02.

Chief Executive by new owners This is a quote from them overnight.

:10:03.:10:11.

I have been dismissed, this is official, I know longer run the

:10:12.:10:13.

company, my position has been taken. The US giant completed its ?6.4bn

:10:14.:10:20.

takeover of F1 last night. Chairman Chase Carey takes

:10:21.:10:23.

on Ecclestone's role and former Mercedes team boss Ross Brawn is

:10:24.:10:26.

the sport's new managing director. 86-year-old Ecclestone has been

:10:27.:10:29.

given the title of chairman emeritus and will act as an

:10:30.:10:32.

adviser to the board. Good morning, then. Did he just

:10:33.:10:49.

walked in front of... That was then. He is so small, he can sneak in

:10:50.:10:53.

anywhere. Good morning. I am sorry it. He is like a little fruit bats.

:10:54.:10:59.

There's anybody know what chairman emeritus means? Apparently Bernie

:11:00.:11:05.

Ecclestone does not. They say he does not understand the title. It

:11:06.:11:07.

means honorary chairman. After making history

:11:08.:11:09.

at the Rio Olympics, Double Olympic gold-medallist boxer

:11:10.:11:11.

Nicola Adams has turned She's signed with boxing

:11:12.:11:14.

promoter Frank Warren. Hull City midfielder Ryan Mason

:11:15.:11:19.

remains in hospital, but is conscious and able

:11:20.:11:21.

to talk, following surgery Mason was injured in a clash

:11:22.:11:23.

of heads with Chelsea's Gary Cahill Rory McIlroy has pulled out

:11:24.:11:29.

of the Dubai Desert Classic The world number two missed last

:11:30.:11:38.

week's event in Abu Dhabi. Still not quite fit enough. In a

:11:39.:11:50.

considerable amount of pain. I am very sorry. It is always good to

:11:51.:11:57.

start the day that way. It's only 11 minutes past six. He has got a new

:11:58.:12:05.

haircut. That is have a look at the front pages of the papers. Very

:12:06.:12:11.

organised today. Here is the times. The main story is, US urged Britain

:12:12.:12:16.

to keep Trident blunder secret. That is on a few front pages. Free little

:12:17.:12:21.

puppies who have been rescued from that Italian hotel that was hit by

:12:22.:12:26.

the avalanche. The Telegraph. Donald Trump vowing to make the special

:12:27.:12:31.

relationship between the UK and the US even closer. Theresa May is due

:12:32.:12:41.

to meet him on Friday. I have got the mirror and the Sun to you. The

:12:42.:12:45.

front page of the Mirra says, she did know. She was briefed on the

:12:46.:12:49.

Trident missile failure before the vote. And the sun has got the story,

:12:50.:13:07.

two BAFTA have Kate? -- do we BAFTA have Kate? Apparently they do not

:13:08.:13:11.

want cakes to come. Prince William has been. But she is going to

:13:12.:13:18.

upstage the likes of Emily Blunt and Naomie Harris. The front page of the

:13:19.:13:27.

Guardian. One of the world's most recognised images. And Michael

:13:28.:13:30.

Fallon accused last night of keeping Parliament in the dark about the

:13:31.:13:35.

Trident weapons test failure. Loads of pictures of GOrdon Kay on front

:13:36.:13:44.

pages, the front page of the Daily Mail. I got a great story. How much

:13:45.:13:50.

time do you spend on your phones? Eddie Jones, the English rugby team

:13:51.:13:57.

boss, has brought in this woman, a former South African hockey player

:13:58.:14:00.

and she says your eye muscles are like any muscle in the body. You

:14:01.:14:04.

need to exercise them and get off your phone. She is encouraging all

:14:05.:14:10.

the players... Which one is she? That is. She is encouraging all the

:14:11.:14:15.

players to get off their phones and what she has set up for the England

:14:16.:14:25.

players is something called an eye gym. You exercise all the muscles in

:14:26.:14:28.

your eyes to improve your spatial awareness. She says that instinctive

:14:29.:14:32.

knowledge of what might be just out of your vision is going because of

:14:33.:14:38.

how much we are using phones. She is hugely effective. Affected in Rugby

:14:39.:14:41.

Union, cricket, football, all over the world. I can see why in rugby.

:14:42.:14:49.

She is working with the backs at the moment. Do you ever have the problem

:14:50.:14:55.

when you're shirt comes on top? A little bit. In the side area. I have

:14:56.:15:01.

the answer. He ago. Excuse the picture. Suspender - like devices

:15:02.:15:07.

which keep shouts tucked in and you are supposed to wear these, 28 quid,

:15:08.:15:11.

you wear them around your thighs and it keeps your shirt tucked in. It

:15:12.:15:15.

looks like the most painful thing in the world. Or you could just type it

:15:16.:15:20.

in. But it never stays. Apparently, the outline of the show -- shelves.

:15:21.:15:25.

Lawyers and managers and chief executives. There you go. We are

:15:26.:15:30.

missing out. Thank you for that. Are you happy?

:15:31.:15:37.

I would say when I was 27... It is actually a date. Alternatively,

:15:38.:15:47.

1977. That was one of the happiest years. But it was really sunny and

:15:48.:15:54.

warm. To be fair you are not born, either of you, 1957. None of us were

:15:55.:16:02.

born, which is amazing. It was the happiest year, few men lived beyond

:16:03.:16:07.

the age of 70, most people had an outside loo but it was the happiest

:16:08.:16:11.

year in recent Rikishi Street, looking at 230 different years --

:16:12.:16:19.

British history. Southend have sacked their groundsmen because

:16:20.:16:24.

there pitch was frozen, so the game was called off. A statement from the

:16:25.:16:29.

club said people generally lose their position as a result of not

:16:30.:16:34.

doing their job. That is like sacking Carol because its nose. It

:16:35.:16:39.

is a bit like that, it is not his fault it is so cold. He did his

:16:40.:16:45.

best. Controversial! See you both later, thank you. Cyclists who

:16:46.:16:51.

choose the right on the pavement instead of the road often face angry

:16:52.:16:55.

stares, not to mention falling foul of a fine. But some police have

:16:56.:17:03.

opted not to challenge every cyclist, instead asking them what

:17:04.:17:07.

prompted them to leave the road in the first place. After 8am we will

:17:08.:17:11.

speak to the police officer who came up with the idea. Is it ever OK to

:17:12.:17:16.

cycle on the footpath? We have been finding out.

:17:17.:17:16.

I choose to cycle on the pavement, I don't agree with people who do cycle

:17:17.:17:25.

of paper, but maybe there should be more facility for people to park in

:17:26.:17:30.

cycle lanes, and stuff like that. I am a cyclist myself, so probably I

:17:31.:17:34.

have been known to, you know, be a bit naughty like that at times. I

:17:35.:17:40.

tend to just come home, I have occasionally been stopped by a

:17:41.:17:43.

policeman. I feel much safer on a bike than in a car, as far as police

:17:44.:17:48.

are concerned. I don't think cyclist should be on the pavement,

:17:49.:17:51.

especially when they have made the cycle lanes and everything. It is

:17:52.:17:54.

more difficult when you are in places where there are no cycle

:17:55.:17:59.

lanes and if they feel trapped by the traffic, then they might but it

:18:00.:18:02.

is difficult for pedestrians. I was always told to get off my bike when

:18:03.:18:07.

I was cycling on the pavement. I can actually remember going down there

:18:08.:18:10.

and turning a corner, down the street, a policeman, and I was about

:18:11.:18:13.

14, and he said get off your bike. What do you think about that? I do

:18:14.:18:24.

not cycle on the pavements, but I think if you have got children, for

:18:25.:18:28.

example, should they be allowed on the pavement? I think possibly they

:18:29.:18:33.

should. I feel a lot of people getting incensed already. You can

:18:34.:18:41.

feel the audience getting incensed. As per usual, you can share your

:18:42.:18:46.

thoughts via e-mail, Facebook and Twitter as well. And the policeman

:18:47.:18:50.

is going to stop them and ask them why they are on the pavement to try

:18:51.:18:57.

and change things. He is also a keen cyclist himself.

:18:58.:19:00.

You are watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:19:01.:19:02.

The main stories this morning: The Supreme Court is preparing

:19:03.:19:05.

to announce its landmark Brexit ruling this morning.

:19:06.:19:07.

The Government will learn if it has to give MPs a vote.

:19:08.:19:10.

Drivers in England and Wales caught going well above the speed limit

:19:11.:19:13.

are to face bigger fines, 1.5 times their weekly income.

:19:14.:19:20.

Here is Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:19:21.:19:24.

A lot to talk about, the fog and the ice yesterday. Good morning. For

:19:25.:19:31.

some of us it is faulty again. There is a real temperature difference. If

:19:32.:19:35.

we take Kates Bridge in Northern Ireland, yesterday morning it was

:19:36.:19:41.

-7.1 Celsius, making it the coldest night this winter in Northern

:19:42.:19:44.

Ireland. This morning at the same time it is eight .3, said that as a

:19:45.:19:48.

15.4 degrees increase in temperature. It is not like that

:19:49.:19:52.

everywhere. It is still cold across England and Wales. We still have

:19:53.:19:55.

some freezing fog which could well lead to some travel disruption once

:19:56.:20:00.

again. And you can find out what is happening where you are on your BBC

:20:01.:20:04.

local radio station. So patchy fog, but dance patchy fog. Not all of us

:20:05.:20:09.

are seeing it, it is not a complete and get, it is patchy but it is

:20:10.:20:12.

freezing. I have hammered at home quite a lot now. As we push into the

:20:13.:20:16.

south-west we are looking at misty conditions but a cold start. A cold

:20:17.:20:21.

start away from the west coast of Wales, patchy bits and pieces of

:20:22.:20:24.

fog. A brighter start across parts of north-west England but the

:20:25.:20:28.

weather front not too far away and for Northern Ireland, again, much

:20:29.:20:32.

milder than it was this time yesterday, and fairly cloudy. There

:20:33.:20:36.

is a weather front across Scotland, producing rain, a weak weather

:20:37.:20:39.

fronts are not particularly heavy rain we are looking at and ahead of

:20:40.:20:42.

it across northern England we are back into some fog, especially

:20:43.:20:47.

across the Vale of York. Rather like yesterday, what is going to happen

:20:48.:20:51.

with that fog is some of it will lift, some of it will be slow to

:20:52.:20:55.

clear and lift into low cloud and some that will hang around for much

:20:56.:20:59.

of the day. Where that happens it will hold temperatures back but

:21:00.:21:02.

across a lot of England we are looking at sunny and bright spells.

:21:03.:21:05.

Afterwards the west there is more cloud and the weather front sinks

:21:06.:21:08.

into northern England and north-west Wales will produce some patchy rain

:21:09.:21:12.

and drizzle. As we head on through the evening and overnight you can

:21:13.:21:16.

see the wind strengthening our towards the west. Still bits and

:21:17.:21:20.

pieces of drizzle from our decaying weather front and if you take a line

:21:21.:21:24.

from the wash down towards Dorset and point south-east, this is where

:21:25.:21:28.

we are prone once again to some dents and patchy fog, and it will be

:21:29.:21:31.

freezing fog with temperatures close to freezing. No such issues further

:21:32.:21:37.

north, a healthy seven or eight. Still windy out towards the west, a

:21:38.:21:42.

fair bit of cloud, weather front not too far away. We are starting to

:21:43.:21:46.

pull in more of a breeze from the continent across the southern areas

:21:47.:21:50.

so there will be a bit more cloud but in between we have a drier and

:21:51.:21:53.

sunnier slice. Still mild out towards the west. Then as we move

:21:54.:21:56.

from Wednesday into Thursday, watch how the wind veers. It is pushing to

:21:57.:22:01.

more of a south-easterly. Normally that would be quite a mild direction

:22:02.:22:05.

for us, coming from the near continent but it has been so cold

:22:06.:22:08.

across other parts of Europe that you can see that cold filtering

:22:09.:22:12.

across the UK. On Thursday we are looking at a windy day for some, a

:22:13.:22:17.

breezy day for others, it will be sunny, but don't forget it will be

:22:18.:22:21.

cold if you are exposed to that wind. Temperature-wise what we are

:22:22.:22:25.

looking at is this kind of range, between one and seven Celsius. When

:22:26.:22:30.

you add on the wind, this is how it will actually feel against your

:22:31.:22:35.

skin, more like -2 or minus five. We have another weather front waiting

:22:36.:22:40.

to come in our direction. This will be a fairly weak affair as it pushes

:22:41.:22:44.

them from the west towards the east and on Friday there will be quite a

:22:45.:22:48.

bit of cloud around as well, still cold if you are exposed to that

:22:49.:22:51.

wind. But out towards the west, something brighter for a time, and

:22:52.:22:55.

you can see what is waiting in the winds on Friday. Thank you very much

:22:56.:23:00.

indeed. We will see you in half an hour. I like how Cal's dresses

:23:01.:23:04.

perfectly matching the blue of the rain. Trying to hide it! -- Carol's.

:23:05.:23:11.

Some of the happiest children in the world are being raised

:23:12.:23:13.

in the Netherlands, according to a UNICEF study.

:23:14.:23:16.

So what is the secret of the Dutch success story?

:23:17.:23:18.

Two mothers who now live there have written a book to find out.

:23:19.:23:22.

Our correspondent Anna Holligan has been to meet them,

:23:23.:23:24.

and to see what happens when you place children

:23:25.:23:27.

This doesn't take much, according to the Dutch.

:23:28.:23:32.

They have got the most contented babies, the happiest kids and,

:23:33.:23:35.

as adults, the best work-life balance.

:23:36.:23:37.

They place a high value on family life, and on communication

:23:38.:23:46.

And so part of eating together is about talking together.

:23:47.:23:52.

And the Dutch scored the highest on children who ate breakfast before

:23:53.:23:55.

they went to school, and that sets them up for the day.

:23:56.:23:59.

So at the end of the day it doesn't matter

:24:00.:24:03.

Chocolate sprinkles clearly contradict the healthy eating advice

:24:04.:24:07.

and yet Dutch kids have some of the lowest obesity rates,

:24:08.:24:10.

which may be linked to the fact that so many cycle to school.

:24:11.:24:14.

But, as you can see, bikes and cars have separate lanes,

:24:15.:24:17.

so parents don't have the same worries about sending kids out

:24:18.:24:20.

And, when they get to school, Dutch pupils don't face academic

:24:21.:24:24.

pressure, things like tests and homework, until much later.

:24:25.:24:30.

When there's not so much pressure, children start school by a positive

:24:31.:24:33.

way, by enjoying it, by feeling this is something nice

:24:34.:24:36.

to do, and I think that lasts your whole life.

:24:37.:24:43.

And that is backed up by the Unicef statistics,

:24:44.:24:46.

which suggests these children are more likely to go

:24:47.:24:48.

on to further education than their British counterparts.

:24:49.:24:50.

You will see lots of fathers at the school gates.

:24:51.:24:53.

The Dutch government legislates for unpaid "daddy days,"

:24:54.:24:55.

which encourage families to share the childcare.

:24:56.:24:57.

And plus, we always read in all of these books,

:24:58.:25:02.

right, that they should play outside.

:25:03.:25:09.

So I'm happy that it's part of our culture,

:25:10.:25:12.

that they're expected to be out and playing.

:25:13.:25:20.

Is it because, in the Netherlands, it is safer?

:25:21.:25:23.

We can't send kids out to parks in London or the heart

:25:24.:25:26.

In a sense, you have to trust your own society, right?

:25:27.:25:31.

Back to basics parenting is what it's all about.

:25:32.:25:33.

And the byproduct of giving kids greater independence -

:25:34.:25:38.

At least, when they're a little older.

:25:39.:25:41.

Head due west from here, and you'll reach Essex.

:25:42.:25:44.

The UK may be geographically close, but there are of course fundamental

:25:45.:25:51.

differences between our societies, and not all of the lessons

:25:52.:25:53.

from here can simply be exported over there.

:25:54.:25:56.

That was Anna Holligan, reporting with the help

:25:57.:26:01.

I think they are onto something with those chocolate sprinkles. It is

:26:02.:26:15.

like we have chocolate spread, but they have these hard chocolate

:26:16.:26:18.

sprinkles and they pour them on hot toast and they melt, and they are

:26:19.:26:30.

magical. A little bit of what you fancy.

:26:31.:26:38.

Still to come this morning: The not-so-beautiful game.

:26:39.:26:42.

An amateur football referee tells us why he is calling on his colleagues

:26:43.:26:45.

from grassroots football to strike over abuse and assault

:26:46.:26:48.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:26:49.:30:12.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:30:13.:30:15.

Now, though, it is back to Louise and Dan.

:30:16.:30:21.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:30:22.:30:23.

We'll have the latest news and sport in just a moment

:30:24.:30:29.

Following the ?6 billion pound takeover of F1,

:30:30.:30:37.

we'll look back at the 40 year reign of its former chief,

:30:38.:30:40.

Also this morning, the Police Officer who won't punish

:30:41.:30:43.

some cyclists who ride on the pavement.

:30:44.:30:45.

Instead he's investigating why they do.

:30:46.:30:48.

Safety campaigners hail the move but is it a free pass for those

:30:49.:30:52.

And after nine, will the musical La La Land continue its unstoppable

:30:53.:31:04.

quickstep towards glory at next month's Oscars?

:31:05.:31:07.

We'll make our predictions ahead of today's nominations.

:31:08.:31:10.

But now a summary of this morning's main news.

:31:11.:31:21.

Loads of your comments coming in on the cycling story. It first. -- but

:31:22.:31:27.

first. The Supreme Court will rule today

:31:28.:31:28.

on whether it's up to Parliament or the Government to start

:31:29.:31:31.

the process for exiting The government argues that ministers

:31:32.:31:34.

have the power to trigger But opponents say they need

:31:35.:31:38.

Parliament's approval The judgement is

:31:39.:31:41.

significant, as it goes to the heart of where power lies

:31:42.:31:44.

in the UK and could disrupt the Prime Minister's Brexit

:31:45.:31:47.

timetable as our political The European Union

:31:48.:31:53.

ignites strong passions. Almost seven weeks ago,

:31:54.:31:58.

protesters gathered outside the Supreme Court

:31:59.:32:02.

as the 11 most senior Hour after hour of dense legal

:32:03.:32:06.

argument followed on the biggest Is it behind the door

:32:07.:32:13.

here in Downing Street? The Prime Minister says

:32:14.:32:23.

she can start the UK's divorce from the EU

:32:24.:32:28.

herself but campaigners, led by the businesswoman

:32:29.:32:31.

Gina Miller, says MPs This morning, we will

:32:32.:32:35.

find out who has won. If the government loses,

:32:36.:32:40.

they will also lose complete control of the timetable for starting

:32:41.:32:45.

the process of leaving It will have to rush

:32:46.:32:49.

its plan through Parliament Today is not about whether Brexit

:32:50.:32:52.

should or will happen That is why it matters

:32:53.:32:58.

and that is why there was a lot of interest

:32:59.:33:07.

here in what the judges had to say. Later this morning we'll be

:33:08.:33:10.

speaking to the former Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg

:33:11.:33:17.

to get his thoughts President Trump has announced that

:33:18.:33:21.

America will formally withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership,

:33:22.:33:29.

one of the major pledges he made The trade deal involving a dozen

:33:30.:33:32.

countries was agreed by Barack President Trump has also cut funding

:33:33.:33:37.

for international groups that provide abortions, and has frozen

:33:38.:33:41.

the hiring of some federal workers. Drivers caught driving well

:33:42.:33:47.

above the speed limit will face bigger fines after a review

:33:48.:33:50.

of the sentencing guidelines The changes will allow magistrates

:33:51.:33:52.

to impose much tougher penalties on drivers

:33:53.:33:59.

and are intended to make sure the punishment for speeding is a lot

:34:00.:34:02.

higher for the worst offenders. Flooding has caused billions

:34:03.:34:08.

of pounds of damage and ruined Flood management in England

:34:09.:34:18.

and Wales is still fragmented, inefficient and ineffective

:34:19.:34:21.

according to a group of MPs. Members of the Commons Environment

:34:22.:34:23.

