26/01/2017 Breakfast


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26/01/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Steph McGovern and Jon Kay.

:00:00.:00:07.

The US President, Donald Trump, has said he believes

:00:08.:00:10.

torture works when dealing with terror suspects.

:00:11.:00:14.

In his first TV interview since taking office,

:00:15.:00:16.

he said the US had to "fight fire with fire".

:00:17.:00:23.

I want to do everything within the bounds of what you are allowed to do

:00:24.:00:30.

legally, but do I feel it works? Absolutely, I feel it works.

:00:31.:00:32.

The PM Theresa May is travelling to Washington to meet Donald Trump

:00:33.:00:36.

and has vowed to renew the UK's special relationship with the USA.

:00:37.:00:49.

She says she isn't afraid to have a candid conversation.

:00:50.:00:53.

Good morning it's Thursday the 26th of January.

:00:54.:00:55.

Children's health in the UK is lagging behind most other

:00:56.:01:02.

European countries, according to a major new report.

:01:03.:01:11.

We will get the latest economic growth figures later. They are

:01:12.:01:16.

expected to show the economy did pretty well at the end of last year,

:01:17.:01:21.

but with rising prices and a fall in the value of the pound, what will

:01:22.:01:23.

the year ahead have in store? In sport, a Wembley

:01:24.:01:25.

final for Southampton. They knock Liverpool

:01:26.:01:27.

out of the League Cup It has taken Tim Peake

:01:28.:01:29.

to space and back. Now the Soyuz capsule

:01:30.:01:34.

is going to be landing in London. Good morning. Today is a cold start

:01:35.:01:50.

to the day. We've also got a fair bit of cloud around. Some of it will

:01:51.:01:54.

break to see some sunshine and a few of us will see some snow. Wherever

:01:55.:01:58.

you are it will feel raw in the wind. More details in 15 minutes or

:01:59.:02:01.

so. The US President Donald Trump has

:02:02.:02:02.

said he believes that torture can work to get information out

:02:03.:02:08.

of suspected terrorists. But he said he would seek further

:02:09.:02:11.

advice before deciding whether to bring back techniques

:02:12.:02:14.

such as water-boarding. Speaking to the American ABC network

:02:15.:02:17.

in his first televised interview since becoming President,

:02:18.:02:19.

he also repeated claims he'd make Mexico pay for a wall along

:02:20.:02:22.

its border with the United States. Here's our Washington

:02:23.:02:26.

correspondent, David Willis. Could America be set for a return to

:02:27.:02:39.

the interrogation methods of old? A draft executive order suggest it is,

:02:40.:02:44.

-- its commander-in-chief could be preparing to return to the dark days

:02:45.:02:51.

of water boarding a reopening the so-called black site prisons

:02:52.:02:55.

operated by the CIA. In his first TV interview since becoming president,

:02:56.:02:58.

Donald Trump made clear he is considering scrapping an order by

:02:59.:03:02.

his predecessor, that terrorist suspects be treated in accordance

:03:03.:03:04.

with international law. Torture works, the president declared. When

:03:05.:03:10.

they are chopping off the heads of our people and other people and

:03:11.:03:13.

chopping off the heads of people because they happen to be a

:03:14.:03:17.

Christian in the Middle East, when Isis is doing things that nobody has

:03:18.:03:20.

heard of since Middle Eastern times, would I feel strongly about water

:03:21.:03:24.

boarding? As far as I'm concerned we have to fight fire with fire.

:03:25.:03:29.

Reports suggest Mr Trump is also due to announce plans to close America's

:03:30.:03:32.

orders to refugees for a period at least and implement tougher visa

:03:33.:03:38.

restrictions on the distance from certain predominantly Muslim nations

:03:39.:03:42.

with links to terrorism, what is known as extreme vetting. In an

:03:43.:03:45.

effort to quell the influx of illegal immigrants from Mexico, is

:03:46.:03:49.

the Trump has signed an executive order to begin work on building a

:03:50.:03:52.

war between the two nations. A multimillion dollar venture that he

:03:53.:03:56.

insist Mexico will be made to pay for. -- building a wall. Ultimately

:03:57.:04:03.

it will come out of what's happening with Mexico and we will stop those

:04:04.:04:07.

negotiations soon and we will be fully versed by Mexico. So they will

:04:08.:04:16.

pay us back? Absolutely, 100%. That has ruffled the feathers of

:04:17.:04:21.

America's seven neighbour. Mexico's president said they have no

:04:22.:04:24.

intention of footing the bill. The Mexican president is due in

:04:25.:04:28.

Washington next week. He faces difficult discussions with an

:04:29.:04:31.

American counterpart clearly determined to reverse many of the

:04:32.:04:34.

changes brought about why Barack Obama. David Willetts, BBC News,

:04:35.:04:38.

Washington. -- Willis. Theresa May will call for a renewed

:04:39.:04:40.

special relationship with the United States,

:04:41.:04:43.

when she addresses Republican A day before she becomes the first

:04:44.:04:45.

international leader to meet President Trump,

:04:46.:04:49.

the Prime Minister will argue for greater co-operation

:04:50.:04:51.

in the fight against terrorism. Our political correspondent

:04:52.:04:55.

Chris Mason is at Westminster. It is an important visit. We will

:04:56.:05:07.

hear special relationship endless is of the coming days. What can we

:05:08.:05:11.

expect? That is the favourite phrase of any British Prime Minister in any

:05:12.:05:16.

era, getting onto any plane and go to the US. We will hear references

:05:17.:05:20.

to the special relationship again and again. Theresa May says it is

:05:21.:05:25.

that relationship that will allow her to be candid in her

:05:26.:05:28.

conversations with President Trump. She set across the Atlantic this

:05:29.:05:32.

morning with a bagful of questions from MPs. They were suggested to her

:05:33.:05:36.

yesterday in the Commons, specifically on torture, for

:05:37.:05:39.

instance, but also on climate change. First stop is Philadelphia,

:05:40.:05:47.

this away day for Republican politicians, the party of the

:05:48.:05:50.

president. We will see the Prime Minister emphasised what she sees as

:05:51.:05:54.

the importance of international organisations like Nato and the UN,

:05:55.:05:59.

that President Trump has been sceptical about. She will also be in

:06:00.:06:11.

the business of making friends. And she will take a Scottish artefact,

:06:12.:06:17.

and old cup. The word dates back to Jaywick, the 17th century. That's a

:06:18.:06:22.

nod to the fact that President Trump's mum grew up in Scotland. All

:06:23.:06:29.

of that is about building bridges, given the team isn't so comp entry

:06:30.:06:32.

about the team, during the election, one of them calling him Trump the

:06:33.:06:39.

chump. And something significant is happening in the building behind

:06:40.:06:44.

you. How significant is it really? What we will get this morning is all

:06:45.:06:49.

things Brexit, because it doesn't go away. We'll get the first detail of

:06:50.:06:56.

the bill that will make its way through Parliament and that's a

:06:57.:06:59.

result of what we heard from the Supreme Court, in a day that will

:07:00.:07:03.

have to be legislation in Parliament in order to start the whole process

:07:04.:07:07.

of divorcing the EU, triggering Article 50. Today we will get the

:07:08.:07:12.

wording of that. It is only the start of the process. We won't get

:07:13.:07:16.

the start of the debate until next week. Thanks for now.

:07:17.:07:18.

Royal Bank of Scotland will take another financial hit

:07:19.:07:20.

for mis-selling risky mortgages in America before the financial

:07:21.:07:23.

The bank, which is more than 70% owned by the taxpayer,

:07:24.:07:29.

could be fined an additional ?3 billion by the US

:07:30.:07:32.

A major report into the health of children in the UK has found

:07:33.:07:43.

an "alarming gap" exists between the rich and poor,

:07:44.:07:48.

with one in five young people suffering as a result of poverty.

:07:49.:07:52.

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health also

:07:53.:07:54.

suggests the UK is lagging behind most western European countries

:07:55.:07:57.

when it comes to measures such as infant mortality

:07:58.:07:59.

Our health correspondent, Dominic Hughes reports.

:08:00.:08:09.

I'm an emotional wreck. Anxiety, depression and a need to be listened

:08:10.:08:17.

to. These are the themes of short play on mental health, devised by

:08:18.:08:21.

school students in Liverpool. The issues they touch on reflect those

:08:22.:08:25.

in the day's report on the health of children and young people and paint

:08:26.:08:29.

a picture of the UK struggling to match other countries and even

:08:30.:08:32.

falling behind. The evidence have been developing for some time that

:08:33.:08:37.

all is not well with children's health. It is the first time we have

:08:38.:08:41.

put together a proper picture of cross all four countries and the

:08:42.:08:45.

news is not good. Some of the issues that raise concerns over the state

:08:46.:08:48.

of child health include just 34% of babies rested to six months, this

:08:49.:08:54.

than half the rate in Norway. 40% of children in England's most deprived

:08:55.:08:58.

areas are overweight or obese and half of adult mental health problems

:08:59.:09:03.

start before the age of 14. And for the drama group in Liverpool, mental

:09:04.:09:08.

health issues are a real priority. Mental illness is an illness of the

:09:09.:09:13.

brain and they are as valid as any other illnesses to any other part of

:09:14.:09:16.

the body. Just because you can't see it physically doesn't mean it isn't

:09:17.:09:20.

there. Our production will mainly be to get rid of that stigma about

:09:21.:09:24.

mental health and just educate the audience a bit more about mental

:09:25.:09:29.

health. The four governments of the UK are all challenged to consider

:09:30.:09:32.

the impact their policies will have on children. They've responded by

:09:33.:09:36.

restating commitments to improve children's health.

:09:37.:09:41.

Ambulance crews are finding it "increasingly difficult to cope",

:09:42.:09:44.

an investigation into the service in England has found.

:09:45.:09:46.

The National Audit Office said rising demand, recruitment

:09:47.:09:48.

problems and wider NHS pressures meant crews were failing

:09:49.:09:51.

The number of cars built in the UK has reached a 17-year high,

:09:52.:10:00.

but investment fell last year amid uncertainty over the future

:10:01.:10:03.

of the economy following the Brexit vote.

:10:04.:10:05.

Around 1.7 million cars rolled off production lines last year

:10:06.:10:08.

Investment in in the -- in the industry fell last year because of

:10:09.:10:19.

continued uncertainty about the economy, following the Brexit vote.

:10:20.:10:21.

Almost half of all hospitals are failing to meet basic government

:10:22.:10:24.

standards for hospital food, according to data released

:10:25.:10:26.

The Campaign for Better Hospital Food warns

:10:27.:10:29.

The government says standards are improving.

:10:30.:10:37.

Ant and Dec won three gongs at the National Television Awards

:10:38.:10:40.

in London last night, while the BBC presenter

:10:41.:10:42.

Graham Norton was recognised for his services to broadcasting.

:10:43.:10:48.

Strictly Come Dancing's Len Goodman, who retired from the show

:10:49.:10:52.

in December, lost out as the public's choice of Best Judge

:10:53.:10:55.

to the Great British Bake-Off's Mary Berry.

:10:56.:11:02.

Please welcome your host for the night! The National Television

:11:03.:11:18.

Awards bring out the great and the good of the television screen. A new

:11:19.:11:21.

category was introduced this year for period drama, won by Call the

:11:22.:11:31.

Midwife. Best comedy went to Mrs Brown's Boys and it was Strictly

:11:32.:11:37.

Come Dancing that got the award for best talent show. Best TV judge went

:11:38.:11:44.

to a very surprised Mary Berry in her final turn on the Great British

:11:45.:11:51.

Bake Off. The first and foremost thing is to be fair, encouraging and

:11:52.:11:56.

honest. Despite our television viewing habits changing, the average

:11:57.:12:01.

household what is about 3.5 hours a day. Nights like these are chance to

:12:02.:12:04.

celebrate the best of what's on the box. Ladies and gentlemen, the

:12:05.:12:09.

nation's heartthrob, Mr Graham Norton! Chatshow host Graham Norton

:12:10.:12:13.

collected the Lifetime Achievement Award. And Ant and Dec won best TV

:12:14.:12:20.

presenter for the 16th year in a row. We are very lucky to have the

:12:21.:12:25.

three shows at the moment and law may it continue! We just want to

:12:26.:12:33.

keep making good telly. Casualty! But the surprise of the night was

:12:34.:12:37.

Casualty was Mac win for best Drama. The Saturday night staple which

:12:38.:12:42.

turned 30 last year. -- for best drama.

:12:43.:12:49.

I think a lot of fun was had, including by our team.

:12:50.:12:55.

Carol is up again this morning working!

:12:56.:12:58.

She is a hero. We need to get all of the gossip.

:12:59.:13:06.

Too right. I've seen some pictures. Not fit for early-morning

:13:07.:13:10.

consumption, I am told. We are talking about the League Cup

:13:11.:13:16.

semi-final last night. Liverpool seem to have lost their mojo.

:13:17.:13:21.

They've only had one win in seven this year. There was all this talk

:13:22.:13:29.

of maybe being the premiership champions, but not looking good at

:13:30.:13:31.

the moment. Southampton beat Liverpool 1-0

:13:32.:13:32.

at Anfield last night to reach 1-0 up from the first leg,

:13:33.:13:35.

Saints spent much of the match defending before before Shane Long

:13:36.:13:39.

scored in injury time. They'll play either Hull

:13:40.:13:42.

or Manchester United who play their second

:13:43.:13:44.

leg semi tonight. 14 years after last week in the

:13:45.:13:51.

Australian Open final, Venus Williams is back. -Year-old

:13:52.:13:55.

seven-time Grand Slam champion beat CoCo Vandeweghe in three sets. She's

:13:56.:14:02.

hoping to see her sister at in the final, because Serena Williams is on

:14:03.:14:05.

court shortly in the other semi-final.

:14:06.:14:06.

Usain Bolt is to lose one of his nine Olympic gold medals,

:14:07.:14:09.

after the International Olympic Committee disqualified his Jamaican

:14:10.:14:11.

relay team-mate Nesta Carter over a doping violation at the Beijing

:14:12.:14:14.

The IOC says Carter tested positive for a banned stimulant,

:14:15.:14:18.

in a re-test of samples from the 2008 Olympics.

:14:19.:14:24.

England rugby union head coach Eddie Jones has named Dylan Hartley

:14:25.:14:28.

as captain of his side for the forthcoming Six Nations.

:14:29.:14:32.

He won't have played for nine weeks before England's opening

:14:33.:14:35.

Six of those due to a ban for striking.

:14:36.:14:46.

You will be with us in a moment to look at the papers. Let's get the

:14:47.:14:52.

gossip from Carol! Ben Blakeley must! You look or just! -- goodness!

:14:53.:14:58.

Spill the beans. You know that what goes on tour

:14:59.:15:02.

stays on tour. We have a bitter wind coming up from

:15:03.:15:14.

the near continent. Temperatures are not as low as yesterday but

:15:15.:15:18.

nonetheless, temperatures below freezing. You can see what is

:15:19.:15:22.

happening today. All this blew across Europe are sure it is cold.

:15:23.:15:26.

With the wind, we are dragging in this air across the shores. I would

:15:27.:15:33.

show you how it will feel against your skin, as well as the

:15:34.:15:38.

temperatures. A lot of cloud around and we could see snowflakes here and

:15:39.:15:41.

there. Nothing too substantial and also drizzle. If you are out early,

:15:42.:15:46.

watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. You can see the

:15:47.:15:49.

temperatures below freezing. Not quite as low as yesterday. For

:15:50.:15:54.

example except in the south-west. Also looking at a cloudy start as we

:15:55.:15:57.

are across Wales and northern England. A pocket of fog but not in

:15:58.:16:02.

the scale of this week. For Scotland, the far north will have

:16:03.:16:06.

the lion 's share of the Sunshine today. For Northern Ireland, a fair

:16:07.:16:10.

bit of clout and dampness in the air. Some drizzle around. -- cloud.

:16:11.:16:15.

Through the rest of the day, you can speak it will still be called. Some

:16:16.:16:20.

of the cloud will break up. -- you can see. A bit of sunshine coming

:16:21.:16:24.

in, especially for Southern counties and Wales. You hang onto it across

:16:25.:16:29.

the North of Scotland. This is how the temperatures will feel against

:16:30.:16:32.

your skin. If you are stepping out in Newcastle, minus six. The wind

:16:33.:16:36.

will be very strong, particularly in the north-west. It will be a windy

:16:37.:16:40.

day out towards the north-west as well. This evening and tomorrow, the

:16:41.:16:45.

wind veers to a northerly direction and you have a set of fronts coming

:16:46.:16:50.

in, this complicated area of low pressure. That will turn the weather

:16:51.:16:55.

more unsettled. Tomorrow, some early flecks of snow across eastern areas.

:16:56.:16:59.

They will tend to fade and there will still be a lot of cloud around.

:17:00.:17:03.

Still a bit bank. He comes the weather fronts. In from the West

:17:04.:17:10.

bringing in some rain. -- dank. Milder in the south and are still

:17:11.:17:13.

cool as we push further north. Becoming less called than it has

:17:14.:17:19.

been. For Saturday, we still have this unsettled picture. The nature

:17:20.:17:23.

of showers will mean not all of us will see one. Could be early fog but

:17:24.:17:27.

some of us could see sunshine. I want to draw your attention to what

:17:28.:17:31.

is happening down here. There is still uncertainty as to the exact

:17:32.:17:34.

positioning of these that this is what we think at the moment, and it

:17:35.:17:38.

could change, we have rain rattling across Southern counties. We will

:17:39.:17:42.

have that through Sunday as well. Move away from that, dry and bright

:17:43.:17:46.

and potentially the best day of the weekend, weatherwise, anyway.

:17:47.:17:50.

Thank you Carol. We didn't win a category this morning but did you

:17:51.:17:58.

have a good time? It was brilliant and it was lovely to see everybody.

:17:59.:18:02.

We missed you guys. Yeah. You say that now. Carol, thank you. We are

:18:03.:18:09.

going to get the gossip out of you, believe you me. The pictures I have

:18:10.:18:14.

seen, they look like they missed nobody.

:18:15.:18:15.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:18:16.:18:17.

President Trump has said he believes torture can work when dealing

:18:18.:18:21.

The Prime Minister Theresa May will call for a renewed special

:18:22.:18:25.

relationship with the US when she speaks to Republicans

:18:26.:18:28.

She says she is not afraid of candid conversations.

:18:29.:18:47.

Looking at the papers. The Daily Mail have story, a picture of Mary,

:18:48.:19:03.

hardly believing her luck. George Osborne, ex- chancellor, has taken

:19:04.:19:07.

on a new banking role which the mail says stinks because they claim he

:19:08.:19:14.

had links to this company. The express has a picture of Hollywood.

:19:15.:19:23.

There is a story here. All week stories about foods you can or can't

:19:24.:19:34.

eat. Mushrooms are the superfood apparently they

:19:35.:19:34.

eat. Mushrooms are the superfood dementia. There are mushrooms on the

:19:35.:19:37.

front of the Daily Mirror as well. They are not talking about mushrooms

:19:38.:19:41.

in your breakfast but a horse or moan they say is being injected into

:19:42.:19:45.

some meat. They are calling it a scandal, a British meat scandal. --

:19:46.:19:55.

hormone. Also, Donald Trump and his interview last night with ABC. The

:19:56.:20:00.

television channel. Also the fact that Theresa May will of course be

:20:01.:20:04.

speaking and meeting with President Trump tomorrow and she is visiting

:20:05.:20:09.

republicans, calling for stronger times next Robert ties between the

:20:10.:20:14.

two countries. The Telegraph have transport story. After all of the

:20:15.:20:20.

trouble, there is a claim that ministers are planning to take over.

:20:21.:20:27.

Then, look at that. I love these pictures of Mary, yet in! -- get in!

:20:28.:20:39.

