25/01/2017 Breakfast


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25/01/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:00:00.:00:00.

The government prepares to put its plan for Brexit

:00:00.:00:09.

should be given a vote on Britain leaving the EU.

:00:10.:00:16.

It's thought a bill could now be introduced as early as tomorrow.

:00:17.:00:21.

Ministers are urging members of parliament not use that bill

:00:22.:00:24.

as a chance to frustrate or delay the process,

:00:25.:00:27.

but critics, including some Conservatives, are putting

:00:28.:00:30.

Theresa May under pressure to give them even more of a say on exactly

:00:31.:00:34.

Good morning, it's Wednesday 25th January.

:00:35.:00:49.

President Trump promises a big day ahead on national security,

:00:50.:00:54.

including an announcement about his plans for a wall

:00:55.:00:56.

In business, can a company impose a dress code for staff?

:00:57.:01:04.

From high heels to short skirts, two parliamentary reports say no.

:01:05.:01:09.

Firms must not and can not tell workers what to wear.

:01:10.:01:13.

Johanna Konta has been knocked out the Australian Open.

:01:14.:01:16.

She lost her quarter-final to Serena Williams 6-2 6-3 in just

:01:17.:01:20.

She was the last Brit left in the competition.

:01:21.:01:27.

We'll be hearing a toy story with a difference.

:01:28.:01:34.

Which one's yours? I would say this is Lego, this is not. OK, this is

:01:35.:01:42.

Lego? This is Lego. We'll find out how one

:01:43.:01:45.

of the world's best known brands is counting the cost

:01:46.:01:49.

of counterfeits in China. Good morning. Once again today with

:01:50.:01:58.

starting off with some patchy freezing fog and it is particularly

:01:59.:02:02.

dense across parts of the South. It's also slippery underfoot so take

:02:03.:02:06.

extra care. There will be some sunshine around today, also some

:02:07.:02:10.

drizzle and strong winds in the north-west. I'll put all that

:02:11.:02:12.

together in 15 minutes. MPs have stepped up demands

:02:13.:02:14.

for the government to publish its plan for Brexit

:02:15.:02:18.

in a formal policy document. The demands for a white paper,

:02:19.:02:21.

including from some Conservatives, follows yesterday's

:02:22.:02:24.

Supreme Court ruling. Theresa May must give parliament

:02:25.:02:26.

a vote before triggering Article 50, the formal process

:02:27.:02:29.

for leaving to the EU. It's thought legislation could be

:02:30.:02:31.

introduced as early as tomorrow. Here's our political

:02:32.:02:34.

correspondent Tom Bateman. After the judges ruled only

:02:35.:02:39.

Parliament could start Brexit, today a warning for MPs -

:02:40.:02:43.

don't to try to derail the plan. The Supreme Court judgement means

:02:44.:02:48.

a bill on triggering Article 50, the start of Britain's exit process,

:02:49.:02:51.

must be put before MPs and Lords. The government says legislation

:02:52.:02:55.

paving the way for Brexit will be tabled within days -

:02:56.:03:03.

that will be voted on by both Theresa May wants Article 50

:03:04.:03:06.

triggered by the end of March, then Britain has two

:03:07.:03:10.

years to leave the EU. The point of no return was passed

:03:11.:03:13.

in June 23, last year. Labour say they won't block Article

:03:14.:03:19.

50 but want to amend the bill, to give MPs more

:03:20.:03:25.

control of the process. If necessary, there will be

:03:26.:03:27.

hand-to-hand combat on this. We need to make sure that we get

:03:28.:03:31.

the best deal on behalf the whole country and she can't say she acts

:03:32.:03:35.

on behalf the whole country. Theresa May also faces opposition

:03:36.:03:38.

from some of her own MPs, who wanta formal exit

:03:39.:03:44.

document to be debated. But for now, at least,

:03:45.:03:46.

ministers believe they are on track to get Brexit triggered

:03:47.:03:49.

by the spring. Our political correspondent

:03:50.:03:51.

Carol Walker is outside the Houses of Parliament, how extensive

:03:52.:03:56.

will the Tory rebellion be? We're hearing in Tom's piece about

:03:57.:04:07.

the Tory rebellion. It looks as though a number of

:04:08.:04:14.

Tories rebelling against the government will be quite small but

:04:15.:04:18.

the question is whether all the different opponents to parts of the

:04:19.:04:21.

government's approach to this will be able to coalesce to impose

:04:22.:04:25.

defeats on the government. We're going to get a build tomorrow from

:04:26.:04:29.

the government which will be a pretty short bill essentially asking

:04:30.:04:32.

Parliament to approve the Negotiating process. We know for

:04:33.:04:43.

example Labour are going to amend that so if we don't like the Bill

:04:44.:04:49.

that we get the Prime Minister will be forced to go back and negotiate

:04:50.:04:53.

more. We know the Liberal Democrats are demanding a second referendum on

:04:54.:04:57.

any final Grexit deal and we know the SNP are saying Scotland should

:04:58.:05:02.

be allowed to remain in the European single market -- Brexit. What they

:05:03.:05:06.

all agree on is they want more detail to be set out in something

:05:07.:05:10.

called a white paper, a formal proposal of government plans but the

:05:11.:05:14.

government could simply agree to that. Underlying this at the moment

:05:15.:05:18.

is the government being confident that they will still be able to

:05:19.:05:24.

stick to its timetable and begin those formal Brexit negotiations by

:05:25.:05:28.

the end of March. Thank you, Carol. Plenty more from the houses of

:05:29.:05:29.

parliament later in the morning. We'll be speaking to businesswoman

:05:30.:05:31.

Gina Miller, who took the case to the Supreme Court,

:05:32.:05:34.

just after 8am this morning. President Trump has said a big day

:05:35.:05:36.

is planned on national security today, including an announcement

:05:37.:05:39.

on building a wall on the US border with Mexico, one of his

:05:40.:05:43.

main campaign pledges. In a message on Twitter,

:05:44.:05:45.

he also said to expect Reports from Washington say

:05:46.:05:48.

he will sign several executive orders relating to immigration

:05:49.:05:51.

and border security over Here's our Washington

:05:52.:05:53.

correspondent, David Willis. We're going to have our border is

:05:54.:06:06.

nice and strong, we're going to build a wall. It was the soundtrack

:06:07.:06:11.

to Donald Trump's unorthodox campaign for president, a call to

:06:12.:06:15.

build a wall along America's southern border with Mexico. Now he

:06:16.:06:19.

seems set to press ahead with measures he believes are vital to

:06:20.:06:22.

stemming the illegal flow of immigrants into the United States.

:06:23.:06:27.

The president on his Twitter account said simply:

:06:28.:06:33.

He's vowed to make Mexico pay for it. But the Mexican government has

:06:34.:06:41.

refused to do so. Later in the week, to round off a busy start to his

:06:42.:06:47.

presidency, Mr Trump is expected to sign executive orders, closing

:06:48.:06:51.

America's borders to refugees and limiting access to citizens from

:06:52.:06:56.

seven African and Middle Eastern countries, countries the

:06:57.:06:58.

administration believes export terrorism.

:06:59.:07:02.

They're mainly Muslim countries but the mantra of the Trump

:07:03.:07:06.

administration is America first. A country that traditionally has

:07:07.:07:10.

opened its doors to immigrants is about to head in the opposite

:07:11.:07:14.

direction. David Willis, BBC News, Washington.

:07:15.:07:15.

Women are experiencing widespread discrimination when it comes

:07:16.:07:17.

to dress codes at work according to a parliamentary report.

:07:18.:07:20.

MPs heard from hundreds of women who reported that the dress

:07:21.:07:23.

codes they were subject to were sexist.

:07:24.:07:25.

They began an inquiry after a receptionist was sent home

:07:26.:07:28.

Here's our business correspondent Emma Simpson.

:07:29.:07:33.

Sometimes there's no choice, and it is not always attractive.

:07:34.:07:40.

But what about being ordered to wear high heels?

:07:41.:07:43.

When Nicola Thorpe arrived for her first day at work,

:07:44.:07:46.

she was told by her employment agency she must wear shoes

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When she refused, she was sent home without pay.

:07:50.:07:58.

What they state is it gives them a more professional look.

:07:59.:08:01.

I'm not entirely sure why adding two or four inches to my height makes me

:08:02.:08:09.

more professional, or makes me walk

:08:10.:08:11.

I don't think it affects how I come across.

:08:12.:08:14.

You can see me now, this is exactly what I would be wearing.

:08:15.:08:18.

And if it's just a matter of a couple of inches,

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I can stand tall without wearing heels.

:08:22.:08:23.

She then started a petition, which led to an inquiry by MPs,

:08:24.:08:26.

who now want action from the Government.

:08:27.:08:28.

We've come up with three recommendations.

:08:29.:08:32.

Firstly, that the Equalities Act of 2010 obviously isn't

:08:33.:08:36.

Secondly, we want to raise awareness that wearing high heels or make-up

:08:37.:08:40.

may be a health and safety issue in the workplace.

:08:41.:08:43.

And thirdly, we are going to hopefully...

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if it doesn't work, then we will be taking people to court.

:08:46.:08:48.

At this company, receptionists can wear what they like.

:08:49.:08:52.

In its evidence, the Government said the existing law was clear,

:08:53.:08:55.

and that the dress code imposed on Nicola was unlawful.

:08:56.:08:59.

But the MPs are calling on the Government to do more to make

:09:00.:09:02.

the law more effective in protecting employees

:09:03.:09:04.

The screening age for bowel cancer in England, Wales

:09:05.:09:17.

and Northern Ireland should be reduced to 50 years old,

:09:18.:09:19.

according to the charity Beating Bowel Cancer.

:09:20.:09:21.

Scotland is the only part of the UK which screens from 50.

:09:22.:09:24.

The charity says that if other parts of the UK came into line,

:09:25.:09:28.

4,000 patients a year would have the opportunity

:09:29.:09:30.

A delayed upgrade to the radio system used by the emergency

:09:31.:09:40.

services in England, Scotland and Wales may cost

:09:41.:09:42.

MPs on the Public Accounts Committee say the planned new system

:09:43.:09:47.

isn't used by any other country, and needs to be properly tested

:09:48.:09:50.

to make sure it works under pressure.

:09:51.:09:52.

The 105 police, fire and ambulance services in England, Scotland and

:09:53.:10:04.

Wales communicate using a radio network known as Airwave. But these

:10:05.:10:09.

contracts expire in two years time. In its pies the emergency service

:10:10.:10:15.

network, and adapted smart phone system run by 4G, on EE. Its hope

:10:16.:10:22.

they'll be able to help the emergency services streamed live

:10:23.:10:27.

video, relayed patient data and access blueprints for buildings. But

:10:28.:10:30.

the Public Accounts Committee is calling on ministers to address what

:10:31.:10:34.

they see as real security concerns. Our real concern about the new

:10:35.:10:38.

system is at the moment at the time we had our hearing there was no deal

:10:39.:10:43.

struck, there still isn't, about transport for London and the London

:10:44.:10:46.

Underground and there are questions about other undergrounds in the

:10:47.:10:49.

country. If it doesn't work underground then it's a real risk

:10:50.:10:53.

for our people and our emergency services who need to contact each

:10:54.:10:57.

other in real time in case of an emergency like 77. On top of this it

:10:58.:11:02.

probably would be ready in time so the old Airwave network may have to

:11:03.:11:09.

be extended at an annual cost of ?475 million, which the Public

:11:10.:11:12.

Accounts Committee says the Home Office hasn't budgeted for. In a

:11:13.:11:14.

statement the Home Office said: When it is up and running the UK

:11:15.:11:28.

will be the first in the world to replace their front-line radios with

:11:29.:11:33.

what effectively is an adapted smart phone. Fiona Lamdin, BBC News.

:11:34.:11:37.

David Cameron has been appointed president

:11:38.:11:39.

In an article in the Times he says research into cancer

:11:40.:11:43.

and strokes deserve all their funding, but that dementia

:11:44.:11:46.

His new role is the second formal position he has taken since standing

:11:47.:11:50.

An RNLI lifeboat station in Yorkshire has a new crew

:11:51.:12:01.

The wild animal has befriended the team and has become a regular

:12:02.:12:06.

They say he's nearly as tame as a pet dog,

:12:07.:12:10.

and as you can see, he certainly isn't camera shy.

:12:11.:12:14.

Normally they run away! It does look like he's incredibly relaxed and

:12:15.:12:25.

calm. I was just wanting to tell you a story... I've trod in a Fox poo

:12:26.:12:32.

this week, I probably shouldn't have told you that! The smell is

:12:33.:12:36.

horrendous. We have one that keeps jumping over the fences. The ones in

:12:37.:12:42.

the back garden and he terrifies our little dog. I was taking the kids'

:12:43.:12:49.

bikes to the shed and I've trod in the poo in the slivers! Maybe I

:12:50.:12:51.

shouldn't have mentioned it! At least it wasn't barefoot!

:12:52.:13:01.

Imagine! I've done that before. Hosed those suckers down! U2 are

:13:02.:13:06.

really bringing up the tone this morning! I'm just searching for a

:13:07.:13:11.

real treat I'm going to bring you in a moment from the papers. That's a

:13:12.:13:16.

promise! We start with news overnight Australia. Not brilliant

:13:17.:13:21.

news. Jana Konta is out of the Australian Open but what a

:13:22.:13:25.

transformation over the last year or so. -- Johanna Konta. She's changed

:13:26.:13:30.

her approach to matches, she's changed her mental attitude, she

:13:31.:13:33.

doesn't panic and she keeps really calm on court. It shows you how

:13:34.:13:38.

disappointed we are not going further. When you think about who

:13:39.:13:42.

she played and what she did today was such an achievement.

:13:43.:13:43.

Johanna Konta has been knocked out of the Australian Open this morning.

:13:44.:13:46.

She lost her quarter-final to Serena Williams 6-2 6-3 in just

:13:47.:13:49.

She was the last Brit left in the competition.

:13:50.:13:55.

Williams will play Lucic-Barroni in the semi-final.

:13:56.:14:05.

Former Olympic champion Nicole Cooke says British Cycling is run by men

:14:06.:14:08.

for men and its attempts to stop doping are inadequate

:14:09.:14:11.

Cooke made the claims in written evidence submitted to a Culture,

:14:12.:14:15.

Media and Sport Select Committee yesterday.

:14:16.:14:16.

Manchester United are making progress under Jose Mourinho

:14:17.:14:18.

and are unlucky not to be challenging Chelsea,

:14:19.:14:21.

according to their former boss Sir Alex Ferguson.

:14:22.:14:23.

Ferguson told the BBC he believes Mourinho has got to grips

:14:24.:14:26.

We will show that interview later this morning.

:14:27.:14:34.

And British five-time Olympian Jo Pavey is to run in this

:14:35.:14:37.

The 43-year-old says she hopes to use the race to qualify

:14:38.:14:41.

for the World Championships in August.

:14:42.:14:48.

I have to say I'm incredibly lucky, I did once go for a run with

:14:49.:14:56.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Film slightly kindly for me. -- with Jo. --

:14:57.:15:03.

filmed. She happily hopped along. Fantastic. Good luck to her.

:15:04.:15:07.

A little look at the papers. I was attracted to the Daily Telegraph

:15:08.:15:13.

this morning because it has nice colours on the front page. There can

:15:14.:15:18.

be no turning back is the main story. The Scottish National Party,

:15:19.:15:24.

the Liberal Democrats and Labour commenting on Brexit in a lovely

:15:25.:15:28.

colour scheme of the fun of the Daily Telegraph. I know it is

:15:29.:15:32.

important, but it attracted my eye. The front of the Daily Mail, the

:15:33.:15:38.

lady who brought the whole case to the Supreme Court, Jean Miller, we

:15:39.:15:42.

will speak to her later, and the Daily Mail looking at the

:15:43.:15:45.

implications of the court ruling yesterday. MPs, they say they have a

:15:46.:15:58.

plot to thwart racks at. -- Brexit. The Daily Mail, when will they

:15:59.:16:03.

learn? They say nothing has changed with drivers using the phone at the

:16:04.:16:07.

wheel. Pictures hear of people holding their mobiles I think taking

:16:08.:16:12.

yesterday. The Times as well talking about the judgement at the Supreme

:16:13.:16:16.

Court. Judges make history in Brexit blow to ministers. Who shall we

:16:17.:16:21.

start with? Oh, Sally. I love how you do that. Sorry, Louise, I am

:16:22.:16:28.

lowering the tone, I'm talking about lycra. You know I love lycra. This

:16:29.:16:35.

is meant in lycra. Several places in New Zealand have banned men going

:16:36.:16:38.

into pubs and cafes wearing cycling shorts. Quite right too. They are

:16:39.:16:46.

trying to raise address standards. They say that lots of customers

:16:47.:16:53.

don't need to know that much detail about someone because the shorts are

:16:54.:17:00.

too tight. Unsightly. Yes, unsightly, and it is really common,

:17:01.:17:05.

isn't it, men and women of all ages, shapes and sizes on their bike

:17:06.:17:10.

cycling. Does it really matter? No, but it is strange, isn't it, when

:17:11.:17:16.

you go to work, and all of a sudden someone is cycling home and there

:17:17.:17:20.

they are in all of their glory. Oh, hello! It is strange. I am standing

:17:21.:17:30.

up for a cyclist, there is only one way to ride a bike and it is in

:17:31.:17:34.

lycra. Not when you are at the pub eating lunch. There is a list of

:17:35.:17:42.

things not to wear over 45, fake tan, pom-pom hats, sweatpants -

:17:43.:17:48.

everything comfortable. Fake tan. Thinking of myself. Shall I raise

:17:49.:17:57.

the tone? You can try. On the front of the business pages, this big

:17:58.:18:01.

story from BT in evolving their Italian business. In itself not

:18:02.:18:07.

usually interesting in the UK but it is knocking 20% off the value of BT

:18:08.:18:12.

shares, that is ?8 billion from the value of the firm, all related to

:18:13.:18:17.

accounting scandals. The Italian unit was borrowing too much money,

:18:18.:18:21.

paying debts with borrowed money and hiding the fact it had borrowed

:18:22.:18:24.

that. They have ousted the management team in Italy. There is

:18:25.:18:29.

pressure on Gavin Patterson, the UK boss, to work out if he can resolve

:18:30.:18:35.

it. ?8 billion off the value of BT. How would you feel about an apple

:18:36.:18:42.

that would never turn brown? Good. It is an GM apple... Oh, I didn't

:18:43.:18:47.

know that. Going on sale in America for the first time next month.

:18:48.:18:52.

Created in Canada, grown over ten years in Washington state and

:18:53.:18:55.

British Columbia and it comes pre- cut. Pre- cut? It never discolours,

:18:56.:19:00.

it never turns brown. Campaigners say it looks great but it doesn't

:19:01.:19:09.

say GM on the packaging. What would be more useful in my house is

:19:10.:19:12.

bananas that don't go brown. Some people love brown bananas. They are

:19:13.:19:20.

very good for blending and Smoothies. Thank you, everybody.

:19:21.:19:29.

Goodness me, save us. Is it cold again? Yes, for some of us, there is

:19:30.:19:35.

an 18 degrees difference in temperature north and south at the

:19:36.:19:39.

moment, in the north-west Highlands it is 13, in Exeter it is -5. We

:19:40.:19:46.

also have freezing fog to watch out for, especially in southern and

:19:47.:19:51.

south-eastern parts of England. Also in the Midlands we have fog around

:19:52.:19:56.

the Vale of York. It is slippery. If you are out and about, take care on

:19:57.:20:01.

the roads and pavements. It is windy to the west. We are looking at

:20:02.:20:05.

severe gales in the north-west with exposure. In the south-east we don't

:20:06.:20:12.

have that problem. We have all this fog, dance, poor visibility, not

:20:13.:20:16.

dissimilar to Monday, and don't forget it is quite slippery as well

:20:17.:20:20.

-- dense. Southwest England doesn't have that problem, nor in Wales or

:20:21.:20:25.

across most of northern England, some in the Vale of York, and here

:20:26.:20:28.

we see some sunshine, but in Scotland there is patchy fog, cloud

:20:29.:20:34.

and a mild start for Northern Ireland. Very varied weather this

:20:35.:20:38.

morning. Through the morning what is happening is, as cloud comes in, it

:20:39.:20:43.

will make the fog lifted into low cloud, you can see sunshine ahead of

:20:44.:20:49.

it for Southwest England, Wales, northern England, whereas in

:20:50.:20:54.

