28/01/2017 Breakfast


28/01/2017

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This is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Steph

:00:00.:00:07.

The veteran actor Sir John Hurt has died aged 77.

:00:08.:00:11.

He appeared in 200 films and television productions

:00:12.:00:13.

and was twice nominated for an Oscar.

:00:14.:00:32.

Good morning, it's Saturday, 28th January.

:00:33.:00:33.

Donald Trump and Theresa May pledge their commitment

:00:34.:00:41.

I am a people person. I think you are also, Theresa, and I can often

:00:42.:00:55.

tell how I get along with somebody very early and I believe we will

:00:56.:00:57.

have a fantastic relationship. After a spate of accidents,

:00:58.:01:00.

a call for lorry drivers to be banned from using satnavs

:01:01.:01:03.

designed for cars. In sport, a let off

:01:04.:01:05.

for the Premier League champions. Leicester City were four minutes

:01:06.:01:07.

from being knocked out of the FA Cup by Derby County, but Wes Morgan

:01:08.:01:11.

earns them a replay. It's not as cold as it has been over

:01:12.:01:23.

recent days, but we've got rain to contend with today and it is still

:01:24.:01:26.

cold enough for some of that range of four as snow in the hills of

:01:27.:01:30.

Scotland. A full forecast in the next half-hour.

:01:31.:01:31.

He was 77 and had recently been battling cancer.

:01:32.:01:38.

He starred in around 200 films, including Harry Potter

:01:39.:01:42.

and was nominated for an Oscar for his roles in The Elephant Man

:01:43.:01:45.

Our correspondent Nick Higham reports.

:01:46.:01:58.

Everything came to a head today. A nice man with an unexpected

:01:59.:02:07.

sympathetic one. The sort of complex character John Hurt played with such

:02:08.:02:08.

ease and subtlety. His talent was spotted early

:02:09.:02:13.

in a succession of leading stage His first big breakthrough came

:02:14.:02:16.

in 1966 in A Man For All Seasons. A small part, but in a high profile,

:02:17.:02:25.

Oscar-winning film. A few years later he was starring

:02:26.:02:31.

opposite Richard Attenborough in 10 On television he was the mad Roman

:02:32.:02:34.

Emperor in I, Claudius. Do you think I ordered

:02:35.:02:49.

triumph for myself? And then came

:02:50.:02:55.

The Naked Civil Servant. I wear rouge and mascara

:02:56.:03:00.

on my eyelashes, I dye my hair Many people said, don't do it, you

:03:01.:03:04.

will never work again. But I said it wasn't

:03:05.:03:12.

about being homosexual, it was about the tenderness of

:03:13.:03:18.

the individual against the cruelty He earned an Oscar nomination

:03:19.:03:21.

for Midnight Express in which he played a heroin addict

:03:22.:03:24.

in a Turkish prison. And there was another Oscar

:03:25.:03:27.

nomination for his performance as the hideously

:03:28.:03:30.

disfigured John Merrick I'm not used to being

:03:31.:03:31.

treated so well... His lined and weathered face meant

:03:32.:03:35.

he was perfect in the film 1984 He accepted all the film

:03:36.:03:39.

and television parts he was offered, although that meant stage

:03:40.:03:49.

appearances like this were rare. That's something that no

:03:50.:03:51.

one can advise you on. He played Stephen Ward,

:03:52.:03:57.

society schemer. I could do wonders

:03:58.:04:00.

with you, little baby. Later in his career he made a guest

:04:01.:04:02.

appearance in Doctor Who. Why are you pointing your

:04:03.:04:07.

screwdrivers like that? Few actors were busy, almost 200

:04:08.:04:17.

screen roles along. Few actors were as reliably and engagingly

:04:18.:04:18.

watchable. Donald Trump and Theresa May have

:04:19.:04:23.

vowed to renew the special relationship between

:04:24.:04:29.

their two countries. The US President said "many great

:04:30.:04:31.

days lie ahead for our two peoples." The two leaders also

:04:32.:04:35.

stressed their commitment to Nato The US President is due to speak

:04:36.:04:38.

to Vladimir Putin on the phone today for the first time

:04:39.:04:43.

since he took office. Our correspondent David Willis

:04:44.:04:45.

reports from Washington. It's going to be a fantastic

:04:46.:04:56.

relationship, so test Donald Trump. And as if to press the point he

:04:57.:05:00.

grasps the Prime Minister by the hand. Perhaps the crowning

:05:01.:05:04.

achievement of Theresa May's visit, engineering and apparent U-turn in

:05:05.:05:08.

Donald Trump's approach to Nato, an alliance he once described as

:05:09.:05:13.

obsolete. On defence and security operation we are united in our

:05:14.:05:17.

recognition of Nato as the ball work of our collective defence and today

:05:18.:05:20.

we've reaffirmed our unshakeable commitment to this alliance. I think

:05:21.:05:26.

Mr President Juncker confident you are 100% behind Nato? It is a week

:05:27.:05:30.

since Donald Trump became president, the week that has been fraught with

:05:31.:05:34.

controversy, following a controversial and unorthodox

:05:35.:05:39.

campaign. If president, you said before that torture works. You

:05:40.:05:42.

praised Russia and said he wanted to ban some Muslims from coming to

:05:43.:05:46.

America, you suggested there should be punishment for abortion. For many

:05:47.:05:51.

people in Britain goes sound like alarming beliefs. -- those are

:05:52.:05:55.

sound. What do you say to viewers at home who are worried about some of

:05:56.:05:59.

your views and worried about you becoming leader of the free world?

:06:00.:06:04.

Your choice of question? Because that relation -- there goes that

:06:05.:06:10.

relationship. Theresa May is the first foreign leader to sign her

:06:11.:06:13.

name in the Donald Trump visitor book. Later today he will talk to

:06:14.:06:17.

the French and German leaders by phone, as well as Russia's president

:06:18.:06:22.

Vladimir Putin. There's been talk of lifting sanctions on Russia. Theresa

:06:23.:06:27.

May's advice, proceed with caution. Their styles may be different but

:06:28.:06:31.

their relationship appears to be off to a solid start. Theresa May might

:06:32.:06:36.

be wondering where it will take them.

:06:37.:06:37.

President Trump has also announced stringent controls on immigration

:06:38.:06:39.

which he said would keep what he called "radical Islamic

:06:40.:06:42.

terrorists" out of the United States.

:06:43.:06:45.

Earlier we asked David Willis to give us more detail

:06:46.:06:48.

Donald Trump loud in his inauguration address too, as he put

:06:49.:06:59.

it, eradicate Islamic terrorism from the face of the earth. He has now

:07:00.:07:05.

signed an executive order, banning refugees from the country

:07:06.:07:09.

indefinitely, in the case of those from Syria, temporarily in the case

:07:10.:07:12.

of those from other places. Mr Trump believes terrorists often pose as

:07:13.:07:17.

refugees in order to get access to the country. He wants only people

:07:18.:07:23.

allowed into support America and who love its people. He also announced

:07:24.:07:27.

plans for a temporary ban on issuing of visas to citizens from seven

:07:28.:07:35.

countries, predominately Muslim countries, that have been linked to

:07:36.:07:37.

terrorism. Reaction has been swift. The Senate Minority Leader Chuck

:07:38.:07:44.

Schumer described it as the Scrivener tree and unconstitutional

:07:45.:07:47.

and he said that tears would be running down the cheeks of the

:07:48.:07:52.

statue of liberty. America's grand tradition of welcoming immigrants,

:07:53.:07:56.

he said, had been stomped upon by these measures.

:07:57.:07:56.

Theresa May has travelled from Washington to Turkey for talks

:07:57.:07:59.

The talks are expected to focus on trade and security

:08:00.:08:02.

but she's facing pressure to discuss concerns about alleged human rights

:08:03.:08:05.