Can I take you inside to a story which, it is about Happiness. What

:20:40.:20:43.

do you think the secret to Happiness is, cat? Lots of sleep. In our job,

:20:44.:20:51.

definitely. Apparently it's getting your kit off, according to this

:20:52.:20:55.

article. If you are somebody who regularly gets naked, you are a --

:20:56.:21:06.

you are likely to be happy happier. You are more likely to be happier

:21:07.:21:11.

about how you feel about life. For the sake of the nation's Happiness,

:21:12.:21:15.

I think we should not try that. Not on television. This is a double page

:21:16.:21:21.

spread. Jinnah how quick it is all about statistics and how it to you

:21:22.:21:25.

work out how good a batsman is, you look at his average. Also with a

:21:26.:21:35.

bowl. -- bowler. But how do you work out how good a fielder is? There has

:21:36.:21:40.

been a computer programme that will work out how good a fielder is. This

:21:41.:21:48.

is in England's last match against India. That drop for England was 23

:21:49.:21:58.

runs so he has got a -23 at Gran Steve Fielding score in England

:21:59.:22:02.

selector's Handbook. -- against his Fielding score. A glimpse of the

:22:03.:22:15.

future for cricket. Critics say... Cricket critics say that the human

:22:16.:22:23.

side has been taken away and it's not much fun any more but other

:22:24.:22:27.

people are saying that this is where cricket is going and this is the

:22:28.:22:30.

future of the game. Quite interesting. They work it out by

:22:31.:22:35.

calculating the runs multiplied by the difficulty of the catch.

:22:36.:22:42.

Apparently he should have been 90% certain to have caught the ball and

:22:43.:22:47.

he didn't. Thank you very much. We need more statistics. Of course,

:22:48.:22:51.

today's the day that we get the latest stats on how the economy has

:22:52.:22:54.

been doing. This is the latest growth figures.

:22:55.:22:57.

Ben's in central London this morning.

:22:58.:22:58.

How much should we read into these figures, Ben?

:22:59.:23:06.

We are here on the rooftop of the i.e. The because it gives us a great

:23:07.:23:13.

advantage of the city and the rest of London. We will be watching

:23:14.:23:18.

closely to the economic growth figure -- IET. It might be able to

:23:19.:23:26.

make out the shard between those buildings, all the way down the

:23:27.:23:31.

South bank, the London Eye. In the distance, in the darkness at this

:23:32.:23:35.

point the morning, is Big Ben and the houses of parliament. Both fair

:23:36.:23:40.

and the city, they will be taking a close eye on the economic figure. It

:23:41.:23:45.

is for the last quarter of last year. It is expected to have grown

:23:46.:23:51.

by about 0.5%. Down slightly from what we have seen before but after

:23:52.:23:58.

all the uncertainty with except, the squeeze on incomes, or what it could

:23:59.:24:03.

mean for us. How will this feel for our pockets? We were out in

:24:04.:24:06.

Manchester asking some of you hate you are feeling the squeeze.

:24:07.:24:09.

People haven't got that much money like they used to. Obviously, having

:24:10.:24:17.

to cut back on what I spend. Prices are going up all the time. What it

:24:18.:24:22.

used to be in the past, it jumping. Cost of living going up. All right.

:24:23.:24:28.

Just all right. Not amazing. It's difficult with a baby because I

:24:29.:24:32.

don't work as many hours as they used to. But I'm OK. I think if you

:24:33.:24:38.

know where you shop -- know where to shop, you can find decent prices.

:24:39.:24:47.

Struggling. Why? Just am. I think things will get tighter but at the

:24:48.:24:52.

moment, I am not as well off as I was the same age and with all that

:24:53.:24:54.

is happening, it will get tighter. Those are some of the issues facing

:24:55.:25:06.

us when it comes to money and a pocket. It will be the weakness in

:25:07.:25:10.

the pound and that makes things we import from overseas more expensive.

:25:11.:25:13.

That accounts for all the raw materials but also things like food

:25:14.:25:17.

and a lot of supermarkets have been telling us they might have to raise

:25:18.:25:21.

prices. There is also that uncertainty around Brexit. What will

:25:22.:25:24.

it mean for business day to day. There is a lot of clarity they will

:25:25.:25:29.

get to work out their plans for things like expansion or hiring more

:25:30.:25:34.

staff. Of course, Ben Perry the squeeze on our income as well as

:25:35.:25:38.

inflation. -- vendor areas. We will talk about that over course of the

:25:39.:25:49.

evening. -- then there is the squeeze. Join me in half an hour and

:25:50.:25:53.

we will talk through some of the figures.

:25:54.:25:53.

As second-hand vehicles go, it doesn't sound very promising -

:25:54.:25:56.

slightly scorched, 74 million miles on the clock and last seen

:25:57.:25:59.

But the capsule which took Major Tim Peake into space -

:26:00.:26:03.

and brought him safely back again - is an invaluable piece

:26:04.:26:06.

It's going on public display in London, as our science

:26:07.:26:10.

Just over one year ago, Tim Peake set off for his mission to the

:26:11.:26:32.

International Space Station. Within weeks of being in orbit, he became

:26:33.:26:37.

the first British astronaut to walk in space. It was the stuff of

:26:38.:26:45.

scientific history. Then before you get the APM are off... Now the cut

:26:46.:26:49.

shot has been brought by British science Museum. The museum says it

:26:50.:26:53.

hopes the display will inspire those who see it. Especially children.

:26:54.:26:57.

Many of who might wish to follow in Tim Peake's footsteps. The unveiling

:26:58.:27:02.

of the capital will also be the first opportunity to hear from the

:27:03.:27:07.

British astronaut, following the announcement last week by the head

:27:08.:27:10.

of the European Space Agency, that Tim would be expected to fly and

:27:11.:27:13.

other mission to the space station, sometime between 2019 and 2024.

:27:14.:27:20.

We'll be talking to Tim Peake after 8:00, and in just over an hour

:27:21.:27:24.

we'll hear from the first British astronaut, Helen Sharman.

:27:25.:27:33.

Let's cross to the news teams around you to get the news, travel

:27:34.:30:54.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:30:55.:30:57.

Now, though, it's back to Steph and Jon.

:30:58.:31:00.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Jon Kay and Steph McGovern.

:31:01.:31:05.

An alarming gap between rich and poor is leaving the health

:31:06.:31:19.

That's the stark warning from the Royal College

:31:20.:31:24.

of Paediatrics and Child Health, who'll join us after 8am

:31:25.:31:26.

What goes up must come down, and the capsule which took Tim Peake

:31:27.:31:35.

to space and back is going on display in London.

:31:36.:31:38.

He'll join us along with Britain's first astronaut, Helen Sharman

:31:39.:31:41.

to tell us how they hope it'll inspire future scientists.

:31:42.:31:52.

And from the outside it appeared to be an ordinary Brixton

:31:53.:31:54.

flat, but for decades it housed an extraordinary secret.

:31:55.:31:59.

After 8am, we'll learn about the strange cult

:32:00.:32:02.

and the people who helped rescue those enslaved in it.

:32:03.:32:06.

But now a summary of this morning's main news.

:32:07.:32:10.

The US President Donald Trump has said he believes that torture can

:32:11.:32:13.

work to get information out of suspected terrorists.

:32:14.:32:20.

But he said he would seek further advice before deciding

:32:21.:32:23.

whether to bring back techniques such as water-boarding.

:32:24.:32:25.

Speaking to the American ABC network in his first televised

:32:26.:32:28.

interview since becoming President, he also repeated his pledge to make

:32:29.:32:31.

Mexico pay for a wall along its border with the United States.

:32:32.:32:34.

Here's our Washington Correspondent, David Willis.

:32:35.:32:36.

Could America be set for a return to the interrogation methods of old?

:32:37.:32:40.

A draft executive order suggests its commander-in-chief

:32:41.:32:42.

could be preparing to return to the dark days

:32:43.:32:52.

of water boarding, by reopening the so-called black site prisons

:32:53.:32:55.

In his first TV interview since becoming President,

:32:56.:32:58.

Donald Trump made clear he is considering scrapping an order

:32:59.:33:01.

by his predecessor, that terrorist suspects be treated in accordance

:33:02.:33:03.

Torture works, the President declared.

:33:04.:33:09.

When they're chopping off the heads of our people and other people,

:33:10.:33:13.

when they're chopping off the heads of people because they happen to be

:33:14.:33:17.

a Christian in the Middle East, when Isis is doing things that

:33:18.:33:20.

nobody has ever heard of since Middle Eastern times,

:33:21.:33:24.

-- medieval times, would I feel strongly about water boarding?

:33:25.:33:26.

As far as I'm concerned, we have to fight fire with fire.

:33:27.:33:30.

Reports suggest Mr Trump is also due to announce plans to close America's

:33:31.:33:34.

borders to refugees, for a period at least,

:33:35.:33:36.

and implement tougher visa restrictions

:33:37.:33:38.

on citizens from certain predominantly Muslim nations

:33:39.:33:40.

with links to terrorism, what is known as extreme vetting.

:33:41.:33:45.

In an effort to quell the influx of illegal immigrants from Mexico,

:33:46.:33:48.

Mr Trump has signed an executive order to begin work on building

:33:49.:33:52.

A multimillion dollar venture that he insists Mexico will be made

:33:53.:33:57.

Ultimately it will come out of what's happening with Mexico

:33:58.:34:08.

and we will start those negotiations relatively soon and we will be

:34:09.:34:11.

So they'll pay us back? Absolutely, 100%.

:34:12.:34:14.

That has ruffled the feathers of America's southern neighbour.

:34:15.:34:23.

In an address to the nation, Mexico's president said they have no

:34:24.:34:26.

The Mexican president is due in Washington next week.

:34:27.:34:30.

He faces difficult discussions with an American counterpart clearly

:34:31.:34:33.

determined to reverse many of the changes brought

:34:34.:34:35.

After 7am, we'll be getting the thoughts on this

:34:36.:34:42.

of the Assistant Head of the US and Americas Programme at Chatham

:34:43.:34:45.

Prime Minister Theresa May will be heading to the US, she is going

:34:46.:34:57.

today. She will call for a renewed

:34:58.:34:57.

special relationship with the United States,

:34:58.:34:59.

when she addresses Republican politicians at their annual retreat

:35:00.:35:02.

in Philadelphia later today. The Prime Minister is due to become

:35:03.:35:04.

the first world leader to hold face-to-face talks

:35:05.:35:07.

with President Trump, when they meet at the

:35:08.:35:09.

White House tomorrow. She has said she's not afraid

:35:10.:35:11.

of having a candid conversation. The government will publish a Bill

:35:12.:35:17.

today, to enable it to invoke Article 50 and trigger

:35:18.:35:20.

the process of Britain leaving The Brexit Secretary,

:35:21.:35:23.

David Davis, has said the bill will be straightforward,

:35:24.:35:26.

although opposition parties Royal Bank of Scotland will take

:35:27.:35:28.

another financial hit for mis-selling risky mortgages

:35:29.:35:33.

in America before the financial The bank, which is more than 70%

:35:34.:35:36.

owned by the taxpayer, could be fined an additional

:35:37.:35:44.

?3 billion by the US A major report into the health

:35:45.:35:47.

of children in the UK has found an "alarming gap" exists

:35:48.:35:54.

between the rich and poor, with one in five young people

:35:55.:35:57.

suffering as a result of poverty. The Royal College of Paediatrics

:35:58.:36:05.

and Child Health also suggests the UK is lagging behind

:36:06.:36:08.

most Western European countries when it comes to measures

:36:09.:36:11.

such as infant mortality The number of cars built in the UK

:36:12.:36:13.

has reached a 17-year high, thanks to continued economic

:36:14.:36:20.

recovery in Europe. Around 1.7 million cars rolled off

:36:21.:36:22.

production lines last year But investment in the industry fell

:36:23.:36:25.

last year because of continued uncertainty over the future

:36:26.:36:34.

of the economy following Ant and Dec won the prize for best

:36:35.:36:39.

TV presenter for the 16th year at last night's National

:36:40.:36:44.

Television Awards. Can you imagine how big their trophy

:36:45.:36:54.

cabinet is? She is catching up!

:36:55.:36:55.

Other winners included Mary Berry for best judge

:36:56.:36:58.

and Strictly Come Dancing picked up the gong for best talent show.

:36:59.:37:02.

Emmerdale was voted best soap and ITV's This Morning won

:37:03.:37:05.

They look quite surprised to win. It was a brilliant category to be in.

:37:06.:37:21.

Our lot had a very good time and we will get the gossip about Carol, as

:37:22.:37:25.

she went to the awards and is in this morning looking bright eyed and

:37:26.:37:29.

bushy tailed, perhaps with the same make-up on!

:37:30.:37:33.

Now to the morning's sport. Southampton are through to the final

:37:34.:37:42.

of the League Cup, which is amazing when some of the big names weren't

:37:43.:37:52.

playing. A big name they lost, they lost their manager over the summer,

:37:53.:37:56.

but they seem to have carried on an ruffled. Here they are in the League

:37:57.:37:59.

Cup final. Southampton beat Liverpool 1-0

:38:00.:38:01.

at Anfield last night to reach 1-0 up from the first leg,

:38:02.:38:04.

Saints spent much of the match defending before Shane Long

:38:05.:38:09.

booked his side's trip to Wembley. They reached the final

:38:10.:38:12.

without conceding a goal. Southampton will play either

:38:13.:38:14.

Hull City or Manchester United who play their second

:38:15.:38:17.

leg semi tonight. It's not. It's fantastic. Fantastic.

:38:18.:38:29.

And happy for the squad because they worked very hard since the beginning

:38:30.:38:38.

of the season, and played every three games, -- days, which is very

:38:39.:38:41.

difficult. Celtic have stretched

:38:42.:38:42.

their lead at the top of the Scottish Premiership

:38:43.:38:44.

to 22 points. They beat St Johnston

:38:45.:38:49.

1-0 in the first game in the league since the winter break

:38:50.:38:52.

and have now gone 26 domestic games unbeaten, equalling

:38:53.:38:55.

their own record. Meanwhile, in the Scottish Cup,

:38:56.:38:57.

Hearts came back from 1-0 down to beat Championship Raith Rovers

:38:58.:39:00.

4-2 in extra time of their Scottish They'll host Edinburgh

:39:01.:39:03.

rivals Hibs next. Serena Williams is on court

:39:04.:39:06.

in Melbourne right now, looking to book her place

:39:07.:39:08.

in the Australian Open final. She's up against world number 79

:39:09.:39:12.

Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, who is in her first Grand Slam

:39:13.:39:14.

semi-final in 18 years. The pair last played each other

:39:15.:39:17.

at Wimbledon, in 1998. Serena the winner that day

:39:18.:39:20.

and she has an early break She took it 6-2. If she wins it will

:39:21.:39:36.

set up an all Williams grandslam final for the first time in 2009,

:39:37.:39:41.

because Venus Williams is awaiting the winner. She beat CoCo Vandeweghe

:39:42.:39:44.

in three sets. Usain Bolt is to lose one

:39:45.:39:46.

of his nine Olympic gold medals, after the IOC disqualified his

:39:47.:39:49.

Jamaican relay teammate Nesta Carter over a doping violation

:39:50.:39:52.

at the Beijing Games. The IOC says Carter tested positive

:39:53.:39:54.

for a banned stimulant in a re-analysis of samples

:39:55.:39:57.

from the 2008 Olympics. Carter and Bolt were teammates

:39:58.:40:10.

on the winning 4x100 As a result, the Jamaican team,

:40:11.:40:13.

including Bolt, has been stripped of its gold, meaning he can no

:40:14.:40:17.

longer claim to hold You can't rerun race and get those

:40:18.:40:27.

medals back. An Usain Bolt's case we all know that what his last Olympic

:40:28.:40:34.

Games. So it has gone from the medals which was unbelievable to

:40:35.:40:37.

eight medals, at what he has achieved is still amazing.

:40:38.:40:38.

Captain Eoin Morgan captain says the current England one day side

:40:39.:40:41.

England lost the ODI series 2-1, but ended on a high with a five run

:40:42.:40:47.

They play the first of three T20 games in Kanpur in a few hours.

:40:48.:40:57.

We have a long way to go. It is the best white ball team I've been

:40:58.:41:06.

apart. We have a lot of talent. Extracting that talent and

:41:07.:41:10.

converting it into wins and results is the challenge for us.

:41:11.:41:14.

Britain's Millie Knight and guide Brett Wild won downhill

:41:15.:41:17.

gold on the opening day of the Para Alpine Skiing

:41:18.:41:19.

The 18-year-old visually impaired skier beat the five-time Paralympic

:41:20.:41:23.

champion Henrieta Farkasova of Slovakia.

:41:24.:41:24.

Knight was Britain's youngest athlete at the Sochi Paralympics

:41:25.:41:27.

and has dominated the World Cup circuit in recent months winning 11

:41:28.:41:30.

When we came into this we thought we just wanted to be pleased with our

:41:31.:41:42.

arms and we wanted to come down, finished the bride and think I'm a

:41:43.:41:46.

yes, IMB is to that, we couldn't have gone any faster and the result

:41:47.:41:49.

looked after itself. What we got with those feelings today, so

:41:50.:41:51.

chuffed! The records were a bit sketchy but

:41:52.:41:58.

we think that is Britain's first ever world Para scheme title. --

:41:59.:42:06.

paraskiing title. Thank you.

:42:07.:42:08.

Keeping up with schoolwork can be stressful for any young person,

:42:09.:42:11.

but how do those caring for a loved one balance their education

:42:12.:42:14.

Research from the Carers Trust has revealed almost

:42:15.:42:18.

three quarters of young carers take time off school to look

:42:19.:42:20.

after relatives, while more than half struggle to meet deadlines.

:42:21.:42:23.

Holly Hamilton has been to meet two sisters who care for their mum

:42:24.:42:27.

Meet Claudia and Leonie. Did Mum take tablets? Just nine and 13, they

:42:28.:42:43.

have big dreams of becoming actresses. But right now their job

:42:44.:42:47.

is taking care of their mum. When she had a heart attack she got

:42:48.:42:53.

tunnel vision and then it is hard for her, because she can't see. I do

:42:54.:43:01.

a lot of tidying, packing things away and keeping things off the

:43:02.:43:05.

floor, because when things are on the floor she will trip over them

:43:06.:43:09.

easily. I was the kind of mum that did everything for her children, the

:43:10.:43:16.

running around, but picking up, and they relied on me for everything.

:43:17.:43:19.

And then suddenly I couldn't do anything for them and found that

:43:20.:43:25.

they were having to do things for me. That's what we've been learning

:43:26.:43:33.

about. The two are young carers, like more than 700,000 children in

:43:34.:43:38.

the UK. Many providing care for over 50 hours a week. So it is no

:43:39.:43:45.

surprise that a survey by the Carers -- Ida on sound more than half of

:43:46.:43:49.

those aged 16- 25 were struggling to with school work. Homework is the

:43:50.:43:54.

thing I struggle with because I'm always doing loads of chores and

:43:55.:44:00.

stuff and then I have to find time to do all my homework. Local council

:44:01.:44:08.

bosses say it is vital young carers are identified so they can get the

:44:09.:44:11.

support we need to achieve their life ambitions. You see everyone and

:44:12.:44:18.

you think, oh, they're so lucky, they can do all of that, but then

:44:19.:44:22.

you think I might wait, I can't do that. But then I also think it is

:44:23.:44:28.

important that I help her out and I like being responsible for her,

:44:29.:44:37.

because it makes me feel special. Claudia and Leonie are getting help

:44:38.:44:41.

from their school, which means they can focus on their schoolwork and

:44:42.:44:44.

looking after mum. What does the word care mean for you? Well, when I

:44:45.:44:51.

think terror I think it's not normal, a normal life. -- think

:44:52.:44:57.

carer. Like when you are an actress you have a big role to play, but

:44:58.:45:01.

then when you finish doing that part you need to stop, but it's like

:45:02.:45:06.

you're doing that role forever. Claudia and Leonie, talking to our

:45:07.:45:17.

reporter. Holly mentioned the research from Carers Trust.

:45:18.:45:19.

Joining us now is Gail Scott-Spicer, who's Chief Executive of the Carers

:45:20.:45:22.