Scotland we see breaks around Murray Firth, but the emphasis is on a lot

:20:55.:20:58.

of cloud with rain coming in on the wind. Temperature-wise, mild in the

:20:59.:21:04.

west, still cold in the south, especially as cloud comes into the

:21:05.:21:08.

south-east through the afternoon. Through this evening, less of an

:21:09.:21:13.

issue with the fog, but there is cloud around during the overnight

:21:14.:21:18.

period. It will be cold as we drag in this continental air. There will

:21:19.:21:22.

be some drizzle around, and some light snow as well, and watch out

:21:23.:21:26.

for us where it has been damp with temperatures below freezing, we are

:21:27.:21:31.

looking at a widespread frost. Through the evening into tomorrow we

:21:32.:21:35.

have a cold, nagging south-easterly. It will feel quite more tomorrow.

:21:36.:21:39.

Some drizzle, so the risk of ice where we have it, or some light

:21:40.:21:45.

snow, but not enough to build a snowman. They will be a lot of dry

:21:46.:21:49.

weather and around and sunshine. This is how it will feel against

:21:50.:21:53.

your skin. Newcastle, one degree, it will feel more like -5. As we go

:21:54.:22:03.

into Friday, cold wind coming in, mild in the south-west and a little

:22:04.:22:08.

less cold into central and eastern areas. So, the message is, wrap up

:22:09.:22:14.

warmly. I am very glad that I brought my big coach today. Wise

:22:15.:22:20.

decision. Ferry. A number of female MPs have told

:22:21.:22:21.

the BBC that they've received physical and verbal threats,

:22:22.:22:25.

and fear for their safety following the death

:22:26.:22:27.

of the Labour MP Jo Cox. In a survey by BBC Radio 5 Live,

:22:28.:22:30.

some said they'd also experienced sexist language in the Commons,

:22:31.:22:33.

and even considered giving At a time when more women

:22:34.:22:36.

are being encouraged to go into politics, how

:22:37.:22:39.

off-putting is this? Our political correspondent

:22:40.:22:41.

Ellie Price has been finding out. It wasn't easy getting women the

:22:42.:22:50.

vote. It took even longer to get women into parliament. The first

:22:51.:22:55.

female MP to take her seat, Nancy Astor, was elected 98 years ago.

:22:56.:23:01.

Eventually, more would follow. It gives me the greatest pleasure to

:23:02.:23:06.

introduce to you the new national unionist women members. Back then,

:23:07.:23:13.

of course, they didn't have social media, unlike the 195 female MPs

:23:14.:23:21.

today. So, what you're looking at are the abusive tweets that my team

:23:22.:23:27.

screen shot it. And McLauchlan MP won't read the abuse she receives

:23:28.:23:34.

online. It is just as well, she doesn't want to share it. It takes a

:23:35.:23:38.

lot of strength not to. It is tempting if you are a loan at night

:23:39.:23:43.

and no one can see you if you get upset to just have a look. But why

:23:44.:23:48.

would I do that to myself? I have to say, I see the silver lining in

:23:49.:23:55.

not... The silver lining is I may never have to put up with that sort

:23:56.:23:59.

of abuse again in my life, because it doesn't happen unless you've got

:24:00.:24:04.

some kind of high profile and then people think they have carte blanche

:24:05.:24:08.

to call you whatever they want to call you. It isn't just hurtful

:24:09.:24:13.

insults on social media. There is an even darker side of death threats

:24:14.:24:17.

and violence. Jo Cox was murdered outside her constituency surgery

:24:18.:24:22.

last June. Two thirds of female MPs we spoke to say they have felt less

:24:23.:24:26.

safe ever since. Well over half have received a physical threat from a

:24:27.:24:29.

member of the public. This is the room where I hold my surgeries.

:24:30.:24:35.

Tulip Sadik grudgingly makes sure she has security whenever she holds

:24:36.:24:42.

security surgeries. You feel safe now? This building has a police

:24:43.:24:46.

presence outside, staff are supportive, so I feel safer. It was

:24:47.:24:53.

one of my staff members who opened, quite young, I felt sorry for them,

:24:54.:25:00.

opening this letter that said they wanted to butcher my family. The

:25:01.:25:04.

offer Scott in part with me and said, we need to take it to the

:25:05.:25:08.

police. I took swift action. The police were quick to respond. It

:25:09.:25:12.

makes me think, who has time to sit and write a letter to an MP saying,

:25:13.:25:17.

I want to kill you and your family? It all paints rather a grim picture

:25:18.:25:20.

and certainly the majority of MPs we spoke to say they are concerned that

:25:21.:25:24.

hearing about this sort of abuse might put off good new people, good

:25:25.:25:28.

new women, from wanting to become MPs. In fact a third of those we

:25:29.:25:32.

heard from ZP have considered giving up their job here in parliament

:25:33.:25:35.

because of it. And yet none of them have. And the majority we heard from

:25:36.:25:40.

say despite the difficulties, the job is a privilege, and well worth

:25:41.:25:41.

the flak. The copy-cat Lego that's so good

:25:42.:25:46.

even the boss can't We have a special report

:25:47.:25:55.

on China's counterfeit market. And he was incredulous, wasn't he,

:25:56.:26:07.

when he was shown? This is the one, yeah. He couldn't believe it.

:26:08.:29:24.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:29:25.:29:46.

We'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment,

:29:47.:29:49.

Bowel cancer is the UK's second biggest cancer killer,

:29:50.:29:53.

but the age at which you're tested depends on where you live.

:29:54.:29:56.

In Scotland it's at 50, and we'll hear about calls to bring

:29:57.:30:00.

They're the volunteer rescue workers saving lives in Syria,

:30:01.:30:04.

and now a short film about their work has been nominated

:30:05.:30:07.

We'll find out more about The white Helmets.

:30:08.:30:10.

And if you think you know your British history,

:30:11.:30:12.

Historian Lucy Worsley will be here to separate fact from fiction,

:30:13.:30:16.

as she tackles the nation's biggest fibs.

:30:17.:30:18.

But now a summary of this morning's main news:

:30:19.:30:25.

MPs have stepped up demands for the government to publish

:30:26.:30:28.

its plan for Brexit in a formal policy document.

:30:29.:30:31.

The demands for a white paper, including from some

:30:32.:30:33.

Conservatives, follow yesterday's Supreme Court ruling that parliament

:30:34.:30:35.

It's thought legislation could be introduced as early as tomorrow.

:30:36.:30:41.

Our political correspondent Carol Walker is at Westminster,

:30:42.:30:43.

how large could this Tory rebellion be?

:30:44.:30:54.

What might the process be? Of what we understand is tomorrow the

:30:55.:31:03.

government in Parliament will introduce a bill. Were told this

:31:04.:31:08.

will be a pretty short, straightforward bill that will

:31:09.:31:11.

essentially said Parliament will approve the triggering of Article 50

:31:12.:31:15.

that begins the formal negotiating process -- we're told. But the

:31:16.:31:20.

opposition parties and indeed some conservatives are going to use that

:31:21.:31:25.

process to try to amend the bill and put down the changes they want to

:31:26.:31:28.

see. Labour are saying they think that there should be a vote at the

:31:29.:31:33.

end of the negotiations and if they don't like the deal, if the Brussels

:31:34.:31:38.

deal is good enough, the Prime Minister should be forced to go back

:31:39.:31:42.

and renegotiate a better deal. Theresa May has said if it's a bad

:31:43.:31:47.

deal she wants to be able to say we're better off having no deal at

:31:48.:31:51.

all. We know the SNP are saying Scotland should be allowed to remain

:31:52.:31:55.

in the single market. They're threatening to have a second

:31:56.:31:58.

referendum on Scottish independence if they don't get their way. And the

:31:59.:32:02.

Liberal Democrats are saying there should be a second referendum of the

:32:03.:32:06.

British people at the end of the two years of negotiations, so lots of

:32:07.:32:10.

different agendas here but one thing on which they could all coalesce is

:32:11.:32:14.

for them to say they want a more formal setting out of government

:32:15.:32:18.

plans in what's called a white paper. Of course the government

:32:19.:32:21.

could simply agree to that and ministers are confident they will be

:32:22.:32:25.

able to stick to their timetable and trigger Article 50 by the end of

:32:26.:32:30.

March. Thanks, Carol. And a reminder, Jean Miller, who

:32:31.:32:34.

brought that case that went to the Supreme Court, will be speaking to

:32:35.:32:38.

us on Breakfast at 8:10am. -- word Gena Miller. -- Gena Miller.

:32:39.:32:42.

President Trump is reportedly preparing to sign several executive

:32:43.:32:44.

orders aimed at restricting immigration.

:32:45.:32:46.

It's expected he'll announce plans for a wall along

:32:47.:32:48.

the US border with Mexico, one of his key election pledges.

:32:49.:32:51.

Reports from Washington say he's also planning tightened visa

:32:52.:32:53.

regulations from seven Middle East and African countries.

:32:54.:32:57.

Women are experiencing widespread discrimination when it comes

:32:58.:32:59.

to dress codes at work according to a parliamentary report.

:33:00.:33:02.

MPs heard from hundreds of women who reported that the dress

:33:03.:33:05.

codes they were subject to were sexist.

:33:06.:33:07.

They began an inquiry after a receptionist was sent home

:33:08.:33:09.

Here's our business correspondent Emma Simpson.

:33:10.:33:18.

Sometimes there's no choice, and it's not always attractive.

:33:19.:33:22.

But what about being ordered to wear high heels?

:33:23.:33:24.

When Nicola Thorpe arrived for her first day at work,

:33:25.:33:27.

she was told by her employment agency she must wear shoes

:33:28.:33:30.

When she refused, she was sent home without pay.

:33:31.:33:34.

What they state is it gives them a more professional look.

:33:35.:33:37.

I'm not entirely sure why adding two or four inches to my height makes me

:33:38.:33:43.

more professional, or makes me walk

:33:44.:33:44.

I don't think it affects how I come across.

:33:45.:33:53.

You can see me now, this is exactly what I would be wearing.

:33:54.:33:57.

And if it's just a matter of a couple of inches,

:33:58.:34:00.

I can stand tall without wearing heels.

:34:01.:34:02.

She then started a petition, which led to an inquiry by MPs,

:34:03.:34:05.

who now want action from the Government.

:34:06.:34:07.

We've come up with three recommendations.

:34:08.:34:09.

Firstly, that the Equalities Act of 2010 obviously isn't quite

:34:10.:34:11.

Secondly, we want to raise awareness that wearing high heels or make-up

:34:12.:34:17.

may be a health and safety issue in the workplace.

:34:18.:34:20.

And thirdly, we are going to hopefully...

:34:21.:34:22.

If it doesn't work, then we will be taking people to court.

:34:23.:34:25.

At this company, receptionists can wear what they like.

:34:26.:34:30.

In its evidence, the Government said the existing law was clear,

:34:31.:34:34.

and that the dress code imposed on Nicola was unlawful.

:34:35.:34:39.

But the MPs are calling on the Government to do more to make

:34:40.:34:43.

the law more effective in protecting employees

:34:44.:34:45.

David Cameron has been appointed president

:34:46.:34:53.

In an article in the Times he says research into cancer

:34:54.:34:57.

and strokes deserve all their funding, but that dementia

:34:58.:35:00.

His new role is the second formal position he has taken since standing

:35:01.:35:04.

They have waited for nearly 20 years, but finally Japan has a Sumo

:35:05.:35:15.

30-year-old Kisenosato is the sport's new champion,

:35:16.:35:42.

The last time a Japanese wrestler won the title was in 1998.

:35:43.:35:46.

The last four grand champions have all been from Mongolia.

:35:47.:35:48.

Prior to that it was a wrestler from Hawaii.

:35:49.:35:51.

I interviewed a grand champion once. Amazing. Incredibly strong. All that

:35:52.:35:56.

stuff about eating and eating and eating and going straight to sleep

:35:57.:35:59.

so you get more fat to improve your bulk. Pretty much what I do! Isn't

:36:00.:36:08.

that what we all do? Exactly! Let's talk sport of a slightly different

:36:09.:36:13.

white. Johanna Konta, she has been beaten overnight in Melbourne, first

:36:14.:36:18.

time she has played Serena Williams -- different weight. She has changed

:36:19.:36:23.

her mental attitude going into the Australian Open and she has done

:36:24.:36:25.

very well. British number one, Johanna Konta,

:36:26.:36:28.

is out of the Australian Open. She was outplayed 6-2 6-3

:36:29.:36:31.

in the quarter finals by six-time Our tennis correspondent

:36:32.:36:34.

Russell Fuller joins She was in form coming into this but

:36:35.:36:51.

how one-sided was it? Not completely one-sided, she hadn't dropped a set

:36:52.:36:55.

here and she won the Sydney tournament before the Australian

:36:56.:36:57.

Open but Serena Williams hadn't dropped a set either. As is often

:36:58.:37:02.

the case, when Serena thinks there's a serious threat to her title

:37:03.:37:06.

chances on the other side of the net she raises her game and she did that

:37:07.:37:09.

today. She didn't always land her first serve in the right spot but

:37:10.:37:14.

when she did she invariably won the point or served an ace, very

:37:15.:37:19.

powerful, that exerts a lot of pressure on the other player. Konta

:37:20.:37:23.

was a break of serve up in the second set and Williams soon broke

:37:24.:37:27.

back and you felt at that stage there was only one winner. She's

:37:28.:37:32.

odds-on now to win a 23rd grand slam title, which would beat the record

:37:33.:37:36.

Steffi Graf currently shares for the most major titles won in the open

:37:37.:37:41.

era, the period since the late 1960s when tennis became open to

:37:42.:37:45.

professionals. That is something that Serena has talked about,

:37:46.:37:49.

something she has got her eye on. But overall you would have to say

:37:50.:37:53.

this has been a really impressive tournament for Konta? She has an

:37:54.:37:57.

amazing record in Melbourne. She turned up last year and seeded and

:37:58.:38:01.

got to the semifinals, the first time she had been in the main draw

:38:02.:38:05.

having failed to qualify three times before. Now with the pressure of

:38:06.:38:09.

defending ranking points from the year, if he had lost in the first

:38:10.:38:16.

round she wouldn't have gained very many and her ranking would have

:38:17.:38:19.

dropped, she's gone nearly as far by reaching the quarters and she has

:38:20.:38:23.

started to look like a potential grand slam champion. She will be in

:38:24.:38:26.

all the major tournaments and her coach was telling me she is

:38:27.:38:29.

confident she can do well at Wimbledon. Her best results have

:38:30.:38:36.

been in America and Australia on the hard courts but she leaves she can

:38:37.:38:41.

make major inroads when she pitches up on the grass courts in a few

:38:42.:38:45.

months. Richard Fuller from Melbourne this morning, our tennis

:38:46.:38:47.

correspondent. Former Olympic champion Nicole Cooke

:38:48.:38:51.

says British Cycling is run by men for men and its attempts to stop

:38:52.:38:54.

doping are inadequate Cooke made the claims

:38:55.:38:57.

in written evidence submitted to a Culture, Media and Sport Select

:38:58.:38:59.

Committee yesterday. The session was held to discuss

:39:00.:39:02.

issues raised at a hearing involving British Cycling and

:39:03.:39:05.

Team Sky last month. Sir Alex Ferguson thinks

:39:06.:39:07.

Jose Mourinho is getting to grips with being Manchester

:39:08.:39:10.

United manager. United are still in both

:39:11.:39:12.

domestic cup competitions and the Europa League,

:39:13.:39:16.

but are sixth in the Premier League, Ferguson says Mourinho has settled

:39:17.:39:19.

into the job after a turbulent start I think that Jose is finding

:39:20.:39:33.

solutions now. There was a period in the season when he wasn't making

:39:34.:39:39.

decisions and his motions boiled over. He is an emotional guy but the

:39:40.:39:44.

way you see him now, he's calm, he's in control. That's obvious... That's

:39:45.:39:51.

the obvious observation I am making of the team now. The team is playing

:39:52.:40:01.

with great energy, determination, will to win. Which I think is really

:40:02.:40:04.

important. It's really interesting, he doesn't

:40:05.:40:10.

have to give an interview, Sir Alex Ferguson, really interesting he has

:40:11.:40:15.

chosen now to give clear support to Jose Mourinho. He could keep quiet

:40:16.:40:19.

but he is definitely giving him his support. The ears team Jose, isn't

:40:20.:40:22.

he! Oakley. British five-time

:40:23.:40:25.

Olympian Jo Pavey will run in this

:40:26.:40:27.

year's London Marathon. The 43-year-old ran the event

:40:28.:40:28.

in 2011 setting a personal best of two hours, 28

:40:29.:40:31.

minutes and 24 seconds. Pavey says she hopes to use the race

:40:32.:40:33.

to set another PB and to qualify for the World Championships

:40:34.:40:37.

in August. One of rugby union's oldest clubs,

:40:38.:40:40.

London Welsh, has been kicked out of the Championship after they were

:40:41.:40:43.

liquidated last month. The club was granted

:40:44.:40:46.

a temporary licence to play on, but he Rugby Football Union says

:40:47.:40:49.

they haven't met the financial conditions required

:40:50.:40:51.

to extend that licence. All their results will be erased

:40:52.:40:53.

from this season's Championship. And finally Sweden's Daniel Bodin

:40:54.:40:59.

pulled off the first successful The double backflip has earned

:41:00.:41:04.

a reputation as the Holy Grail. Oh my goodness! There it is, one,

:41:05.:41:27.

goes around a whole number time. How long has he been practising bad for?

:41:28.:41:33.

-- nother. -- back for. -- that for. And now Bodin, who has been working

:41:34.:41:41.

on this for two years, The world's most profitable toy

:41:42.:41:57.

business, Lego, is having problems with counterfeits and copycats. It's

:41:58.:42:01.

a problem so big even the boss can't what is real and what is fake as

:42:02.:42:03.

Robin Brant has been finding out. Billions and billions of these

:42:04.:42:07.

little plastic bricks have been sold the world over and now Lego

:42:08.:42:10.

is betting big on China. What started out with hand-cut

:42:11.:42:13.

bricks in Denmark in 1949 is now a $100 million state-of-the-art

:42:14.:42:16.

operation near Shanghai but they are not the

:42:17.:42:18.

only ones doing it. or counterfeits are prolific in

:42:19.:42:26.

China. Lego is currently suing the firm

:42:27.:42:39.

behind this copycat Star Wnrs model. So how easy is it to

:42:40.:42:42.

spot the difference? We bought a real one and a copycat

:42:43.:42:45.

and asked the experts. If you have to ask me to guess,

:42:46.:42:55.

I would say this one, maybe. You think this one is real.

:42:56.:42:59.

You're right. The truth is, they look

:43:00.:43:04.

and feel almost identical. The copy's so good, in fact,

:43:05.:43:13.

that even the boss of that huge What do you think of that?

:43:14.:43:17.

It looks like a mini figure to me. I would say this is

:43:18.:43:24.

Lego and this is not. OK.

:43:25.:43:44.

This is Lego. Bought from Toy'R'Us yesterday,

:43:45.:43:45.

built by my daughter. It is trying to be Lego,

:43:46.:43:48.

is my assessment of it. Lego is not the only foreign firm

:43:49.:43:59.

investing big in China but having White Evoques like this

:44:00.:44:02.

sell particulalrly well. But the British firm has been

:44:03.:44:08.

powerless to stop this. Tucked away on a Shanghai side

:44:09.:44:10.

street, this is a Land Wind. It's similar on the inside and very,

:44:11.:44:13.

very similar on the outside This is our copycat

:44:14.:44:17.

that caught people out. on the huge online retailer,

:44:18.:44:20.

Alibaba. They took down thousands of links

:44:21.:44:24.

to copycat Lego products last year alone but the toy maker

:44:25.:44:28.

is still pursuing manufacturers in the courts because even the boss

:44:29.:44:31.

cannot tell the difference. That is just fascinating, isn't it?

:44:32.:44:49.

He is not happy at all. If even he can't tell the difference, what do

:44:50.:44:57.

you do? I suppose if it says something else... Yes, look for the

:44:58.:44:59.

spelling. You're watching

:45:00.:45:00.

Breakfast from BBC News. The main stories this morning:

:45:01.:45:02.

A bill paving the way for Brexit could be introduced as early

:45:03.:45:05.

as tomorrow, after judges ruled that parliament should be given a vote

:45:06.:45:08.

on Britain leaving the EU. President Trump could announce his

:45:09.:45:11.

plans for a wall on the Mexican border, as he promises a big day

:45:12.:45:15.

ahead on national security. Now, the last few days, we have been

:45:16.:45:28.

telling you about how fog has been causing issues.

:45:29.:45:29.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:45:30.:45:32.

Is that from today? No, but it tells a story quite nicely. Once again

:45:33.:45:43.

we've got fog, especially dense for southern and south-eastern England,

:45:44.:45:46.

affecting motorways and maybe flights as well. It is freezing fog.

:45:47.:45:52.

Find out what is happening on the BBC local radio. Freezing fog tells

:45:53.:45:59.

you it is cold outside, so watch out for slippery surfaces and black ice.

