27/01/2017 Breakfast


27/01/2017

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This is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Steph

:00:00.:00:00.

Theresa May becomes the first world leader to meet Donald Trump

:00:07.:00:11.

The Prime Minister says the two leaders can "lead the world

:00:12.:00:16.

together" but they cannot return to "failed" military interventions.

:00:17.:00:22.

We have the opportunity, indeed, the responsibility, to renew the special

:00:23.:00:34.

relationship for this new age. I do not have my Commerce Secretary, they

:00:35.:00:49.

want to talk trade. So I'll have to handle it myself.

:00:50.:00:50.

Proposals to restrict knee and hip replacements for only those

:00:51.:01:02.

The Royal College of Surgeons says there's no justification

:01:03.:01:05.

The babies who die before 24 weeks and their parents who are denied

:01:06.:01:10.

As a mother, you want to protect your children. And we could not. We

:01:11.:01:20.

had no choice. You could be paying to get money out

:01:21.:01:21.

of thousands more cash machines if banks and ATM operators fail

:01:22.:01:25.

to reach an agreement over fees. In sport, it's a happy

:01:26.:01:28.

birthday for Jose Mourinho. Manchester United reach

:01:29.:01:33.

the League Cup final, with an aggregate victory over Hull,

:01:34.:01:35.

so they'll face Southampton Good morning. A cold and frosty

:01:36.:01:48.

start to the day. Once again, pockets of fog around. Cloudy.

:01:49.:01:53.

Summer rain. The sunshine hanging around for the longest in the far

:01:54.:01:55.

north of Scotland like yesterday. And I'll have the rest of your

:01:56.:02:06.

weather forecast details in 15 minutes.

:02:07.:02:06.

Theresa May will meet President Donald Trump

:02:07.:02:10.

She'll be hoping to prepare the ground for a smooth

:02:11.:02:14.

The two leaders will spend around an hour in The Oval Office,

:02:15.:02:18.

where they're also expected to discuss the role of Nato

:02:19.:02:21.

as well as relations with Russia and China.

:02:22.:02:23.

Yesterday, the Prime Minister told senior Republicans it was time

:02:24.:02:26.

for Britain and America to renew their special relationship.

:02:27.:02:28.

Here's our Washington correspondent, David Willis.

:02:29.:02:30.

She arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling from the

:02:31.:02:36.

effects of the new occupant of the White House. Theresa May will meet

:02:37.:02:39.

with President Donald Trump less than a week after he came to office,

:02:40.:02:44.

a week as unpredictable as any in modern American history. And as the

:02:45.:02:47.

Prime Minister's motorcade went through the capital, she could be

:02:48.:02:54.

forgiven for thinking will the new relationship be more strange than

:02:55.:02:58.

special? In Philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers, Theresa May

:02:59.:03:04.

had a standing ovation for a speech that dwelt on the shared history of

:03:05.:03:08.

the two nations, a relationship which defined the modern world, all

:03:09.:03:13.

part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way for a trade

:03:14.:03:18.

deal with the US. So I am delighted that the new administration has many

:03:19.:03:22.

trade agreement with our country, one of the earliest priority is. A

:03:23.:03:26.

new trade deal with Britain and America. It must serve both of us.

:03:27.:03:32.

Later, she will become the first foreign leader to meet with Donald

:03:33.:03:36.

Trump at the White House. The streetwise New Yorker who, when it

:03:37.:03:41.

comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always put America first. He

:03:42.:03:46.

and Theresa May do have things in common, and it remains to be seen

:03:47.:03:50.

whether they can find common ground, just as the UK is preparing to

:03:51.:03:57.

negotiate its departure from the EU. David Willetts, BBC News,

:03:58.:03:58.

Washington. Let's speak to our political

:03:59.:03:59.

correspondent, Carole Walker, Good morning. The Prime Minister has

:04:00.:04:09.

to walk a tightrope, doesn't see, between trying to get on with Donald

:04:10.:04:14.

Trump, the president, and also not annoying everyone here with what she

:04:15.:04:22.

says to him. Absolutely. This be a very important and potentially very

:04:23.:04:27.

tricky meeting for the Prime Minister. The first world leader to

:04:28.:04:34.

meet President Trump in Downing -- and Downing Street are happy about

:04:35.:04:38.

that. She says she does not want to go back to the sort of foreign

:04:39.:04:42.

interventions we saw in Iraq and Afghanistan. That will be welcome

:04:43.:04:47.

back here. But she does want the US and the UK to continue to engage on

:04:48.:04:52.

the international scene, for example, confronting Islamic State.

:04:53.:04:59.

That will be welcomed back here. But there is a lot of concern, not just

:05:00.:05:03.

among opposition MPs, but in her own party, about Donald Trump's

:05:04.:05:12.

comments, for example, on allowing waterboarding to end terrorism. Many

:05:13.:05:16.

people have said they are opposed to it. It has provoked concern, not

:05:17.:05:21.

just about the future with intelligence sharing and defence

:05:22.:05:26.

agreements, but also how the Prime Minister is talking about shared

:05:27.:05:30.

values with someone whose views on those sorts of issues many people

:05:31.:05:34.

here find objectionable. What the Prime Minister will want to do will

:05:35.:05:38.

be to forge that new personal relationship. She talked last night

:05:39.:05:43.

about how sometimes opposites attract. She did not appear to

:05:44.:05:47.

pander to closely to the president to provoke a backlash here in the

:05:48.:05:54.

UK. Thank you. We will speak to you shortly later on.

:05:55.:05:54.

Shortly after 7am, we'll be asking Tony Blair's former Chief of Staff

:05:55.:05:58.

just how significant this first meeting is likely to be.

:05:59.:06:00.

The Labour MP and party whip, Jeff Smith, has said he'll defy

:06:01.:06:04.

Jeremy Corbyn and vote against the Government Bill that'll

:06:05.:06:06.

The MP said he wasn't convinced the Government had a proper

:06:07.:06:10.

The Shadow Transport Minister, Daniel Zeichner, has also said he'll

:06:11.:06:13.

oppose the legislation, while Tulip Siddiq has resigned

:06:14.:06:16.

The Royal College of Surgeons has described as "alarming" plans

:06:17.:06:23.

to restrict the number of hip and knee replacements in one

:06:24.:06:26.

The move by three clinical commissioning groups

:06:27.:06:29.

in Worcestershire is designed to save money, but they insist

:06:30.:06:32.

operations will continue to be carried out elsewhere.

:06:33.:06:34.

Hip and knee operations can be a godsend to do is to get them, but

:06:35.:06:51.

also expensive, up to ?6,000 each. Three groups in Worcestershire want

:06:52.:06:57.

to decrease those bills because they said they were spending far more

:06:58.:07:01.

than other areas. It is important that they consider operations

:07:02.:07:06.

restricted to those who were in such pain they could not sleep. In the

:07:07.:07:10.

end they did not go that far. But it is understood that criteria is used

:07:11.:07:16.

in many areas. A spokesman for over 50 said they should examine their

:07:17.:07:21.

consciences. They said it was an outrage even to suggest inability to

:07:22.:07:24.

sleep should be used in deciding eligibility for an operation. The

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Royal College of Surgeons said it was worried this example of health

:07:32.:07:35.

rationing was only the tip of the iceberg. The statement went on like

:07:36.:07:44.

this. A health spokeswoman in Worcestershire said many patients

:07:45.:07:50.

would benefit from physiotherapy and weight loss before considering

:07:51.:07:53.

therapy. She also said there was a clear appeal system. Andy Moore, BBC

:07:54.:07:57.

News. A committee of MPs is calling

:07:58.:07:59.

for a tougher approach to taxing The Public Accounts Committee says

:08:00.:08:02.

the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen

:08:03.:08:07.

by a billion pounds. It's urged HM Revenue and Customs

:08:08.:08:09.

to do more to fight tax Head teachers in England,

:08:10.:08:12.

who have been warning of a deepening funding crisis, have been angry

:08:13.:08:20.

to discover that hundreds of millions of funding promised

:08:21.:08:22.

to schools last year were taken back by the Treasury, when the government

:08:23.:08:25.

was defeated in its plan to turn Education correspondent,

:08:26.:08:29.

Sean Coughlan, has the story. Head teachers in West Sussex and

:08:30.:08:46.

other parts of the country have been warning that schools are running out

:08:47.:08:50.

of cash. But only last year, the government announced an extra ?500

:08:51.:08:55.

million, as part of their plan to turn every school into an academy.

:08:56.:08:59.

School leaders have been asking whatever happened to that money? But

:09:00.:09:05.

it has now emerged that most of the money was in fact taken back by the

:09:06.:09:10.

Treasury. The education department said this was the right thing to do.

:09:11.:09:15.

The schools are receiving record levels of funding, according to

:09:16.:09:19.

them. Head teachers are furious that so much money could appear and

:09:20.:09:22.

disappear when schools are struggling to make ends meet. Sean

:09:23.:09:25.

Coughlan, BBC News. Girls are less confident

:09:26.:09:26.

in their ability than boys A study found that by the age

:09:27.:09:29.

of six, girls are much less likely to associate their gender with

:09:30.:09:34.

activities that require brilliance. Gender stereotyping from the media,

:09:35.:09:37.

teachers, and other children, means less women aspire

:09:38.:09:39.

to professions that require subjects The current cold weather appears to

:09:40.:09:46.

be bringing unusual migrant birds to Britain such as waxbirds. Aid

:09:47.:09:56.

charity is holding an annual bird count in the world's largest

:09:57.:09:59.

wildlife survey. --A. Relocating can be stressful

:10:00.:10:03.

at the best of times, but residents in Ghent, Belgium,

:10:04.:10:05.

have found an inventive way to help their local library

:10:06.:10:08.

move down the road. More than 1,200 people formed

:10:09.:10:11.

a human chain over a distance of 250 meters to move books

:10:12.:10:14.

from the old library building You could say they had

:10:15.:10:17.

the situation covered. Do you think they would be better to

:10:18.:10:28.

just put them in a lorry? That is a much better idea. I guess this one

:10:29.:10:32.

brings the community together. Exactly. It is like a big game of

:10:33.:10:36.

pass the parcel. Do you get to look at the books? It is a nostalgic day.

:10:37.:10:45.

The tennis. And now football, a throwback to 1976. A repeat of the

:10:46.:10:50.

League Cup final. Manchester United versus Southampton. That famous day

:10:51.:10:57.

when Robbie Stokes scored an upset to win.

:10:58.:10:58.

Jose Mourinho might have a few more grey hairs,

:10:59.:11:01.

but his Manchester United team, are in the final of the EFL Cup.

:11:02.:11:04.

It was a close shave for Mourinho celebrating his

:11:05.:11:07.

United lost their 17-match unbeaten run, but did they beat Hull City,

:11:08.:11:12.

on aggregate, over the two legs, and so they'll play Southampton

:11:13.:11:16.

Arsenal manager, Arsene Wenger, will accept

:11:17.:11:29.

an FA misconduct charge today.

:11:30.:11:30.

He said he was "big enough" to say he hadn't behaved well,

:11:31.:11:34.

when he verbally abused and pushed an official,

:11:35.:11:36.

during his side's 2-1 win over Burnley.

:11:37.:11:38.

Eoin Morgan led England's cricketers to victory,

:11:39.:11:40.

in their first Twenty20 international against India in

:11:41.:11:42.

The captain's half-century made him the first England player to reach

:11:43.:11:45.

1,500 runs in the shortest format of the game.

:11:46.:11:48.

And will there be a Roger and Rafa final at the Australian Open?

:11:49.:11:52.

A throwback to those days at the Australian Open.

:11:53.:11:57.

Federer won his semi-final in Melbourne yesterday,

:11:58.:11:58.

Nadal plays the in-form Grigor Dimitrov in the next few hours.

:11:59.:12:03.

All the pundits and fans are hoping we see a final between them. But,

:12:04.:12:15.

there might be something to say about that. I was hoping it was at

:12:16.:12:21.

eight o'clock but they started a 30. A quick look at the papers. -- 830.

:12:22.:12:28.

The Times. Are a lot of interest in to reason may's speech last night

:12:29.:12:32.

speaking to Republicans in Philadelphia. Donald Trump was the

:12:33.:12:36.

warmup act. He appeared before Theresa May. She gave her speech to

:12:37.:12:43.

them. Then the face-to-face meeting will be taking place later today. A

:12:44.:12:48.

story about hip operations. Patients will be denied hip or knee

:12:49.:12:55.

operations unless there pain is so severe they cannot sleep. We will

:12:56.:13:00.

talk about that. No more wars like Iraq. That was one of the lines they

:13:01.:13:05.

came out of that speech in Philadelphia. People will be looking

:13:06.:13:10.

very closely at just what message it is she is sending out. What have you

:13:11.:13:15.

got? A glimpse of what it might look like in the future for the British

:13:16.:13:18.

economy. What happened last year is looking big in the papers. Consumer

:13:19.:13:22.

spending sending the country to grow. That was predicted in the last

:13:23.:13:27.

few months of last year, growing the economy 0.6%. People were surprised

:13:28.:13:32.

because they didn't think we would grow. We have talked about consumer

:13:33.:13:36.

spending four years. That is what is propping up the economy. They say it

:13:37.:13:41.

is a surprise but it seems to be the one thing that is strong in the UK.

:13:42.:13:46.

If life is not great for you at work at the minute, you can escape the

:13:47.:13:52.

rat race. Are you not happy at work? My application is in. Look at this.

:13:53.:13:59.

This island, they are looking for someone to live on the island. They

:14:00.:14:04.

have been looking for them for a while. They need them to look after

:14:05.:14:09.

the puffins. 24 nesting species. You can have up to ?70,000,

:14:10.:14:13.

accommodation provided for free, and two motorboats to get around. When

:14:14.:14:25.

you say look after a penguin... Dodos are good! It is going so well.

:14:26.:14:31.

I imagine it requires a lot of counting. He would have to climb the

:14:32.:14:40.

cliffs to get to their nests. Have you done this before? Apparently

:14:41.:14:42.

they have full mobile phone reception and the Internet. Nothing

:14:43.:14:48.

is sacred. I don't know if anyone could have a better job than that.

:14:49.:14:53.

Do they need expertise with puffins? I don't know. LAUGHING. They are

:14:54.:15:01.

calling it timewarp Thursday. No one thought they would see the Williams

:15:02.:15:06.

sisters in a final against each other and potentially Rafael Nadal

:15:07.:15:10.

against Roger Federer. The semi-final in the Australian Open.

:15:11.:15:17.

Nadal still has to get there, and three months ago there was a lovely

:15:18.:15:26.

interview with Roger Federer, they were playing mini tennis in Spain

:15:27.:15:30.

and they joked that they would love to meet again and they would have to

:15:31.:15:36.

set up a charity match. Rafa Nadal was playing with one arm, and that

:15:37.:15:44.

are playing with one leg. It is so reassuring, in a world that is

:15:45.:15:48.

changing fast tennis is giving us a little bit of what we used to know.

:15:49.:15:53.

5000:1 were the odds for the Williams sisters to make it to the

:15:54.:15:57.

final and for Nadal and Federer to make it as well. Sister act part 28,

:15:58.:16:09.

their first since 2009. I have another animal story which has

:16:10.:16:13.

suddenly appeared. We were obviously obsessed with it. This one is a

:16:14.:16:18.

bit... You know if you are at work and wondering how your dog might be

:16:19.:16:22.

at home, your dog or cat, and you are thinking I hope they are

:16:23.:16:26.

enjoying themselves? Now there is a ball you can get where you can be at

:16:27.:16:31.

work and on your phone and you can make the ball moves and do tricks,

:16:32.:16:35.

and it can even have your face on it. You can actually entertain your

:16:36.:16:39.

pet while you are sat in a boring meeting. Can the ball looked at the

:16:40.:16:47.

pet? You can, because even see what they are up to, although it is a bit

:16:48.:16:51.

of an invasion of privacy for the dog. If they are up to something

:16:52.:16:56.

they shouldn't be? Here is one that everyone up. Supposedly the

:16:57.:17:00.

roundabout with the worst potholes in the UK. This is in Staffordshire.

:17:01.:17:07.

100 in one roundabout complex. If you have been across this you must

:17:08.:17:11.

know what it is like. A lot of people saying it is shocking. When

:17:12.:17:16.

cyclist is have to go around it you literally have to navigate in

:17:17.:17:23.

amongst gigantic potholes. It livens up the journey. Well done finding a

:17:24.:17:33.

positive spin. We will see you both a little later on. Have you stopped

:17:34.:17:37.

talking now? Thanks, Mike. You are watching

:17:38.:17:44.

Breakfast from BBC News. The main stories this morning:

:17:45.:17:46.

Theresa May heads to the White House for her first face-to-face meeting

:17:47.:17:49.

with President Trump. Plans to restrict the number of hip

:17:50.:17:53.

and knee replacements are described as alarming by the Royal

:17:54.:17:56.

College of Surgeons. Here is Carol with a look

:17:57.:18:04.

at this morning's weather. It certainly felt chilly for lots of

:18:05.:18:13.

people. Look at that. That is the 13 I can see that. That is a good

:18:14.:18:18.

number for us. It certainly is. Good morning all. Steph is quite right.

:18:19.:18:23.

It is a chilly start to the day, some temperatures as low as -5 but

:18:24.:18:29.

yesterday, look at this gorgeous Weather Watcher's picture, sent in

:18:30.:18:33.

from Glen Morriston in the Highlands. As we came that bit

:18:34.:18:38.

further south, we had seen more like this, -1 and a lot of frost around.

:18:39.:18:44.

Today it is not going to be as cold, but it is going to still be cold.

:18:45.:18:49.

What is happening is, if you remember yesterday, France was all

:18:50.:18:55.

blue, indicating it was cold, and dragging in the south-easterly

:18:56.:18:57.

winds. Today the green and yellow are reappearing. It is still cold

:18:58.:19:02.

but not as cold so that is being dragged across our shores by the

:19:03.:19:06.

south-easterly wind. Increasingly today we will see more of a

:19:07.:19:10.

south-westerly wind developing around this area of low pressure, so

:19:11.:19:13.

things are going to turn less cold through the day. We have a weather

:19:14.:19:18.

front coming an associated with that area of low pressure which will

:19:19.:19:21.

slowly be ringing some rain and drizzle from the west, very slowly

:19:22.:19:25.

moving east. So first thing this morning there is a fair bit of cloud

:19:26.:19:30.

around, it is cold, some frost and pockets of fault as well, especially

:19:31.:19:34.

the East Midlands and Lincolnshire, where it is dense in this increasing

:19:35.:19:40.

fog. Watch out for ice in East Anglia, on damp surfaces and a lot

:19:41.:19:44.

of cloud across Northern Ireland, with the rain knocking on the door

:19:45.:19:48.

across northern England and cold across Scotland. For most of us we

:19:49.:19:51.

are getting off to a decent start, with some sunshine. Through the day,

:19:52.:19:57.

as this weather front approaches slowly, bringing rain across

:19:58.:19:59.

Northern Ireland, the cloud will build and we also have something

:20:00.:20:03.

else coming up, more rain across the Channel Island in across southern

:20:04.:20:07.

areas. The cloud building ahead of both of these systems, the far north

:20:08.:20:11.

and east of Scotland and northern England we are going to see the best

:20:12.:20:14.

of the weather today. Temperature-wise, down in the

:20:15.:20:20.

Highlands we are not looking at 13, neither are we looking at minus one.

:20:21.:20:24.

So through the course of the evening and overnight our two systems join

:20:25.:20:28.

forces and the whole lot will be drifting slowly towards the east,

:20:29.:20:33.

ringing some rain. Some snow in the Pennines and also above about 400m

:20:34.:20:38.

across Scotland, and increasingly we are looking at clearer skies behind,

:20:39.:20:44.

the risk of ice on untreated surfaces, more especially in the

:20:45.:20:48.

west. As we go through the weekend we continue with the less cold

:20:49.:20:53.

theme. It will be breezy at times as well, with some rain. To translate

:20:54.:20:56.

that onto the charts, our system coming in from the west moving

:20:57.:21:01.

slowly towards the east, taking some rain with them. Behind them it will

:21:02.:21:06.

brighten up. Quite a lot of cloud at times, some sunshine in the west but

:21:07.:21:10.

nonetheless some showers as well, so it will not be bone dry. Sunshine

:21:11.:21:14.

chases away that cloud. Temperatures between about five and nine Celsius

:21:15.:21:19.

and for Sunday we have rain coming in from the south-west and the

:21:20.:21:22.