Hearing their story, it's really heartbreaking. How common is a story

:45:23.:45:36.

like that? There are 700,000 children upto the age of 18 but also

:45:37.:45:42.

as young as five who caring. Caring for friends, family, somebody in

:45:43.:45:45.

their life who they love dearly. It's a real challenge for them. The

:45:46.:45:50.

data we have produced today and that we have seen from carers trust is

:45:51.:45:55.

showing that young carers are a danger, not only to their education,

:45:56.:45:59.

not fulfilling their life ambitions. There might be children up during

:46:00.:46:04.

the night that have been looking after Perrett and now had to be

:46:05.:46:09.

hitting their bag ready. What should teachers be looking out for as far

:46:10.:46:12.

as checking all these kids are getting the support they need once

:46:13.:46:16.

at school? We know from the data that half of children are having

:46:17.:46:21.

problems coping with schoolwork. We know that they are struggling with

:46:22.:46:25.

deadlines. These are the things that children can look -- teachers can

:46:26.:46:33.

look after. You might find that some of these young carers are not moving

:46:34.:46:37.

it into school. Maybe they are hiding it, showing they are coping.

:46:38.:46:44.

Maybe it's hard to spot. It is but we do lots of work with schools to

:46:45.:46:51.

help spot the signs. There might be some carers watching this morning as

:46:52.:46:56.

they go through what they need to to support their family. They can reach

:46:57.:47:00.

out to schools because schools know how to support them. They can do

:47:01.:47:04.

that in confidence and they run a lot of charities around like Carers

:47:05.:47:11.

Trust. They can reach out in confidence. We also have online

:47:12.:47:17.

forums where they can come on and be anonymous. That is the first step

:47:18.:47:23.

for young carers sometimes to reach out and get support. They must

:47:24.:47:27.

realise crucially they are not alone. That is the way. If you can

:47:28.:47:31.

go on for and speak to other people, you can make a difference. There was

:47:32.:47:36.

a change in the law around giving more support and essentially

:47:37.:47:39.

assessment to young people. Has that made a difference and tell us, yes,

:47:40.:47:49.

haven't it ready difference? They came in to support children for the

:47:50.:47:53.

first time to give them rights in law. It is crucial now the

:47:54.:47:57.

government hold local authorities to account to realise both law and the

:47:58.:48:00.

principles and ambitions of those acts. It is very varied out there.

:48:01.:48:07.

Sometimes we see buried a lot of great work going on to support

:48:08.:48:11.

carers but in other places, there is a lot more work to do. Gale from the

:48:12.:48:15.

C/o's Trust, thank you. Here's Carol with a look

:48:16.:48:16.

at this morning's weather. Carroll, you are looking gorgeous

:48:17.:48:27.

considering how many hours sleep you have had. How many hours sleep? 3.5.

:48:28.:48:35.

You legend. It is because of the national television awards, I have

:48:36.:48:50.

two ad. -- --3. We are importing cold winds from a cold continent.

:48:51.:48:57.

They are dragging it in on the south-easterly wind. Very windy

:48:58.:49:03.

across the north-west once again today but the West of the UK

:49:04.:49:06.

generally windy. There is a lot of clout for us, we also have drizzle.

:49:07.:49:13.

-- cloud. We will also see the odd flurry of snow. We wait all see it.

:49:14.:49:20.

-- we won't. There is the risk of ice first thing this morning. Watch

:49:21.:49:24.

out for that underfoot and if you are driving. There are also pockets

:49:25.:49:30.

of fog but not on the scale that some of us have seen. Cloudy start

:49:31.:49:36.

across most of us. Also in Northern Ireland. Scotland, too. The North of

:49:37.:49:40.

Scotland is sticking out of the cloud. He refused. Here we will see

:49:41.:49:46.

the lion 's share of any sunshine as we will through the course of the

:49:47.:49:51.

day. The rest of the day, cloudy for the morning. Gradually, though, we

:49:52.:49:55.

start to see the cloud break up across Southern counties and we will

:49:56.:49:59.

see sunshine. Some of that extends into Wales. We will hang on to war

:50:00.:50:04.

this cloud and although we see temperatures largely above freezing,

:50:05.:50:08.

when you add on the wind chill, how it will feel against your skin when

:50:09.:50:14.

you are out, -5 in Newcastle, freezing in Cardiff. Remember to

:50:15.:50:18.

wrap up warmly if you are just a stepping out. As we had on through

:50:19.:50:22.

Thursday and into Friday, we hang on to quite keen to win. Then we have

:50:23.:50:27.

the complex area of low pressure. It is coming in from the West. We start

:50:28.:50:32.

off on Friday, possibly the odd pockets of fog and nothing

:50:33.:50:36.

substantial. Any snow flurries in the east will tend to fade and then

:50:37.:50:40.

we have weather front coming in from the north and west and they will

:50:41.:50:46.

introduce some rain. Also some milder conditions, particularly in

:50:47.:50:49.

the south-west. Although we will still feel cold in central areas, it

:50:50.:50:55.

will feel less than it did today. Saturday, showers but the nature of

:50:56.:51:00.

showers mean we were not all see them. Some of us will see sunshine.

:51:01.:51:04.

Look at this. It looks as though we will see the next area of low

:51:05.:51:08.

pressure sweeping across the Southern counties of England and

:51:09.:51:11.

Wales. The timing and position of this will change. Deep in touch with

:51:12.:51:16.

the weather forecast. Further north, not a bad day at all.

:51:17.:51:21.

Carroll, should we have a look at how we went last night? A beautiful

:51:22.:51:27.

picture of the gang. Everybody looking top dollar. That was before

:51:28.:51:32.

the party began. Tell us what it was like. LAUGHTER. You are getting no

:51:33.:51:39.

change out of me about anything. It was a good night, a good night,

:51:40.:51:47.

great. You have the party line down. And so used to it because they are

:51:48.:51:52.

WestJet a grilling from you guys! I'm glad you had a lovely time.

:51:53.:52:01.

Figures out later this morning are expected to show the British

:52:02.:52:04.

If so, it would be the latest data to suggest the UK

:52:05.:52:09.

economy is remaining resilient despite the Brexit vote.

:52:10.:52:11.

Ben is in central London for us this morning.

:52:12.:52:13.

Just how significant could these figures be Ben?

:52:14.:52:18.

You have a cracking view over the city. A bit cold that you have your

:52:19.:52:32.

gloves on. What are we expecting? Carol is not fibbing, it is freezing

:52:33.:52:36.

but the economy is going to be faring a bit better. We had the

:52:37.:52:41.

concerns about a fall in the value of the pound and that uncertainty

:52:42.:52:45.

surrounding Brexit. The latest thing is that word in inflation. We will

:52:46.:52:50.

hear a lot about it this year as prices start rising. We have had

:52:51.:52:54.

warnings from retailers including supermarkets, saying they might have

:52:55.:52:59.

to put prices up. On economic growth, we get the figure at 930. It

:53:00.:53:04.

is for the last quarter of last year, expected to show that the

:53:05.:53:13.

economy grew for about 0.5%. We have city -esque Burts with me. You are a

:53:14.:53:20.

cold, windy rooftop. Thank you for putting up with it. City experts. We

:53:21.:53:27.

have seen headlines about what inflation and Brexit could mean. The

:53:28.:53:33.

end of 2016 has been good and so will the beginning of 2017, as we

:53:34.:53:37.

have seen. Everybody is pretty upbeat but inflation has doubled

:53:38.:53:42.

between October and December so I think we will see wages squeezed

:53:43.:53:47.

because inflation is rising higher and rising more than wages at the

:53:48.:53:51.

moment. People will feel a bit poorer and it is consumption that

:53:52.:53:55.

has been driving the economy so I am worried about that going forward.

:53:56.:53:59.

The fact that manufacturers are getting towards capacity constraints

:54:00.:54:07.

and labour is a bit short. There are two stories on today because when we

:54:08.:54:12.

look at things like Brexit, there is uncertainty for business, we don't

:54:13.:54:15.

know what is going to happen and if you are a business with, you either

:54:16.:54:19.

embrace it or worry. Which way should you be going? These are

:54:20.:54:24.

challenging times but exciting times. Refer to what Bronwyn said,

:54:25.:54:35.

it is uncertain. We unfortunately, London is the only standard bearer.

:54:36.:54:39.

We need a much more mixed and balanced economy. We need to find

:54:40.:54:45.

labour in the right places so we can give construction and industrial

:54:46.:54:49.

print duction a real boost. I'm really upbeat long-term. --

:54:50.:55:00.

production. Wages is only at 2.6%. Have some courage, it will be fine.

:55:01.:55:05.

Catherine, you are nodding along to some things but as far as consumers

:55:06.:55:11.

are concerned, we may feel a squeeze. We will see a large to

:55:12.:55:18.

start -- decline. Businesses might not see it. These things take a long

:55:19.:55:26.

time to ramp up. Consumers are doing heavy lifting at the moment. Whether

:55:27.:55:31.

it can continue, we don't know. We are not going to delay spending

:55:32.:55:35.

because of an Article 50 ruling, for example. Thank you very much. We

:55:36.:55:41.

will speak more to you guys later in the programme. We will delve into

:55:42.:55:45.

the idea of consumer spending. It is all of us who is going out and

:55:46.:55:49.

spending in the shops that has helped prop up the economy. Big

:55:50.:55:52.

questions about whether we will carry on doing that.

:55:53.:55:56.

Delve into the flat and get some heat. It is freezing.

:55:57.:56:03.

Plenty more news, travel and weather on our website. Goodbye for now.

:56:04.:59:57.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Steph McGovern and Jon Kay.

:59:58.:00:01.

The Prime Minister vows to renew the UK's special relationship

:00:02.:00:04.

with the US as she travels to America to meet Donald Trump.

:00:05.:00:10.

Theresa May will say the two countries can "lead together again"

:00:11.:00:12.

and propose greater co-operation in the fight against terrorism.

:00:13.:00:19.

In his first TV interview since taking office,

:00:20.:00:21.

President Trump has said he believes torture works when dealing

:00:22.:00:26.

I want to do everything within the bounds of what you are allowed

:00:27.:00:31.

to do legally, but do I feel it works?

:00:32.:00:33.

Children's health in the UK is lagging behind most other

:00:34.:00:58.

European countries, according to a major new report.

:00:59.:01:08.

We will get the latest growth figures later. They are expected to

:01:09.:01:13.

show the economy fared pretty well at the end of last year, but with

:01:14.:01:17.

rising prices and that uncertainty around except what does the next

:01:18.:01:20.

year have in store? In sport, it be an all-Williams

:01:21.:01:24.

showdown in Melbourne. Venus Williams is through and in the

:01:25.:01:36.

last few minutes Serena Williams got to the first final where they will

:01:37.:01:37.

play each other in eight years. It has taken Tim Peake

:01:38.:01:40.

to space and back. Now the Soyuz capsule

:01:41.:01:42.

is going to be landing in London. This morning it's a cold start to

:01:43.:01:52.

the day again. Watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. A fairly cloudy

:01:53.:01:57.

start, producing drizzle. A few of us seeing snow. Later it will

:01:58.:02:01.

brighten up in the south. The overriding factor is it will feel

:02:02.:02:06.

cold in a bitter wind. More in 15 minutes.

:02:07.:02:07.

Good morning. First, our main story.

:02:08.:02:09.

Theresa May will call for a renewed special relationship

:02:10.:02:11.

with the United States when she addresses Republican

:02:12.:02:14.

A day before she becomes the first international leader

:02:15.:02:21.

the Prime Minister will argue for greater co-operation

:02:22.:02:26.

Our political Correspondent Chris Mason is at Westminster.

:02:27.:02:33.

This is the reason they officially meeting President Trump. She has

:02:34.:02:40.

already said she isn't afraid of a frank conversation with him, but

:02:41.:02:44.

still wants to renew their special relationship. How is it going to

:02:45.:02:49.

work do you think west that phrase special relationship will tumble out

:02:50.:02:52.

of her lips many times in the next 48 hours. The plane carrying the

:02:53.:02:57.

Prime Minister is leaving Heathrow about now. First stop is

:02:58.:03:03.

Philadelphia, this away day for senior Republican politicians. A

:03:04.:03:07.

chance for her to address them. People who might be able to bend the

:03:08.:03:11.

ear and influence the president over the next four years. She will talk

:03:12.:03:16.

about how for her international organisations are really important.

:03:17.:03:20.

The United States and the UK were central in setting her up. The UN

:03:21.:03:25.

and the defence alliance, Nato, for instance. President Trump has been

:03:26.:03:32.

sceptical about any international organisations. The other thing she

:03:33.:03:36.

will be keen to do is just build a working relationship with the

:03:37.:03:39.

president. The human connection is hugely important and she starts it

:03:40.:03:45.

with some awkwardness, because she was not, entry about him in the

:03:46.:03:51.

past. So she turns up with a hamper, from her retreat in Buckinghamshire,

:03:52.:03:57.

complete with a belt -- Bakewell tart, I'm told, and she will also

:03:58.:04:05.

carry an ancient Scottish artefact, a nod to President Trump's mum who

:04:06.:04:10.

was from Scotland. So attending to make friends and build bridges. One

:04:11.:04:19.

of her team described him as Trump the chump before he was let in. Now

:04:20.:04:25.

of course things have changed. -- he was elected. It is another important

:04:26.:04:29.

day for Brexit because of course we have a big announcement at 9:30am?

:04:30.:04:34.

Yes. The Prime Minister might be flying across the Atlantic, but that

:04:35.:04:39.

doesn't mean Brexit stops. The whole process rumbles on. What we get this

:04:40.:04:43.

morning is the publication of a bill. The start of the process of

:04:44.:04:48.

creating a law that will allow the Prime Minister to press go on the

:04:49.:04:52.

wrecks that process by the end of March. We will get the wording of

:04:53.:04:56.

that in the next few hours. The debate amongst MPs and those in the

:04:57.:05:00.

House of Lords to follow from next week. As ever, lovely to talk to

:05:01.:05:02.

you. When she visits Washington tomorrow,

:05:03.:05:04.

Theresa May has said she is not afraid of having a candid

:05:05.:05:07.

conversation with President Trump, who said he believed that torture

:05:08.:05:10.

could work to get information out Donald Trump said he would seek

:05:11.:05:13.

further advice from the CIA, before deciding whether to

:05:14.:05:19.

bring back techniques Speaking to the American ABC network

:05:20.:05:22.

in his first televised interview since becoming President,

:05:23.:05:32.

he also repeated his pledge to make Mexico pay for a wall along

:05:33.:05:35.

its border with the United States. Here's our Washington

:05:36.:05:38.

Correspondent, David Willis. Could America be set for a return

:05:39.:05:41.

to the interrogation methods of old? A draft executive order

:05:42.:05:45.

suggests its commander-in-chief could be preparing to return

:05:46.:05:47.

to the dark days of water boarding, by reopening the so-called black

:05:48.:05:54.

site prisons operated by the CIA. In his first TV interview

:05:55.:05:57.

since becoming President, Donald Trump made clear

:05:58.:06:01.

he is considering scrapping an order by his predecessor, that terrorist

:06:02.:06:04.

suspects be treated in accordance Torture works,

:06:05.:06:07.

the President declared. When they're chopping off the heads

:06:08.:06:13.

of our people and other people, when they're chopping off the heads

:06:14.:06:17.

of people because they happen to be a Christian in the Middle East,

:06:18.:06:20.

when Isis is doing things that nobody has ever heard

:06:21.:06:24.

of since medieval times, would I feel strongly

:06:25.:06:26.

about water boarding? As far as I'm concerned,

:06:27.:06:27.

we have to fight fire with fire. Reports suggest Mr Trump is also due

:06:28.:06:31.

to announce plans to close America's borders to refugees,

:06:32.:06:34.

for a period at least, and implement tougher visa

:06:35.:06:37.

restrictions on citizens from certain predominantly Muslim

:06:38.:06:39.

nations with links to terrorism, In an effort to quell the influx

:06:40.:06:41.

of illegal immigrants from Mexico, Mr Trump has signed an executive

:06:42.:06:48.

order to begin work on building A multimillion dollar venture

:06:49.:06:51.

that he insists Mexico will be made Ultimately it will come out

:06:52.:07:03.

of what's happening with Mexico and we will start those negotiations

:07:04.:07:08.

relatively soon and we will be That has ruffled the feathers

:07:09.:07:11.

of America's southern neighbour. In an address to the nation,

:07:12.:07:22.

Mexico's president said they have no The Mexican president is due

:07:23.:07:25.

in Washington next week. He faces difficult discussions

:07:26.:07:32.

with an American counterpart clearly determined to reverse

:07:33.:07:35.

many of the changes brought Royal Bank of Scotland will take

:07:36.:07:44.

another financial hit for mis-selling risky mortgages

:07:45.:07:49.

in America before the financial The bank, which is more than 70%

:07:50.:07:51.

owned by the taxpayer, could be fined an additional

:07:52.:07:56.

?3 billion by the US A major report into the health

:07:57.:08:02.

of children in the UK has found an "alarming gap" exists

:08:03.:08:06.

between the rich and poor, with one in five young people

:08:07.:08:09.

suffering as a result of poverty. The Royal College of Paediatrics

:08:10.:08:18.

and Child Health also suggests the UK is lagging behind

:08:19.:08:21.

most western European countries when it comes to measures

:08:22.:08:23.

such as infant mortality Our health correspondent

:08:24.:08:26.

Dominic Hughes reports. Anxiety, depression

:08:27.:08:30.

and a need to be listened to. These are the themes of a short

:08:31.:08:40.

play on mental health, devised by school

:08:41.:08:43.

students in Liverpool. The issues they touch on reflect

:08:44.:08:46.

those in today's report on the health of children

:08:47.:08:54.

and young people. It paints a picture of the UK

:08:55.:08:57.

struggling to match other countries The evidence has been developing

:08:58.:09:00.

for some time that all is not well It's the first time we have really

:09:01.:09:04.

put together a proper picture across all four countries

:09:05.:09:09.

and the news is not good. Some of the issues that raise

:09:10.:09:12.

concerns over the state of child health include just 34%

:09:13.:09:14.

of babies breast fed to six months, 40% of children in

:09:15.:09:18.

England's most deprived and half of adult mental health

:09:19.:09:22.

problems start before the age of 14. And for the drama group

:09:23.:09:29.

in Liverpool, mental Mental illnesses are an illness

:09:30.:09:31.

of the brain and they're as valid as any other illnesses

:09:32.:09:40.

to any other part of the body. Just because you can't see it

:09:41.:09:43.

physically it doesn't mean Our production will mainly be to get

:09:44.:09:46.

rid of that stigma about mental health and just educate the audience

:09:47.:09:50.

a bit more about mental health. The four governments of the UK

:09:51.:09:53.

are all challenged to consider the impact their policies

:09:54.:09:56.

will have on children. They've responded by restating

:09:57.:09:58.

commitments to improve The number of cars built in the UK

:09:59.:10:00.

has reached a 17-year high, due to continued economic

:10:01.:10:16.

recovery in Europe. Around 1.7 million cars rolled off

:10:17.:10:18.

production lines last year But investment in the

:10:19.:10:21.

industry fell last year because of continued

:10:22.:10:27.

uncertainty about the Almost half of all hospitals

:10:28.:10:29.

are failing to meet basic government standards for hospital food,

:10:30.:10:33.

according to data released The Campaign for Better

:10:34.:10:35.