Lorry drivers should be banned from using sat navs designed

:08:06.:08:10.

That's what councils are calling for after a spate

:08:11.:08:14.

of incidents caused by heavy goods vehicles using bridges where they're

:08:15.:08:17.

The Local Government Association wants legislation

:08:18.:08:22.

brought in to make it compulsory for all lorry drivers to use

:08:23.:08:25.

sat navs specifically designed for their vehicle.

:08:26.:08:27.

When a large lorry tried to cross this region over the Thames in

:08:28.:08:37.

Buckinghamshire last year, it caused hundreds of thousands of pounds of

:08:38.:08:41.

damage. It was ten times heavier Bamber Bridge's weight limits, but

:08:42.:08:47.

the sat nav didn't know that. Sat navs are leading large vehicles into

:08:48.:08:52.

unsuitable roads across the country. Causing damage and disruption. The

:08:53.:08:57.

Local Government Association, which represents local authorities across

:08:58.:09:01.

England and Wales, says truck drivers using sat navs and phones

:09:02.:09:06.

meant for cars are causing mayhem. They want to lorry drivers to be

:09:07.:09:10.

forced to use the right kind of sat navs for large vehicles. We're

:09:11.:09:14.

singer growing problem. I get more complaints from local residents.

:09:15.:09:18.

They see country lanes blocked by vehicles that should go down them

:09:19.:09:22.

and local high streets where they are blocked by large vehicles and

:09:23.:09:25.

also local economies as it when you see the glory is going over bridges

:09:26.:09:30.

that they can't take the weight for. Most truck drivers to use the right

:09:31.:09:34.

kind of sat navs, but they say they are no substitute for common sense.

:09:35.:09:40.

Sat navs are OK, but you can't rely on them. We've got specialised

:09:41.:09:45.

vehicles and even they go wrong. It is being careful. That's not to say

:09:46.:09:51.

you don't turn around sometimes. The bridge has now reopened after two

:09:52.:09:56.

months of repairs, but locals say they live in fear of a similar

:09:57.:10:00.

accident closing it at any time and that's why the Local Government

:10:01.:10:02.

Association says something needs to be done to stop drivers of larger

:10:03.:10:06.

vehicles using the wrong kind of sat nav, that's leading them into

:10:07.:10:08.

nothing but trouble. Employers are being offered advice

:10:09.:10:11.

about how to reduce the gender pay gap before new regulations come

:10:12.:10:15.

into force in April. Ministers say progress has

:10:16.:10:17.

been made but more needs to be done. Companies with at least 250 workers

:10:18.:10:20.

will be forced to reveal the pay International help has been arriving

:10:21.:10:24.

in Chile to help the country fight So far 11 people have died and 1,500

:10:25.:10:30.

homes have been destroyed. Our correspondent

:10:31.:10:35.

Greg Dawson has more. Beneath the rising plumes of smoke

:10:36.:10:48.

you get a sense of the scale of what is now one of the biggest

:10:49.:10:51.

emergencies in this country's history. Forest incinerated, towns

:10:52.:10:58.

destroyed and lives lost. The fire service is so overwhelmed that

:10:59.:11:02.

residents are protecting their homes with whose pipes and bottles of

:11:03.:11:06.

water. Or than 100 fires are still breaching. They are aided by high

:11:07.:11:11.

winds and dry conditions. With services are stretched, teams of

:11:12.:11:16.

firefighters have arrived from Colombia and Mexico has also provide

:11:17.:11:19.

reinforcements. Earlier in the week the world's list firefighting plane

:11:20.:11:24.

arrived on loan from the US. Now Russia is sending a similar

:11:25.:11:28.

aircraft. The damage has left thousands without a home and many

:11:29.:11:32.

forced into temporary shelters, like the school. Others are sleeping in

:11:33.:11:36.

vehicles, clinging to what they have left. But on Friday came a reminder

:11:37.:11:42.

of those who flossed much more. Funerals were held for a firefighter

:11:43.:11:46.

and policeman, both killed as they tried to tackle the flames. At least

:11:47.:11:51.

ten people are now known to have died, but with so few of these fires

:11:52.:11:55.

under control it's a number that is likely to keep rising in the coming

:11:56.:11:57.

days. A draft letter of abdication

:11:58.:12:01.

from King George III has been The unsent letter,

:12:02.:12:04.

which includes crossings out, redrafts, blotches and scrawls

:12:05.:12:09.

was written during the American War of Independence, and is one

:12:10.:12:12.

of thousands of his private papers It is fascinating seeing those

:12:13.:12:15.

documents. The Royal Archives release has been

:12:16.:12:24.

filmed for a BBC documentary and we will be speaking

:12:25.:12:27.

to the historian Robert Hardman They had a chance to have a look at

:12:28.:12:35.

some of these documents and we will talk to him a little later.

:12:36.:12:39.

I bet they were excited when they got the chance to see them.

:12:40.:12:45.

It is coming up to the Eurovision Song Contest and the UK entry has

:12:46.:12:56.

been decided. Metabolism. # The oceans cross...

:12:57.:12:57.

Former X-Factor contestant Lucie Jones will represent

:12:58.:13:06.

the country in Kiev, in May, with the song

:13:07.:13:08.

It was written by a former Eurovision winner.

:13:09.:13:12.

Lucie was chosen after winning the combined public and jury vote

:13:13.:13:17.

at the end of a live TV show, in which six singers performed.

:13:18.:13:21.

All of the potential acts were former X-Factor contestants.

:13:22.:13:25.

I feel like maybe we need to hear a little bit more.

:13:26.:13:32.

We couldn't make out much of it, but maybe we will hear more of it later.

:13:33.:13:38.

Over to the sport in a few minutes. First, the newspapers. Let's have a

:13:39.:13:46.

look at the front page of the Daily Mirror. They are the first of the

:13:47.:13:50.

papers to reflect the news overnight that we will be reporting on this

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morning, many tributes being paid to John Hurt, who has died at the age

:13:55.:13:59.

of 77. The announcement made in the early hours of this morning.

:14:00.:14:04.

And if we look at The Daily Mail, a lot of the papers are covering the

:14:05.:14:08.

picture off course of Trump meeting Theresa May and the fact that they

:14:09.:14:13.

held hands. Not for very long, I hasten to add. But that is the

:14:14.:14:17.

picture that all of the papers are... Have grabbed. It was one of

:14:18.:14:21.

the most extraordinary days in the long history of the UK- US

:14:22.:14:25.

relations. Indeed, those images all over the

:14:26.:14:30.

front pages. The Times, this was taken a little earlier in their

:14:31.:14:41.

meeting. This is in the White House. Churchill, the bust is back. Donald

:14:42.:14:47.

Trump said it should have been there all along. Slightly awkward at that

:14:48.:14:51.

point, but by the time they got to the press conference later thing

:14:52.:14:54.

seemed a lot smoother and that was the point at which Theresa May

:14:55.:14:58.

revealed that Donald Trump had been invited by the queen for a state

:14:59.:15:01.

visit later this year and Donald Trump has agreed that he will come.

:15:02.:15:06.

There is so much analysis of the time and the body language. This was

:15:07.:15:13.

the Daily Mirror before they changed the front cover to Sir John Hurt.

:15:14.:15:19.

Yes, and if we go through some of the inside pages, they are having a

:15:20.:15:24.

great deal of fun looking at how the two of them were engaging with one

:15:25.:15:29.

another. You can see quite a lot of the smiles. A lot of mentions of the

:15:30.:15:34.

special relationship and indeed certainly from Theresa May quite a

:15:35.:15:38.

lot of detail and specifics of the things she had been asking. Donald

:15:39.:15:45.

Trump a couple of times taken aback by some of the questions, especially

:15:46.:15:49.

from the British press. We will hear more about that later this morning.

:15:50.:15:53.