:46:00.:46:04.

We have all this fog on the south-east and we hang on to it for

:46:05.:46:08.

a while yet. It will be slow to clear. It will take to late morning

:46:09.:46:13.

and four others until late afternoon. So cold, foggy and

:46:14.:46:22.

frosty. In south-west England and Wales you might see the odd pocket

:46:23.:46:29.

of fog but that is all. Largely dry. Most of northern England is dry. A

:46:30.:46:35.

couple of pockets of fog. . A lot When of cloud here and a mild start.

:46:36.:46:43.

It is currently 13 degrees. -5 in Exeter. As cloud comes in from the

:46:44.:46:50.

near continent, it will lift the fog into low cloud, but sunshine for

:46:51.:46:55.

south-west England, Wales, into northern England, Murray Firth,

:46:56.:46:59.

quite a bit of cloud for Scotland and Northern Ireland with reining in

:47:00.:47:04.

the Outer Hebrides, nothing heavy. 11 degrees, ten in the west, where

:47:05.:47:09.

it is feeling cold, especially where the cloud comes in in the

:47:10.:47:13.

south-east. Through the evening and overnight not such an issue over the

:47:14.:47:19.

last couple of days, it will be windy to the west, but it will also

:47:20.:47:24.

be windy today. Tonight there will be some drizzle around, we could see

:47:25.:47:28.

the odd flurry of light snow and widespread frost so that tomorrow

:47:29.:47:32.

you need to watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. And tomorrow,

:47:33.:47:36.

certainly call for the odd light snow flurry here and there. Nothing

:47:37.:47:41.

substantial. Maybe just on the roof of your car, that's all. A lot of

:47:42.:47:46.

dry weather around as well. Look at the temperatures, five in Aberdeen

:47:47.:47:50.

will feel more like -1, and wherever you are across the UK it will feel

:47:51.:47:56.

bitter with the nagging wind from the freezing fronts. On Friday, dry

:47:57.:48:01.

weather around, a weather front from a south-west introducing rain and

:48:02.:48:05.

mild conditions from the south-west, and that we see temperatures picked

:48:06.:48:10.

up a touch as well. OK, well, you have made us very happy that we have

:48:11.:48:16.

warm coats, thank you. And a lovely library picture, thank you very

:48:17.:48:20.

much. Pleasure! I feel I have been firmly put in my place. She does it

:48:21.:48:28.

so gently. So nice. Yes, it is a library picture. OK, I've learnt my

:48:29.:48:29.

lesson. Having to wear high heels, make-up,

:48:30.:48:35.

shorter skirts or even dying their hair, those are just

:48:36.:48:38.

some examples of what women say they have been asked

:48:39.:48:41.

to do for their job. Now MPs are calling

:48:42.:48:43.

on the government to take action Yes, a really important area, and

:48:44.:48:52.

MPs looking at whether it is as widespread as people believe.

:48:53.:48:54.

This story started last year when a woman was sent home

:48:55.:48:57.

from a temp job in London after refusing to wear high heels.

:48:58.:49:01.

She launched a petition that gained over 150,000 signatures leading

:49:02.:49:03.

MPs to investigate workplace and dress code discrimination.

:49:04.:49:05.

Here are a few examples of what women say are their experiences.

:49:06.:49:10.

One air hostess described feeling humiliated due

:49:11.:49:12.

Adding that there was one set of clothing rules for men

:49:13.:49:21.

Another woman working in a jewellery store said wearing high heels

:49:22.:49:28.

While a retail worker told MPs she was offended

:49:29.:49:39.

Dress rules which attracted unwanted attention from customers.

:49:40.:49:45.

Let's speak to MP Helen Jones who Chairs the Parliamentary Petitions

:49:46.:49:48.

We've heard a snapshot of some stories - just how widespread did

:49:49.:49:51.

Just how widespread is it? From the evidence we've had, it is very

:49:52.:50:00.

widespread indeed, and it feeds into a culture where women feel degraded

:50:01.:50:07.

and humiliated at work, which often attracts unwanted attention often

:50:08.:50:14.

from customers, which can go far as putting them at risk, you know, with

:50:15.:50:17.

examples of people being followed home, for instance. So, give me some

:50:18.:50:23.

examples of the proposals of what you would like changed, so it is

:50:24.:50:26.

clear with high heels, but not suggesting you could go to work

:50:27.:50:31.

wearing trainers, for example? No, it is clear that employers are

:50:32.:50:37.

entitled to impose a uniform policy, which requires people to be smart

:50:38.:50:41.

and well turned out, but if that policy impact more on women than

:50:42.:50:45.

men, then it can be indirect discrimination. The problem is that

:50:46.:50:51.

indirect discrimination can be justified if the employer says it is

:50:52.:50:55.

reasonably necessary in pursuit of a legitimate aim and tribunal is can

:50:56.:50:59.

find differently in different parts of the country. -- tribunals. We the

:51:00.:51:05.

test cases to clarify the law. And I think that is where it might be

:51:06.:51:08.

difficult because in some cases there would be great area where the

:51:09.:51:12.

employer says, this is the look I want to present for my phone to my

:51:13.:51:16.

customers and this is how I would expect you to dress accordingly to

:51:17.:51:19.

present a look to those customers. That in some cases may not be

:51:20.:51:23.

discriminatory, am I right? It may not be but it is quite possible to

:51:24.:51:28.

draw up a dress code which isn't discriminatory between men and

:51:29.:51:32.

women. The agency which employed Nicola for instance revised its

:51:33.:51:35.

dress code after what happened and came up with a much more

:51:36.:51:39.

satisfactory one. The problem is some employers don't even realise

:51:40.:51:43.

they may be discriminating and certainly don't realise they have to

:51:44.:51:48.

do the health and safety assessment. So, we are asking for the government

:51:49.:51:53.

to shore up guidelines for employers as well as doing a guideline for

:51:54.:51:59.

employees so that people understand what is expected of them and what is

:52:00.:52:07.

not. And who will police it? Well, hopefully we see the quality and

:52:08.:52:11.

Human Rights Commission taking some more cases in order to clarify the

:52:12.:52:15.

law but we would really like to see much more information from employers

:52:16.:52:18.

so they get it right in the first place. OK, it is good to talk to

:52:19.:52:26.

you, Helen. Thank you very much. And we will speak with the chief

:52:27.:52:29.

executive of the chartered management institute which promotes

:52:30.:52:32.

nest practice in business leadership. And I must point out it

:52:33.:52:40.

is not just women. My head demands men wear a tie while women wear what

:52:41.:52:51.

they like. Whatever it is, they might be experiencing different

:52:52.:52:55.

codes of practice. That is true, there might be an issue, and what

:52:56.:52:59.

you cannot do with a dress code is have gender discrimination against

:53:00.:53:02.

men or women, and you can't compromise health and safety. High

:53:03.:53:06.

heels actually do both. So that is the guidance. It is fine if you are

:53:07.:53:12.

a hairdresser and you want to look full and you have to wear black.

:53:13.:53:18.

That is OK -- cool. It is something that compromises health and safety

:53:19.:53:23.

or discriminate. That said I think examples discriminating against

:53:24.:53:25.

women are more widespread. What sort of exam boards they become across?

:53:26.:53:29.

Well, we just did some research at CMI that found quite astoundingly

:53:30.:53:34.

that four out of five managers have witnessed gender discrimination

:53:35.:53:36.

against women in the workplace. So it is not just dress codes. The most

:53:37.:53:42.

common forms were inappropriate remarks, the so-called locker room

:53:43.:53:51.

Dan Dyer. -- banter. Women in meetings finding it hard to have

:53:52.:53:55.

themselves heard. Is it common and how does it manifest itself?

:53:56.:53:59.

Absolutely, well, that was the most second most common form of

:54:00.:54:06.

discrimination, almost 70%, and it is mansplaining, or even

:54:07.:54:17.

manerrupting. LAUGHTER. There is some... LAUGHTER. Lots of comments

:54:18.:54:26.

coming in as well. Patricia says, I have no issues with dress codes as

:54:27.:54:29.

long as they are consistent and apply equally so that men and women

:54:30.:54:34.

have to wear them, so women have to wear a suit and men do the same,

:54:35.:54:39.

perhaps with a tie. Theo says, at an investment bank the dress code for

:54:40.:54:42.

males was more strict than for females. Marcus says a tie is

:54:43.:54:47.

ridiculously uncomfortable and has no place in modern life. I feel that

:54:48.:54:52.

we are inappropriately dressed. Yeah, true. Those comments echo a

:54:53.:54:57.

lot. Women saying, here is an example, I was asked to wear skirts

:54:58.:55:02.

above the knee, make-up, and the employer was suggesting that is what

:55:03.:55:06.

the job is all about, but you are right, Andy says teaching women has

:55:07.:55:10.

no expectation, men have to wear this suit and tie and it is about

:55:11.:55:15.

universality? Well, it is, and by way I think if men don't want to

:55:16.:55:21.

wear a tie then they shouldn't have to, so that is a... Can you speak to

:55:22.:55:27.

the boss? It applies to both sexes. There is a serious side to this.

:55:28.:55:34.

There is still gender discrimination primarily affecting women and it is

:55:35.:55:37.

not just little things, it is big things like promotions and pay. You

:55:38.:55:42.

make a very good point. What do you make about... Does it need to be a

:55:43.:55:48.

culture change to see things in a different light? Absolutely, I think

:55:49.:55:51.

there needs to be a culture change and we know that from our research

:55:52.:55:55.

and this sort of tolerant of little things, so, little remarks, you

:55:56.:55:59.

know, you have to apply lipstick, can often almost act as condoning

:56:00.:56:09.

the big things. So, really, our request is, speak out if you see an

:56:10.:56:15.

inappropriate remark, call out your employer if there is an

:56:16.:56:18.

inappropriate dress code. Challenge the smaller things and hopefully

:56:19.:56:21.

that will take over all the big things as well. Thank you. And thank

:56:22.:56:24.

you for getting in touch. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:56:25.:00:19.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. The government prepares

:00:20.:00:22.

to put its plan for Brexit should be given a vote

:00:23.:00:24.

on Britain leaving the EU. It's thought a bill could now be

:00:25.:00:32.

introduced as early as tomorrow. I'll be live at Westminster where

:00:33.:00:47.

ministers are urging MPs not to try and thwart the will of the people

:00:48.:00:51.

but opposition parties and some Tories are demanding more detail and

:00:52.:00:54.

a greater say in the Brexit process. Good morning, it's

:00:55.:01:04.

Wednesday 25th January. President Trump promises a big day

:01:05.:01:06.

ahead on national security, including an announcement

:01:07.:01:13.

about his plans for a wall In business, can a company impose

:01:14.:01:15.

a dress code for staff? From high heels to short skirts,

:01:16.:01:23.

two parliamentary reports say no. Firms must not and can not tell

:01:24.:01:27.

workers what to wear. Johanna Konta has been knocked out

:01:28.:01:32.

the Australian Open. She lost her quarter-final

:01:33.:01:34.

to Serena Williams 6-2 6-3 in just She was the last Brit

:01:35.:01:37.

left in the competition. I would say this

:01:38.:01:43.

is Lego, this is not. We'll find out how one

:01:44.:01:57.

of the world's best known brands is counting the cost

:01:58.:02:04.

of counterfeits in China. Once again this morning there is

:02:05.:02:19.

freezing fog, especially across southern and south-eastern England.

:02:20.:02:23.

Also black eyes to watch out for but there will be some sunshine, a wee

:02:24.:02:27.

bit of drizzle and strong winds in the north-west. I'll put all that

:02:28.:02:31.

together in 15 minutes. -- black eyes.

:02:32.:02:32.

MPs have stepped up demands for the government to publish

:02:33.:02:36.

its plan for Brexit in a formal policy document.

:02:37.:02:39.

The demands for a white paper, including from some Conservatives,

:02:40.:02:42.

follows yesterday's Supreme Court ruling.

:02:43.:02:43.

Theresa May must give parliament a vote before triggering

:02:44.:02:45.

Article 50, the formal process for leaving to the EU.

:02:46.:02:48.

It's thought legislation could be introduced as early as tomorrow.

:02:49.:02:51.

Here's our political correspondent Tom Bateman.

:02:52.:02:54.

After the judges ruled only Parliament can start Brexit,

:02:55.:02:57.

today a warning for MPs - don't to try to derail the plan.

:02:58.:03:02.

The Supreme Court judgement means a bill on triggering Article 50,

:03:03.:03:05.

the start of Britain's exit process, must be put before MPs and Lords.

:03:06.:03:09.

The government says legislation paving the way for Brexit will be

:03:10.:03:15.

tabled within days - that will be voted on by both

:03:16.:03:18.

Theresa May wants Article 50 triggered by the end of March,

:03:19.:03:25.

then Britain has two years to leave the EU.

:03:26.:03:31.

The point of no return was passed in June 23, last year.

:03:32.:03:36.

Labour say they won't block Article 50 but want to amend the bill

:03:37.:03:40.

to give MPs more control of the process.

:03:41.:03:42.

If necessary, there will be hand-to-hand combat on this.

:03:43.:03:45.

We need to make sure that we get the best deal on behalf the whole

:03:46.:03:49.

country and she can't say she acts on behalf the whole country.

:03:50.:03:52.

Theresa May also faces opposition from some of her own MPs,

:03:53.:03:55.

who wanta formal exit document to be debated.

:03:56.:03:57.

But for now, at least, ministers believe they are on track

:03:58.:04:02.

to get Brexit triggered by the spring.

:04:03.:04:04.

Our political correspondent Carol Walker is outside

:04:05.:04:10.

So, the process starts now and there will be so many discussions, the

:04:11.:04:25.

government at the moment saying it can stay on track. What are your

:04:26.:04:30.

thoughts? We know that tomorrow we expect the government to publish the

:04:31.:04:33.

bill it was forced to introduce to the Commons by that decision of the

:04:34.:04:37.

Supreme Court yesterday. Ministers are saying that will be a short and

:04:38.:04:42.

straightforward bill and it will essentially ask parliament to

:04:43.:04:46.

approve the triggering of Article 50 to begin the formal Brexit

:04:47.:04:50.

negotiations. But already we're hearing how MPs on all sides are

:04:51.:04:54.

going to try to put down the Mance, the changes they want to try to make

:04:55.:04:58.

to that legislation as it goes through the Commons. -- the

:04:59.:05:04.

amendments. Labour say they want a meaningful vote so if MPs don't like

:05:05.:05:08.

the final deal they can send the Prime Minister back to get a better

:05:09.:05:14.

one. The Lib Dems are saying they would like a second referendum at

:05:15.:05:18.

the end of the process and the SNP aren't happy. One area where they

:05:19.:05:24.

could get the support of Conservative rebel MPs is the idea

:05:25.:05:28.

of a white paper, formerly setting out the government approach to

:05:29.:05:31.

negotiations. The government hasn't ruled that out, it could publish

:05:32.:05:35.

plans in a white paper. Ministers are sounding pretty confident they

:05:36.:05:40.

will be able to stick to their timetable, trigger Article 50 and

:05:41.:05:43.

start those formal negotiations by the end of March. Carol Walker,

:05:44.:05:45.

thank you very much. We'll be speaking to businesswoman

:05:46.:05:46.

Gina Miller, who took the case to the Supreme Court,

:05:47.:05:49.

just after 8am this morning. President Trump has said a big day

:05:50.:05:52.

is planned on national security today, including an announcement

:05:53.:05:55.

on building a wall on the US border with Mexico, one of his

:05:56.:05:58.

main campaign pledges. In a message on Twitter,

:05:59.:06:01.

he also said to expect Reports from Washington say

:06:02.:06:03.

he will sign several executive orders relating to immigration

:06:04.:06:10.

and border security over Here's our Washington

:06:11.:06:12.

correspondent, David Willis. We're going to have our borders

:06:13.:06:15.

nice and strong, we're It was the soundtrack

:06:16.:06:17.

to Donald Trump's unorthodox campaign for president,

:06:18.:06:24.

a call to build a wall along America's southern

:06:25.:06:27.

border with Mexico. Now he seems set to press ahead

:06:28.:06:28.

with measures he believes are vital to stemming the illegal flow of

:06:29.:06:32.

immigrants into the United States. The president on his Twitter

:06:33.:06:35.

account said simply: He's vowed to make Mexico

:06:36.:06:37.

pay for it what's more, although the Mexican government

:06:38.:06:40.

has refused to do so. Later in the week, to round off

:06:41.:06:42.

a busy start to his presidency, Mr Trump is expected

:06:43.:06:45.

to sign executive orders, closing America's borders

:06:46.:06:48.

to refugees and limiting access to citizens from seven

:06:49.:06:50.

African and Middle Eastern the administration believes export

:06:51.:06:52.

terrorism. They're mainly Muslim countries

:06:53.:07:09.

but the mantra of the Trump A country that traditionally has

:07:10.:07:11.

opened its doors to immigrants is about to head in

:07:12.:07:18.

the opposite direction. Women are experiencing widespread

:07:19.:07:20.

discrimination when it comes to dress codes at work according

:07:21.:07:30.

to a parliamentary report. MPs heard from hundreds of women

:07:31.:07:33.

who reported that the dress codes they were subject

:07:34.:07:36.

to were sexist. They began an inquiry

:07:37.:07:38.

after a receptionist was sent home Here's our business

:07:39.:07:40.

correspondent Emma Simpson. Sometimes there's no choice,

:07:41.:07:50.

and it's not always attractive. But what about being ordered

:07:51.:07:56.

to wear high heels? When Nicola Thorpe arrived

:07:57.:08:00.

for her first day at work, she was told by her employment

:08:01.:08:02.

agency she must wear shoes When she refused, she was

:08:03.:08:05.

sent home without pay. What they state is it gives them

:08:06.:08:14.

a more professional look. I'm not entirely sure why adding two

:08:15.:08:17.

or four inches to my height makes me more

:08:18.:08:22.

professional, or makes me walk I don't think it affects

:08:23.:08:23.

how I come across. You can see me now, this is exactly

:08:24.:08:27.

what I would be wearing. And if it's just a matter

:08:28.:08:30.

of a couple of inches, I can stand tall

:08:31.:08:33.

without wearing heels. She then started a petition,

:08:34.:08:37.

which led to an inquiry by MPs, who now want action

:08:38.:08:40.

from the Government. We've come up with

:08:41.:08:42.

three recommendations. Firstly, that the Equalities Act

:08:43.:08:44.

of 2010 obviously isn't quite Secondly, we want to raise awareness

:08:45.:08:46.

that wearing high heels or make-up may be a health and safety

:08:47.:08:57.

issue in the workplace. And thirdly, we are

:08:58.:09:00.

going to hopefully... If it doesn't work, then we will be

:09:01.:09:02.

taking people to court. At this company, receptionists can

:09:03.:09:05.

wear what they like. In its evidence, the Government said

:09:06.:09:09.

the existing law was clear, and that the dress code imposed

:09:10.:09:13.

on Nicola was unlawful. But the MPs are calling

:09:14.:09:15.

on the Government to do more to make the law more effective

:09:16.:09:19.

in protecting employees David Cameron has been

:09:20.:09:21.

appointed president In an article in the Times he says

:09:22.:09:38.

research into cancer and strokes deserve

:09:39.:09:42.

all their funding, but that dementia His new role is the second formal

:09:43.:09:45.

position he has taken since standing An RNLI lifeboat station

:09:46.:09:50.

in Yorkshire has a new crew The wild animal has befriended

:09:51.:09:54.

the team and has become a regular They say he's nearly

:09:55.:09:58.

as tame as a pet dog, and as you can see,

:09:59.:10:07.

he certainly isn't camera shy. I don't know how good he is at

:10:08.:10:13.

rescuing people! Bowel cancer is the UK's second

:10:14.:10:19.

biggest cancer killer, and every day another 110 people

:10:20.:10:24.

are diagnosed with the disease. But the age at which people

:10:25.:10:27.

are screened varies. The charity Beating Bowel Cancer

:10:28.:10:30.

wants to see everyone tested from the age of 50,

:10:31.:10:32.

in line with Scotland. It says this would dramatically

:10:33.:10:35.

boost early diagnosis. Let's talk to Dorothy

:10:36.:10:38.

Byres from Edinburgh, of Cancer Studies at the Christie

:10:39.:10:43.

hospital in Manchester, who also works with

:10:44.:10:50.