Hospital Food warns But the government says

:10:36.:10:40.

standards are improving. In 2014 food standards became

:10:41.:10:55.

mandatory in English hospitals. This is an attempt to find out what

:10:56.:10:59.

progress has been made since then. It says there is more to do, but

:11:00.:11:03.

claimed that has been immeasurable improvement in food quality. For

:11:04.:11:08.

example in 89% of hospitals patients said their food was good or very

:11:09.:11:15.

good, but up 5% from 2013. 55% of hospitals are fully compliant with

:11:16.:11:18.

standards recommended I dieticians, but up 14% from 2015. And 52% of

:11:19.:11:26.

hospitals are fully compliant with basic government standards on food

:11:27.:11:30.

quality and nutrition. Nearly 40% are said to be hardly compliant. But

:11:31.:11:35.

the campaign for better hospital food excel on that same statistic,

:11:36.:11:40.

saying it shows nearly half of hospitals don't meet basic

:11:41.:11:45.

standards. -- picks up. The organisation claims nearly one third

:11:46.:11:48.

of patients are at real risk of malnutrition. The department of

:11:49.:11:53.

Health says food standards in hospital are legally binding. The

:11:54.:11:56.

campaigners claim the legal framework for schools is more

:11:57.:11:59.

rigourous. They say that means healthy children in schools get more

:12:00.:12:03.

and legal protection on food standards and six children in

:12:04.:12:04.

hospitals. It was a big night for the TV

:12:05.:12:08.

industry last night. Ant and Dec won the prize

:12:09.:12:19.

for the best TV presenters Imagine how big

:12:20.:12:22.

their trophy room is! It was the National Television

:12:23.:12:28.

Awards in London last night, while the BBC presenter

:12:29.:12:31.

Graham Norton was recognised ITV's programme got best magazine.

:12:32.:12:46.

We were at the awards. ARM happy to say Allah team still had a brilliant

:12:47.:12:56.

time. -- I am happy. Carol was there, she pulled on all

:12:57.:12:58.

night. Not for the first time! We will be

:12:59.:13:03.

getting the weather forecast from her, if she is still awake, in a

:13:04.:13:05.

couple of minutes. It was controversially

:13:06.:13:08.

sanctioned by President Bush, banned by President Obama,

:13:09.:13:10.

but now President Trump has said In an interview with the US Network

:13:11.:13:13.

ABC, he said he supports the reintroduction of interrogation

:13:14.:13:18.

techniques, currently banned Donald Trump also repeated

:13:19.:13:20.

his stance that Mexico would pay for a 2,000 mile wall

:13:21.:13:26.

along it's border with the US. Though the Mexican President

:13:27.:13:29.

has rejected the idea. We'll discuss this in more detail

:13:30.:13:35.

in a moment, but first When Isis is doing things that

:13:36.:13:48.

nobody has ever heard of since mediaeval times, would I feel

:13:49.:13:52.

strongly about water boarding? As far as I'm concerned I think we have

:13:53.:13:57.

to fight fire with fire. I've spoken as recently as 24 hours ago, with

:13:58.:14:02.

people at the highest level of intelligence, and I asked them the

:14:03.:14:08.

question: Does it work? Does torture work? And the answer was yes,

:14:09.:14:12.

absolutely. You are now the president. You want water boarding?

:14:13.:14:17.

I don't want people to chop off anybody's heads in the Middle East.

:14:18.:14:22.

The Mexican president said in recent days that Mexico will absolutely not

:14:23.:14:25.

pay adequate against their dignity as a country and their dignity as

:14:26.:14:32.

Mexicans. He has to say that. But I am just telling you there will be a

:14:33.:14:39.

form, perhaps a complicated form. You have to understand, what I'm

:14:40.:14:43.

doing is good for the United States and it will also be good for Mexico.

:14:44.:14:47.

We want to have a stable and solid Mexico. When will construction

:14:48.:14:52.

begin? As soon as we can. As soon as we can physically do it. Months? I

:14:53.:14:56.

would say months, yes. Banning is starting immediately.

:14:57.:14:59.

Jacob Parakilas is Assistant Head of the US and Americas Programme

:15:00.:15:03.

He joins us from our London newsroom.

:15:04.:15:06.

Good morning. He hasn't even been in position for one week and we've had

:15:07.:15:16.

constant tweeting and announcements and executive orders signed. Is he

:15:17.:15:20.

going about this with an amazing, an unusual amount of energy?

:15:21.:15:26.

If you are calling to the nine when Obama took office, he signed a

:15:27.:15:32.

number of things including torture techniques, calling for the closure

:15:33.:15:36.

of Guantanamo Bay. Some of those things and notably the closure of

:15:37.:15:41.

that detention centre, didn't. It is normal for a president to begin

:15:42.:15:44.

their term with a flurry of activity because it sets out the agenda and

:15:45.:15:51.

it also, in some ways, they are in their honeymoon period. They set up

:15:52.:15:55.

their agenda and they can reinforce it over the course of their term.

:15:56.:15:58.

That go through some of the things they have been talking about. Let's

:15:59.:16:02.

start with torture. Shall we be surprised by the strength of some of

:16:03.:16:09.

his words in that interview? No, it's entirely consistent with what

:16:10.:16:13.

he said during the campaign. The interesting thing is the internal

:16:14.:16:17.

dynamics. He said in that interview that he would listen to the press

:16:18.:16:24.

Secretary General Mattis and his CIA director Mike Pompeo. Both of those

:16:25.:16:27.

said they would be bringing back water boarding. Also bringing back

:16:28.:16:36.

the Acted that would bring any interrogation which bans water

:16:37.:16:41.

boarding or other forms of torture. For the moment, it sounds by Kuwait

:16:42.:16:45.

push for any harder to the reintegration of. -- he won't push

:16:46.:16:53.

any harder. The number of Republicans, especially John Cain,

:16:54.:16:57.

have pushed for the continuation of the ban. So he might not intend to

:16:58.:17:03.

deliver it but is he just trying to appeal directly to his voters, his

:17:04.:17:07.

supporters, at the moment, and throw them some red meat? Think you

:17:08.:17:11.

straight to appeal to his supporters and also set out what he sees as the

:17:12.:17:16.

position of toughness. Set out this idea that he will be aggressively

:17:17.:17:20.

defending America's national interest. All of this is continued

:17:21.:17:27.

on the current political situation. There is general turnover in Cabinet

:17:28.:17:32.

posts. We don't know whether Mike Pompeo or General Mattis will last

:17:33.:17:38.

both terms. We don't know who else might get into crucial national

:17:39.:17:43.

security posts. He is talking about the wall and talking about building

:17:44.:17:51.

it within months. If that realistic? No. It's absolutely a huge

:17:52.:17:57.

construction project. Much of it is through in hospitable territory.

:17:58.:18:00.

There is also the problem that a lot of the land is not owned by the

:18:01.:18:04.

Federal government. It is private land owners. Housing estates. It is

:18:05.:18:09.

compensated legal process. Securing land rights. You can't do is that

:18:10.:18:13.

land and then start putting up a concrete barrier. So, he will be

:18:14.:18:18.

able to begin construction on certain segments of the wall beyond

:18:19.:18:22.

the 700 or so miles of war that already exist. It is not something

:18:23.:18:27.

he will be able to get done quickly. In terms of effectiveness, most

:18:28.:18:34.

undocumented immigration in the US is not from people crossing the

:18:35.:18:38.

border that people coming on student visas or work visas and overstaying

:18:39.:18:42.

so the wall will not stop any of that. A lot for Donald Trump and

:18:43.:18:48.

Theresa May to talk about when she hits the White House tomorrow. As we

:18:49.:18:52.

speak, she is getting on a plane. Thank you for your time. And taking

:18:53.:18:57.

a hamper with her. What would you want in a hamper? Tarts. Carol, what

:18:58.:19:07.

would you like in a hamper that would impress you?

:19:08.:19:13.

Good morning. If you are just stepping out, it is called start the

:19:14.:19:20.

day. Temperatures are widely around freezing orders below or above. It

:19:21.:19:25.

will get down to the bitter wind. It is coming off a cold continent and

:19:26.:19:29.

it has been dragged across our shores from South to North. If you

:19:30.:19:34.

are just stepping out, make sure you take something warm with you. Cloudy

:19:35.:19:40.

start to the day. Thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle and the odd

:19:41.:19:45.

snow flurry. Most of us will miss it anyway. We also have the odd pocket

:19:46.:19:50.

of log around, not to the level of what we have seen lately. As you can

:19:51.:19:54.

see across Southern counties, a lot of cloud. That is called in Exeter

:19:55.:20:00.

as it was yesterday. Over into Wales, a lot of cloud. The Pennines

:20:01.:20:06.

and the Vale of York, a bit of drizzle but a lot of hill fog. You

:20:07.:20:11.

will have into the sunshine through the day for the North of Scotland

:20:12.:20:16.

but the rest of Scotland and Northern Ireland, some drizzle and

:20:17.:20:24.

cloud. Talking through the day, it will be windy, especially out

:20:25.:20:27.

towards the West and the north-west. Don't forget, all of us, if exposed

:20:28.:20:34.

to the wind, feel cold. London's temperature is at three Celsius and

:20:35.:20:38.

in the wind will feel like more like minus one. For Newcastle in the

:20:39.:20:44.

wind, -6, that is the field. -- feeling. Into tomorrow, still windy

:20:45.:20:55.

Collette -- conditions. We will start off in the morning began with

:20:56.:20:59.

the odd pocket of Frost, like this morning, the risk of ice. In the

:21:00.:21:05.

West, what you will find is the rain coming in, courtesy of the front. It

:21:06.:21:09.

won't be too heavy and any snow flurries will move away. In the

:21:10.:21:14.

south-west, milder conditions, less call than it has been across central

:21:15.:21:18.

and eastern areas but if you are outside, it will still feel cold. On

:21:19.:21:23.

Saturday, we start to see a more unsettled dealing. A few more

:21:24.:21:27.

showers around, it won't be as cold and we will equally the sunshine in

:21:28.:21:31.

between the showers. I will draw your attention to this area of rain.

:21:32.:21:36.

This is a next area of low pressure which at the moment looks as though

:21:37.:21:39.

it will sweep across other southern parts of England and Wales through

:21:40.:21:44.

Sunday. The timing and position of that could change so don't be gutted

:21:45.:21:48.

if that's what you see and you have outdoor plans, it may move further

:21:49.:21:54.

south. At the moment, it looks like it is the northern half of the

:21:55.:21:58.

country that will see the driest and brightest conditions with some

:21:59.:22:03.

sunshine. Is it fair to say it is quite fresh at the moment? Fresh!

:22:04.:22:08.

That is an understatement it is perishing. As you fresh today? I'm

:22:09.:22:18.

very fresh, Steph, thank you for asking. There is a reason we are

:22:19.:22:24.

saying is, it was the TV awards last night and Carol was there. She was

:22:25.:22:28.

there last night and she looks brilliant.

:22:29.:22:32.

As second-hand vehicles go, it doesn't sound very promising -

:22:33.:22:34.

slightly scorched, 74 million miles on the clock and last seen

:22:35.:22:37.

But the capsule which took Major Tim Peake into space -

:22:38.:22:42.

and brought him safely back again - is an invaluable piece

:22:43.:22:45.

It's going on display at London's Science Museum today,

:22:46.:22:48.

where our Global science correspondent Rebecca Morelle

:22:49.:22:50.

Global science correspondence doesn't do it justice. It's gone

:22:51.:23:14.

beyond global! Yes, I am here science Museum and behind me you can

:23:15.:23:21.

see the Soyuz capital that brought Tim Peake up to space and more

:23:22.:23:25.

importantly, brought him back down-to-earth. Apprising the small

:23:26.:23:31.

when you see it up close. She gets a sense of what it must have been like

:23:32.:23:35.

in there. Three people crammed in. You can see the scorch marks outside

:23:36.:23:39.

where it re-entered backstreet the atmosphere when temperatures reached

:23:40.:23:45.

up to 5100dC. We'll be talking to little later but a select group of

:23:46.:23:52.

people that had the delight of going up into space and had the amazing

:23:53.:23:56.

experience of going up in one of these. One is them is Doctor Helen

:23:57.:24:09.

Sharman. Visit bring back memories? -- does it? We do get the chance to

:24:10.:24:18.

get up close to see one up close even for astronauts. Inside, it

:24:19.:24:23.

looks like the real thing in the simulators but to have one that has

:24:24.:24:28.

actually flown into space is a real excitement stop here at the science

:24:29.:24:35.

Museum, you have this. Ways it important to get these pieces of

:24:36.:24:42.

space history on display? This is space history but actually, it's not

:24:43.:24:46.

just history. This is something that really happened in our lifetime.

:24:47.:24:51.

It's very recent history. People can remember not just the thing but what

:24:52.:24:55.

it signifies. This is a British astronaut, Tim Peake, he put Britain

:24:56.:25:00.

back into the realms of human spaceflight where we are competing

:25:01.:25:05.

again on the international stage. We were so proud of him and it will

:25:06.:25:10.

inspire many more people to do more things, not just associated with

:25:11.:25:14.

space at all that space offers and the excitement of science and

:25:15.:25:18.

engineering technologies and mathematics that you need to

:25:19.:25:23.

understand in order to make missions like this possible. It's interesting

:25:24.:25:33.

that Tim Peake might have another chance to go back up, maybe in a

:25:34.:25:39.

Soyuz maybe in another Capshaw. Would you like to go back up? Every

:25:40.:25:43.

single astronaut would like to go back up. Everything goes back to

:25:44.:25:49.

normal except for one thing and that would be a longing to go back. Is

:25:50.:25:55.

anything on the earth ever the same again afterwards? Space is so

:25:56.:26:00.

different to anything that you do in life. There are many exciting things

:26:01.:26:04.

in life, of course there are. But there is this opportunity to do

:26:05.:26:09.

something that you will never be able to do again. It is just the

:26:10.:26:15.

most natural and relaxing thing to be able to float around in space.

:26:16.:26:19.

All these things that you can do in science. Thank you, Helen. A piece

:26:20.:26:24.

of space history that will be unveiled to the public later this

:26:25.:26:29.

morning, bought from the Russian Space Agency for an undisclosed

:26:30.:26:30.

amount. Thank you, Rebecca. Amazing to hear from Helen Sharman.

:26:31.:26:41.

Such an amazing woman. Have Tim Peake on later in the show as well.

:26:42.:26:47.

Back in the Capshaw, see how it feels. -- Capshaw.

:26:48.:26:53.

Still to come this morning, we'll meet nine-year-old Leonie.

:26:54.:26:58.

Homework is the thing I struggle with because I'm always looking

:26:59.:27:02.

after staff. many of which are struggling to

:27:03.:27:03.

balance school with helping at home. Time now to get the news,

:27:04.:27:10.

travel and weather where you are. They will be also

:27:11.:30:37.

possible heavy showers. I'm back with the latest

:30:38.:30:39.

from the BBC London newsroom Plenty more news, travel

:30:40.:30:42.

and weather on our website. This is Breakfast, with Jon Kay

:30:43.:30:45.

and Steph McGovern. Theresa May will call for a renewed

:30:46.:30:50.

special relationship with the United States,

:30:51.:30:52.

when she addresses Republican politicians at their annual retreat

:30:53.:30:55.

in Philadelphia later today. The Prime Minister is due to become

:30:56.:30:57.

the first world leader to hold face-to-face talks

:30:58.:31:00.

with President Trump, when they meet at the

:31:01.:31:04.

White House tomorrow. She has said she's not afraid

:31:05.:31:06.

of having a candid conversation. Meanwhile, Donald Trump has said

:31:07.:31:10.

he believes that torture can work to get information out

:31:11.:31:13.

of terrorism suspects. In an interview with ABC News,

:31:14.:31:16.

the President said the US had But Mr Trump said he would seek

:31:17.:31:19.

further advice before deciding whether to bring back techniques,

:31:20.:31:26.

such as water-boarding, Are have spoken as recently as 24

:31:27.:31:43.

hours ago with people at the highest level of intelligence and I ask them

:31:44.:31:48.

the question: Does it work? Does torture work? And the answer was

:31:49.:31:52.

yes, absolutely. The government here will publish

:31:53.:32:02.

a Billm, to enable it to invoke Article 50 and trigger

:32:03.:32:06.

the process of Britain leaving The Brexit Secretary David

:32:07.:32:08.

Davis has said the bill will be straightforward,

:32:09.:32:11.

although opposition parties Royal Bank of Scotland will take

:32:12.:32:13.

another financial hit for mis-selling risky mortgages

:32:14.:32:18.

in America before the financial The bank, which is more than 70%

:32:19.:32:21.

owned by the taxpayer, could be fined an additional

:32:22.:32:26.

?3 billion by the US Ambulance crews are finding it

:32:27.:32:43.

increasingly difficult to cope, according any -- according to an

:32:44.:32:47.

investigation into the service. The National Audit Office said rising

:32:48.:32:50.

demand, recruitment problems and wider NHS problems meant crews were

:32:51.:32:54.

failing to reach their target. NHS England says it is trying a new

:32:55.:33:02.

response strategy to reach the maximum number of people in a short

:33:03.:33:04.

amount of time. The number of cars built in the UK

:33:05.:33:05.

has reached a 17-year high, thanks to continued economic

:33:06.:33:09.

recovery in Europe. Around 1.7 million cars rolled off

:33:10.:33:11.

production lines last year But investment in the industry fell

:33:12.:33:13.

last year because of continued uncertainty over the future

:33:14.:33:18.

of the economy following Almost half of our hospitals are

:33:19.:33:29.

failing to meet basic government standards for hospital food

:33:30.:33:32.

according to new data released today by the Department of Health. The

:33:33.:33:37.

campaign for better hospital food warned the situation is diabolical.

:33:38.:33:41.

The government says the standards are legally binding and that

:33:42.:33:42.

performance is improving. It was the National Television

:33:43.:33:45.

Awards last night. No surprise - Ant and Dec won

:33:46.:33:49.

the prize for best TV presenter Other winners included

:33:50.:33:52.

Mary Berry for best judge Strictly Come Dancing picked up

:33:53.:34:00.

the gong for best talent show. There were lots of surprises as

:34:01.:34:09.

well. On that delighted many was that Emmerdale won the best soap.

:34:10.:34:18.

And ITV's This Morning won best live magazine programme.

:34:19.:34:23.

World unto them, well done to the team and our lot had a great night.

:34:24.:34:29.

-- well done to them. We weren't invited, what we had a

:34:30.:34:33.

good time watching. We're holding the fort... Over to

:34:34.:34:44.

the sport. Serena and Venus Williams are

:34:45.:34:46.

through to the final of the Australian Open. You would be

:34:47.:34:52.

forgiven for thinking you've gone back ten years.

:34:53.:34:58.

And Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer are going strong as well!

:34:59.:35:03.

Venus and Serena have played themselves so many times, the last

:35:04.:35:06.

time they played in a grandslam final was ten years ago. Venus

:35:07.:35:14.

Williams is 36, Serena is 35. In the men's draw, there's only one person

:35:15.:35:20.

who is left under 30. So it is one for the veterans. William.

:35:21.:35:23.

It's Serena versus Venus at the Australian Open,

:35:24.:35:27.

the first all-Williams final since the Wimbledon showdown eight

:35:28.:35:29.

Serena, a six time winner in Melbourne, comfortably beat

:35:30.:35:32.

the world number 79 Mirjana Lucic-Baroni

:35:33.:35:34.

Baroni was playing in her first grand slam semi-final in 18 years

:35:35.:35:38.

and couldn't match the pace and power of the world number two.

:35:39.:35:49.

And at the age of 36, her older sister Venus Williams is through.

:35:50.:35:54.

The seven-time Grand Slam beat Coco Vandeweghe in three sets.

:35:55.:35:59.

She said it would be a dream to see Serena on the other side of the net

:36:00.:36:04.

Alfie Hewitt and Gordon Reid will face-off with their respective

:36:05.:36:12.

partners in a wheelchair tennis. Southampton beat Liverpool 1-0

:36:13.:36:17.

at Anfield last night to reach 1-0 up from the first leg,

:36:18.:36:20.

Saints spent much of the match defending before Shane Long

:36:21.:36:26.

booked his side's trip to Wembley. They reached the final

:36:27.:36:30.

without conceding a goal. Southampton will play either

:36:31.:36:33.