Committee have accused the Government of failing to take

:34:24.:34:25.

simple steps to protect homes after they recommended

:34:26.:34:28.

an overhaul of the system. The government has rejected

:34:29.:34:30.

the criticism, saying that many Sadly not such a rare sight,

:34:31.:34:33.

waging war against the water as roads are transformed

:34:34.:34:38.

into rivers. In recent years there's been severe

:34:39.:34:40.

flooding in Cumbria, Two months ago the nvironmental food

:34:41.:34:44.

and rural affairs committee Efra called for a radical overhaul

:34:45.:34:51.

to what it called the government's Just one of the many

:34:52.:34:55.

criticisms levied at Defra, it hasn't created a national floods

:34:56.:35:02.

commissioner for England. Flooding is a much more regular

:35:03.:35:05.

occurrence affecting many more So the citizens of this country

:35:06.:35:07.

want to see the government protect We've asked some questions and made

:35:08.:35:12.

some recommendations, it's the government's responsibility

:35:13.:35:16.

to protect its citizens. Defra say it's already implementing

:35:17.:35:18.

many of the report suggestions, such as managing water courses

:35:19.:35:21.

across entire catchment areas. But say there is no need

:35:22.:35:25.

for structural changes. Over the next five years

:35:26.:35:29.

the government is investing ?2.5 billion on building flood defence

:35:30.:35:33.

schemes across the country, protecting an additional

:35:34.:35:39.

300,000 homes. But with climate change we're

:35:40.:35:47.

being told to expect more heavy And so for this Select Committee

:35:48.:35:51.

it's unlikely the government's current interventions

:35:52.:35:55.

will be enough. Four people were taken to hospital

:35:56.:35:56.

and 25 people had to be rescued from the partially collapsed

:35:57.:36:14.

building in Hornchurch. Transport for London said debris had

:36:15.:36:16.

been scattered across nearby roads. The cause of the explosion

:36:17.:36:19.

is not yet known. The nominations for this

:36:20.:36:22.

year's Academy Awards Critics have tipped modern

:36:23.:36:24.

musical romance, La La Land It's expected to face stiff

:36:25.:36:30.

competition from brooding domestic drama Manchester By The Sea starring

:36:31.:36:35.

Casey Affleck and also from Moonlight, a coming of age

:36:36.:36:38.

drama set in drug-torn Miami. We will be talking -- talking about

:36:39.:36:51.

them a bit later. And we are hearing at 100 flights have been cancelled

:36:52.:36:58.

at Heathrow, due to fog. DS -- the airport says there is reduced

:36:59.:37:00.

visibility and passengers should check flight status before setting

:37:01.:37:05.

off so check on your phone or your laptop to make sure your flight is

:37:06.:37:10.

going. Carol will talk us through all the weather. Wherever you are.

:37:11.:37:19.

Mostly in the UK. Good morning, Sally. You are in charge of sport.

:37:20.:37:22.

I am steering sport. Bernie Ecclestone has gone and he is not

:37:23.:37:35.

very happy about it. He says the -- that he has basically lost his job.

:37:36.:37:43.

He is in his 80s. He is obviously going to find it difficult to move

:37:44.:37:45.

away from Formula 1. The US giant Liberty Media

:37:46.:37:55.

completed its ?6.4bn takeover Chairman Chase Carey takes

:37:56.:37:58.

on Ecclestone's role and former Mercedes team boss Ross Brawn is

:37:59.:38:01.

the sport's new managing director. Double Olympic gold-medallist boxer

:38:02.:38:09.

Nicola Adams has turned At last year's Rio Games she became

:38:10.:38:11.

the first British boxer to successfully defend an Olympic

:38:12.:38:14.

title in nearly 100 years. I feel like I have achieved

:38:15.:38:24.

everything I wanted to achieve in the amateur ranks. Commonwealth

:38:25.:38:30.

Games champion, double Olympic champion, number one, it's the best

:38:31.:38:36.

way to leave the sport. There are of goals -- goals in the professional

:38:37.:38:41.

ranks to achieve. Becoming a world champion and European champion. So

:38:42.:38:44.

many goals to achieve in the professional ranks.

:38:45.:38:53.

England's women take on Sweden in a friendly. It's all part of the

:38:54.:38:59.

preparations that this year 's European Championships. We want to

:39:00.:39:03.

be a major part of it. When we come up against any team, we will be as

:39:04.:39:08.

possible -- as ready as possible. But we had to take those that

:39:09.:39:10.

doorsteps. Rory McIlroy has pulled out

:39:11.:39:11.

of the Dubai Desert Classic The world number two missed last

:39:12.:39:14.

week's event in Abu Dhabi. The Wales back row Sam Warburton

:39:15.:39:34.

says not being captain of the national side will help make him a

:39:35.:39:42.

hungrier player. Warburton led Wales for nearly six years but has handed

:39:43.:39:45.

the armband over to Alun Wyn Jones. The Cardiff Blues player's in the

:39:46.:39:48.

squad for Wales' opening game against Italy but knows he's got

:39:49.:39:52.

competition for his place in the side. That is what drives me every

:39:53.:39:55.

day, when you are training and at home, you have that goal of wanting

:39:56.:40:00.

to play for Wales. It will make me more hungry, not to have the

:40:01.:40:07.

captaincy. Ryan Mason's family have thanked well-wishers to their

:40:08.:40:10.

support upto what they described as a traumatic 24 hours. The Hull City

:40:11.:40:20.

midfielder underwent surgery, after sustaining a fractured skull at

:40:21.:40:28.

Stamford Bridge on Sunday. Mason was injured in a clash of heads with

:40:29.:40:31.

Chelsea defender Gary Cahill. He's conscious and talking. From that

:40:32.:40:35.

moment until being in surgery was less than one hour. He was hugely

:40:36.:40:41.

helped by being on a huge ground near a fantastic hospital. One hour

:40:42.:40:45.

later, he was in surgery to relieve pressure on his brain. How

:40:46.:40:50.

incredible the first aid is. Taken seriously quickly. A massive

:40:51.:40:57.

difference, not only did the relate as a football grounds of sporting

:40:58.:41:01.

stadiums but the speed at which they are able to manoeuvre. Ryan Mason's

:41:02.:41:10.

recovery is testament to that. All the best to him. Bernie Ecclestone

:41:11.:41:16.

was key to turning Formula 1 into what of the biggest sports in the

:41:17.:41:21.

world. Baht for the first time in 40 years, he will no longer be involved

:41:22.:41:25.

in the day-to-day running of Formula 1. Mark Jenkins 's professional

:41:26.:41:29.

business strategy at Cranfield University. 40 years in charge.

:41:30.:41:37.

Quite a legacy. What is most significant? I think he created a

:41:38.:41:40.

business where no business existed, which was the whole Formula 1 model.

:41:41.:41:45.

He created a series of races which were delivered year-on-year where

:41:46.:41:50.

before then it was all and hoc so he created an entirely new racing

:41:51.:41:53.

product. Many people became very rich on the back of his work. Are

:41:54.:41:58.

you surprised at the speed with which he seems to be exiting? On one

:41:59.:42:06.

level, yes. They said it would be involved but three years. Clearly,

:42:07.:42:10.

they have put a new company in place. That is a good time to make

:42:11.:42:14.

the kind of changes they feel they need to make. He is going to be a

:42:15.:42:20.

huge figure. He is going to be missed in the sport. They are

:42:21.:42:24.

replacing him with two jobs but it's likely there will more roles needed

:42:25.:42:28.

to really provide the kind of attention to detail and build the

:42:29.:42:32.

relationships that he had at his fingertips. That is interesting. So

:42:33.:42:38.

much of it is about relationships. Teams and circuits and all the rest

:42:39.:42:43.

of it. He has built all those relationships. He is at every race.

:42:44.:42:48.

He understands all the little things that need to be oiled and all the

:42:49.:42:52.

issues that need to be resolved. I do not think anyone has that

:42:53.:42:55.

detailed understanding of the whole process. Tell us, what does it mean

:42:56.:43:02.

for fans of the sport? I think in the short run, there is not going to

:43:03.:43:06.

be much change but in the longer run, we are going to see far more

:43:07.:43:11.

engagement with social media, the TV Pack Moorman -- platform is

:43:12.:43:15.

fragmenting, people are watching on their mobiles and the way in which

:43:16.:43:19.

the sport is delivered to fans will change. Does that mean fans will get

:43:20.:43:27.

up close and personal with the drivers more? In Las Vegas earlier

:43:28.:43:32.

this year, there was a virtual race where people where people were at

:43:33.:43:35.

their consoles racing each other and you can see the distinction between

:43:36.:43:39.

the real world and the virtual world is going to become more blurred.

:43:40.:43:43.

Absolutely, those scenarios are very possible. We know ticket prices can

:43:44.:43:50.

be expensive. I noticed Bernie Ecclestone made the comment that he

:43:51.:43:54.

would be able to afford to go to a Formula 1 race and you could argue

:43:55.:43:58.

he is probably one of the few people who can. Prices are very expensive

:43:59.:44:03.

but what we are going to seek is the way the sport is delivered, the way

:44:04.:44:11.

you engage with it will be less physical, but with more virtual

:44:12.:44:15.

technologies. 40 years and that job. Will he find it difficult to let go?

:44:16.:44:21.

Certainly. That has been his life. That is as well. I am sure he well.

:44:22.:44:29.

What now happens, quite a few out of work team principals, like Ron

:44:30.:44:33.

Dennis. Quite a few retired drivers. We could see another series. What an

:44:34.:44:38.

interesting point to end on. An interesting future, isn't it? Thank

:44:39.:44:46.

you to being with us. Let us remind you of the main stories. The Supreme

:44:47.:44:53.

Court is preparing to announce its landmark Brexit ruling and the

:44:54.:44:57.

government will learn if it has to give MPs the vote. Drivers caught

:44:58.:45:01.

going well above the speed limits are to face bigger fines, 1.5 times

:45:02.:45:03.

their weekly income. Telling you this morning about some

:45:04.:45:15.

flights being held up at Heathrow, about 100 flights. Fog out there in

:45:16.:45:18.

places. Here is Carol with a look

:45:19.:45:19.

at this morning's weather. You could be forgiven for saying

:45:20.:45:27.

Monday, because the weather for many of us is like it was on Monday. It

:45:28.:45:31.

is Tuesday and there is fog around, it is dense and patchy in places. It

:45:32.:45:35.

is also freezing fog and it has already caused a little bit of

:45:36.:45:38.

travel disruption and may well cause some more. You can find out what is

:45:39.:45:43.

happening where you are on your BBC local radio station. It is patchy

:45:44.:45:47.

fog so you may have it where you are, travel down the road and there

:45:48.:45:52.

will be nothing and then you will land back in it again a bit further

:45:53.:45:56.

on. For the south-west it is misty rather than faulty. A cold start

:45:57.:45:59.

with widespread frost and away from the west coast of Wales it is a cold

:46:00.:46:03.

start with some patchy fog. A brighter start across parts of

:46:04.:46:06.

north-west England although there is rain not far away and a much milder

:46:07.:46:12.

start to the morning across Northern Ireland. In Kate 's bridge is 15

:46:13.:46:16.

degrees warmer than it was this time yesterday. We have a weak weather

:46:17.:46:19.

front across Scotland, producing some light rain and drizzle, and we

:46:20.:46:23.

have some more fog as we move across the Pennines and into the Vale of

:46:24.:46:26.

York. Like yesterday, what will happen with that fog is some will

:46:27.:46:31.

clear altogether, some will be very slow to clear and lifting the low

:46:32.:46:35.

cloud, and some will hang around all day. If you are in an area where it

:46:36.:46:39.

sticks in the Butcher will struggle to break freezing but if you are in

:46:40.:46:43.

an area where it clears the temperatures will rise. You could

:46:44.:46:46.

see six or seven in some brightness and sunny spells but the highest

:46:47.:46:50.

temperatures will be out towards the west and through the day our weather

:46:51.:46:53.

front moving across Scotland will get into northern England and

:46:54.:46:56.

north-west Wales but by then it will be very weak and producing patchy,

:46:57.:47:00.

light rain and drizzle. Through the evening and overnight the wind picks

:47:01.:47:04.

up towards the west. There will be a fair bit of cloud and again some

:47:05.:47:08.

patchy, light rain and drizzle. No problems with frost here but take a

:47:09.:47:13.

line from the wash down towards Dorset and point south-east and once

:47:14.:47:17.

again we are looking at some pockets of dance, freezing fog -- points

:47:18.:47:23.

south-east. -- dance, freezing fog. This could be slow to lift in some

:47:24.:47:29.

places but move away from the fog areas, and you will have some

:47:30.:47:32.

sunshine coming through and weather front starting to show its hand

:47:33.:47:37.

across the north-west of Scotland. Breezy conditions here, but very

:47:38.:47:42.

mild. Ten or 11. As we move from Wednesday into Thursday, our weather

:47:43.:47:46.

front weakened as it approaches us. Look how the wind veers to more of a

:47:47.:47:50.

south-easterly. The impact that will have is dragging this cold,

:47:51.:47:56.

Continental air onto our shores. It is going to feel pretty chilly if

:47:57.:47:59.

you are exposed to that through the course of Thursday but there will be

:48:00.:48:03.

a lot of dry weather around on Thursday. There will be a fair bit

:48:04.:48:07.

of sunshine as well. Out towards the west, the wind particularly strong.

:48:08.:48:10.

But to show you the temperature values, this is what you will see in

:48:11.:48:14.

your thermometer. Between one and seven, but this is how it will feel

:48:15.:48:18.

against your skin with the wind chill. As low as -5 in some areas,

:48:19.:48:26.

so you should wrap up warmly. Here is our weak weather front moving

:48:27.:48:30.

from the west was the east. Quite a bit of cloud around and if you are

:48:31.:48:34.

exposed to that trees it will feel on the nippy side. Thank you very

:48:35.:48:39.

much for that. We will send you outside Ina Bauer's time. Are you

:48:40.:48:45.

prepared for some live fog news, later? Thank you very much for that.

:48:46.:48:50.

It is not too foggy at the moment, but that could change.

:48:51.:48:51.

Fraud cost the UK more than ?1 billion last year,

:48:52.:48:54.

blamed on a massive rise in cyber crime.

:48:55.:48:56.

Are sadly familiar tale, I am afraid.

:48:57.:49:08.

The figures are from the accountancy firm KPMG.

:49:09.:49:10.

They have looked at fraud cases, and that boom in online

:49:11.:49:13.

It cost Britain ?1 billion last year.

:49:14.:49:17.

That is more than double the previous year.

:49:18.:49:19.

But why, when there have been so many attempts to tackle it?

:49:20.:49:23.

Well, the number of cases has actual fallen by a third,

:49:24.:49:26.

it is just that the cost of each case has risen sharply.

:49:27.:49:29.

And that is largely due to cyber fraud.

:49:30.:49:34.

It has risen by more than 1,000%, at a cost of ?120 million.

:49:35.:49:40.

David Clarke is director of the Fraud Advisory Panel,

:49:41.:49:42.

and a former head of the City of London Police Fraud Squad.

:49:43.:49:53.

Very good morning to you. Good morning. As I said in the

:49:54.:50:00.

introduction, sadly not surprising that cyber crime is on the rise,

:50:01.:50:04.

despite all of the attempts to tackle it. Are you surprised by what

:50:05.:50:09.

these figures show? I am not surprised, in fact I am pleased to

:50:10.:50:13.

be seeing reports of the nature and extent of the problem being much

:50:14.:50:18.

clearer now. The chief inspector of Constabulary reported last week, he

:50:19.:50:22.

said fraud in the UK is epidemic. The fraud advisory panel, we would

:50:23.:50:26.

agree with that. I would say it goes further. Fraud is a global pandemic

:50:27.:50:32.

that we need to address. We have seen it coming. The cyber figures,

:50:33.:50:37.

yes, they are worrying, but a lot of these are using cyber, the criminals

:50:38.:50:42.

have used tools now that a newly available. They have found other

:50:43.:50:48.

ways to con people, but this is a global pandemic. It is an illness we

:50:49.:50:53.

need to treat urgently. So if they are using new tools, how do we stay

:50:54.:50:58.

one step ahead? It strikes me every time we deal with one element, be

:50:59.:51:06.

they phishing or anything like that, they come up with a new thing. That

:51:07.:51:11.

is the art of the clever fraudster. The police will always be some way

:51:12.:51:15.

behind. It links in with what we have said at the fraud advisory

:51:16.:51:19.

panel charity, and it is about the moral compass here. What you will

:51:20.:51:22.

see in those figures which is worrying for me is not the number of

:51:23.:51:26.

cases. We will see larger numbers going to court, and the police and

:51:27.:51:30.

law enforcement will prioritise the serious cases. What is interesting

:51:31.:51:34.

with this is that we are seeing senior management involved. This is

:51:35.:51:39.

worrying. Senior managers trying to maintain lifestyles. We're also

:51:40.:51:43.

seeing some of the poorer people trying to engage in fraud. We know

:51:44.:51:47.

these criminal offences. A story about people buying teeth whitening

:51:48.:51:53.

scams and subscriptions to satellite TV, it is the moral compass. And

:51:54.:51:57.

globally, not just in the UK, we record fraud very well here but it

:51:58.:52:03.

is a problem we need to address through education as well. And that

:52:04.:52:08.

such an important area, that education. It gives us the sense

:52:09.:52:12.

that big business is reluctant to admit it sometimes. They don't want

:52:13.:52:16.

to put their hand up and say we have been a victim and we need to deal

:52:17.:52:21.

with it. It is about coming clean, because until people come clean, we

:52:22.:52:27.

have trouble dealing with it. We have to encourage reporting. People

:52:28.:52:30.

saying the police will not do anything, but it is not about doing

:52:31.:52:34.

something, it is about knowing it. When you have a serious illness, you

:52:35.:52:38.

go to the doctor. When you have a serious crime, you report it. What

:52:39.:52:43.

is reassuring as people are coming forward. Our message is disclose,

:52:44.:52:46.

report. We have seen the awful situation with brands like

:52:47.:52:52.

Rolls-Royce embroiled in an awful situation. Many companies are trying

:52:53.:52:57.

to do their best in business. They become targets of fraud. They can go

:52:58.:53:02.

to the police or authorities and they can disclose. When they have

:53:03.:53:05.

information about people and it is insiders, properly two thirds of the

:53:06.:53:11.

time, research shows, insiders are collusive and involved in this. The

:53:12.:53:17.

business very often is the. So I find it very reassuring that

:53:18.:53:20.

companies are coming forward, and they are disclosing this, because

:53:21.:53:24.

then we can start to understand it and act on it, and get these people

:53:25.:53:28.

before the courts in these kinds of cases. It is good to talk to you,

:53:29.:53:33.

thank you for your insight. Thank you. After 7am, we talk about your

:53:34.:53:43.

favourite subject, the cost of coffee. The cost could be going up

:53:44.:53:47.

and there could be less available. So the price of my coffee is going

:53:48.:53:54.

to go up?! Yes, to be blunt. I will tell you how you might be able to

:53:55.:54:02.

avoid it. Why have you put her in a bad mood? He just doesn't drink it.

:54:03.:54:08.