Can I show you one story? Anyone who loves their dog, which is pretty

:15:54.:15:57.

much everyone, a leading to basically... Her beagle managed to

:15:58.:16:02.

get into trouble and ended up in some water for up she went in

:16:03.:16:06.

wearing one of those life rings that she found nearby and saved the

:16:07.:16:11.

beagle. A frozen lake. She was really brave!

:16:12.:16:21.

You would say brave, others would say stupid. I wouldn't say that but

:16:22.:16:28.

it's instinct. You hear about the emergency services warning about

:16:29.:16:32.

those circumstances. All is well. They are both OK.

:16:33.:16:35.

Here's Chris with a look at this morning's weather.

:16:36.:16:39.

Good morning. We've had a week where the deep freeze has been with us,

:16:40.:16:45.

temperatures way below normal and we've had a lot of fog problems as

:16:46.:16:51.

well but the thaw is setting in and today will be significantly milder

:16:52.:16:55.

for a good chunk of the country, particularly England and Wales with

:16:56.:16:58.

temperatures on the mild side for some this morning. Yesterday we had

:16:59.:17:02.

a lot of cloud in the Isle of Wight, this was a Weather Watcher picture.

:17:03.:17:08.

We will see a lot of these cloudy skies today, a band of rain working

:17:09.:17:13.

northwards across England, Wales, Scotland and rain for Northern

:17:14.:17:16.

Ireland but it shouldn't last too long here. Through the day the only

:17:17.:17:20.

thing to watch out for is we could see some of the rain falling as snow

:17:21.:17:24.

in the higher ground in Scotland, around 300 metres elevation for the

:17:25.:17:28.

most part but we could have I0 in this part of the world first thing.

:17:29.:17:32.

By the time we get to the afternoon the rain will ease of in eastern

:17:33.:17:38.

England and southern Wales, the sky is brighter, a few showers coming in

:17:39.:17:44.

but look at these temperatures. Nine in London and sixes and sevens in

:17:45.:17:47.

the Midlands and northern England. In Northern Ireland, brightening up

:17:48.:17:51.

nicely, a few showers here but in Scotland and the far north of

:17:52.:17:54.

England the rain will be reluctant to ease and here it will stay cold

:17:55.:18:00.

at around four. Overnight as the rain clears away, with clearing

:18:01.:18:04.

skies it will be cold enough for highs to develop on untreated roads

:18:05.:18:08.

and services. A touch of frost in the countryside. Further south the

:18:09.:18:13.

breeze keeping the frost at bay in Wales and southern counties in

:18:14.:18:17.

particular. Here's the picture on Sunday, the weather starting on a

:18:18.:18:20.

bright note with sunshine in northern areas, the risk of ice

:18:21.:18:24.

first thing. A change through the day, a band of rain working into

:18:25.:18:28.

Northern Ireland, Wales and the south-west and we should hold onto

:18:29.:18:31.

decent sunshine in Scotland and north-east England. Quite cold in

:18:32.:18:36.

the sunshine, forsix, but in the south-west we'll have double figures

:18:37.:18:41.

in Plymouth. -- forsix. The Atlantic finally waking up bringing weather

:18:42.:18:45.

fronts in from the west. These will be slow-moving across the UK but it

:18:46.:18:51.

could be windy later in the week as well. That's the weather. Back to

:18:52.:18:52.

you two. Tell you what, it must be warm in

:18:53.:18:59.

the studio with three buttons open on your! I know! Thanks very much,

:19:00.:19:04.

see you later -- your shirt. This week Mark Kermode

:19:05.:19:06.

and Gavin Esler take us through T2 Trainspotting,

:19:07.:19:11.

Sing and Hacksaw Ridge. Hello, and welcome to

:19:12.:19:26.

the Film Review on BBC News. To take us through this

:19:27.:19:28.

week's cinema releases, as ever, Mark Kermode is with me,

:19:29.:19:31.

and what will you be telling us Trainspotting T2, they meet

:19:32.:19:34.

up after 20 years. Then we have Singh, an animated

:19:35.:19:51.

feature from the people that gave us Minions.

:19:52.:19:53.

And Hacksaw Ridge, Mel Gibson at war.

:19:54.:20:03.

One of those titles you can't quite get a measure of.

:20:04.:20:11.

20 years later, the original characters are reunited.

:20:12.:20:13.

Renton is drawn back into his past for reasons which are not

:20:14.:20:16.

immediately explained and we find the old crew ravaged not so much

:20:17.:20:19.

by heroin as by age and by disappointment

:20:20.:20:21.

and by a degree of emasculation and the way in which their lives

:20:22.:20:25.

have not worked out as they will have expected.

:20:26.:20:27.

Begbie has been in prison and Spud, when Renton first finds him,

:20:28.:20:31.

has basically all but lost the will to live, until hi friend

:20:32.:20:34.

It's not getting it out of your body that's the problem,

:20:35.:21:09.

You think I haven't heard that 100,000 times. You got 12 more steps

:21:10.:21:17.

for me? You have got to channel it,

:21:18.:21:18.

you have got to control it. That clip's interesting because it

:21:19.:21:44.

was funny but it ends on that very melancholic note.

:21:45.:21:46.

As somebody who saw the original 20 years ago, I remember being really

:21:47.:21:49.

But people forget about how shocking it was.

:21:50.:21:58.

What I liked about this was it felt like a film about middle age,

:21:59.:22:02.

about the way in which the world changes, about the way

:22:03.:22:04.

in which the characters' bodies have changed,

:22:05.:22:07.

their characteristics have changed, and as with so many of Danny Boyle's

:22:08.:22:10.

films, it's about friendship, the way the present loops back

:22:11.:22:12.

to the past and has this elegiac longing for the past.

:22:13.:22:26.

But it's also very much a modern movie.

:22:27.:22:29.

My only reservation with this, I thought it worked really well,

:22:30.:22:32.

because I didn't want to be let down.

:22:33.:22:34.

I didn't want them to be revisiting this for cash,

:22:35.:22:37.

for money, because that is an easy thing to do.

:22:38.:22:39.

The screenwriter John Hodge created something new.

:22:40.:22:45.

They have created something artistic.

:22:46.:22:46.

My only question would be, I don't know what it would look

:22:47.:22:51.

like if you were a young viewers seeing it for the first time,

:22:52.:22:52.

not having all that history with Trainspotting,

:22:53.:22:55.

because a lot of what it is doing is playing with the past.

:22:56.:22:59.

But I like that about it - the interplay between the past

:23:00.:23:02.

It's like meeting these characters again and genuinely seeing what time

:23:03.:23:09.

And the screenplay of the original, from the Irvine Welsh

:23:10.:23:16.

book, was funny and quite philosophical.

:23:17.:23:21.

I think Hodge has done a brilliant job.

:23:22.:23:33.

There are an awful lot of laughs in it.

:23:34.:23:35.

It is definitely more melancholy than the original.

:23:36.:23:37.

It doesn't have that vampiric bite that the original had,

:23:38.:23:40.

not the venomous feeling of the original.

:23:41.:23:42.

But what it does have is a sense of ennui,

:23:43.:23:45.

That life is full of in two disappointment but giving voice to

:23:46.:23:52.

those characters. A sense that life is full

:23:53.:24:01.

of disappointments, but somehow finding vibrancy and giving

:24:02.:24:03.

a voice to those characters who would otherwise have been

:24:04.:24:06.

written off as deadbeats again, I am looking forward

:24:07.:24:09.

to your other choice. It's about a group of animals

:24:10.:24:12.

in a singing competition. It owes a lot more to Mickey Rooney,

:24:13.:24:17.