Hull City or Manchester United who play their second

:36:34.:36:36.

leg semi tonight. I'm happy for the squad

:36:37.:36:41.

because they worked very hard since the beginning of the season,

:36:42.:36:49.

and played every three Celtic have stretched

:36:50.:36:56.

their lead at the top of the Scottish Premiership

:36:57.:37:00.

to 22 points. They beat St Johnston

:37:01.:37:03.

1-0 in the first game in the league since the winter break

:37:04.:37:06.

and have now gone 26 domestic games unbeaten, equalling

:37:07.:37:10.

their own record. Meanwhile, in the Scottish Cup,

:37:11.:37:13.

Hearts came back from 1-0 down to beat Championship Raith Rovers

:37:14.:37:17.

4-2 in extra time of their Scottish They'll host Edinburgh

:37:18.:37:20.

rivals Hibs next. Usain Bolt is to lose one

:37:21.:37:23.

of his nine Olympic gold medals, after the IOC disqualified his

:37:24.:37:26.

Jamaican relay teammate Nesta Carter over a doping violation

:37:27.:37:29.

at the Beijing Games. The IOC says Carter tested positive

:37:30.:37:31.

for a banned stimulant in a re-analysis of samples

:37:32.:37:34.

from the 2008 Olympics. Carter and Bolt were teammates

:37:35.:37:40.

on the winning 4x100 As a result, the Jamaican team,

:37:41.:37:42.

including Bolt, has been stripped of its gold, meaning he can no

:37:43.:37:47.

longer claim to hold You can't rerun race

:37:48.:37:50.

and get those medals back. In Usain Bolt's case,

:37:51.:37:56.

we all know that was his last So it has gone from nine medals,

:37:57.:37:59.

which was unbelievable, to eight medals, but what he has

:38:00.:38:03.

achieved is still amazing. Captain Eoin Morgan captain says

:38:04.:38:09.

the current England one day side England lost the ODI series 2-1,

:38:10.:38:12.

but ended on a high with a five run They play the first of three

:38:13.:38:18.

T-20 games in Kanpur Britain's Millie Knight and guide

:38:19.:38:22.

Brett Wild won downhill gold on the opening day of the

:38:23.:38:33.

Para Alpine Skiing The 18-year-old visually impaired

:38:34.:38:35.

skier beat the five-time Paralympic champion Henrieta

:38:36.:38:38.

Farkasova of Slovakia. Knight was Britain's youngest

:38:39.:38:42.

athlete at the Sochi Paralympics and has dominated the World Cup

:38:43.:38:45.

circuit in recent months winning 11 When we came into this we thought

:38:46.:38:48.

we just want to be pleased We wanted to come down,

:38:49.:38:59.

finish the line and think, "Yes,

:39:00.:39:05.

I managed to do that. "We couldn't have gone any

:39:06.:39:07.

faster and the result But we got both of those

:39:08.:39:09.

feelings today, so chuffed! Brilliant and understandably the

:39:10.:39:19.

favourite to win at the Winter Olympics next year. Can you think of

:39:20.:39:22.

anything more terrifying, not being able to see properly and skiing at

:39:23.:39:27.

100 mph down a mountain? Brilliant. You're going to stick

:39:28.:39:34.

with us because we are going to talk American football.

:39:35.:39:39.

I am trying to pass myself out and look little bit taller, but I don't

:39:40.:39:41.

think it will work. It is as quintessentially American

:39:42.:39:42.

as hot dogs and cowboys, but American football continues

:39:43.:39:47.

to grow in popularity Nearly 3.5 million

:39:48.:39:49.

British viewers now tune The NFL's fan base tops

:39:50.:39:52.

13 million in the UK. Tickets for the first NFL game

:39:53.:40:00.

in London in 2007 sold out And that has been replicated

:40:01.:40:03.

by subsequent sell-outs ever since. we'll speak to two former

:40:04.:40:10.

Super Bowl winners in a moment First, here's a taste

:40:11.:40:15.

of the last one. Welcome to the stadium as we are

:40:16.:40:24.

getting set for Super Bowl L. The ball is free! Touchdown! He

:40:25.:40:54.

leaps and scores! Touchdown! In trouble! To the end zone! Touchdown!

:40:55.:41:08.

They are the world champions. They have just one Super Bowl L. -- won.

:41:09.:41:13.

They know how to sell it. It is the drama.

:41:14.:41:17.

Former Super Bowl champions Osi Umenyiora and Jason Bell

:41:18.:41:20.

Good morning and thanks for coming in. Osi, you are an ambassador for

:41:21.:41:30.

the NFL to the UK. That means you have to sell the game in the UK?

:41:31.:41:35.

That's what I am trying to do and so forehead has been easy. NFL is a

:41:36.:41:40.

fantastic game. -- so far it has been. Why do you think it is popular

:41:41.:41:46.

here? You have to understand the dynamics of American football. It

:41:47.:41:50.

has something for everybody, with the UR vig, tall, fast, slow,

:41:51.:41:55.

whatever. -- whether you are big. So when they see the incredible

:41:56.:42:00.

athleticism on the field they enjoy it and obviously it's a very

:42:01.:42:04.

American game. There's a special relationship between America and the

:42:05.:42:09.

UK... We've been hearing about that! I think that's why they enjoy it.

:42:10.:42:14.

Maybe you can get the big ambassador job in London as well!

:42:15.:42:17.

For someone who doesn't understand it, a lot of the UK audience, give

:42:18.:42:23.

us the basics. The basics? Follow the ball. Always follow the ball.

:42:24.:42:29.

You look at the line scrummage, the big guys at the front, and you see

:42:30.:42:32.

whoever is moving forwards and backwards, that's usually who is

:42:33.:42:37.

winning the game. The NFL, there's a lot of talk about it, like cricket,

:42:38.:42:41.

and it comes across as more complicated than it is. If you watch

:42:42.:42:46.

it you can pick it up quite easily. There are millions of people

:42:47.:42:49.

watching it in the UK. Our people getting out and playing it? Does it

:42:50.:42:53.

translate to people having a go on the pitch? Absolutely. Maybe about

:42:54.:42:59.

two or three weeks ago I looked to the left and saw a big field and

:43:00.:43:03.

people were playing with their full kit and gear and that threw me,

:43:04.:43:06.

because I had never seen that before. So from what I understand a

:43:07.:43:11.

lot of universities are playing it, a lot of kids, the game is

:43:12.:43:14.

increasing in popularity and we are really happy. Do you think perhaps

:43:15.:43:18.

people see it as a slightly safer version of Rob D, because you have

:43:19.:43:24.

the helmets, the pads? -- rugby. Is it safer than rugby? We've been

:43:25.:43:29.

talking a lot about concussion and head injuries. The risks are

:43:30.:43:34.

obviously there. Are you safer with a helmet on? I don't know if it is

:43:35.:43:39.

safer. I know it is definitely a better sport, but I don't know if it

:43:40.:43:44.

is safer. In all fairness rugby is a great sport, I enjoy watching it as

:43:45.:43:48.

well. But the NFL, there's really no comparison. You are part of the BBC

:43:49.:43:53.

highlights show. When you are doing the punditry, is it different doing

:43:54.:43:59.

it in the UK? It is. You've got to get the basics down. I forget how

:44:00.:44:04.

hard the basics are, you take it granted because you've been playing

:44:05.:44:07.

it for so long, but then you explain it and you feel it is intricate, but

:44:08.:44:12.

it is fun and exciting. There are so many stops and starts. I enjoy

:44:13.:44:16.

watching it when it's happening, but I look back on 1.5 hours and I think

:44:17.:44:23.

I waited more time in the gaps. It gives you time to talk to your

:44:24.:44:27.

friends! It gives you time to do the commentary. You get to do all the

:44:28.:44:32.

things you want to do. That's why you have to watch these guys on the

:44:33.:44:35.

highlights programme. We can't let you go without asking... These guys

:44:36.:44:45.

have won the Super Bowl. We have some enormous events in the UK, the

:44:46.:44:50.

FA Cup, grand slams in tennis, nothing quite compares to the scale

:44:51.:44:54.

of the Super Bowl. What does it feel like to win the Super Bowl?

:44:55.:44:58.

Incredible. Other than the World Cup there's really no other sport like

:44:59.:45:01.

that, there's no other game like that in the world. To be able to win

:45:02.:45:07.

that, and all of these little kids dream about playing this game for

:45:08.:45:12.

their entire life and once you get out there and you can do it and win

:45:13.:45:18.

at twice, twice! There's absolutely no feeling like it. It is an

:45:19.:45:22.

incredible completion. You feel like you are in paradise. One day I will

:45:23.:45:27.

achieve something that is minutely on the scale. We achieved something.

:45:28.:45:33.

We came on this show with you guys and it is almost like the Super

:45:34.:45:37.

Bowl! We should stop the interview there. Thank you.

:45:38.:45:42.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:45:43.:45:43.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:45:44.:45:50.

This morning is a cold start to the day. In Cardiff, it is plus three,

:45:51.:46:10.

Edinburgh, plus one. Today, wherever you are, it will feel cold. Largely

:46:11.:46:15.

down to the bitter wind. Again, it is coming up from this cold

:46:16.:46:19.

continent and it is dragging the cold air right across our shores.

:46:20.:46:25.

First thing this morning, it is cloudy as well is called. Watch out

:46:26.:46:29.

for ice on untreated surfaces because it has been damp, a wee bit

:46:30.:46:33.

of drizzle. Some of us could also see some snow flurries. There will

:46:34.:46:43.

be -- went to be enough to build a snowman. Breezy across most of the

:46:44.:46:46.

country. Northern Scotland is standing out. From the word go, you

:46:47.:46:52.

will see some sunshine. One of two brighter breaks as you come south.

:46:53.:46:55.

Essentially, fairly cloudy across the bulk of England but across

:46:56.:46:59.

southern counties, later in the morning and into the afternoon, you

:47:00.:47:02.

will see the cloud breakup and a sunny spells developing. Don't be

:47:03.:47:07.

full, it will feel better despite the fact we have sunshine and

:47:08.:47:13.

temperatures up to about six. For Wales, we will also see some

:47:14.:47:17.

sunshine come through but for most of Wales and in towards past of the

:47:18.:47:22.

Midlands, we hang on to the cloud. As we head into Northern Ireland, a

:47:23.:47:29.

cloudy and damp day. The Newcastle, the maximum temperature is freezing

:47:30.:47:34.

but if you are exposed to the wind, it will feel against your skin more

:47:35.:47:38.

like -6 because of the wind chill. As we had on through the evening and

:47:39.:47:43.

overnight, it will still be fairly windy. Then we have the next cluster

:47:44.:47:47.

of weather fronts coming our way ringing unsettled conditions as we

:47:48.:47:50.

had on through Friday. Friday we will start off on a cold note. Maybe

:47:51.:47:55.

the odd pocket of frost and fog around. One or two wintry flurries

:47:56.:47:59.

in the east that they won't last. Out towards the West and the north,

:48:00.:48:03.

we will see the weather fronts coming in, introducing patchy, light

:48:04.:48:08.

rain. With those, we will see higher temperatures in the West and it will

:48:09.:48:12.

become less cold in central and eastern parts of the UK. I'm using

:48:13.:48:17.

the terminology wisely because it won't be mild. In between showers,

:48:18.:48:24.

bright spells and sunshine. As is the nature of showers, you can see

:48:25.:48:31.

the next area waiting in the wings. It will bring rain across other

:48:32.:48:40.

parts of England. Dry and brighter with sunshine, John and Steph. Thank

:48:41.:48:43.

you very much indeed, Carol. We will be finding out more about

:48:44.:48:49.

how the economy will be doing. Figures out later this morning

:48:50.:48:54.

are expected to show the British Ben is in central London

:48:55.:48:57.

for us this morning. As Carol was saying, you must be

:48:58.:49:01.

freezing. It is a freezing this morning. We

:49:02.:49:12.

are on the rooftop of their Institution of Engineering and

:49:13.:49:17.

Technology. We will be keeping a close eye on the figures. We get the

:49:18.:49:22.

figures to the end of last year, the last quarter of last year. It is the

:49:23.:49:26.

economic growth figures, the GDP figures. It will show us how we

:49:27.:49:30.

fared as a country economically but there are a lot of questions about

:49:31.:49:35.

the year ahead because of uncertainty because of Brexit and

:49:36.:49:39.

also the fall in the value of the pound could have fed -- affect the

:49:40.:49:47.

money in our pockets. We have experts for us. London, the money in

:49:48.:49:54.

the pocket. 2016 was quite a good year but concern about the coming

:49:55.:49:58.

year. Inflation, uncertainty. A lot to contend with. Yes. 2016 was a

:49:59.:50:04.

good year. Much better than most economists was expect in. Inflation

:50:05.:50:12.

is rising, double between October and December last year. Some people

:50:13.:50:19.

are talking about 3.5%. Wages are rising, everyone is doing quite well

:50:20.:50:23.

but prices are rising faster than wages. Consumer demand which has

:50:24.:50:27.

been driving this economy is probably going to be a bit lower. We

:50:28.:50:32.

are really looking for it to tail off in the second half of the year

:50:33.:50:37.

but good figures today. David, we will feel the fall in the value of

:50:38.:50:41.

the pound, which we? It will squeeze our incomes because things will get

:50:42.:50:44.

more expensive. That is the flipside... Is down about 12.5%

:50:45.:50:53.

against the euro. We are starting to feel it through the supermarket and

:50:54.:50:58.

also some of the stores. A definite feeling of pain. People are much

:50:59.:51:01.

more discerning, we have seen horrible figures come out. You will

:51:02.:51:10.

find because 84,000 people lost their job at the beginning of 2016

:51:11.:51:15.

out of a workforce of 2.4 million out of the retail sector. People are

:51:16.:51:21.

on their guard. As Bronwyn says, the ability to have disposable income

:51:22.:51:24.

will be very much more carefully watched as it is done today and it

:51:25.:51:28.

will likely effect of GDP. I won't be the prophet of doom. The

:51:29.:51:36.

beautiful city of ours will have billions of tourist spending lots of

:51:37.:51:39.

filthy money. I hope it leads through to give everybody an upbeat

:51:40.:51:46.

feeling about life. There is an element that we will deal with this

:51:47.:51:50.

come what may. There are a lot of things for the economy to content

:51:51.:51:53.

with that we have been through worse. The 2008 financial crisis and

:51:54.:51:58.

have come through. This is just one of the things. It is robust but we

:51:59.:52:02.

are at a point where the global economy is doing much better.

:52:03.:52:07.

European economy, is to risk it. The UK is doing well. They have ready

:52:08.:52:12.

put up interest rates in the US. They may have to put up interest

:52:13.:52:15.

rates in the UK because some manufacturers are reaching capacity

:52:16.:52:21.

constraints and so that usually means that inflation will go higher.

:52:22.:52:26.

If it does. We might see the Bank of England raising rates. I think it

:52:27.:52:31.

will be constrained. A lot will depend on whether the pound takes

:52:32.:52:35.

another beating and import prices going up. A lot of uncertainty

:52:36.:52:43.

around. We will chat more later. You might be able to see London coming

:52:44.:52:47.

to life behind me. Everybody commuting into the city. I have

:52:48.:52:50.

noticed a fair few joggers wearing short shorts this morning. I would

:52:51.:52:55.

rather them than me because it is lolling freezing down here on the

:52:56.:52:57.

banks of the Thames. -- lolling. It is 753. You are watching

:52:58.:53:13.

breakfast. Just before eight AEM, lots of people will be heading off

:53:14.:53:17.

to school to begin their works to the day. For many kids, they mate

:53:18.:53:22.

to school to begin their works to the day. For many kids, they --

:53:23.:53:24.

might have been looking after their mum or dad who might be poorly. And

:53:25.:53:28.

that affects people doing their schoolwork. Research from the carers

:53:29.:53:36.

trust show that more than half struggled to meet deadlines.

:53:37.:53:40.

Holly Hamilton has been to meet two sisters who care for their mum -

:53:41.:53:49.

Just nine and 13, they have big dreams of becoming actresses.

:53:50.:53:56.

But right now their job is taking care of their Mum.

:53:57.:53:59.

When she had a heart attack she got tunnel vision and then it is hard

:54:00.:54:03.

I do a lot of tidying, packing things away and keeping

:54:04.:54:11.

things off the floor, because when things are on the floor

:54:12.:54:14.

I was the kind of Mum that did everything for her children,

:54:15.:54:23.

the running around, the picking up, and they relied

:54:24.:54:26.

And then suddenly I couldn't do anything for them and found

:54:27.:54:31.

that they were having to do things for me.

:54:32.:54:37.

That's what we've been learning about.

:54:38.:54:40.

The two are young carers, like more than 700,000 children

:54:41.:54:43.

Many providing care for over 50 hours a week.

:54:44.:54:50.

So it's no surprise that a survey by the Carers Trust

:54:51.:54:53.

found that more than half of those aged 16-25 were struggling

:54:54.:54:56.

Homework is the thing I struggle with because I'm

:54:57.:55:04.

always doing loads of chores and stuff and then I have to find

:55:05.:55:07.

Local council bosses say it is vital young carers

:55:08.:55:16.

are identified so they can get the support they need

:55:17.:55:19.

You see everyone and you think, oh, they're so lucky,

:55:20.:55:26.

they can do all of that, but then you think, oh,

:55:27.:55:29.

But then I also think it is important that I help her out

:55:30.:55:36.

and I like being responsible for her, because it makes

:55:37.:55:39.

Claudia and Leonie are getting help from their school,

:55:40.:55:47.

which means they can focus on their schoolwork

:55:48.:55:49.

What does the word carer mean for you?

:55:50.:55:57.

Well, when I think carer I think it's not normal,

:55:58.:56:02.

Like when you are an actress you have a big role to play,

:56:03.:56:07.

but then when you finish doing that part you need to stop,

:56:08.:56:14.

but it's like you're doing that role forever.

:56:15.:56:25.

After 8:30 we'll be joined by the Chief Executive

:56:26.:56:31.

of the Carers Trust to find out more about their concerns and discuss

:56:32.:56:35.

what can be done to make life easier for young carers.

:56:36.:56:39.

The former dentist who took up sprinting in his 90s.

:56:40.:56:50.

Now a World Record holder, Charles Eugster

:56:51.:56:54.

will be here to tell us why he's refusing to slow down in old age.

:56:55.:57:00.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:57:01.:00:30.

The Prime Minister vows to renew the UK's special

:00:31.:00:32.

relationship with the US, as she travels to America

:00:33.:00:34.

Theresa May will say the two countries can "lead together again",

:00:35.:00:39.

and will propose greater co-operation in the fight

:00:40.:00:41.

She will leave Downing Street for the states very soon.

:00:42.:00:49.

In his first TV interview since taking office,

:00:50.:00:51.

President Trump says he believes torture works when dealing

:00:52.:00:53.

I want to do Everything within the bounds of what you're allowed to do

:00:54.:01:06.

legally. But do I feel it works? Absolutely I feel it works.

:01:07.:01:19.

Good morning, it's Thursday, the 26th of January.

:01:20.:01:23.

Also this morning: Children's health in the UK is lagging behind most

:01:24.:01:25.

other European countries, according to a major new report.

:01:26.:01:38.

We get the latest growth figures later today. They are expected to

:01:39.:01:44.

show the economy third pretty well at the end of last year, but a rise

:01:45.:01:47.

in the cost-of-living, if all so might fall in the value of the

:01:48.:01:52.

pound, what does this year have in store?

:01:53.:01:54.

It's a Serena and Venus Williams final at the Australian Open,

:01:55.:01:57.

as both win their semi-finals this morning.

:01:58.:02:00.

It is the first time they have met in a grand slam final for eight

:02:01.:02:04.

years. It's taken Tim Peake

:02:05.:02:07.

to space and back. Now the Soyuz capsule

:02:08.:02:08.

has landed in London. Carroll might want to get inside and

:02:09.:02:18.

have a little sleep because she has been up most of the night for the

:02:19.:02:22.

National television awards! It is a cold start to the day-to-day and it

:02:23.:02:28.

is also fairly cloudy. We have some ice on untreated surfaces, a little

:02:29.:02:31.

bit of drizzle and the odd snow flurry. Later, some of us will see

:02:32.:02:36.

some sunshine, but it is going to feel chilly. Thanks, Carol.