It is going to take years, but one day we will convert you. I have

:54:09.:54:15.

never drank coffee, don't like the smell. He has coffee Beams,

:54:16.:54:18.

everybody. Punched, head-butted and spat at,

:54:19.:54:26.

just three examples of abuse an amateur football referee has had

:54:27.:54:30.

to deal with on the pitch. Ryan Hampson says the bad treatment

:54:31.:54:33.

he and his fellow match officials sometimes receive has

:54:34.:54:37.

led him to calling a strike Breakfast's Tim Muffett

:54:38.:54:39.

met him on the sidelines. Another football match, refereed by

:54:40.:54:46.

Ryan Hampson. This one is played in good spirits. His decisions are

:54:47.:54:52.

respect that. It is your first one. That is not always the case. I have

:54:53.:54:57.

had experiences such as being headbutted by a player, I have been

:54:58.:55:01.

spat at and I have been punched on numerous occasions. It got to the

:55:02.:55:04.

point where I had to stop refereeing for about four or five weeks. If you

:55:05.:55:11.

were on the streets, and you were assaulted, you would be arrested. On

:55:12.:55:17.

the pitch it is different. It is not, it is completely the same. Ryan

:55:18.:55:23.

says amateur referees are not getting enough support. He has

:55:24.:55:27.

called for a national strike on the first week of March. He says 400

:55:28.:55:32.

referees have been in touch, backing up his ideas. When you have been

:55:33.:55:35.

speaking to so many government bodies and asking them for help,

:55:36.:55:38.

asking them to for support, and you get the door slammed in your face on

:55:39.:55:42.

several occasions, what else can you do? Jo Fleming refereed for years,

:55:43.:55:48.

and our organisers for officials in Manchester. There has always been

:55:49.:55:53.

abused was referees, but it has got worse. Why do you think it has gone

:55:54.:55:59.

worse? It has become a blame culture. Before you think about

:56:00.:56:03.

yourself, it should never go as far as the abuse and the physical

:56:04.:56:08.

intimidation. A group referees are saying they want to make a stand,

:56:09.:56:12.

than I would say make sure that you are heard. Manchester FA, which

:56:13.:56:16.

oversees this league, has just announced it will give referees more

:56:17.:56:20.

support, visiting them within 24 hours of any incident and ensuring

:56:21.:56:27.

any assaults are reported to police. But after much deliberation, Ryan

:56:28.:56:30.

still wants referees to boycott matches. If referees' strike does go

:56:31.:56:37.

ahead, nationally, hundreds of face cancellation. A timely wake-up call,

:56:38.:56:44.

or just a huge own goal? I don't advocate a strike, I think that's

:56:45.:56:54.

going too far. He doesn't want them to go on strike. He the zero

:56:55.:56:58.

tolerance approach adopted by his club is more effective. We fully

:56:59.:57:02.

support the referees, and if a player is abusing referees on a

:57:03.:57:06.

regular basis, we get rid of them. Most of these problems are caused by

:57:07.:57:11.

a minority of people, and it is the same people. And I'm sure given

:57:12.:57:14.

another couple of years we. This. For Ryan Hampson, though, a referees

:57:15.:57:19.

because strike is the only way to tackle this problem effectively. Let

:57:20.:57:27.

us know if you have thoughts on that. We will be speaking to Ryan

:57:28.:57:30.

later. Time now to get the news,

:57:31.:57:31.

travel and weather where you are. I'm back with the latest

:57:32.:00:52.

from the BBC London newsroom Now, though, it is back

:00:53.:00:55.

to Louise and Dan. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:00:56.:01:00.

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. Judgement day as The Supreme

:01:01.:01:03.

Court decides who has the power to officially

:01:04.:01:05.

begin Brexit. should be allowed to start

:01:06.:01:07.

the process without a vote. But campaigners who've brought

:01:08.:01:11.

the case say Parliament must The 11 judges will reveal

:01:12.:01:19.

their decision at half past Tougher penalties are on their way

:01:20.:01:24.

for drivers caught well Liberty Media complete their ?6.4

:01:25.:01:46.

billion takeover of Formula One - and remove Bernie Ecclestone

:01:47.:02:03.

as chief executive, ending his 40 The cost of your

:02:04.:02:05.

cappuccino is on the up. Coffee drinkers face big price rises

:02:06.:02:10.

because of bad weather, I'll look at what it means

:02:11.:02:12.

for our morning caffeine fix. And we're going to be talking

:02:13.:02:17.

about the happiest children Studies suggest they live

:02:18.:02:20.

in the Netherlands. But what makes children

:02:21.:02:23.

there so happy? We'll meet two mums who've gone

:02:24.:02:25.

Dutch to try to find out. Good morning. It is a cold and

:02:26.:02:35.

frosty start across much of England. Some patchy, dense freezing fog? .

:02:36.:02:41.

London Northern Ireland, much milder. I will have more details in

:02:42.:02:46.

15 minutes. The Supreme Court will rule today

:02:47.:02:48.

on whether it's up to Parliament or the Government to start

:02:49.:02:53.

the process for exiting The government argues that ministers

:02:54.:02:56.

have the power to trigger But opponents say they need

:02:57.:02:59.

Parliament's approval The European Union

:03:00.:03:05.

ignites strong passions. Almost seven weeks ago,

:03:06.:03:19.

protesters gathered outside the Supreme Court

:03:20.:03:26.

as the 11 most senior Hour after hour of dense legal

:03:27.:03:28.

argument followed on the biggest Is it behind the door

:03:29.:03:37.

here in Downing Street? The Prime Minister says

:03:38.:03:45.

she can start the UK's divorce from the EU

:03:46.:03:54.

herself but campaigners, led by the businesswoman

:03:55.:03:59.

Gina Miller, says MPs This morning, we will

:04:00.:04:01.

find out who has won. If the government loses,

:04:02.:04:06.

they will also lose complete control of the timetable for starting

:04:07.:04:08.

the process of leaving It will have to rush

:04:09.:04:11.

its plan through Parliament Today is not about whether Brexit

:04:12.:04:20.

should or will happen That is why it matters

:04:21.:04:28.

and that is why there was a lot of interest

:04:29.:04:32.

here in what the judges had to say. Let's speak to our political

:04:33.:04:36.

correspondent, Carole Walker, who is outside the Supreme

:04:37.:04:40.

Court this morning. Is there any indication yet

:04:41.:04:42.

about what the judges It is going to be a fairly brief

:04:43.:04:52.

judgement, to the point. The expectation is that will go against

:04:53.:04:55.

the government. The Prime Minister will hope to go ahead, trickle --

:04:56.:05:02.

trigger Article 50 by the end of March. The expectation is the

:05:03.:05:07.

judgement will have to get the consent of Parliament first. We

:05:08.:05:11.

don't expect MPs or peers to try to block the process but they will try

:05:12.:05:16.

to amend, to shape the legislation, to change the Prime Minister's

:05:17.:05:21.

approach to those negotiations. That could delay the proceedings quite

:05:22.:05:25.

significantly. It could also affect exactly how she goes into those

:05:26.:05:30.

negotiations. There is also another important issue being decided here.

:05:31.:05:34.

That is, whether the government needs to consult or get the approval

:05:35.:05:40.

of the devolved nations, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Scotland

:05:41.:05:45.

is demanding the right to stay in the single market. Northern Ireland,

:05:46.:05:49.

we are still awaiting elections at the beginning of March. It's not

:05:50.:05:52.

even clear who the Prime Minister would consult at this stage. All of

:05:53.:05:56.

could complicate the process when Theresa May is determined to get on

:05:57.:06:02.

and begin those negotiations by the end of March. Carroll, thank you.

:06:03.:06:15.

And in a few minutes we'll speak to the former

:06:16.:06:17.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg to get his thoughts

:06:18.:06:20.

President Trump has announced that America will formally withdraw

:06:21.:06:24.

from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, one of the major pledges he made

:06:25.:06:27.

The trade deal involving a dozen countries was agreed by Barack

:06:28.:06:31.

President Trump has also cut funding for international groups that

:06:32.:06:34.

provide abortions, and has frozen the hiring of some federal workers.

:06:35.:06:37.

Drivers caught driving well above the speed limit will face

:06:38.:06:40.

bigger fines after a review of the sentencing guidelines

:06:41.:06:42.

The changes will allow magistrates to impose much tougher

:06:43.:06:46.

penalties on drivers and are intended to make sure

:06:47.:06:49.

the punishment for speeding is a lot higher for the worst offenders.

:06:50.:06:52.

Thousands of motorists are fined for speeding on our roads every year.

:06:53.:07:03.

After hearing concerns from road safety campaigners, the sentencing

:07:04.:07:06.

council has decided that the current system isn't good enough. As a

:07:07.:07:11.

result, fines will be increased by 50% for the most serious speeding

:07:12.:07:17.

offences. The current limit for a speeding fine is 100% of the drivers

:07:18.:07:24.

weekly wage, up to ?1000 or ?2500 if they are caught on the motorway but

:07:25.:07:27.

when the new guidelines come into force on the 24th of April, drivers

:07:28.:07:31.

caught well above the speed limit can expect a fine of 1.5 times their

:07:32.:07:38.

weekly income. When the limit is 30, that means someone driving at 51

:07:39.:07:43.

miles per hour. When the limit is 70, like on a motorway, that means

:07:44.:07:48.

travelling at 101 miles per hour but the upper limits of the fines still

:07:49.:07:56.

remain the same, at ?1000 and ?2500. In 2015, more than 166,000 motorists

:07:57.:08:02.

were fined for speeding offences in England and Wales, the average fine

:08:03.:08:08.

?188. And it's not just speeding offences. Another change concerns

:08:09.:08:13.

people who don't have a TV license. Thousands are fined but major

:08:14.:08:18.

streets will now be able to impose a non-financial pentiti, a conditional

:08:19.:08:22.

discharge in cases where people have made significant efforts to pay the

:08:23.:08:24.

fee. Sian Grzeszczyk, BBC News. Bernie Ecclestone has been replaced

:08:25.:08:26.

as the Chief Executive of Formula One, after

:08:27.:08:29.

four decades in charge. The move was announced

:08:30.:08:31.

by the American company Liberty Media following its ?6

:08:32.:08:36.

billion takeover of the sport. Mr Ecclestone, who says

:08:37.:08:39.

he's been forced out, by the vice-president

:08:40.:08:41.

of 21st Century Fox, Having ruled Formula 1 with an iron

:08:42.:08:54.

grip of the last 40 years, transforming the sport into a global

:08:55.:08:57.

commercial phenomenon and becoming superrich in the process, it seemed

:08:58.:09:01.

as if Bernie Ecclestone would somehow go on forever. But what the

:09:02.:09:06.

most remarkable rains and sport has reached the end of the road. In a

:09:07.:09:11.

statement confirming its ?6 billion takeover of F1, new and American

:09:12.:09:15.

owner liberty media said chairman Chase Carey would now be Chief

:09:16.:09:20.

Executive, with Ecclestone offered the title of chairman emeritus. That

:09:21.:09:24.

diminished role is unlikely to sat -- satisfy him, who said he has been

:09:25.:09:31.

deposed. He will not be in charge of the day running of the sport. The 86

:09:32.:09:35.

enrolled billionaire's rise from second-hand car salesman to team

:09:36.:09:40.

owner and then F1's all powerful commercial rights holder is unique.

:09:41.:09:44.

Able to pick up the phone to heads of state and royals and celebrities,

:09:45.:09:49.

he was the best connected man in the sport, expert beholding his various

:09:50.:09:53.

factions together and surviving many controversies including bribery

:09:54.:09:58.

trial in 2014. But declining television audiences and concerns

:09:59.:10:03.

over the predictability of races, liberty believes F1 needs a revamp

:10:04.:10:09.

and with Chase Carey saying it has multiple untapped opportunities,

:10:10.:10:14.

Ecclestone has been driven out. Some will feel he outstayed his welcome

:10:15.:10:17.

but others in the sport are indebted to him.

:10:18.:10:21.

We're hearing that approximately 100 flights have been cancelled

:10:22.:10:23.

The airport says that there is reduced visibility again today,

:10:24.:10:27.

and that passengers should check their flight status

:10:28.:10:29.

with their airline before setting off.

:10:30.:10:37.

Flood management in England and Wales is still fragmented,

:10:38.:10:40.

inefficient and ineffective according to a group of MPs.

:10:41.:10:47.

That's according to a committee of MPs who have criticised

:10:48.:10:53.

the government for a lack of action two months

:10:54.:10:55.

The government says its plans will help protect 300,000 homes.

:10:56.:11:00.

The nominations for this year's Academy Awards will be

:11:01.:11:03.

Critics have tipped the modern musical romance La La Land

:11:04.:11:06.

It's expected to face stiff competition from the domestic drama

:11:07.:11:10.

Manchester By The Sea and also from Moonlight,

:11:11.:11:12.

a coming of age drama set in drug-torn Miami.

:11:13.:11:21.

Zookeepers at San Diego Safari Park are caring for a miracle baby

:11:22.:11:24.

a bat delivered by caesarean section.

:11:25.:11:26.

The 12-day-old Rodrigues fruit bat, also known as the flying fox,

:11:27.:11:29.

is being hand-reared following surgery.

:11:30.:11:36.

Staff say he's a fiesty creature, who's quick to let them know

:11:37.:11:39.

Absolutely lovely. I need to clear up these back to facts before I pass

:11:40.:11:57.

them on to you. Cavill will bring you all the weather in a few

:11:58.:11:59.

minutes' time. -- Carroll. The Supreme Court will rule later

:12:00.:12:01.

whether Parliament or ministers have the power to begin

:12:02.:12:04.

the process of leaving the EU. We've been promised a red,

:12:05.:12:07.

white and blue Brexit. A clean break from European Union

:12:08.:12:09.

membership, rather than But who has the power

:12:10.:12:12.

to fire the starting gun? The Government, Theresa May

:12:13.:12:16.

and her ministers? Or Parliament - the elected MPs

:12:17.:12:17.

in the Commons and their neighbours Both sides at court agreed

:12:18.:12:21.

that the case wasn't If the Government

:12:22.:12:25.

wins its case today, it will trigger Article 50 and begin

:12:26.:12:29.

the process by the end of March. If it loses, it may

:12:30.:12:33.

still try to meet that deadline, but will have to consult

:12:34.:12:35.

Parliament and will likely ask MPs Let's speak to former

:12:36.:12:40.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg. He campaigned for a Remain vote

:12:41.:12:45.

in the referendum and is now the Liberal Democrat's

:12:46.:12:48.

spokesman on Brexit. Good morning and thank you very much

:12:49.:12:59.

of your time on this. If the government does lose today, what

:13:00.:13:02.

will your party look to do in Parliament? If the government loses

:13:03.:13:08.

and by the way, it's extraordinary that this even ended up in court,

:13:09.:13:12.

you would have thought it was normal to give Parliament a say on

:13:13.:13:16.

something as momentous as this but if the government loses, if MPs have

:13:17.:13:21.

a say, I don't think, given that the Labour Party have in effect written

:13:22.:13:24.

a blank cheque to the government and said they would support them come

:13:25.:13:28.

what may, there was no risk that parliament. Article 50 from being

:13:29.:13:34.

triggered. The question is, in what kind -- and what kind of amendments

:13:35.:13:40.

will be tabled. There will be difficulties across parties, for

:13:41.:13:42.

instance, to make sure the government limits economic damage

:13:43.:13:47.

with what they are determined to do, which is pull the United Kingdom

:13:48.:13:50.

after the single market. Amendments to make sure MPs have a look at

:13:51.:13:54.

negotiations while they are going on, not just at the beginning and

:13:55.:13:58.

the end and as you know, the Liberal Democrats are they also believe that

:13:59.:14:02.

when a final deal emerges in years to come, that it is put to the

:14:03.:14:06.

people and the people have final say on they like or don't like the final

:14:07.:14:10.

deal that emerges from these negotiations. There might be many

:14:11.:14:14.

people watching this, thinking, just accept it. We understand you and

:14:15.:14:20.

many others did not want to leave the EU at the UK have voted to do

:14:21.:14:25.

that and that is now what is going to happen so stop arguing about it.

:14:26.:14:31.

What we are arguing about, you are right, I was disappointed by the

:14:32.:14:39.

outcome, but the complicated bit is how to pull us out of the European

:14:40.:14:43.

Union. There are lots of different choices. The Brexit campaign, Boris

:14:44.:14:56.

Johnson, Nigel Farage, Michael Gove, making promises about cuts to the

:14:57.:15:02.

NHS, VAT, they went quiet but it is reasonable to say that at the end of

:15:03.:15:06.

this process, much as it was kicked off by the British people, it should

:15:07.:15:10.

also be signed off by the British people. It should not become

:15:11.:15:16.

something to decide upon at the end of the process. Did Theresa May make

:15:17.:15:21.

the plans clear? I am here, as you can see, just talking to vote to get

:15:22.:15:28.

under the skin of some of this because it's very well to say, you

:15:29.:15:35.

wanted be a great global free trade in Britain. And then the world's

:15:36.:15:43.

most successful free trading error, the single market, the EU, created

:15:44.:15:49.

by Margaret Thatcher, there are so many contradictions. I suspect the

:15:50.:15:54.

final deal looks substantially different to what Theresa May has

:15:55.:15:59.

set up, which is the nature of negotiations. That is why we think

:16:00.:16:02.

it is important that people should have a say in the end on whether

:16:03.:16:06.

they agree or disagree on the final outcome of these talks. People have

:16:07.:16:11.

already had a say, haven't they? Brexit has been decided. Whatever

:16:12.:16:14.

changes you make, they will get through. I agree with you. MPs, at

:16:15.:16:24.

this stage, will give their consent for the government to start the

:16:25.:16:28.

Article 50 negotiations but as I say, if you look further forward,

:16:29.:16:33.

certainly two years hence, it is important to ask ourselves now how

:16:34.:16:40.

we should put the finishing touches as we like to this very complex

:16:41.:16:51.

negotiation. Also, as you know, young people, they voted

:16:52.:16:55.

overwhelming numbers for a different direction of travel and it seems

:16:56.:16:58.

right that we do not know what the final deal is and we should give

:16:59.:17:03.

people a say and not keep it in the hands of politicians.

:17:04.:17:08.

You will see the Prime Minister on many of the front pages today saying

:17:09.:17:14.

she was aware of what happened with the Trident misfire before she

:17:15.:17:19.

addressed MPs in Parliament. Do you think she has a duty to clarify what

:17:20.:17:23.

she knew and when she knew it, and to address these issues? Of course.

:17:24.:17:30.

It is a very serious matter if these missiles are now, at least some of

:17:31.:17:35.

them, misfiring. But to not have told parliament at a point when

:17:36.:17:39.

Parliament was making a major decision, a decision which I happen

:17:40.:17:44.

to disagree with, about spending billions of pounds of British

:17:45.:17:48.

taxpayers' money in the future to replace the existing system, to not

:17:49.:17:52.

have told MPs that there were some flaws, I'm not actually convinced

:17:53.:17:55.

that it would have changed the decision in Parliament that seems to

:17:56.:17:59.

me to have been a very relevant piece of information, that should

:18:00.:18:02.

have been made public. And they certainly should come clean now I

:18:03.:18:05.

think this endless ducking and weaving, they should stop digging

:18:06.:18:11.

now, the government, and come clean. Appreciate your time on track list

:18:12.:18:17.

this morning. And in an hour we will get the other side of the argument,

:18:18.:18:22.

from the Conservative MP Iain Duncan Smith.

:18:23.:18:22.

And, as we have been hearing, the Supreme Court is expected

:18:23.:18:25.

to deliver its judgement around 9:30am this morning.

:18:26.:18:27.

You can follow it live on the BBC News Channel,

:18:28.:18:30.

and keep up to date with the latest developments on BBC News online.