South, slowly moving northwards. It looks like this is where its

:21:23.:21:27.

northern extent will be. The south-westerly is coming our way,

:21:28.:21:30.

bringing in milder conditions but in the north we will see the best and

:21:31.:21:34.

driest of the weather, if that is your definition of what is best,

:21:35.:21:38.

with temperatures that little bit lower. Less cold is my favourite bit

:21:39.:21:44.

of that weather broadcast. Thank you very much. See you in a bit.

:21:45.:21:46.

Losing a child is perhaps the most painful experience any parent

:21:47.:21:49.

But if a baby is born earlier than 24 weeks into a pregnancy,

:21:50.:21:54.

and doesn't manage to survive, they won't receive a birth

:21:55.:21:57.

That made the situation even more upsetting for Sarah Henderson

:21:58.:22:00.

when her daughter arrived at 23 weeks, but without a heartbeat.

:22:01.:22:03.

She has been speaking to Breakfast's Graham Satchell

:22:04.:22:05.

about her loss, and why she is calling for a change

:22:06.:22:08.

We had the opportunity to take photographs of her, which we will

:22:09.:22:27.

treasure for ever. And handprints, and footprints, and we held her. She

:22:28.:22:32.

was very small, but she was perfectly formed. To us she was

:22:33.:22:38.

perfect. She was our daughter. Sarah gave birth to her daughter at 23

:22:39.:22:44.

weeks and four days. She was born without a heartbeat. I don't know

:22:45.:22:49.

how many times I told her I was sorry. As a mother, you ought to

:22:50.:22:53.

protect your children. And we couldn't. We had no choice. Over

:22:54.:23:02.

what happened, how it happened. Sarah was told she wouldn't get a

:23:03.:23:06.

birth or death certificate for her daughter. Legally, the birth of a

:23:07.:23:11.

child is registered after 24 weeks, the age of viability. Sarah started

:23:12.:23:14.

to petition to change the law. It now has more than 300,000

:23:15.:23:20.

signatures. It is a recognition that your child existed at all,

:23:21.:23:23.

acknowledgement that they were here. No matter how short the time. It

:23:24.:23:31.

really would have helped for the grieving process, the fact that she

:23:32.:23:34.

was acknowledged, the fact that our grief was acknowledged, that we had

:23:35.:23:39.

lost. Like millions of others, Sarah has been watching harrowing scenes

:23:40.:23:44.

on Coronation Street. Michelle,, played by Kym Marsh, loses her son

:23:45.:23:50.

at 23 weeks. She also asks for a birth certificate, and is refused.

:23:51.:23:56.

What touched me so much was knowing that she had actually experienced

:23:57.:23:59.

that in her real life. One of the reasons I felt rave enough to share

:24:00.:24:05.

my story, and to do the petition, was if Kym was brave enough to do

:24:06.:24:12.

that, then I could use my voice. -- brave enough. A meeting with Zoe

:24:13.:24:18.

Clark Coates from the charity Saying Goodbye. What we all want is

:24:19.:24:25.

grieving parent is very much that every baby gets the recognition they

:24:26.:24:28.

deserve. Together we can make a difference. Registering all births

:24:29.:24:33.

before 24 weeks would mean issuing certificates in abortion cases, so

:24:34.:24:36.

charities have been working on compromises. A new national

:24:37.:24:40.

certificate available to parents who want it. It will give parents a

:24:41.:24:45.

certificate, formal certificate. We want to a formal, legal document

:24:46.:24:51.

that is given to any parent who requests it, and a new register be

:24:52.:24:57.

created. Sarah is hoping for more signatures for her petition, and

:24:58.:25:02.

change. Not having legal recognition for her daughter has been

:25:03.:25:09.

devastating. There is no... There is no record of her anywhere. So she is

:25:10.:25:13.

not in our family tree, she will never appear in an birth register or

:25:14.:25:16.

death register in any way. It is like legally she didn't exist, that

:25:17.:25:20.

she was never a person. Of course, to us she was, and will always be.

:25:21.:25:24.

That was Sarah Henderson, sharing her story with

:25:25.:25:26.

If you or someone you know is affected by this,

:25:27.:25:30.

you can find details of organisations offering support

:25:31.:25:32.

at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free at any time

:25:33.:25:35.

to hear recorded information on 0800 560 190.

:25:36.:25:49.

Still to come this morning: We all know there is no such thing

:25:50.:25:53.

as free money, but now withdrawing cash could become more costly.

:25:54.:25:57.

We will find out why with Sean, before 7:00am.

:25:58.:26:07.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:26:08.:29:26.

Now, though, it is back to Charlie and Steph.

:29:27.:29:29.

This is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Steph

:29:30.:29:37.

The soldiers came in, took all of it, and put it on my head.

:29:38.:29:52.

Thankfully, the atrocities of the Holocaust have been condemned

:29:53.:29:54.

to history, but worrying research suggests more than a quarter

:29:55.:29:57.

of survivors living in the UK still experience discrimination.

:29:58.:29:59.

We'll hear from some of those affected.

:30:00.:30:01.

"Men are from Mars, women from Venus."

:30:02.:30:04.

And it seems, when it comes to confidence,

:30:05.:30:07.

the difference between boys and girls can become worlds apart

:30:08.:30:09.

Hollywood actor, Neil Patrick Harris, as you've never

:30:10.:30:15.

The star of the hit comedy, How I Met Your Mother,

:30:16.:30:18.

will be here to tell us about his new children's drama

:30:19.:30:21.

and what it's like to play a villain.

:30:22.:30:24.

But now a summary of this morning's main news.

:30:25.:30:28.

Theresa May will today become the first world leader to meet

:30:29.:30:31.

Donald Trump since he became US President.

:30:32.:30:33.

The Prime Minister told Republicans yesterday of the importance

:30:34.:30:36.

of the special relationship between the two countries,

:30:37.:30:38.

but says they cannot return to "failed" military interventions.

:30:39.:30:40.

Mrs May will be hoping to lay the ground work for a trade

:30:41.:30:44.

Here's our Washington correspondent, David Willis.

:30:45.:30:53.

She arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling

:30:54.:30:56.

from the effects of the new occupant of the White House.

:30:57.:31:00.

Theresa May will meet with President Trump less

:31:01.:31:02.

than a week after he came to office, a week as unpredictable as any

:31:03.:31:06.

And as the Prime Minister's motorcade wound its way

:31:07.:31:15.

through the streets of the capital, she could be forgiven for thinking

:31:16.:31:19.

will the new relationship be more strange than

:31:20.:31:21.

In Philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers,

:31:22.:31:27.

Mrs May earned a standing ovation for a speech

:31:28.:31:30.

that dwelt on the shared history of the two nations,

:31:31.:31:33.

a relationship which had defined the modern world,

:31:34.:31:36.

all part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way

:31:37.:31:39.

So I am delighted that the new administration has made a trade

:31:40.:31:52.

agreement between our countries, one of its earliest priorities.

:31:53.:31:54.

A new trade deal with Britain and America.

:31:55.:31:58.

It must serve both of our sides and interests.

:31:59.:32:00.

Later, she will become the first foreign leader to meet with Donald

:32:01.:32:04.

The streetwise New Yorker who, when it

:32:05.:32:07.

comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always put

:32:08.:32:10.

He and Theresa May do have things in common,

:32:11.:32:13.

and it remains to be seen whether they can find common ground,

:32:14.:32:16.

just as the UK is preparing to negotiate its departure

:32:17.:32:19.

Shortly after 7am, we'll be asking Tony Blair's former Chief of Staff

:32:20.:32:33.

just how significant this first meeting is likely to be.

:32:34.:32:39.

Donald Trump's first week as president has been described

:32:40.:32:41.

by the former Labour leader, as "dizzying"

:32:42.:32:43.

Speaking on the BBC's Newsnight programme,

:32:44.:32:45.

he also criticised Theresa May for positioning herself so closely

:32:46.:32:48.

Her speech was a perfectly decent speech if it had been normal times.

:32:49.:33:02.

But to align yourself so closely with his project, which is what she

:33:03.:33:04.

did, that, I think, was a mistake. Jeremy Corbyn faces more dissent

:33:05.:33:07.

in the Labour Party today, as the party whip, Jeff Smith,

:33:08.:33:10.

says he'll defy the leader and vote against the Government Bill that

:33:11.:33:13.

will trigger Article 50. The MP said he wasn't convinced

:33:14.:33:16.

the government had a proper The Shadow Transport Minister,

:33:17.:33:19.

Daniel Zeichner, has also said he'll oppose the legislation,

:33:20.:33:22.

while Tulip Siddiq has resigned The Royal College of Surgeons has

:33:23.:33:24.

described as "alarming" plans to restrict the number of hip

:33:25.:33:41.

and knee replacements in one The move by three clinical

:33:42.:33:44.

commissioning groups in Worcestershire is designed

:33:45.:33:47.

to save money, but they insist operations will continue to be

:33:48.:33:49.

carried out elsewhere. A committee of MPs is calling

:33:50.:34:02.

for a tougher approach to taxing The Public Accounts Committee says

:34:03.:34:05.

the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen

:34:06.:34:10.

by a billion pounds. It's urged HM Revenue and Customs

:34:11.:34:12.

to do more to fight tax Head teachers in England,

:34:13.:34:15.

who have been warning of a deepening funding crisis, have been angry

:34:16.:34:19.

to discover that hundreds of millions of funding promised

:34:20.:34:21.

to schools last year were taken back by the Treasury, when the government

:34:22.:34:25.

was defeated in its plan to turn The RSPB says the current cold

:34:26.:34:28.

weather appears to be bringing unusual migrant birds

:34:29.:34:38.

to Britain, such as waxwings. The charity is holding its annual

:34:39.:34:40.

bird count this weekend, when more than half a million people

:34:41.:34:43.

are expected to take part in what's claimed to be the world's

:34:44.:34:46.

largest wildlife survey. Relocating can be stressful

:34:47.:34:49.

at the best of times, but residents in Ghent, Belgium,

:34:50.:34:51.

have found an inventive way to help their local library

:34:52.:34:54.

move down the road. More than 1,200 people formed

:34:55.:34:56.

a human chain over a distance of 250 meters to move books

:34:57.:35:00.

from the old library building You could say they had

:35:01.:35:02.

the situation covered. That is quite a long way. I think it

:35:03.:35:15.

is a good idea. It gets everyone involved. And as you are passing the

:35:16.:35:20.

books you might think, hey, this one looks good. The complete works of

:35:21.:35:27.

Shakespeare might be quite heavy to move that way. We are about to step

:35:28.:35:34.

into the weird and wonderful world of Jose Mourinho. The final score,

:35:35.:35:43.

you will hear written a moment, it was Hull, two, Man U, one. Bear that

:35:44.:35:45.

in mind. Manchester United are into the EFL

:35:46.:35:46.

Cup final after beating Hull City United led 2-0 from the first leg

:35:47.:35:49.

and after Hull scored a penalty, Paul Pogba struck what would

:35:50.:35:56.

be the decisive goal. Oumar Niasse ended United's

:35:57.:35:58.

17-match unbeaten run, but that didn't stop Jose Mourinho

:35:59.:36:00.

reaching his first final And on his birthday,

:36:01.:36:03.

too, although he's not accepting their winning

:36:04.:36:07.

streak is over. He is even saying that that wasn't

:36:08.:36:22.

the real score. We did not lose. It was 1-1. 1-1. I only saw two goals.

:36:23.:36:38.

Pogba's one. And the guy in the far post coming... 1-1. We are still

:36:39.:36:45.

unbeatable. Why did you not count the first goal? I did not see it.

:36:46.:37:05.

Winning after winning is the toughest thing. That is what

:37:06.:37:10.

Leicester has proven to be difficult this season. But they still, in cup

:37:11.:37:16.

competitions, as we saw in the Champions League, are formidable

:37:17.:37:24.

opponents on their day. I put on the best team. The best team. That is

:37:25.:37:32.

because we need to go to the cup. We need to get confidence. Because we

:37:33.:37:39.

lost so many matches in the last days.

:37:40.:37:39.

Arsenal manager, Arsene Wenger, will attend a personal hearing

:37:40.:37:42.

for his misconduct charge later today.

:37:43.:37:43.

Wenger says he'll accept the charge for verbally abusing and pushing

:37:44.:37:46.

an official during his side's win over Burnley last weekend,

:37:47.:37:49.

but he wants clarity on the rules for when a manager is sent

:37:50.:37:53.

When I was sent off, I was surprised. I was in the tunnel. I

:37:54.:38:09.

thought I had the right to be in the tunnel. In 2009 I had to go into the

:38:10.:38:14.

stands in Old Trafford. I did not know where to go. Nobody tells you

:38:15.:38:19.

what you have to do when you are sent off. He looked a little bit

:38:20.:38:23.

lost when he went to the stands. Just, where do you go?

:38:24.:38:27.

Former England captain Steven Gerrard says he's "very

:38:28.:38:29.

excited but nervous and anxious" about his new role

:38:30.:38:31.

Gerrard, who made more than 500 appearances for the club,

:38:32.:38:35.

I think the key to it is Liverpool are prepared to help me. They want

:38:36.:38:44.

to help me become a better coach and a better manager. You know, they

:38:45.:38:49.

welcomed me with open arms. But at the same time, I have to put in all

:38:50.:38:53.

the hard work and tried to improve as well.

:38:54.:39:00.

England cruised to a seven-wicket victory in their first twenty20

:39:01.:39:04.

international against India in Kanpur.

:39:05.:39:05.

Captain Eoin Morgan led by example, top scoring in the match.

:39:06.:39:08.

His half century made him the first England player to reach 1,500 runs

:39:09.:39:12.

They can wrap up the series with a win in the second

:39:13.:39:17.

I think it was a pretty complete performance. Certainly as complete

:39:18.:39:23.

as we have performed on the strip. To win the toss and bowl, there is

:39:24.:39:29.

always more pressure on the bowlers to perform on that kind of wicket.

:39:30.:39:34.

Finally, to the tennis. Will there be a Roger and Rafa final

:39:35.:39:37.

at the Australian Open? Federer won his semi-final

:39:38.:39:40.

in Melbourne yesterday, Nadal plays the in-form Grigor

:39:41.:39:42.

Dimitrov in the next few hours. Nadal has not reached a major final

:39:43.:39:45.

since winning his 14th Grand Slam If he beats Dimitrov,

:39:46.:39:49.

then all four singles finalists will be aged over 30,

:39:50.:39:53.

as 35-year-old Serena Williams meets sister Venus, who's 36,

:39:54.:39:56.

in the women's final. And it would be, if Rafael Nadal can

:39:57.:40:18.

get through, be a repeat of 2008. It would be a real throwback. When is

:40:19.:40:24.

the game? 830 our time. It will obviously go on beyond that. Thank

:40:25.:40:26.

you. Later today, Theresa May will become

:40:27.:40:27.

the first global leader to meet The Prime Minster has said she hopes

:40:28.:40:30.

the two leaders can find a trade Mrs May has also said she's

:40:31.:40:35.

not afraid of having But with Donald Trump promising

:40:36.:40:39.

to "put America first," just how Breakfast's Jayne McCubbin has been

:40:40.:40:43.

to Liverpool to investigate. On the quayside in Liverpool, row

:40:44.:40:58.

after row of British made cars bound for America. They are red bit

:40:59.:41:02.

exports for us out of the UK, as well as construction and mining

:41:03.:41:08.

machinery. Heavy machinery. When you hear Donald Trump is getting America

:41:09.:41:11.

building again, this sounds encouraging for you. Obviously. We

:41:12.:41:15.

want a slice of that. We can export the goods he needs to carry on that

:41:16.:41:26.

construction he is looking at. If. A slice of the economy is what Theresa

:41:27.:41:31.

May wants. This is the exports out of the UK, a fifth of global

:41:32.:41:36.

exports. We sell more than we buy, with imports totalling ?35 billion.

:41:37.:41:42.

The US is our biggest single nation export market. But we are America's

:41:43.:41:48.

fifth most important market. It is clear who has the upper hand. A new

:41:49.:41:53.

trade deal between Britain and America must serve both sides and

:41:54.:41:58.

both of our interests. It is going to be only America first. America

:41:59.:42:06.

first. America first. Does that alarm you at all? If they are more

:42:07.:42:13.

serious about manufacturing that creates opportunities for us. If we

:42:14.:42:20.

listen to what Donald Trump says, we could have great opportunity. You

:42:21.:42:24.

never know. But if there are opportunities at what cost? In

:42:25.:42:33.

Liverpool's shopping districts, look up, and you might notice a golden

:42:34.:42:38.

eagle. It marks the spot of America's very first consulate, when

:42:39.:42:40.

the fledgeling republic first looked the world, and it traded with

:42:41.:42:47.

Britain first then. Today it is a French restaurant, and everything

:42:48.:42:51.

has changed. We think we are still a big power. But the special

:42:52.:42:54.

relationship was only important from the British point of view. The

:42:55.:42:57.

assumption that everything would be fine with trade assumes Donald

:42:58.:43:03.

Trump's administration will behave rationally. They may not. They could

:43:04.:43:09.

genuinely prioritised American consumers and jobs and manufacturing

:43:10.:43:12.

to the exclusion of other trading partners. High tariffs could be put

:43:13.:43:17.

in place to tax imports. We don't know. Barack Obama's great, great

:43:18.:43:23.

grandfather once sailed from here in the hope of finding a better future

:43:24.:43:30.

in America. Has Theresa May meets his successor, she has her eye on

:43:31.:43:35.

the same thing. -- as. More coverage through the morning as we look to

:43:36.:43:39.

that face-to-face meeting between Donald Trump and Theresa May

:43:40.:43:41.

happening later on today. You are watching

:43:42.:43:45.

Breakfast from BBC News. The main stories this morning:

:43:46.:43:47.

Theresa May is heading to the White House to become

:43:48.:43:50.

the first foreign leader to meet Plans to restrict the number of hip

:43:51.:43:53.

and knee replacements for all but those in the most severe

:43:54.:43:56.

pain are described as alarming It is time to find out what is

:43:57.:44:11.

happening with the weather. That is definitely a lovely optimistic

:44:12.:44:14.

picture. Good morning. For some of us, we will see pictures like this

:44:15.:44:19.

today. Skies like this. Not necessarily for the whole day. This

:44:20.:44:23.

is a Weather Watcher picture. It was sent in yesterday to Morriston in

:44:24.:44:27.

the highlands where we had 13 Celsius. That is a brilliant

:44:28.:44:33.

temperature. Lovely skies. Look further south. Another cracking

:44:34.:44:40.

picture. -1, that is as warm as it got. Both these temperatures, one is

:44:41.:44:47.

going up and the other is going down. You can see air coming up from

:44:48.:44:52.

the continent which is not as cold as it was yesterday. To take a look

:44:53.:44:57.

at that, if you remember in France yesterday, my chart had blues in it,

:44:58.:45:01.

indicating it was cold. Mild greens and yellow is now. I use the word

:45:02.:45:08.

mild. It will still feel cold. Dragging south-easterly is across

:45:09.:45:12.

the country. Not as cold as yesterday. But to get through the

:45:13.:45:17.

day how we start to see air rotating around. The area of low pressure

:45:18.:45:21.

approaching us. This is a mild air direction approaching from the

:45:22.:45:25.

south-west. With that, a front coming our way. That will introduce

:45:26.:45:31.

a fair bit of rain at times. Light rain and drizzle. It will very

:45:32.:45:34.

slowly move east. First thing this morning we have got variable

:45:35.:45:39.

fortunes. Cloud around. Also some sunshine when it gets up. A cold

:45:40.:45:46.

start. Temperatures and parts of England will go as low as -5, -6.

:45:47.:45:53.

Clear skies as well. Northern Ireland, a lot of cloud around and

:45:54.:45:57.

showers. As we move into Scotland, a cold start, but a lot of sunshine.

:45:58.:46:02.

More mild towards the west. Wales, you can see a bit of cloud coming in

:46:03.:46:08.

from the south-west this morning. Sunny breaks. Through the day, as

:46:09.:46:12.

the weather front goes across Northern Ireland, it will bring

:46:13.:46:16.

rain. Eventually, it will get into western part of Scotland, England,

:46:17.:46:20.

and Wales. At the same time, a system going up across the English

:46:21.:46:24.

Channel bringing rain to the Channel Islands and into southern counties.

:46:25.:46:29.

Watch out for ice first thing in Kent, Sussex, in the east of East

:46:30.:46:32.

Anglia, where there will be rain. Through the afternoon, more cloud

:46:33.:46:36.

will build to be hanging onto the sunshine in north and eastern

:46:37.:46:40.