:02:37.:02:40.

Theresa May will call for a renewed special relationship

:02:41.:02:44.

with the United States, when she addresses Republican

:02:45.:02:46.

politicians in Philadelphia later. A day before she becomes the first

:02:47.:02:49.

international leader to meet President Trump,

:02:50.:02:50.

the Prime Minister will argue for greater co-operation

:02:51.:02:52.

in the fight against terrorism. Our Political Correspondent Chris

:02:53.:02:57.

This is really important for both sides, isn't it? For President Trump

:02:58.:03:10.

and Theresa May. What can we

:03:11.:03:15.

expect to come out of this visit? Crucially, it is a chance for the

:03:16.:03:21.

two leaders to get to know one another. It is often in

:03:22.:03:26.

underestimated how important the personal relationship is. The two

:03:27.:03:29.

leaders need to get to know one another. And overcome some

:03:30.:03:33.

differences. Not least the criticisms that Theresa May has made

:03:34.:03:37.

of now President Trump in the past. But also on specific aspects of

:03:38.:03:41.

policy. I know you've been talking this morning about what Donald Trump

:03:42.:03:45.

has been saying about the potential reintroduction of what is known as

:03:46.:03:49.

waterboarding, what many people see us techniques of torture. The

:03:50.:03:53.

British Government has been very explicit in the past. It doesn't

:03:54.:04:02.

cooperate with foreign governments that use techniques that are seen as

:04:03.:04:05.

torture, or are seen as cruel and degrading. Potentially tricky spot

:04:06.:04:07.

the former Prime Minister. On a personal level, it is a chance -- a

:04:08.:04:13.

pretty tricky spot for the Prime Minister. It is a chance to get to

:04:14.:04:18.

know Donald Trump in this away day at Philadelphia, and one a human

:04:19.:04:22.

level, a chance to get to know one another, there has been an exchange

:04:23.:04:25.

of gifts, we are told the Prime Minister is taking a hamper from her

:04:26.:04:29.

country retreat in Buckinghamshire. Bakewell tarts amongst the things

:04:30.:04:33.

that hamper I'm told. She is also going to take an agent Scottish

:04:34.:04:42.

artefact, it is a cup. It dates back to the Cilic language in the 15th

:04:43.:04:47.

and 16th century. That is a nod to President Trump's mother, originally

:04:48.:04:52.

being from the Isle of Lewis. She heads west with the Bakewell parts.

:04:53.:04:56.

In the building behind you, in Parliament today, they are thinking

:04:57.:05:00.

the other way across the Channel, about Europe and Brexit. What is the

:05:01.:05:03.

significance of this paper which is going to be introduced before MPs

:05:04.:05:08.

today? What we are going to get in the next couple of weeks is what we

:05:09.:05:13.

could describe as a lot of Westminster around Brexit. The

:05:14.:05:15.

building behind me needs to draw up a new law to make this process of

:05:16.:05:20.

Brexit start, the so-called triggering of Article 50. Today, we

:05:21.:05:24.

get the outline of that new law, what is known as a bill. The

:05:25.:05:27.

Government will publish that in the next couple of hours. From then, the

:05:28.:05:32.

debate can truly begin. We will get proper debate in the Commons and the

:05:33.:05:36.

Lord of all of this starting next week. Chris Mason in Westminster,

:05:37.:05:37.

thank you. When she visits Washington tomorrow,

:05:38.:05:39.

Theresa May has said she is not afraid of having a candid

:05:40.:05:42.

conversation with President Trump, who said he believed that torture

:05:43.:05:44.

could work to get information out of suspected terrorists.

:05:45.:05:47.

Donald Trump said he would seek further advice from the CIA before

:05:48.:05:50.

deciding whether to bring back techniques such as water-boarding.

:05:51.:05:53.

Speaking to the American ABC network in his first televised interview

:05:54.:05:58.

since becoming President, he also repeated his pledge to make

:05:59.:05:59.

Mexico pay for a wall along Here's our Washington

:06:00.:06:03.

Correspondent, David Willis. Could America be set for a return

:06:04.:06:14.

to the interrogation methods of old? A draft executive order

:06:15.:06:21.

suggests its commander-in-chief could be preparing to return

:06:22.:06:27.

to the dark days of waterboarding, by reopening the so-called

:06:28.:06:33.

black site secret prisons In his first TV interview

:06:34.:06:35.

since becoming President, Donald Trump made clear

:06:36.:06:38.

he is considering scrapping an order by his predecessor that terrorist

:06:39.:06:41.

suspects be treated in accordance Torture works,

:06:42.:06:44.

the President declared. When they're chopping off the heads

:06:45.:06:50.

of our people and other people, when they're chopping off the heads

:06:51.:06:53.

of people because they happen to be a Christian in the Middle East,

:06:54.:06:56.

when Isis is doing things that nobody has ever heard

:06:57.:06:59.

of since mediaeval times, would I feel strongly

:07:00.:07:01.

about water boarding? As far as I'm concerned,

:07:02.:07:02.

we have to fight fire with fire. Reports suggest Mr Trump is also due

:07:03.:07:06.

to announce plans to close America's borders to refugees,

:07:07.:07:14.

for a period at least, and implement tougher visa

:07:15.:07:16.

restrictions on citizens from certain predominantly Muslim

:07:17.:07:17.

nations with links to terrorism, In an effort to quell the influx

:07:18.:07:20.

of illegal immigrants from Mexico, Mr Trump has signed an executive

:07:21.:07:27.

order to begin work on building A multimillion dollar venture

:07:28.:07:30.

that he insists Mexico will be made Ultimately it will come out

:07:31.:07:34.

of what's happening with Mexico and we will start those negotiations

:07:35.:07:42.

relatively soon and we will be That has ruffled the feathers

:07:43.:07:46.

of America's southern neighbour. In an address to the nation,

:07:47.:07:57.

Mexico's president said they have no The Mexican president is due

:07:58.:08:00.

in Washington next week. He faces difficult discussions

:08:01.:08:06.

with an American counterpart clearly determined to reverse

:08:07.:08:10.

many of the changes brought Let's have a look at some of the

:08:11.:08:12.

other stories this morning. Royal Bank of Scotland is taking

:08:13.:08:27.

another financial hit for mis-selling risky mortgages

:08:28.:08:29.

in America before the financial crisis hit in 2008.

:08:30.:08:32.

The bank, which is more than 70% owned by the taxpayer,

:08:33.:08:34.

will be fined an additional ?3 billion by the US

:08:35.:08:36.

Department of Justice. A major report into the health

:08:37.:08:39.

of children in the UK has found an "alarming gap" exists

:08:40.:08:43.

between the rich and poor - with one in five young people

:08:44.:08:46.

suffering as a result of poverty. The Royal College of Paediatrics

:08:47.:08:51.

and Child Health also suggests the UK is lagging behind most

:08:52.:08:54.

western European countries when it comes to measures such as infant

:08:55.:08:57.

mortality rates and obesity. Our Health Correspondent,

:08:58.:09:03.

Dominic Hughes, reports. Anxiety, depression

:09:04.:09:06.

and a need to be listened to. These are the themes of a short

:09:07.:09:14.

play on mental health, devised by school

:09:15.:09:16.

students in Liverpool. The issues they touch on reflect

:09:17.:09:20.

those in today's report on the health of children

:09:21.:09:24.

and young people. It paints a picture of the UK

:09:25.:09:26.

struggling to match other countries The evidence has been developing

:09:27.:09:29.

for some time that all is not well It's the first time we have really

:09:30.:09:35.

put together a proper picture across all four countries,

:09:36.:09:42.

and the news is not good. Some of the issues that raise

:09:43.:09:44.

concerns over the state of child health include just 34%

:09:45.:09:47.

of babies breast fed to six months, 40% of children in

:09:48.:09:50.

England's most deprived areas are overweight or obese,

:09:51.:09:54.

and half of adult mental health And for the drama group

:09:55.:09:57.

in Liverpool, mental Mental illnesses are an illness

:09:58.:10:04.

of the brain, and they're as valid as any other illnesses

:10:05.:10:13.

to any other part of the body. Just because you can't see it

:10:14.:10:16.

physically, it doesn't mean Our production will mainly be to get

:10:17.:10:19.

rid of that stigma about mental health, and just educate

:10:20.:10:23.

the audience a bit more The four governments of the UK

:10:24.:10:25.

are all challenged to consider the impact their policies

:10:26.:10:29.

will have on children. They've responded by restating

:10:30.:10:32.

commitments to improve Almost half of all hospitals

:10:33.:10:33.

are failing to meet basic Government standards for hospital food,

:10:34.:10:42.

according to data released The Campaign for Better

:10:43.:10:45.

Hospital Food warns The Government says the standards

:10:46.:10:49.

are "legally binding" The spacecraft which took

:10:50.:10:54.

Major Tim Peake to and from the International Space Station

:10:55.:11:01.

is going on public display today. The Soyuz capsule, still scorched

:11:02.:11:07.

from its re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere in June, is now

:11:08.:11:10.

at the Science Museum in London. Our Global Science Correspondent

:11:11.:11:16.

Rebecca Morelle is there. I should say extraterrestrials

:11:17.:11:29.

Science Correspondent! It must be an exciting day, having a good look at

:11:30.:11:33.

Matt? It is an amazing thing, really. Just behind me we have got

:11:34.:11:38.

Tim Peake reunited with his Soyuz spacecraft. This is a craft that

:11:39.:11:44.

took him up into space and safely back down again. It's incredible,

:11:45.:11:49.

it's pretty small, really. You can imagine three people crammed in

:11:50.:11:52.

there on the way up, sitting on top of 300 tonnes of rocket fuel, and on

:11:53.:11:57.

the way back down again, flying through the atmosphere, temperatures

:11:58.:12:01.

reaching 1500 Greece centigrade. You can see the scorch marks all down

:12:02.:12:06.

the side there. This is a piece of spacious history that is being put

:12:07.:12:14.

on display. It is bought by the science Museum from the Russian

:12:15.:12:15.

space agency for an undisclosed amount, they are not saying how much

:12:16.:12:18.

they paid. For Tim, it must be quite an emotional moment seeing it. We

:12:19.:12:22.

were talking to Helen Sharman, the first Brit in space, she said you

:12:23.:12:27.

get a patch to the spacecraft, it is essential for the most dangerous

:12:28.:12:31.

part of the mission -- attached to the spacecraft. It is now on display

:12:32.:12:34.

for everybody to come and see, a piece of history at the science

:12:35.:12:39.

Museum, and Tim Peake with it. Banks, Rebecca. We will be talking

:12:40.:12:44.

to Major Tim Peake himself, hopefully in about ten minutes. He

:12:45.:12:48.

looks a bit busy at the minute! We'll let him do his tours. Do you

:12:49.:12:53.

think they got a discount for the scorch marks on the scratches on the

:12:54.:12:57.

side of it when Becks marked its not exactly a new vehicle. Before we

:12:58.:12:59.

finish this section of the Ant and Dec won the prize for Best

:13:00.:13:06.

TV presenter for the 16th year at last night's

:13:07.:13:09.

National Television Awards. do they always win at?! They

:13:10.:13:16.

literally storm it every year, don't they?

:13:17.:13:17.

Other winners included Mary Berry for Best Judge,

:13:18.:13:22.

What a lovely lady, she was over the moon.

:13:23.:13:31.

And Strictly Come Dancing picked up the gong for Best Talent Show.

:13:32.:13:33.

Emmerdale was voted Best Soap, and ITV's This Morning won

:13:34.:13:36.

Beating us at! But we don't mind, because we just love our jobs, it's

:13:37.:13:47.

lovely to be here. We didn't get to go to the party, but we're not

:13:48.:13:51.

bitter. It's not the winning that counts. It's not even the party that

:13:52.:13:57.

counts, it's just being here with you every day. Sincerity is in from

:13:58.:14:00.

every pore! Children's health in the UK

:14:01.:14:03.

is in jeopardy, with higher death rates and levels of obesity

:14:04.:14:05.

than in much of Europe. That's the warning from

:14:06.:14:08.

the The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health.

:14:09.:14:10.

In a major report out today, the body also highlights

:14:11.:14:12.

a growing gap between rich Let's find out more on this

:14:13.:14:14.

from Dr Ronny Cheung, who's from the Royal College

:14:15.:14:18.

of Paediatrics and Child Health. Thank you very much indeed for

:14:19.:14:31.

joining us here this morning. These are bold warnings and claims. What

:14:32.:14:34.

makes you so sure that things aren't as bad as the picture that you are

:14:35.:14:40.

painting? Well, this is the first opportunity to manage and really

:14:41.:14:43.

pull together all of the data around Child health in this country. Across

:14:44.:14:48.

all four nations. Across 25 health indicators across the board, what we

:14:49.:14:53.

have seen is that for many of them, we are not doing as well as we have

:14:54.:14:57.

been doing, and certainly not as well as compared to our neighbours,

:14:58.:15:02.

our comparable neighbours in Western Europe. For instance, in terms of

:15:03.:15:07.

our child mortality levels, the rate of child deaths in childhood, we

:15:08.:15:12.

have gone from being amongst the best in Europe, 20 or 30 years ago,

:15:13.:15:16.

the now being amongst the worst. As you have said earlier on, the gap

:15:17.:15:22.

between the outcomes for the poorest and the most affluent children in

:15:23.:15:27.

this country is growing. Again, that pattern is replicated across all

:15:28.:15:28.

indicators. We have a statement from the

:15:29.:15:37.

Department of Health, who say it is a top priority for the Government.

:15:38.:15:40.

They say they have dealt with tobacco, a soft drinks levy, obesity

:15:41.:15:46.

strategy. We have similar statements from devolved governments. If all

:15:47.:15:50.

that is going on, why do you say we are not seeing the improvements? We

:15:51.:15:54.

welcome a lot of the strategies and policies that have come through from

:15:55.:15:59.

the Government, but we don't think that some of them have gone far

:16:00.:16:03.

enough. We need to be bolder in some of our strategies and policies that

:16:04.:16:10.

come through. For instance, things based in good evidence, such as

:16:11.:16:14.

minimum alcohol pricing, thinking about a tax levy on high sugar and

:16:15.:16:21.

high fat foods, and reducing the advertising of those foods to young

:16:22.:16:25.

children. It goes a little beyond that. We'd like to see, firstly, a

:16:26.:16:33.

focus on tackling child poverty. As I said earlier, poorer children are

:16:34.:16:44.

unhealthy children. And they will become the unhealthy adults in 20,

:16:45.:16:47.

30 years. We are storing up problems if we don't tackle this now. We

:16:48.:16:54.

should think about a unified national strategy, a cross

:16:55.:16:57.

Government strategy for child health which looks at all areas of policy

:16:58.:17:02.

and has child health embedded in all of those, be that in health, the

:17:03.:17:07.

economy, in social care, and also education. You say in this report

:17:08.:17:12.

that we are falling behind other countries in Western Europe - what

:17:13.:17:17.

are they doing? Are there lessons that we can learn or is this a

:17:18.:17:23.

cultural, social thing? With all of these things, it is different...

:17:24.:17:28.

There are lots of different causes. We know that poverty is an issue,

:17:29.:17:32.

but we also know that public health, in other words, an investment in

:17:33.:17:37.

services that help tackle the causes of ill health, has been reducing

:17:38.:17:41.

significantly in this country in the recent past. I think if we don't

:17:42.:17:45.

manage to reinvest that money and that support for families and young

:17:46.:17:51.

children, we will not be able to manage... We won't be able to get on

:17:52.:17:54.

top of the problem and we will be chasing after it by investing more

:17:55.:17:58.

in health care and health care problems in the future. Thank you

:17:59.:17:59.

for joining us. I wonder what time it feels like to

:18:00.:18:11.

Carol. She has had three hours sleep. I saw a picture of her in a

:18:12.:18:19.

24-hour supermarket. What time did you get to bed after the TV awards?

:18:20.:18:26.

Quarter to midnight. What might you look very fresh. -- you look very

:18:27.:18:38.

fresh. How was the weather? Very fresh!

:18:39.:18:49.

Today, it will feel quite bitter. We are pulling in all this cold air

:18:50.:18:54.

from the near continent and it's going to sweep across our shores.

:18:55.:19:02.

Wrap up warmly. You will feel it. I will show you that in a second.

:19:03.:19:06.

There is also a lot of clout. Here and there are, it is they can offer

:19:07.:19:13.

drizzle or the odd snow flurry. There is the risk of ice on

:19:14.:19:18.

untreated surfaces, roads and pavements alike, first thing this

:19:19.:19:23.

morning. In northern Scotland, a cold but beautiful day from the word

:19:24.:19:27.

go. The rest of Scotland and parts of northern England will see some

:19:28.:19:30.

breaks in the cloud, but there is a lot of cloud around. The cloud will

:19:31.:19:37.

start to break up in southern counties of England, and some of us

:19:38.:19:40.

will see some sunshine. The far south of England and into the South

:19:41.:19:47.

West. Although there are temperatures of four Celsius in

:19:48.:19:50.

Barnstaple, in the wind, it will feel colder. A lot of cloud in Wales

:19:51.:20:01.

still, despite the breaks. There could be some doubt and drizzle in

:20:02.:20:07.

Northern Ireland. Three Celsius is the maximum temperature in Glasgow.

:20:08.:20:11.

With the wind chill, it will feel more like freezing. Through the

:20:12.:20:19.

evening and overnight, still quite a windy one in prospect, then we have

:20:20.:20:23.

a cluster of weather fronts moving in from the north and the West. They

:20:24.:20:27.

will introduce more unsettled conditions in the form of rain. It

:20:28.:20:32.

is still quite windy. This cold continental wind is still coming our

:20:33.:20:37.

way. A frosty start for some tomorrow. Milder air starts to sweep

:20:38.:20:45.

into the West. Less cold air moves across central and eastern areas. It

:20:46.:20:48.

is certainly not going to be mild in central and eastern areas. On

:20:49.:20:53.

Saturday, a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. Then

:20:54.:20:59.

you can see what is waiting in the wings for Sunday. There is still

:21:00.:21:04.

some uncertainty as to where this low pressure will end up. We think

:21:05.:21:09.

at the moment it will bring rain to parts of Wales in southern England.

:21:10.:21:12.

It might get this far north, but it might stay further south. If you are

:21:13.:21:17.

doing something outdoors, do keep in touch with the weather forecast.

:21:18.:21:21.

Further north, it looks at this stage like it will stay dry and find

:21:22.:21:25.

with some sunshine. Temperatures continue to climb. The maximum

:21:26.:21:31.

temperature in London today is run about one Celsius. By Sunday, it

:21:32.:21:36.

will be a leading Celsius. Carroll, one more to go and then it is home

:21:37.:21:38.

time! The spacecraft which took

:21:39.:22:00.

Major Tim Peake to and from the International Space Station

:22:01.:22:02.

is going on public display today. The Soyuz capsule, still scorched

:22:03.:22:05.

from its re-entry into the Earth's I should say extraterrestrials

:22:06.:22:07.

Science Correspondent! It must be an exciting day,

:22:08.:22:09.

having a good look at It is really cool seeing that union

:22:10.:22:44.

Jack going outside. There he goes! Major Tim Peake is at

:22:45.:23:12.

the science Museum for us. Good morning. And stood in front of it,

:23:13.:23:18.

does it bring back brilliant memories when you see your capsule?

:23:19.:23:24.

Good morning. Yes, it certainly does. I arrived here about 30

:23:25.:23:27.

minutes ago, and this was the first time I had seen this capsule since

:23:28.:23:33.

the 18th of June in Kazakhstan, and it has brought back all the memories

:23:34.:23:37.

of the mission. We have seen some pictures of your trip to space. Tell

:23:38.:23:41.

us about the capsule. It looks fairly small to, -- fairly small, to

:23:42.:23:49.

be honest. It comprises three pieces. The other two pieces

:23:50.:23:54.

separate just before we come back to the's atmosphere and they burn up.