:18:31.:18:33.

Here is Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:18:34.:18:36.

We know that flights are cancelled at Heathrow. Good morning to you. We

:18:37.:18:42.

have got some fog around this morning, some dense, patchy,

:18:43.:18:46.

freezing fog, causing some travel disruption and you can find out what

:18:47.:18:50.

is happening where you are on your BBC local radio station. It is

:18:51.:18:54.

fairly patchy so we are not all seeing it. At my house it was really

:18:55.:18:58.

dense but onto the M4 there was not much around, and we ran into more

:18:59.:19:03.

later on. Quite a lot of patchy fog around as we push over towards the

:19:04.:19:07.

south-west. Here it is misty rather than foggy and a cold and frosty

:19:08.:19:12.

start. For Wales, a cold start away from the west. Patchy had sent

:19:13.:19:18.

pieces of fog, a from close by so it is cloudy with the odd spot of

:19:19.:19:21.

drizzle but for Northern Ireland one thing you will notice is a much

:19:22.:19:26.

milder start to the day that it was yesterday. Fairly cloudy. Across

:19:27.:19:29.

Scotland a similar story. Milder start with a weak weather front

:19:30.:19:32.

producing patchy rain and drizzle and as we head back into the

:19:33.:19:36.

north-east England, around the Vale of York, for example, we do have

:19:37.:19:41.

some patchy fog. Rather like yesterday, some of this fault will

:19:42.:19:44.

lift quite badly, some of it believed only in the low cloud and

:19:45.:19:49.

some of it will not clear at all. If you are stuck in an area where the

:19:50.:19:52.

fog doesn't lift, temperatures will struggle to break freezing but out

:19:53.:19:56.

towards the west, under the cloud, temperatures on the mild side, ten

:19:57.:20:01.

or 11. As we push towards Central and eastern areas, despite the fact

:20:02.:20:04.

there will be some sunshine, we are looking at a chilly six or seven. It

:20:05.:20:09.

sinks into northern England and north Wales, producing again some

:20:10.:20:13.

patchy rain and drizzle. Through the evening and overnight the wind

:20:14.:20:16.

strengthens towards the west. There will be quite a lot of cloud around,

:20:17.:20:21.

patchy fog, some drizzly bits and pieces as well so no problems with

:20:22.:20:26.

frost. As we push towards Wales and the west once again, it will be a

:20:27.:20:32.

cold night, some pockets of frost but also some pockets of freezing

:20:33.:20:35.

fog. Down towards Dorset and all points south-east. Tomorrow morning

:20:36.:20:39.

you will find that fog does exactly what it has been doing the last few

:20:40.:20:43.

days. Some of it will clear quite readily, some of it will turn the

:20:44.:20:47.

low cloud and some of it will stick. For most it will be a dry day. We

:20:48.:20:51.

will see some sunshine towards the central swathes of the UK but

:20:52.:20:55.

another weather front towards the north-west will already be bringing

:20:56.:20:57.

in some rain by mid-afternoon. Temperatures again in the west

:20:58.:21:01.

higher than they are likely to be in the east, where it will still feel

:21:02.:21:05.

cold. As we move from Wednesday into Thursday, watch how the isobars via

:21:06.:21:09.

towards more of a south-easterly. The weather front knocking on the

:21:10.:21:13.

doors of Northern Ireland, bringing some rain. The wind direction is

:21:14.:21:17.

salient because it will start to drag on some of that cold,

:21:18.:21:21.

Continental air. So although on Thursday it will be a dry day for

:21:22.:21:25.

most of the UK, it will be a fine day when we could see some sunshine.

:21:26.:21:29.

Strongest winds towards the west. It will feel cold. This is what your

:21:30.:21:33.

thermometer will save between 1am and 7am, but this is what it will

:21:34.:21:38.

feel like if you are exposed to the wind, so -5, for example, in

:21:39.:21:42.

Newcastle, because of the wind chill. So you need to wrap up

:21:43.:21:44.

warmly. Her two children were killed

:21:45.:21:45.

in a house fire, started Claire had warned the authorities

:21:46.:21:52.

that their father posed a danger, but he was still allowed

:21:53.:21:56.

unsupervised access to them under Later today, she will deliver

:21:57.:21:59.

a petition urging the Government to change the way courts

:22:00.:22:03.

handle cases such as hers. Good morning to you. Thank you very

:22:04.:22:19.

much for coming back. I know we talk to you about it a year ago. Remind

:22:20.:22:24.

us, for viewers who don't remember, what happened to your two young

:22:25.:22:29.

boys. They were on an access visit to their father and in the two hours

:22:30.:22:32.

when he was having them he barricaded the house and set 14

:22:33.:22:37.

separate fires and trapped the boys in the Attic upstairs. Jack tried to

:22:38.:22:41.

get out and save his brother, unfortunately he fell through the

:22:42.:22:50.

hatch, and he was 56% burnt. So Paul died two hours later in my arms, and

:22:51.:22:54.

Jack died five days later in Manchester. It is a brutal and

:22:55.:23:00.

terrible story. I know we have heard it before but hearing it again, it

:23:01.:23:04.

doesn't change the facts of the case. How much have you flagged up

:23:05.:23:07.

your concerns about your ex-husband with the authorities? I have elected

:23:08.:23:12.

up with everybody, social services, the police, they all knew. The judge

:23:13.:23:17.

was aware as well. It is actually in my court case that I said I thought

:23:18.:23:21.

he would either kill or significant harm the boys. He was on the edge.

:23:22.:23:28.

He had threatened to commit suicide couple of earlier. And he just

:23:29.:23:33.

wasn't in the right place at the time to have safe contact with the

:23:34.:23:39.

two boys. In the organisation which represents children in Family Court

:23:40.:23:46.

cases, so what is it you hope to see changed? What needs to change is

:23:47.:23:50.

that children's voices need to be heard. It is all too easy in a

:23:51.:23:57.

complicated separation that the children's voices get lost somewhere

:23:58.:24:03.

down the process. But what we need to do is make sure children are at

:24:04.:24:07.

the heart of every decision made, and that they are allowed their

:24:08.:24:11.

voice. Jack never had his voice heard until he was in the fire and

:24:12.:24:16.

he said to the foam and my dad did this and he did it on purpose. The

:24:17.:24:21.

day that Jack was supposed to be having his interview was the day I

:24:22.:24:25.

held him in his arms as he died. That can't be allowed to happen.

:24:26.:24:28.

What we need to do is change the legislation and make family courts

:24:29.:24:31.

are safer process, both for the families and for the children that

:24:32.:24:35.

are currently going through separation. I'm sure all our viewers

:24:36.:24:39.

feel for you, as you describe your own story. Do you think it is right

:24:40.:24:44.

that, in principle, family courts try and make sure that both parents

:24:45.:24:47.

of easily get access to the children, that is the overriding

:24:48.:24:52.

principle, isn't it? Yet it is, and so it should be. There are lots of

:24:53.:24:56.

dads out there that are fantastic dads, and children should see both

:24:57.:25:00.

their parents. But there is a balance between people who love and

:25:01.:25:05.

care for the children, and people who just can't fit to have their

:25:06.:25:10.

children. And the children's voices must always be heard in those cases.

:25:11.:25:13.

Their wishes and feelings must be taken into account. I suppose when

:25:14.:25:20.

you go to Downing Street today, do you expect or hope for a kind of

:25:21.:25:24.

quick change, if they were to be changed? Because these things do

:25:25.:25:28.

take a while, don't they? They do. I mean, we've launched the campaign a

:25:29.:25:34.

year ago. The petition with 38 Degrees, and we got 38,000

:25:35.:25:38.

signatures, and hopefully the government will take this on board

:25:39.:25:41.

and move them through, as you say, as quickly as possible. Some changes

:25:42.:25:47.

are going through before June, the new cross questioning and practice

:25:48.:25:52.

direction should be changed quite soon, and hopefully on the back of

:25:53.:25:56.

that the Family Court system will change as they go along. Thank you.

:25:57.:26:05.

And a statement from them, which I'm sure you have heard before. Coffee

:26:06.:26:13.

-- Claire Throsell's case was tragic and we have written to her and

:26:14.:26:17.

listen to her concerns. We acknowledge the findings of the

:26:18.:26:20.

coroner and a serious case review that no agency had failed in its

:26:21.:26:24.

duty but accept that is always there are lessons to be learned from such

:26:25.:26:28.

terrible cases. Thank you again for coming in and talking to us this

:26:29.:26:30.

morning. Carol will tell you about the

:26:31.:26:38.

weather shortly, it is called for most of us.

:26:39.:29:58.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:29:59.:30:00.

Now, though, it is back to Louise and Dan.

:30:01.:30:03.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:30:04.:30:11.

The Supreme Court will rule today on whether it's up to Parliament

:30:12.:30:15.

or the Government to start the process for exiting

:30:16.:30:18.

The government argues that ministers have the power to trigger

:30:19.:30:26.

But opponents say they need Parliament's approval

:30:27.:30:30.

The judgement is significant, as it goes

:30:31.:30:32.

to the heart of where power lies in the UK and could disrupt

:30:33.:30:36.

the Prime Minister's Brexit timetable.

:30:37.:30:42.

Earlier, Nick Clegg told the programme his party wants a

:30:43.:30:48.

referendum on any final Brexit deal. The Brexit campaign, Nigel Farage,

:30:49.:30:55.

Michael Gove, Boris Johnson, they make commitments like pots of money

:30:56.:31:00.

to the NHS and cuts to the VAT, things they have fallen silent on

:31:01.:31:04.

but they were articulate -- were not articulate about what it means. At

:31:05.:31:09.

the end of this process, much as it was kicked off by the British

:31:10.:31:13.

people, it should be signed off by the British people and not something

:31:14.:31:17.

for politicians to decide upon at the end of the process.

:31:18.:31:19.

And in around half an hour we'll speak to the Conservative MP

:31:20.:31:22.

We're hearing that approximately 100 flights have been cancelled

:31:23.:31:25.

The airport says that there is reduced visibility again today,

:31:26.:31:29.

and that passengers should check their flight status

:31:30.:31:32.

with their airline before setting off.

:31:33.:31:36.

Drivers caught driving well above the speed limit will face

:31:37.:31:39.

bigger fines after a review of the sentencing guidelines

:31:40.:31:41.

The changes will allow magistrates to impose much tougher

:31:42.:31:47.

penalties on drivers and are intended to make sure

:31:48.:31:49.

the punishment for speeding is a lot higher for the worst offenders.

:31:50.:31:54.

President Trump has announced that America will formally withdraw

:31:55.:31:56.

from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, one of the major pledges he made

:31:57.:31:59.

The trade deal involving a dozen countries was agreed by Barack

:32:00.:32:05.

President Trump has also cut funding for international groups that

:32:06.:32:11.

provide abortions, and has frozen the hiring of some federal workers.

:32:12.:32:18.

Flooding has caused billions of pounds of damage and ruined

:32:19.:32:24.

But the government still isn't doing enough to tackle the problem.

:32:25.:32:30.

That's according to a committee of MPs who have criticised

:32:31.:32:33.

the government for a lack of action two months

:32:34.:32:35.

The government says its plans will help protect 300,000 homes.

:32:36.:32:43.

The citizens of this country want to see the government to protect them

:32:44.:32:48.

against flooding. We have made recommendations and it is their

:32:49.:32:51.

responsibility to protect its citizens and as far as we are

:32:52.:32:56.

concerned, it is not adequately done that so far and explained how it is

:32:57.:32:58.

going to do it. after an explosion at a block

:32:59.:33:01.

of flats in East London Monday. Four people were taken to hospital

:33:02.:33:06.

and 25 people had to be rescued from the partially collapsed

:33:07.:33:09.

building in Hornchurch. Transport for London said debris had

:33:10.:33:11.

been scattered across nearby roads. The cause of the explosion

:33:12.:33:14.

is not yet known. The nominations for this

:33:15.:33:17.

year's Academy Awards Critics have tipped modern musical

:33:18.:33:19.

romance La La Land as a frontrunner. It's expected to face stiff

:33:20.:33:23.

competition from brooding domestic drama Manchester By The Sea starring

:33:24.:33:26.

Casey Affleck and also from Moonlight, a coming of age

:33:27.:33:29.

drama set in drug-torn Miami. Our Colin will be here on the sofa

:33:30.:33:58.

later on. Sally is here now. There is Bernie Ecclestone. He is chairman

:33:59.:34:11.

emeritus. Bernie, I've looked up the job title. Chairman emeritus means

:34:12.:34:20.

you are the honorary boss. Liberty needy

:34:21.:34:20.

Liberty Media have completed their ?6.4 billion takeover and made

:34:21.:34:25.

After 40 years running the sport, Bernie Ecclestone is no longer Chief

:34:26.:34:30.

Ross Brawn, former Mercedes team principal, has been appointed

:34:31.:34:34.

Double Olympic gold-medallist boxer Nicola Adams has turned

:34:35.:34:37.

At last year's Rio Games she became the first British boxer

:34:38.:34:42.

to successfully defend an Olympic title in nearly 100 years.

:34:43.:34:45.

I feel like I have achieved everything I wanted to achieve

:34:46.:34:49.

Commonwealth Games champion, double Olympic

:34:50.:34:52.

champion, number one, it's the best way to leave the sport.

:34:53.:34:59.

There are a lot of goals in the professional

:35:00.:35:01.

Becoming a world champion and European champion.

:35:02.:35:06.

So many goals to achieve in the professional ranks.

:35:07.:35:10.

James Haskell's hopes of playing in England's Six Nations opener

:35:11.:35:13.

against France have been dealt a blow.

:35:14.:35:15.

He's not joined the squad at their training camp in portugal,

:35:16.:35:18.

despite making his comeback in Wasps' Champions Cup win

:35:19.:35:21.

He had been out for six months with a foot injury.

:35:22.:35:25.

England play france on February fourth.

:35:26.:35:30.

The Wales back row Sam Warburton says not being national captain

:35:31.:35:35.

will help make him a hungrier player.

:35:36.:35:37.

Warburton led Wales for nearly six years but has handed the armband

:35:38.:35:43.

The Cardiff Blues player's in the squad for Wales' opening game

:35:44.:35:47.

against Italy but knows he's got competition for his place

:35:48.:35:50.

I want to have those nerves whether I do not know if I am in the

:35:51.:35:59.

starting 15 because that is what drives me every day. You are

:36:00.:36:03.

training at home, you are a professional. You want to play for

:36:04.:36:08.

Wales. That is why think it will make me more hungry and not to have

:36:09.:36:10.

the captaincy. Andy Murray's unlikely to play in

:36:11.:36:28.

Great Britain's Davis Cup tie in Canada next week - according to his

:36:29.:36:31.

captain Leon Smith. The provisional team will be announced later today.

:36:32.:36:46.

Murray was knocked out of the Australian Open by Mischa Zverev who

:36:47.:36:49.

plays Roger Federer in the last eight this morning. In the women's

:36:50.:36:53.

draw, Venus Williams is through to the semi-finals after beating

:36:54.:36:54.

Russia's Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in straight sets earlier.

:36:55.:36:56.

England women are in action later today. They take on Sweden in a

:36:57.:37:02.

friendly in Spain. It's all part of the preparations for this summer's

:37:03.:37:04.

European Championship. Will not be as ready as we can be right now. I

:37:05.:37:08.

feel very sorry to Jordan right there.

:37:09.:37:09.

She was obviously standing under a shadow. Maybe they like the view

:37:10.:37:15.

because it is such a beautiful place to beat. What she is saying makes

:37:16.:37:26.

perfect sense. World number two Rory McIlroy has pulled out of the Dubai

:37:27.:37:30.

Desert Classic as he recovers from a rib injury. He

:37:31.:37:31.

missed the Aberdovey championship last weekend. Ryan Mason have

:37:32.:37:37.

thanked well-wishers for their support after what they described as

:37:38.:37:42.

a dramatic row was. The whole city midfielder underwent surgery after

:37:43.:37:45.

sustaining a fractured skull at Stamford Bridge on Sunday. He was

:37:46.:37:48.

injured in a clash of heads with Chelsea defender Gary Kay Hill. He

:37:49.:37:53.

was carried off after eight or nine minutes. He is conscious and talking

:37:54.:37:58.

and has had visitors as well. Gary Kay Hel has been in to see him. The

:37:59.:38:05.

really good news is, he was in theatre just one hour after it

:38:06.:38:09.

happened. Those pictures we saw of him being carried off one-hour

:38:10.:38:14.

afterwards. It is the best possible care. Great to see it. Good news.

:38:15.:38:19.

Fingers crossed. Are your kids happy? I think so. My favourite

:38:20.:38:31.

phrase at home is, I am doing my best! I am just doing my best. The

:38:32.:38:38.

reason they ask you that is because... I might move to the

:38:39.:38:42.

Netherlands. Some of the happy as children are apparently raised in

:38:43.:38:46.

the Netherlands according to UNICEF study. What we want to know is what

:38:47.:38:52.

is the secret of the Dutch success story. To mothers who live there

:38:53.:39:02.

have written a book to find out. Our correspondent, Anna Holligan has

:39:03.:39:05.

been to meet them and to see what happens when you place children at

:39:06.:39:07.

the centre of society. This doesn't take much,

:39:08.:39:11.

according to the Dutch. They have got the most contented

:39:12.:39:13.

babies, the happiest kids and, as adults, the best

:39:14.:39:16.

work-life balance. They place a high value on family

:39:17.:39:18.

life, and on communication And so part of eating together

:39:19.:39:22.

is about talking together. And the Dutch scored the highest

:39:23.:39:27.

on children who ate breakfast before they went to school,

:39:28.:39:30.

and that sets them up for the day. So at the end of the day it doesn't

:39:31.:39:33.

matter if it's chocolate. Chocolate sprinkles clearly

:39:34.:39:37.

contradict the healthy eating advice, and yet Dutch kids have some

:39:38.:39:38.

of the lowest obesity rates, which may be linked to the fact that

:39:39.:39:42.

so many cycle to school. But, as you can see,

:39:43.:39:45.

bikes and cars have separate lanes, so parents don't have the same

:39:46.:39:48.

worries about sending kids out And, when they get to school,

:39:49.:39:51.

Dutch pupils don't face academic pressure, things like tests

:39:52.:39:55.

and homework, until much later. When there's not so much pressure,

:39:56.:39:58.

children start school by a positive way, by enjoying it,

:39:59.:40:01.

by feeling this is something nice to do, and I think that

:40:02.:40:04.

lasts your whole life. And that is backed up

:40:05.:40:07.

by the Unicef statistics, which suggests these children

:40:08.:40:11.

are more likely to go on to further education than their

:40:12.:40:14.

British counterparts. You will see lots of fathers

:40:15.:40:16.

at the school gates. The Dutch government legislates

:40:17.:40:19.

for unpaid "daddy days," which encourage families

:40:20.:40:27.

to share the childcare. And plus, we always read

:40:28.:40:29.

in all of these books, right, that they

:40:30.:40:40.

should play outside. So I'm happy that it's

:40:41.:40:42.

part of our culture, that they're expected

:40:43.:40:44.

to be out and playing. Is it because, in the

:40:45.:40:47.