Beating Bowel Cancer. Good morning to you both and thanks

:10:51.:10:57.

for joining us. Take us through your story. You were diagnosed when you

:10:58.:11:02.

were just 52 and this was through a routine screening, why did you even

:11:03.:11:06.

do the routine screening? In actual fact the day I received my screening

:11:07.:11:11.

kit was on my 52nd birthday and I had just been out with my family for

:11:12.:11:16.

a birthday celebration and my sister had told us her partner, Colin,

:11:17.:11:22.

advanced bowel cancer and, you know, it wasn't good news. When I went

:11:23.:11:26.

home and saw my bowel screening kit in the post I managed to complete it

:11:27.:11:31.

in record time and send it off. A lot of people don't like the

:11:32.:11:35.

screening kit and they say, you know, it doesn't make a very good

:11:36.:11:39.

birthday present but for me it was the best birthday present I ever

:11:40.:11:43.

received. How accurate are those tests normally? Yeah, so, in short

:11:44.:11:50.

they are very accurate. The UK has led in a lot of the research in this

:11:51.:11:55.

area over the last two decades. We have run big trials and we've done a

:11:56.:12:00.

lot of quality assurance and quality control in these areas. And this is

:12:01.:12:04.

a very effective way of screening for bowel cancer. You had no

:12:05.:12:08.

symptoms at all but they found out you had stage three? Mine was a

:12:09.:12:12.

stage three, yes. Which must have been a shock to you but thank

:12:13.:12:18.

goodness you did the screening? Yes, I was very surprised because I had

:12:19.:12:22.

no idea, I seemed quite healthy and fit but I had stage three bowel

:12:23.:12:26.

cancer. The important thing here is the age difference and you're

:12:27.:12:29.

arguing we should bring things in line with the situation that Dorothy

:12:30.:12:33.

found herself in in Scotland because it is currently different in other

:12:34.:12:39.

parts of the UK? Yes, outside of Scotland, England, Wales and

:12:40.:12:42.

Northern Ireland, this form of screening starts at the age of 60 so

:12:43.:12:48.

the argument is to bring this down to 50. This is a very effective way

:12:49.:12:53.

of beating bowel cancer and beating these deaths from bowel cancer. How

:12:54.:12:58.

much difference does early diagnosis make? A lot of people are diagnosed

:12:59.:13:03.

perhaps when they come into A? That's something we want to get rid

:13:04.:13:08.

of the. When I trained ten or 15 years ago a quarter of patients were

:13:09.:13:13.

coming through as emergencies. That's a lot of patients. It's

:13:14.:13:17.

expensive. It's a lot of radical and morbid surgery. Treating them

:13:18.:13:21.

earlier can now be done a lot simpler. We very often used keyhole

:13:22.:13:26.

types of surgery and they can avoid things like chemotherapy, so that's

:13:27.:13:30.

the way forward. Dorothy Comer can you understand, I know you said it

:13:31.:13:36.

was the best birthday present ever, there is a stigma about it but the

:13:37.:13:41.

importance of diagnosis is so crucial but there's embarrassment

:13:42.:13:45.

involved? Yes there is. But when you look at what the alternatives can

:13:46.:13:49.

be, it's a no-brainer to complete the screening when you're invited to

:13:50.:13:56.

do so. How are you now? Absolutely fine. You've had treatment, what was

:13:57.:14:02.

that like? It was challenging. I had an operation and then I had six

:14:03.:14:06.

months of chemotherapy, which was challenging. But there's lots of

:14:07.:14:10.

things in life that are challenging. I was just wondering about the cost

:14:11.:14:16.

implication. Also the number of people that might go through this

:14:17.:14:20.

process for whom it would be entirely unnecessary, is it worth it

:14:21.:14:24.

to catch up with that early diagnosis do you think? There's two

:14:25.:14:29.

crises, the cost issue again has been looked at 4/20 years in this

:14:30.:14:34.

country by health economists. A Thai time again it comes out as

:14:35.:14:38.

cost-effective -- for 20 years. -- time and time again. These are

:14:39.:14:44.

people and working age and we returned them back to work at a

:14:45.:14:50.

normal productive age. It is devastating news to hear you have

:14:51.:14:56.

cancer, what is your message to people going for the test and

:14:57.:14:59.

getting a diagnosis they don't necessarily want to hear? Despite

:15:00.:15:03.

people knowing about this with still lagging behind in terms of uptake.

:15:04.:15:08.

Typically for this test uptake across the country runs at about 60%

:15:09.:15:12.

so that the likes behind for instance breast cancer, which is

:15:13.:15:17.

70%. The first message is we need greater uptake. It's a simple test,

:15:18.:15:24.

as Dorothy has shown, and the message is once we find it, yes it's

:15:25.:15:27.

bad news but it's eminently treatable. Good to see you looking

:15:28.:15:31.

and feeling so well. We have public health or these in Northern Ireland,

:15:32.:15:35.

England and Wales and we asked them for a response. Wales is looking at

:15:36.:15:39.

extending it, Northern Ireland is looking at different approaches

:15:40.:15:43.

across the country before making changes. Public Health England says

:15:44.:15:47.

evidence shows the best way to reduce deaths is to combine the

:15:48.:15:51.

scope test at 55 with regular screening from the age of 60. Thank

:15:52.:15:55.

you very much four x four of your input.

:15:56.:15:57.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:15:58.:15:59.

The main stories this morning: A bill paving the way for Brexit

:16:00.:16:03.

could be introduced as early as tomorrow, after judges ruled that

:16:04.:16:06.

parliament should be given a vote on Britain leaving the EU.

:16:07.:16:09.

President Trump could announce his plans for a wall on the Mexican

:16:10.:16:12.

border, as he promises a big day ahead on national security.

:16:13.:16:18.

Let's get a weather update from Carol. I'm not going to ask you

:16:19.:16:27.

anything about that picture, but it looks lovely. Good morning, it is

:16:28.:16:30.

lovely, isn't it, and it tells another story because once again

:16:31.:16:33.

this morning especially in southern and south-eastern parts of England

:16:34.:16:37.

there is some freezing fog, travel disruption is possible, you can find

:16:38.:16:41.

out more on the BBC local radio station but the freezing weather

:16:42.:16:46.

gives you a hint of the temperatures, it is a cold start, it

:16:47.:16:50.

is frosty, this is a crossing word in particular, and we are looking at

:16:51.:16:54.

some black ice on 100 services, so if you're heading out, buried in

:16:55.:16:59.

mind, you will have to scrape the windscreen -- untreated surfaces.

:17:00.:17:04.

Across the Midlands, Southern counties, this is where we have some

:17:05.:17:09.

fog, patchy and dance as well -- bear in mind. It is a cold start for

:17:10.:17:15.

Wales, with a fair bit of cloud around and no problems with the fog

:17:16.:17:18.

as such -- dense. Just the odd pocket. Across the bow of York, the

:17:19.:17:22.

odd pocket of fog. Most of northern England is fog free and the odd

:17:23.:17:26.

pocket for parts of Scotland but Scotland and Northern Ireland are

:17:27.:17:30.

off to a very mild start -- the Vale of York. Temperatures around 12 or

:17:31.:17:33.

13 at the moment. Through the morning you will find as we import

:17:34.:17:37.

cloud from any continent the fog will lift into low cloud. -- from

:17:38.:17:41.

the near continent. As it happens it will feel cold in the south-east. We

:17:42.:17:46.

have sunshine for south-west England and Wales, into northern England,

:17:47.:17:50.

Murray first and parts of Northern Ireland, but we also have a weather

:17:51.:17:55.

front coming in and that is going to bring rain for western Scotland and

:17:56.:17:58.

also the north-west of Northern Ireland. If you are out celebrating

:17:59.:18:03.

this evening, wrap up warmly because, once again, it is going to

:18:04.:18:07.

be cold with a fair bit of cloud coming across our shores, producing

:18:08.:18:11.

grizzle or light snow but snow should not present a problem, but

:18:12.:18:15.

there is also widespread frost so that ice might be a problem first

:18:16.:18:19.

thing in the morning -- drizzle. That is to bear in mind. So tomorrow

:18:20.:18:23.

we start off on that cold note. Again we are dragging in this cold

:18:24.:18:27.

continental air. It is going to feel better tomorrow. For many of us it

:18:28.:18:31.

will be dry but it will be cold enough here and there 40 odd flurry

:18:32.:18:34.

of light snow. So Manchester tomorrow's maximum temperatures one

:18:35.:18:43.

degree. -- for the odd flurry. It will feel like -4 here, and as we

:18:44.:18:50.

had into Friday we drag in the cold, Continental air, with a lot of dry

:18:51.:18:54.

weather around on Friday but, having said that, you can see the array of

:18:55.:18:58.

weather front here the west, the Atlantic front is bringing in some

:18:59.:19:02.

rain and as they do so, know the temperatures in the south-west of

:19:03.:19:06.

Northern Ireland, starting to climb. Ahead of that, temperatures slowly

:19:07.:19:10.

start to rise as well. So, into the weekend, well, the John Carlson

:19:11.:19:13.

showers, some sunshine and it will be less chilly, Sunday at the moment

:19:14.:19:19.

looks like the driest and best day of the week and -- the chance of

:19:20.:19:24.

some showers. Well, at the moment. Good clarification. Talking today

:19:25.:19:29.

about enforced dress codes and women being told to wear high heels and

:19:30.:19:35.

reapply make up. Loads of comments. Andrew says when I wore a Hawaiian

:19:36.:19:39.

T-shirt it was cited in the dress code as unacceptable but it didn't

:19:40.:19:43.

apply to female floral shirts. Marcus... (LAUGHTER).. That is a

:19:44.:19:50.

very good comment. Anonymous comment and you might see why. It isn't

:19:51.:19:55.

about a quality but the forced sexuality of women. Men not wearing

:19:56.:20:00.

ties in a position of importance in the office or frontline media jobs

:20:01.:20:03.

don't command respect. Julie says the only dress code should apply to

:20:04.:20:08.

all employees and the example is to dress smartly or a uniform is

:20:09.:20:11.

provided in hazardous areas as it is dangerous to wear high heels and I

:20:12.:20:15.

can't wear them because I fall over. In Japan department stores ban staff

:20:16.:20:19.

from earings and nail varnish which is different from cosmetic staff in

:20:20.:20:24.

the UK. Thank you for your comments and I cannot believe we are talking

:20:25.:20:28.

about Christmas. I am disappointed that Ben isn't in a Hawaiian shirt.

:20:29.:20:33.

Can we just chat, actually, because Dan and I have to wear a tie, not

:20:34.:20:38.

because the boss says we have to but we feel we have to, so if you are

:20:39.:20:42.

watching and you think we need to wear a tight, let us know. Let us

:20:43.:20:46.

know if we have to wear a tie. Do you not want to? Take it off. Shall

:20:47.:20:52.

I take it off? OK, I am not going to do it now. That is the fear. Thank

:20:53.:20:56.

you so much. We are still talking about Christmas.

:20:57.:20:57.

In the last few minutes we've had a couple of Christmas updates

:20:58.:21:00.

WHSmith says like-for-like sales rose 5% boosted by its stores

:21:01.:21:04.

But it's a familiar tale on the high-street where sales fell

:21:05.:21:09.

It also opened another 32 Post Offices and announced plan

:21:10.:21:16.

to open 23 more by the end of the year.

:21:17.:21:19.

Restaurant Group, the firm that runs Frankie Benny's

:21:20.:21:22.

and Garfunkels, says sales fell 3.9% over the last year.

:21:23.:21:25.

It says its now focusing on cutting prices to win back customers.

:21:26.:21:28.

It also warned of the extra cost of the new Minimum Wage,

:21:29.:21:31.

higher business rates, rising energy prices and extra costs

:21:32.:21:34.

because of the devaluation of the pound and rising food prices.

:21:35.:21:48.

And ?8 billion was wiped off the value of BT yesterday as shares

:21:49.:21:52.

slumped 20% over an accounting scandal

:21:53.:21:53.

in Italy, which could lead to a big fall in overall profits.

:21:54.:22:07.

Problems with BT's Italian business were found to be much worse

:22:08.:22:10.

than first thought, including misreporting profits and borrowing

:22:11.:22:13.

BT has fired its Italian management team but British Boss Gavin

:22:14.:22:17.

Patterson is under fire to explain how the problems occurred

:22:18.:22:19.

I am probably going to get in trouble for that now, but let's find

:22:20.:22:34.

out if we can wear and tie once and for all. Oh, look at the body

:22:35.:22:38.

language. It is all right. I am going to wicked off. After 8am, no

:22:39.:22:46.

tie, yeah? Don't negotiate on air. -- whip it off. You are forcing me

:22:47.:22:52.

into an uncomfortable situation. Exactly.

:22:53.:22:54.

A number of female MPs have told the BBC that they've received

:22:55.:22:57.

physical and verbal threats, and fear for their safety

:22:58.:22:59.

following the death of the Labour MP Jo Cox.

:23:00.:23:02.

In a survey by BBC Radio 5 Live, some said they'd also experienced

:23:03.:23:05.

sexist language in the Commons, and even considered giving

:23:06.:23:08.

At a time when more women are being encouraged to go

:23:09.:23:12.

into politics, how off-putting is this?

:23:13.:23:13.

Our political correspondent Ellie Price has been finding out.

:23:14.:23:16.

It wasn't easy getting women the vote.

:23:17.:23:18.

It took even longer to get women into parliament.

:23:19.:23:20.

The first female MP to take her seat, Nancy Astor,

:23:21.:23:23.

It gives me the greatest pleasure to introduce

:23:24.:23:28.

to you the new National Unionist women members.

:23:29.:23:39.

Back then, of course, they didn't have social media,

:23:40.:23:41.

So, what you're looking at are the abusive tweets

:23:42.:23:52.

Anne McLauchlan MP won't read the abuse she receives online.

:23:53.:24:07.

Which is just as well, it's deeply personal,

:24:08.:24:09.

It's tempting if you are alone at night and no one can see

:24:10.:24:17.

you if you get upset to just have a look.

:24:18.:24:19.

I have to say, I very much see the silver lining in not getting

:24:20.:24:31.

reelected, the silver lining is I may never have to put up

:24:32.:24:34.

with that sort of abuse again in my life, because it doesn't

:24:35.:24:37.

happen unless you've got some kind of high profile,

:24:38.:24:40.

and then people think they have carte blanche to call you whatever

:24:41.:24:43.

But it isn't just hurtful insults on social media,

:24:44.:24:47.

there's an even darker side of death threats and violence.

:24:48.:24:49.

Jo Cox was murdered outside her constituency surgery last June.

:24:50.:24:52.

Two thirds of female MPs we spoke to say they have felt less

:24:53.:24:56.

Well over half have received a physical threat from a member

:24:57.:24:59.

This is the room where I hold my surgeries.

:25:00.:25:03.

Tulip Sadik begrudgingly makes sure she has security whenever

:25:04.:25:05.

This building is a secure building, there is a police presence outside,

:25:06.:25:18.

staff are supportive, so I feel safer.

:25:19.:25:21.

It was one of my staff members who opened the letter,

:25:22.:25:28.

quite a young staff member, I felt sorry for them,

:25:29.:25:31.

opening this letter that said they wanted to butcher my family.

:25:32.:25:34.

The office got in touch with me and said, we need to take

:25:35.:25:37.

It makes me think, who has time to sit and write a letter to an MP

:25:38.:25:45.

saying, I want to kill you and your family?

:25:46.:25:48.

It all paints rather a grim picture, and certainly the majority of MPs

:25:49.:25:51.

we spoke to say they're concerned that hearing about this sort

:25:52.:25:54.

of abuse might put off good new people, good new women,

:25:55.:25:57.

In fact, a third of those we heard from said they have considered

:25:58.:26:02.

giving up their job here in parliament because of it.

:26:03.:26:05.

And the majority we heard from say, despite the difficulties,

:26:06.:26:09.

the job is a privilege, and well worth the flak.

:26:10.:26:16.

It is very interesting, we are talking about that and as well

:26:17.:26:22.

talking about what women are being made to wear to work as well, so it

:26:23.:26:26.

is kind of a theme. Yes, keep your comments coming in, because it is

:26:27.:26:30.

lovely to read, there is a cross-section of opinion. Yes.

:26:31.:26:33.

The copy-cat Lego that's so good even the boss can't

:26:34.:26:37.

We have a special report on China's counterfeit marketplace.

:26:38.:26:41.

Not just toys, it is cars being made as well. Yes, all sorts, and how can

:26:42.:26:48.

you tell, because if the boss doesn't know? The children seem to

:26:49.:26:52.

know. You will see later on the young girl is shown the fake and the

:26:53.:26:56.

real and straightaway she says, that is the real one and that is right.

:26:57.:26:58.

We will Hello, this is Breakfast

:26:59.:30:17.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. MPs have increased pressure

:30:18.:30:32.

on Theresa May to set out her negotiating

:30:33.:30:34.

position on Brexit. The demands for a white paper,

:30:35.:30:36.

including from some Conservatives, follow yesterday's

:30:37.:30:38.

Supreme Court ruling. The Prime Minister must now give

:30:39.:30:40.

parliament a vote before triggering It's thought legislation could be

:30:41.:30:43.

introduced as early as tomorrow. President Trump is reportedly

:30:44.:30:54.

preparing to sign several executive orders aimed at

:30:55.:30:56.

restricting immigration. It's expected he'll announce

:30:57.:31:01.

plans for a wall along the US border with Mexico,

:31:02.:31:03.

one of his key election pledges. Reports from Washington say he's

:31:04.:31:06.

also planning tightened visa regulations from seven Middle East

:31:07.:31:09.

and African countries. Women in the workplace

:31:10.:31:14.

are being told what to wear, how to have their hair and how much

:31:15.:31:16.

make up they need to put on, according to a report

:31:17.:31:20.

into office discrimination. MPs began an inquiry

:31:21.:31:23.

after a receptionist was sent home

:31:24.:31:26.

for refusing to wear high heels. They heard examples of sexism

:31:27.:31:27.

from hundreds of women. the problem is that indirect

:31:28.:31:41.

discrimination can be justified if the employer says it is reasonably

:31:42.:31:46.

necessary in pursuit of a legitimate aim and tribunal is can find

:31:47.:31:49.

differently in different parts of the country. So we need more test

:31:50.:31:52.

cases so the law's clarified. The screening age for bowel

:31:53.:31:54.

cancer in England, Wales and Northern Ireland should be

:31:55.:31:57.

reduced to 50 years old, according to the charity

:31:58.:32:00.

Beating Bowel Cancer. Scotland is the only part of the UK

:32:01.:32:02.

which screens from 50. The charity says that if other parts

:32:03.:32:05.

of the UK came into line, 4,000 patients a year

:32:06.:32:09.

would have the opportunity Ten or 15 years ago

:32:10.:32:11.

a quarter of patients were coming It's a lot of radical

:32:12.:32:27.

and morbid surgery. Treating them earlier

:32:28.:32:32.

can now be done a lot We very often used keyhole types

:32:33.:32:34.

of surgery and they can avoid things like chemotherapy,

:32:35.:32:38.

so that's the way forward. David Cameron has been

:32:39.:32:41.

appointed president In an article in the Times he says

:32:42.:32:42.

research into cancer and strokes deserve

:32:43.:32:46.

all their funding, but that dementia His new role is the second formal

:32:47.:32:49.

position he has taken since standing They have waited for nearly 20

:32:50.:32:54.

years, but finally Japan has a Sumo 30-year-old Kisenosato

:32:55.:33:03.

is the sport's new champion, The last time a Japanese wrestler

:33:04.:33:06.

won the title was in 1998. The last four grand champions have

:33:07.:33:10.

all been from Mongolia. Prior to that it was

:33:11.:33:13.

a wrestler from Hawaii. I tell you what, impressive. You

:33:14.:33:30.

wouldn't want to mess with him. And there's an interview about the food

:33:31.:33:35.

he eats. Paid stacks of grub and then they go straight to sleep so it

:33:36.:33:43.

turns to fat as quickly as possible. -- paid stacks of grub. Sounds like

:33:44.:33:49.

my dream life -- and they eat stacks of grub. -- they eat stacks of grub.

:33:50.:33:57.

We have been talking about Johanna Konta this morning, British number

:33:58.:34:02.

one, not fantastic news for her but she's had a great tournament.

:34:03.:34:03.

Johann Konta has been knocked of the Australian Open this morning.

:34:04.:34:07.

She lost to Serena Williams 6-2 6-3 in just over

:34:08.:34:09.

She was the last Brit left in the competition.

:34:10.:34:13.

She had been on a nine match winning streak. She is now two victories

:34:14.:34:20.

away from claiming an open era record 23rd major title.

:34:21.:34:24.

I think overall she played at a higher level than I did today and I

:34:25.:34:32.

think she showed why she is arguably one of the best of all time. So I

:34:33.:34:37.

think, yeah, I really enjoyed my time out there on court against her.

:34:38.:34:43.

I think I was able... I hope I'll be able to bring a lot away from it and

:34:44.:34:48.

thinks I'll be able to reuse and hopefully I'll get a chance to play

:34:49.:34:53.

her again, and for other matches as well.

:34:54.:34:56.