Scotland and north-east England. Temperatures down in the north end

:46:41.:46:44.

up in the south compared with yesterday. Ben True this evening and

:46:45.:46:47.

overnight, well, the rain is coming from both directions. Joining

:46:48.:46:53.

forces. It moves towards the east. Behind that, the risk of ice on

:46:54.:46:58.

untreated surfaces. Above 400 metres. We could also see snow on

:46:59.:47:02.

the tops of the Pennines. The weekend. If anything, again, it is

:47:03.:47:08.

going to be less cold. I am choosing my language carefully here. Breezy.

:47:09.:47:14.

Rain at times. Saturday, first of all, do you remember this from the

:47:15.:47:18.

west slowly towards the east? Behind that, brighter skies,. A lot of

:47:19.:47:23.

cloud initially, but the sunshine will chase that way. A plethora of

:47:24.:47:27.

showers towards the west. Temperatures, coming up, between

:47:28.:47:32.

five and nine. And then on Sunday, rain, from the south-west in the

:47:33.:47:36.

south moving slowly west, and the brighter skies will be across

:47:37.:47:38.

Scotland and eventually into northern England.

:47:39.:47:47.

Where are you? We are listening very intently. You set at one point the

:47:48.:47:56.

Sun is going to chase the clouds away, and I heard what you said. It

:47:57.:48:01.

was poetry! Yes, because normally Steph always listens, but Charlie, I

:48:02.:48:09.

am very impressed! He is a part-time, we both know that.

:48:10.:48:12.

Now let's have a look at this morning's papers.

:48:13.:48:17.

The Guardian, first of all, lots of the papers covering the news today

:48:18.:48:25.

that Theresa May will be meeting President Trump, the first foreign

:48:26.:48:29.

leader to do so now that Donald Trump is president and lots of

:48:30.:48:33.

people analysing what is going to happen, the opposites attract

:48:34.:48:38.

headline being because Theresa May said to journalists on her flight to

:48:39.:48:42.

the US that sometimes opposites do attract. And the front page of the

:48:43.:48:46.

Daily Telegraph, it is interesting how they have framed this one. No

:48:47.:48:51.

more wars like Iraq. They haven't quoted her directly, this is a

:48:52.:48:57.

reference to know more interventions in foreign countries, and they have

:48:58.:49:02.

obviously thinks that with Iraq and Afghanistan. There is a story about

:49:03.:49:07.

hip operations on the Daily Mail this morning, and this is the news

:49:08.:49:11.

this morning that patients could be denied hip Warnie replacements

:49:12.:49:16.

unless they cannot sleep through the night due to pain -- or knee. We

:49:17.:49:23.

will be speaking to the Royal College of surgeons a bit later

:49:24.:49:25.

about that. We all know there is no such

:49:26.:49:26.

thing as free money, but it could soon cost

:49:27.:49:29.

you to withdraw money from tens of thousands of ATMs

:49:30.:49:32.

which are currently free. How much would you pay to take a

:49:33.:49:34.

tenner out of a machine? We have got used to pretty

:49:35.:49:43.

much all cash machines Banks and ATM operators are arguing

:49:44.:49:46.

over the fees they pay each other to cover the cost of

:49:47.:49:50.

running the machines. If you don't go to a machine that

:49:51.:49:52.

belongs to your bank, your bank has to pay a small fee,

:49:53.:49:56.

either to another bank But some of the banks

:49:57.:49:59.

want to reduce the fees. So will us customers be asked

:50:00.:50:03.

to make up the difference? Ron Delnevo is the executive

:50:04.:50:07.

director Europe of the ATM industry association, representing both

:50:08.:50:10.

banks and independent You represent the industry. I do.

:50:11.:50:25.

Why has this issue come up now? It seems we have been used to not

:50:26.:50:29.

paying for our cash out of cash machines for quite awhile. It is

:50:30.:50:33.

probably a relief to some of your not hearing about Brexit and Donald

:50:34.:50:38.

Trump, this issue is more important today now than some of those other

:50:39.:50:43.

issues. The reality is we have enjoyed fantastic free access to

:50:44.:50:46.

cash in the UK. The system which connect all of the ATMs here is

:50:47.:50:51.

admired around the world, and we have it and therefore we have that

:50:52.:50:55.

easy access to cash. It is under threat now. Why now? Why all of a

:50:56.:51:00.

sudden other banks saying they are not willing to pay as much as the

:51:01.:51:04.

machine operators want to charge? It is not all the banks. Some banks are

:51:05.:51:09.

saying they don't want to pay but the reality is that is because

:51:10.:51:12.

rightly that banks are examining their cost them trying to save

:51:13.:51:16.

money. What I would say and the UK public would say is this is not a

:51:17.:51:20.

good way of saving money. An average of 15 million adults in the UK use

:51:21.:51:27.

an ATM once a week so it is a vital part of our economy and that cash

:51:28.:51:31.

keeps the economy going. Millions of people use cash to lead their daily

:51:32.:51:35.

lives. There is a myth that cash is dying away but more than 50% of

:51:36.:51:39.

retail transactions are still carried out using cash. It is very

:51:40.:51:44.

important to the people of the UK and that is why it needs to be kept

:51:45.:51:48.

on a sustainable basis for ever. Some of your members are banks, are

:51:49.:51:52.

they picking the wrong fights and should they be looking to save money

:51:53.:51:57.

in other ways? This is a fight between banks and independence,

:51:58.:52:00.

because as you save many banks operate ATMs away from branches. We

:52:01.:52:04.

shouldn't criticise banks were trying to save money. They are right

:52:05.:52:08.

to be trying to save money. This is just the wrong place to be saving

:52:09.:52:12.

that money. We need good public access to cash, which is what we

:52:13.:52:17.

have at the moment. Millions only use cash to lead their daily lives

:52:18.:52:21.

and we have to restore that access to cash, that is called financial

:52:22.:52:26.

inclusion. So there is a big meeting today among operators to try and

:52:27.:52:29.

sort out what will go on with these fees. If it turns out the fees have

:52:30.:52:33.

to be reduced, how many of the current cash machines that we have

:52:34.:52:37.

free to use across the country could turn into us seeing those charges

:52:38.:52:41.

like we used to? Well, the working party which has been set up solves

:52:42.:52:47.

the problem. If not, to be honest, we would expect the payment

:52:48.:52:50.

regulator to intervene. Do you think a third of them? It could be a third

:52:51.:52:57.

of ATMs. We estimate 8500 would come out, but there will also be bank

:52:58.:53:03.

ATMs, because of branch ATMs will mean a lot of cash access removed.

:53:04.:53:07.

One major bank leaving the network could mean the end of the network.

:53:08.:53:12.

We need that to be safeguarded, and we need to have guarantees of free

:53:13.:53:20.

access to cash, guaranteed under the Link network. It makes you think how

:53:21.:53:28.

often you get cashed out. Are you a cash man? I have started to use my

:53:29.:53:32.

mobile phone. And I found out this morning what ATMs stood for. Any

:53:33.:53:40.

idea? Automatic teller machine. Very good, very good. You would think I

:53:41.:53:45.

knew a bit about business, wouldn't you?

:53:46.:53:47.

It is not every day that a rare tropical turtle washes up on a beach

:53:48.:53:51.

in Wales, but that is exactly what happened in November

:53:52.:53:54.

when an olive ridley turtle named Menai turned up in Anglesey.

:53:55.:53:57.

The species is critically endangered, and experts say

:53:58.:53:59.

it is the first time one has been seen on UK shores.

:54:00.:54:02.

Our Wales correspondent Sian Lloyd has more.

:54:03.:54:19.

An early morning start, and another step on a journey that could

:54:20.:54:26.

eventually lead to this tropical sea turtle being released back into the

:54:27.:54:31.

wild. She was driven all the way from Anglesey, where she was found

:54:32.:54:34.

last November, to Hertfordshire. Six hours later, and the team at the

:54:35.:54:39.

Royal veterinary College were preparing their unique patient. They

:54:40.:54:45.

have never seen a olive ridley here before. Menai is the first to be

:54:46.:54:50.

spotted in British waters since records began, almost 250 years ago.

:54:51.:54:54.

Getting a sea turtle into the scanning machine is no easy task,

:54:55.:54:59.

but experts need to check her lungs for damage. You can see her shell,

:55:00.:55:05.

all around, and we can see her lungs, and we can see also that

:55:06.:55:10.

there is some gas, which is black, and that is outside her lungs. So it

:55:11.:55:19.

is free gas, and that is potentially responsible for her buoyancy

:55:20.:55:23.

problem. Staff caring for her on Anglesey had noticed that Menai was

:55:24.:55:27.

unable to keep below the water. She may be struggling to dive, but the

:55:28.:55:32.

team are delighted by her appetite, which is helping her regain weight.

:55:33.:55:37.

She is starting to eat really, really well now. She is demolishing

:55:38.:55:42.

a couple of kilos of calamari a day, and she is a real personality. She

:55:43.:55:47.

likes to see us, she seems to recognise people, she knows what is

:55:48.:55:53.

going on. Olive ridleys can travel vast distances but it is thought

:55:54.:55:56.

this one was carried by current thousands of miles off course. Menai

:55:57.:56:01.

the total has been through a lot, and now it is time for some TLC. Gel

:56:02.:56:06.

is being applied to prevent her skin from drying, and it will soon be

:56:07.:56:12.

time for her return to Anglesey, where experts decide her future.

:56:13.:56:17.

I have learned a lot in that piece, not least that they serve calamari

:56:18.:56:26.

to captive totals. It has fine tastes, that turtle.

:56:27.:59:47.

so feeling milder, but rather unsettled.

:59:48.:59:48.

There will be some rain around on Sunday morning, too.

:59:49.:59:51.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:59:52.:59:54.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:59:55.:59:57.

This is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Steph

:59:58.:00:32.

Theresa May becomes the first world leader to meet Donald Trump

:00:33.:00:36.

The Prime Minister says the two leaders can "lead the world

:00:37.:00:41.

together" but they cannot return to "failed" military interventions.

:00:42.:00:47.

We have the opportunity, indeed, the responsibility,

:00:48.:00:49.

to renew the special relationship for this new age.

:00:50.:00:51.

I do not have my Commerce Secretary, they want to talk trade.

:00:52.:00:54.

Proposals to restrict knee and hip replacements for only those

:00:55.:01:22.

The Royal College of Surgeons says there's no justification

:01:23.:01:26.

The babies who die before 24 weeks and their parents who are denied

:01:27.:01:34.

It is a recognition that your child existed at all. Proof that they were

:01:35.:01:50.

here. One of our biggest companies BT

:01:51.:01:51.

is having to deal with accounting I'll be looking at why this

:01:52.:01:55.

could affect our pensions In sport, it's a happy

:01:56.:01:59.

birthday for Jose Mourinho. Manchester United reach

:02:00.:02:03.

the League Cup final, with an aggregate victory over Hull,

:02:04.:02:04.

so they'll face Southampton A cold and frosty start to the day.

:02:05.:02:20.

Patchy fog. Some dense. Dry and bright. Cloudy rain coming in from

:02:21.:02:25.

the west and south. Those will merge and slowly move east through the

:02:26.:02:29.

day. For many, though, it will be dry. I will have more details in 15

:02:30.:02:34.

minutes. Thank you. See you soon. Theresa May will meet

:02:35.:02:38.

President Donald Trump She'll be hoping to prepare

:02:39.:02:42.

the ground for a smooth The two leaders will spend around

:02:43.:02:46.

an hour in The Oval Office, where they're also expected

:02:47.:02:50.

to discuss the role of Nato as well as relations

:02:51.:02:53.

with Russia and China. Yesterday, the Prime Minister told

:02:54.:02:55.

senior Republicans it was time for Britain and America

:02:56.:02:58.

to renew their special relationship. Here's our Washington

:02:59.:03:00.

correspondent, David Willis. She arrived on a blustery winter's

:03:01.:03:02.

evening in a city reeling from the effects of the new occupant

:03:03.:03:05.

of the White House. Theresa May will meet

:03:06.:03:08.

with President Trump less than a week after he came to office,

:03:09.:03:10.

a week as unpredictable as any And as the Prime Minister's

:03:11.:03:14.

motorcade wound its way through the streets of the capital,

:03:15.:03:18.

she could probably be forgiven for thinking will the new

:03:19.:03:20.

relationship be more In Philadelphia, the city

:03:21.:03:23.

of the founding fathers, Mrs May earned a standing ovation

:03:24.:03:26.

for a speech that dwelt on the shared history of the two

:03:27.:03:29.

nations, a relationship which had defined the modern world,

:03:30.:03:32.

all part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way

:03:33.:03:35.

for a trade deal with the US. So I am delighted that the new

:03:36.:03:38.

administration has made a trade agreement between our countries,

:03:39.:03:42.

one of its earliest priorities. A new trade deal with

:03:43.:03:44.

Britain and America. It must serve both of our

:03:45.:03:46.

sides and interests. Later, she will become the first

:03:47.:04:02.

foreign leader to meet with Donald Trump at

:04:03.:04:04.

the White House, the streetwise New Yorker who, when it

:04:05.:04:07.

comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always

:04:08.:04:09.

put America first. He and Theresa May do

:04:10.:04:11.

have things in common, and it remains to be seen

:04:12.:04:14.

whether they can find common ground, just as the UK is preparing

:04:15.:04:17.

to negotiate its departure Let's speak to our political

:04:18.:04:20.

correspondent, Carole Walker, Inevitably, there is fascination

:04:21.:04:41.

with the personal side to this. Donald Trump and Theresa May, their

:04:42.:04:46.

personal sides. They wanted top business. Interesting. It was

:04:47.:04:52.

interesting to hear the Prime Minister last night the learning no

:04:53.:04:57.

more foreign interventions the UK and US have been involved in in the

:04:58.:05:01.

past with the UK and Afghanistan. -- signalling. That will chime with the

:05:02.:05:06.

views of the new president. It will be welcome to many MPs back here at

:05:07.:05:11.

Westminster. She also wants to make sure that both Britain and the

:05:12.:05:16.

United States remain engaged in the world, through Nato, a joint-venture

:05:17.:05:21.

to stand up to Islamic State terrorists, and indeed, in things

:05:22.:05:27.

like the deal with Iran over its nuclear programme. But the important

:05:28.:05:31.

thing for the Prime Minister's point of view is going to be to try to

:05:32.:05:35.

forge a personal relationship. She talked last night about how

:05:36.:05:40.

opposites attract. Some might be surprised to hear that sort of

:05:41.:05:44.

language from Theresa May. But of course there are also issues where

:05:45.:05:48.

they disagreed. Many MPs are not just on the opposition benches, but

:05:49.:05:54.

in her own party, were concerned to hear Donald Trump countenancing

:05:55.:06:02.

waterboarding as torture. It is not clear if that will go ahead. Theresa

:06:03.:06:06.

May has already warned that could affect intelligence sharing. And of

:06:07.:06:10.

course, the Prime Minister will be aware that many MPs here at

:06:11.:06:14.

Westminster will be concerned about many of the things that Donald Trump

:06:15.:06:18.

has said and done. She will want to forge that new personal relationship

:06:19.:06:23.

to form the basis for a future trade deal without appearing to pander to

:06:24.:06:28.

the new president so much that she prompts a backlash here at home.

:06:29.:06:33.

Carol, for the moment, thank you for that.

:06:34.:06:34.

In a few minutes, we'll speak to Tony Blair's former Chief

:06:35.:06:37.

of Staff and get his views on just how significant a first meeting this

:06:38.:06:41.

Let us have a look at the rest of the news this morning.

:06:42.:06:46.

The Labour MP and party whip, Jeff Smith, has said he'll defy

:06:47.:06:49.

Jeremy Corbyn and vote against the Government Bill that'll

:06:50.:06:51.

The MP said he wasn't convinced the Government had a proper

:06:52.:06:55.

The Shadow Transport Minister, Daniel Zeichner, has also said he'll

:06:56.:06:59.

oppose the legislation, while Tulip Siddiq has resigned

:07:00.:07:01.

Patients in parts of Worcestershire will have to be in more pain,

:07:02.:07:06.

to qualify for a hip or knee operation, under new plans

:07:07.:07:09.

Three clinical commissioning groups want to up the threshold to get

:07:10.:07:13.

access to surgery, in a bid to save over two million.

:07:14.:07:16.

Though they insist operations will continue, the Royal College

:07:17.:07:18.

of Surgeons are calling the plans "alarming."

:07:19.:07:20.

Hip and knee operations can be a godsend to do is to get them,

:07:21.:07:34.

Hip and knee operations can be a godsend to the people who get

:07:35.:07:40.

them, but they can also be expensive, up to ?6,000 each.

:07:41.:07:43.

Three groups in Worcestershire want to decrease those bills

:07:44.:07:47.

million because they said they were spending far more

:07:48.:07:50.

It is important that they consider operations restricted to those

:07:51.:07:54.

who were in such pain they could not sleep.

:07:55.:07:56.

But it is understood those criteria are used in many areas.

:07:57.:08:09.

A spokesman for SAGA, an organisation for over 50s,

:08:10.:08:12.

said they should examine their consciences.

:08:13.:08:13.

They said it was an outrage even to suggest inability to sleep should

:08:14.:08:17.

be used in deciding eligibility for an operation.

:08:18.:08:19.

The Royal College of Surgeons said it was worried this example

:08:20.:08:22.

of health rationing was only the tip of the iceberg.

:08:23.:08:25.

A health spokeswoman in Worcestershire said many patients

:08:26.:08:32.

would benefit from physiotherapy and weight loss before

:08:33.:08:34.

She also said there was a clear appeal system.

:08:35.:08:39.

The taxman's failure to get tough with the super-rich risks

:08:40.:08:44.

undermining confidence in the whole system,

:08:45.:08:45.

The Public Accounts Committee says the amount raised each year

:08:46.:08:50.

from wealthy individuals has fallen by a billion pounds,

:08:51.:08:52.

and there needs to be a tougher approach.

:08:53.:08:55.

HM Revenue and Customs has rejected any suggestion of special treatment

:08:56.:08:57.

The Treasury has taken back hundreds of millions of pounds of funding

:08:58.:09:07.

for schools in England, at a time when head teachers have

:09:08.:09:10.

The money had been announced last year as part of a plan to turn

:09:11.:09:15.

But the Department for Education has revealed that when the compulsory

:09:16.:09:19.

academy plan was ditched, the Treasury took back most

:09:20.:09:22.

Our education correspondent, Sean Coughlan, reports.

:09:23.:09:30.

Head teachers in West Sussex and other parts of the country have

:09:31.:09:33.

been warning that schools are running out of cash.

:09:34.:09:37.

But only last year, the government announced an extra ?500 million,

:09:38.:09:40.

for schools as part of their plan to turn every school

:09:41.:09:43.

School leaders have been asking whatever happened to that money?

:09:44.:09:57.

But it has now emerged that when the academy plan was abandoned,

:09:58.:10:03.

most of the money, ?384 million, was in fact taken back

:10:04.:10:06.

The Education Department said this was the right thing to do.

:10:07.:10:10.

The schools are receiving record levels of funding,

:10:11.:10:12.

Head teachers are furious that so much money could appear

:10:13.:10:16.

and disappear when schools are struggling to make ends meet.

:10:17.:10:19.

Business news on BT with figures just in. We heard about trouble they

:10:20.:10:28.

were having. Their profits last year were down by nearly 14% because of

:10:29.:10:34.

various issues they have had with the business increasing cost. We

:10:35.:10:40.

heard of the big Italian accounting scandal going on. Interestingly, the

:10:41.:10:47.

boss says the customer experience remains the top row pretty. --

:10:48.:10:57.

priority. That is a big issue for them. If any big customers have had

:10:58.:11:03.

an issue. He is highlighting that as something. All this is quite

:11:04.:11:08.

important because BT is a massive company and many pensions are

:11:09.:11:13.

massively invested in them. Anyone who is a customer of BT will have a

:11:14.:11:18.

tough time. Will prices rise if they have to pay for accounting? You will

:11:19.:11:23.

talk about that later on. Another story. Tesco. A merger. This was a

:11:24.:11:30.

surprise. They have an appearance to merge with a food wholesaler.

:11:31.:11:38.

Smaller shops... It is like a cash and carry kind of place. Tesco is

:11:39.:11:44.

thinking of merging that part of the business. It is a far bigger

:11:45.:11:48.

business than Booker is in the UK. Tesco would still be the dominant

:11:49.:11:52.

force, you would have thought. Interesting to see the changes in

:11:53.:11:56.

the retail sector, especially with food. Prices going up, they think

:11:57.:12:01.

that could help them. OK. Both of those stories coming in the last few

:12:02.:12:05.

minutes. We will check out some of those details and come back to you.

:12:06.:12:08.

The RSPB says the current cold weather appears to be bringing

:12:09.:12:11.

unusual migrant birds to Britain, such as waxwings.

:12:12.:12:13.