Netherlands, it is safer? We can't send kids out to parks

:40:48.:40:49.

in London or the heart In a sense, you have

:40:50.:40:52.

to trust your own society, right? Back-to-basics parenting

:40:53.:40:57.

is what it's all about. And the byproduct of giving kids

:40:58.:40:59.

greater independence - At least, when they're

:41:00.:41:04.

a little older. Head due west from here,

:41:05.:41:10.

and you'll reach Essex. The UK may be geographically close,

:41:11.:41:13.

but there are of course fundamental differences between our societies,

:41:14.:41:16.

and not all of the lessons from here can simply be

:41:17.:41:19.

exported over there. That was Anna Holligan reporting

:41:20.:41:36.

with the help of her six month old baby Zena. So how practical would it

:41:37.:41:46.

be for children to be raised the Dutch way? Thank you very much feel

:41:47.:41:54.

time. Wendy, the Dutch system, parents would be thinking, that

:41:55.:41:57.

would be lovely but in this country, we are far down another road, too

:41:58.:42:03.

far to reverse? I don't think so. It is all about the priorities be set.

:42:04.:42:08.

It think it is really simple. It is what makes a good life so in

:42:09.:42:13.

Holland, success is all about self-worth and confidence and

:42:14.:42:17.

independence and following your own interests and academic achievements

:42:18.:42:21.

are part of it but it's not the be all and end all. In the UK, we have

:42:22.:42:25.

made success all about academic achievement and it's actually only a

:42:26.:42:31.

small part of the equation. I personally think we can shift

:42:32.:42:34.

priorities and achieve something over here. I actually calling for

:42:35.:42:40.

the child to be at the centre of everything. It is possible to bring

:42:41.:42:45.

change. It may not be the -- it may not be easy. Your husband works full

:42:46.:42:57.

time, you work part-time. Is it practical? A lot of the ideas which

:42:58.:43:02.

are prevalent in the Netherlands, we had in the 70s. We all used to play

:43:03.:43:08.

out a lot. I'm not sure how we lost that. As a parent, we don't really

:43:09.:43:16.

let our children do an awful lot. We keep them in. I think in the

:43:17.:43:22.

Netherlands, they basically cycle everywhere, they have a lot more

:43:23.:43:29.

free time, they are not watched over all the time. We are scared to let

:43:30.:43:39.

them play out by themselves. I was in the Netherlands last year and you

:43:40.:43:43.

are right, everybody cycles everywhere. She had one strapped to

:43:44.:44:08.

her back. Are we overprotective we are so risk averse in this country.

:44:09.:44:21.

My mum could walk two miles. Your parents could go to the shops and

:44:22.:44:25.

within those kind of three generations, we are now in a

:44:26.:44:28.

situation where children are not even allowed out of their own back

:44:29.:44:32.

gate and we have to question why that is. Actually the most dangerous

:44:33.:44:40.

place is in their own homes. Especially in a row and bedrooms.

:44:41.:44:50.

Why have we created these restrictions? What about letting

:44:51.:44:58.

your children roam free? I have a nine-year-old, and she should be

:44:59.:45:02.

getting to the point where she should be able to walk to the shops.

:45:03.:45:06.

She hasn't yet. I have also got fired and sexy rolled and I think

:45:07.:45:11.

social services would be called if you let them play by themselves. We

:45:12.:45:15.

live near a busy road. I really would not like them out by

:45:16.:45:20.

themselves. We live in a gated development and when we moved there,

:45:21.:45:24.

I thought they could play on bikes and things. Is that you stopping

:45:25.:45:32.

them? No, it's me. I don't know why. It is just the way we are.

:45:33.:45:41.

And the focus on academics, it is quite difficult if you don't agree

:45:42.:45:47.

with that to get out of the system. Do you think that is the case? They

:45:48.:45:51.

call it in the book rat race childhood. I think this rush to get

:45:52.:45:55.

children into learning, I mean, there is actually no evidence to

:45:56.:45:59.

show that getting children learning earlier has better results later on.

:46:00.:46:03.

That is the weird thing. Rushing children into formal learning early

:46:04.:46:09.

can actually be detrimental. Most other countries, 90% of countries in

:46:10.:46:13.

the world, start their children in formal learning at school at six or

:46:14.:46:18.

seven, and they give them structured play in the interim. Actually they

:46:19.:46:21.

achieve more later on. We have kind of got it the wrong way around and

:46:22.:46:26.

we are putting huge pressure on parents and children which isn't

:46:27.:46:29.

justified and doesn't make them happy, healthy people. So many

:46:30.:46:35.

people getting in touch, thank you very much for your time. Lots of

:46:36.:46:41.

feedback, Jones says you are supposed to be a parent, stop

:46:42.:46:48.

pandering to them. Matt says maybe if parents took interest in their

:46:49.:46:51.

children they would be happier. Max says children should be having good,

:46:52.:46:56.

old-fashioned fun. Just turning the television off at the weekend,

:46:57.:46:59.

playing a board game or card game can help relax a busy family after a

:47:00.:47:07.

week. And Jones says cut the working week for parents, like in Australia.

:47:08.:47:11.

The first "very high" pollution alert has been issued for London

:47:12.:47:14.

by the city's Mayor, under a new system that warns people

:47:15.:47:17.

And the sky looks magnificent. Very different to what we were looking at

:47:18.:47:30.

yesterday with all that fog. That's right, a beautiful start to the day

:47:31.:47:34.

out here but we were talking air pollution. I need to talk to the

:47:35.:47:39.

expert, Andrew grieve. What are the air pollution levels like today?

:47:40.:47:44.

Yesterday we had very high pollution levels in the south-east but also

:47:45.:47:47.

very high levels across England as well. They have dropped a little

:47:48.:47:51.

overnight at as rush-hour starts we are starting to see those levels

:47:52.:47:56.

climb back up again. What is causing this? We have had this high-pressure

:47:57.:48:01.

system for over a week, very cold, calm, still conditions, which has

:48:02.:48:06.

allowed the pollution levels to build-up. Are their health risks

:48:07.:48:11.

attached to this? Yes, there was a big study done into

:48:12.:48:17.

the 2014 episode, when we were last here, which found there was a

:48:18.:48:21.

doubling in the rise of hospital admissions for respiratory and

:48:22.:48:24.

cardiovascular events, and these episodes always perfect the very

:48:25.:48:30.

young and the very elderly. So in France, in Paris, they are doing

:48:31.:48:34.

something with cars about this, giving one car access and one can't

:48:35.:48:39.

not, is that right? Yes, and in Madrid as well. They start to

:48:40.:48:44.

restrict traffic, who can come in, starting to make public transport

:48:45.:48:48.

free as well. That is something we can consider in the UK as well. I

:48:49.:48:53.

will let you go and grab a cup of tea but here in London, as then

:48:54.:48:59.

said, there is dense fog around this morning so if you are travelling, do

:49:00.:49:03.

bear that in mind. It is patchy, dense fog but a lot of it is

:49:04.:49:08.

freezing as well, and especially across parts of England and also

:49:09.:49:13.

Wales. If we start the forecast at 9am, you can see that we do have a

:49:14.:49:18.

fair bit of fog around. It may lead to some travel disruption. It has

:49:19.:49:23.

already, a lot of planes cancelled, a lot of flights out of Heathrow.

:49:24.:49:27.

Through the morning we will see an improvement in the fog, but still at

:49:28.:49:31.

the moment we have got that. As we travel further north into northern

:49:32.:49:34.

England, there is some fog across the Vale of York, for example, but

:49:35.:49:39.

as we sweep over towards Wales and Northern Ireland there is a fair bit

:49:40.:49:42.

of cloud around and for Northern Ireland and Scotland a much milder

:49:43.:49:46.

start to the day. In Scotland a weak weather front is producing some

:49:47.:49:49.

patchy, light rain and drizzle, some of that getting of the north-west of

:49:50.:49:54.

England. Through the day we see an improvement in the fog. Like

:49:55.:49:58.

yesterday, some of it will clear altogether, some of it will only

:49:59.:50:02.

lift into low cloud, and some of it will hang around. If you are in an

:50:03.:50:06.

area where the fog hangs around it will feel cold. Some of us will see

:50:07.:50:09.

some sunshine, with temperatures highest in the west and lowest in

:50:10.:50:13.

the east. Through the afternoon we will see some more light, patchy

:50:14.:50:17.

rain and drizzle getting down in the north-west England and north Wales.

:50:18.:50:21.

Through the evening and overnight in the north and west there will be

:50:22.:50:25.

more cloud. We're looking at breezy conditions so no problem with frost

:50:26.:50:30.

here, but particularly if you take a loan from the wash down towards

:50:31.:50:34.

Dorset and points south-east, it will be cold. Once again we will see

:50:35.:50:39.

some fog forming, patchy, freezing fog. Tomorrow, rather like today, it

:50:40.:50:46.

will be slow to lift. That will depress the temperature but moving

:50:47.:50:49.

away from that we will have some drier and brighter conditions. Windy

:50:50.:50:53.

out towards the west and we will see the arrival of a weather front

:50:54.:50:56.

coming in across north-west Scotland. So again, Norwich only

:50:57.:51:02.

four but ten or 11 as we push on the western areas. By the time we get to

:51:03.:51:07.

Thursday, any fog which has formed will tend to lift. By Thursday will

:51:08.:51:11.

be pulling in some cold continental air. Despite the fact that you can

:51:12.:51:16.

see the temperatures between one and seven on the charts it will feel

:51:17.:51:20.

much colder than that when you add on the strength of the winds. For

:51:21.:51:24.

example, in Newcastle, despite the temperatures you can see that, it

:51:25.:51:28.

will feel more like -5. Out towards the west weather front waiting in

:51:29.:51:32.

the winds will be coming our way as a weakening feature during the

:51:33.:51:35.

course of Friday. It looks very much now like by the end of the week we

:51:36.:51:40.

should lose our problems with fog and it will turn that bit milder.

:51:41.:51:47.

Thank you very much, it does look rather lovely this morning. A

:51:48.:51:54.

beautiful sunrise. And you will leave it to me, as there is the

:51:55.:51:59.

wonderful smell of coffee in the studio. And it could cost more,

:52:00.:52:04.

which is not making us particular happy.

:52:05.:52:06.

Your morning coffee could soon cost you more.

:52:07.:52:08.

It is because of a poor harvest and the weak pound.

:52:09.:52:11.

It has prompted Nestle, that makes Nescafe,

:52:12.:52:13.

to raise its prices, and others could soon follow.

:52:14.:52:15.

It could mean rises of up to 30% for some coffee.

:52:16.:52:19.

Simon Bower is managing director of Sheffield-based wholesalers

:52:20.:52:21.

Nice to see you, good morning. Good morning. Let's talk about what is

:52:22.:52:44.

driving this. It is the weaker pound, but also poor harvest. It is

:52:45.:52:50.

a bit of a perfect storm, isn't it? The real story is this is the post

:52:51.:52:58.

Brexit drop in the exchange rate. Coffee is traded and shipped in

:52:59.:53:02.

dollars and we have to buy it in pounds, about 17% more and if you

:53:03.:53:06.

look at what the industry is doing, Nestle had a 14% price rise, and

:53:07.:53:11.

that is all explainable by the exchange. There is a little bit of

:53:12.:53:17.

fundamental news, not an awful lot. There have been a few weaker

:53:18.:53:22.

harvests in East Africa. But fundamentally this is about

:53:23.:53:28.

exchange. When it comes to demand and supply we have seen demands in

:53:29.:53:33.

many countries which traditionally were not coffee drinkers, so that

:53:34.:53:37.

means demand goes up as well. China, one of the legacy elements of the

:53:38.:53:43.

Beijing Games is that China is a huge consumer of coffee whereas

:53:44.:53:47.

before it was on. India is now a net consumer. Brazil consumes all the

:53:48.:53:54.

lower grade coffee that it can grow. The coffee consumption patterns are

:53:55.:53:58.

changing and with that there is a bit of supply chains as well.

:53:59.:54:02.

Climate change having an effect on countries like Honduras, which are

:54:03.:54:07.

planting millions of hectares of coffee and producing some really

:54:08.:54:10.

good coffee, it is becoming a serious part of their economy. We

:54:11.:54:15.

have had parts of East Africa, Brazil, they are sort of balancing

:54:16.:54:21.

out. It reminds us how global trade is, especially when it comes to

:54:22.:54:28.

coffee, and it is affected by conditions all over the world. We

:54:29.:54:34.

are bang in the middle, coffee trading at $1.55. In the last four

:54:35.:54:43.

years it has between $1.20 and $2.05. We are bang in the middle.

:54:44.:54:50.

Last time I was here when all of the concerns with the stock markets were

:54:51.:54:55.

around, investors were piling out of stocks and shares and into coffee.

:54:56.:55:02.

That is not happening so much this year. And like gold, like oil, like

:55:03.:55:10.

everything else, you buy coffee. And they don't take delivery of it. So

:55:11.:55:17.

people going down to their local coffee shop, how much more will it

:55:18.:55:22.

cost? Taking a morning coffee or cappuccino, if the price of coffee

:55:23.:55:27.

doubled and was passed on all the way down the line, you are looking

:55:28.:55:31.

at between 3p and 7p increase in your cup. Many people will still say

:55:32.:55:36.

it is worth it for that morning caffeine fix. Nice to see you, thank

:55:37.:55:40.

you very much for that. I will keep the smell over this end of the

:55:41.:55:46.

studio. I note damned hate the smell of coffee, -- I know Dan hates the

:55:47.:55:56.

smell of coffee. Something else, as well as coffee and bringing up of

:55:57.:56:00.

children, something else very much exercising of this morning is

:56:01.:56:03.

cycling and whether you should or shouldn't do it on the pavement. One

:56:04.:56:09.

police force will be, if they see cyclists on the pavement, instead of

:56:10.:56:12.

giving them find they will ask them why, so maybe they can change. Clare

:56:13.:56:17.

says as a dog walker and pedestrian, bikes on pavements are a huge

:56:18.:56:21.

problem. The worst thing is meant on bikes with safety gear and helmets

:56:22.:56:28.

hammering on without a bell. And pedestrians don't like us on the

:56:29.:56:33.

footpath is, we can't really win. We were looking at the Netherlands

:56:34.:56:36.

where they seem to have separate cycleways, possibly why lots of

:56:37.:00:07.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:00:08.:00:09.

Judgment day as the Supreme Court decides who has the power

:00:10.:00:12.

Downing Street says the Government should be allowed to start

:00:13.:00:15.

But campaigners who've brought the case

:00:16.:00:18.

I will be live at the Supreme Court were 11 senior judges will deliver

:00:19.:00:33.

their verdict at 9:30, a judgment which will shake the whole process

:00:34.:00:40.

of Britain's departure from the European Union.

:00:41.:00:49.

Good morning, it's Tuesday 24th January.

:00:50.:00:53.

Also this morning, tougher penalties are on their way for drivers

:00:54.:00:56.

Liberty Media complete their ?6.4 billion takeover of Formula One

:00:57.:01:04.

and remove Bernie Ecclestone as chief executive,

:01:05.:01:08.

ending his 40-year reign in charge of the sport.

:01:09.:01:12.

The cost of your cappuccino is on the up.

:01:13.:01:15.

Coffee drinkers face big price rises

:01:16.:01:17.

because of bad weather, poor harvests and a weak pound.

:01:18.:01:20.

I'll look at what it means for our morning caffeine fix.

:01:21.:01:24.

and this murmaration of starlings is one of the stars of the show.

:01:25.:01:31.

Before nine, we'll join Michaela Strachan and Chris Packham

:01:32.:01:33.

And is it ever acceptable to cycle on the pavement?

:01:34.:01:39.

We'll speak to a police officer who's pedalling

:01:40.:01:42.

a new approach to the problem, and we'll find out what you think.

:01:43.:01:47.

Good morning from the roof of Broadcasting House in London, a cold

:01:48.:01:57.

start of the day across England and Wales, some pockets of frost, some

:01:58.:02:02.

dense freezing fog, most will it, some of us will see sunshine. For

:02:03.:02:06.

Scotland and Northern Ireland, much milder, a lot of clout, patchy rain,

:02:07.:02:10.

but we will see sunshine in places through the day. More details in 15

:02:11.:02:13.

minutes. A lovely sunrise as well!

:02:14.:02:17.

Good morning. First, our main story.

:02:18.:02:19.

The Supreme Court will rule today on whether it's up to Parliament

:02:20.:02:23.

or the Government to start the process for exiting

:02:24.:02:25.

The Government argues that ministers have the power to trigger

:02:26.:02:28.

But opponents say they need Parliament's approval

:02:29.:02:31.

as our political correspondent Chris Mason reports.

:02:32.:02:37.

The European Union ignites strong passions.

:02:38.:02:42.

Almost seven weeks ago, protesters gathered outside

:02:43.:02:44.

the Supreme Court as the 11 most senior judges

:02:45.:02:48.

Hour after hour of dense legal argument followed

:02:49.:02:58.

Is it behind the door here in Downing Street?

:02:59.:03:04.

The Prime Minister says she can start the UK's divorce from the EU

:03:05.:03:15.

herself, but campaigners, led by the businesswoman

:03:16.:03:17.

Gina Miller, says MPs and peers have to have a say first.

:03:18.:03:22.

This morning, we will find out who has won.

:03:23.:03:26.

If the Government loses, they will also lose complete control

:03:27.:03:28.

of the timetable for starting the process of leaving

:03:29.:03:31.

It will have to rush its plan through Parliament

:03:32.:03:35.

Today is not about whether Brexit should or will happen

:03:36.:03:41.

That is why it matters, and that is why there was a lot

:03:42.:03:50.

of interest here in what the judges had to say.

:03:51.:03:59.

Let's speak to our political correspondent Carole Walker,

:04:00.:04:04.

who is outside the Supreme Court this morning.

:04:05.:04:06.

Chris was talking about both sides of the adamant, any indication as to

:04:07.:04:12.

what might be announced this morning? Well, we won't know for

:04:13.:04:17.

certain until we get that judgment at 9:30, key figures including the

:04:18.:04:22.

Attorney General have arrived here in the last few minutes, but the

:04:23.:04:27.

expectation in government circles, and amongst legal analysts, is that

:04:28.:04:31.

the judgment will go against the Government, will essentially say

:04:32.:04:34.

that the Prime Minister has to get the consent of Parliament before she

:04:35.:04:40.

can trigger Article 50 to start that formal negotiation over the process

:04:41.:04:44.

of Brexit. And Theresa May has made it clear she wants to do that by the

:04:45.:04:48.

end of March. We don't think that I'd peers or MPs will try to block

:04:49.:04:52.

Brexit, but what is clear is that the opposition parties will try to

:04:53.:04:58.

amend any bill that goes through Parliament. And we heard earlier,

:04:59.:05:03.

here on Breakfast, from former Lib Dem leader Nikolay, who made it

:05:04.:05:09.

clear what they would try to do. -- Nick Clegg. The Brexit campaign,

:05:10.:05:13.

Michael Gove, Boris Johnson, they made commitments about pots of money

:05:14.:05:18.

for the NHS every week, cuts for VAT, things they have now fallen

:05:19.:05:22.

silent on. But they went articulate about what the deal actually means,

:05:23.:05:27.

so I think it is reasonable to say, much as it was kicked off by the

:05:28.:05:30.

British people, it should also be signed off by the British people,

:05:31.:05:34.

not just a thing for politicians to decide at the end of the process. We

:05:35.:05:43.

know the Labour Party will also try to amend any legislation as it goes

:05:44.:05:45.

through. I should say that one other important issue in the judgment is

:05:46.:05:50.

how much the Government needs to consult the devolved nations.

:05:51.:05:54.

Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland - Scotland wants to remain in the

:05:55.:05:58.

single market, in Northern Ireland we are still awaiting elections for

:05:59.:06:03.

a new government, so that could complicate the whole process. Thank

:06:04.:06:07.

you, Carol, some interesting art behind you as well!

:06:08.:06:12.

And in ten minutes, we'll speak to the Conservative

:06:13.:06:14.

MP Iain Duncan Smith. That's at 8:10am.

:06:15.:06:15.

President Trump has announced that America will formally withdraw

:06:16.:06:18.

one of the major pledges he made during the election campaign.