Former Olympic champion Nicole Cooke says British Cycling is run by men

:34:57.:34:59.

for men and its attempts to stop doping are inadequate

:35:00.:35:02.

Cooke made the claims in written evidence submitted

:35:03.:35:05.

to a Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee yesterday.

:35:06.:35:07.

The session was held to discuss issues raised at a hearing involving

:35:08.:35:10.

British Cycling and Team Sky last month.

:35:11.:35:25.

Sir Alex Ferguson thinks Jose Mourinho is getting to grips

:35:26.:35:27.

with being Manchester United manager.

:35:28.:35:29.

United are still in both domestic cup competitions

:35:30.:35:31.

and the Europa League, but are sixth in the Premier League,

:35:32.:35:34.

Ferguson says Mourinho has settled into the job after a turbulent start

:35:35.:35:38.

I think that Jose is finding solutions now.

:35:39.:35:42.

There was a period there in the season when he wasn't getting

:35:43.:35:46.

decisions and his emotions boiled over.

:35:47.:35:47.

He is an emotional guy but the way you see him now,

:35:48.:35:50.

That's the obvious observation I am making

:35:51.:35:57.

It's playing with great energy, determination,

:35:58.:36:04.

will to win, which I think is really important.

:36:05.:36:20.

England's women have drawn 0-0 with Sweden in Murcia,

:36:21.:36:22.

it was the second of two friendlies in Spain.

:36:23.:36:24.

Siobhan Chamberlain saved a second half penalty.

:36:25.:36:26.

The next step in England's preparation for the European

:36:27.:36:29.

Championship is to take part in the SheBelieves Cup,

:36:30.:36:31.

I think everyone will be happy with how the week's gone. Everyone's

:36:32.:36:39.

pretty much got minutes and that's fantastic, especially at

:36:40.:36:40.

international level and everyone who's come out here has performed

:36:41.:36:45.

and as I said before, it will give Mark a headache and hopefully going

:36:46.:36:50.

forward into the she will give us a bit more fitness and match sharpness

:36:51.:36:52.

and hope us get results out there. British five-time

:36:53.:36:54.

Olympian Jo Pavey will run in this

:36:55.:36:56.

year's London Marathon. The 43-year-old ran the event

:36:57.:36:57.

in 2011 setting a personal best of two hours, 28

:36:58.:37:00.

minutes and 24 seconds. Pavey says she hopes to use the race

:37:01.:37:03.

to set another PB and to qualify for the World Championships

:37:04.:37:07.

in August. That is really fast! When I read

:37:08.:37:20.

that I think two hours, 28 minutes and 24 seconds. It's ridiculous,

:37:21.:37:25.

it's not allowed! You've got a big guest in the next hour? I have, Alun

:37:26.:37:30.

Wyn Jones, the Welsh captain, he will be talking about the Six

:37:31.:37:34.

Nations and their preparations for the Six Nations. Let your questions

:37:35.:37:38.

come in for that! Meanwhile he's not too happy to hear this.

:37:39.:37:40.

One of rugby union's oldest clubs, London Welsh, has been kicked out

:37:41.:37:43.

of the Championship after they were liquidated last month.

:37:44.:37:45.

The club was granted a temporary licence to play on,

:37:46.:37:48.

but he Rugby Football Union says they haven't met the financial

:37:49.:37:51.

conditions required to extend that licence.

:37:52.:37:53.

All their results will be erased from this season's Championship.

:37:54.:38:02.

And finally Sweden's Daniel Bodin pulled off the first successful

:38:03.:38:05.

The double backflip has earned a reputation as the Holy Grail.

:38:06.:38:12.

Lots of people have tried, many people have failed.

:38:13.:38:16.

And now Bodin, who has been working on this for two years,

:38:17.:38:19.

Amazing to watch. How do you work on it, how do you practise? Don't you

:38:20.:38:29.

do it on a big foam? With a snowmobile? I'm not the expert, I'm

:38:30.:38:34.

just guessing! Maybe you try it with a bike to start with. All that

:38:35.:38:39.

timing and balance. Congratulations to him. See you later with Alun Wyn

:38:40.:38:42.

Jones. La La Land may have dominated

:38:43.:38:42.

the Oscar nominations, but there's more to

:38:43.:38:44.

the Academy Awards than just The White Helmets is

:38:45.:38:47.

a story about a team of volunteers saving lives in Syria,

:38:48.:38:50.

and it's been nominated In a moment we'll chat

:38:51.:38:53.

to the British team behind it, The latest missile attacks on

:38:54.:39:23.

hospitals and schools in rebel held areas have left up to 50 civilians

:39:24.:39:25.

dead. It is a really powerful bit of

:39:26.:40:01.

cinema. and producer Joanna Natasegara

:40:02.:40:03.

are with us now. I have no shame in telling you I

:40:04.:40:13.

watched this on the train yesterday and I was in bits on the train. It

:40:14.:40:18.

is such a powerful story and so beautifully told. Congratulations on

:40:19.:40:21.

the nomination first of all. Thank you very much. Syria is such a

:40:22.:40:27.

difficult issue for people to engage with and these guys are a story of

:40:28.:40:32.

hope. They are real-life heroes, they are civilians just like us,

:40:33.:40:36.

just like the viewers watching at home who decided to every day get up

:40:37.:40:41.

and risk their lives to said strangers. Tell us about what they

:40:42.:40:46.

are doing, they are going in to help people as much as they can? -- said

:40:47.:40:52.

strangers. Their volunteer rescue workers, instead of fleeing or

:40:53.:40:58.

taking up a gun they help when people are needing it -- said

:40:59.:41:05.

strangers. -- save strangers. Some of the footage I know you have, a

:41:06.:41:11.

lot of it was just too distressing, upsetting to use, wasn't it? Yeah.

:41:12.:41:16.

What you see in this film, you still see some quite graphic scenes but it

:41:17.:41:20.

was a very small fraction of the original material which if we had

:41:21.:41:25.

included would have made the film unwatchable by its graphic nature.

:41:26.:41:30.

There was one powerful part when the team pull out a baby and the baby is

:41:31.:41:34.

alive, it is less than two weeks old, they're in tears when they do

:41:35.:41:39.

it and when you're asking The white Helmets to retell the story, it is

:41:40.:41:43.

so powerfully told and one life rescued had a huge impact on so

:41:44.:41:49.

many? It did, baby Makhmudov was less than two weeks old and

:41:50.:41:52.

underneath a 3-storey building -- the mood. Nobody thought he would be

:41:53.:41:58.

alive and he was when they pulled him out 16 hours later. In the film

:41:59.:42:03.

you see the reunion between The white Helmets that saved him. I

:42:04.:42:07.

think we can see a bit of that now. Have a look.

:42:08.:42:42.

In another part of the film you can hear the baby crying and the

:42:43.:42:49.

jubilation from The white Helmets as they pull this little child from the

:42:50.:42:53.

rubble. It's extraordinary, they had been searching for 16 hours and they

:42:54.:42:57.

almost gave up hope they would find anyone else alive and then one of

:42:58.:43:01.

them suddenly hears this faint sound of a baby crying and that gave

:43:02.:43:05.

everyone hope and energy again and they kept digging and we get to that

:43:06.:43:09.

moment where you see the baby being pulled out by The White Helmets.

:43:10.:43:13.

It's all to ditch from them, you couldn't go out there or be there

:43:14.:43:18.

for very obvious reasons. Yeah, the team we chose to focus on was from

:43:19.:43:22.

Eastern Aleppo, which we've seen so many times is the most dangerous

:43:23.:43:27.

place for journalists. We did film on the border of Syria and Turkey

:43:28.:43:31.

with them in the training camp but it's a combination of our footage

:43:32.:43:35.

and beautiful work from a young cameraman and a couple of his

:43:36.:43:39.

colleagues, they were really documenting the work in eastern

:43:40.:43:43.

Aleppo and working with us to put that in the film. I no you don't

:43:44.:43:47.

make films to collect awards, but what is it like for you to receive

:43:48.:43:52.

this Oscar nomination -- I no you don't. Personally we're over the

:43:53.:43:57.

moon but far more importantly it's a fantastic opportunity to keep a

:43:58.:44:01.

focus on the work these guys do and the risk they take everyday.

:44:02.:44:06.

Extraordinary. Presumably their work carries on? Absolutely it does,

:44:07.:44:16.

unfortunately they are still digging, they are still working in

:44:17.:44:19.

areas where they can, they're a target of the regime so now they're

:44:20.:44:23.

out of the stem Aleppo but into other areas. Your background is in

:44:24.:44:26.

directing and producing and journalism, the veracity of the

:44:27.:44:29.

footage, you know where it's come from -- eastern Aleppo. We went

:44:30.:44:33.

through dozens of hours of material and we did our homework working out

:44:34.:44:36.

exactly where that staff had come from. It's not just us, there's been

:44:37.:44:40.

numerous other journalists who have done exactly the same sort of work

:44:41.:44:45.

on this material to verify it. People have seen hours and hours of

:44:46.:44:49.

news footage, it's fascinating to see a different life and these

:44:50.:44:54.

people doing amazing jobs. A really powerful film, congratulations. Will

:44:55.:44:58.

you be going out to the Oscars? We will, and we hope some of the guys

:44:59.:45:05.

from the film will be able to join us as well. Great. Thanks for

:45:06.:45:07.

joining us. The Oscar-nominated documentary

:45:08.:45:08.

The White Helmets is available More fog? Yes, freezing fog,

:45:09.:45:20.

especially for southern and south-eastern England, heading into

:45:21.:45:25.

the Midlands as well, Apache fog elsewhere, but this is where the fog

:45:26.:45:31.

is most dense, and it tells you it is a cold start -- the patchy fog.

:45:32.:45:38.

If you are heading out, watch out for black ice on untreated surfaces.

:45:39.:45:42.

This is where we currently have the fog, and it is patchy and dense. It

:45:43.:45:48.

is on par with what we had on Monday. It is a cold start with the

:45:49.:45:53.

risk of ice, as I mentioned, and south-west, at 9am this morning, we

:45:54.:45:58.

are into the sunshine with temperatures that bit higher. In

:45:59.:46:02.

Wales we have a little fog, not much around the Welsh marches, giving way

:46:03.:46:07.

to some sunshine. As we moved to northern England, some fog along the

:46:08.:46:12.

Vale of York, lifting to see some sunshine. Sunshine around Murray

:46:13.:46:16.

Firth but for Scotland and Northern Ireland it is cloudy to start and

:46:17.:46:22.

mild, and windy out to the west with gales across the far north-west of

:46:23.:46:25.

Scotland, even severe gales with exposure. Through the day we are

:46:26.:46:29.

importing cloud from the new continent, which will lift the fog,

:46:30.:46:32.

so it will be cold in the south-east, but as we push across

:46:33.:46:37.

where we have the sunshine we are looking at 7-9, and the highest

:46:38.:46:41.

temperatures north-west Scotland and Northern Ireland. Through the

:46:42.:46:45.

evening and overnight it will still be windy in the west, it will be

:46:46.:46:50.

breezy for the rest of the UK, so it doesn't mean we won't have such

:46:51.:46:53.

issues with fog but we have widespread frost, we will see some

:46:54.:46:57.

drizzle, light snow flurries, so there could be some ice first thing

:46:58.:47:00.

tomorrow morning, something to bear in my if you are travelling and once

:47:01.:47:04.

again leave extra time to scrape your car windscreen. Tomorrow it is

:47:05.:47:10.

a cold and frosty start, watch out for the ice, for many it will be dry

:47:11.:47:16.

but tomorrow we have a keen raw nagging south-easterly wind coming,

:47:17.:47:20.

so the one degree in Manchester in the wind will feel more like -4

:47:21.:47:26.

against your skin. Wherever you are in the UK it will feel colder than

:47:27.:47:30.

you might see on the thermometer. And then as we heading to Friday,

:47:31.:47:34.

the nagging south-easterly coming off the cold continent, dry weather

:47:35.:47:38.

around at a set of fronts waiting in the wings in the Atlantic. They will

:47:39.:47:42.

come in from the south-west bringing rain and note the temperatures

:47:43.:47:46.

lifting. And as we go through the rest of the day and into the weekend

:47:47.:47:50.

it will be less chilly. I have a special treat tonight, I am going to

:47:51.:47:54.

see you in person. It will be lovely. And it is Burns night as

:47:55.:47:59.

well is the national TV awards. She is going to be fired up. It is and

:48:00.:48:05.

we are nominated and as we has said before we are quite excited. Yes,

:48:06.:48:12.

fully dressed and ready to go. And I know we are not allowed to be

:48:13.:48:18.

plucky, but you can vote at midday, -- from Mendez, and there are other

:48:19.:48:27.

categories -- from midday. We are in the Life magazine show. It is over

:48:28.:48:29.

now. It will be over by tomorrow. Its plastic bricks are commonplace

:48:30.:48:33.

in playrooms all over the world, turning it into the most profitable

:48:34.:48:36.

toy business of all, Lego is having a problem

:48:37.:48:38.

with counterfeits. And we have a great report that I

:48:39.:48:51.

will show you in a second. The boss can't tell the fake from the real

:48:52.:48:53.

ones. You'll be used to seeing fake

:48:54.:48:53.

Ray Ban glasses and rip off designer handbags at the beach

:48:54.:48:57.

but what about fake toys? Lego is the biggest

:48:58.:48:59.

toy maker in the world and the Danish firm is trying

:49:00.:49:01.

to make it big in China, too. They've just opened a factory there,

:49:02.:49:05.

taking on thousands But the problem with rip offs

:49:06.:49:07.

is so great they're already suing one Chinese manufacturer,

:49:08.:49:11.

and the world's biggest retailer Alibaba has taken down tens

:49:12.:49:14.

of thousands of online links to suspect Lego products

:49:15.:49:16.

in the last year alone. My colleague in Asia Robin Brant

:49:17.:49:25.

went to meet the boss. Billions and billions of these

:49:26.:49:28.

little plastic bricks have been sold the world over and now Lego

:49:29.:49:31.

is betting big on China. What started out with hand-cut

:49:32.:49:36.

bricks in Denmark in 1949 is now a $100 million state-of-the-art

:49:37.:49:39.

operation near Shanghai but they are not the

:49:40.:49:41.

only ones doing it. Copies like this and fakes

:49:42.:49:49.

or counterfeits are prolific in Lego is currently suing the firm

:49:50.:49:52.

behind this copycat Star Wnrs model. So how easy is it to

:49:53.:49:56.

spot the difference? We bought a real one and a copycat

:49:57.:49:58.

and asked the experts. If you have to ask me to guess,

:49:59.:50:20.

I would say this one, maybe. The truth is, they look

:50:21.:50:24.

and feel almost identical. The copy's so good, in fact,

:50:25.:50:33.

that even the boss of that huge I would say this is

:50:34.:50:36.

Lego and this is not. Bought from Toy'R'Us yesterday,

:50:37.:51:02.

built by my daughter. It is trying to be Lego,

:51:03.:51:15.

is my assessment of it. Lego is not the only foreign firm

:51:16.:51:19.

investing big in China but having White Evoques like this

:51:20.:51:23.

sell particulalrly well. But the British firm has been

:51:24.:51:29.

powerless to stop this. Tucked away on a Shanghai side

:51:30.:51:32.

street, this is a Land Wind. It's similar on the inside and very,

:51:33.:51:38.

very similar on the outside This is our copycat

:51:39.:51:41.

that caught people out. You can buy him and the real thing

:51:42.:51:45.

on the huge online retailer, They took down thousands of links

:51:46.:51:49.

to copycat Lego products last year alone but the toy maker

:51:50.:51:56.

is still pursuing manufacturers in the courts because even the boss

:51:57.:51:58.

cannot tell the difference. With me now is intellectual property

:51:59.:52:01.

expert Charlotte Wigham. Charlotte, good morning. So, that

:52:02.:52:15.

report is fascinating and we saw the boss couldn't spot the difference

:52:16.:52:20.

between the figures, but noticeably the kids could, so they know what

:52:21.:52:23.

they are doing, but just talk through the problem, what laws have

:52:24.:52:27.

been breached, what is the problem as far as Lego is concerned? Yes,

:52:28.:52:31.

there are various potential breaches of intellectual property rights

:52:32.:52:38.

here. And you know, a company like Lego, I am not surprised that they

:52:39.:52:44.

want to pursue that. Intellectual property rights can exist in things

:52:45.:52:51.

like the logo, which is trademarked, design, the packaging, the figurines

:52:52.:52:58.

themselves might be trademarked or the artistic works, the

:52:59.:53:05.

instructions, all kinds of intellectual property rights that

:53:06.:53:08.

could have been infringed. So many interesting things, there was a grey

:53:09.:53:13.

area, it is about whether it is trying to be pretending to be

:53:14.:53:16.

something, or if it is distinctively different, and with China that is

:53:17.:53:21.

the problem, many see it as the wild west with many of the traditional

:53:22.:53:24.

rules we take for granted in Europe or the US don't seem to apply. Yes,

:53:25.:53:31.

well, one issue is the likelihood of confusion. With counterfeit goods

:53:32.:53:36.

sometimes providing them knowing they are counterfeit, so there are

:53:37.:53:43.

two things going on. Yes, in general, China has traditionally

:53:44.:53:47.

been seen in that light, unfortunately, as the largest

:53:48.:53:51.

manufacturer. But things are changing. We are seeing a lot more

:53:52.:53:57.

cases being brought in China against those infringing. The Chinese

:53:58.:54:03.

government has committed to improving its legal system and its

:54:04.:54:06.

enforcement of those intellectual property rights, which is very

:54:07.:54:09.

positive. Some change there. It comes down to two things. All the

:54:10.:54:14.

companies creating these things, it costs money on research and

:54:15.:54:17.

development, but if you are a consumer and you have the choice,

:54:18.:54:21.

one might be ?5 and the other is ?10, you may be tempted to choose

:54:22.:54:25.

the cheaper one? Yes, I can understand why people buy

:54:26.:54:30.

counterfeit goods. Of course, for the price reason. But there are

:54:31.:54:35.

various considerations. Obviously, as an intellectual property lawyer,

:54:36.:54:43.

that is my livelihood, and it is obviously important. There are also

:54:44.:54:49.

serious issues for consumers, safety regulations won't have been complied

:54:50.:54:54.

with usually with counterfeit goods, which is important with Lego. It is

:54:55.:54:59.

a toy, you don't know what is in the product, and then there are other

:55:00.:55:04.

consumer protection issues, if you are buying counterfeit goods online,

:55:05.:55:09.

giving out your bank details to God knows her, so there are various

:55:10.:55:16.

reasons why you would discourage it. It is really fascinating, such an

:55:17.:55:20.

interesting area, so, there you go and that is fake. Oh, it has come

:55:21.:55:29.

apart, actually. All sorts of reasons. Thank you. There is humour

:55:30.:55:33.

in everything, he knows his stuff. If you think you know your British

:55:34.:55:36.

history, then think again. Historian Lucy Worsley will be

:55:37.:55:40.

here to separate fact from fiction, and what she says are our

:55:41.:55:43.

nation's biggest fibs. Hello, this is Breakfast

:55:44.:55:47.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. The Government prepares

:55:48.:00:09.

to put its plan for Brexit Yesterday judges ruled that MPs

:00:10.:00:11.

should be given a vote It's thought a Bill could now be

:00:12.:00:15.

introduced as early as tomorrow. I will be live at Westminster where

:00:16.:00:31.

ministers are warning MPs not to try to thwart the will of the people,

:00:32.:00:38.

but MPs are looking for more information and a greater say on the

:00:39.:00:39.

Brexit process. Good morning.

:00:40.:00:51.

It's Wednesday 25th January. President Trump

:00:52.:00:53.

promises a "big day" ahead on national security including

:00:54.:00:56.

an announcement about his plans Can a company impose

:00:57.:00:59.

a dress code for staff? From high heels to short skirts -

:01:00.:01:16.

two parliamentary reports say no. Firms must not and cannot tell

:01:17.:01:18.

workers what to wear. Johanna Konta has been knocked out

:01:19.:01:21.

the Australian Open. She lost her quarter-final

:01:22.:01:23.

to Serena Williams 6-2, 6-3 in just She was the last Brit

:01:24.:01:26.

left in the competition. Also this morning, a toy

:01:27.:01:35.

story with a difference. Which one is yours? This is Lego.

:01:36.:01:45.

This is not. OK, this is Lego. No, this is Lego.

:01:46.:01:49.

We'll find out how one of the world's best known brands

:01:50.:01:51.

is counting the cost of counterfeiting in China.

:01:52.:01:53.

Good morning. Once again we've got freezing fog especially so across

:01:54.:02:02.

parts of England and east Wales. There is ice to watch out for first

:02:03.:02:06.

thing, but some of us will see sunshine, some of us will see a

:02:07.:02:10.

little drop of rain and it will be windy in the north-west. I will have

:02:11.:02:13.

more details in 15 minutes. Thank you.