:23:55.:24:00.

The heat shield was jettisoned before landing as well, and this is

:24:01.:24:03.

the only part that comes back to Earth, with the three crew members

:24:04.:24:10.

and about a hundred kilos of cargo. Above me is also the huge canopy

:24:11.:24:14.

which brings the capsule back to Earth safely. Obviously, an

:24:15.:24:19.

important part of your life, but a brilliant bit of science and British

:24:20.:24:24.

history for everyone to see now. It is, it is wonderful to see this

:24:25.:24:30.

actual back in the UK. For everybody who gets to visit, I hope it will be

:24:31.:24:34.

a great source of inspiration and will maybe so the seeds for young

:24:35.:24:44.

people. I remember seeing this type of exhibit in museums as a child and

:24:45.:24:48.

being inspired. It has done a fair few million miles in its time - what

:24:49.:24:54.

is actually inside it, then? Inside is just about enough room for the

:24:55.:24:58.

three crew members. I looked in the window this morning, and it even has

:24:59.:25:02.

the seat liners that were moulded to our bodies. They are still in there.

:25:03.:25:10.

In addition, the control panels and all the other bits and pieces that

:25:11.:25:14.

enable us to control this spacecraft during launch and re-entry. It

:25:15.:25:20.

really does have one careful user, it is in great condition. It is the

:25:21.:25:24.

incredible to see it here and this CD scorch marks. Coming back into

:25:25.:25:30.

the's atmosphere is very punishing that any space vehicle, so to see

:25:31.:25:34.

the punishment this capsule has been through this morning is incredible.

:25:35.:25:39.

Doing what you did is very rare and very expensive - tell us a bit about

:25:40.:25:45.

why your trip was so important, what was the return on investment. From

:25:46.:25:51.

an economic sense, it makes absolute sense for the UK to be involved in

:25:52.:25:57.

human space flight. We get a huge return on our investment - around

:25:58.:26:05.

2-1. In addition to the economic return, it is great for our industry

:26:06.:26:09.

to be involved and for the science community to be involved. We are

:26:10.:26:12.

doing great science on board the space station. We have started DNA

:26:13.:26:18.

sequencing and genetic research. Also, for educational inspiration

:26:19.:26:22.

was not so there are many great benefits in being involved in the

:26:23.:26:27.

space programme, now and in the future. And I understand you are

:26:28.:26:32.

going back to space in the future? Yellow like the space station is

:26:33.:26:39.

going to go until 2024 at least. The European Space Agency and the UK

:26:40.:26:47.

will be involved until then. It gives us a second opportunity to go

:26:48.:26:51.

back to the space station. In fact, some of my colleagues are already

:26:52.:26:55.

going back for their second mission next year. It is great for European

:26:56.:27:00.

astronauts to be able to go back and continue our involvement in the

:27:01.:27:04.

space programme. An absolute treat adult you.

:27:05.:27:08.

Thank you for joining us. I would buy a used

:27:09.:30:26.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London

:30:27.:30:28.

Now though it's back to Jon and Steph.

:30:29.:30:35.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Steph McGovern and Jon Kay.

:30:36.:30:39.

Theresa May will call for a renewed special relationship

:30:40.:30:42.

with the United States, when she addresses Republican

:30:43.:30:45.

politicians at their annual retreat in Philadelphia later today.

:30:46.:30:48.

The Prime Minister is due to become the first world leader

:30:49.:30:52.

to hold face-to-face talks with President Trump, when they meet

:30:53.:30:54.

She has said she's not afraid of having a candid conversation.

:30:55.:31:01.

Meanwhile, Donald Trump has said he believes that torture can work

:31:02.:31:04.

to get information out of terrorism suspects.

:31:05.:31:07.

In an interview with ABC News, the President said the US had

:31:08.:31:10.

But Mr Trump said he would seek further advice before deciding

:31:11.:31:21.

whether to bring back techniques such as water-boarding, which

:31:22.:31:23.

I have spoken as recently as 24 hours ago with people at the highest

:31:24.:31:32.

level of intelligence and I ask them the question, "Does it work?

:31:33.:31:34.

And the answer was, "Yes, absolutely."

:31:35.:31:43.

The Government will publish a Bill today, to enable it to invoke

:31:44.:31:46.

Article 50 and trigger the process of Britain leaving

:31:47.:31:48.

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis, has said the bill

:31:49.:31:53.

will be straightforward - although opposition parties

:31:54.:31:54.

Royal Bank of Scotland is taking another financial hit

:31:55.:32:03.

for mis-selling risky mortgages in America before the financial

:32:04.:32:05.

The bank, which is more than 70% owned by the taxpayer,

:32:06.:32:13.

looks set to be fined an additional ?3 billion by the US

:32:14.:32:16.

A major report into the health of children in the UK has found

:32:17.:32:24.

an "alarming gap" exists between the rich and poor,

:32:25.:32:26.

with one in five young people suffering as a result of poverty.

:32:27.:32:30.

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health also suggests

:32:31.:32:34.

the UK is lagging behind most western European countries when it

:32:35.:32:37.

comes to measures such as infant mortality rates and obesity.

:32:38.:32:41.

The four governments of the UK have reaffirmed their commitments

:32:42.:32:47.

Ant and Dec won the prize for Best TV Presenter for the 16th year

:32:48.:32:57.

at last night's National Television Awards.

:32:58.:33:01.

BBC presenter Graham Norton was recognised for his services to

:33:02.:33:08.

broadcasting. Strictly Come Dancing's Len Goodman,

:33:09.:33:14.

who retired in December, lost out as the public's choice of best judge.

:33:15.:33:18.

But it was Mary Berry who won. There is only one Mary Berry.

:33:19.:33:29.

Please welcome your host for the night!

:33:30.:33:31.

The National Television Awards bring out the great and the good

:33:32.:33:35.

A new category was introduced this year for Period Drama,

:33:36.:33:48.

Best Comedy went to Mrs Brown's Boys and it was Strictly Come Dancing

:33:49.:33:56.

that waltzed off with the award for Best Talent Show.

:33:57.:33:58.

Best TV Judge went to a very surprised Mary Berry in her final

:33:59.:34:01.

The first and most important thing is to be fair,

:34:02.:34:15.

Despite our television viewing habits changing,

:34:16.:34:17.

the average household watches about 3.5 hours a day.

:34:18.:34:21.

Nights like the NTAs are a chance to celebrate the best

:34:22.:34:24.

Ladies and gentlemen, the nation's heartthrob, Mr Graham Norton!

:34:25.:34:27.

Chatshow host Graham Norton collected the Lifetime

:34:28.:34:28.

And Ant and Dec won Best TV Presenter for

:34:29.:34:33.

We're very lucky to have the three big shows at the moment

:34:34.:34:45.

We just want to keep making good telly.

:34:46.:34:48.

But the surprise of the night was Casualty's win for Best Drama.

:34:49.:35:02.

The perennial Saturday night staple, which turned 30 last year, beat some

:35:03.:35:08.

high budget affairs like Game Of Thrones.

:35:09.:35:13.

It looks like they had a great night without us!

:35:14.:35:17.

They sent us some pictures. That meant the world!

:35:18.:35:21.

But they have got hangovers! Victoria Derbyshire

:35:22.:35:24.

is on at 9am on BBC Two. Let's see what's

:35:25.:35:28.

on today's programme. Today, and exclusive interview with

:35:29.:35:40.

Raffaele Sollecito, who, together with Amanda Knox, was wrongly

:35:41.:35:45.

imprisoned for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher. I am a

:35:46.:35:49.

normal guy who passed through a nightmare. Now, I'm different

:35:50.:35:53.

because of the nightmare I passed through, but I'm innocent. This week

:35:54.:36:00.

he finds out if he is to receive compensation for what he

:36:01.:36:04.

experienced. Join us after Breakfast on BBC Two, the BBC News Channel,

:36:05.:36:07.

and online. Victoria, thank you.

:36:08.:36:10.

Coming up here on Breakfast this morning...

:36:11.:36:14.

From the outside, it appeared to be an ordinary Brixton flat,

:36:15.:36:17.

but for decades it housed an extraordinary secret.

:36:18.:36:19.

We'll find out more about the strange cult

:36:20.:36:21.

and the people who helped rescue those enslaved in it.

:36:22.:36:23.

The former dentist who took up sprinting in his 90s.

:36:24.:36:30.

Now a world record holder, Charles Eugster will be here to tell

:36:31.:36:33.

us why he's refusing to slow down in old age.

:36:34.:36:38.

We've travelled to Tokyo to find out how the man known

:36:39.:36:44.

as the Steven Spielberg of gaming is planning to change the industry

:36:45.:36:47.

We talked about double act this morning with ant and Dec...

:36:48.:37:04.

The Williams sisters! Another 88 pinching the headlines. It is

:37:05.:37:08.

difficult for Venus, your sister on the cusp of winning a

:37:09.:37:12.

record-breaking 23rd grand slam title and you watch the only one

:37:13.:37:16.

standing in her way. What do you do? Venus is an amazing competitor, of

:37:17.:37:20.

course she will be giving everything in the final on Saturday. But... You

:37:21.:37:25.

would not want to be in the locker room afterwards or on the flight

:37:26.:37:28.

home with your sister afterwards if you had beaten her to stop her

:37:29.:37:31.

winning that! Have a seat in between!

:37:32.:37:34.

It's Serena vs Venus at the Australian Open -

:37:35.:37:37.

the first all-Williams final since the Wimbledon

:37:38.:37:38.

Serena, a six-time winner in Melbourne, comfortably

:37:39.:37:42.

beat the world number 79 Mirjana Lucic-Baroni

:37:43.:37:43.

Baroni was playing in her first Grand Slam semifinal in 18 years.

:37:44.:37:51.

And she couldn't match the pace and power of the world number two.

:37:52.:37:58.

And, at the age of 36, her older sister Venus is through.

:37:59.:38:04.

The seven-time Grand Slam beat Coco Vandeweghe in three sets -

:38:05.:38:06.

she said it would be a dream to see Serena on the other side

:38:07.:38:09.

And we're guaranteed a British winner in the men's wheelchair

:38:10.:38:13.

doubles in Melbourne, because Alfie Hewitt

:38:14.:38:20.

and Gordon Reid will face off with their respective partners.

:38:21.:38:24.

Andy Lapthorne is on court at the moment, going for his third

:38:25.:38:26.

Australian Open title in the quad doubles - he and his partner have

:38:27.:38:29.

Southampton beat Liverpool 1-0 at Anfield last night

:38:30.:38:32.

1-0 up from the first leg, Saints spent much of the match

:38:33.:38:38.

defending before Shane Long booked his side's trip to Wembley.

:38:39.:38:40.

They reached the final without conceding a goal.

:38:41.:38:42.

Southampton will play either Hull City or Manchester United

:38:43.:38:44.

who play their second-leg semi tonight.

:38:45.:38:46.

Celtic have stretched their lead at the top

:38:47.:38:48.

of the Scottish Premiership to 22 points.

:38:49.:38:51.

They beat St Johnston 1-0 in the first game in the league

:38:52.:38:56.

since the winter break and have now gone 26 domestic games unbeaten,

:38:57.:38:59.

Meanwhile, in the Scottish Cup, Hearts came back from 1-0 down

:39:00.:39:05.

to beat Championship Raith Rovers 4-2 in extra time of their

:39:06.:39:08.

They'll host Edinburgh rivals Hibs next.

:39:09.:39:12.

Britain's Millie Knight and guide Brett Wild won downhill gold

:39:13.:39:17.

on the opening day of the World Para Alpine Skiing

:39:18.:39:19.

The 18-year-old visually-impaired skier beat the five-time

:39:20.:39:25.

Paralympic champion Henrieta Farkasova of Slovakia.

:39:26.:39:26.

Knight was Britain's youngest athlete at the Sochi Paralympics

:39:27.:39:29.

and has dominated the World Cup circuit in recent months

:39:30.:39:31.

winning 11 medals - seven of them gold.

:39:32.:39:39.

When we came into this, we thought, we just want to be pleased with our

:39:40.:39:46.

runs, we want to be able to come down, finished the line and think,

:39:47.:39:49.

yes, I'm pleased with that, we did our best, we couldn't go any faster,

:39:50.:39:53.

and the result would look after its self. We got both of those feelings

:39:54.:39:59.

today, so chuffed! It is amazing what she does, Brett,

:40:00.:40:04.

her guide, skis down in front of her and shouts the instructions, she has

:40:05.:40:08.

to listen out and feel when two... So brave, not being able to see

:40:09.:40:13.

where you are going particularly well and throw yourself down a

:40:14.:40:15.

mountain like that. Well done to her.

:40:16.:40:21.

When it comes to sporting stars, the achievements of our next

:40:22.:40:24.

He is absolutely nailing it in his 90s.

:40:25.:40:34.

In 2015, Charles Eugster set a new world record for the 200m -

:40:35.:40:37.

Since retiring, the former dentist has also won numerous medals

:40:38.:40:48.

Now, at the of 97, he shows no sign of slowing down.

:40:49.:40:58.

Charles wants to redefine the way we see old age so he's written

:40:59.:41:03.

a book about getting older and staying active.

:41:04.:41:05.

We'll speak to him in a moment, but first let's see what goes

:41:06.:41:08.

Relentless! Child is with us this morning, good morning. I am amazed

:41:09.:41:58.

to see you in a suit, I thought you would be wearing your shorts and a

:41:59.:42:03.

T-shirt. Well, I consider this to be a very special occasion, so I

:42:04.:42:08.

thought it would be appropriate if I should wear a tie. Well, we are

:42:09.:42:12.

delighted to have you. You have got your medals with you... I have just

:42:13.:42:27.

two, the world champion, two World Championships. This is for which

:42:28.:42:33.

sport? You have done so many! This is 100 metres and 200 metres. And

:42:34.:42:41.

seeing your training regime there, Charles, do you ever have a break or

:42:42.:42:46.

are you constantly on the move?! Oh, no, no, that is a complete

:42:47.:42:54.

misunderstanding. At the present time, my coach puts me through a

:42:55.:42:59.

very tough regime. We train for about three hours, but only once a

:43:00.:43:06.

week. In the other days, if the weather is OK, I do my running or

:43:07.:43:13.

sprinting. We are seeing some pictures of you running here because

:43:14.:43:16.

Mike Bushell, our presenter, did some training with you a couple of

:43:17.:43:21.

years ago, didn't he? Reading the book you have written, what

:43:22.:43:25.

surprised me, I assumed you had been a really sporty youngster, into

:43:26.:43:31.

sports and games and PE, but that is not the case, you were quite sick as

:43:32.:43:36.

a child? I was very sickly child, and the other point that I think

:43:37.:43:42.

should be remembered is the fact that, during the middle-aged, I was

:43:43.:43:49.

a self-satisfied bolding lump of lard. There is nothing wrong with

:43:50.:43:55.

that, Charles! And then your life change? And then my life changed

:43:56.:44:03.

simply because I realised that there was a new rowing category, the

:44:04.:44:07.

oldest age at that particular time was 60 and so I started rowing at

:44:08.:44:13.

the age of 63. Was that hard? There will be a lot of people who will be

:44:14.:44:18.

so inspired by you and think, if he can do it, I can do it. What it

:44:19.:44:23.

difficult at the age of 63 to suddenly become a row were? No,

:44:24.:44:27.

because I had been growing at school and also during university, and just

:44:28.:44:41.

restarted. So one of the great advantages of education here in the

:44:42.:44:46.

UK is the opportunity to learn so many different sports and in older

:44:47.:44:52.

age you can then pick out one that would apply to you. You also write

:44:53.:44:58.

very honestly about losing your wife and basically having to make a

:44:59.:45:02.

choice about what you wanted to do with your life, and you just threw

:45:03.:45:06.

everything into going forward and embracing the opportunities in front

:45:07.:45:12.

of you? Well, it's perhaps was not exactly like that. What happened was

:45:13.:45:20.

that I was rowing six days a week and at the age of about 86, in spite

:45:21.:45:26.

of the fact that I was rolling six days a week, my body began to

:45:27.:45:32.

deteriorate, and, being an extremely vain person, I wanted to do

:45:33.:45:37.

something about it, I wanted to build muscle. I tried some weights,

:45:38.:45:43.

that didn't give a great deal, so at the age of 807I joined a

:45:44.:45:50.

body-building club and employed a previous Mr Universe as a coach. The

:45:51.:45:58.

first thing that I learned was that I must not, under any circumstances,

:45:59.:46:04.

train six days a week. I must only, maximum, trained three, because if

:46:05.:46:08.

you build muscle you have to have a certain amount of recovery period.

:46:09.:46:15.

And that is extremely important because endurance exercise needs is

:46:16.:46:19.

shorter recovery period so that you can train six days a week, but if

:46:20.:46:27.

you do your exercise to build strength and muscle, you have to

:46:28.:46:32.

have a recovery period. I am also very vain, like you, so I have no

:46:33.:46:36.

intention of embarrassing myself on television but I would like to

:46:37.:46:42.

volunteer Steph Maybe some sit dips or something like that?

:46:43.:46:49.

The jacket is being undone. It must be serious! Let me take that. So,

:46:50.:47:00.

what are we doing? I will hold the microphone. So we can hear you. What

:47:01.:47:10.

are we doing here then? Are we doing dips? Are we going to have a

:47:11.:47:13.

competition over who can last longest? I think it will be you!

:47:14.:47:24.

Show us a few. OK. Do we count it? Let's just carry on! Tell me what

:47:25.:47:28.

would be your key thing that you would say to anyone watching, who is

:47:29.:47:33.

thinking, I don't know if I have the strength to do this. He's fast,

:47:34.:47:40.

isn't he! Do you know what, I'm going to stop. My arms are killing

:47:41.:47:45.

me! Charles, thank you so much. Let's leave him to its! I think you

:47:46.:47:56.

cheated! I probably did. Charles, 97 years old. I would say 97 years

:47:57.:48:03.

young! I'm out of breath! Thank you so much.

:48:04.:48:07.

Charles' book is called Age Is Just A Number.

:48:08.:48:14.

Clearly I need to work on my fitness!

:48:15.:48:20.

Figures out later this morning are expected to show the British

:48:21.:48:26.

economy finished last year strongly, providing evidence that the UK

:48:27.:48:29.

economy remained resilient in the fact of Brexit.

:48:30.:48:32.

Let's get more from Ben who's in London for us this morning.

:48:33.:48:36.

He's in the city with a great view. What are we expecting at 9:30am?

:48:37.:48:47.

Good morning. I could have done with some of those exercises to keep us

:48:48.:48:51.

warm up here this morning. But we have this great vantage point, the

:48:52.:48:55.

institution of engineering and technology in central London. We

:48:56.:49:01.

will be keeping a close eye on what we hear as far as economic growth is

:49:02.:49:05.

concerned, get the figure for the last quarter of last year. We will

:49:06.:49:09.

see how the economy fares in the wake of the Brexit vote. And with

:49:10.:49:13.

all sorts of changes as far as the economy is concerned going forward

:49:14.:49:16.

for the year ahead. What should we expect and what will mean for

:49:17.:49:21.

finances and the money in our pocket? Cathy and David, thank you

:49:22.:49:26.

for bearing the cold. We have talked already about the impact of

:49:27.:49:29.

uncertainty. That's the big thing this year. What would it mean for

:49:30.:49:33.

the money in our pocket, will we feel worse off this year? Writes

:49:34.:49:40.

now, no. Wages are actually going up and employment is at record levels.

:49:41.:49:45.

People have jobs and wages are rising, but I think we will feel it

:49:46.:49:50.

down the line. If businesses like financial businesses and big banks

:49:51.:49:53.

leave the city, that's where we will see unemployment levels rise and

:49:54.:49:57.

potentially wages come down and consumers will feel the pinch.

:49:58.:50:01.

Unemployment is rising and wages going down, not a pretty picture.

:50:02.:50:09.