:06:19.:06:22.

The trade deal involving a dozen countries

:06:23.:06:25.

for international groups that provide abortions,

:06:26.:06:30.

and has frozen the hiring of some federal workers.

:06:31.:06:37.

Drivers caught driving well above the speed limit

:06:38.:06:39.

will face bigger fines after a review

:06:40.:06:41.

of the sentencing guidelines for courts in England and Wales.

:06:42.:06:43.

The changes will allow magistrates to impose much tougher penalties

:06:44.:06:45.

on drivers and are intended to make sure the punishment

:06:46.:06:52.

for speeding is a lot higher for the worst offenders.

:06:53.:06:55.

Thousands of motorists are fined for speeding

:06:56.:07:00.

After hearing concerns from road-safety campaigners,

:07:01.:07:04.

that the current system isn't good enough.

:07:05.:07:09.

As a result, fines will be increased by 50%

:07:10.:07:11.

for the most serious speeding offences.

:07:12.:07:17.

The current limit for a speeding fine is 100% of the driver's

:07:18.:07:22.

weekly wage, up to ?1000 or ?2500 if they are caught on the motorway,

:07:23.:07:29.

but when the new guidelines come into force on the 24th of April,

:07:30.:07:31.

drivers caught well above the speed limit can expect a fine

:07:32.:07:35.

of one and a half times their weekly income.

:07:36.:07:38.

that means someone driving at 51 miles per hour.

:07:39.:07:44.

When the limit is 70, like on a motorway,

:07:45.:07:47.

that means travelling at 101 miles per hour,

:07:48.:07:50.

but the upper limits of the fines still remain the same,

:07:51.:07:53.

were fined for speeding offences in England and Wales.

:07:54.:08:02.

Another change concerns people who don't have a TV licence.

:08:03.:08:21.

Thousands are fined, but magistrates will now be able to impose

:08:22.:08:23.

a non-financial penalty, a conditional discharge in cases

:08:24.:08:25.

where people have made significant efforts to pay the fee.

:08:26.:08:31.

We are hearing this morning that approximately 100 flights have been

:08:32.:08:36.

cancelled at Heathrow due to the fog, the airport says there is

:08:37.:08:41.

reduced visibility again today, and if you are travelling, passengers

:08:42.:08:44.

should check their flight status with their airline before they set

:08:45.:08:49.

off. The unmistakable smell of coffee is

:08:50.:08:53.

wafting in, Ben has been throwing his beans all around the place.

:08:54.:08:59.

There are worse things to smell of! We are talking about the price.

:09:00.:09:05.

The price of coffee beans has risen, partly due to the weak pound, it is

:09:06.:09:13.

normally priced in dollars, so a fall in the value of the pound means

:09:14.:09:17.

it is more expensive. And it also means that transport and fuel costs,

:09:18.:09:21.

everything that gets it from the field to the coffee shop, that is

:09:22.:09:27.

going up by about 30%. It is also because of weak harvest in countries

:09:28.:09:31.

where it is grown, particularly Kenya, but also Brazil, so demand is

:09:32.:09:37.

rising, supply has been falling. But it is interesting, I have been

:09:38.:09:41.

speaking to guests this morning, two other things at play, global demand

:09:42.:09:45.

has gone up, China has become a copy thinking nation for the first time,

:09:46.:09:49.

a legacy from the Olympic Games, they suddenly have a taste for it

:09:50.:09:54.

now. Other countries are producing more, so this is very much a

:09:55.:09:58.

cyclical thing. The thing that matters to me and Louise, and not

:09:59.:10:02.

you! I can appreciate your needs!

:10:03.:10:06.

It is about how much it will cost us, it could be about 10p, between

:10:07.:10:13.

5-10p on a couple of coffee. If you add up three and a every

:10:14.:10:17.

single day, it is a big difference. I would like to see you without your

:10:18.:10:24.

morning coffee! No, you would not like to see it!

:10:25.:10:28.

Ben, thank you. The nominations for this year's

:10:29.:10:32.

Academy Awards Critics have tipped

:10:33.:10:34.

the modern musical romance, It's expected to face stiff

:10:35.:10:36.

competition from the domestic drama Manchester By The Sea

:10:37.:10:41.

and also from Moonlight, a coming of age drama set

:10:42.:10:44.

in drug-torn Miami. The Supreme Court will rule later

:10:45.:10:53.

whether Parliament or Ministers have the power to begin the process

:10:54.:10:56.

of leaving the EU. We've been promised a red,

:10:57.:11:02.

white and blue Brexit. A clean break from

:11:03.:11:04.

European Union membership, But who has the power

:11:05.:11:05.

to fire the starting gun? The Government -

:11:06.:11:12.

Theresa May and her ministers? Or Parliament - the elected MPs

:11:13.:11:13.

in the Commons and their neighbours Both sides at court agreed

:11:14.:11:16.

that the case wasn't If the Government wins its case

:11:17.:11:20.

today, it will trigger Article 50 and begin the process

:11:21.:11:24.

by the end of March. If it loses, it may still try

:11:25.:11:27.

to meet that deadline, but will have to consult Parliament

:11:28.:11:29.

and will likely ask MPs and Lords Let's speak now

:11:30.:11:33.

to Iain Duncan Smith, who campaigned for

:11:34.:11:40.

Britain to leave the EU. He joins us now from our

:11:41.:11:42.

Westminster studio. Good morning to you, thanks for

:11:43.:11:50.

joining us. Which way do you think it will go today? Nobody knows. I

:11:51.:11:54.

was in government for six years as a Secretary of State, and innumerable

:11:55.:12:00.

cases ended up in the Supreme Court, and we were never able to tell which

:12:01.:12:04.

way they would go. Quite often we were surprised, and on a number of

:12:05.:12:07.

occasions we were told we have lost the case definitely, then we have

:12:08.:12:13.

found we had won. It really is a matter of utter secrecy, and they

:12:14.:12:16.

are not telling anybody, they haven't told the Government, so

:12:17.:12:20.

today will be a surprise to everybody, I suspect. Let's talk

:12:21.:12:25.

either that or he, if it did go against the Government, I am sure

:12:26.:12:29.

you are preparing for that, what is the immediate impact? Well,

:12:30.:12:33.

actually, there two levels of impact. The first is to do with

:12:34.:12:38.

triggering Article 50, and the second is, I think, that goes

:12:39.:12:42.

missing in these discussions, the wider constitutional implications of

:12:43.:12:46.

a clash between what essentially is the powers of Parliament and the

:12:47.:12:50.

powers of the Supreme Court, who is supreme in this matter. If we deal

:12:51.:12:54.

with the Europe is you, I don't think it will have a massive affect

:12:55.:12:58.

in terms of timings, because even if we had to put a bill through both

:12:59.:13:03.

houses, I am pretty certain it would be very simple, at most two clauses,

:13:04.:13:08.

and time would be allotted to get it through both houses. I suspect,

:13:09.:13:12.

without too much doubt, the Prime Minister will reach a deadline of

:13:13.:13:18.

triggering Article 50 by the end of March, and the opposition, and the

:13:19.:13:20.

majority of parliamentarians, have said they are not going to block it

:13:21.:13:26.

outright. The other is a bigger issue, which is this is a moment

:13:27.:13:30.

where even someone like Lord judge, who is no longer with us, but who

:13:31.:13:35.

was the Lord Chief Justice, has criticised in the past the Supreme

:13:36.:13:39.

Court, for straying into what he believed to be Parliament's

:13:40.:13:44.

position. It has generally been accepted that it is not the right of

:13:45.:13:48.

judges to tell Parliament how to go about its business, Parliament will

:13:49.:13:52.

decide that, whether they have acts of parliament, whether they call the

:13:53.:13:56.

Government to account. This is right on the edge of the Supreme Court

:13:57.:13:59.

telling parliament not just that they should, but how to do their

:14:00.:14:03.

business. The question will be, do they just support the High Court in

:14:04.:14:06.

saying Parliament should have a vote, or do they go further and say

:14:07.:14:12.

that Parliament has to enact legislation? That would be an

:14:13.:14:16.

enormous step into the territory marked the supremacy of Parliament.

:14:17.:14:21.

Are you saying that it might trigger a constitutional crisis in some

:14:22.:14:25.

ways? Well, I think it is already in that territory right now, in the

:14:26.:14:29.

sense that this is really the marginal debate about who is

:14:30.:14:33.

supreme. In our constitution, it has always been the case that the

:14:34.:14:38.

elected body is supreme, and the courts essentially assess what

:14:39.:14:41.

Parliament has decided and decide whether it is workable, whether

:14:42.:14:44.

changes need to be made, and they will tell Parliament if that is the

:14:45.:14:49.

case. Here is is where the debate exists, and if it wasn't about the

:14:50.:14:54.

European Union, I think it would be the more interesting debate, which

:14:55.:14:58.

is what is going to happen - you know, this is not just, have a vote,

:14:59.:15:03.

we did that before Christmas, and over 370 members of the House of

:15:04.:15:08.

Commons voted to trigger Article 50 in the timescale, so this is

:15:09.:15:11.

actually come and do they stray further than that and say, this is

:15:12.:15:14.

not good enough, in which case they are telling Parliament what to do,

:15:15.:15:16.

and it is a big issue. The Prime Minister is due to go to

:15:17.:15:24.

America later this week. We've heard President Trump say buy America,

:15:25.:15:29.

hire American, where does this leave the UK in trade negotiations?

:15:30.:15:33.

Actually I think that if you very carefully sift through what he,

:15:34.:15:37.

that's President Trump and his advisors are saying, I think you

:15:38.:15:40.

start to get a clearer picture about what he means. I think where the

:15:41.:15:45.

president is, concerned about what has happened, he thinks with various

:15:46.:15:48.

trade agreements where American companies have off shored a lot of

:15:49.:15:52.

production and that's left areas, swathes of the United States, I

:15:53.:15:56.

don't know if you go there much, but I have been to the Rust Belt

:15:57.:16:01.

territories where there is real problems, poverty, difficulty, high

:16:02.:16:04.

levels of unemployment. What's interesting at the moment, everyone

:16:05.:16:09.

goes on and on about how American unemployment has fallen to below 5%,

:16:10.:16:13.

that's true, but there is a bigger problem in the United States which

:16:14.:16:18.

we don't have, the proportion of those of working age who are working

:16:19.:16:24.

has not been lower since the Second World War. It is 68% or 69%, here in

:16:25.:16:30.

the UK we are at record high levels. There is a huge gap between the

:16:31.:16:34.

numbers who are of working age, in work and those who could be in work

:16:35.:16:39.

and that's the bit, I think, where the Trump admission is saying this

:16:40.:16:42.

isn't good enough. They have a point. So they will be looking at

:16:43.:16:47.

competition in terms of what they call the low wage economy. That's

:16:48.:16:51.

not really about the UK. The UK will be a natural fit for them in terms

:16:52.:16:55.

of trade and high-level financial services, a lot of high technology

:16:56.:17:00.

stuff. We compete at pretty much the same level. Iain Duncan Smith thank

:17:01.:17:03.

you very much for your time on Breakfast. As we have been talking

:17:04.:17:06.

about it all morning, the Supreme Court is expected to deliver its

:17:07.:17:11.

judgement. Nobody knows what it is at 9.30am. You can follow it live on

:17:12.:17:15.

the BBC News Channel and keep up-to-date with the latest

:17:16.:17:20.

developments on the BBC News Online. There will be repercussions either

:17:21.:17:25.

way. The first high pollution alert has

:17:26.:17:41.

been issued by London's mayor. Carol has the weather.

:17:42.:17:48.

It is rather cold. Some of us are starting off on a cold note

:17:49.:17:52.

particularly across England and Wales. In Scotland and Northern

:17:53.:17:55.

Ireland, you're milder. Yesterday morning the lowest temperature in

:17:56.:18:00.

Katesbridge was minus 7.1 Celsius. This morning, it was plus eight, so

:18:01.:18:04.

you'll notice a real difference. As well as the sunshine, some of us

:18:05.:18:07.

have got dense fog around this morning. Now, it is fairly patchy.

:18:08.:18:13.

Not all of us are seeing it, but if you run into it, you will know all

:18:14.:18:16.

about it. Like yesterday, it will take its time to lift. So it's

:18:17.:18:19.

already caution some travel disruption as we have heard at

:18:20.:18:22.

Heathrow Airport. It may cause further disruption perhaps on the

:18:23.:18:26.

roads and you can find out more about what's happening where you are

:18:27.:18:31.

on your BBC local radio station. At 9am you can see where we have got

:18:32.:18:36.

dense fog. It is patchy. Not all of us catching it and some of it is

:18:37.:18:40.

freezing fog. As we move further north, yes, there is patchy fog

:18:41.:18:44.

around the Vale of York, north-west England, we've got more cloud at

:18:45.:18:48.

times. For Northern Ireland, it is cloudy and mild. As we move into

:18:49.:18:52.

Scotland, here too, we've got some rain. Draped across some western

:18:53.:18:57.

areas around the Central Lowlands as well. As we go through the course of

:18:58.:19:00.

the day, the weather front producing the rain will slip further southment

:19:01.:19:04.

again patchy rain and drizzle getting in across the rest of

:19:05.:19:07.

north-west England and north-west Wales. The fog in the south will

:19:08.:19:11.

lift for some of us. For others, it will only lift into low cloud and if

:19:12.:19:15.

you're stuck under it and it doesn't shift, then it is going to feel cold

:19:16.:19:19.

with temperatures struggling to break freezing. But generally

:19:20.:19:23.

speaking, it's milder in the west. It's still cold as we drit over

:19:24.:19:26.

towards the central and eastern parts of the country. Now, through

:19:27.:19:31.

this evening, and overnight, well, we'll quite quickly see the winds

:19:32.:19:36.

strengthen and we've got rain, showing its hand across parts of the

:19:37.:19:41.

north-west. Whereas in the South East, you take a like from the Wash

:19:42.:19:46.

down towards Dorset, we're once again going to have patchy fog and

:19:47.:19:50.

some of that will be freezing. So take it easy if you're travelling

:19:51.:19:54.

first thing in the morning. Tomorrow rather like today with the fog, some

:19:55.:19:57.

of it will lift readily. Some of it will clear slowly. Some of it will

:19:58.:20:02.

lift into low cloud and some of it will stick. Tomorrow you've got a

:20:03.:20:06.

better chance of it clearing because we've got more of a south easterly

:20:07.:20:10.

breeze. Out towards the west, we've got the rain coming in as well and

:20:11.:20:14.

windy. By the time we get into Thursday, well, we really will have

:20:15.:20:18.

a noticeable wind out in the west. Some rain not too far away and once

:20:19.:20:22.

again, with the wind coming in from the near Continent which is cold,

:20:23.:20:26.

it's going to feel cold. Despite the fact that you can see temperatures

:20:27.:20:29.

around about one to seven Celsius, it will feel more like minus

:20:30.:20:32.

something depending on where you are and if we pick on Newcastle, it is

:20:33.:20:38.

one in Newcastle, but it will feel more like minus five Celsius with

:20:39.:20:40.

the wind-chill, Dan and Lou. Thank you. I'm mesmerised by the

:20:41.:20:50.

sunshine behind you. It looks like it's cold out there.

:20:51.:20:55.

Cyclists choosing to ride on the pavement instead of the road

:20:56.:20:57.

often face angry stares from pedestrians, not to mention

:20:58.:21:00.

But the Metropolitan Police in Camden have decided not to punish

:21:01.:21:03.

every bike rider who swaps the tarmac for tiles.

:21:04.:21:06.

Instead, they are asking what led them to leave the road

:21:07.:21:08.

So is it ever OK to cycle on the footpath?

:21:09.:21:13.

We asked people in Manchester what they thought.

:21:14.:21:17.

I choose not to cycle on the pavement.

:21:18.:21:19.

I don't agree with people that do cycle on pavement,

:21:20.:21:22.

but maybe there should be more facility for people to

:21:23.:21:27.

park in cycle lanes, and stuff like that.

:21:28.:21:31.

I'm a cyclist myself, so probably I have been known to,

:21:32.:21:33.

you know, be a bit naughty like that at times.

:21:34.:21:36.

I have occasionally been stopped by a policeman though.

:21:37.:21:41.

I feel much safer on a bike than in a car as far

:21:42.:21:45.

I don't think cyclists should be on the pavement particularly

:21:46.:21:48.

whenever they have made all of the cycle

:21:49.:21:50.

It's more difficult whenever you're in places

:21:51.:21:53.

where there aren't cycle lanes and I think if they feel trapped by

:21:54.:21:56.

traffic then sometimes they might, but it's difficult then for

:21:57.:21:59.

I was always told to get off my bike when I was cycling on the pavement.

:22:00.:22:06.

I can actually remember going down there,

:22:07.:22:12.

and I turned that corner and there

:22:13.:22:14.

and I was about 14 and he said, "Get off your bike."

:22:15.:22:18.

We're joined now by Sergeant Nick Clarke

:22:19.:22:21.

from the Metropolitan Police, who's in Camden this morning,

:22:22.:22:25.

and Tompion Platt from the campaign group Living Streets.

:22:26.:22:30.

Nick Clarke, so if you could explain to us. You're going to stop people

:22:31.:22:36.

and you're going to have a chat. What's the idea? So fundamentally,

:22:37.:22:41.

the key issues we received a complaint about people cycling on

:22:42.:22:47.

the pavement following some of our looking at close passing of cyclists

:22:48.:22:51.

with another operation. Rather than going over there and putting a

:22:52.:22:55.

plaster over it and sticking out some tickets for cycling on the

:22:56.:22:58.

pavement, we wanted to look at why the people were cycling on the

:22:59.:23:00.

pavement to get them off the pavement and become on to the roads.

:23:01.:23:04.

So that the pedestrians were safer, but if you just take an

:23:05.:23:09.

enforcement-only approach, you're not going to solve it because you're

:23:10.:23:15.

just going to be doing a short window. Whereas if you look at the

:23:16.:23:19.

reason behind it and tackle those, you can then deal with that problem

:23:20.:23:25.

and hopefully it goes away. That's the aim. Loads of people have been

:23:26.:23:30.

getting in contact with us today. Again, it is quite balanced on both

:23:31.:23:33.

sides of the argument saying I can't cycle on the road because it's not

:23:34.:23:37.

safe and car drivers saying cyclists don't really care and they are a law

:23:38.:23:41.

on to themselves. What have people been telling you, similar things? I

:23:42.:23:45.

want to be really clear. We want more people cycling and we want to

:23:46.:23:48.

have streets that are safe for cycling. However, it's when you mix

:23:49.:23:52.

people walking and cycling together that that can cause conflict,

:23:53.:23:56.

anxiety and fear and sometimes even serious injury and we do have a lot

:23:57.:23:59.

of our older supporters in particular who get in touch and say

:24:00.:24:03.

it is a problem in their area. In a nutshell, we want safer streets for

:24:04.:24:07.

cycling, but don't want to have that at the expense of people walking.

:24:08.:24:14.

Nick mentioned close passing. And that's when things get problematic?

:24:15.:24:19.

That's about making it safer to cycle on the road, but the bigger

:24:20.:24:23.

issue here is tackling the sources of road danger for cyclists. So

:24:24.:24:29.

things like introducing 20mph speed limits and segregated cycle lanes so

:24:30.:24:34.

they don't feel like they need to cycle on the footway. No one would

:24:35.:24:39.

expect a young kid cycling to school to be told to cycle on a busy road.

:24:40.:24:44.

But what's also important, I think, is local authorities aren't let off

:24:45.:24:49.

the hook in some way with tackling the source of road danger and

:24:50.:24:55.

slowing down traffic by saying you put cyclists on to the footway. As

:24:56.:25:01.

someone cycles past behind you on the pavement! You should have

:25:02.:25:04.

stopped him and handed out a fine, Nick!