:02:14.:02:17.

MPs have increased pressure on Theresa May to set out her

:02:18.:02:22.

The demands for a white paper, including from some Conservatives,

:02:23.:02:26.

follow yesterday's Supreme Court ruling.

:02:27.:02:27.

The Prime Minister must now give parliament a vote before

:02:28.:02:29.

triggering Article 50, the formal process

:02:30.:02:31.

It's thought legislation could be introduced as early as tomorrow.

:02:32.:02:36.

Here's our political correspondent Tom Bateman.

:02:37.:02:40.

After the judges ruled only Parliament can start Brexit,

:02:41.:02:43.

today a warning for MPs - don't try to derail the plan.

:02:44.:02:46.

The Supreme Court judgement means a Bill on triggering Article 50,

:02:47.:02:50.

the start of Britain's exit process, must be put before MPs and Lords.

:02:51.:02:56.

The Government says legislation paving the way for Brexit

:02:57.:03:01.

That'll be voted on by both Houses of Parliament.

:03:02.:03:06.

Theresa May wants Article 50 triggered by the end of March.

:03:07.:03:08.

Then Britain has two years to leave the EU.

:03:09.:03:15.

The point of no return was passed on 23rd June last year.

:03:16.:03:19.

Labour say they won't block Article 50, but want to amend the Bill

:03:20.:03:23.

to give MPs more control of the process.

:03:24.:03:27.

If necessary, there will be hand-to-hand combat on this.

:03:28.:03:32.

We need to make sure that we get the best deal on behalf of the whole

:03:33.:03:36.

country and she can't say she acts on behalf of the whole country.

:03:37.:03:39.

Theresa May also faces opposition from some of her own MPs who want

:03:40.:03:42.

a formal exit document to be debated, but for now at least,

:03:43.:03:45.

ministers believe they are on track to get Brexit triggered

:03:46.:03:47.

Our political correspondent Carole Walker is outside

:03:48.:03:56.

I wanted to show you this cartoon on the front of the Telegraph. It says,

:03:57.:04:07.

"From the Supreme Court ruling it means I will be standing outside

:04:08.:04:11.

Parliament for the next few months." ." You can see it zwrust about

:04:12.:04:17.

there. And let's talk about that Tory rebellion. Just how big a

:04:18.:04:21.

rebellion might that be? Well, I think there is plenty in the Brexit

:04:22.:04:25.

process to keep me out here for many years to come yet! But when it comes

:04:26.:04:30.

to the Bill ta we're going to get introduced into the Commons

:04:31.:04:34.

tomorrow, we're told by ministers that they want that to be

:04:35.:04:37.

straightforward and brief and they want to get it through as soon as

:04:38.:04:42.

possible. N-terms of a Conservative rebellion -- in terms of a

:04:43.:04:45.

Conservative rebellion, there are some Conservatives who might

:04:46.:04:48.

possibly side with the Opposition parties in seeking in what they're

:04:49.:04:52.

calling a White Paper. It is a formal document setting out the

:04:53.:04:56.

Government's plans, but that's something the Government could agree

:04:57.:05:00.

to without too much difficulty. There are other demands on the

:05:01.:05:03.

Government. Labour are saying that they want any vote on a deal to be

:05:04.:05:08.

meaningful so they could force the Prime Minister to go back and

:05:09.:05:12.

negotiate a better deal if Parliament doesn't like what she

:05:13.:05:15.

gets. The SNP are saying that Scotland should be allowed to stay

:05:16.:05:19.

in the single market. So, I think, there will be a lot of efforts to

:05:20.:05:22.

try to amend and to try and change this Bill as it goes through

:05:23.:05:27.

Parliament, but as things stand, ministers are still pretty confident

:05:28.:05:31.

that they can stick to their timetable, trigger Article 50 to

:05:32.:05:34.

start the formal Brexit negotiations by the end of March. Thank you,

:05:35.:05:42.

Carole. I expect to speak to you for many more days standing exactly

:05:43.:05:43.

where you are. We'll be speaking to

:05:44.:05:47.

the businesswoman Gina Miller President Trump has said

:05:48.:05:48.

a "big day" is planned on national security today,

:05:49.:05:55.

including an announcement on building a wall on the US

:05:56.:05:58.

border with Mexico, one In a message on Twitter,

:05:59.:06:00.

he also said to expect Reports from Washington say

:06:01.:06:04.

he will sign several executive orders relating to immigration

:06:05.:06:07.

and border security Here's our correspondent,

:06:08.:06:09.

David Willis. We're going to have our

:06:10.:06:18.

borders nice and strong. It was the soundtrack

:06:19.:06:23.

to Donald Trump's unorthodox campaign for president,

:06:24.:06:29.

a call to build a wall along America's southern

:06:30.:06:31.

border with Mexico. Now he seems set to press ahead

:06:32.:06:33.

with measures he believes are vital to stemming the illegal flow

:06:34.:06:36.

of immigrants into The president on his Twitter

:06:37.:06:38.

account said simply, "Big day planned on national

:06:39.:06:42.

security tomorrow among He's vowed to make Mexico

:06:43.:06:44.

pay for it what's more, although the Mexican government has

:06:45.:06:52.

refused to do so. Later in the week, to round off

:06:53.:06:54.

a busy start to his presidency, Mr Trump is expected to sign

:06:55.:06:57.

executive orders, closing America's borders to refugees and limiting

:06:58.:07:00.

access to citizens from seven African and Middle Eastern

:07:01.:07:02.

countries, countries the administration believes export

:07:03.:07:04.

terrorism. They're mainly Muslim countries

:07:05.:07:14.

but the mantra of the Trump A country that traditionally

:07:15.:07:16.

has opened its doors to immigrants is about to head

:07:17.:07:19.

in the opposite direction. Women in the workplace

:07:20.:07:30.

are being told what to wear, how to have their hair and how much

:07:31.:07:32.

make up they need to put on, according to a Commons report

:07:33.:07:36.

into office discrimination. MPs began an inquiry

:07:37.:07:39.

after a receptionist was sent home They heard examples of sexism

:07:40.:07:42.

from hundreds of women, as our business correspondent

:07:43.:07:45.

Emma Simpson explains. Sometimes there's no choice,

:07:46.:07:50.

and it's not always attractive. But what about being ordered

:07:51.:07:57.

to wear high heels? When Nicola Thorp arrived

:07:58.:08:00.

for her first day at work, she was told by her employment

:08:01.:08:02.

agency she must wear shoes When she refused, she was

:08:03.:08:04.

sent home without pay. What they state is it gives them

:08:05.:08:10.

a more professional look. Now I'm not entirely sure why adding

:08:11.:08:13.

two or four inches to my height makes me more professional

:08:14.:08:18.

or makes me walk in I don't think it affects

:08:19.:08:21.

how I come across. You can see me now, this is exactly

:08:22.:08:25.

what I would be wearing and if it's just a matter of a couple of inches,

:08:26.:08:29.

I can stand tall She then started a petition,

:08:30.:08:32.

which led to an inquiry by MPs, who now want action

:08:33.:08:38.

from the Government. We've come up with

:08:39.:08:40.

three recommendations. Firstly, that the Equalities Act

:08:41.:08:41.

of 2010 obviously isn't quite Secondly, we want to raise awareness

:08:42.:08:44.

that wearing high heels or make-up may be a health and safety issue

:08:45.:08:51.

in the workplace. Thirdly, we are going

:08:52.:08:56.

to hopefully... If it doesn't work, then we will be

:08:57.:09:01.

taking people to court. At this company, receptionists can

:09:02.:09:04.

wear what they like. In its evidence, the Government said

:09:05.:09:08.

the existing law was clear, and that the dress code imposed

:09:09.:09:11.

on Nicola was unlawful. But the MPs are calling

:09:12.:09:13.

on the Government to do more to make the law more effective in protecting

:09:14.:09:17.

employees from David Cameron has been

:09:18.:09:18.

appointed president In an article in the Times, he says

:09:19.:09:30.

research into cancer and stroke deserve all their funding,

:09:31.:09:38.

but that dementia shouldn't His new role is the second formal

:09:39.:09:40.

position he has taken A RNLI lifeboat station

:09:41.:09:44.

in Yorkshire has a new crew The wild animal has befriended

:09:45.:09:51.

the team and has become a regular They say he's nearly as tame

:09:52.:09:59.

as a pet dog and as you can see, He's nice, isn't he? We've got Carol

:10:00.:10:16.

coming up. The new Wales captain will be

:10:17.:10:24.

talking to Sally after 8.30am. Her photograph is in all the pictures,

:10:25.:10:30.

it is Gina Miller. Declaring yesterday's winning as a vic ve for

:10:31.:10:34.

the constitution. Gina Miller joins us now.

:10:35.:10:38.

Thank you very much for joining us. I'm wondering how you feel today.

:10:39.:10:44.

You took this to the Supreme Court, was it the right thing to do? It was

:10:45.:10:48.

the right thing. If it was clear cut as to who had the power to trigger

:10:49.:10:52.

Article 50, the courts wouldn't have accepted the case and we wouldn't

:10:53.:10:55.

have gone all the way up to the Supreme Court. How do you feel?

:10:56.:10:59.

You've got your way. It went your way in the end. How do you feel

:11:00.:11:03.

about that today? I'm delighted the debate has already started and the

:11:04.:11:07.

MPs are already doing what they should have done, I felt, months

:11:08.:11:11.

ago, and before the actual vote itself. So I'm delighted that they

:11:12.:11:16.

have already started their debate. In some ways it was more about the

:11:17.:11:20.

debate for you, was it? Oh, absolutely. This is what the MPs

:11:21.:11:25.

were supposed to do. They're supposed to debate vote, put through

:11:26.:11:28.

an Act of Parliament and then the Government can trigger Article 50.

:11:29.:11:32.

We've heard from David Davis saying he hopes that Parliament and this

:11:33.:11:37.

won't be used to thwart the will of the people. What's your reaction to

:11:38.:11:42.

people who say that perhaps that's what you have been trying to do? We

:11:43.:11:45.

need to move on. It is a broken record. We can't go back and talk

:11:46.:11:49.

about what happened last June. We need to look forward and what's

:11:50.:11:53.

going to happen in the future. We haven't talked about that. My case

:11:54.:11:57.

was to ensure that our constitution stands and that governments can

:11:58.:12:00.

actually ensure that they are answerable to Parliament. In some

:12:01.:12:06.

ways, it was 8-3, wasn't it, amongst the justices and we heard from one

:12:07.:12:10.

of the three that voted against this, Lord Reid, he was cautioning

:12:11.:12:15.

against judicial activism. He said the courts should not overlook the

:12:16.:12:20.

constitutional importance of ministerial accountability to

:12:21.:12:23.

Parliament. And what do you think about this, is this involvement of

:12:24.:12:28.

the judiciary in politics? The judges did not in anyway involve

:12:29.:12:31.

themselves in politics. They looked at the rule of law. They looked at

:12:32.:12:36.

our constitutional law. They were very careful and to have independent

:12:37.:12:41.

judges who can hold the Government and ministers to account is exactly

:12:42.:12:45.

their job. Do you think it will, I mean, now we are going to see this

:12:46.:12:49.

debate and we know as well because we've spoken to people here on BBC

:12:50.:12:52.

Breakfast, there will be different votes along the way. The Government

:12:53.:12:56.

is maintaining until not change the timetable, what are your thoughts?

:12:57.:13:01.

No, I don't see how it would change the timetable in that they can have

:13:02.:13:04.

emergency sittings etcetera, but I'd like to point out that if the

:13:05.:13:08.

Government actually hadn't done the appeal in October they wouldn't be

:13:09.:13:11.

in this position of having to rush everything through. It was them who

:13:12.:13:15.

decided to appeal, not us, obviously because we won. So you have to ask

:13:16.:13:18.

the Government as to why they appealed. Just let's talk as well,

:13:19.:13:24.

because I know, that you have received and many of these have been

:13:25.:13:28.

passed on to police, abuse as well. Tell me about the personal cost.

:13:29.:13:32.

Tell me about the tone of what's been going on for you? Well, it has

:13:33.:13:38.

at times been very difficult, but I've had to push it to the side. I

:13:39.:13:42.

can't allow others to win by bullying me. What I have decided to

:13:43.:13:48.

do just be steely and focus on why I do things. I know the principles and

:13:49.:13:51.

the reasons behind behind what I've done and I won't let them win. What

:13:52.:13:55.

I find shocking is the amount of bullying of women that I've come

:13:56.:13:59.

across as I've more into the public eye from people like yourself doing

:14:00.:14:04.

their jobs in the media, and journalists etcetera, you know, we

:14:05.:14:07.

have to get away from this idea that just because you're doing your job,

:14:08.:14:11.

just because you're standing up and putting yourself out there for

:14:12.:14:14.

things you believe are right, it is justified that you can be targeted

:14:15.:14:18.

by the most vile behaviour. We have to stand up to this. And we all have

:14:19.:14:23.

to stand up to it as you say, give a little bit about the tone of what

:14:24.:14:28.

you've had. It must have an impact on you in some ways? You're trying

:14:29.:14:31.

to do your job and this is what's coming at you. Well, at times it's

:14:32.:14:36.

difficult because nobody is looking at the message of what I'm doing, it

:14:37.:14:42.

is very, very personal, it is assassination, be it about my gender

:14:43.:14:46.

or my country of origin, it is so personal, when did we get to this

:14:47.:14:50.

place? It can't be like this and I won't let them win, but I have to

:14:51.:14:54.

say, it is disheartening, hugely disheartening that it has been so

:14:55.:14:56.

vile. OK, what happens to you now? You

:14:57.:15:00.

have been through this extraordinary battle. It has been to the Supreme

:15:01.:15:03.

Court, what next? I will go back to doing what I do in

:15:04.:15:08.

my day job, I'm very active when it comes to the City and the rip office

:15:09.:15:12.

and the charity sector and running my business, I will go back to doing

:15:13.:15:16.

all the things I was doing before. Gene gernings thank you for your

:15:17.:15:17.

time here oon Breakfast, thank you. For many of you, this is the final

:15:18.:15:28.

weather bulletin you watch before going out today. What can people

:15:29.:15:30.

expect? Peter Lawell. Jobs to get through,

:15:31.:15:40.

schools together two. -- people have got jobs to get to.

:15:41.:15:48.

In the south-east and the Midlands, freezing fog. It may lead to some

:15:49.:15:53.

travel disruption. You can find out what is happening on your BBC local

:15:54.:15:59.

radio station. The fact it is freezing fog tells you something

:16:00.:16:04.

about the temperatures. Watch out for slippery surfaces. Roads and

:16:05.:16:11.

pavements alike. Fog in East Anglia, part of the Midlands, heading down

:16:12.:16:15.

towards Southern counties. It is patchy but it is dense. On a par

:16:16.:16:21.

with what we had on Monday. Mild in the south-west. Some sunshine.

:16:22.:16:26.

Patchy fog in the Welsh Marches. Generally speaking, much of Wales is

:16:27.:16:33.

fog free. Fog patches across the Vale of York. The rest of northern

:16:34.:16:37.

England is fine but cold. A cloudy start in Scotland and Northern

:16:38.:16:44.

Ireland. Also windy. Today the winds touching gale force. Especially in

:16:45.:16:50.

the north-west. As for the fog, as we import cloud from -- fog from the

:16:51.:16:57.

low continent, the fog will lift into low cloud. The Midlands and

:16:58.:17:03.

northern England, perhaps it will take into the early part of the

:17:04.:17:06.

afternoon. It will feel cold under this fog. Sunshine Tour south-west

:17:07.:17:12.

England, Wales, the north west Midlands and the Moray Firth.

:17:13.:17:21.

Tonight, a lotto windy conditions towards the West. Breezy across the

:17:22.:17:26.

rest of the UK. Although fog will not be too much of an issue, we're

:17:27.:17:30.

looking at a widespread frost. There will be some drizzle in the morning.

:17:31.:17:35.

Some will see the odd snow flurry. That is how we start tomorrow, on

:17:36.:17:41.

this cold note. Tomorrow, dry weather. The odd snow flurry,

:17:42.:17:46.

drizzle. The wind is coming from the cold continent. Temperature wise,

:17:47.:17:52.

although we're looking at values into low single figures, it will

:17:53.:17:55.

feel colder than that if you are in the wind. Friday, still under this

:17:56.:18:01.

cold wind, a love of dry weather. Atlantic France from the West will

:18:02.:18:06.

introduce rain and milder air. -- Atlantic fronts. Sunday is going to

:18:07.:18:11.

be the best day weather-wise. Thank you.

:18:12.:18:16.

In the last few minutes, we've had a couple of Christmas

:18:17.:18:19.

Still talking about Christmas. Such a big time for the retailers. And

:18:20.:18:29.

now we get a sense of who the winners and losers are. Good

:18:30.:18:30.

morning. WH Smith says like-for-like sales

:18:31.:18:32.

rose 5% boosted by its stores But it's a familiar tale

:18:33.:18:35.

on the high street, where sales fell again,

:18:36.:18:38.

this time, by 3%. Spanish bank Santander says its

:18:39.:18:53.

profit in the UK was down by almost 15%. That is mainly due to the fall

:18:54.:18:57.

in the value of the pound after the Brexit Ford. A better performance in

:18:58.:19:02.

South America helped to improve the British figures. Profits were up

:19:03.:19:11.

just over 4%. ?8 billion was wiped off the value of BT yesterday. Its

:19:12.:19:16.

shares slumped by 20% because of in -- accounting scandal in Italy.

:19:17.:19:21.

Problems with BT's Italian business were found to be much worse

:19:22.:19:24.

than first thought, including misreporting profits

:19:25.:19:25.

BT has fired its Italian management team, but British boss Gavin

:19:26.:19:30.

Patterson will face questions over how the problems occurred

:19:31.:19:33.

Having to wear high heels, make-up, shorter skirts

:19:34.:19:50.

or even dying their hair - those are just some examples

:19:51.:19:52.

of what women say they have been asked to do for their job.

:19:53.:19:55.

Now MPs are calling on the government to take action

:19:56.:19:58.

Let's take a look at some of the stories they were told.

:19:59.:20:02.

One air hostess described feeling humiliated due

:20:03.:20:03.

to company uniform policy, adding that there was one set

:20:04.:20:06.

of clothing rules for men, and a different one for women.

:20:07.:20:09.

Another woman working in a jewellery store said wearing high heels

:20:10.:20:13.

While a retail worker told MPs she was offended

:20:14.:20:18.

by company dress rules, which she said attracted

:20:19.:20:21.

unwanted attention from customers. For more on this, let's

:20:22.:20:23.

talk to Nicola Thorp, who launched the petition

:20:24.:20:25.

to parliament after her experience of dress code discrimination.

:20:26.:20:28.

And we're also joined by Ann Francke, chief executive of

:20:29.:20:32.

the Chartered Management Institute, which promotes best practice

:20:33.:20:34.

Nicola, can you run bus through what exactly happened to you and what was

:20:35.:20:51.

the process he went through? Last year, I turned for my first day as a

:20:52.:20:57.

receptionist at an accountancy firm in London. I turned up in the usual

:20:58.:21:04.

uniform, issued and smart flat shoes. I was told it was company

:21:05.:21:08.

policy that I have to wear high heels for the day's work. I refused,

:21:09.:21:15.

so I was sent home. They wanted you to go out and buy these issues? Yes,

:21:16.:21:20.

they said the only way I could work that day was with fight went out and

:21:21.:21:26.

bought a pair of shoes. -- if I went out. I was sent home. Wide did they

:21:27.:21:32.

think you had to wear high heels, because of the impression they felt

:21:33.:21:36.

you should be giving? That's what they said. They said it was an

:21:37.:21:41.

industrywide practice. I saw women working higher up in the accountancy

:21:42.:21:45.

firm wearing flat shoes. I said, it's obviously not for everybody in

:21:46.:21:49.

this company at a higher level, so why are you asking us to wear them?

:21:50.:21:54.

'S turned out because the agency I had worked for, insisted that all

:21:55.:22:00.

girls wore flat, sorry, high heel shoes and Magog. A items of Magog.

:22:01.:22:13.