Judy Garland, old school, let's put the show on here rather

:24:18.:24:22.

than a singing competition. It starts out as a singing

:24:23.:24:25.

competition, but moves At the beginning I thought

:24:26.:24:28.

it was sweet-natured fun, but as it went on, it

:24:29.:24:43.

started to have that charm, that old-fashioned throwback charm

:24:44.:24:46.

which I loved from all You can tell it's not just something

:24:47.:24:49.

which is just fluff. Yes, it's bright and shiny with more

:24:50.:24:52.

pop tunes in it than you could wave a stick at, but it has

:24:53.:24:57.

something more important. It has a bit of heart in it

:24:58.:25:02.

and that is down to Garth Jennings. Mel Gibson reinventing

:25:03.:25:06.

himself again? It's the film that rehabilitated Mel

:25:07.:25:08.

Gibson. This is about someone

:25:09.:25:12.

who volunteered as a medic in World War Two and refused

:25:13.:25:14.

to carry a weapon into the unfolding Pacifism says to turn the other

:25:15.:25:18.

cheek, don't it? I don't think this is a question

:25:19.:25:45.

of religion, fellas. I think this is cowardice,

:25:46.:25:48.

plain and simple. I'll tell you what, I'm

:25:49.:25:50.

going to give you a free shot. The peculiar thing about this

:25:51.:25:58.

film is before I saw it, I heard people comparing it

:25:59.:26:18.

to Apocalypto, which I think is Mel Gibson's best

:26:19.:26:21.

work but this is not it. This is two films

:26:22.:26:24.

fighting for supremacy. The first half of

:26:25.:26:26.

it is almost cheesy. Then we move to the war scenes

:26:27.:26:28.

and they are brutal and bloody and if you have seen

:26:29.:26:37.

the Passion of the Christ, you know that Mel Gibson absolutely

:26:38.:26:39.

really does that well. What that means is you get two

:26:40.:26:42.

separate movies going on. Sometimes the battle scenes

:26:43.:26:49.

are absolutely horrific and up there with the Stephen Spielberg

:26:50.:26:52.

stuff from Saving Private Ryan, but sometimes they teeter over

:26:53.:26:55.

into something which approach is parody, almost Tropic Thunder,

:26:56.:26:58.

so you get a weird mix. The movie feels like it is pulling

:26:59.:27:01.

in a number of different ways. I came out of this slightly baffled,

:27:02.:27:04.

because there are things in it that are very cheesy, some things that

:27:05.:27:15.

are really sentimental and saccharine,

:27:16.:27:17.

other things that are brutal and gory I think it has moments that

:27:18.:27:21.

are really striking. It is a true story and I have read

:27:22.:27:24.

a bit about him in the past. Obviously the point of that is he's

:27:25.:27:29.

a very brave man not to fight. Just because the story is great,

:27:30.:27:34.

doesn't mean the film I wondered if the saccharine start

:27:35.:27:37.

at the beginning was Mel Gibson trying to prepare the American

:27:38.:27:41.

public to find someone who was a conscientious

:27:42.:27:45.

objector heroic. I don't know if that's what was

:27:46.:27:49.

going on. I literally spent the first third

:27:50.:27:52.

of the film thinking, when is this going to turn

:27:53.:27:54.

into the great movie that everyone Once we had got into the war

:27:55.:27:58.

sequences as I said, he can do that stuff really well,

:27:59.:28:03.

but he can also push it too far. No, but that is an interesting

:28:04.:28:07.

comparison, because his movies are different to an American

:28:08.:28:11.

audience than to a British audience. What more can we say

:28:12.:28:14.

about La La Land? I think everyone who keeps saying,

:28:15.:28:22.

is it as good as everyone says? Yes it is.

:28:23.:28:24.

People are concerned that it is not as good as we have been saying,

:28:25.:28:28.

like it is overhyped, but I haven't stopped singing it

:28:29.:28:30.

That little phrase he plays on the piano. By the way it is clearly

:28:31.:28:41.

ripped off Mad World. Best film and Best Director

:28:42.:28:43.

for the Baftas and the Oscars? Yes, I think it will

:28:44.:28:47.

absolutely sweep the board. Which is a shame because I loved

:28:48.:28:49.

Moonlight. Finally, Under The Shadow,

:28:50.:28:52.

which I haven't seen yet. You must, because you will

:28:53.:28:55.

absolutely love it. It is a British production set

:28:56.:29:00.

in Tehran, shot in Jordan. It is about a mother

:29:01.:29:04.

and her daughter in an apartment building being shelled

:29:05.:29:11.

in the Iraq/Iran war, but they are being terrorised

:29:12.:29:13.

by a gin spirit. It owes a debt to things

:29:14.:29:16.

like Rosemary's Baby. It is smart, it is intelligent,

:29:17.:29:24.

suprising, influenced by the Babadook and I promise

:29:25.:29:30.

you you will love it. Right, that is my homework

:29:31.:29:32.

for the weekend. You will find more film news

:29:33.:29:35.

and reviews across the BBC including all our previous

:29:36.:29:40.

shows on the website. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:29:41.:29:42.

with Steph McGovern and Charlie Coming up before 7am:

:29:43.:29:55.

We'll have an update But first, a summary of this

:29:56.:29:59.

morning's main news. He starred in around 200 films,

:30:00.:30:07.

including Harry Potter, and was nominated for an Oscar

:30:08.:30:12.

for his roles in The Elephant Man Sir John continued working

:30:13.:30:16.

despite despite being diagnosed Tributes have been

:30:17.:30:21.

pouring in online. Actor Elijah Wood tweeted,

:30:22.:30:30.

saying: Very sad to hear

:30:31.:30:32.

of John Hurt's passing. It was such an honor

:30:33.:30:34.

to have watched you work, No one could have played

:30:35.:30:37.

The Elephant Man more memorably. Actor David Schneider

:30:38.:30:45.

in a tweet has said: I was in a film with him

:30:46.:30:48.

and he was so mesmerising I kept Theresa May and Donald Trump have

:30:49.:30:52.

stressed their commitment to NATO The Prime Minister and

:30:53.:31:03.

the President both reiterated the importance of the special

:31:04.:31:07.

relationship in the first visit of a foreign leader to Washington

:31:08.:31:10.

since Donald Trump's inauguration. Theresa May urged the United States

:31:11.:31:15.

not to lift sanctions against The US President is due to speak

:31:16.:31:18.

to Vladimir Putin today. I will be representing the American

:31:19.:31:31.

people very, very strongly and forcefully and if we have a great

:31:32.:31:36.

relationship with Russia and other countries and if we go after Isis

:31:37.:31:43.

together, which has to be stopped, I will consider that a good thing, not

:31:44.:31:45.

a bad thing. Theresa May has travelled

:31:46.:31:47.

from Washington to Turkey for talks The talks are expected to focus

:31:48.:31:49.

on trade and security but she's facing pressure to discuss

:31:50.:31:53.

concerns about alleged human rights Lorry drivers should be banned form

:31:54.:31:56.

using sat navs designed for cars. That's what councils

:31:57.:32:06.

are calling for after a spate of incidents caused by heavy goods

:32:07.:32:08.

vehicles using bridges where they're The Local Government Association

:32:09.:32:11.

wants legislation brought in to make it compulsory for all lorry drivers

:32:12.:32:15.

to use sat-navs specifically A draft letter of abdication

:32:16.:32:18.

from King George III has been The unsent letter,

:32:19.:32:33.

which includes crossings out, redrafts, blotches and scrawls,

:32:34.:32:36.

was written during the American War of Independence, and is one

:32:37.:32:39.

of thousands of his private papers We will be looking in more detail at

:32:40.:32:42.

that. Those are the main

:32:43.:32:49.

stories this morning. Over to the sport.

:32:50.:32:57.

Let's hope the FA Cup fourth round continues in the way it started. One

:32:58.:33:01.

of those moments where we don't know whether to laugh... When you watch

:33:02.:33:06.

it again, it is an own goal, but in the end it didn't matter for derby.

:33:07.:33:09.

Derby went so close to upsetting their neighbours

:33:10.:33:12.

and the Premier League champions Leicester City.