The charity is holding its annual bird count this weekend,

:12:14.:12:16.

when more than half a million people are expected to take part in what's

:12:17.:12:20.

claimed to be the world's largest wildlife survey.

:12:21.:12:26.

Does that mean they actually just count all of the birds? People are

:12:27.:12:33.

asked to take pictures and they put everything together. A great idea.

:12:34.:12:37.

Many people take part in it all across the weekend. One more story

:12:38.:12:39.

for you. Relocating can be stressful

:12:40.:12:40.

at the best of times, but residents in Ghent, Belgium,

:12:41.:12:43.

have found an inventive way to help their local library

:12:44.:12:46.

move down the road. More than 1,200 people formed

:12:47.:12:48.

a human chain over a distance of 250 meters to move books

:12:49.:12:52.

from the old library building You could say they had

:12:53.:12:54.

the situation covered. Quite a lot of effort. But I think

:12:55.:13:10.

it is a great way to the books you fancy that you may not have read. We

:13:11.:13:16.

will have the weather and all the sport coming up for you in the next

:13:17.:13:19.

few minutes. Those are the words of Theresa May,

:13:20.:13:20.

as she becomes the first foreign The Prime Minister is coming under

:13:21.:13:24.

increasing pressure to oppose some of the President's controversial

:13:25.:13:28.

views, but her team are confident the so-called "special

:13:29.:13:31.

relationship" between Britain Let's take a look at how it has

:13:32.:13:33.

evolved over the years. In his talks at the White House, Mr

:13:34.:13:59.

McMillan will certainly have experienced a new spirit and

:14:00.:14:02.

thinking from President Kennedy. It is not an exaggeration to say, nor

:14:03.:14:20.

is it a reflection on our other friends and allies to say, that we

:14:21.:14:23.

enjoy a special relationship with Great Britain. A new look in White

:14:24.:14:26.

House welcoming ceremonies. More pomp and ceremony. Mrs Thatcher will

:14:27.:14:30.

get more of both as the first president to be received by

:14:31.:14:32.

President Reagan. In Britain you will find a ready response, an ally,

:14:33.:14:42.

valiant, staunch, and through. On a White House visit billed as a

:14:43.:14:48.

securing of the special relationship, John Major is already

:14:49.:14:52.

having to talk down the lack of enthusiasm for the Clinton's plan

:14:53.:14:57.

for airdrops on was the. George and Laura Bush there are two read their

:14:58.:15:05.

guests. They expect to forge a friendship based on common values.

:15:06.:15:15.

Ours will be a strong and good personal relationship. And an

:15:16.:15:18.

alliance that will stand the test of time. Welcome to the David and

:15:19.:15:21.

Barack Obama showed. The United States and the United Kingdom enjoy

:15:22.:15:23.

a truly special relationship. Joining us now from Westminster

:15:24.:15:25.

is Jonathan Powell, the former Chief of Staff to Tony Blair

:15:26.:15:28.

during his time as Prime Minister. We were just showing the

:15:29.:15:43.

relationship between the Prime Minister and the previous prime

:15:44.:15:47.

ministers, and we were given a flavour of this special

:15:48.:15:49.

relationship. What will that mean when Donald Trump and Theresa May

:15:50.:15:54.

meet today. Unfortunately, very little. What is important as what

:15:55.:16:01.

reason can bring to the table. We can bring our alliance, and a strong

:16:02.:16:05.

military in the past. As we leave Europe and run down our military we

:16:06.:16:09.

will be less relevant. The more we talk about a special relationship

:16:10.:16:13.

ourselves, the more needy we look. What will be the special message

:16:14.:16:17.

from the Prime Minister today? The prime Minister will come back saying

:16:18.:16:21.

here is a man I can do business with but when we talk about shared

:16:22.:16:24.

values, they were shed values with previous presidents but it is

:16:25.:16:28.

difficult after last week to identify what the shared values are

:16:29.:16:31.

with someone who supports torture, who wants to old war with Mexico,

:16:32.:16:36.

who supports protectionism. They are not having a joint US conference, as

:16:37.:16:40.

it would be tricky to manage it given the different directions they

:16:41.:16:44.

are pointing in. From what you say it will be a tricky meeting. Looking

:16:45.:16:48.

at the specifics, Theresa May spoke the Republicans last night and one

:16:49.:16:51.

of the things which came up was foreign policy, and the Prime

:16:52.:16:55.

Minister herself saying the days of reason and America intervening in

:16:56.:16:59.

sovereign countries in an attempt to remake the world in our own image

:17:00.:17:03.

are over. What does this mean for foreign policy? I am not quite sure,

:17:04.:17:07.

because she seemed to contradict herself in the next sentence when

:17:08.:17:11.

she said written and America must lead the world by making sure our

:17:12.:17:14.

values are upheld around the world by taking action, which sounds like

:17:15.:17:18.

intervention to me. So I wasn't quite sure that the one thing I

:17:19.:17:22.

would say is it is a mistake to encourage Donald Trump to be

:17:23.:17:25.

isolationist. He has a tendency to want to isolate the United States

:17:26.:17:28.

from the world. He talks about the common world, the 1930s movement to

:17:29.:17:32.

separate America, the last thing he wants to do is be an isolationist.

:17:33.:17:38.

We should encourage him to support NATO, and promised to defend the

:17:39.:17:46.

countries of NATO if they are attacked. And she brought that up in

:17:47.:17:49.

her speech, highlighting that it was the United States in the UK who

:17:50.:17:53.

essentially founded NATO and the UN. How likely is she to convince

:17:54.:17:57.

President Trump about the importance of NATO. As you said, that is a big

:17:58.:18:02.

thing. The problem is, the point of having a close relationship are

:18:03.:18:06.

twinned an American president and British Prime Minister from the

:18:07.:18:10.

British point of view is you can influence the American president to

:18:11.:18:13.

do something. Influence on Kosovo led to the fall of the loss of itch.

:18:14.:18:18.

It is not clear that you can influence Donald Trump. --

:18:19.:18:24.

Milosevic. Changing his mind is going to be very difficult and I

:18:25.:18:28.

don't give Mrs Mac a lot of chances of being able to do that. It sounds

:18:29.:18:33.

as if you are pessimistic about what will come out of this meeting -- Mrs

:18:34.:18:39.

May. I think talking about a trade deal is a complete waste of time

:18:40.:18:42.

because we have been negotiating a trade deal for five years and

:18:43.:18:45.

probably longer with the United States, and goodness knows Mr Trump

:18:46.:18:49.

will still be there. It is much better to talk about NATO. She can

:18:50.:18:54.

get him to come out publicly and say he fully supports NATO and will

:18:55.:18:57.

defend any country in NATO if it is attacked by Russia, I think that

:18:58.:19:01.

will be an achievement. What I suspect she will do is say this is

:19:02.:19:05.

someone we can do business with, and I have my doubts about that. Can I

:19:06.:19:09.

ask you, on the trade deal, we have heard Trump talk about bilateral

:19:10.:19:13.

deals would obviously he likes and that sales were good news for us.

:19:14.:19:17.

There is a real danger that he likes them because it means the US can

:19:18.:19:21.

dictate the terms of the deal, and therefore we could come out in a bad

:19:22.:19:25.

day with a trade deal. I have experience trying to negotiate with

:19:26.:19:29.

the Americans on trade. They are hard-nosed about trade deals and

:19:30.:19:33.

agriculture in particular. The American agriculture industry is

:19:34.:19:36.

huge and they want to have access to the British market. If we allow them

:19:37.:19:40.

to have the access they will demand from bilateral trade deal, British

:19:41.:19:41.

agriculture better watch out. Here is Carol with a look

:19:42.:19:48.

at this morning's weather. Good morning to you. Good morning.

:19:49.:19:57.

Hopefully more than a moment. You will notice if you are stepping

:19:58.:20:01.

outside this morning it is a cold and frosty start to the day but it

:20:02.:20:06.

isn't going to feel as cold through the day to day as it did yesterday.

:20:07.:20:09.

What is happening is yesterday we had all this blew across France. We

:20:10.:20:13.

are pulling up the air from France so it is coming from the south-east,

:20:14.:20:17.

moving across our shores, and we have green and yellow indicating it

:20:18.:20:22.

won't be as cold. Through the day the wind will veer to the

:20:23.:20:25.

south-westerly, milder direction and we have a weather front coming in as

:20:26.:20:29.

well. That will introduce some rain, not particularly heavy rain, and

:20:30.:20:33.

some drizzle. Across southern England this morning we have bits

:20:34.:20:37.

and pieces of cloud, some breaks, and it is a cold start. Some parts

:20:38.:20:42.

have dropped as low as minus six. We also have some patchy and dense fog

:20:43.:20:46.

across the East Midlands and then can share and some rain moving

:20:47.:20:50.

across Sussex, Kent, and clipping East Anglia so we could see some

:20:51.:20:54.

ice. Across Wales, largely dry, northern England dry and frosty.

:20:55.:20:58.

Northern Ireland cloud with some spots of rain and a cold start

:20:59.:21:02.

across Scotland. Also we are looking at a fair bit of sunshine,

:21:03.:21:05.

especially in the northern half of the country. Through the day the

:21:06.:21:09.

weather front in the west moves across Northern Ireland, ringing

:21:10.:21:12.

some rain the western fringes of Scotland, England and Wales. We have

:21:13.:21:15.

another weather front across the Channel Isles bringing rain in the

:21:16.:21:20.

southern England. Ahead of both of these the cloud will build and there

:21:21.:21:23.

will be some sunny breaks. Mostly across eastern and southern Scotland

:21:24.:21:27.

and the far north-east of England. Temperatures down in the north and

:21:28.:21:31.

up in the south compared with yesterday. Both of these systems

:21:32.:21:34.

will join forces in a whole lot will drift eastwards. As that clears

:21:35.:21:38.

there is the risk of ice on untreated surfaces in the west. Snow

:21:39.:21:42.

on the hills and the Pennines and snow above 400m in the Scottish

:21:43.:21:47.

Highlands as well. Tomorrow all of that rain continues to drift slowly

:21:48.:21:50.

towards the east. Behind that there will be a lot of cloud around.

:21:51.:21:54.

Brightest spells towards the west with some showers and temperatures

:21:55.:22:00.

again not as low as they have been. Thank you very much, see you later

:22:01.:22:02.

on. Losing a child is perhaps the most

:22:03.:22:04.

painful experience any parent But if a baby is born earlier

:22:05.:22:06.

than 24 weeks into a pregnancy, and doesn't manage to survive,

:22:07.:22:11.

they won't receive a birth That made the situation even more

:22:12.:22:14.

upsetting for Sarah Henderson when her daughter arrived at 23

:22:15.:22:18.

weeks, but without a heartbeat. She has been speaking

:22:19.:22:21.

to Breakfast's Graham Satchell about her loss, and why

:22:22.:22:23.

she is calling for a change We had the opportunity

:22:24.:22:26.

to take photographs of her, And handprints, and footprints,

:22:27.:22:38.

and we held her. She was very small,

:22:39.:22:42.

but she was perfectly formed. Sarah gave birth to Rowan,

:22:43.:22:46.

her daughter, at 23 weeks I don't know how many times

:22:47.:23:00.

I told her I was sorry. As a mother, you want

:23:01.:23:06.

to protect your children. We had no choice, over

:23:07.:23:08.

what happened, how it happened. Sarah was told she wouldn't

:23:09.:23:14.

get a birth or death Legally, the birth of a child

:23:15.:23:17.

is registered after 24 weeks, Sarah started to petition

:23:18.:23:22.

to change the law. It now has more than

:23:23.:23:27.

300,000 signatures. It's a recognition that your child

:23:28.:23:32.

existed at all, acknowledgement that they were here,

:23:33.:23:35.

no matter how short the time. It really would have helped

:23:36.:23:44.

with the grieving process, the fact that she was acknowledged,

:23:45.:23:47.

the fact that our grief Like millions of others,

:23:48.:23:49.

Sarah has been watching harrowing Michelle Connor, played

:23:50.:23:54.

by Kym Marsh, loses her son She also asks for a birth

:23:55.:23:58.

certificate, and is refused. What touched me so much was knowing

:23:59.:24:06.

that she had actually experienced One of the reasons I felt brave

:24:07.:24:13.

enough to share my story, and to do the petition,

:24:14.:24:20.

was if Kym was brave enough to do A meeting with Zoe Clark-Coates,

:24:21.:24:23.

from the charity Saying Goodbye. What we all want as grieving parents

:24:24.:24:33.

is very much that every baby gets Together, we can make

:24:34.:24:37.

a real difference. Registering all births before 24

:24:38.:24:45.

weeks would mean issuing certificates in abortion cases,

:24:46.:24:47.

so charities have been working on a compromise - a new national

:24:48.:24:50.

certificate available to parents It will give parents a certificate,

:24:51.:24:53.

a formal certificate. We want to see a formal,

:24:54.:25:04.

legal document that is given to any parent who requests it,

:25:05.:25:08.

and a new register be created. Sarah is hoping for more signatures

:25:09.:25:11.

for her petition, and change. Not having legal recognition for her

:25:12.:25:16.

daughter has been devastating. So she's not in our family tree,

:25:17.:25:19.

she'll never appear in an birth register or a death

:25:20.:25:34.

register anywhere. It's like, legally, she didn't

:25:35.:25:37.

exist, that she was never a person. But of course, to us she was,

:25:38.:25:41.

and will always be. That was Sarah Henderson,

:25:42.:25:44.

sharing her story with If you or someone you know

:25:45.:25:47.

is affected by this, you can find details

:25:48.:25:50.

of organisations offering support at bbc.co.uk/actionline,

:25:51.:25:52.

or you can call for free at any time to hear recorded information

:25:53.:25:53.

on 08000 566 065. Time now to get the news,

:25:54.:26:08.

travel and weather where you are. so feeling milder,

:26:09.:29:29.

but rather unsettled. There will be some rain around

:29:30.:29:30.

on Sunday morning, too. I'm back with the latest

:29:31.:29:33.

from the BBC London newsroom Plenty more on our website

:29:34.:29:36.

at the usual address. This is Breakfast,

:29:37.:29:39.

with Charlie Stayt and Steph Theresa May will today become

:29:40.:29:44.

the first world leader to meet Donald Trump since he

:29:45.:29:47.

became US President. She told Republicans

:29:48.:29:49.

yesterday of the importance of the special relationship

:29:50.:29:51.

between the two countries, but says they cannot return

:29:52.:29:53.

to "failed" military interventions. It's expected a post-Brexit trade

:29:54.:29:58.

deal will be high on the agenda at today's meeting

:29:59.:30:01.

in The Oval Office. Donald Trump's first week

:30:02.:30:07.

as president has been described by the former Labour leader

:30:08.:30:09.

Ed Miliband, as "dizzying" Speaking on the BBC's

:30:10.:30:12.

Newsnight programme, he also criticised Theresa May

:30:13.:30:14.

for positioning herself so closely Her speech was a perfect and decent

:30:15.:30:26.

speech, if it was normal times. But to align yourself so closely with

:30:27.:30:30.

his project, which is what she did, that, I think, was a mistake

:30:31.:30:37.

Jeremy Corbyn faces more dissent in the Labour Party today,

:30:38.:30:39.

as the party whip, Jeff Smith, says he'll defy the leader and vote

:30:40.:30:43.

against the Government Bill that will trigger Article 50.

:30:44.:30:46.

The MP said he wasn't convinced the government had a proper

:30:47.:30:49.

The Shadow Transport Minister, Daniel Zeichner, has also said he'll

:30:50.:30:52.

oppose the legislation, while Tulip Siddiq has resigned

:30:53.:30:54.

Patients in parts of Worcestershire will have to be in more pain,

:30:55.:31:00.

to qualify for a hip or knee operation, under new plans

:31:01.:31:03.

Three clinical commissioning groups are outlining

:31:04.:31:09.

plans to up the threshold in a bid to save around ?2 million.

:31:10.:31:13.

Though, they insist surgery would continue to be carried out

:31:14.:31:15.

elsewhere, the Royal College of Surgeons are calling

:31:16.:31:17.

Britain's biggest supermarket, Tesco, has agreed to buy food

:31:18.:31:32.

is claimed to create the country's largest food company.

:31:33.:31:37.

Tesco boss Dave Lewis has this morning told the BBC it's not

:31:38.:31:40.

about cutting costs at the business, arguing the merger will bring

:31:41.:31:43.

The taxman's failure to get tough with the super-rich risks

:31:44.:31:47.

undermining confidence in the whole system,

:31:48.:31:49.

The Public Accounts Committee says the amount raised each year

:31:50.:31:53.

from wealthy individuals has fallen by a billion pounds,

:31:54.:31:55.

and there needs to be a tougher approach.

:31:56.:31:57.

HM Revenue and Customs has rejected any suggestion of special treatment

:31:58.:32:00.

Hundreds of millions of funding promised to schools in England last

:32:01.:32:05.

year has been taken back by the Treasury.

:32:06.:32:07.

The money had been announced to fund a plan to turn

:32:08.:32:10.

The Department for Education says that it was appropriate to return

:32:11.:32:14.

The RSPB says the current cold weather appears to be bringing

:32:15.:32:29.

unusual migrant birds to Britain, such as waxwings.

:32:30.:32:32.

The charity is holding its annual bird count this weekend,

:32:33.:32:34.

when more than half a million people are expected to take part in what's

:32:35.:32:38.

claimed to be the world's largest wildlife survey.

:32:39.:32:40.

I love the idea of bird counting. Are they literally counting them? I

:32:41.:32:58.

gathered that they are. I saw three problems in the same few seconds

:32:59.:33:01.

visiting my bird table. It is unusual that they are coming here

:33:02.:33:05.

now that it is colder. Maybe some puffins coming. First, happy

:33:06.:33:12.

birthday to Jose Mourinho yesterday. He celebrated with his Manchester

:33:13.:33:22.

United side reaching the EFL Cup. Interestingly, he thought that the

:33:23.:33:24.

score was 1-1. I will explain now. Manchester United are into the EFL

:33:25.:33:27.

Cup final after beating Hull City United led 2-0 from the first leg

:33:28.:33:30.

and after Hull scored a penalty, Paul Pogba struck what would

:33:31.:33:36.

be the decisive goal. Oumar Niasse ended United's

:33:37.:33:38.

17-match unbeaten run, but that didn't stop Jose Mourinho

:33:39.:33:40.

reaching his first final And on his birthday,

:33:41.:33:43.

too, although he's not accepting their winning

:33:44.:33:46.

streak is over. And the guy in the far

:33:47.:33:55.

post coming... Why did you not count

:33:56.:34:17.

the first goal? Interesting. We could say we did not

:34:18.:34:33.

lose this morning. Fake news. Alternative fact. Complicated.

:34:34.:34:37.

Anyway. Arsenal manager, Arsene Wenger,

:34:38.:34:40.

will attend a personal hearing for his misconduct

:34:41.:34:42.

charge later today. Wenger says he'll accept the charge

:34:43.:34:44.

for verbally abusing and pushing an official during his side's win

:34:45.:34:47.

over Burnley last weekend, but he wants clarity on the rules

:34:48.:34:49.

for when a manager is sent When I was sent off,

:34:50.:34:53.

I was surprised. I thought I had the right

:34:54.:34:56.

to be in the tunnel. In 2009 I had to go

:34:57.:35:00.

into the stands in Old Trafford. Nobody tells you what you have to do

:35:01.:35:04.

when you are sent off. Arsene Wenger needs to know where to

:35:05.:35:16.

go. Could there be another Clough

:35:17.:35:36.

in charge of Nottingham Forest? They've made an approach

:35:37.:35:38.

to Burton Albion, to speak with Nigel Clough about their

:35:39.:35:41.

vacant manager's job. His father Brian Clough was Forest's

:35:42.:35:43.

most famous manager, leading them to numerous victories,

:35:44.:35:45.

including two European Cups Nigel has already followed

:35:46.:35:48.

in his father's footsteps once, Anthony Joshua's world

:35:49.:35:51.

heavyweight title bout against Wladimir Klitshcko

:35:52.:35:54.

will be fought in front Over 80,000 tickets have already

:35:55.:35:56.

been sold for the Wembley bout on April the 29th, and the Mayor

:35:57.:36:00.

of London, Sadiq Khan, has granted permission,

:36:01.:36:03.

for another 10,000 to go on sale, after talking to rail companies,

:36:04.:36:06.

to make sure fans could England cruised to a seven-wicket

:36:07.:36:09.

victory in their first twenty20 international against

:36:10.:36:12.

India in Kanpur. Captain Eoin Morgan led by example,

:36:13.:36:14.

top scoring in the match. His half century made him the first

:36:15.:36:16.