-- make-ups. I suggested the dress code was sexist. I was laughed out

:22:14.:22:19.

of the building. Right. And, she is not alone. You have looked at this

:22:20.:22:22.

sort of thing. What have you been finding? What we found is that

:22:23.:22:28.

gender discrimination is still widespread. Four out of five

:22:29.:22:32.

managers have experienced it in the workplace in the last year. There

:22:33.:22:36.

are the dress code examples, equally there are inappropriate remarks,

:22:37.:22:42.

interrupting me to -- women at meetings and a lack of promotion and

:22:43.:22:47.

unequal pay. Quite a lot to be done still. A lot of people get involved

:22:48.:22:53.

in this as well. They are contacting the programme. Wendy, I may be old

:22:54.:22:56.

school but dress code should apply. They don't need to be sexist but

:22:57.:23:01.

create a better attitude. There can be a dress code across the sexes. I

:23:02.:23:09.

agree that dress codes are important for business. They puff -- project a

:23:10.:23:15.

professional image. But in my case and that of thousands of other

:23:16.:23:18.

women, they were being told they needed to look attractive to do

:23:19.:23:22.

their job. Their male counterparts were not being told the same thing.

:23:23.:23:32.

Things have changed with regard to companies. What you think needs to

:23:33.:23:39.

change? How do attitudes change? Absolutely it is a cultural issue.

:23:40.:23:43.

We think that men need to become more involved as role models. We

:23:44.:23:48.

know the majority of men support gender equality in the workplace.

:23:49.:23:54.

80% to support this. What we want is for men and women to call out these

:23:55.:24:00.

bad examples, be they of behaviour, dress codes, like a promotional

:24:01.:24:05.

opportunity. And we want companies to follow best practice. We do have

:24:06.:24:11.

a website where you can go and look and see what others are doing to

:24:12.:24:18.

tackle this issue. Nicola, what do you feel about the publicity your

:24:19.:24:22.

case has attracted and the fact we are talking about it here? Summary

:24:23.:24:27.

people seem to have a view. It is fantastic. Hundreds of women have,

:24:28.:24:33.

ride the woodwork and said, this has happened to me. I didn't feel like I

:24:34.:24:41.

could bring it up at work. A lot of these women are on zero hours

:24:42.:24:45.

contracts or are temporary workers. Even women and contracts were scared

:24:46.:24:50.

of losing their livelihoods. The current structure, legally, benefits

:24:51.:24:53.

the employers because the penalty isn't big enough to scare them into

:24:54.:24:57.

following dress code laws. What they do is they say to women, you have to

:24:58.:25:01.

do this, you have to wear that, because the likelihood of women --

:25:02.:25:06.

woman painter Take That employer to a tribunal is very low. They get

:25:07.:25:11.

away with it. -- and woman paying to take that employer to a tribunal.

:25:12.:25:18.

Let's pick-up on that point about calling out. That is uncomfortable,

:25:19.:25:27.

isn't it? It is an uncomfortable place but I would encourage people

:25:28.:25:31.

to come forward as Nicola has done because that is how we will change

:25:32.:25:35.

the culture, when people see it is no longer acceptable to behave that

:25:36.:25:42.

way. A gender balanced workplace is a better workplace. It is more

:25:43.:25:46.

productive, it is happier. There are very good commercial reasons for

:25:47.:25:51.

ending discrimination. Let me read some more texts. Sanders says she

:25:52.:25:58.

has to wear white shirt and a tie serving food in a busy environment.

:25:59.:26:01.

It will be a nightmare in the summer when it is hot. Trudy says, surely

:26:02.:26:08.

it is more about not sexualising dress, asking staff to be smart is

:26:09.:26:12.

not the same as asking a woman to wear high heels and lipstick. Would

:26:13.:26:17.

you expect a man to wear something that draws attention to their

:26:18.:26:23.

bodies? That's the point. It can't be discriminatory. It is fine if you

:26:24.:26:27.

are in a hairdressers and you have to wear all black because you want

:26:28.:26:31.

to project a cool image. Or if you are serving food and the uniform is

:26:32.:26:39.

white with a black tie. But sexualising women is wrong. Do you

:26:40.:26:44.

think things are changing? Absolutely. After the petition and

:26:45.:26:47.

the media coverage, I'm grateful that people are debating this.

:26:48.:26:53.

Hopefully now employers will think twice. Thank you. Now the news where

:26:54.:26:59.

you are. Hello, this is Breakfast

:27:00.:30:18.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. The woman who launched a successful

:30:19.:30:44.

legal challenge over Brexiteers told this programme that it is time

:30:45.:30:47.

for... MPs have increased pressure

:30:48.:30:49.

on Theresa May to set out her The demands for a white paper,

:30:50.:30:51.

including from some Conservatives, follow yesterday's Supreme Court

:30:52.:30:55.

ruling. Jamila, the lead claimant in the

:30:56.:30:59.

Brexit case which went to the Supreme Court, told us that it is

:31:00.:31:04.

now up to politicians to hold the government to account. We need to

:31:05.:31:09.

look at what is going to happen in the future but we have not had that

:31:10.:31:14.

debate. My case was to ensure that the Constitution stands and that

:31:15.:31:17.

governments can actually make sure that they are answerable to

:31:18.:31:19.

Parliament. President Trump is reportedly

:31:20.:31:21.

preparing to sign several executive orders aimed

:31:22.:31:23.

at restricting immigration. It's expected he'll announce

:31:24.:31:24.

plans for a wall along the US border with Mexico,

:31:25.:31:27.

one of his key election pledges. Reports from Washington say he's

:31:28.:31:30.

also planning to tighten visa regulations from seven Middle East

:31:31.:31:32.

and African countries. Women in the workplace

:31:33.:31:35.

are being told what to wear, how to have their hair and how much

:31:36.:31:39.

make-up they need to put on, according to a report

:31:40.:31:42.

into office discrimination. MPs began an inquiry,

:31:43.:31:46.

after a receptionist was sent home They heard examples of sexism

:31:47.:31:48.

from hundreds of women. The problem is that indirect

:31:49.:31:57.

discrimination can be justified, if the employer says

:31:58.:32:02.

it is reasonably necessary in pursuit of a legitimate aim,

:32:03.:32:05.

and tribunals can find differently So we need more test cases

:32:06.:32:07.

so the law's clarified The screening age for bowel

:32:08.:32:15.

cancer in England, Wales and Northern Ireland should be

:32:16.:32:18.

reduced to 50 years old, according to the charity,

:32:19.:32:20.

Beating Bowel Cancer. Scotland is the only part of the UK

:32:21.:32:22.

which screens from the age of 50. The charity says that if the other

:32:23.:32:26.

nations came into line, 4000 patients a year

:32:27.:32:28.

would have the opportunity Ten or 15 years ago,

:32:29.:32:30.

a quarter of patients were coming It's a lot of radical

:32:31.:32:37.

and morbid surgery. Treating them earlier can now

:32:38.:32:47.

be done a lot simpler. We very often use keyhole types

:32:48.:32:52.

of surgery, and they can avoid things like chemotherapy,

:32:53.:32:55.

so that's the way forward. David Cameron has been

:32:56.:32:57.

appointed president In an article in the Times, he says

:32:58.:32:59.

research into cancer and stroke deserve all their funding,

:33:00.:33:06.

but that dementia shouldn't His new role is the second formal

:33:07.:33:08.

position he has taken They have waited for nearly 20

:33:09.:33:13.

years, but finally Japan has a sumo 30-year-old Kisenosato

:33:14.:33:23.

is the sport's new champion, The last time a Japanese wrestler

:33:24.:33:28.

won the title was in 1998. The last four grand champions have

:33:29.:33:38.

all been from Mongolia. Look at that. Incredible, aren't

:33:39.:33:52.

they? That is one way of describing it.

:33:53.:33:56.

Impressive, maybe. Have you ever seen a live?

:33:57.:34:01.

No. Wow. Often it is the noise and the

:34:02.:34:06.

smell that gets you, but with sumo, it is the noise. When they

:34:07.:34:10.

connect... I'm going to watch it.

:34:11.:34:21.

We will be with you until the end of the programme.

:34:22.:34:22.

Victoria Derbyshire is on at nine o'clock this morning on BBC Two.

:34:23.:34:27.

Let's find out what is on the programme. This morning, the

:34:28.:34:33.

domestic file and is victim on the run from her abusive ex-husband says

:34:34.:34:36.

that she was put at risk of being murdered after a social worker

:34:37.:34:39.

disclosed the location of her safe eyes twice. Eventually policed

:34:40.:34:47.

advice to drop investigation into her ex because they could not

:34:48.:34:53.

guarantee her safety. They said it was impossible to safeguard us and

:34:54.:34:57.

keep our address safe. He said, ultimately losing your life is not

:34:58.:35:00.

worth seeking justice and ultimately, that will happen.

:35:01.:35:07.

Exquisitely after Breakfast, on the BBC news channel, BBC Two and

:35:08.:35:10.

online. -- exclusively after Breakfast.

:35:11.:35:15.

And coming up here on Breakfast this morning...

:35:16.:35:18.

If you think you know your British history, then think again.

:35:19.:35:20.

Historian Lucy Worsley will be here to separate fact

:35:21.:35:22.

from fiction, as she tackles the nation's biggest fibs.

:35:23.:35:25.

We'll be discussing how to get more women in Parliament,

:35:26.:35:27.

as a survey of female MPs reveals the levels of online, verbal

:35:28.:35:30.

And she has one husband, nine children and 1,000 sheep.

:35:31.:35:38.

We'll meet Amanda Owen, also known as the 'Yorkshire Shepherdess'.

:35:39.:35:42.

I love that on the front page of her book it says, mother of eight

:35:43.:35:48.

children. She has had one since then totting it up to nine. An amazing

:35:49.:35:53.

lady. Never mind herding sheep, she is

:35:54.:35:56.

probably hurting children the whole time!

:35:57.:36:01.

And she doesn't even stay in hospital. As soon as she has the

:36:02.:36:04.

kid, she is back at home and the next day she has the baby strapped

:36:05.:36:07.

on her back, and she is out working again.

:36:08.:36:13.

That is impressive. We're going to talk about Johanna Konta in a second

:36:14.:36:19.

but first, rugby. You have seen the trails for the Six Nations on the

:36:20.:36:21.

BBC? Well, after 105 caps for Wales,

:36:22.:36:27.

Alun Wyn Jones is preparing to take on a new challenge

:36:28.:36:29.

as his country's captain. He takes up the helm

:36:30.:36:32.

for Wales' Six Nations opener We can talk to him now from this

:36:33.:36:34.

year's tournament launch in London. Good morning to you. You are taking

:36:35.:36:41.

over the captaincy from Sam Walker tin and another has been a lot of

:36:42.:36:44.

chat about this. You have done this all before. How tricky and act is to

:36:45.:36:51.

follow? -- how tricky and act is he to follow him out there has been a

:36:52.:36:57.

lot said about his success as a captain, but for me and the Welsh

:36:58.:37:02.

team, he is still a part of that. It is not the case of passing on the

:37:03.:37:07.

baton, it is a case of moving on and evolving. From myself, on an

:37:08.:37:10.

individual point, I have the captaincy but hopefully people will

:37:11.:37:14.

be talking about the team on the weekend. You have Italy a week on

:37:15.:37:18.

Sunday. How do you rate Wales' chances? It will be a tough opening

:37:19.:37:24.

game away against a passionate Italian side. As is always the case.

:37:25.:37:29.

Any team wants to get off to a flying start, as it were, to get

:37:30.:37:34.

some points on the board and make it a good competition. Who is the team

:37:35.:37:42.

to beat? I think you probably know the answer, but when you are

:37:43.:37:45.

altogether, and there is one team you really want to beat, who might

:37:46.:37:52.

that be? More so for the success of last year, I have to say the English

:37:53.:37:59.

side, who are well out in front at the moment for obvious reasons. You

:38:00.:38:05.

don't want to discount a French side with things to prove. Or a Scotland

:38:06.:38:10.

side on the cusp of something good at the domestic level with the

:38:11.:38:13.

players they have coming through. It is going to be an entertaining

:38:14.:38:18.

situation. Being a coach, Eddie Jones, has limited the amount of

:38:19.:38:21.

time that players can use their mobile phones. They are doing clever

:38:22.:38:25.

little things with using a vision coach to improve their vision. What

:38:26.:38:31.

Wales doing? Do you have anything up your sleeves? Well... You are not

:38:32.:38:42.

going to tell me, are you? I wouldn't tell you anyway. But a lot

:38:43.:38:47.

has been said about the way that we play, and the things that we have or

:38:48.:38:55.

haven't done. The more we do with the ball, the better. One of the

:38:56.:39:01.

things you have done in the past is used is very, very cold cryotherapy

:39:02.:39:04.

chambers, where it is something like -110 degrees at times. You still

:39:05.:39:12.

doing that? We have a facility back at the Vale in Cardiff, which we use

:39:13.:39:17.

quite frequently, sometimes three times a day. When Warren Gatland is

:39:18.:39:25.

in situ, he is a big believer in that. We use it when required. We

:39:26.:39:32.

might have a week off to your or they are, to get the slingshot when

:39:33.:39:39.

you go into -140, and it is not the boys' favourite, but if you buy into

:39:40.:39:42.

it, you reap the rewards. I bet it feels positively tropical where you

:39:43.:39:48.

are this morning. The very best of luck.

:39:49.:39:53.

It did look really cold. It is always a sign that the

:39:54.:39:58.

sporting year has started. The Australian Open, into the Six

:39:59.:39:59.

Nations and we are up and running. British Number One, Johanna Konta,

:40:00.:40:04.

is out of the Australian Open. She was outplayed 6-2,

:40:05.:40:07.

6-3 in the quarter finals by six-time champion,

:40:08.:40:09.

Serena Williams. Konta had been on a nine-match

:40:10.:40:12.

winning streak but came up short The American won in just over

:40:13.:40:15.

an hour and is now two victories away from claiming an Open-era

:40:16.:40:19.

record 23rd major title. I think, overall, she played

:40:20.:40:23.

at a higher level than I did today, and I think she showed why

:40:24.:40:27.

she is arguably one So I think, yeah, I really

:40:28.:40:29.

enjoyed my time out there Well, I hope I'll be able to bring

:40:30.:40:35.

a lot away from it, and think I'll be able to reuse,

:40:36.:40:49.

and hopefully I'll get a chance to play her again,

:40:50.:40:51.

and for other matches as well. Sir Alex Ferguson thinks

:40:52.:40:56.

Jose Mourinho is getting to grips with being Manchester United

:40:57.:40:58.

manager. United are still in both

:40:59.:40:59.

Domestic Cup competitions and the Europa League but are sixth

:41:00.:41:01.

in the Premier League, Ferguson says Mourinho has settled

:41:02.:41:04.

into the job after a turbulent start I think that Jose is finding

:41:05.:41:21.

solutions now. There was a period earlier in the season where he was

:41:22.:41:24.

not getting those solutions and his emotions boiled over. And he is an

:41:25.:41:28.

emotional guy. But now you see him, he is calm and in control. That is

:41:29.:41:31.

the obvious observation I am making of the team now.

:41:32.:41:42.

The team is all about the manager. They are playing with determination

:41:43.:41:48.

and the will to win, which is important.

:41:49.:41:52.

There is a man that you want to approve of you. At this point, it

:41:53.:42:00.

seems like Mourinho is gathering things together and for him to say

:42:01.:42:04.

this about him has to be a real boost.

:42:05.:42:06.

It is going to be fascinating to see the next few days.

:42:07.:42:09.

Who knows what might happen at the end of the season?

:42:10.:42:15.

Let's see you later on. Don't get dolled up.

:42:16.:42:18.

It may take all day. From the War of the Roses,

:42:19.:42:22.

to the Battle of the Boyne, there are some defining moments

:42:23.:42:25.

in British history that we have But could what we thought was fact,

:42:26.:42:28.

turn out to be fiction? The historian Lucy Worsley has been

:42:29.:42:37.

seeing if she can get to the truth in her new series,

:42:38.:42:39.

'British History's Biggest Fibs'. Before we talk to her,

:42:40.:42:42.

let's get her take on what happened at the Battle of Bosworth,

:42:43.:42:45.

when Henry Tudor defeated King Richard III goes into battle

:42:46.:42:51.

wearing a crown, a symbol of what is at stake that day. Britain declares,

:42:52.:42:59.

this day I will die as King or I will win. -- Richard declared. Even

:43:00.:43:04.

his enemies admit that he fights originally. Richard gets within a

:43:05.:43:08.

swords length of Henry Tudor but the enemy forces overwhelm them. In

:43:09.:43:14.

desperation, he cries out, my horse, my horse, my kingdom for a horse.

:43:15.:43:19.

And then he's killed with a blow to the head, and he loses his crown.

:43:20.:43:29.

After Henry's victory, Richard's crown is discovered in a hawthorn

:43:30.:43:36.

bush and Henry is crowned with it on the battlefield. Now how much of

:43:37.:43:47.

this really happened? It is impossible to say. But the reason

:43:48.:43:53.

that this is the story we now is because it is the one that Henry

:43:54.:43:54.

wanted us to remember. Without the crown, sadly. But you

:43:55.:44:04.

got to dress up in all sorts of outfits for this. I think it was

:44:05.:44:08.

debunking what we thought we knew about history because once you look

:44:09.:44:11.

into it, there is all sorts of interesting theories about what

:44:12.:44:15.

really went on. That is our aim. And it seemed the right time to do this,

:44:16.:44:19.

with everyone talking about living in a post truth age. Alternative

:44:20.:44:24.

facts and fake news, well, the Tudors were added 500 years ago.

:44:25.:44:30.

What we have tried to do is just picked the story that everyone

:44:31.:44:33.

thinks they know, which is partly to do with the propaganda genius of

:44:34.:44:37.

Henry Tudor and also he was lucky that William Shakespeare came along

:44:38.:44:41.

and sort of solidified the Tudors winning version of events. One of

:44:42.:44:46.

the most controversial part of history that you deal with in this

:44:47.:44:49.

series is the glorious Revolution. People of the 17th century where

:44:50.:44:54.

William of orange comes and takes over James II. What did we think

:44:55.:44:59.

that we knew and what do we know now? This is really, really

:45:00.:45:04.

interesting as a historical conundrum. Lots of younger people

:45:05.:45:07.

don't even know what the glorious Revolution is supposed to be because

:45:08.:45:10.

it is not such a big thing in what people learn about history any more.

:45:11.:45:14.

But it was a key moment where King James II got knocked off the throne

:45:15.:45:19.

by the Protestant William III. If you are English ROM is great and

:45:20.:45:24.

this is good, a triumph for Protestantism and the foundation of

:45:25.:45:27.

Parliamentary democracy. But if you are Welsh and Scottish, is not a

:45:28.:45:33.

good guy, he is the bad guy, the one who enforces the regime with lots of

:45:34.:45:39.

violence at the Battle of the Boyne, the clan MacDonald in Scotland. He

:45:40.:45:42.

is such a controversial figure to this day.

:45:43.:45:46.

The old thing that people say is that history is written by the

:45:47.:45:52.

victors, so how do you know, how do you go back and actually decipher

:45:53.:45:56.

what did happen? Well, you just look at sources from the time, so with

:45:57.:46:01.

Henry Tudor, for example, there was an historian who worked for both

:46:02.:46:07.

King Richard III and then for Henry Chuter, and you look what he was

:46:08.:46:11.

writing about Richard III, he says he was splendid man, and then the

:46:12.:46:17.

same man writing under Henry chewed, he said Richard III was terrible, he

:46:18.:46:23.

was born with talons, he came out of the womb seriously deformed. So

:46:24.:46:32.

which is true? Well, that's the trouble, and my conclusion is that

:46:33.:46:36.

this is my version, I am telling you this now in 2017, in five years'

:46:37.:46:39.

time another historian will be telling you something different, so

:46:40.:46:43.

what I want people to take away is the question things, to try and work

:46:44.:46:47.

out what somebody's agenda is when they're talking to you. That is not

:46:48.:46:51.

just history, that is a really important life skill. So assess the

:46:52.:46:56.

sources and check the validity of them. We have a picture of it, in

:46:57.:47:01.

doing this, you get to dress up in all sorts of outfits. I do. There I

:47:02.:47:06.

am modelling one of the most impressive pieces of branding in the

:47:07.:47:10.

whole of history, the Tudor Rose. Everybody knows what the chewed

:47:11.:47:15.

roses, they think it is red and white together, and that represents

:47:16.:47:20.

the union of the houses of York and Lancaster, when Henry married

:47:21.:47:24.

Elizabeth of York, everyone thinks it is a peaceful process. They were

:47:25.:47:28.

wearing these different flowers on the battlefield, actually flowers

:47:29.:47:33.

business was invented later. It is a shame! And then really, really

:47:34.:47:38.

powerfully picked up, reproduced in chewed architecture and in

:47:39.:47:41.

portraiture and iconography but is not quite what it says on the tin.

:47:42.:47:49.

As historians, do you argue? Oh, constantly, that's the joy of it.

:47:50.:47:54.