:25:05.:25:08.

I can't see behind me. Very good. Enforcement of the law,

:25:09.:25:16.

because lots of people getting in contact saying that cyclists ignore

:25:17.:25:21.

in many ways and just go about their business wherever they want to go,

:25:22.:25:23.

whether that's on the road or the pavement. What would you say to

:25:24.:25:28.

that? OK, first of all, we're not saying for a second that cycling on

:25:29.:25:31.

the pavement isn't illegal. It still is. It is just about using our

:25:32.:25:36.

discretion. The guidance since 1999 has been that we should apply it

:25:37.:25:45.

appropriately. To say a swathe of people obey the law is ridiculous.

:25:46.:25:50.

There was one cyclist behind me was cycling on the pavement, but how

:25:51.:25:55.

many more were cycling legitimately. You can't tar them with the same

:25:56.:26:00.

brush? If someone is cycling on the pavement and they are doing it in an

:26:01.:26:05.

inconsiderate fashion, that's a different ball game. We are talking

:26:06.:26:09.

about the casual cyclist who is feeling intimidated by the volume of

:26:10.:26:17.

traffic and the close passing of HGVs, we're trying to find out why

:26:18.:26:21.

they're doing that and we can feedback through the Connell and

:26:22.:26:24.

through Transport for London where the infrastructure needs improving.

:26:25.:26:28.

Do you think there maybe just certain places that cyclists feel

:26:29.:26:33.

worried about for example? Well, yes, I think it is really clear.

:26:34.:26:41.

When we started doing our close pass stuff, Twitter came alive with

:26:42.:26:45.

people saying, "Try this road. Try that road because that's where I get

:26:46.:26:51.

the worst problems." The statistics for killed and seriously injured

:26:52.:26:55.

people reflect that. We know you're busy. We'll let you get on with your

:26:56.:27:02.

job. Let's get the

:27:03.:30:22.

Now though it's back to Louise and Dan.

:30:23.:30:24.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:30:25.:30:35.

I was just tidying up. The headlines:

:30:36.:30:42.

The Supreme Court will rule today on whether it's up to Parliament

:30:43.:30:45.

or Government to start the process for exiting the European Union.

:30:46.:30:47.

The government argues that ministers have the power to trigger the EU's

:30:48.:30:50.

But opponents say they need Parliament's approval

:30:51.:30:53.

The judgement is significant, as it goes to the heart

:30:54.:30:56.

of where power lies in the UK and could disrupt the Prime

:30:57.:30:59.

Iain Duncan Smith earlier told this programme that he doesn't think the

:31:00.:31:10.

Brexit timetable will be delayed if the government loses the appeal. I

:31:11.:31:15.

don't think it will have a massive effect in terms of timings, because

:31:16.:31:21.

even if we had to put a bill through both houses, I'm pretty certain it

:31:22.:31:25.

would be very simple. One, at most two clauses, and time would be at a

:31:26.:31:32.

loss to get it through both houses. Without too much doubt the Prime

:31:33.:31:35.

Minister will reach her deadline of triggering article 50 by the end of

:31:36.:31:40.

March. And the opposition and most of the majority of parliamentarians

:31:41.:31:43.

have said they won't block it out right.

:31:44.:31:44.

Let's speak to our Legal Correspondent Clive Coleman.

:31:45.:31:45.

Clive, why has this case got to the Supreme Court,

:31:46.:31:48.

It seems to be that nobody is entirely sure, but it looks like

:31:49.:31:56.

other suggestions are, the government might lose this.

:31:57.:32:01.

That is what a lot of the paper seem to be hinting at. Just to say, this

:32:02.:32:07.

is, without doubt, the most important case about where power

:32:08.:32:11.

lies in our Constitution. As between ministers and as between Parliament

:32:12.:32:16.

in decades. The government and ministers argue they can trigger

:32:17.:32:19.

article 50. That's the mechanism by which the UK leads the EU, using

:32:20.:32:25.

something called prerogative powers. They are ancient powers derived from

:32:26.:32:28.

times when all powerful monarchs could do pretty much whatever they

:32:29.:32:32.

wanted and those that remain are exercised by ministers. The reason

:32:33.:32:37.

they controversial is because exercising their bypasses that place

:32:38.:32:43.

over there, Parliament. Dean Miller that simply cannot happen. It is

:32:44.:32:47.

Parliament that has created laws, laws that derive from EU treaties,

:32:48.:32:52.

and enshrined in our domestic law under the 1972 European communities

:32:53.:32:57.

act. Parliament created that. Only Parliament can change those rights,

:32:58.:33:01.

rights enjoyed by you and I. It's in the cannot be done at the stroke of

:33:02.:33:06.

Minister's pen. A lot of speculation the government have lost. We won't

:33:07.:33:09.

know that until judgment is delivered. I am with Robert Bourne,

:33:10.:33:12.

soon-to-be president of the Law Society, he represents solicitors in

:33:13.:33:18.

England and Wales. If you were a gambling man, what do you anticipate

:33:19.:33:22.

the Supreme Court justices are going to find this morning? The question

:33:23.:33:26.

is whether or not is the procedure of article 50. It says we have to

:33:27.:33:31.

follow a procedure in accordance with our constitutional

:33:32.:33:33.

requirements. That is the question the court hearing will determine. It

:33:34.:33:39.

will follow the lead set by the High Court, or it'll disagree with the

:33:40.:33:44.

High Court. A lawyer's answer. I'm not putting my money on it. After

:33:45.:33:49.

the High Court ruling there were described in one paper as enemies of

:33:50.:33:52.

the people. A lot of people are upset by the way the judiciary were

:33:53.:33:56.

treated. Will they be in for a rough ride as they go against the

:33:57.:33:59.

government? I very much hope they won't be. It's fantastic. We should

:34:00.:34:05.

be proud of a system that allows people who are concerned about the

:34:06.:34:08.

interpretation of a particular legal point to come to the High Court or

:34:09.:34:13.

Supreme Court for a determination. They don't have to go to the

:34:14.:34:16.

streets. The Court are independent. That's been illustrated absolutely

:34:17.:34:22.

emphatically in this situation. It's incredibly important we don't

:34:23.:34:26.

undermine that independence. Thanks very much. Things are building up

:34:27.:34:32.

here. As we say, we don't know what the judgment will be, but whatever

:34:33.:34:35.

it is it'll be a very big story today.

:34:36.:34:39.

We can follow it throughout the day on the BBC News Channel. It is

:34:40.:34:45.

expected to be starting from around 9:30am, but we will find out by the

:34:46.:34:47.

end of the day. President Trump has announced that

:34:48.:34:49.

America will formally withdraw from the Trans Pacific Partnership,

:34:50.:34:51.

one of the major pledges he made The trade deal involving

:34:52.:34:54.

a dozen countries President Trump has also cut funding

:34:55.:34:56.

for international groups that provide abortions,

:34:57.:35:00.

and has frozen the hiring Approximately 100 flights have been

:35:01.:35:15.

cancelled at Heathrow because of fog. There was reduced visibility.

:35:16.:35:18.

These are pictures from about an hour ago. Passengers should check

:35:19.:35:24.

their flight status with their airline before setting off this

:35:25.:35:25.

morning. Motorists caught driving well

:35:26.:35:26.

above the speed limit will face bigger fines after a review

:35:27.:35:29.

of the sentencing guidelines The changes will allow magistrates

:35:30.:35:31.

to impose much tougher penalties on drivers and are intended to make

:35:32.:35:34.

sure the punishment for speeding is a lot higher

:35:35.:35:37.

for the worst offenders. The nominations for this year's

:35:38.:35:42.

Academy Awards will be Critics have tipped

:35:43.:35:45.

the modern musical romance, It's expected to face stiff

:35:46.:35:47.

competition from the domestic drama, Manchester By The Sea and also from,

:35:48.:35:54.

Moonlight, a coming of age drama Colin Paterson has been to 14

:35:55.:36:06.

ceremonies already. He must know everything.

:36:07.:36:11.

He knows a lot. There is nothing he doesn't know.

:36:12.:36:15.

Good. We will have the weather in ten minutes' time.

:36:16.:36:16.

Also coming up: This is Spike, also known

:36:17.:36:21.

as 'Radio Boy', he's been described as a new Adrian Mole

:36:22.:36:23.

for the internet generation. We'll speak to his creator, the DJ,

:36:24.:36:26.

Christian O'Connell about his novel and getting approval as an author

:36:27.:36:28.

from his fiercest From starling sightings

:36:29.:36:30.

to sandpipers on the shore, Winterwatch's Chris Packham

:36:31.:36:34.

and Michaela Strachan join us from Dorset to look ahead

:36:35.:36:36.

to what the wildlife has But first let's get

:36:37.:36:39.

the sport with Sally. A man who has been onstage for 40

:36:40.:36:58.

years. Bennett Ecclestone we are talking

:36:59.:37:08.

about. He has had a huge amount of power with Formula 1 for years. --

:37:09.:37:11.

Bernie Ecclestone. Bernie Ecclestone has been

:37:12.:37:14.

at the helm of Formula His canniness and ability

:37:15.:37:16.

to pin down million-pound deals made the sport

:37:17.:37:19.

commercially very successful. But now F1 is moving

:37:20.:37:21.

in a new direction following Let's speak now to the Formula One

:37:22.:37:23.

commentator Murray Walker, Good morning. Bernie has been a

:37:24.:37:31.

controversial character over the years. But we have to start by

:37:32.:37:35.

saying you have, for a long time, been a big fan of his. I have

:37:36.:37:40.

admiration and respect for Bernie Ecclestone. He took what was really

:37:41.:37:50.

a basic sport for amateurs and turned it into the global enterprise

:37:51.:37:54.

it is now, watched by millions and millions of people all around the

:37:55.:37:58.

world, admittedly he has done it with a great deal of dissension, but

:37:59.:38:02.

he has had a lot of help from a lot of people. But he is 86. He has to

:38:03.:38:10.

go sometime. Although he has told me he hadn't got any intention of

:38:11.:38:16.

leaving. Liberty are taking over and seem to be making all of the right

:38:17.:38:19.

noises about expanding the sport in America. Better distribution of

:38:20.:38:25.

money between the teams and better promotion. Maybe it is a good thing

:38:26.:38:30.

after all. One of the things, you have just touched on it, there is

:38:31.:38:36.

this huge issue of an untapped market in America. They want to

:38:37.:38:39.

modernise things, use social media, something Bernie was reluctant to

:38:40.:38:43.

do. What might Formula 1 look like in five years' time? Who knows?

:38:44.:39:01.

Liberty or a sports oriented organisation. They are in it to make

:39:02.:39:04.

money, yes, but they want to make money by making the sport more

:39:05.:39:09.

popular. There is a desperate need for Formula 1 to be bigger in

:39:10.:39:17.

America, because if you are going to call it a World Championship sport

:39:18.:39:19.

events to have more than one event in the US I dearly. Difficult to say

:39:20.:39:24.

what it'll look like in ten years' time, but it'll be heavily promoted.

:39:25.:39:36.

-- in the US I -- ideally. Hopefully this move will make it more popular

:39:37.:39:41.

than ever. Every time I hear this voice all I hear is "It's Nigel

:39:42.:39:48.

Mansell! " do you? Is amazing. Well, the American

:39:49.:39:54.

market will be huge for them. In other sports News:

:39:55.:39:56.

Double Olympic gold medallist boxer Nicola Adams has

:39:57.:39:58.

At last year's Rio Games she became the first British boxer

:39:59.:40:02.

to successfully defend an Olympic title in nearly 100 years.

:40:03.:40:04.

I feel like I have achieved everything I wanted to achieve

:40:05.:40:07.

World Champion, European Champion, Commonwealth Games champion,

:40:08.:40:20.

number one, it's the best way to leave the sport.

:40:21.:40:24.

There are a lot of goals in the professional ranks to achieve.

:40:25.:40:26.

Becoming a world champion and European champion.

:40:27.:40:28.

So many goals to achieve in the professional ranks.

:40:29.:40:30.

Andy Murray's unlikely to play in Great Britain's Davis Cup tie

:40:31.:40:33.

in Canada next week, according to his captain Leon Smith.

:40:34.:40:35.

The provisional team will be announced later today.

:40:36.:40:37.

Murray was knocked out of the Australian Open

:40:38.:40:39.

by Mischa Zverev, who plays Roger Federer in the last

:40:40.:40:42.

James Haskell's hopes of playing in England's Six Nations opener

:40:43.:40:49.

against France have been dealt a blow.

:40:50.:40:55.

He's not joined their squad at their training camp in Portugal,

:40:56.:40:58.

despite making his comeback in Wasps' Champions Cup

:40:59.:41:00.

He had been out for six months with a foot injury.

:41:01.:41:04.

Ryan Mason's family have thanked well-wishers for their support

:41:05.:41:17.

after what they described as a "traumatic 24 hours".

:41:18.:41:19.

The Hull City midfielder underwent surgery after sustaining a fractured

:41:20.:41:22.

Mason was injured in a clash of heads with Chelsea

:41:23.:41:26.

Within an hour of these pictures he was, in fact, in surgery. That is

:41:27.:41:42.

one of the reasons he is recovering so well. They dealt with it

:41:43.:41:44.

brilliantly, very, very quickly indeed. All of the news from the

:41:45.:41:47.

hospital is good. Long may it continue.

:41:48.:41:52.

Stay with us. Let's talk about the next story.

:41:53.:41:56.

Not you! It happens to me every day with

:41:57.:42:03.

these two. Just three examples of abuse

:42:04.:42:04.

an amateur football referee has had Ryan Hampson says the bad treatment

:42:05.:42:07.

he and his fellow match officials sometimes receive has led him

:42:08.:42:13.

to calling for grassroots Breakfast's Tim Muffett has been

:42:14.:42:15.

to meet him on the side lines. Another football match,

:42:16.:42:19.

refereed by Ryan Hampson. I have had experiences such

:42:20.:42:24.

as being headbutted by a player, I have been spat at,

:42:25.:42:37.

and I have been punched If it happens on the street, that

:42:38.:42:46.

person would be arrested, but apparently on the pitch it is

:42:47.:42:48.

different. But it isn't, it's just the same.

:42:49.:42:56.

Ryan says amateur referees are not getting enough support.

:42:57.:42:58.

He has called for a national strike in the first week of March.

:42:59.:43:01.

He says 400 referees have been in touch, backing up his idea.

:43:02.:43:04.

There has always been abuse of referees, but it has got worse.

:43:05.:43:08.

Manchester FA, which oversees this league, has just announced it

:43:09.:43:19.

will give referees more support, visiting them within 24

:43:20.:43:21.

hours of any incident, and ensuring any assaults

:43:22.:43:23.

If a referees' strike does go ahead, nationally hundreds

:43:24.:43:26.

A timely wake-up call, or just a huge own-goal?

:43:27.:43:38.

We fully support the referees, and if a player is abusing

:43:39.:43:41.

referees on a regular basis, we get rid of them.

:43:42.:43:43.

Most of these problems are caused by a minority of people,

:43:44.:43:46.

And I'm sure, given another couple of years, we will stop this.

:43:47.:43:50.

For Ryan Hampson, though, a referees' strike is the only way

:43:51.:43:52.

Joining us now are Ryan Hampson and Dr Jimmy O'Gorman,

:43:53.:44:01.

who has conducted research into the abuse amateur

:44:02.:44:02.

Good morning, thank you for coming on the sofa. Was it last week, Sally

:44:03.:44:15.

picked up the story we saw in the newspaper. And here you are now

:44:16.:44:18.

talking about this. It really has grown. Why on earth, having gone

:44:19.:44:23.

through what you have gone through, do you want to be a referee? Because

:44:24.:44:31.

a lot of referees watching this will understand... You know, there are

:44:32.:44:35.

good teams. I will start by saying that. The bad teams are a minority.

:44:36.:44:40.

When you referee a game and you come off that pitch and it went well,

:44:41.:44:46.

there is no better feeling. Especially when they say the

:44:47.:44:50.

refereeing was fantastic. But there is the other side of the abuse and

:44:51.:44:53.

the insults, and it isn't great. You said it is teams. I expected it to

:44:54.:45:00.

be individuals. Do you see what I mean? Individuals coming year,

:45:01.:45:05.

individuals, but there are also teams... When I say teens I mean in

:45:06.:45:09.

terms of managers and the officials at a club, not actually taking the

:45:10.:45:14.

players aside and saying, you need to respect the referee. It comes

:45:15.:45:18.

from the team. It might be a few players on the pitch, but it

:45:19.:45:24.

ultimately comes down to the team as a whole, do you know what I mean?

:45:25.:45:30.

Jimmy, I have a personal tale of this, when I go and watch my boy

:45:31.:45:34.

play football on a Saturday, very recently just a couple of weeks ago

:45:35.:45:39.

I saw a referee abused by parents. A 15-year-old referee abused by

:45:40.:45:42.

parents. Is this more common than it ever was before? Are we recording it

:45:43.:45:46.

better? What referees said to us, over 2000

:45:47.:45:59.

responded, they felt that these incidents are getting worse, and

:46:00.:46:02.

becoming more common over time. We were looking at the impact of the

:46:03.:46:09.

campaign from 2008 until 2015, and more recently those incidents have

:46:10.:46:17.

become more common, especially with respect to parents and players. This

:46:18.:46:23.

football worse than, say, rugby and cricket? We do not have the data,

:46:24.:46:30.

but it does occur in other sports as well. Football is sometimes more

:46:31.:46:36.

high-profile in terms of the incidents that occur, more people

:46:37.:46:43.

participate, so that gives people the impression it has a worse

:46:44.:46:50.

problem. It is one thing to say this is bad, tell your friends and family

:46:51.:46:55.

I was insulted or punched, it is another thing to get referees

:46:56.:46:58.

together and say, we need to go on strike. What has the reaction from

:46:59.:47:03.

other referees and the FA to you been? It has been massive. Starting

:47:04.:47:09.

with the positive, the support I have got from referees all over the

:47:10.:47:15.

country, and a referee from Australia, New Zealand, Gibraltar,

:47:16.:47:20.

contacting me, Scotland, a high-profile referee from Scotland

:47:21.:47:22.

contacted me, stating his support. That is massive. I never thought

:47:23.:47:29.

that this would reach out to that many people. I thought Manchester,

:47:30.:47:34.

maybe Cheshire, but not the whole of this country and other countries.

:47:35.:47:41.

What about the FA? Manchester FA have been really supportive, they

:47:42.:47:44.

have made changes to the laws, but the national FA, I am saddened by

:47:45.:47:52.

this, this campaign has been going since the back-end of December, I

:47:53.:47:55.

have not had one e-mail or phone call or text message from anybody at

:47:56.:48:00.

the national FA. I thought I would get something back, it is really

:48:01.:48:08.

disappointing. That says it all, what support is being given. From

:48:09.:48:15.

the we see some managers being penalised...

:48:16.:48:19.

Arsene Wenger pushed the fourth official at the weekend.

:48:20.:48:24.

How much of that is a link? That is one of the most common themes from

:48:25.:48:29.

the research. The referees were keen to point at those who operate at the

:48:30.:48:37.

grassroots level, the operate -- the players and managers at elite level,

:48:38.:48:42.

they felt it was being implicitly condoned, because they were not

:48:43.:48:48.

dealing with it. They were not getting sent off. At the grassroots

:48:49.:48:52.

level, they were expected to do that. You can often see the

:48:53.:48:58.

difference, they are on their own, isolated in terms of Ryan's

:48:59.:49:01.

experience, a lack of consistency as well, across the street and elite

:49:02.:49:09.

levels. It is really interesting. He said the FA have not contacted

:49:10.:49:14.

you directly, but they have said they have contacted Ryan through the

:49:15.:49:20.