England player to reach 1,500 runs They can wrap up the series

:36:17.:36:20.

with a win in the second I think it was a pretty

:36:21.:36:25.

complete performance. Certainly, as complete as we have

:36:26.:36:33.

performed on this trip. To win the toss and bowl,

:36:34.:36:36.

there is always more pressure on the bowlers to produce

:36:37.:36:40.

what is needed on that Especially with a guy

:36:41.:36:43.

like Virat up first. So, will there be a Roger and Rafa

:36:44.:36:49.

final at the Australian Open? Federer won his semi-final

:36:50.:36:52.

in Melbourne yesterday, Nadal plays the in-form Grigor

:36:53.:36:54.

Dimitrov in the next few hours. Nadal has not reached

:36:55.:36:57.

a major final since, winning his 14th Grand Slam

:36:58.:36:59.

at the French Open three years ago. If he beats Dimitrov,

:37:00.:37:02.

then all four singles finalists will be aged over 30,

:37:03.:37:05.

as 35-year-old Serena Williams meets sister Venus, who's 36,

:37:06.:37:08.

in the women's final. I love a bit of retro tennis.

:37:09.:37:25.

Throwback. I remember sitting with you. Tennis experts... Welcome back,

:37:26.:37:35.

by the way. LAUGHTER. They were saying the old order had changed.

:37:36.:37:39.

They thought that themselves. There is an interview with Roger Federer

:37:40.:37:43.

in the papers. Three months ago he was only able to play mini-tennis

:37:44.:37:50.

with Rafael Nadal at a charity do. Rafael Nadal had a wrist injury so

:37:51.:37:57.

he was playing one-armed. Roger Federer had an injured leg. They

:37:58.:38:01.

said they could only dream about playing each other properly again.

:38:02.:38:04.

They thought they might have to have a charity match. Now, Dimitrov

:38:05.:38:10.

willing, they are facing each other for the first time since 2011. Now

:38:11.:38:16.

for the front pages. Many of the papers are using these images.

:38:17.:38:22.

Theresa May arrived in Philadelphia. She spoke at a Republican meeting.

:38:23.:38:26.

There were some moments when the people got up off their feet. She

:38:27.:38:29.

was described as barnstorming. Now she is having a face-to-face meeting

:38:30.:38:35.

with Donald Trump. She said she will handle the UK and she will do it by

:38:36.:38:45.

herself. He talks fondly of the UK. All you have heard from Donald Trump

:38:46.:38:49.

is America first when it comes to trade deals. We are going there

:38:50.:38:54.

talking about expanding the special relationship. How can we do it

:38:55.:38:59.

better than America in the coming years, I am not too sure we're not

:39:00.:39:03.

supposed to negotiate with anyone until we leave the EU. Donald Trump

:39:04.:39:07.

things he can do what he wants when it comes to trade talks, probably.

:39:08.:39:11.

Shall be look at other papers? One being in all the papers, the economy

:39:12.:39:18.

grew by 0.6% in the last few months of last year. That was better than

:39:19.:39:22.

expected. It was boosted by consumer spending. So it is ours going to

:39:23.:39:31.

bars and shops and restaurants. People forget how much the economy

:39:32.:39:36.

is boosted by going to shops. And we are talking about manufacturing, but

:39:37.:39:40.

lots of it comes down to that. Did anyone mention puffins? He is

:39:41.:39:45.

excited. Explain the story, please. Escape the rat race, says the Daily

:39:46.:39:50.

Mail. Look after puffins on this island instead. This is near fine

:39:51.:39:56.

islands near Northumberland. -- Farnham Islands. You could do many

:39:57.:40:04.

things. You could count puffins or cute seal pups. Is that an actual

:40:05.:40:10.

job? You get ?70,000, free accommodation, and two motorboats to

:40:11.:40:18.

get around. Really? Do you have to climb up a cliff and look at their

:40:19.:40:23.

nests? That will be your first question at the interview. They are

:40:24.:40:28.

saying that being good at PowerPoint. Is not necessary. I do

:40:29.:40:33.

not think you would need PowerPoint. . How do you know so much about

:40:34.:40:42.

puffins? They are very fascinating. They love to talk when they are in

:40:43.:40:47.

their nests, but when they fly, they are completely quiet. I will

:40:48.:40:51.

struggle to bring us back to the front pages now. The front page of

:40:52.:40:57.

the Times. Looking at the speech with Theresa May. Let us stand

:40:58.:40:59.

together. Looking at the words. Everyone is fascinated. Together was

:41:00.:41:04.

one of them. Special relationship was also used over and over again as

:41:05.:41:09.

she talked to Republicans. Many people will analyse the language.

:41:10.:41:15.

They will look at the speech between Donald Trump and Theresa May to see

:41:16.:41:19.

if it feels as good as it sounds. The front page of the Telegraph. No

:41:20.:41:23.

more wars like Iraq. That was not actually a quote. She talked about

:41:24.:41:28.

no more intervention, failed intervention. But people have read

:41:29.:41:33.

that to me in Iraq and Afghanistan. Before we go, can I... Where am I

:41:34.:41:40.

going? LAUGHTER. I am off with the puffins. Look at this. How great is

:41:41.:41:48.

this picture? A bear in the air. He they say that? Look at that. All

:41:49.:42:00.

right, lads. Is that a puffin in a bear costume? You have got one. No,

:42:01.:42:08.

I have a moose costume. It is a nice bear. But I think we should finish

:42:09.:42:12.

talking about it. Thank you very much. We will see it in a few

:42:13.:42:16.

minutes because he will bring us up-to-date with more stories. BT and

:42:17.:42:22.

Tesco. You are watching Breakfast from BBC News. The main stories this

:42:23.:42:25.

morning. to the White House to become

:42:26.:42:30.

the first foreign leader to meet Plans to restrict the number of hip

:42:31.:42:34.

and knee replacements for all but those in the most severe

:42:35.:42:38.

pain are described as alarming I think we should find out what is

:42:39.:42:49.

happening with the weather. What do you think about going to an island

:42:50.:42:54.

to look at puffins? It sounds idyllic. I have never seen a real

:42:55.:43:00.

one. That would be a double bonus. The weather. Today, a cold start.

:43:01.:43:08.

You may be glad of this if you are a puffin. Frost on the leaves. That is

:43:09.:43:12.

how we will wake up. That will turn slowly less cold through the day.

:43:13.:43:16.

Not warm. It will not feel as cold as yesterday. What what is

:43:17.:43:19.

happening, we are importing less cold air. Yesterday, if you

:43:20.:43:25.

remember, across France, blue, that means temperatures were sub-0. Now,

:43:26.:43:31.

mild greens and yellows. Mild is not the right word. It will still feel

:43:32.:43:39.

cold. South-easterly winds. Later, south-westerly, a milder direction.

:43:40.:43:41.

Coming from the Atlantic accompanied by the weather front, that will

:43:42.:43:45.

bring rain. That is knocking on the door of Northern Ireland at the

:43:46.:43:48.

moment. Starting off this morning with some frost around. Temperatures

:43:49.:43:52.

and parts of England, -6, Scotland, -5. Dense pockets of fog in east

:43:53.:43:56.

Midlands and Lincolnshire in particular. Through the day, as the

:43:57.:44:00.

weather front approaches, rainy Northern Ireland and also across

:44:01.:44:03.

western parts of Scotland as well. -- rain in. East and western part of

:44:04.:44:09.

Scotland will hang on to the sunshine in the afternoon and also

:44:10.:44:13.

north England. South of that, the cloud will build through the day.

:44:14.:44:16.

That is because we have a weather front not too far away. Even so,

:44:17.:44:21.

some sunny breaks here and there. Kent will see some. A weather front

:44:22.:44:25.

in the Channel Islands bringing rain. That will come in through

:44:26.:44:30.

southern counties of England. At the same time, a weather front from the

:44:31.:44:33.

west. That will bring rain through Cornwall and west Wales. A lot of

:44:34.:44:39.

dry weather and there cloud with the odd sunny break. Western Ireland, a

:44:40.:44:43.

weather front across the Irish Sea. It will brighten up with some

:44:44.:44:47.

sunshine. Some showers. Through the evening and overnight, the weather

:44:48.:44:50.

front goes north and the other weather front coming from the west

:44:51.:44:55.

moves east. They will meet in slowly continue their journey, going

:44:56.:44:58.

towards the east. They will deposit snow in the Pennines and also go up

:44:59.:45:04.

to 400 metres in Scotland. Behind that, cold and damp enough on the

:45:05.:45:08.

surface for the risk of ice. Through the weekend, we continue with a less

:45:09.:45:14.

cold, not mild, theme. Breezy with some rain. On Saturday, that

:45:15.:45:18.

translates into the rain continuing to edge towards the east of the

:45:19.:45:24.

country. Breezy around yet. In the west, sunshine developing behind the

:45:25.:45:28.

cloud. There will be showers towards the west. Some of us will see quite

:45:29.:45:33.

a few with the odd heavy one. Temperatures, 5-9. A quick look at

:45:34.:45:38.

Sunday. Rain coming from the south-west. It is moving north. The

:45:39.:45:42.

north of the country, especially Scotland, seeing the driest and

:45:43.:45:46.

brightest of the weather. The positioning, the final resting

:45:47.:45:49.

place, will change. It will turn mild in the south by Sunday. Back to

:45:50.:45:56.

you. Charlie and Steph, not Lou! That is shocking. Never mind.

:45:57.:46:04.

We didn't notice when you nearly dropped to the floor in shock!

:46:05.:46:07.

In the last hour one of our biggest businesses,

:46:08.:46:10.

BT, has announced a steep fall in profits towards the end

:46:11.:46:13.

Earlier this week, shares in telecoms giant lost ?8 billion

:46:14.:46:22.

in value due to a scandal in their Italian business.

:46:23.:46:25.

They have had a lot of problems within the business.

:46:26.:46:28.

This morning the business has confirmed pre-tax profits at the end

:46:29.:46:33.

of last year fell more than a third, and earlier this week the company's

:46:34.:46:37.

share price dropped 20%, losing ?8 billion in a day,

:46:38.:46:40.

when they revealed details about an accounting

:46:41.:46:42.

It is worth remembering the firm once known as British Telecom

:46:43.:46:52.

is a huge global player, offering phone and internet services

:46:53.:46:55.

And, because it was privatised here, it still has an estimated one

:46:56.:46:59.

million small shareholders as a result, so those share

:47:00.:47:02.

If you have a private or company pension, it is almost certain

:47:03.:47:06.

that your pension fund will hold its shares, too.

:47:07.:47:08.

Dave Millett is the boss of the telecoms consultancy Equinox,

:47:09.:47:11.

and he worked for BT for more than decade.

:47:12.:47:19.

How much of a different business is it now than the BT you used to work

:47:20.:47:29.

for? Well, it was still part of the civil service when I joined and

:47:30.:47:33.

privatisation has led to the million shareholders but it means it has a

:47:34.:47:39.

lot more competition, it didn't in the TV when I worked there. It has

:47:40.:47:44.

become a more complex business. And we have seen profits down whichever

:47:45.:47:49.

way you look at them. When you talk about the 1 million shareholders, BT

:47:50.:47:53.

is quite an important company for our own incomes, especially in

:47:54.:48:04.

retirement. Absolutely, because it is on the FTSE 100, people will see

:48:05.:48:09.

their share holdings fall. White that it has been a rough week. Is BT

:48:10.:48:14.

struggling or not? Well, you have to bear in mind they are making ?100 of

:48:15.:48:19.

profit every second. But the problem is their debts are mounting. They

:48:20.:48:27.

are about nine billion pounds as a result of recent purchases, the

:48:28.:48:31.

pension review fund will be another ?9 billion and they lost ?500

:48:32.:48:35.

million this week so they have to find a lot of money. Is one of the

:48:36.:48:40.

ways they might find that money to push prices up more than they have?

:48:41.:48:44.

Yes, because they have announced they will raise dividends, with

:48:45.:48:48.

people possibly asking who they are building up the most. There are

:48:49.:48:53.

price rises due in April which give consumers and small businesses the

:48:54.:48:58.

option to leave. You have a right to live within 30 days of being told

:48:59.:49:02.

the price. Is that because they need more money to cover these costs, or

:49:03.:49:06.

do they want more money to reinvest in the business for things like

:49:07.:49:10.

football rights? Well, football rights have been expensive but the

:49:11.:49:15.

number of new TV connections has dropped, growing at half the rate it

:49:16.:49:19.

was last year. That is potentially a problem. Certainly the investment,

:49:20.:49:24.

if you look at the various reports, UK infrastructure is lagging most in

:49:25.:49:28.

Europe, which is why businesses can't get fibre broadband and a lot

:49:29.:49:32.

of money is needed there. They have to cut it from somewhere or raise

:49:33.:49:37.

prices. And open Reach has been a big issue for BT as well. How will

:49:38.:49:42.

changes in the way that is run affect the business going forward?

:49:43.:49:47.

Will they have less money? Well, the money will still come from BT. In

:49:48.:49:54.

theory, open Reach will decide more where it is invested. Historically

:49:55.:49:58.

it has favoured residential areas, which is where BT makes most of its

:49:59.:50:04.

money. And finally, with all of these costs, do you think BT will be

:50:05.:50:08.

a stronger company over the coming year or will it have turbulent

:50:09.:50:13.

times? I think the leadership has a very heavy in tray but I think it is

:50:14.:50:18.

still profitable. So tough week for BT but they are doing all right

:50:19.:50:20.

overall. It was horror on a scale never seen

:50:21.:50:22.

before, the mass-murder of six Decades on, worrying research

:50:23.:50:26.

suggests a quarter of genocide survivors now living in the UK

:50:27.:50:29.

still face discrimination because of their

:50:30.:50:32.

religion or ethnicity. To mark Holocaust Memorial Day,

:50:33.:50:33.

our reporter Holly Hamilton has been to meet one survivor

:50:34.:50:36.

and hear his story. The door opened. Three German

:50:37.:50:56.

soldiers came in. Took out his revolver and put it to my head.

:50:57.:51:02.

People asked me what does it feel like when you have a gun to your

:51:03.:51:06.

head? What did you do? This wasn't the first time Gabor came face to

:51:07.:51:10.

face with death, and it wouldn't be the last. That's the certificate the

:51:11.:51:16.

Germans gave me on arrival to the concentration camp. Just 12 years

:51:17.:51:21.

old when the Germans invaded, he describes himself as one of the

:51:22.:51:26.

lucky ones. Death was all around us, all the time. Nothing was new,

:51:27.:51:33.

nothing was surprising. We were prepared for everything. And as you

:51:34.:51:39.

see, it is made from bits and pieces of material, because... His first

:51:40.:51:45.

yellow star, warned to identify him as a Jew, was made by his mother, a

:51:46.:51:51.

piece of history he has kept to this day. I will never forget it. The

:51:52.:51:57.

first day I was wearing it, I had a medical appointment on the top of

:51:58.:52:03.

the road. A lady whose only trying to hide it with a newspaper under my

:52:04.:52:13.

arm, said little boy, don't cover it. There is nothing to be ashamed

:52:14.:52:27.

of. But they discovered it -- but I covered it. Like many survivors,

:52:28.:52:35.

Gabor waited for more than 20 years before talking about his

:52:36.:52:38.

experiences, motivated by a desire to help people understand what

:52:39.:52:43.

happened. I don't think young people appreciate how lucky they are. They

:52:44.:52:56.

buy their mobile telephones and game consoles. They do zero problems are,

:52:57.:53:01.

they do know what it is. Bombs fall from the sky and you don't know if

:53:02.:53:04.

you survive it, and an occupying army can take you away. You don't

:53:05.:53:16.

know what happens tomorrow. And you learn to live with it. That is my

:53:17.:53:32.

parents. My mother was -- with a young granddaughter. He moved to

:53:33.:53:38.

England, where he has lived for over 60 years. Well, in those days people

:53:39.:53:43.

looked at refugees with different eyes, and they tried to make us

:53:44.:53:49.

welcome. I started a new life, and I got on with it, with friends who

:53:50.:53:57.

went through the same. Whatever is the conversation, after a while it

:53:58.:54:01.

always turns to the past. We all have memories. We've got to live

:54:02.:54:08.

with them. Holly Hamilton there,

:54:09.:54:15.

speaking to Gabor Lacko. And thank you to Gabor for taking

:54:16.:54:28.

part. Really interesting to hear his reflections about younger people,

:54:29.:54:31.

and the lives they lead, as compared with the life he and others had to

:54:32.:54:34.

leave. After 8:30pm, we will be joined

:54:35.:54:35.

on the sofa by a woman whose extended family was

:54:36.:54:39.

destroyed by the Holocaust. She is now working to help

:54:40.:54:41.

young people better Still to come this morning:

:54:42.:54:43.

It is the old adage, men are from Mars, women from Venus,

:54:44.:54:52.

and it seems when it comes to confidence, the difference

:54:53.:54:56.

between boys and girls can become worlds apart from

:54:57.:54:58.

just six years old. Were you are confident kid? Do you

:54:59.:55:14.

know, I can't remember. I wasn't worried, and if you are anxious

:55:15.:55:21.

about things that can make a difference. Let us know if you have

:55:22.:55:27.

been affected by that over the years.

:55:28.:58:44.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:58:45.:58:47.

Hello this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern.

:58:48.:59:44.

Theresa May will become the first world leader to meet Donald Trump

:59:45.:59:47.

The Prime Minister says they can "lead the world

:59:48.:59:50.

together" but can't return to "failed" military interventions.

:59:51.:59:54.

We have the opportunity, indeed, the responsibility,

:59:55.:59:58.

to renew the special relationship for this new age.

:59:59.:00:02.

I don't have my Commerce Secretary, and they want to talk trade, so I

:00:03.:00:06.

Good morning, it's Friday the 27th of January.

:00:07.:00:25.

Proposals to restrict knee and hip replacements for only those

:00:26.:00:31.

in the most severe pain - but the Royal College

:00:32.:00:33.

of Surgeons says there's no justification for the decision.

:00:34.:00:38.

The babies who die before 24 weeks, and their parents who are denied

:00:39.:00:41.

It's a recognition that your child existed at all.

:00:42.:00:49.

Tesco has been shopping this morning - buying food wholesale business

:00:50.:00:57.

This morning I'm looking at what this could mean

:00:58.:01:02.

In sport - it's a happy birthday for Jose Mourinho.

:01:03.:01:05.

Manchester United reach the League Cup final,

:01:06.:01:08.

with an aggregate victory over Hull, so they'll face Southampton

:01:09.:01:10.

Neil Patrick Harris as you've never seen him before.

:01:11.:01:25.

The Hollywood actor will be here with his two young co-stars

:01:26.:01:28.

And we have the weather with Carol. It's a cold enough and frosty start

:01:29.:01:43.

to the day. Cloud building through the day for most of us but it will

:01:44.:01:50.

remain dry and for most of us, sonny.

:01:51.:01:51.

Theresa May will today become the first world leader to meet

:01:52.:01:56.

Donald Trump since he became US President.

:01:57.:01:58.

The Prime Minister told Republicans yesterday of the importance

:01:59.:02:00.

of the special relationship between the two countries,

:02:01.:02:02.

but says they cannot return to "failed" military interventions.

:02:03.:02:07.

Mrs May will be hoping to lay the groundwork

:02:08.:02:09.

Here's our Washington Correspondent, David Willis.

:02:10.:02:14.

She arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling

:02:15.:02:19.

from the effects of the new occupant of the White House.

:02:20.:02:22.

Theresa May will meet with President Trump less

:02:23.:02:26.

than a week after he came to office, a week as unpredictable as any

:02:27.:02:29.

And as the Prime Minister's motorcade wound its way

:02:30.:02:35.

through the streets of the capital, she could probably be

:02:36.:02:40.

forgiven for thinking, will the new relationship be more

:02:41.:02:43.

In Philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers,

:02:44.:02:51.

Mrs May earned a standing ovation for a speech that dwelt

:02:52.:02:54.

on the shared history of the two nations, a relationship which had

:02:55.:02:57.

which she hopes will pave the way for a trade deal with the US.

:02:58.:03:05.

So I am delighted that the new administration has made a trade

:03:06.:03:09.

agreement between our countries one of its earliest priorities.

:03:10.:03:16.

A new trade deal between Britain and America.

:03:17.:03:18.

It must serve work for both sides and serve both

:03:19.:03:21.

Later, she'll become the first foreign leader

:03:22.:03:23.

to meet with Donald Trump at the White House,

:03:24.:03:26.

the streetwise New Yorker who, when it comes to trade deals,

:03:27.:03:29.

has vowed he will always put America first.

:03:30.:03:31.

He and Theresa May do have things in common,

:03:32.:03:35.

and it remains to be seen whether they can find common ground,

:03:36.:03:38.

just as the UK is preparing to negotiate its departure

:03:39.:03:40.