:33:13.:33:16.

Derby of the championship made it hard for themselves

:33:17.:33:19.

as Darren Bent showed why he's a striker.

:33:20.:33:27.

He loves to find the ne, but usually not his own.

:33:28.:33:30.

But after this slice of luck for his opponents

:33:31.:33:33.

Bent made amends, popping up again at the right end, to make

:33:34.:33:36.

Derby then went ahead before half time, and they held

:33:37.:33:39.

on until with 4 minutes to go Leicester equalised

:33:40.:33:41.

through Wes Morgan, to force a replay.

:33:42.:33:43.

What a great atmosphere. Out of them to perform like that. A good game.

:33:44.:33:51.

Another game against them, I look forward to it. It is a great tie for

:33:52.:33:53.

us. Five Premier League sides are facing

:33:54.:33:54.

lower league opposition Including Liverpool at home

:33:55.:33:58.

to Wolves in the 12:30 kick off. Liverpool's only win in any

:33:59.:34:04.

competition in 2017 so far came when they beat Plymouth Argyle

:34:05.:34:07.

in a third round replay. But Wolves have already knocked out

:34:08.:34:10.

premier league Stoke City. I don't like the results but I see

:34:11.:34:21.

that we are still fighting for each point, for each little victory, for

:34:22.:34:26.

each success. That's what we are doing and that's the job we have to

:34:27.:34:33.

do. I am absolutely more than OK and look forward to the next opportunity

:34:34.:34:34.

tomorrow. Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger

:34:35.:34:37.

won't be in the dug-out for their FA Cup

:34:38.:34:39.

match at Southampton. He's been banned from

:34:40.:34:41.

the touchline for four matches and fined ?25,000 after verbally

:34:42.:34:46.

abusing and pushing an official during last weekend's

:34:47.:34:48.

game against Burnley. Niall McGinn scored two

:34:49.:34:51.

goals and set up another, as Aberdeen beat Dundee 3-0

:34:52.:34:53.

in the Scottish Premiership. McGinn's volley on the

:34:54.:34:56.

stroke of half time The win moved Abderdeen

:34:57.:34:58.

above Rangers into second place in the table, but they're still 21

:34:59.:35:01.

points behind Celtic. There's a distinctly retro feel

:35:02.:35:09.

to the Australian Open tennis. You have to go back to 2008

:35:10.:35:11.

to find these four players This morning, Serena Williams

:35:12.:35:14.

takes on her sister Venus and tomorrow's men's decider will be

:35:15.:35:20.

between Roger Federer That's after Nadal spent almost five

:35:21.:35:23.

hours on court yesterday against Grigor Dimitrov,

:35:24.:35:29.

before eventually winning Nadal hasn't won a major

:35:30.:35:30.

title for three years, We never thought that we have the

:35:31.:35:48.

chance to again be in a final and especially in the first of... I

:35:49.:35:55.

think we both worked very hard to be where we are, so it is great and it

:35:56.:36:02.

is great that again we are in a moment like this and we hope we have

:36:03.:36:06.

a chance to enjoy a moment like this.

:36:07.:36:12.

Saracens have gone top of their pool in Rugby Union's

:36:13.:36:14.

Anglo Welsh Cup, thanks to a 32-17 away to Scarlets.

:36:15.:36:17.

Elsewhere, Sale beat Cardiff 41-3, and Gloucester fought back

:36:18.:36:19.

in the last few minutes to earn a 17-17 draw at Bath.

:36:20.:36:23.

Ben Vellacott's late try and James Hook's conversion rounded

:36:24.:36:25.

More than 5000 runners from 42 countries are bracing themselves for

:36:26.:36:37.

the pain and fear that they will experience in a final ever Tough Guy

:36:38.:36:42.

challenge this weekend. It started 30 years ago and has led to many

:36:43.:36:48.

other extreme obstacle event is being held around the world. There

:36:49.:36:52.

is now even a movie out to tell the story. I've been onto the course

:36:53.:36:54.

this week ahead of final weekend. It is the end of an era, on a farm

:36:55.:37:05.

in the West Midlands, where for decades people from around the world

:37:06.:37:13.

have come together. Why? To share the ultimate pain and fear. Pushing

:37:14.:37:20.

their bodies over eight miles. But after this weekend there will be no

:37:21.:37:24.

more Tough Guy. It has definitely changed my life. It will be a huge

:37:25.:37:29.

part of my life that will cease to be. Hundreds of thousands of people

:37:30.:37:36.

have attempted this Tough Guy challenge over the past 30 years.

:37:37.:37:43.

Oh! But for those doing at this Sunday, it will be the last ever.

:37:44.:37:51.

Behind it all the man known as Mr Mouse. A former soldier who 30 years

:37:52.:37:57.

ago wanted to add more of a challenge to fun runs, and so we

:37:58.:38:03.

invented the obstacles. This is mild compared to the electric shocks

:38:04.:38:08.

before. I decided to put people through something that they'd never

:38:09.:38:14.

seen before. Fear, pain, claustrophobic, all of the terrible

:38:15.:38:18.

things that you fear and leave them here! They come through and they

:38:19.:38:26.

say, thank you! I am so happy. You get this medal put around your neck.

:38:27.:38:33.

There's nothing else like it. I'm terrified, what can I say? As Mr

:38:34.:38:39.

Mouse now brings the curtain down on this world-famous event, he is the

:38:40.:38:42.

subject of a movie that looks at why people of today willingly pay to

:38:43.:38:46.

experience such pain and suffering. If you can come back with a Flight

:38:47.:38:53.

Club-esque scar and a story about what you did, it sounds awesome. Mr

:38:54.:39:02.

Mouse's cultural impact is massive. All of these things have exploded

:39:03.:39:07.

because of Tough Guy. Not many people know about it and I thought

:39:08.:39:11.

it was a compelling story. To mark the final Tough Guy, competitors

:39:12.:39:17.

will be joined by the star of the War Horse film. He wants them to

:39:18.:39:22.

remember the suffering that was real in the trenches 100 years ago.

:39:23.:39:26.

Thanks to what started here, obstacle racing is now one of the

:39:27.:39:28.

fastest growing sports in the world. There are other events that will

:39:29.:39:40.

test people to the extreme, no more Tough Guy after this weekend.

:39:41.:39:44.

IU OK? A bit cold! We all sat around the

:39:45.:39:47.

fire. Thank you. He was 77 and had recently

:39:48.:39:54.

been ill with cancer. Steven Gaydos is a screenwriter

:39:55.:40:06.

and executive editor of Variety Thank you very much for joining us.

:40:07.:40:15.

If you look at it, Sir John Hurt was in over 200 films. An incredible

:40:16.:40:19.

acting career and a real loss to the acting world, isn't he? Incalculable

:40:20.:40:23.

loss because he was one of a kind. He was the bona fides great actor,

:40:24.:40:31.

but he was also a character. He had a style and a persona that was

:40:32.:40:37.

clearly unique. You met him. Tell us a bit about what he was like. Well,

:40:38.:40:42.

if you were blessed to have an evening with a great artist I

:40:43.:40:48.

admired so much, he was a quiet man and very self-effacing. You know,

:40:49.:40:55.

what I would call from my American perspective they find Englishman. He

:40:56.:41:00.

had the qualities of intellect and grace and humour. You know, he was

:41:01.:41:07.

quite open and talked about the fact that he was kind of the young fellow

:41:08.:41:11.

in the game of British actors that came up in the 60s who almost all of

:41:12.:41:16.

them were gone. Names like Peter O'Toole, Burton, so many more.

:41:17.:41:25.

Richard Attenborough, a senior member of the game, and many more.

:41:26.:41:29.

So he took his place in that arena. If you look early in his career, it

:41:30.:41:33.

is worth noting that very early on he was working for directors like

:41:34.:41:39.