It's a team effort, and what you do is use a lot of reach a consensus

:47:55.:47:57.

amongst yourselves and then five years later someone says, hang on,

:47:58.:48:02.

you got it wrong. It's constantly evolving. In history, suppose there

:48:03.:48:08.

were the modern-day version of spin doctors and propaganda, and all

:48:09.:48:11.

those people trying to make things out to be slightly more attractive

:48:12.:48:14.

than they were, almost change the course of history a little bit? Yes,

:48:15.:48:21.

exactly. A sneaky bit of power we have as historians, we can change

:48:22.:48:24.

the course of history because we get to write it. You talk about it being

:48:25.:48:29.

a good time in some ways to be questioning and looking back, in

:48:30.:48:35.

where we are now in the modern era? This has really come up just these

:48:36.:48:39.

words, we didn't talk about fake news a year ago, did we? It just

:48:40.:48:43.

seemed like a very important time with politics and world events and

:48:44.:48:47.

everything to try to open the eyes of people to what is being told. And

:48:48.:48:53.

the conclusions are, keep looking at the sources, is that the kind of

:48:54.:48:56.

thing you recommend people? Guest, ask yourselves, is this person

:48:57.:49:02.

fibbing? People do it all the time, the very good reason sometimes, they

:49:03.:49:05.

might be trying to promote a particular cause you are trying to

:49:06.:49:09.

support and you might believe in but they are still feeding. I wonder if

:49:10.:49:12.

we will ever learn the lessons of history or we will keep making the

:49:13.:49:15.

same mistakes again and again and again. It is not necessarily about

:49:16.:49:21.

the past but how you behave in the present, I think. I want to make

:49:22.:49:27.

people more analytical, and once you understand something, this is what

:49:28.:49:30.

is regret about history, if you can understand where people are coming

:49:31.:49:33.

from, then you can empathise, and that makes you more tolerant of

:49:34.:49:37.

their funny little foibles and weaknesses and makes the world a

:49:38.:49:43.

better place. Very wise. Lucy, thank you imagined Deed. We like a bit of

:49:44.:49:46.

philosophy as well as history on BBC breakfast.

:49:47.:49:49.

'British History's Biggest Fibs' starts on BBC Four at 9pm tomorrow.

:49:50.:49:54.

It is cold again. Carol has got the details.

:49:55.:50:01.

I have also got some fabulous Weather Watch pictures. Cold and

:50:02.:50:11.

frosty, a bit of missed here and there. Then we run into the fog.

:50:12.:50:20.

Because of the fog, there may well be some travel disruption just for

:50:21.:50:24.

the next couple of hours, it is freezing fog, that gives you a clue

:50:25.:50:28.

as to what the temperature is like outside, particularly across England

:50:29.:50:30.

and parts of Wales. This is where we currently have the fog and some of

:50:31.:50:35.

it is still dense. It is on a par with the fog we had on Monday.

:50:36.:50:39.

Elsewhere, though, we don't have so much of an issue, there is some

:50:40.:50:43.

around but not as dense. Through the morning as we start to import cloud

:50:44.:50:49.

from the near continent, the fog will lift. In the south-west,

:50:50.:50:53.

beautiful start today, much milder, some sunshine. Sunshine across Wales

:50:54.:50:58.

but we lose the fog across the Welsh marshes. Then back into the sunshine

:50:59.:51:05.

as we creep into the north of Inman. For Northern Ireland and Scotland,

:51:06.:51:08.

we are looking at a cloudy start with some sunny breaks and mild. Out

:51:09.:51:13.

towards the west today, it will be windy, particularly the north-west

:51:14.:51:21.

where we are looking at Gales, even severe gales. In the sunshine, it

:51:22.:51:25.

will be a beautiful day, cold, crisp and rather pleasant. For the time of

:51:26.:51:32.

year. In the evening and overnight, not so much of an issue with fog,

:51:33.:51:35.

the breeze picking up, still windy out towards the West, some dampness

:51:36.:51:39.

in the air, so a little bit of drizzle, some of us seeing a flurry

:51:40.:51:43.

or two of snow and a widespread frost, so tomorrow morning, like

:51:44.:51:48.

this morning, watch out for eyes on untreated surfaces. Tomorrow on that

:51:49.:51:56.

note we start off, potential for an order of snow flurry or two, not

:51:57.:52:00.

enough to build a snowman or sledging. Some sunshine but it will

:52:01.:52:04.

feel better. In London, the maximum temperature will get up to five

:52:05.:52:08.

Celsius but in the wind it will feel more like one. In Newcastle, the

:52:09.:52:11.

maximum temperature will be won but it will feel more like minus five.

:52:12.:52:16.

On Friday we are still in this regime of the cold South East coming

:52:17.:52:18.

from from the continent. As we go through the weekend, it

:52:19.:52:31.

will be less chilly than it has been.

:52:32.:52:36.

Thank you. We have had to let Sally go to get ready already for the

:52:37.:52:43.

National television awards. She doesn't take that long! She has

:52:44.:52:48.

already started stripping her hair, getting ready.

:52:49.:52:52.

It's a big night tonight, as we are in the running

:52:53.:52:55.

It has been a pretty busy 12 months for us on breakfast. Let's have a

:52:56.:52:59.

reminder of what we have been up to. This is breakfast with neck and

:53:00.:53:10.

chatty and Charlie Stayt. What an incredible year 2016 has been.

:53:11.:53:18.

Lovely face! I feel so short. I can see Charlie

:53:19.:53:38.

speaking up behind me. I have always wanted to do this. It is very

:53:39.:53:47.

comforting. Now, stop! We've very clearly run the wrong pictures. Some

:53:48.:53:51.

people said it was a slice of Battenberg. I can touch and

:53:52.:53:54.

everything, he's real! Come on! Now, so many skills. Yes, and

:53:55.:54:07.

massive failures as well. Thank you for all of those who have voted so

:54:08.:54:12.

far. If you would like to do so, you can do so.

:54:13.:54:13.

Voting is open until midday today at nationaltvawards.com

:54:14.:54:17.

We appreciate you watching, if you want to vote, that is a bonus.

:54:18.:54:26.

Awards mean nothing, honestly! Thank you for being with us.

:54:27.:54:30.

A number of female MPs have told the BBC that they've received

:54:31.:54:33.

physical and verbal threats, and fear for their safety

:54:34.:54:35.

following the death of the Labour MP, Jo Cox.

:54:36.:54:38.

In a survey by BBC Radio 5Live, some said they'd also experienced

:54:39.:54:41.

sexist language in the Commons, and even considered

:54:42.:54:42.

At a time when more women are being encouraged

:54:43.:54:46.

to go into politics, how off-putting is this?

:54:47.:54:47.

Our political correspondent Ellie Price has been finding out.

:54:48.:54:54.

It wasn't easy getting women the vote. It took even longer to get

:54:55.:55:01.

women into Parliament. The first female MP to take her seat, Nancy

:55:02.:55:08.

Astor, was elected 98 years ago. Eventually more would follow. It

:55:09.:55:13.

gives me the greatest pleasure to introduce to you the new National

:55:14.:55:19.

Unionist women members. Back then, of course, they didn't have social

:55:20.:55:25.

media, unlike the 195 female MPs today. Right, so, what you're

:55:26.:55:31.

looking at our tweets, the abusive tweets that my team screenshot. She

:55:32.:55:39.

won't read the abuse she receives online, which is just as well, it is

:55:40.:55:43.

deeply personal, she doesn't really want to share it. It takes a lot of

:55:44.:55:48.

strength not to. It is very tempting if you're alone at night and nobody

:55:49.:55:51.

can see you, if you get upset and you cry just have a look, but why

:55:52.:55:56.

would I do that to myself? I have to say, I very much see the silver

:55:57.:56:02.

lining in not getting re-elected, the silver lining being that I may

:56:03.:56:05.

never have to put up with that sort of abuse again in my life, because

:56:06.:56:10.

it doesn't happen unless you've got some kind of high-profile. And then

:56:11.:56:14.

people think they have carte blanche to just call you whatever they want

:56:15.:56:19.

to call you. But it is not just hurtful insults on social media,

:56:20.:56:23.

there is an even darker side of death threats and violence. Jo Cox

:56:24.:56:27.

was murdered outside her constituency surgery last June. Two

:56:28.:56:31.

thirds of female MPs which spoke to said they have felt less safe ever

:56:32.:56:35.

since. Well over half have received a physical threat from a member of

:56:36.:56:40.

the public. This is the room where I hold my surgeries. Begrudgingly, she

:56:41.:56:46.

now make sure she has security whenever she holds surgeries. This

:56:47.:56:52.

building is a secure building, there is a police presence outside, the

:56:53.:56:56.

staff are very supportive so I do feel safer here. It was one of my

:56:57.:57:00.

staff members who opened the letter, quite a young staff member, and I

:57:01.:57:05.

felt very sorry for the person who opened it and have this letter

:57:06.:57:08.

saying they wanted to picture me, but chew my family, and then quickly

:57:09.:57:12.

the office got in touch with me and said we need to report this to the

:57:13.:57:15.

police and took swift action. The police were very quick to respond

:57:16.:57:19.

and it just made me think, who has the time to sit and write a letter

:57:20.:57:24.

to an MP, saying I want to kill you and your family? It all p rather a

:57:25.:57:28.

grim picture, and certainly the majority of MPs we spoke to say they

:57:29.:57:32.

are concerned about hearing this sort of abuse method of good people,

:57:33.:57:36.

good new women from wanting to become MPs. In fact a third of those

:57:37.:57:41.

we have heard from said they have considered giving up their jobs here

:57:42.:57:44.

in Parliament because of it, and yet none have. The majority we heard

:57:45.:57:48.

from said despite the difficulties the job is a privilege, and well

:57:49.:57:53.

worth the flak. Ellie Price, BBC News, Westminster.

:57:54.:57:55.

Joining us now is Lesley Abdela, a journalist and campaigner

:57:56.:57:57.

You've been trying for a long time to get more women into Parliament.

:57:58.:58:05.

What do you think it is? We have seen some of the reasons there, how

:58:06.:58:09.

distressing is it that people are being put off into that job because

:58:10.:58:13.

of what we have been talking about? I think it's very sad, more than

:58:14.:58:17.

sad, I think it's shocking. They have always been threats over the

:58:18.:58:21.

years in different ways. It used to be the IRA when I stood as a

:58:22.:58:25.

candidate back in 1979, but I think with twitter and the social networks

:58:26.:58:30.

as we have just seen, it is worse. There are several things we can do

:58:31.:58:34.

that should be being done. I do think there should be a helpline

:58:35.:58:38.

that you can ring immediately or contact immediately if you are

:58:39.:58:43.

getting threats. These are threats. So the Parliamentary authorities

:58:44.:58:49.

should be more protective, supportive, and the police, as well.

:58:50.:58:53.

People haven't caught up with the new threats. I work in a lot of

:58:54.:58:57.

different countries with women in politics, and the intimidation is a

:58:58.:59:03.

big problem, and it's getting worse, not just for women, but everyone,

:59:04.:59:08.

but particularly aimed at women. On the other hand, we have more women

:59:09.:59:11.

now in parliament that we have ever had before. So interesting, watching

:59:12.:59:16.

that piece, because it is not just being scared, that is a huge

:59:17.:59:20.

problem, but the real hurt as well, people really taking a look and

:59:21.:59:25.

thinking, one MP saying I'm not sure I would do this again. It is very

:59:26.:59:30.

damaging to democracy. It is, but also I think what we ought to be a

:59:31.:59:34.

bit careful of, I'm really pleased we have done this survey, but I

:59:35.:59:38.

would like you to have survey G-Men as well as women, because we don't

:59:39.:59:42.

know if they are getting threats as well, maybe different threats, not

:59:43.:59:45.

the same threats, I don't know. But otherwise people think women are

:59:46.:59:50.

being wimpish and whingeing, when they're not, it is serious and it

:59:51.:59:53.

should be addressed, and I know some of the most courageous women, people

:59:54.:59:58.

I have met around the world in hotspots, are women who are not

:59:59.:00:02.

going to be told that you should not have to be put through that. On the

:00:03.:00:08.

other hand, I get letters from young women who are writing dissertations

:00:09.:00:10.

and things and I had one this week, she said I was shocked to find that

:00:11.:00:14.

there are only 30% of our Parliament are women. I thought, shocked! We

:00:15.:00:20.

have spent blood, sweat and tears since 1980 going from 19 women to

:00:21.:00:25.

195, and I thought she's right, she should be shocked. It has gone the

:00:26.:00:28.

right way but we certainly don't want it to move backwards.

:00:29.:00:36.

A number of high-profile female politicians out there, our second

:00:37.:00:46.

e-mail -- female Prime Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, and many others.

:00:47.:00:50.

There are, but we have to watch out because it is going to be a pond

:00:51.:00:55.

shrinking with men scrabbling for the comparatively few seats left. We

:00:56.:01:02.

have to have quotas. But that is a discussion for another day? How

:01:03.:01:06.

would that be permitted? A-lister system? A list system is the best

:01:07.:01:14.

way, like the Swedish have. That way it is the same rules for women and

:01:15.:01:18.

four men and they still have to be elected. It is not just picking

:01:19.:01:23.

women and putting them in there. Of all the countries I have worked in,

:01:24.:01:27.

nearly all the countries with over 40% women, the political parties in

:01:28.:01:31.

one way or another are using some form of temporary equalising action.

:01:32.:01:36.

And in your view, which country is the gold standard? There is no

:01:37.:01:39.

perfect place, but I would say the Nordic countries are high up there,

:01:40.:01:44.

Sweden in particular. I do a lot of work with the Swedes, as colleagues

:01:45.:01:48.

in developing countries. And I would say that Britain is two thirds of

:01:49.:01:53.

the way up the football league of women in politics and Sweden is at

:01:54.:01:57.

the top, with other countries way down. But we should be much higher

:01:58.:02:01.

up. We are 48 in the league of women in politics. Rwanda has over 60%,

:02:02.:02:13.

and Cuba has over 50%. There are 12 countries over 40% and we think it

:02:14.:02:17.

is great to have got to 30%. Yes, it is going the right way but this is

:02:18.:02:23.

2017. When we started in 1980 with 19 women, it was 3%, the same as

:02:24.:02:28.

Afghanistan. We are just about level with Afghanistan now. I think they

:02:29.:02:33.

have 27%, something like that. Very interesting, talking to you. Thank

:02:34.:02:34.

you very much. It's recognisable all over

:02:35.:02:37.

the globe, and the world's most profitable toy business,

:02:38.:02:40.

but Lego is having a problem And it's a problem so big,

:02:41.:02:42.

even the boss can't tell what's real and what's fake,

:02:43.:02:48.

as our Beijing Correspondent Robin Billions and billions of these

:02:49.:02:50.

little plastic bricks have been sold the world over and now Lego

:02:51.:03:02.

is betting big on China. What started out with hand-cut

:03:03.:03:10.

bricks in Denmark in 1949 is now a $100 million state-of-the-art

:03:11.:03:15.

operation near Shanghai but they Copies like this and fakes or

:03:16.:03:17.

counterfeits are prolific in China. Lego is currently suing the firm

:03:18.:03:34.

behind this copycat Star Wnrs model. So how easy is it to

:03:35.:03:37.

spot the difference? We bought a real one and a copycat

:03:38.:03:40.

and asked the experts. If you have to ask me to guess,

:03:41.:03:54.

I would say this one, maybe. The truth is, they look

:03:55.:03:58.

and feel almost identical. The copy's so good, in fact,

:03:59.:04:09.

that even the boss of that huge I would say this is

:04:10.:04:12.

Lego and this is not. Bought from Toys'R'Us yesterday,

:04:13.:04:36.

built by my daughter. It is trying to be Lego,

:04:37.:04:47.

is my assessment of it. Lego's not the only foreign firm

:04:48.:04:52.

investing big in China but having White Evoques like this

:04:53.:04:55.

sell particularly well. But the British firm has been

:04:56.:05:02.

powerless to stop this. Tucked away on a Shanghai side

:05:03.:05:05.

street, this is a Land Wind. It's similar on the inside and very,

:05:06.:05:09.

very similar on the outside This is our copycat

:05:10.:05:12.

that caught people out. You can buy him and the real

:05:13.:05:17.

thing on the huge online They took down thousands of links

:05:18.:05:20.

to copycat Lego products last year alone but the toy maker

:05:21.:05:26.

is still pursuing manufacturers in the courts because even the boss

:05:27.:05:31.

cannot tell the difference. That is one of my favourite pieces

:05:32.:05:40.

on Breakfast this week. I feel the embarrassment, the little

:05:41.:05:44.

look to camera from the Lego boss. He knows he is in trouble.

:05:45.:05:49.

But the amazing thing, the children, the ones we saw at least, were so

:05:50.:05:53.

sure. But that is how close they are.

:05:54.:05:58.

Our next guest is Amanda Owens, but you may

:05:59.:06:00.

know her as The Yorkshire Shepherdess.

:06:01.:06:01.

We'll be speaking more to her in a moment but first a last

:06:02.:06:05.

look at the headlines where you are this morning.

:06:06.:06:08.

I'm just searching for my bits of paper.

:06:09.:07:56.

You need to tidy up, it's a mess! Wife, mum, author, award winner,

:07:57.:07:59.

and social media sensation, The Yorkshire Shepherdess has

:08:00.:08:04.

a follow-up to her best-selling book, this time giving us an insight

:08:05.:08:10.

into a year in her life What goes on month. -- month by

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month. How on earth do you fit everything

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in? On the front cover of the book it says mother of eight but since it

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printed, you are now online. That's right, and there is probably not

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1000 sheep at the moment but I prioritise. I am not wonder mum, I

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am not a smug mother, I just decide what the most important job is

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everyday and I get on with it. You lead a packed life. And it is

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important that the children helped you with the work. Absolutely. Farm

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life, it is really a great way to bring up the children. They run a

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bit wild, the farm is 2000 acres. It is in peat bog, and I see it more as

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a slightly scruffy version of the Darling buds of May, without

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Catherine Zita Jones. People are so interested in the life that you

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lead, because you have these nine kids but you live how far away from

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the nearest hospital? A two hour Drive? Yes. You seem matter-of-fact

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about it but have you had problems getting to hospital? We have had

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issues, but having nine children I have given up on trying to get to

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the hospital. I have done anything from having them in leg byes over

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the North of England is trying to get there, and then with number

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eight, I stayed at home and I did it on my own. My terrier was my birth

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partner. No way. My husband was quite shocked. And you have made a

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really conscious decision to have this country life, inspired by James

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Herriot. Yes, I read his books and I'd just love them. I thought to

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myself, I want to be a vet but academically it was not going to

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happen, so I had to rethink and I borrowed a book called the Hill

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Shepherd, and I read the book and saw pictures. I fell in love with

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the countryside and that kind of lifestyle and I thought, if I can do

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this, I need to leave Huddersfield and go to the countryside. And

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knuckle down and work. And I started at the very bottom, living in a

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caravan. I got myself a dog. And eventually here I am. Doing

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brilliantly, and being an inspiration to many people as well.

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The pictures are beautiful, but there must be tough days. This book

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is about the day-to-day life. It had to be reality. Give me an ideal of a

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-- an idea of a typical day in winter. A couple of weeks ago, the

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forecast was snow and we had proper snow. Snow to our waists in places.

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It was blowing about, and it was about bringing the sheep down to

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safety. It may seem like we have a microclimate, because you have wind

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and lashing rain and it is a tough place to live and work. But we are

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doing what has been done there for generations, carrying on the

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tradition. We are predominantly a sheep farm, and we are looking after

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them as nature intended, farming not intend to play. And you have written

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one book already and what is clear is that people are really interested

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about it, they are interested in your lifestyle, interested in what

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you are doing. I don't know if it is me. I don't see myself as

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particularly interesting, I see myself as an ordinary person who

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lives in an ordinary way. Many people would not see having a child

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and then waking your husband up to see you have had another one as

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ordinary. Britain people have a natural affinity with the

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countryside. Many people are just a generation away from working on the

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land. And people are interested. They want to know about the

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environment, how farming works. It is important and people want to know

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where the food is coming from. That is what we do and I was given the

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opportunity to write. Me being me, I thought to myself, I'll give it a

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go, what is the worst that can happen? I am the kind of person, if

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an opportunity comes along I take it. And that is my message. I have

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not anything to preach, other than you have to give things a shot. You

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have to break stereotypes. I am a woman and I like to be a bit

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glamorous but I spend my life in wellies. And you nearly put the

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device in your washing machine when you were writing it. I nearly put

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the iPad with my manuscript on it in the washing machine with an enormous

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bundle. But you know... You could have written it again. Probably in

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the dust of the living room. I am not a smug mum, I am not a perfect

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mum, I never iron anything. I have a sock chandelier in the living room,

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you look up and everything is drying. The glamour (!). But it is

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about reality. And life in the countryside.

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Amanda's book is called 'A Year in the Life

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Jon and Steph will be here from six tomorrow.

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Until then, thanks for watching and have a great day.

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