Let's speak to our political correspondent Carole Walker,

:03:41.:03:50.

There's a lot of talk about renewing the special relationship between the

:03:51.:04:00.

president and Prime Minister. There will be a lot of pressure on Theresa

:04:01.:04:06.

May today. Absolutely. Fascinating day with the Prime Minister

:04:07.:04:09.

yesterday who said she believed there should be no more of the sorts

:04:10.:04:13.

of foreign interventions that the US and UK have engaged in in the past,

:04:14.:04:18.

like Iraq and Afghanistan. I think that will chime with the views of

:04:19.:04:22.

the new American president. Jonathan Powell, who used to be Tony Blair's

:04:23.:04:27.

chief of staff, was pretty critical of those comments when he spoke to

:04:28.:04:32.

this programme earlier. I think it's a mistake to encourage Donald Trump

:04:33.:04:37.

to be isolationist. He already has a tendency to want to isolate the US

:04:38.:04:45.

from the world. It's all about America first, which was the 1930s

:04:46.:04:47.

movement to separate America from the rest of the world. The last

:04:48.:04:50.

thing we should encourage him to be is an isolationist. We should

:04:51.:04:52.

encourage him to support Nato, and say he will defend all the countries

:04:53.:04:55.

of Nato if attacked. If she can achieve that in her visit, it will

:04:56.:04:59.

be worth bringing home. Is one of the issues on the agenda. For

:05:00.:05:03.

Theresa May, the important thing is to establish a personal

:05:04.:05:07.

relationship, a rapport with the new American president. They are very

:05:08.:05:12.

different characters. She said last night that sometimes opposites

:05:13.:05:19.

attract. She wants to try to lay the groundwork for a future trade deal,

:05:20.:05:22.

but she will be conscious that many MPs, including some in her own party

:05:23.:05:26.

are very concerned about some of President Tromp's remarks, including

:05:27.:05:30.

those on torture and wanting to build a wall with Mexico. She will

:05:31.:05:35.

walk a tightrope to try to establish a new special relationship, but

:05:36.:05:39.

without appearing to pander to the president so much that she provokes

:05:40.:05:46.

a backlash back home. It will be interesting. I'm pleased to see

:05:47.:05:49.

you've got a double coat on! It must be freezing this morning.

:05:50.:05:54.

Jeremy Corbyn faces more dissent in the Labour party today,

:05:55.:05:57.

as the party whip, Jeff Smith, says he'll defy the leader and vote

:05:58.:06:00.

against the government Bill that will trigger Article 50.

:06:01.:06:02.

The MP said he wasn't convinced the government had

:06:03.:06:04.

Two Labour frontbenchers have already said they will oppose the

:06:05.:06:10.

bill. Patients in parts of Worcestershire

:06:11.:06:13.

will have to be in more pain, to qualify for a hip or knee

:06:14.:06:16.

operation, under new Three clinical commissioning groups

:06:17.:06:18.

want to up the threshold to get access to surgery,

:06:19.:06:22.

in a bid to save over ?2 million. Though they insist operations

:06:23.:06:25.

will continue, the Royal College of Surgeons are calling

:06:26.:06:27.

the plans "alarming". Hip and knee operations can be

:06:28.:06:29.

a godsend to the people who get them, but they can also be

:06:30.:06:37.

expensive, up to ?6,000 each. Three clinical commissioning

:06:38.:06:47.

groups in Worcestershire want to decrease those bills by ?2

:06:48.:06:51.

million because they said they were spending far more

:06:52.:06:53.

than other areas. It is important that they consider

:06:54.:06:57.

operations restricted to those who were in such pain

:06:58.:06:59.

they could not sleep. But it is understood those criteria

:07:00.:07:01.

are used in many areas. A spokesman for SAGA,

:07:02.:07:07.

the organisation for over 50s, said the bean-counters should

:07:08.:07:13.

examine their consciences. They said it was an outrage even

:07:14.:07:16.

to suggest inability to sleep should be used in deciding

:07:17.:07:19.

eligibility for an operation. The Royal College of Surgeons said

:07:20.:07:21.

it was worried this example of health rationing was only

:07:22.:07:24.

the tip of the iceberg. A health spokeswoman

:07:25.:07:26.

in Worcestershire said many patients would benefit from physiotherapy

:07:27.:07:38.

and weight loss before She also said there was

:07:39.:07:40.

a clear appeal system. The taxman's failure to get tough

:07:41.:07:45.

with the super-rich risks undermining confidence

:07:46.:07:50.

in the whole system, The Public Accounts Committee says

:07:51.:07:52.

the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen

:07:53.:08:01.

by a billion pounds, and there needs Her Majesty's Revenue

:08:02.:08:04.

and Customs has rejected any suggestion of special

:08:05.:08:08.

treatment for the wealthy. The Treasury has taken back hundreds

:08:09.:08:15.

of millions of pounds of funding The money had been announced last

:08:16.:08:19.

year as part of a plan to turn But the Department for Education has

:08:20.:08:24.

revealed that when the compulsory academy plan was ditched,

:08:25.:08:29.

the Treasury took back Britain's biggest supermarket,

:08:30.:08:30.

Tesco, has agreed to buy food wholesale business Booker in a deal

:08:31.:08:35.

worth ?3.7 billion. Sean is here - what's

:08:36.:08:37.

behind this move? We were both shocked about this one.

:08:38.:08:43.

It wasn't on the cards and it's a big deal. We haven't heard many

:08:44.:08:47.

people talk about it but its ?3.7 billion. The biggest supermarket and

:08:48.:08:51.

Booker are the biggest food wholesaler. It's a big deal. Looking

:08:52.:08:56.

at why Tesco want to do it. They call it a merger but Tesco is five

:08:57.:09:00.

times bigger than Booker. It gives an opportunity to talk about the

:09:01.:09:08.

supply chain. Tesco talked about suppliers when we had the whole

:09:09.:09:13.

marmite- gate when there was the rising cost of food. Tesco save

:09:14.:09:18.

rising prices is and why they have done this deal, but imagine they are

:09:19.:09:21.

doing deals with suppliers, and now they are selling food to Britain's

:09:22.:09:25.

biggest supermarket and we have the biggest wholesaler there as well, it

:09:26.:09:29.

will change things. You have to dig down into the report and Tesco says

:09:30.:09:33.

it recognises that to achieve the benefits it wants from the merger,

:09:34.:09:37.

there might be restructuring between the two companies. Whether that

:09:38.:09:42.

means jobs going or moving from different places, because Booker,

:09:43.:09:46.

they are a big food wholesaler, but they also own Londis, Budgens.

:09:47.:09:56.

Competition for the small Tesco Expresses. Dave Lewis says he

:09:57.:10:01.

doesn't expect there to be issues, but there will be questions about

:10:02.:10:07.

whether it's good for customers, Tesco buying such a big company as

:10:08.:10:09.

Booker. The RSPB says the current cold

:10:10.:10:11.

weather appears to be bringing unusual migrant birds to Britain,

:10:12.:10:14.

such as waxwings. The charity is holding its annual

:10:15.:10:16.

bird count this weekend, when more than half a million people

:10:17.:10:18.

are expected to take part in what's claimed to be the world's

:10:19.:10:21.

largest wildlife survey. Relocating can be stressful

:10:22.:10:28.

at the best of times, but residents in Ghent, Belgium,

:10:29.:10:31.

have found an inventive way to help their local library move

:10:32.:10:34.

down the road. More than 1,200 people formed

:10:35.:10:36.

a human chain over a distance of 250 You could say they had

:10:37.:10:46.

the situation book-covered. That's terrible, isn't it! Sorry! I

:10:47.:11:05.

know you hate a pun. They are OK when they work, but when they

:11:06.:11:11.

don't... Sport and weather coming up later.

:11:12.:11:14.

In a few hours, Theresa May will become the first foreign leader

:11:15.:11:17.

to meet President Trump at the White House.

:11:18.:11:22.

The mood music is positive from both sides. But behind the scenes, what's

:11:23.:11:29.

the real balance of power and should she be attempting to align herself

:11:30.:11:33.

so closely with the US editor? -- the US president?

:11:34.:11:37.

Joining us from Westminster is the consultant editor

:11:38.:11:39.

of the Daily Mail, Andrew Pierce, and also Steven Erlanger,

:11:40.:11:41.

Stephen, Donald Trump right now appears to be a man who pretty much

:11:42.:11:50.

gets whatever he wants. What does he want from this meeting with Theresa

:11:51.:11:55.

May? He wants good atmospherics. He really does like Britain and he

:11:56.:12:00.

favours Brexit. He wants to have a good relationship. He has Scottish

:12:01.:12:05.

ancestry. He's always been a bit of an Anglophile. He has a soft spot

:12:06.:12:08.

for the Queen. For him it's all about atmospherics, but he's the new

:12:09.:12:16.

guy, and she's the supplicants who has made the effort to see him

:12:17.:12:19.

first, so he will be very magnanimous, certainly in public. He

:12:20.:12:30.

will make good noises, and she will try to speak truth to him as she

:12:31.:12:35.

sees it about Nato and why she is leaving. But it is crucial because

:12:36.:12:41.

she has blown up the EU pillar of and British foreign policy, meaning

:12:42.:12:46.

she needs the American pillar. Andrew, be a fly on the wall looking

:12:47.:12:51.

ahead to the meeting. Looking at the contrasting characters, she is a

:12:52.:12:55.

Flickr's daughter, grammar school educated. He's a buccaneering, brash

:12:56.:13:03.

businessman. -- she is a vicar's daughter. She said coquettishly on

:13:04.:13:07.

the plane on the way over that opposites can attract. Maybe Theresa

:13:08.:13:10.

May will flatter her eyelashes. I don't think it will work too well on

:13:11.:13:14.

Donald Trump, but she will be firm and clear. What she doesn't want

:13:15.:13:19.

this to be seen as is the new Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan

:13:20.:13:23.

show. She gets rather cross when people compare her to Mrs Thatcher,

:13:24.:13:27.

but she will be hoping for a constructive meeting with Donald

:13:28.:13:30.

Trump because she needs an important trade deal with the United States,

:13:31.:13:34.

because as Stephen said, we are leaving the EU. It's interesting,

:13:35.:13:41.

and you mentioned the Thatcher and Reagan relationship. She mentioned

:13:42.:13:45.

that relationship many times in her speech to Republicans last night. It

:13:46.:13:50.

was one of the touchstones, together, special relationship, a

:13:51.:13:54.

bit of Churchill, and then it was Thatcher and Reagan. It's something

:13:55.:13:59.

Trump has mentioned as well. The thing about Thatcher and Reagan,

:14:00.:14:03.

though, is that they were a team, I remember it well. They had big

:14:04.:14:07.

problems to solve. I don't think Trump is a team player as much. He's

:14:08.:14:13.

happy to have her as a sort of wing lady, but I think we have gone a

:14:14.:14:17.

long way. And Reagan and Thatcher actually got on. I'm not sure these

:14:18.:14:21.

two will get on very well. This is the stiff headmistress against the

:14:22.:14:28.

great salesman. Trump is very nice face to face, but you never know

:14:29.:14:31.

what he will do or to eat later. Andrew, that's an interesting

:14:32.:14:36.

element to this. -- do or tweet later. It will be interesting what

:14:37.:14:44.

people at home make of her and the way she praises him. Inevitably,

:14:45.:14:48.

when she comes on, people will say, did you tell him that being sexist

:14:49.:14:53.

is wrong. Did you tell him torture is wrong? They will ask her if she

:14:54.:14:54.

was upfront with him. There is no understating the fact

:14:55.:15:05.

that this is aided and coup, she is the first leader to cede Donald

:15:06.:15:10.

Trump by a long chalk, so it is game on for her, she likes that. She will

:15:11.:15:14.

be quite clear, privately, and I think she will be able to tell us

:15:15.:15:17.

that in public that if torture cropped up, and I'm sure she will

:15:18.:15:22.

make sure that it does, but an absolutely deprecates the idea of

:15:23.:15:27.

reintroducing torture, and she wants Nato to be supported, and while

:15:28.:15:30.

Donald Trump may wish the EU to wither on the vine, she does not. We

:15:31.:15:34.

are leaving, but we want to continue to have a relationship with the EU,

:15:35.:15:39.

so she will be aware, of course, a lot a lot of British people have

:15:40.:15:43.

misgivings, to put it mildly, about the new president, and I'm sure she

:15:44.:15:48.

will reflect that in a public utterances. Just a couple of

:15:49.:15:51.

thoughts on the business elements, I notice he said in his press

:15:52.:15:55.

conference to Republicans, he will handle the UK himself, and that is

:15:56.:16:04.

because he literally has no-one in-house to deal with the trade

:16:05.:16:06.

talks. He is a deal maker, is he going to say something that we are

:16:07.:16:09.

not expecting today, just because you can? He always seems to. Britain

:16:10.:16:14.

is a real estate guy, and Britain has just sold its house, it needs a

:16:15.:16:18.

new house, so we will see what kind of deal gets struck. It is not going

:16:19.:16:22.

to happen right away, I expect there will be nice talk about a trade

:16:23.:16:27.

frame or, talks and so on, but as we know, Britain, under treaty

:16:28.:16:31.

obligation, cannot stop negotiating a deal until it leaves the European

:16:32.:16:36.

Union, which is at least two away. Atmospherics is good. The only other

:16:37.:16:40.

point I would make is that Theresa May did good work for the

:16:41.:16:44.

Republicans in Congress, by the way, because his speech to them was well

:16:45.:16:49.

accepted, and she is much more like a mainstream American Republican

:16:50.:16:52.

than Donald Trump, who is a Republican by convenience, and some

:16:53.:16:55.

of the things she said about Nato and Western leadership will go over

:16:56.:16:59.

very well with the Republicans, who are trying to make this point to

:17:00.:17:04.

Donald Trump themselves. She did mention they does several times in a

:17:05.:17:09.

speech to Republicans, that clearly it is on the agenda, she wants to

:17:10.:17:12.

get some reassurance from Donald Trump about his view of the world -

:17:13.:17:17.

is that the thing? I think that is right, but she will accept Donald

:17:18.:17:21.

Trump's point too that it is time for the rest of the world to pay

:17:22.:17:26.

their share of the Nato bill, because Britain and the United

:17:27.:17:29.

States and a handful of others are paying most of the money. She will

:17:30.:17:32.

want an assurance that Nato continues to be the important

:17:33.:17:36.

bulwark that it is in defence policy for the West. We will leave at

:17:37.:17:43.

there, thank you very much for your time, we wait with interest to see

:17:44.:17:47.

how that emerges, that meeting happening later today.

:17:48.:17:50.

There will be a lot of analysis of that.

:17:51.:17:51.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:17:52.:17:54.

Theresa May is heading to the White House

:17:55.:17:58.

to become the first foreign leader to meet President Trump.

:17:59.:18:01.

Plans to restrict the number of hip and knee replacements

:18:02.:18:04.

for all but those in the most severe pain

:18:05.:18:06.

are described as alarming by the Royal College of Surgeons.

:18:07.:18:14.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:18:15.:18:19.

The other Carol, Carole Walker, our political correspondent, was doubled

:18:20.:18:27.

up with two coats on, looking pretty cold, particularly in London.

:18:28.:18:34.

And other cold and frosty start to the day, and it is a foggy one for

:18:35.:18:39.

some, the Weather Watchers doing us proud, beautiful picture, freezing

:18:40.:18:43.

fog in Leicestershire. As we push that bit further north, clearer

:18:44.:18:47.

skies, this is Perth and Kinross, you are likely to hang onto this

:18:48.:18:50.

through the course of the day, but having said that it is cold. These

:18:51.:18:55.

are the current temperatures, in Fife, minus six, Edinburgh minus

:18:56.:19:02.

five, Burton on Trent minus five, London around freezing. St Mary's

:19:03.:19:07.

sticking out like a sore thumb, 10 Celsius already, and that is because

:19:08.:19:10.

we have a weather front not too far away which is producing some cloud

:19:11.:19:15.

and also some rain. As we go through the course of the day, my graphics

:19:16.:19:20.

are just frozen, no, there they go! Through the course of the day, the

:19:21.:19:25.

weather front towards the West will introduce some rain and some

:19:26.:19:28.

drizzle, and it will also come in from the South as well, but it will

:19:29.:19:34.

remain dry for most of us, not as cold as yesterday. Through the

:19:35.:19:37.

evening and overnight, two areas of rain will meet in the middle, and

:19:38.:19:42.

they are going to push eastwards. Ahead of them, snow on the mountains

:19:43.:19:46.

of Scotland and the Pennines. Behind them, the risk of ice on untreated

:19:47.:19:52.

surfaces. Let's hope the graphics are working now! As we head into the

:19:53.:19:56.

weekend, it is going to be less cold, and I'm choosing my words

:19:57.:20:01.

wisely - it is not going to be mild, it will be less cold. On Saturday

:20:02.:20:06.

and self, this rain continues its slow progress, eventually getting

:20:07.:20:11.

over to the east. Behind it, quite a veil of cloud, and behind all of

:20:12.:20:16.

that, some sunshine and showers. But look how the cloud is eroded by

:20:17.:20:19.

sunshine through the course of the day. Temperatures down in the North

:20:20.:20:23.

compared to what we have been used to, up in the South competitor what

:20:24.:20:28.

we have been used to. And then as we head through the rest of the day, my

:20:29.:20:31.

graphics are doing very funny things, sorry about this! Into

:20:32.:20:36.

Sunday, we have got a weather front coming in from the south-west and

:20:37.:20:39.

the south of England, and it is going to bring in some rain. How far

:20:40.:20:44.

north that gets is open to question, but we think it will cross Wales

:20:45.:20:49.

into the Midlands, East Anglia, the far north of North Lingle and, and

:20:50.:20:52.

also Scotland should remain largely dry with sunshine. -- the far north

:20:53.:20:58.

of northern England. I can only apologise for my graphics, no idea

:20:59.:20:59.

what went on there! And you still styled it out, you

:21:00.:21:10.

know so much about the weather, you don't even need and!

:21:11.:21:13.

We are talking about confidence among girls, you are super sassy,

:21:14.:21:18.

what will you like when you were a kid? No, not until I was about 25,

:21:19.:21:25.

only a couple of years ago! Can we talk rates for an agent, please? You

:21:26.:21:31.

would make a brilliant agent for me! Everybody wants you, Carol! We are

:21:32.:21:36.

talking about confidence amongst girls, because there is some

:21:37.:21:40.

research out about it, how young girls compare two young boys in

:21:41.:21:41.

terms of growing up. that by just six years old,

:21:42.:21:47.

girls already see themselves as less intelligent

:21:48.:21:51.

and talented than boys do. The researchers describe the results

:21:52.:21:56.

as disheartening, and say it is likely to shape decisions about

:21:57.:22:01.

studies and careers in the future. So how can gender stereotypes be

:22:02.:22:03.

overcome? Let's speak to counsellor

:22:04.:22:08.

and parenting educator Suzi Hayman, as well as Anousa Parkin -

:22:09.:22:10.

who's a Girlguiding, young leader. So you are 17 now? When you hear the

:22:11.:22:19.

survey about girls lacking in confidence, being less confident,

:22:20.:22:22.

when they are younger, what do you make of that? I do find it quite

:22:23.:22:27.

shocking, because I think back to when I was six or seven, and I don't

:22:28.:22:32.

demand the feeling that at all. When I was six, I felt I was invincible,

:22:33.:22:37.

you know. So the fact that they are feeling like this so young, yeah, it

:22:38.:22:42.

is quite shocking. So you were feeling pretty confident, but what

:22:43.:22:45.

about your peers? Could any of them identify with that? To be honest, I

:22:46.:22:49.

don't know whether I can remember what the blood drinking when I was

:22:50.:22:53.

that young, I think that is part of the thing. -- what people were

:22:54.:22:59.

thinking when I was that young. I don't think they were thinking about

:23:00.:23:03.

it explicitly, it is subconscious, so it is hard to realise, I think.

:23:04.:23:09.