John Houston, so the world clearly was noting that there was a new face

:41:40.:41:47.

in a circle that was important. Many people paying their tributes to Sir

:41:48.:41:51.

John Hurt today. A lot of people reflecting on the variety of the

:41:52.:41:55.

work that he was involved in. We are just going to play a clip and share

:41:56.:41:59.

with everyone. This is an interview with did with Sigourney Weaver

:42:00.:42:03.

sometime ago, two years ago, and she was reminiscing about that

:42:04.:42:10.

extraordinary scene in the film Alien that many people would

:42:11.:42:13.

remember, and what it was like when a shot that scene.

:42:14.:42:16.

It was in the script and when we got down to the set everyone was wearing

:42:17.:42:24.

ponchos, which made us think... Something is going to happen that is

:42:25.:42:30.

not usual. But I don't think anything could have prepared us

:42:31.:42:33.

first of all for John's performance. I mean, such brilliant acting. I

:42:34.:42:38.

didn't realise he was acting. You thought something had gone wrong? I

:42:39.:42:42.

didn't even think. All I thought was, John is dying! And then the

:42:43.:42:47.

next take on a and this is with a couple of guys under the table. No

:42:48.:42:51.

CGI, though anything, no green screen, with a couple of little

:42:52.:42:56.

tubes and bulbs and they made this little... Honestly, they did a quick

:42:57.:43:03.

change, then this thing came out of John Hurt's fake chest, sat on the

:43:04.:43:09.

table, looked around and went SQUEAKS. And then ran off the table,

:43:10.:43:15.

all in one shot. And there is a master where all of us are like...

:43:16.:43:19.

And we're not acting, because we just went... What just happened? It

:43:20.:43:25.

happened so seamlessly that it was... It seemed so real.

:43:26.:43:29.

That scene has been voted by many people as one of their favourite

:43:30.:43:38.

scenes of all time in the film. Oh, you know, that movie - I still

:43:39.:43:42.

vividly remember the first screening in my hometown and the audience

:43:43.:43:46.

just... You could hear a pin drop. Horror... There are films that moved

:43:47.:43:53.

the whole genre forward that changed the world. Psycho was one of them in

:43:54.:44:01.

the 50s, and Ridley Scott's Alien was another. He was working until

:44:02.:44:06.

recently, because he was actually in the film Jackie, that's out at the

:44:07.:44:13.

moment. Yes, and he has a Joey Wright film coming out, where he

:44:14.:44:19.

plays Neville Chamberlain to Gary Oldman's Winston Churchill. Of

:44:20.:44:22.

course he was really terrific on the couple of years ago in Only Lovers

:44:23.:44:30.

Left Alive. So if you haven't heard of some of these movies in John

:44:31.:44:35.

Hurt's film graffiti then you are lucky person because you get to see

:44:36.:44:39.

for the first time all of the different facets of John Hurt. --

:44:40.:44:46.

filmography. Just looking at some of the tributes paid by a monk stub as

:44:47.:44:51.

Mel Brooks, he was held in great esteem in Hollywood. -- among

:44:52.:44:59.

others. When you look at people like Stephen Spielberg, and many others,

:45:00.:45:04.

the directors choose at that level who is in their films and so many

:45:05.:45:11.

great filmmakers said, get me John Hurt. That's another testament to

:45:12.:45:15.

his quality. Thank you for your time this morning.

:45:16.:45:18.

Steven Gaydos is a screenwriter and executive editor of Variety

:45:19.:45:20.

Here's Chris with a look at this morning's weather.

:45:21.:45:32.

Good morning. We're looking at a change in our weather, compared to

:45:33.:45:40.

last week when we were in the deep freeze, nasty fog around. Things

:45:41.:45:46.

turning milder, the macro thaw setting in and with the milder

:45:47.:45:50.

weather comes the rain and that is getting going in England, Wales and

:45:51.:45:54.

Northern Ireland and pushing into Scotland. In Scotland, still quite

:45:55.:45:59.

cold so some of that rain falling as snow in the higher hills mostly

:46:00.:46:03.

above 300 metres. The risk of icy stretches on untreated roads first

:46:04.:46:07.

thing this morning here. Through the afternoon the rain will be reluctant

:46:08.:46:12.

to clear from the north but further south the skies will brighten. A

:46:13.:46:15.

mixture of sunshine and showers moving into southern Wales and

:46:16.:46:18.

southern counties of England with a brisk south-westerly wind bringing

:46:19.:46:21.

milder air, temperatures in London reaching a high of nine. The rain

:46:22.:46:26.

reluctant to clear from northern England but Northern Ireland

:46:27.:46:29.

brightening up quickly, a few blustery showers in the afternoon

:46:30.:46:33.

from the west. In Scotland we have the rain with us into the afternoon,

:46:34.:46:37.

staying quite cold, around four degrees. As the rain clears through

:46:38.:46:42.

overnight the skies complete increasingly clear, a touch of frost

:46:43.:46:46.

for northern part, the risk of icy stretches on an treating services.

:46:47.:46:51.

In the south the wind keeping the frost out they -- on untreated

:46:52.:46:59.

surfaces. -- at bay. This area of rain bringing wet weather through

:47:00.:47:02.

the morning reaching Northern Ireland eventually and south-west

:47:03.:47:05.

England before going further north and east. The best of the sunshine

:47:06.:47:10.

into the afternoon for Scotland and north-east England but in the

:47:11.:47:14.

sunshine still quite chilly, forsix. Milder in the south-west with the

:47:15.:47:18.

cloud and rain, up to ten in Plymouth. For the week ahead, and

:47:19.:47:23.

unsettled week, bands of rain will become quite slow moving across the

:47:24.:47:27.

UK and later in the week some bigger areas of low pressure will spread

:47:28.:47:31.

windy weather our weight. Next week is looking unsettled, a change in

:47:32.:47:35.

the weather compared to recent weeks -- Alleway. Very windy later in the

:47:36.:47:41.

week but it will also be mild -- our way. Not too much frost. That's the

:47:42.:47:43.

latest weather. To you two. Unsettled but getting warmer. --

:47:44.:47:47.

back to you two. cooking We're back with

:47:48.:47:55.

the headlines at 8am. First, let's get all the latest

:47:56.:47:57.

technology news with Spencer Kelly We've long fantasised

:47:58.:48:01.

about the possibility But it was only in 1995

:48:02.:48:19.

that we actually found the first Of course they are,

:48:20.:48:26.

they're relatively tiny. And so far they've mainly been

:48:27.:48:40.

detected indirectly, either by the incredibly slight

:48:41.:48:42.

dimming of a star's light as the planet moves in front of it,

:48:43.:48:45.

or by the wobble of the star In the last 20 years we've detected

:48:46.:48:49.

about 2000 exoplanets, but we haven't actually seen

:48:50.:48:53.

many at all. Well, the planets are very,

:48:54.:48:55.

very faint compared to a star The kind planets where we might find

:48:56.:49:03.

life, an earthlike planet orbiting a star, would be 10 billion times

:49:04.:49:12.

fainter than a star. But if you can see the planets,

:49:13.:49:14.

you can start to look for evidence What you need is something to block

:49:15.:49:18.

out the light of a star. Due to go into space

:49:19.:49:24.

in the middle of the next decade, it is a crazy-sounding thing that

:49:25.:49:36.

can be flown in between a space telescope and the star to precisely

:49:37.:49:40.

block out the star's light It'll be a few tens of metres

:49:41.:49:44.

in diameter, and in order to block out just the light from that distant

:49:45.:49:55.

star, it'll need to be about 40,000 kilometres

:49:56.:50:01.

away from the telescope. And this is not even

:50:02.:50:04.

the maddest part of the scheme. The star shade won't

:50:05.:50:07.

fit in a rocket. And that's why a big part

:50:08.:50:12.

of the work being done here at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory,

:50:13.:50:18.

in Pasadena, and the beautiful solution they've come up with,

:50:19.:50:23.

is all about fitting the thing into a tight space and then

:50:24.:50:26.

unfurling it once in space. And the inspiration

:50:27.:50:29.

comes from origami. At the end you can see how large

:50:30.:50:31.

an area you can fill with such But this is only the half of it

:50:32.:50:54.

because you have petals Yes, exactly.