No, but although I agree with 90% of what Cathy says, we are not going to

:50:10.:50:15.

have droves of people leaving the City of London. On the

:50:16.:50:18.

straightforward question of inflation, she will be correct,

:50:19.:50:26.

currently inflation is two point 6%. If it changes people would be more

:50:27.:50:29.

concerned about how they spend money. 60% of expenditure in this

:50:30.:50:34.

country comes from retail expenditure. If people are not

:50:35.:50:39.

spending money than unemployment will go up. Consumer spending has

:50:40.:50:45.

kept the economy so strong. The one caveat is that after 2008 the UK

:50:46.:50:50.

consumer was wonderful, and incredibly resilient beast. It could

:50:51.:50:53.

be the same this time. You are right, we do not know what will

:50:54.:50:57.

happen with Brexit. There is a lot for Theresa May to do. Lovely to

:50:58.:51:02.

speak to you both. That the state of play, wait and see. We get the

:51:03.:51:05.

figures at 9:30am. We are looking for a figure of 0.5%. The commute

:51:06.:51:14.

into London is well underway, streaming across Waterloo Bridge

:51:15.:51:18.

behind me. I'm impressed with the number of cyclists and joggers out

:51:19.:51:21.

this morning, some of them wearing shorts! It's freezing here this

:51:22.:51:26.

morning. Go and join them, Ben. It'll keep me warm! His brief

:51:27.:51:30.

silence was deafening then. We mentioned about the weather and

:51:31.:51:38.

how chilly it is in London, but what about the rest of the country?

:51:39.:51:43.

Good morning, it's cold wherever you are this morning, not just London.

:51:44.:51:52.

Temperatures around freezing, just above or below for the UK. This

:51:53.:51:57.

picture from Cheshire, a bit of brightness. As we push towards

:51:58.:52:02.

Derbyshire, Chesterfield, again eight Pleasant Sunrise with a bit of

:52:03.:52:07.

missed. As we push towards this picture in North Yorkshire, you can

:52:08.:52:10.

see there's a fair bit of cloud around. The forecast today is a

:52:11.:52:15.

cloudy one for the bulk of the UK. Also cold because we are dragging in

:52:16.:52:20.

cold, Continental air on a south-easterly wind, right the way

:52:21.:52:23.

across the UK. Although your thermometer might say it's 2

:52:24.:52:28.

degrees, it will feel much colder in the wind. We have pockets of fog,

:52:29.:52:35.

mostly hill fog across northern England. Watch out for ice on

:52:36.:52:39.

untreated surfaces where it is damp. Damp conditions coming out of thick

:52:40.:52:44.

cloud, some drizzle and maybe some snow flurries, but most of us will

:52:45.:52:48.

miss it. Northern Scotland will have sunshine from the beginning, but the

:52:49.:52:51.

rest of Scotland will see sunny breaks and parts of northern England

:52:52.:52:56.

will as well. However, a lot of cloud into the afternoon. You can

:52:57.:52:58.

see from the temperatures, not particularly high. Across the

:52:59.:53:04.

southern counties, we're looking at sunshine coming through but it will

:53:05.:53:09.

still feel cold. Into the south-west, a similar story with

:53:10.:53:11.

sunny spells developing. Southern Wales will also see sunshine but

:53:12.:53:18.

also a lot of cloud around. Into Northern Ireland, a cloudy start

:53:19.:53:20.

that will remain fairly cloudy through the day with the odd spot of

:53:21.:53:26.

drizzle here and there. The temperatures, freezing in Newcastle

:53:27.:53:32.

with a maximum temperature. Four in Cardiff, but when you add in the

:53:33.:53:36.

wind chill, it will feel more like -6 in Newcastle and freezing in

:53:37.:53:41.

Cardiff. As we head through Thursday and into Friday, things more

:53:42.:53:44.

unsettled with weather fronts coming from the west that will introduce

:53:45.:53:50.

some rain. Temperatures won't be as low and it will be less cold as we

:53:51.:53:54.

push across central and eastern areas. But it will not feel warm.

:53:55.:54:00.

But at least you are looking smiley and fabulous despite just three

:54:01.:54:05.

hours sleep. That's good enough for me. So are you. I wasn't at the TV

:54:06.:54:10.

awards. It's an industry worth

:54:11.:54:13.

billions of pounds - But what does the future have

:54:14.:54:15.

in store for computer games? Hideo Kojima - known

:54:16.:54:20.

as the Steven Spielberg of gaming - wants to change the industry forever

:54:21.:54:24.

by combining virtual reality BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat's Steffan

:54:25.:54:27.

Powell has been given an exclusive To speak to the biggest movie

:54:28.:54:34.

directors in the world, To speak to the biggest game

:54:35.:54:41.

designers, you come to Tokyo. In Japan, it's customary to exchange

:54:42.:54:46.

gifts before an interview. But what do you get the guy whose

:54:47.:54:49.

many lifetime achievement awards And I hear you are a bit

:54:50.:54:52.

of a Lego fan, on the quiet. Yes.

:54:53.:55:03.

Thank you. 30 years ago, games were all

:55:04.:55:06.

about fighting things, until this man decided to make one

:55:07.:55:09.

about sneaking around instead. The stealth genre that is still

:55:10.:55:12.

so popular today was born. For decades he made Metal Gear

:55:13.:55:16.

titles for the giant gaming company Konami,

:55:17.:55:22.

which sold millions of copies. But after splitting from them

:55:23.:55:27.

controversially in 2015, gamers across the world

:55:28.:55:30.

are desperate to find out So far, just two trailers

:55:31.:55:32.

about his next game, Death Stranding, which will be

:55:33.:55:40.

a PlayStation exclusive. TRANSLATION: We want this game to be

:55:41.:55:50.

something that people can get into very easily,

:55:51.:55:53.

but after they play it for about an hour or two,

:55:54.:55:55.

they start to notice something It's something they

:55:56.:55:58.

haven't played before. It is normal to stay tight-lipped

:55:59.:56:03.

about upcoming projects like this. It's far too soon for people to test

:56:04.:56:11.

it, so no one can say But the idea that it's

:56:12.:56:15.

different from what's been As we visit places that have been

:56:16.:56:23.

important turning points in his recent history,

:56:24.:56:28.

he explained how he sees the gaming industry changing

:56:29.:56:31.

for ever with movies, games and music, converging

:56:32.:56:33.

in different ways. There are almost hidden movies

:56:34.:56:36.

or hidden series within the game? Yes, for example, or within

:56:37.:56:53.

the movie we have a game hidden. TRANSLATION: Things are just games

:56:54.:56:56.

and music and novels and movies, and all these things will kind

:56:57.:57:03.

of mesh together into one What struck me about spending time

:57:04.:57:06.

with Hideo Kojima is, here's a man who's achieved

:57:07.:57:12.

everything there is to within When I asked him about retirement

:57:13.:57:14.

he basically said, no chance. He's still really passionate

:57:15.:57:18.

and energetic about And he's still coming

:57:19.:57:19.

up with new ideas. And he's set himself his

:57:20.:57:26.

biggest challenge yet. He's changed the gaming

:57:27.:57:28.

industry once, and now So, what can we look

:57:29.:57:30.

forward to in the future, and how could advances in gaming be

:57:31.:57:42.

incorporated into our Joining us now is technology

:57:43.:57:45.

consultant, Tom Cheesewright. Good morning. It's an incredible

:57:46.:57:57.

story about him. He looks so young but he's 53. Gaming keeps you young!

:57:58.:58:03.

Explain why he's so important in the industry. He's got that important

:58:04.:58:11.

vision. He created the Metal Gear franchise, stealth and speaking out.

:58:12.:58:16.

I don't like it, I like blowing things up! -- sneaking around. But

:58:17.:58:24.

the scale of that franchise as well, it was one of the first franchises

:58:25.:58:28.

that rather than coming in from books or gaming or films was created

:58:29.:58:33.

in gaming and built up to the point where it stood on its own two feet.

:58:34.:58:37.

It sounds like he's influenced and set the agenda, he's been ahead of

:58:38.:58:41.

the curve the whole way. Is he right when he predicts the next stage

:58:42.:58:45.

about this fusing of novels and movies and games together into one

:58:46.:58:50.

output? I would say yes and no. We see lots more crossover of comics,

:58:51.:58:55.

books and films and games. The Marvel franchise is a good example.

:58:56.:59:00.

I don't think one necessarily replaces the other. Films didn't

:59:01.:59:05.

replace books. Records and LPs are still around despite CDs and digital

:59:06.:59:08.

music. Just because you bring them all together and you're able to

:59:09.:59:14.

doesn't mean you do. There is something about passive

:59:15.:59:16.

entertainment and absorbing someone else's vision and being in the game.

:59:17.:59:23.

I think games will be increasingly cinematic, especially at the high

:59:24.:59:26.

with virtual reality but I don't think it necessarily replaces all

:59:27.:59:30.

the other games or entertainment. But games are so pricey that's an

:59:31.:59:35.

issue. Will they be eight big cost in the future for parents? Yes and

:59:36.:59:41.

no. About ?80 billion split three ways in the industry now between PC,

:59:42.:59:46.

high-end gaming with virtual reality. The console market is still

:59:47.:59:51.

pricey, but mobile gaming is now the biggest segment and we pay

:59:52.:59:55.

relatively small sums up front, if anything, and that's the way the

:59:56.:59:59.

market goes, players you play. -- pay as you play.

:00:00.:00:05.

The school day is beginning for many across the country.

:00:06.:00:17.

But keeping up with schoolwork can be stressful for any young person,

:00:18.:00:25.

especially those caring for a loved one.

:00:26.:00:27.

Research from the Carers Trust has revealed almost three quarters

:00:28.:00:29.

of young carers take time off school to look after relatives,

:00:30.:00:32.

while more than half struggle to meet deadlines.

:00:33.:00:34.

Holly Hamilton has been to meet two sisters who care for their mum -

:00:35.:00:37.

Just nine and 13, they have big dreams of becoming actresses.

:00:38.:00:47.

But right now their job is taking care of their mum.

:00:48.:00:53.

When she had a heart attack she got tunnel vision, and then it is hard

:00:54.:00:57.

I do a lot of tidying up, packing things away and keeping

:00:58.:01:06.

things off the floor, because when things are on the floor

:01:07.:01:08.

I was the kind of mum that did everything for her children,

:01:09.:01:15.

the running around, the picking up, and they relied

:01:16.:01:17.

And then suddenly I couldn't do anything for them and found

:01:18.:01:23.

that they were having to do things for me.

:01:24.:01:27.

That's what we've been learning about.

:01:28.:01:38.

Claudia and Leonie are young carers, like more than 700,000 children

:01:39.:01:45.

in the UK, many providing care for over 50 hours a week.

:01:46.:01:48.

So it's no surprise that a survey by the Carers Trust

:01:49.:01:51.

found that more than half of those aged 16-25 were struggling

:01:52.:01:53.

Homework is the thing I struggle with because I'm

:01:54.:01:56.

always doing loads of chores and stuff, and then I have to find

:01:57.:02:00.

Local council bosses say it is vital young carers

:02:01.:02:07.

are identified so they can get the support they need

:02:08.:02:10.

You see everyone and you think, "Oh, they're so lucky,

:02:11.:02:27.

they can do all this and that," but then you think, "Oh,

:02:28.:02:30.

But then I also think it is important that I help her out

:02:31.:02:34.

and I like being responsible for her, because it makes

:02:35.:02:37.

Claudia and Leonie are getting help from their school,

:02:38.:02:41.

meaning they can focus on their schoolwork

:02:42.:02:45.

What does the word carer mean for you?

:02:46.:02:53.

Well, when I think "carer", I think it's not normal,

:02:54.:02:55.

Like, when you're an actress you have a big role to play,

:02:56.:03:02.

but then when you finish doing that part you need to stop,

:03:03.:03:05.

but it's like you're doing that role forever.

:03:06.:03:14.

Joining us now is Gail Scott-Spicer, who's chief executive

:03:15.:03:24.

You have been doing research and looking at the common problems? Yes,

:03:25.:03:36.

we have new data released today from the Carers Trust which showed young

:03:37.:03:39.

carollers are at real danger of not fulfilling their potential in

:03:40.:03:42.

education, shoving that they are not potentially going to reach their

:03:43.:03:46.

life ambitions, so we have got data today that shows half of young

:03:47.:03:50.

carers have problems coping with their schoolwork, they are

:03:51.:03:53.

struggling to meet deadlines and actually about a third of young

:03:54.:03:56.

carers are regularly having to skip school because of their caring

:03:57.:04:00.

responsibilities. How does a teacher, then, spot that a child who

:04:01.:04:07.

is caring is struggling or maybe not reaching their potential? What

:04:08.:04:14.

should teachers be looking out for? Today is Young Carers Awareness Day

:04:15.:04:18.

and it is precisely for that, so that teachers and other

:04:19.:04:22.

professionals, in health care and local authorities, can spot the

:04:23.:04:25.

signs and things to look out for, children being absent from school,

:04:26.:04:30.

behavioural issues, sometimes depression as well, all those sorts

:04:31.:04:34.

of things that you cannot out for. We support schools to be able to

:04:35.:04:38.

talk to carers in a way that will help them and not stigmatise them as

:04:39.:04:43.

well. I bet for a lot of them they probably don't want to add admit

:04:44.:04:45.

they have problems at home with their family because it is the kind

:04:46.:04:49.

of thing you can get picked on for at school? Yes, we know that young

:04:50.:04:55.

carers are bullied because they seem different, so even if their peers

:04:56.:05:05.

don't know they a Qera, it is really challenging, which is why we work

:05:06.:05:08.

with schools and support young carers directly. At Carers Trust we

:05:09.:05:10.

have 90 services around the country that are part of our network and

:05:11.:05:12.

support young carers with local support and activities and they can

:05:13.:05:15.

meet other carers and understand they are not alone and get support

:05:16.:05:19.

about what might be going on at school. Also they can reach out to

:05:20.:05:22.

somebody at school, a teacher or someone they might trust, in

:05:23.:05:26.

complete confidence to get support with what might be happening and

:05:27.:05:30.

help them engage more at school. One of the challenges is that their

:05:31.:05:34.

preacher ambitions can be completely shattered so what we are doing today

:05:35.:05:40.

is think about what carers want to be when they grow up, so it is great

:05:41.:05:44.

to be able to support professionals like teachers to talk to them. And

:05:45.:05:49.

opportunities to support one another online as well? Yes, if people go to

:05:50.:05:54.

the Carers Trust website, you can find our forums for children who are

:05:55.:06:01.

carers and older children who are carers, it can be anonymous, which

:06:02.:06:05.

can be a first step into getting support for themselves. I guess it

:06:06.:06:09.

can be quite a lonely thing as well as a responsible thing, can't it?

:06:10.:06:13.

Thank you very much indeed for coming on this morning.

:06:14.:06:14.

We'll be speaking to the film-maker Vanessa Engle in a moment

:06:15.:06:20.

about her documentary The Cult Next Door, as well as one

:06:21.:06:22.

But first, let's have a last, brief look at the headlines

:06:23.:06:27.

I'll be back at 1.30pm with the lunchtime news -

:06:28.:08:15.

In 2013, three woman emerged from a small,

:08:16.:08:21.

ordinary-looking flat in Brixton in south London.

:08:22.:08:23.

It soon came to light the walls had been hiding

:08:24.:08:28.

an extraordinary and distressing secret.

:08:29.:08:29.

For three decades, the women had been kept as prisoners -

:08:30.:08:32.

brainwashed and enslaved by a bizarre cult.

:08:33.:08:36.

The documentary-maker Vanessa Engle has been

:08:37.:08:37.

She joins us along with Yvonne Hall, a care worker who helped the women

:08:38.:08:45.

Thank you so much for coming in. This is a really, really difficult

:08:46.:08:52.

story to tell because so much of it happened behind closed doors, but I

:08:53.:08:57.

know you were desperately keen to tell it, to make the world aware of

:08:58.:09:02.

what happened? Yes, it is a riveting and extraordinary story but, as a

:09:03.:09:06.

film-maker, that was the challenge, that it took place over nearly 40

:09:07.:09:10.

years but all behind closed doors and there is no video footage, very

:09:11.:09:15.

few photographs taken. The challenge as a film-maker is how do you tell

:09:16.:09:21.

an amazing story when it all happened, as I say, in visibly?

:09:22.:09:27.

Evolved, how are the women now? You worked closely with them when they

:09:28.:09:32.

were rescued from this situation, how are they? In terms of Katy, she

:09:33.:09:40.

is doing very well, she has learned to live independently and is doing

:09:41.:09:44.

very well considering the start that she had in her life, being born in

:09:45.:09:54.

captivity. In terms of Aisha, she is integrating into the community

:09:55.:09:58.

beautifully, and unfortunately Josie is still not very well. She is

:09:59.:10:04.

campaigning to have her captors released. Which is quite common,

:10:05.:10:08.

isn't it? We can hear a clip from Katy.

:10:09.:10:11.

He used to say that everything would go against me if I had done wrong.

:10:12.:10:18.

So, like, possibly the light shouldn't work or the tap shouldn't

:10:19.:10:25.

work because everything's controlled by him, by "Jackie", he's my control

:10:26.:10:41.

So if I went to the bathroom or turn the tap on it

:10:42.:10:46.

shouldn't work because I had done wrong.

:10:47.:10:48.

Then when I went to the bathroom and the tap did work I

:10:49.:10:54.

thought, "Oh, the tap, you're on my side, thank you!"

:10:55.:10:58.

And hugged the toilet when the flush worked.

:10:59.:11:03.

Clearly they were all brainwashed by Aravindan Balakrishnan, can you

:11:04.:11:14.

explain this? Balakrishnan was very clever in the way he acted, he

:11:15.:11:19.

targeted vulnerable young women who were university educated and used

:11:20.:11:22.

brainwashing techniques to control their mind WHO. He also very

:11:23.:11:29.

invented this mind control machine called "Jackie", which is an acronym

:11:30.:11:38.

of all the gods, Jehovah, Allah Krishna, Christ, and he used that to

:11:39.:11:47.

maintain control by saying that this machine could actually kill them or

:11:48.:11:51.

damage or harm them if they didn't obey him. It is incredible to think

:11:52.:11:58.

that this was going on in a build up, busy neighbourhood and hardly

:11:59.:12:03.

anybody knew what was happening? Yes, we interviewed some of the

:12:04.:12:06.

neighbours in the film and a lot of them had noticed this was quite a

:12:07.:12:10.

strange group, but I think when the group came and went they tended to

:12:11.:12:14.

keep themselves to themselves or be quite hostile or monosyllabic, and I

:12:15.:12:19.

suppose it is a feature of living in a big city, we all have a level of

:12:20.:12:24.

anonymity and that is something people enjoy about living in a big

:12:25.:12:32.

city. Making a film like this, you realise that it is very, very

:12:33.:12:34.

chilling and unnerving to realise something so bizarre and so

:12:35.:12:37.

frightening can be happening within yards of where you might be living.

:12:38.:12:42.

Watching the documentary, the neighbours got quite upset about

:12:43.:12:45.

what had gone on, because what is interesting about this is it started

:12:46.:12:49.

off as a spiritual movement and then became sinister, so you can see how

:12:50.:12:53.

these women were trapped, because they really were brainwashed? They

:12:54.:12:58.

were absolutely brainwashed, and it started off as what they thought was

:12:59.:13:02.

a political movement, they wanted to make a difference in society, they

:13:03.:13:05.

were disgruntled with the way the world was at that time and they

:13:06.:13:10.

subscribed to Chairman Mao and his teachings, but over a period of time

:13:11.:13:14.

a lot of that followed was dropped off and they were left with a core

:13:15.:13:21.

group of people. We will have to leave it there, I'm afraid, but

:13:22.:13:22.

thank you both very much indeed. The Cult Next Door is

:13:23.:13:24.

on BBC Two tonight at 9pm. That's all from

:13:25.:13:27.

Breakfast this morning. You might get the impression

:13:28.:13:29.

that history is just a record

:13:30.:13:52.