That is a really good point, how does it manifests? How can you tell

:23:10.:23:14.

girls are not as confident? It is about aspirations, how they might

:23:15.:23:18.

describe themselves, what choices they make, or what they see

:23:19.:23:23.

themselves as. You may find a girl, six or seven, would not see herself

:23:24.:23:31.

becoming a doctor - a knows maybe, but not a doctor. And it is about

:23:32.:23:33.

the descriptions they have of themselves. -- a nurse. And colours,

:23:34.:23:42.

blue for a boy, pink for a girl, already we are saying there is a

:23:43.:23:46.

divide, you are different. Look at the slogans on T-shirts, for boys,

:23:47.:23:51.

primary schoolboys, you could find scientist or dinosaur or something

:23:52.:23:56.

like that. With girls, it is all form fitting, and it is little

:23:57.:24:00.

princess or kittens or something. Right from the beginning, in a

:24:01.:24:04.

sense, we are telling children that they are different, and that one of

:24:05.:24:07.

them is supposed to be pretty and nice, and the other is supposed to

:24:08.:24:11.

be thrusting and able and all those things. It is not that we tell them

:24:12.:24:15.

specifically, it is the atmosphere, and is exactly you said, it is the

:24:16.:24:19.

subconscious messages you are taking that put you in your place. Anousa,

:24:20.:24:25.

where do you think your confidence has come from? Clearly you are doing

:24:26.:24:32.

really well, brilliantly leading your Girlguiding group, where has it

:24:33.:24:35.

come from? I think a lot of it has been from people supporting the

:24:36.:24:39.

really well, whether that is at school or at home, or within the

:24:40.:24:44.

Guides, I have always had a support network to really encourage me to be

:24:45.:24:50.

a good leader, and to build up my confidence like that, which I think

:24:51.:24:53.

is a really big thing. And I have had good role models and good

:24:54.:24:58.

mentoring, which has really helped build my confidence. Role models are

:24:59.:25:03.

important, because you talk about your mother doing research into

:25:04.:25:07.

child health, was it? But there is a model for you in your family, of a

:25:08.:25:11.

woman who is actually doing something, who has a level, and this

:25:12.:25:17.

is the point. Many schools are very good at trying to break through

:25:18.:25:20.

these gender stereotypes, but we need more models, we need people to

:25:21.:25:25.

say, it doesn't matter what your politics are, having a female Prime

:25:26.:25:30.

Minister is absolutely fabulous. I am wary of going to gender

:25:31.:25:34.

stereotypes, but do you think boys worry less about what others think

:25:35.:25:40.

of them? And that breeds a kind of confidence? That if you don't worry

:25:41.:25:44.

so much about what people think of you, you may be emboldened? I think

:25:45.:25:49.

Anousa will back me up on this, it is not so much that you feel what

:25:50.:25:53.

other people think of you, but there is a barrier that is about the

:25:54.:25:57.

ceiling above you, how high you can go, what your aspirations may be,

:25:58.:26:02.

what you expect of yourself, what people expect of you. You may feel a

:26:03.:26:07.

very confident young person in your own little field, and boys tend to

:26:08.:26:11.

feel very confident, much more so, they inhabit the space. Girls stand

:26:12.:26:20.

around the outside of the playground, the boys are in the

:26:21.:26:23.

middle, that is a very common thing. They have a superficial confidence,

:26:24.:26:25.

but aspirations, they may also feel there is a ceiling. Going back to

:26:26.:26:28.

role models, I think that is absolutely crucial, and when you

:26:29.:26:31.

look at six-year-old, who are their role models? There are not really

:26:32.:26:35.

role models for boys at six, are they?

:26:36.:26:41.

Sports stars. Who are the stars? For the women, it is pop stars, in other

:26:42.:26:45.

words looking good and doing something that shows yourself off,

:26:46.:26:51.

rather than doing something. It is men have skills, so you can see a

:26:52.:26:56.

very skilled footballer, you know, he trumps someone else. Thank you

:26:57.:27:02.

very much, good luck with everything, Anousa. Time now to get

:27:03.:27:05.

the news, travel Hello, this is Breakfast with

:27:06.:30:25.

Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern. Theresa May will today become

:30:26.:30:38.

the first world leader to meet Donald Trump since he became US

:30:39.:30:41.

President. She told Republicans yesterday

:30:42.:30:43.

of the importance of the special relationship between the two

:30:44.:30:46.

countries, but says they cannot return to "failed"

:30:47.:30:50.

military interventions. It's expected a post-Brexit

:30:51.:30:52.

trade deal will be high Back in the UK, Donald Trump's first

:30:53.:30:55.

week as president has been described by the former Labour leader

:30:56.:31:03.

Ed Miliband as "dizzying" Speaking on the BBC's

:31:04.:31:05.

Newsnight programme, he also criticised Theresa May

:31:06.:31:09.

for positioning herself so closely Her speech was a perfectly decent

:31:10.:31:11.

speech, if it had been normal times. But to align yourself

:31:12.:31:17.

so closely with his project, which is what she did,

:31:18.:31:21.

that I think was a mistake. Jeremy Corbyn faces more dissent

:31:22.:31:27.

in the Labour Party today, as party whip Jeff Smith says he'll

:31:28.:31:30.

defy the leader and vote against the government Bill that

:31:31.:31:33.

will trigger Article 50. The MP said he wasn't

:31:34.:31:36.

convinced the government had Two Labour frontbenchers,

:31:37.:31:38.

Daniel Zeichner and Tulip Siddiq, have already said they'll

:31:39.:31:43.

oppose the Bill. Patients in parts of Worcestershire

:31:44.:31:46.

will have to be in more pain to qualify for a hip or knee

:31:47.:31:51.

operation, under new Three clinical commissioning groups

:31:52.:31:53.

are outlining plans to up the threshold in a bid

:31:54.:31:57.

to save around ?2 million. Though they insist surgery

:31:58.:32:00.

would continue to be carried out elsewhere,

:32:01.:32:03.

the Royal College of Surgeons Britain's biggest supermarket,

:32:04.:32:05.

Tesco, has agreed to buy food The deal, worth ?3.7 billion,

:32:06.:32:10.

is claimed to create the country's Tesco boss Dave Lewis has this

:32:11.:32:18.

morning told the BBC it's not about cutting costs at the business,

:32:19.:32:22.

arguing the merger will bring The taxman's failure to get tough

:32:23.:32:24.

with the super-rich risks undermining confidence in the whole

:32:25.:32:31.

system, according to a group of MPs. The Public Accounts Committee says

:32:32.:32:34.

the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen

:32:35.:32:38.

by ?1 billion, and there needs HM Revenue and Customs has rejected

:32:39.:32:42.

any suggestion of special Hundreds of millions of funding

:32:43.:32:46.

promised to schools in England last year has been taken back

:32:47.:32:52.

by the Treasury. The money had been announced

:32:53.:32:55.

to fund a plan to turn The Department for Education says

:32:56.:32:58.

that it was appropriate to return The RSPB says the current cold

:32:59.:33:03.

weather appears to be bringing unusual migrant birds to Britain,

:33:04.:33:10.

such as waxwings. The charity is holding its annual

:33:11.:33:15.

bird count this weekend, when more than 500,000 people

:33:16.:33:18.

are expected to take part in what's claimed to be the world's

:33:19.:33:21.

largest wildlife survey. And coming up here

:33:22.:33:29.

on Breakfast this morning. It's a few days. I can feel him

:33:30.:33:40.

moving. I can feel him now. I know, I know.

:33:41.:33:44.

Actress Kym Marsh says losing her baby so late in pregnancy

:33:45.:33:47.

was the most painful experience of her life.

:33:48.:33:49.

As she plays out a heartbreaking stillbirth storyline

:33:50.:33:51.

on Coronation Street, Kym will be here to explain

:33:52.:33:53.

why she wants the law changed so stillborn babies

:33:54.:33:55.

The Holocaust saw 6 million Jews killed by the Nazis.

:33:56.:33:58.

But decades on, a quarter of genocide survivors living

:33:59.:34:01.

in the UK say they still face discrimination linked

:34:02.:34:03.

We'll hear from some of those affected.

:34:04.:34:06.

Hollywood actor Neil Patrick Harris as you've never seen him before.

:34:07.:34:11.

The star of the hit comedy How I Met Your Mother

:34:12.:34:14.

will be here to tell us about his new children's

:34:15.:34:16.

drama and what it's like to play a villain.

:34:17.:34:23.

That is coming up in a few minutes but time for the sport with Mike.

:34:24.:34:29.

Stepping into the wonderful world of Jose Mourinho. Manchester United

:34:30.:34:33.

reached their first cup final under his charge, on his 54th birthday.

:34:34.:34:39.

But results can change, you can see results your own way. Even though

:34:40.:34:44.

Manchester United went through an aggregate 3-2, they lost on the

:34:45.:34:49.

night, 2-1, to Hull said their 17 match unbeaten run came to an end.

:34:50.:34:53.

The final score was 2-1, officially but there was a goal Mourinho did

:34:54.:34:58.

not agree with sowing his eyes, it was a different result.

:34:59.:34:59.

Here's the goal that Mourinho is refusing to recognise.

:35:00.:35:02.

Four players tangled in the penalty area,

:35:03.:35:03.

and Harry Maguire went to ground, possibly after Marcos Rojo

:35:04.:35:06.

Tom Huddlestone scored from the spot.

:35:07.:35:09.

Paul Pogba then struck what turned out to be the decisive goal before

:35:10.:35:12.

Oumar Niasse ended United's 17-match unbeaten run, but not

:35:13.:35:16.

Great action, fantastic cross and the guy in the far post coming in.

:35:17.:35:45.

We are still unbeaten. Why did you not count

:35:46.:35:47.

the first goal? Manchester United will play

:35:48.:35:55.

Southampton in the EFL Cup final next month at Wembley.

:35:56.:35:58.

Could there be another Clough in charge of Nottingham Forest?

:35:59.:36:00.

They've made an approach to Burton Albion to speak with Nigel Clough

:36:01.:36:03.

His father, Brian Clough, was Forest's most famous manager,

:36:04.:36:06.

leading them to numerous victories, including two

:36:07.:36:08.

Nigel has already followed in his father's footsteps once,

:36:09.:36:11.

Anthony Joshua's world heavyweight title bout

:36:12.:36:16.

against Wladimir Klitshcko will be fought in front of a

:36:17.:36:19.

Over 80,000 tickets have already been sold for the Wembley bout

:36:20.:36:26.

on April 29th and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan,

:36:27.:36:28.

has granted permission for another 10,000 to go on sale,

:36:29.:36:31.

after talking to rail companies to make sure fans

:36:32.:36:33.

Britain's Gordon Reid has completed a career Grand Slam.

:36:34.:36:41.

He and partner Joachim Gerard won the wheelchair doubles title

:36:42.:36:43.

at the Australian Open, where Rafael Nadal is about

:36:44.:36:51.

to start his semifinal against Grigor Dimitrov.

:36:52.:36:54.

The prize is a face in the fire -- place in the final against Roger

:36:55.:36:59.

Federer, which would be such a throwback!

:37:00.:37:01.

Now finally, if you want to see me suffer in freezing water

:37:02.:37:04.

I've been out on the Tough Guy course ahead of the final

:37:05.:37:11.

Over 5,000 will chose to take part in the eight-mile obstacle race,

:37:12.:37:15.

which has been going for 30 years and started the whole craze

:37:16.:37:18.

And to mark the legacy of Mr Mouse, who started it all,

:37:19.:37:27.

there is now a movie out, all about the rise of the so-called

:37:28.:37:31.

"suffer-fests" in which people chose to leave their pampered worlds

:37:32.:37:34.

to experience pain and fear - fire, water, mild electric shocks...

:37:35.:37:39.

We can see the whole thing tomorrow? A taste of the movie which has come

:37:40.:37:44.

out in honour of the legacy. Losing a child is perhaps the most

:37:45.:37:48.

painful experience any But if a baby is born earlier

:37:49.:37:51.

than 24 weeks into a pregnancy and doesn't manage to survive,

:37:52.:37:55.

they won't receive a birth That made the situation even more

:37:56.:37:58.

upsetting for Sarah Henderson when her daughter arrived at 23

:37:59.:38:03.

weeks, but without a heartbeat. She's been speaking

:38:04.:38:07.

to Breakfast's Graham Satchell about her loss and why she's calling

:38:08.:38:09.

for a change in the law We had the opportunity

:38:10.:38:12.

to take photographs of her, And handprints, and footprints,

:38:13.:38:21.

and we held her. She was very small,

:38:22.:38:26.

but she was perfectly formed. Sarah gave birth to Rowan,

:38:27.:38:30.

her daughter, at 23 weeks I don't know how many times

:38:31.:38:38.

I told her I was sorry. As a mother, you want

:38:39.:38:47.

to protect your children. We had no choice over

:38:48.:38:51.

what happened, how it happened. Sarah was told she wouldn't

:38:52.:38:58.

get a birth or death Legally, the birth of a child

:38:59.:39:01.

is registered after 24 weeks, Sarah started a petition

:39:02.:39:06.

to change the law. It now has more than

:39:07.:39:10.

300,000 signatures. It's a recognition that your child

:39:11.:39:14.

existed at all, acknowledgement that they were here,

:39:15.:39:18.

no matter how short the time. It really would have helped

:39:19.:39:23.

with the grieving process, the fact that she was acknowledged,

:39:24.:39:27.

the fact that our grief Like millions of others,

:39:28.:39:30.

Sarah has been watching harrowing Michelle Connor, played

:39:31.:39:35.

by Kym Marsh, loses her son She also asks for a birth

:39:36.:39:43.

certificate, and is refused. What touched me so much was knowing

:39:44.:39:50.

that Kym had actually experienced One of the reasons I felt brave

:39:51.:39:54.

enough to share my story and to do the petition was if Kym

:39:55.:40:04.

was brave enough to do A meeting with Zoe Clark-Coates,

:40:05.:40:07.

from the charity Saying Goodbye. What we all want as grieving parents

:40:08.:40:15.

is very much that every baby gets Together, we can make

:40:16.:40:19.

a real difference. Registering all births before 24

:40:20.:40:24.

weeks would mean issuing certificates in abortion cases,

:40:25.:40:29.

so charities have been working on a compromise - a new national

:40:30.:40:32.

certificate available to parents It will give parents a certificate,

:40:33.:40:34.

a formal certificate. We want to see a formal,

:40:35.:40:41.

legal document that's given to any parent who requests it,

:40:42.:40:46.

and a new register be created. Sarah is hoping for more signatures

:40:47.:40:53.

for her petition, and change. Not having legal recognition for her

:40:54.:40:56.

daughter has been devastating. So she's not in our family tree,

:40:57.:41:02.

she'll never appear in a birth register or a death

:41:03.:41:11.

register anywhere. It's like, legally, she didn't

:41:12.:41:13.

exist, that she was never a person. But of course, to us she was,

:41:14.:41:15.

and will always be. Sarah Henderson sharing

:41:16.:41:22.

her experience there. And in that piece, you'll

:41:23.:41:27.

have noticed upsetting scenes from the storyline

:41:28.:41:29.

of Michelle Connor's miscarriage We're joined now by Kym Marsh,

:41:30.:41:31.

who plays Michelle in the soap, and also Zoe Clark-Coates

:41:32.:41:36.

from the charity Saying Goodbye. Kym commie scum you are taking a bit

:41:37.:41:47.

of a deep breath, aren't you, because the storyline in Coronation

:41:48.:41:51.

-- Kim, yes, you are taking a bit of a deep red. The storyline touched

:41:52.:41:55.

you so personally. Are you OK sharing what happened to you because

:41:56.:42:01.

some people will not be aware. I lost my little boy, RG, in February

:42:02.:42:05.

2009, so it is close to his birthday. I was 21 weeks and five

:42:06.:42:09.

days pregnant when I went into labour and lost my son, sadly.

:42:10.:42:15.

Obviously, it was the worst experience of my entire life, and

:42:16.:42:19.

something that I found very difficult to put my life back

:42:20.:42:24.

together after. The one thing that kind of help me to do that was by

:42:25.:42:29.

talking and sharing my story and speaking to other people who had

:42:30.:42:32.

gone through similar experiences which was the driving force behind

:42:33.:42:35.

my decision to go ahead with the storyline on Coronation Street when

:42:36.:42:39.

it was pitched. One of the most upsetting things for me was the fact

:42:40.:42:46.

that there was no record of him ever being here. There's no birth

:42:47.:42:51.

certificate or death certificate. That was one of the big things that

:42:52.:42:55.

really affected me because I went into hospital with my baby and came

:42:56.:42:59.

out with a leaflet for helplines and that was it, you know? It was like

:43:00.:43:03.

he had never existed, he was never there and it was one of the worst

:43:04.:43:08.

thing is, really. Of course, we saw you in the piece as well, Zoe,

:43:09.:43:11.

because it is a story that resonates with you and something you are now

:43:12.:43:17.

working with your charity to try and help people like Kym and others who

:43:18.:43:21.

have suffered as a result. Absolutely, the support we offer

:43:22.:43:25.

reaches around 50,000 people each week and our website has over

:43:26.:43:29.

650,000 hits per month. This is a huge issue, a lot of people hurting

:43:30.:43:34.

out there. I think it is easy for people to think it only happens to a

:43:35.:43:38.

few people but it doesn't. It happens to a huge amount of people.

:43:39.:43:41.

What this petition that has been started shows as well is how

:43:42.:43:46.

passionate people feel about certificates and how crucial they

:43:47.:43:52.

are to people in their grief, while they are getting through their loss.

:43:53.:43:56.

Tell us more about the idea of the National certificate. What would it

:43:57.:44:01.

be? Our idea as a charity is to launch a new certificate that is

:44:02.:44:04.

available for all parents to go through loss, whatever the

:44:05.:44:09.

gestation, so if it is 12 weeks, 18 weeks, 20 weeks, it will give them a

:44:10.:44:13.

formal piece of paper with their child's name on, if they have named

:44:14.:44:18.

their child. But it will also go on to register and I think that is

:44:19.:44:23.

really important. So babies can be traced, every baby will be logged

:44:24.:44:27.

somewhere. Often people say to us, "The only thing I have got is a

:44:28.:44:31.

leaflet and it's not good enough. We want our children to be recognised,

:44:32.:44:34.

to show they existed. They are not in the family tree. When generations

:44:35.:44:40.

go forward, our babies won't be seen. We need something that can be

:44:41.:44:44.

passed on to the generations as well as for us as parents". That is

:44:45.:44:49.

something you feel strongly about as well? Really strongly. Obviously, my

:44:50.:44:54.

children know about our my older children were ten and 12 at the

:44:55.:44:59.

time. And Polly, who is five, we talk about him all the time and we

:45:00.:45:02.

celebrate his birthday and everything. You know, he was a part

:45:03.:45:07.

of our family. He was my son and I don't like to think... You know,

:45:08.:45:12.

that he was never here. It seems like he was never here to society

:45:13.:45:16.

and it's not very fair. To some people, it might just be a piece of

:45:17.:45:20.

paper but it would mean the world to me. It's interesting, you were very

:45:21.:45:25.

brave in talking about this openly and Sarah, who we saw in the film,

:45:26.:45:28.

was saying that seeing you in Coronation Street, you know, going

:45:29.:45:32.

through a storyline which you knew about yourself, this was your own

:45:33.:45:36.

story, that has emboldened her intern. That must mean a lot to you?

:45:37.:45:39.

-- in turn. That really got to me, I did not

:45:40.:45:51.

take the decision to take on the storyline likely, I spoke about it

:45:52.:45:55.

with my family and one of the big things I hoped would come from this

:45:56.:45:59.

would be helping other people and getting people to talk, so the fact

:46:00.:46:02.

she has done that makes me feel really proud of us as a show as well

:46:03.:46:06.

as me, myself. It makes a big difference, if a show

:46:07.:46:10.

like Coronation Street with millions of viewers is doing such a

:46:11.:46:15.

hard-hitting subject like the one Kym has done, that makes a

:46:16.:46:23.

difference to your work? Absolutely, it is breaking the two blue, talking

:46:24.:46:25.

about loss and enabling people who have gone through it to speak openly

:46:26.:46:28.

and confidently. I know on the night that the show was aired, when you

:46:29.:46:33.

went through the loss as a character, one post on our Facebook

:46:34.:46:38.

page got 2 million views on that night, so it shows the impact that

:46:39.:46:43.

it had. I know from parents I have spoken to, they said it made such a

:46:44.:46:47.

difference knowing the fact that Kym had personally been through it, they

:46:48.:46:50.

were not just watching an actress, they could feel the fact that she

:46:51.:46:53.

was really representing them as parents.

:46:54.:46:58.

What is the official justification, if you like, for there not being a

:46:59.:47:03.

certificate? What is the counterargument. Everyone hearing

:47:04.:47:07.

you and Kym talk about it would say obviously you should have something,

:47:08.:47:11.

what is the argument against it? It comes down to viability, there are

:47:12.:47:16.

official acts and lots of legislation tied around this, the

:47:17.:47:22.