:50:55.:51:00.

Oh, my goodness. This cardboard model is the latest

:51:01.:51:03.

test to make sure the shade can unfurl perfectly

:51:04.:51:03.

when it's all alone. The flower shape blocks out

:51:04.:51:09.

the light better than a circle, and those outer petals need to be

:51:10.:51:16.

made to an accuracy This sounds like we want

:51:17.:51:19.

to spot some planets, We're going to put a shade in space

:51:20.:51:30.

and we're going to fire Yeah, but what's really cool

:51:31.:51:35.

about that if there is this insane concept of how you're

:51:36.:51:43.

going to fly this massive shade so far away, 40,000

:51:44.:51:46.

kilometres away from the telescope, but once you start breaking it down

:51:47.:51:49.

into little problems, you start testing and build a petal,

:51:50.:51:51.

you build the truss, you build the shield,

:51:52.:51:54.

you realise piece by piece what engineering needs to go

:51:55.:52:09.

in to that problem to solve it. So we just break it down into little

:52:10.:52:12.

problems that we can solve Yeah, and isn't that

:52:13.:52:16.

a great motto for life? Take an impossible problem and break

:52:17.:52:19.

it down into more possible chunks. I love the fact that at JPL you can

:52:20.:52:23.

just wander into a random room and it is called something like

:52:24.:52:27.

the Extreme Terrain Mobility lab. They're making robots to cope

:52:28.:52:30.

with extreme terrain. This is Axel, which is a robot

:52:31.:52:33.

with a pair of wheels that can be These are the prototype

:52:34.:52:37.

is for the Mars rovers Of course the point about robots

:52:38.:52:42.

is they can do things that humans might want to do but in places that

:52:43.:52:47.

humans can't go. All of these have fairly familiar

:52:48.:52:50.

designs, wheels here, But Kate Russell has found one

:52:51.:52:52.

that looks like nothing In 2012 the world watched

:52:53.:52:56.

with baited breath as Nasa deployed a rover on the surface of Mars

:52:57.:53:02.

using a sky crane. This kind of science

:53:03.:53:09.

is incredibly expensive. The rover weighed 900 kilograms,

:53:10.:53:11.

as much of a full grown giraffe. But the equipment required to land

:53:12.:53:15.

it gently had to be able to take It would have been much cheaper

:53:16.:53:21.

if Curiosity was lightweight, came flat-packed and was sturdy

:53:22.:53:32.

enough just to be dropped Meet Super Ball, a tensgrity robot

:53:33.:53:35.

in development to Nasa Ames. This lightweight sphere-like matrix

:53:36.:53:43.

can be packed down flat, taking up minimal space in a rocket

:53:44.:53:48.

and vastly reducing launch costs. Because of the unique structure

:53:49.:53:52.

of this robot and the fact that it can deform and reform itself

:53:53.:53:55.

and take massive impacts, eventually Nasa will be able

:53:56.:53:58.

to literally throw it at the surface of a planet and its scientific

:53:59.:54:01.

payload in the middle Once deployed, Super Ball can handle

:54:02.:54:04.

much rougher terrains then a rover, rolling right over obstacles

:54:05.:54:19.

and up and down hills. Tendon wires connecting the struts

:54:20.:54:25.

spool in and out to create momentum, in much the same way

:54:26.:54:29.

as flexing your muscles If it bumps into anything solid,

:54:30.:54:31.

it'll just bounce back. It should even be able to survive

:54:32.:54:35.

falling off a cliff. The next step for Super Ball

:54:36.:54:38.

is to redesign the robot such that it can actually survive

:54:39.:54:41.

at least a one-storey drop. You can expect to see a system

:54:42.:54:44.

like this on an actual Nasa mission Over at JPL, they are

:54:45.:54:48.

working on limbed robots. It's research spawned from the DARPA

:54:49.:54:59.

Robotics Challenge where teams competed to create highly mobile

:55:00.:55:03.

and dextrous robots that can move, explore and build things

:55:04.:55:06.

without human intervention. The plan for King Louis is to be

:55:07.:55:14.

sent into space to build stuff with visual codes a bit

:55:15.:55:18.

like QR codes to guide it. We know what we are putting

:55:19.:55:21.

together so we put signposts onto all the bits and pieces

:55:22.:55:31.

of the structure we are putting together, that tell

:55:32.:55:34.

the robot a few things. Most importantly, it tells

:55:35.:55:36.

the robot where those things it is manipulating are in space,

:55:37.:55:39.

literally and figuratively, The codes will also include

:55:40.:55:41.

construction information like which bits go together and how

:55:42.:55:46.

much torque to apply to a bolt. This will allow robots to work

:55:47.:55:50.

autonomously in teams, building space stations or planetary

:55:51.:55:56.

habitats faster and more economically than

:55:57.:55:57.

previously possible. But Nasa hasn't completely given up

:55:58.:55:59.

on our four-wheeled space helpers. Here we've tried to develop

:56:00.:56:07.

new kinds of robots This robot, for example,

:56:08.:56:09.

is called K-Rex. It's one of our main research robots

:56:10.:56:18.

that we develop and test here This is a large play area

:56:19.:56:22.

for robots, a proving ground that we use to really try to develop

:56:23.:56:26.

things like navigation So, the biggest question

:56:27.:56:29.

perhaps of the day for me, Let's have you do that.

:56:30.:56:34.

Yes! Now lots of you think we Click

:56:35.:56:38.

reporters have the best jobs in the world, but after spending

:56:39.:56:42.

a day at the roverscape testing ground, I think there is another

:56:43.:56:45.

contender for that title. Hello and welcome

:56:46.:56:54.

to the Week in Tech. I've had some really engaging

:56:55.:57:12.

virtual reality experiences. One of them simply set in an office,

:57:13.:57:14.

but it seems if you are entering at VR world, you might as well go

:57:15.:57:18.

somewhere really That's where Home: A VR

:57:19.:57:21.

Spacewalk takes you. Inspired by Nasa's training

:57:22.:57:24.

programme, it aims to bring After getting used to your

:57:25.:57:26.

new surroundings, you undertake Whilst enjoying views of Earth

:57:27.:57:39.

from afar, a friendly hand from a fellow astronaut helps to get

:57:40.:57:42.

you on your way. I feel a strange sense of safety

:57:43.:57:45.

there is another astronaut here. The BBC commissioned

:57:46.:57:50.

the experience last year, as its first steps into the world

:57:51.:57:52.

of virtual reality content. We've taken all the storytelling

:57:53.:57:56.

power of the BBC and applied that behind it, so there's a great

:57:57.:57:59.

script, a great narrative and then we've looked at all the cutting edge

:58:00.:58:03.

explorations people are doing around VR, in terms of bio-monitoring,

:58:04.:58:06.

haptic feedback etc etc and trying to bring that into it as a massive

:58:07.:58:10.

piece of learning really. My preview here on the HTC Vive saw

:58:11.:58:15.

it set up with a chair providing haptic feedback and a heart rate

:58:16.:58:22.

monitor which resulted in my being sent back to base

:58:23.:58:24.

if readings went too high. But apparently I'm

:58:25.:58:27.

very calm in space. In March it will be released

:58:28.:58:33.

for Vive on Steam as well as Oculus. Oh, goodness!

:58:34.:58:37.

I feel most disorientated! Wow, the depth of it

:58:38.:58:47.