Manchester FA, they said 4000 registered -- referees are

:49:21.:49:28.

registered with the FA and they are relaunching their Respect campaign

:49:29.:49:30.

next month, it will be interesting to see if that makes a difference.

:49:31.:49:33.

The first "very high" pollution alert has been issued for London

:49:34.:49:36.

by the city's mayor under a new system that warns people

:49:37.:49:39.

It is a cold start, but I have an expert who can tell is about the air

:49:40.:49:56.

pollution. What are the levels across the UK today? Yesterday we

:49:57.:50:02.

had high and very high pollution rivals across the UK, especially in

:50:03.:50:05.

the south-east. The levels have dropped overnight, that they started

:50:06.:50:10.

to rise again. What is causing this pollution? We have had high pressure

:50:11.:50:19.

for over a week, very cold, calm, still conditions, so pollution has

:50:20.:50:24.

built up day after day. Yesterday and Sunday we are reaching high and

:50:25.:50:29.

very high levels. We need the weather to be more mobile? We are

:50:30.:50:33.

looking for a breakdown in the high-pressure. If we get low

:50:34.:50:39.

pressure of the Atlantic, it will clear this pollution. What are the

:50:40.:50:45.

main contributors? The majority is from traffic, but we saw a peak on

:50:46.:50:49.

Sunday evening, a big tradition from wood-burning. About 25% of Sunday's

:50:50.:50:57.

big boss from wood-burning in the evening, which is unusual, because

:50:58.:51:01.

normally we see it go up and down with Rush hour through the morning

:51:02.:51:07.

and evening. He has implications? The young and elderly are more

:51:08.:51:11.

susceptible to pollution. There was a study in 24 team that looked at

:51:12.:51:17.

that and found that there was a doubling of GP admissions and

:51:18.:51:20.

hospital admissions during that episode, so there will be a similar

:51:21.:51:24.

scenario again this time. It has been interesting talking to you. If

:51:25.:51:30.

you are thinking of going out jogging today, perhaps it is not the

:51:31.:51:34.

best day, because of the high evils of air pollution.

:51:35.:51:39.

A cold start for England and is, we have dense fog around. If you are

:51:40.:51:46.

out and about today, there that in mind. It is patchy dense fog, so not

:51:47.:51:57.

all of us see it. It could lead to other travel disruption. Across

:51:58.:52:07.

southern counties, we have this fog and mist. It is cold and frosty, so

:52:08.:52:13.

it is freezing fog. As we travel north, a bit more clout, some

:52:14.:52:17.

brighter breaks, and patchy fog across the Vale of York. Very mild

:52:18.:52:20.

for Northern Ireland compared to yesterday. In Scotland, a week by

:52:21.:52:26.

the front is producing some patchy light rain and drizzle. Across

:52:27.:52:31.

western areas and the central lowlands. As we go through today,

:52:32.:52:37.

some of the fog will clear altogether, some will slowly clear

:52:38.:52:41.

and lift into low cloud and some will hang around all day. If you are

:52:42.:52:46.

stuck with it all day, it will feel cold, meanwhile, we see some shine

:52:47.:52:53.

come through away from the fog. We also have the weather front pushing

:52:54.:52:56.

south, getting in across north-west England and north-west Wales. That

:52:57.:53:00.

will produce patchy light rain and drizzle. It is called in the East,

:53:01.:53:06.

milder in the West. Through this evening and overnight, quite a lot

:53:07.:53:11.

of clout in northern and western areas, spots of rain, and it will be

:53:12.:53:19.

cold, especially in the south-east. We will have the lowest temperatures

:53:20.:53:23.

here, and we will see some freezing fog patches. It will be windy as

:53:24.:53:28.

well as cross the North and West. As we step into tomorrow, the fog in

:53:29.:53:36.

the south-east again, like today and yesterday, will be slow to shift.

:53:37.:53:40.

But there is a better chance of it lifting tomorrow. There will be some

:53:41.:53:46.

sunshine around. Towards the west, it is windy, with another weather

:53:47.:53:49.

front introducing grain across north-west Scotland and Northern

:53:50.:53:54.

Ireland. As we get to Thursday, the wind will have veered round into a

:53:55.:54:00.

south-easterly, so it is dragging in cold continental F. Some sunshine,

:54:01.:54:06.

some rain waiting in the wings, but although you can see the template

:54:07.:54:09.

values above freezing, it will feel much colder than that against your

:54:10.:54:10.

skin. Sorry for sending queue outside, but

:54:11.:54:21.

the pictures look beautiful! She is used to it, probably!

:54:22.:54:24.

Our next guest is an award-winning DJ who is using his experience

:54:25.:54:27.

of the airwaves in his new role as an author.

:54:28.:54:29.

Christian O'Connell's first children's book Radio Boy

:54:30.:54:31.

tells the story of Spike, an ordinary child with

:54:32.:54:33.

an extraordinary secret show that broadcasts from his shed.

:54:34.:54:44.

Kristian is here, but you are also on the radio, your show is going out

:54:45.:54:51.

with you not quite there but he. I have left it to come here, I am

:54:52.:54:56.

downstairs, and my sidekick is on air now, struggling. I have stuck on

:54:57.:55:03.

stairway to Heaven, and I will have to go! My kids do not understand how

:55:04.:55:07.

you can leave a radio show to pop on TV, they said, are you going to

:55:08.:55:13.

break radio? I have torn a wormhole. They might not be a show to go back

:55:14.:55:18.

to! Drag this out for an hour, please! Tell others about Spike.

:55:19.:55:26.

Eight years ago I had an idea of kids having their own radio show,

:55:27.:55:32.

but the kids that -- the shows that kids listen to are made by adults.

:55:33.:55:36.

They would get into trouble, because they would want to take the Mickey.

:55:37.:55:42.

It would be chaos. It is about a young lad called Spike who has no

:55:43.:55:46.

confidence, very similar to what I was like as a kid, but he has one

:55:47.:55:52.

secret superpower. He is good on the radio, so he does his own secret

:55:53.:55:56.

show. He does not think anybody will tune in, he does it with his best

:55:57.:56:02.

mates, and what happens is, as with a lot of DJs, the show does very

:56:03.:56:06.

well and it goes to his head, and he goes a bit too far. That is the

:56:07.:56:11.

story of the book. There are parallels with yourself, not you

:56:12.:56:19.

going to go head! Thank you! He is sacked from hospital radio, and that

:56:20.:56:23.

happened to you. Are you the only person to be sacked from hospital

:56:24.:56:33.

radio? I think so. In radio it is the lowest of the low, you are a

:56:34.:56:38.

volunteer, they do not pay you, but I was sacked at 16 for making what

:56:39.:56:43.

they thought was too rude a joke. That was probably devastating. I

:56:44.:56:50.

thought, it is over. I did a request show at midnight until 2am, that is

:56:51.:56:56.

when... It is prime-time! It would be in a hospital! Nobody called in!

:56:57.:57:02.

I had to make up names that were not listening. I was doing a radio show

:57:03.:57:09.

to myself. I started low, but somehow I managed to get back into

:57:10.:57:15.

it. There is a top bus but the positive message, you said your

:57:16.:57:19.

parents never held you back, and this is your dream. You were

:57:20.:57:22.

encouraged. This is the positive message. It is hard, because as a

:57:23.:57:28.

parent now, my daughter says she wants to be the next Taylor Swift,

:57:29.:57:31.

and there is a part of bigger things, good luck, but the other

:57:32.:57:35.

part of me says, of course, how can we encourage that? I wanted to be

:57:36.:57:41.

the world BMX champion, then it was the boxing champion, then it was the

:57:42.:57:45.

DJ. They were like, OK, with every single one. I think that is what we

:57:46.:57:51.

need to do as parents. But the other thing is, when we were kids, we did

:57:52.:57:56.

not have access to the Internet. Kids can start a blog or a YouTube

:57:57.:58:00.

channel, you can start your own Internet radio show with next to

:58:01.:58:05.

nothing, and we could not, so the kids use Instagram a lot. Conscious

:58:06.:58:11.

reasons, but there is other stuff you can do that we never had. They

:58:12.:58:16.

do not need to ask permission. If I was a kid now, I would have been

:58:17.:58:24.

doing a radio show now with my mate. Did your daughters read the copy?

:58:25.:58:30.

They tore it apart. I would print chapters off and hand it to them,

:58:31.:58:35.

and they do not care about my ego, they would rip it to pieces. At the

:58:36.:58:40.

end of the third chapter, my daughter said, the female character

:58:41.:58:44.

is not doing enough. They were a massive part of it, which was really

:58:45.:58:48.

nice, so if it does not do well, they have let me down. If it does, I

:58:49.:58:53.

get the money, they get nothing. You now have to go back to your radio

:58:54.:58:58.

show, so can Louise have a request? I would like some other. We don't

:58:59.:59:11.

play Abba, I am sorry! AC/DC? AC/DC. They may have covered a Abba song! I

:59:12.:59:15.

would love you to play Abba! We'll be speaking to the Winterwatch

:59:16.:59:18.

team in a moment, but first, a last brief look at the headlines

:59:19.:59:29.

where you are this morning. Winterwatch returned to our screens

:59:30.:01:23.

last night and viewers were treated to spectacular scenes including

:01:24.:01:26.

a starling flock in flight and otters playing off the west

:01:27.:01:28.

coast of Scotland Two of the shows -- and otters playing off

:01:29.:01:35.

the west coast of Scotland. Two of the show's presenters,

:01:36.:01:43.

Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan, Before we speak to them let's

:01:44.:01:45.

look at what our winter When we were here in October the

:01:46.:01:53.

deer were rotting and the leaves were turning.

:01:54.:01:58.

Now, the rot is over, the leaves have been replaced by a crown of

:01:59.:02:12.

Frost. -- the deer were rutting. On the mud flaps, 25,000 new arrivals.

:02:13.:02:20.

The marshes and heat are hugely important for winter raptors.

:02:21.:02:25.

All are here because this area is like no other part of the country.

:02:26.:02:32.

A mosaic of habitats create a unique microclimate full of species, all

:02:33.:02:35.

seeking refuge during the cold winter months.

:02:36.:02:38.

Delighted to go there right now. Michaela Strachan and Chris

:02:39.:02:40.

Packham join us now. It is clearly cold. Really cold.

:02:41.:02:50.

What are you most looking forward to? We have a whole host of things

:02:51.:02:56.

down here this week. They are out there in the fog somewhere. We are

:02:57.:03:00.

hoping if it left we will see them. In the woods we have some carcass

:03:01.:03:09.

cams. At this time of year things are tough, so that we can all get

:03:10.:03:13.

weeded out. It is part of the natural process. -- the old and weak

:03:14.:03:23.

get weeded out. We have small birds coming to feed off carcasses.

:03:24.:03:28.

Throughout the rest of the week we will be watching those. We will be

:03:29.:03:32.

looking at all of the waders. And we're hoping to see a lot if the fog

:03:33.:03:38.

lifts. Those who watched last night would have seen this amazing

:03:39.:03:41.

starving man narration. Tell us more about that. -- starling. That was

:03:42.:03:53.

amazing. I think there are about 15,000 of them making displays in

:03:54.:03:59.

the sky before they roost. But what made it amazing was the sky, it

:04:00.:04:03.

wasn't foggy, it was a beautiful sunset, so you had gorgeous oranges

:04:04.:04:06.

and purples and it couldn't have been better. But this is going on

:04:07.:04:10.

every night in the winter. Anyone around this area, which is just 20

:04:11.:04:15.

minutes away from where we are standing right now, can go and see

:04:16.:04:20.

it. I think it is fantastic. It is a natural wonder that people can go

:04:21.:04:24.

and watch for free. They don't need to watch it now, because you have

:04:25.:04:30.

been doing a display with your hands.

:04:31.:04:31.

CHUCKLES It is an amazing feat of flying that

:04:32.:04:37.

they managed to complete, as well. It really is. When you watch them,

:04:38.:04:41.

you can see a single bird and you wonder how on earth does it not bump

:04:42.:04:47.

into another bird. I used to be a dancer, I love the choreography, its

:04:48.:04:52.

natural choreography. We can be starlings together. Every night is

:04:53.:04:55.

different because it is never the same patterns. I am mesmerised.

:04:56.:05:00.

Brilliant impression from both of you. As ever, you have loads of

:05:01.:05:04.

hidden cameras, what sort of things will we see that the animals do not

:05:05.:05:10.

know we are looking at? Lots of hidden cameras in the environment.

:05:11.:05:16.

We are also interested in looking at animals people can see in their back

:05:17.:05:21.

gardens. We will be having a feeding experiment with some feeders, which

:05:22.:05:25.

are behind us. We will find out if birds have a preference of the

:05:26.:05:30.

colour of the feeder, the colour of the actual dispensing device. And

:05:31.:05:33.

then we will also cover the food to see if the birds make a choice,

:05:34.:05:37.

whether they would rather have read or blue food. I'm pinning my hopes

:05:38.:05:44.

they will both the red. -- red or blue. Very often the pigments that

:05:45.:05:54.

form blue in nature are heavily toxic. -- I'm pinning my hopes that

:05:55.:05:59.

they will go for the red. I like this experiment because it is

:06:00.:06:02.

something that our viewers can replicate in their garden. They can

:06:03.:06:07.

spray paint the feeders and see if that has an impact on the birds in

:06:08.:06:11.

their garden. Our programmes are very much about the animals we share

:06:12.:06:16.

our community with. British wildlife. And a lot of that is about

:06:17.:06:20.

the underdog. We are not so much about the exotic animals. We have

:06:21.:06:25.

films coming up about insects that live in basements of houses. House

:06:26.:06:31.

mice, as well. Everyday animals. We like to champion these and hopefully

:06:32.:06:36.

we can tell people exciting things about them. What about the studio

:06:37.:06:42.

owl. It's been a bit of a let down, to be honest. No... What we have to

:06:43.:06:49.

understand is that we come with a plan of the plan doesn't always get

:06:50.:06:55.

executed, so, what? Nobody paid the studio owl. No one gave him a

:06:56.:07:01.

script. Nobody gave him a mouse. It would have just cost a mouse. Nobody

:07:02.:07:06.

came up with one. But fingers crossed, we have cameras on a box

:07:07.:07:10.

where the owl was. Hopefully the barn owl will return and we will be

:07:11.:07:15.

able to show you that. That's true. At this time of year, things are

:07:16.:07:19.

tough, the fields have been frozen, it is difficult to forage, and it is

:07:20.:07:23.

likely that bird has gone away to find something else, try and find

:07:24.:07:27.

some food, fingers crossed. Sorry about asking that.

:07:28.:07:39.

Can we finish off with another murmurate display. We will never be

:07:40.:07:42.

able to do it properly. It will never work. Absolutely brilliant,

:07:43.:07:47.

guys. I hope that has warned you up. Take care. Thank you.

:07:48.:07:54.

You can see Winterwatch every night until this Thursday 26th of

:07:55.:07:57.

This year's Oscar nominations are announced later today,

:07:58.:08:00.

with La La Land expected to emerge as the clear frontrunner.

:08:01.:08:03.

The modern musical romance has swept film fans off their feet,

:08:04.:08:05.

and its stars Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling who are likely

:08:06.:08:08.

Let's get an idea of why, in this scene where Mia,

:08:09.:08:12.

a struggling actress tells Sebastian, a musician

:08:13.:08:13.

What? Come on, for what? For a TV show. The one I was telling you

:08:14.:08:32.

about. Dangerous Minds? That is incredible. I feel like I did not

:08:33.:08:41.

talk nicely about it last time. I got The Blitz. You've never seen it.

:08:42.:08:50.

I haven't. It's playing. I will take you. OK. For research. The research,

:08:51.:09:00.

OK. Monday night, ten o'clock. Great, for research. Who is likely

:09:01.:09:07.

to pick up one of the sought-after golden statuettes? This will be your

:09:08.:09:13.

15th ceremony. More than Jack Nicholson. La La Land isn't a

:09:14.:09:19.

difficult one to pick. They got the most ever Golden Globe wins. It has

:09:20.:09:23.

got the most nominations at the BAFTA awards. Lots of experts think

:09:24.:09:27.

it has a chance of equalling the most Oscar nominations ever this

:09:28.:09:34.

afternoon. That would be 14, equal with Titanic and All About Eve. It

:09:35.:09:39.

got nominated in the music category twice. They need to get all of those

:09:40.:09:45.

to get all 14, if they do they would tie the records. Who is likely to be

:09:46.:09:50.

in the Best actor and actress category? Up against Ryan Gosling

:09:51.:09:53.

and Emma Stone? When it comes to best actor, one of the films that

:09:54.:09:59.

has been talked a lot about is Manchester By The Sea. It stars

:10:00.:10:10.

Casey Affleck. It is a film which deals with. He plays a handyman who

:10:11.:10:15.

has to go back to where he grew up because his brother has died and he

:10:16.:10:20.

has to bring up his son. He revisits lots of old problems. It is a

:10:21.:10:23.

fantastic performance from him. He is one of the favourites for that.

:10:24.:10:27.

You mentioned best actress, as well, Emma Stone is the favourite. But she

:10:28.:10:32.

will be going up against an interesting one. The Oscars likes

:10:33.:10:35.

somebody playing a real person. Helen Mirren winning for the Queen.

:10:36.:10:40.

We had Meryl Streep playing Margaret Thatcher. Well, Natalie Portman has

:10:41.:10:45.

played Jackie Kennedy in Jackie. And it is uncanny. I would say it is

:10:46.:10:51.

more than an impression. She inhabits her. She captures all of

:10:52.:10:56.

the mannerisms. It is about grief, a portrait of grief, dealing with the

:10:57.:11:01.

death of her husband. If anybody is going to stop Emma Stone it might be

:11:02.:11:06.

Natalie Portman. Going back to La La Land, the fact you said they could

:11:07.:11:10.

have 40 nominations, do you think when they set out with that film

:11:11.:11:13.

they were thinking about that? When they trying to go for that? This is

:11:14.:11:18.

the film that the director wanted to make at the start of his career. But

:11:19.:11:24.

you don't get to do a musical at the start of your career. The studio

:11:25.:11:29.

said not a chance. So he went off and made a film called Whiplash as

:11:30.:11:36.

his calling card. He made it so that the studio would trust him with

:11:37.:11:41.

music. And he loves Hollywood musicals. There is so much hype.

:11:42.:11:45.

People are going expecting Singing In The Rain. Nothing will be the

:11:46.:11:51.

same as that, so you lower your expectations if that is what you are

:11:52.:12:01.

thinking. -- so lower. There was a lot of controversy last time about

:12:02.:12:09.

there not being a lot of nominations for minorities. They have tried to

:12:10.:12:19.

change things this year. The Academy is 75% male, 92% white, which might

:12:20.:12:23.

explain a lot of things. But there is a film called Moonlight. It will

:12:24.:12:30.

do well. It is a great film, not for any other reason it will do well. It

:12:31.:12:39.

as a nomination for best supporting actor. It is all about a young man

:12:40.:12:46.

coming to terms with his sexuality. The mother, played by British

:12:47.:12:54.

actress, is a crack addict who plays his mother. Difficult to follow

:12:55.:13:03.

Chris Rock last year he was hilarious. But it will be Jimmy

:13:04.:13:13.

Kimmel. He is hilarious. It will start at 1:18am to the second.

:13:14.:13:14.

Thanks very much. Until then, have a good day

:13:15.:13:17.

and thanks for watching. The careful on your bike. Look after

:13:18.:13:29.

your kids. -- be careful. Have coffee.

:13:30.:13:32.