Stillbirth Act, The Death Registration Act, tied in to

:47:23.:47:28.

viability starting at 24 weeks. And without but changing it will stay as

:47:29.:47:32.

it is, the fact you are only awarded a stillbirth certificate over 24

:47:33.:47:36.

weeks unless your baby is born with any sign of life, whether that be

:47:37.:47:43.

breeding ora hard to beat. As you describe and we heard Sarah talking

:47:44.:47:46.

about it, it would make a big difference to have the birth and

:47:47.:47:51.

death certificate. -- whether that be breeding or a heartbeat. Would

:47:52.:47:56.

some parents think that would be too much? We wanted to be optional, for

:47:57.:48:02.

some people they would not want to register, but the majority of people

:48:03.:48:07.

would. As a charity we did a poll last week am petitioned around 2600

:48:08.:48:13.

people, 88% of parents said they would want a city of the cut.

:48:14.:48:18.

Presumably you know by now, if not from seeing those films... Do people

:48:19.:48:23.

speak to you directly and talk about it? They do. I was that the National

:48:24.:48:28.

TV awards on Wednesday at the amount of people that came up to me and

:48:29.:48:34.

said it was amazing, this happened to my mum, my sister, my auntie. The

:48:35.:48:40.

amount of tweets and posts on social media directed to me, talking about

:48:41.:48:45.

the story. I think it aired in Canada last night and all the

:48:46.:48:48.

Canadian fans have been tweeting. It is literally going all over the

:48:49.:48:53.

world now. I feel really proud of us, I really, really do and I really

:48:54.:48:58.

hope that we have helped a lot of people. Thank you very much for

:48:59.:49:00.

joining us. If you or someone you know

:49:01.:49:06.

is affected by this, you can find details

:49:07.:49:08.

of organisations offering support at bbc.co.uk/actionline,

:49:09.:49:10.

or you can call for free at any time to hear recorded information

:49:11.:49:13.

on 08000 566 065. Here's Carol with a look

:49:14.:49:22.

at this morning's weather. Thank you. Good morning. This

:49:23.:49:32.

morning mixed fortunes in terms of the weather, the BBC Weather

:49:33.:49:36.

Watchers are doing is proud. This is a picture of Bob, a foggy start

:49:37.:49:41.

across parts of the East Midlands and Lincolnshire and around

:49:42.:49:44.

Leicester. -- this is a picture of fog. Wishing further north into

:49:45.:49:52.

Perth and Kinross, a beautiful start to the day, as it is in Essex with

:49:53.:49:57.

lovely sunrise pictures. Where we have the clear skies, a cold start.

:49:58.:50:10.

Heading towards Belfast, plus six because we have a weather front

:50:11.:50:13.

coming in from the West, that is introducing more cloud and will

:50:14.:50:19.

continue to push rain very closely from the west towards the East --

:50:20.:50:26.

push rain very slowly. The patchy fog and the frost will lift, we have

:50:27.:50:33.

a system moving across the Channel Islands and coming into southern

:50:34.:50:36.

parts of England. The cloud will build ahead of it, there will be

:50:37.:50:39.

breaks with brighter skies remaining across the North and east of

:50:40.:50:45.

Scotland and into northern England, particularly the north-east. Coming

:50:46.:50:48.

south, there will still be some holes in the cloud, some of us will

:50:49.:50:53.

still see sunshine, but there will be quite a bit of cloud at times.

:50:54.:50:58.

Not feeling as cold as yesterday. Here is the rain, by the afternoon

:50:59.:51:02.

it will have crossed the Channel Island is coming across Southern

:51:03.:51:06.

counties. Eventually these two areas of rain will merge, across Wales

:51:07.:51:11.

cloud builds through the day but a few of us will see sunny spells. The

:51:12.:51:17.

rain pushes out of Northern Ireland through the afternoon, you will have

:51:18.:51:20.

some sunny spells and if you shall as that.

:51:21.:51:23.

This evening and overnight, rain continuing from the south, joining

:51:24.:51:27.

forces with rain from the west and eventually that will all slowly push

:51:28.:51:32.

towards the east. Snow in the Pennines tonight and above 400

:51:33.:51:37.

metres in Scotland. Behind, with damp surfaces and low temperatures,

:51:38.:51:42.

the risk of ice. Through the weekend, it will not be

:51:43.:51:47.

as cold as it has been, breezy with some rain, but it will not suddenly

:51:48.:51:53.

turn mild across the bulk of the UK. On Saturday today's rain continues

:51:54.:51:57.

its journey, moving towards the east. Lots of cloud left behind as

:51:58.:52:01.

it clears, then the sun will come out, there will be lots of showers

:52:02.:52:05.

at times across northern and western parts of the UK.

:52:06.:52:09.

Temperatures generally five to nine Celsius. By Sunday, we will see

:52:10.:52:14.

milder air coming across the south-west as the area of rain

:52:15.:52:18.

pushes northwards. Ahead of it, some sunshine, temperatures that bit

:52:19.:52:22.

longer. The northern extent of the rain could still change, so keep

:52:23.:52:25.

interchurch with the weather forecast.

:52:26.:52:28.

With a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, ten million Twitter

:52:29.:52:34.

followers and five Emmys to his name, Neil Patrick Harris has

:52:35.:52:36.

come a long way since he first burst onto our screens almost

:52:37.:52:39.

LAUGHTER That certainly sounds like a

:52:40.:52:47.

long-time ex-Asian market it was going well until we said that!

:52:48.:52:52.

That macro that certainly sounds like a long time!

:52:53.:52:54.

Perhaps best known for his role in the comedy How I Met Your Mother,

:52:55.:52:57.

Neil is now embracing his villainous side for a new family drama.

:52:58.:53:00.

We'll speak to him and two of his co-stars in a moment,

:53:01.:53:03.

but first let's take a look at them in action in A Series

:53:04.:53:09.

I am Count Olaf, the renowned actor and your new

:53:10.:53:37.

Please, come in, and mind you wipe your feet on the mat

:53:38.:53:55.

And don't forget your enormous fortune.

:53:56.:54:04.

Welcome, everyone. Neal, as soon as people see you in that make-up...

:54:05.:54:10.

You must have had a lot of fun? H Amanda 's amount of fun. I don't

:54:11.:54:15.

often get to play people who look nothing like me and I'm incredibly

:54:16.:54:20.

villainous, it was a great 1/2-macro punch. You really mean. Horrible.

:54:21.:54:26.

There are 13 episodes in the series of books, and it is through the

:54:27.:54:33.

highs of these three children, the Baudelaire triplets, no, the

:54:34.:54:37.

Baudelaire kids, and I played a horrible, dastardly villain trying

:54:38.:54:41.

to get all of them money, which is PHONE RINGS

:54:42.:54:43.

Because I don't have to be redeemable in any way, I can just be

:54:44.:54:48.

awful. Melina, you play one of the

:54:49.:54:53.

children, and you, Louis. It is quite dark, what you are doing, the

:54:54.:55:00.

dark comedy? It is so PHONE RINGS Because we get to work with the

:55:01.:55:05.

little baby, who is so cute. I think it is just fun to be so dark

:55:06.:55:13.

and always be sad in a way, but also have the family way and have Klaus

:55:14.:55:19.

and violate always looking out for each other and trying to get away

:55:20.:55:25.

from Count Olaf. Louis, you are British, playing with

:55:26.:55:29.

an American accent? That was a lot of fun. I spent a lot of time with

:55:30.:55:35.

dialect coach is to try to get that down for me. That was a lot of fun

:55:36.:55:40.

to work on. I think we can all say he got back down. Great job. Thanks.

:55:41.:55:48.

Have you done much acting before? I have always acted, but never

:55:49.:55:51.

professionally, small things just for fun, and it was A Series of

:55:52.:55:58.

Unfortunate Events was the first thing. It is a beautiful production,

:55:59.:56:08.

it has a certain visual style? The director who did the Men In Black

:56:09.:56:16.

aren't Addams Family movies, he has a visual style. It is exciting to be

:56:17.:56:21.

something so grand and skill. We do two episodes for each book. There

:56:22.:56:31.

are no commercials, you can binge watch the whole thing on Netflix,

:56:32.:56:35.

that is unique than me, Haddington television before when you are

:56:36.:56:40.

answering to networks' advertisers, having to break in the middle and

:56:41.:56:42.

come back and remind people of what is going on. Anyone who knows the

:56:43.:56:49.

stories, Count Olaf keeps reappearing in different guises,

:56:50.:56:55.

which must be a delight? I got to play four different characters, Kym,

:56:56.:57:01.

who use all, than Stefano, who talks like a crazy man, has a beard and

:57:02.:57:06.

glasses, then there is a sea captain with a peg leg and an eye patch and

:57:07.:57:15.

is like a drunken Sean Connery, and the fourth one is surely since I've

:57:16.:57:20.

is, she is female, a receptionist for an optometrist and she talks

:57:21.:57:25.

like she is Betty Davis in the 1940s -- and another one is Shirley. She

:57:26.:57:33.

is sensual and annoying, no more wire hangers. What is he like to

:57:34.:57:39.

work with? He is incredible. He is awful! I have learned so much from

:57:40.:57:46.

working with him. Just to watch in. Sometimes when we are off-camera and

:57:47.:57:50.

doing other things we will just laugh sometimes well he is working.

:57:51.:57:57.

I have learnt so much from you. What have you learned? Go with your

:57:58.:58:00.

instincts and try again if it does not work, keep trying things out and

:58:01.:58:05.

doing things differently and try to keep it entertaining. It is

:58:06.:58:09.

interesting for me, I started acting at 12 or 13, I am 43 now so I have

:58:10.:58:15.

done this for awhile, I am protective of these two but I

:58:16.:58:18.

recognise things, I appreciate you saying that, when you are filming on

:58:19.:58:21.

camera and you are younger you do not really appreciate that you can

:58:22.:58:26.

fail and do another take, you tend sometimes to be nervous and want

:58:27.:58:30.

every take to be good and in doing so you don't get to mess around and

:58:31.:58:39.

screw up, and that is the beauty of film as opposed to theatre, where

:58:40.:58:41.

when you screw up everybody's watching live, when you are filming

:58:42.:58:44.

you can give a ridiculous take and if it is not good they do not use

:58:45.:58:46.

it. We were talking about young people

:58:47.:58:49.

and confidence, the difference between boys and girls. If you were

:58:50.:58:52.

a child performer, presumably you were very confident? Not really, to

:58:53.:58:59.

be honest. I was more self-conscious than anything. I was good under the

:59:00.:59:03.

pressure of adult situations and being able to do it but it was hard

:59:04.:59:07.

for me to watch myself because I would recognise the things that I

:59:08.:59:10.

did not like that were going on physically.

:59:11.:59:19.

You have done quite a bit already. Sort of, I did a Barry Sonnenfeld

:59:20.:59:27.

film, I was here and there in Supergirl and my first big thing was

:59:28.:59:35.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, I had like a two second part. When was

:59:36.:59:41.

that? It was 2014 so I might have been ten, I think. Where do you

:59:42.:59:46.

think your confidence comes from? We were talking about how when you are

:59:47.:59:51.

younger, it can be tougher for girls, they tend to lose their

:59:52.:59:55.

confidence. For me, I don't know, I'm sort of a people person. I don't

:59:56.:00:00.

know, I think I just love acting in itself and it is kind of an art.

:00:01.:00:05.

When you are behind the camera and doing it... Sorry, in front of the

:00:06.:00:09.

camera and doing it, I think I sort of pretend like it is not there and

:00:10.:00:13.

you pretend like you are in the actual situation. You have kids

:00:14.:00:20.

yourself? Twins. How old are they? Six, a boy and a girl. Was that part

:00:21.:00:24.

of the driver? Some actors want to do things their kids will enjoy. A

:00:25.:00:29.

bit but I like to diversify and play different demographics at different

:00:30.:00:40.

times. I've done crazy hard-core Harold and Kumar kind of movies that

:00:41.:00:42.

for a specific, 20-something audience and then I like to remedy

:00:43.:00:45.

that by doing something similar to this. This is kind of great because

:00:46.:00:47.

it plays to all demographics. Have the kids watched it? They were on

:00:48.:00:52.

set. What debating? They liked it, I would not recommend it for most 60

:00:53.:00:57.

roles, it is probably for age ten and up but they had seen us on set

:00:58.:01:01.

and knew us by our real names so for them to what it was uniquely

:01:02.:01:05.

exciting. The hair is a particular feature. It is nice, isn't it? How

:01:06.:01:10.

would you describe it? You could probably do that, a little longer.

:01:11.:01:15.

It was a lot of hairpieces, a giant wig in three parts and then ageing

:01:16.:01:21.

piece. I have a fake nose and a big fake forehead. It took about three

:01:22.:01:24.

hours every morning to become that guy so I had for 30 AM calls. Could

:01:25.:01:28.

you imagine being in make up for three hours every morning?

:01:29.:01:35.

I need a lot more than that. It's great to see you, thanks for coming

:01:36.:01:39.

in and something tells me it will be great. Hope you watch the show. The

:01:40.:01:47.

series is on Netflix now. We will I'll be back at 1:30pm

:01:48.:03:22.

with the lunchtime news. It was horror on a scale

:03:23.:03:31.

never seen before - the mass murder of 6

:03:32.:03:34.

million Jews by the Nazis. Decades on, research suggests

:03:35.:03:36.

a quarter of survivors now living in the UK still face discrimination

:03:37.:03:40.

because of their To mark Holocaust Memorial Day,

:03:41.:03:43.

our reporter Holly Hamilton has been to meet one survivor

:03:44.:03:49.

and hear his story. He took out his revolver

:03:50.:03:51.

and put it to my head. And people ask me,

:03:52.:04:00.

what did it feel like This wasn't the first

:04:01.:04:02.

time Gabor Lacko came face-to-face with death and it

:04:03.:04:11.

wouldn't be the last. That is the certificate

:04:12.:04:14.

the Germans gave me when Just 12 years old when the Germans

:04:15.:04:17.

invaded, he describes himself as one And as you see, it is made

:04:18.:04:23.

from bits and pieces His first yellow star,

:04:24.:04:42.

worn to identify him as a Jew, A piece of history he

:04:43.:04:47.

has kept to this day. The first day I was wearing

:04:48.:04:54.

it, I had a medical appointment and at the top

:04:55.:04:59.

of the road, a lady who saw me trying to hide it

:05:00.:05:05.

with the newspaper, under my arm, said, "Little

:05:06.:05:09.

boy, don't cover it. Like many survivors,

:05:10.:05:15.

Gabor waited for more than 20 years before

:05:16.:05:37.

talking about his experiences, motivated

:05:38.:05:40.

by a desire to help people

:05:41.:05:43.

understand what happened. I don't think young people

:05:44.:05:46.

appreciate how lucky they are. They worry about their mobile

:05:47.:05:49.

telephone and their games consoles. They don't know what it is for bombs

:05:50.:05:57.

to fall from the sky if you survive it, and an occupying

:05:58.:06:04.

army can take you away. You don't know what

:06:05.:06:13.

happens tomorrow. That is the happiest, my mother

:06:14.:06:19.

with her young granddaughter. It wasn't until 1956

:06:20.:06:32.

that Gabor decided to move to England, where he has

:06:33.:06:35.

lived for over 60 years. Well, in those days,

:06:36.:06:40.

people looked at refugees with different eyes,

:06:41.:06:43.

and they tried to make us welcome. I started a new life

:06:44.:06:47.

and I got on with it, with friends who

:06:48.:06:49.

went through the same. Whatever is the conversation,

:06:50.:06:54.

after a while, it Holly Hamilton there,

:06:55.:06:58.

speaking to Gabor Lacko. Thank you so much to him for talking

:06:59.:07:21.

to us about his experiences. Joining us on the sofa

:07:22.:07:25.

is Joan Salter, who lost her grandparents, aunties,

:07:26.:07:27.

uncles and cousins in the Holocaust. Thank you for joining us. Obviously,

:07:28.:07:37.

hearing Gabor Lacko's story as well, there are so many stories like this

:07:38.:07:44.

and for you, I know it is probably really difficult to talk about but

:07:45.:07:47.

it is something you are passionate about, about telling people what

:07:48.:07:51.

happened so people can learn more about it and there's more

:07:52.:07:54.

acceptance. Yeah, the reason I speak about it is I wanted them to see me

:07:55.:08:02.

as a human being, not as a stereotype or a caricature. I was

:08:03.:08:07.

born in Belgium in 1940, February. My parents were Polish Jews who had

:08:08.:08:13.

lived in western Europe most of their adult lives. They had met, my

:08:14.:08:17.

mother was a widow with a young child and they had married in 1938.

:08:18.:08:22.

They were living in Paris. After Poland was occupied, and the ghettos

:08:23.:08:29.

were set up in Warsaw and time off, where my parents came from, my

:08:30.:08:32.

father thought that Belgium would stay neutral, so they moved to

:08:33.:08:39.

Belgium, to Brussels. I was born in February and in May 1940, Belgium

:08:40.:08:46.

was occupied. They began rounding up the foreign men, 90% of them were

:08:47.:08:56.

Polish Jews. They had an agreement, the Nazis, with the government of

:08:57.:09:00.

Belgium and France are that their own citizens would not be deported.

:09:01.:09:06.

And you lost so many members of your family? Yeah, yeah, my mother was

:09:07.:09:12.

one of eight siblings and of course, the time I am speaking of, her older

:09:13.:09:17.

sisters would have been in their 50s and my mother was already in her

:09:18.:09:25.

late 30s. All seven of my aunts and uncles, cousins, all my cousins, my

:09:26.:09:30.

grandmother, my grandparents in Warsaw would have gone to Treblinka,

:09:31.:09:36.

which was a death camp. On my father's side, only one sister

:09:37.:09:39.

survived. She was in Russia during the war. And my grandparents in

:09:40.:09:48.

Tarnow would have gone to. Gabor was very reflective talking

:09:49.:10:01.

about children. He was talking about the freedoms they have and the

:10:02.:10:05.

things they have as compared with young people at a very different

:10:06.:10:09.

time and place. Is it something that occurs to you quite a bit? Well, it

:10:10.:10:16.

was just a different world. For me, I think Gabor was much older than

:10:17.:10:23.

me. What happened was my mother eventually went to Paris, where we

:10:24.:10:26.

nearly got rounded up, then down into Vichy, and then we had to

:10:27.:10:33.

escape over the Pyrenees. Actually, the Americans had sent visas for the

:10:34.:10:41.

children but they would not take adults so I was separated from my

:10:42.:10:46.

mother. I was only three. When I got to America, mine passed was wiped

:10:47.:10:49.

out, my name and culture were changed. And for four years, I was

:10:50.:10:55.

this happy child in an American family until one day I was told I

:10:56.:10:59.

didn't belong to them and I was put on a plane and came here. As a child

:11:00.:11:09.

and teenager, it was very strange. It is a story... You tell your story

:11:10.:11:15.

in schools a lot, don't you? Yes. How do young people react? It is

:11:16.:11:19.

fascinating, I think because I'm telling them the story of a child,

:11:20.:11:25.

they can relate. And very sadly, it is afterwards, when I'm talking to

:11:26.:11:28.

them, I was in a very multiethnic school last week, and the girls were

:11:29.:11:35.

coming up to me and they were saying, "What's going to happen with

:11:36.:11:40.

Brexit? Our wheel going to be deported?" So they were genuinely

:11:41.:11:47.

concerned? -- are we all going. Yes, and meat coming from that, to know

:11:48.:11:50.

what it is like, being put on a plane to a different culture, I've

:11:51.:11:54.

found that extremely moving and it made me very angry. Because what can

:11:55.:11:59.

I say to them? It is not going to happen? And obviously, you must get

:12:00.:12:05.

a mixed reaction from different students that you talk to. On the

:12:06.:12:12.

whole, they are very good. But a few months ago, I was at a school and I

:12:13.:12:18.

always ask the kids what they were expecting because I'd like to

:12:19.:12:24.

breakdown down caricature stereotypes and normally, they say,

:12:25.:12:28.

"A little old lady", so I say, I might not look it, but I am, and one

:12:29.:12:33.

kid called out and they said, "We are going to hear lies". You know, I

:12:34.:12:38.

have been speaking for 30 years and this is the first time someone has

:12:39.:12:43.

said that to me. And there is an awful lot of... It is hatred because

:12:44.:12:51.

there is so much evidence. I'm sure your attitude presumably is that you

:12:52.:12:53.

will tell your story and that will change, attitudes will be changed by

:12:54.:12:59.

that. Hopefully, yes. Thank you for joining us. Thank you. Coming in and

:13:00.:13:04.

sharing your life story with us. That's all from

:13:05.:13:06.

Breakfast this morning. Thank you for joining us. And all

:13:07.:13:17.

your comments on the various subjects. BBC News will be looking

:13:18.:13:23.

ahead to Donald Trump's meeting with Theresa May happening later in the

:13:24.:13:28.

day. And we will cover that tomorrow, I'm sure. Goodbye.

:13:29.:13:31.