I think was the thing You really got a sense

:58:48.:58:50.

of being up high, seeing things It took a while to get grips

:58:51.:59:06.

with what I was meant to be doing, but just the fact that I was moving

:59:07.:59:11.

around within space Whilst it wasn't possible to create

:59:12.:59:14.

a sense of weightlessness, the pictures were amazing,

:59:15.:59:17.

but obviously, I can't vouch for how This is Breakfast,

:59:18.:59:20.

with Charlie Stayt and Steph The veteran actor Sir John

:59:21.:00:06.

Hurt has died aged 77. He appeared in 200 films

:00:07.:00:10.

and television productions and was twice nominated

:00:11.:00:12.

for an Oscar. Good morning, it's

:00:13.:00:33.

Saturday, 28th January. Donald Trump and Theresa May

:00:34.:00:34.

pledge their commitment I think you are also, Theresa,

:00:35.:00:42.

and I can often tell how I get along with somebody very early

:00:43.:00:52.

and I believe we'll After a spate of accidents,

:00:53.:00:55.

a call for lorry drivers to be banned from using satnavs

:00:56.:01:00.

designed for cars. In sport, a let off

:01:01.:01:05.

for the Premier League champions. Leicester City were four minutes

:01:06.:01:08.

from being knocked out of the FA Cup by Derby County, but Wes Morgan

:01:09.:01:11.

earns them a replay. It's not as cold as it has

:01:12.:01:23.

been over recent days, but we've got rain to contend

:01:24.:01:27.

with today and it is still cold enough for some of that

:01:28.:01:31.

range of four as snow A full forecast in

:01:32.:01:34.

the next half-hour. He was 77 and had recently

:01:35.:01:37.

been battling cancer. He starred in around 200 films,

:01:38.:01:43.

including Harry Potter, and was nominated for an Oscar

:01:44.:01:45.

for his roles in The Elephant Man Our correspondent

:01:46.:01:49.

Nick Higham reports. Everything seemed to

:01:50.:01:51.

come to a head today. John Hurt as political

:01:52.:01:57.

diarist Alan Clark. Both my black teeth have

:01:58.:01:59.

disintegrated into blackened Not a nice man, but surprisingly

:02:00.:02:01.

sympathetic - a complex character John Hurt played with

:02:02.:02:13.

such ease and subtlety. His talent was spotted early

:02:14.:02:15.

in a succession of leading stage His first big breakthrough came

:02:16.:02:18.

in 1966 in A Man For All Seasons. A small part, but in a high profile,

:02:19.:02:26.

Oscar-winning film. A few years later he was starring

:02:27.:02:35.

opposite Richard Attenborough in 10 He played the illiterate

:02:36.:02:39.

Timothy Evans, wrongly hanged. On television he was the mad

:02:40.:02:42.

Roman Emperor in I, Claudius. And then came

:02:43.:02:45.

The Naked Civil Servant. I wear rouge and mascara

:02:46.:02:57.

on my eyelashes, I dye my hair Many people said, don't do that,

:02:58.:03:00.

you will never work again. But I said it wasn't

:03:01.:03:11.

about being homosexual, it was about the tenderness

:03:12.:03:14.

of the individual as opposed to the cruelty

:03:15.:03:17.

of the crowd. He earned an Oscar nomination

:03:18.:03:19.

for Midnight Express in which he played a heroin addict

:03:20.:03:21.

in a Turkish prison. And there was another Oscar

:03:22.:03:25.

nomination for his performance as the hideously

:03:26.:03:27.

disfigured John Merrick His lined and weathered face meant

:03:28.:03:29.

he was perfect in the film 1984 as George Orwell's reluctant

:03:30.:03:41.

rebel, Winston Smith. He accepted all the film

:03:42.:03:44.

and television parts he was offered, though that meant stage appearances

:03:45.:03:48.

like this were rare. That's something no

:03:49.:03:51.

one can advise you on. He played Stephen Ward,

:03:52.:03:58.

society schemer and later victim I could do wonders

:03:59.:04:00.

with you, little baby. Late in his career he made a guest

:04:01.:04:03.

appearance in Doctor Who. Why are you pointing your

:04:04.:04:08.

screwdrivers like that? Few actors were busier,

:04:09.:04:11.

almost 200 screen roles along. Few actors were as

:04:12.:04:14.

reliably and engagingly Donald Trump and Theresa May have

:04:15.:04:16.

vowed to renew the special relationship between

:04:17.:04:27.

their two countries. The two leaders also

:04:28.:04:38.

stressed their commitment to Nato Theresa May urged the US not to lift

:04:39.:04:48.

sanctions against Russia. The US president is due to speak to

:04:49.:04:54.

Vladimir Putin today. I will be representing the American people

:04:55.:04:58.

very strongly and forcefully and if we have a great relationship with

:04:59.:05:02.

Russia and other countries and if we go after Isis together, which has to

:05:03.:05:08.

be stopped, that an evil that has to be stopped, I will consider that a

:05:09.:05:11.

good thing, not a bad thing. President Trump has announced

:05:12.:05:16.

stringent controls on immigration which would keep what he called

:05:17.:05:19.

radical Islamic terrorists out of the US. Earlier we asked David

:05:20.:05:24.

Willis to give us more details. Donald Trump vowed in his

:05:25.:05:26.

inauguration address to, as he put it, eradicate Islamic

:05:27.:05:28.

terrorism from the face He has now signed an executive

:05:29.:05:31.

order, banning refugees from the country indefinitely,

:05:32.:05:35.

in the case of those from Syria, temporarily in the case

:05:36.:05:39.

of those from other places. Mr Trump believes that terrorists

:05:40.:05:46.

often pose as refugees in order He wants only people allowed

:05:47.:05:49.

in who support America He also announced plans

:05:50.:05:53.

for a temporary ban on issuing visas to citizens from seven

:05:54.:05:59.

predominately Muslim countries that The Senate Minority Leader Chuck

:06:00.:06:02.

Schumer described it as discriminatory and

:06:03.:06:13.

unconstitutional and he said that tears would be running down

:06:14.:06:15.

the cheeks of the Statue of Liberty. America's grand tradition

:06:16.:06:22.

of welcoming immigrants, he said, had been stomped

:06:23.:06:24.

upon by these measures. Theresa May has travelled

:06:25.:06:31.

from Washington to Turkey for talks The talks are expected

:06:32.:06:33.

to focus on trade and security but she's facing pressure to discuss

:06:34.:06:37.

concerns about alleged human rights A growing number of Labour MPs have

:06:38.:06:40.

said they will defy Jeremy Corbyn and vote against triggering

:06:41.:06:46.

the formal process to leave the EU. Yesterday, a member of his

:06:47.:06:50.

shadow cabinet resigned Our political correspondent

:06:51.:06:52.

Ellie Price is in our It is worth reminding people, if you

:06:53.:07:06.

are a party leader that means MPs have to do what you say? Unless!

:07:07.:07:12.

Unless, and that's where it all gets messy for Jeremy Corbyn. Yesterday

:07:13.:07:16.

Joe Stevens, the Shadow Secretary, decided to quit the front bench. She

:07:17.:07:21.

says she thinks wrecks it's a terrible mistake. Also,

:07:22.:07:26.

intriguingly, we found out that two of the party's Witts said they would

:07:27.:07:30.

vote in defiance of triggering Article 50. -- whips. Interesting is

:07:31.:07:39.

that the whip's job is to enforce party discipline. Jeremy Corbyn

:07:40.:07:42.

struck a conciliatory tone when speaking to Joe Stevens, saying he

:07:43.:07:46.

understood the majority of Labour MPs from pro-Remain constituencies

:07:47.:07:52.

would be understandably torn, but he is a difficult position as he needs

:07:53.:07:57.

strike an obvious role for Labour in what its position should be on

:07:58.:08:01.

Brexit. He himself we understand is not that bothered about staying in

:08:02.:08:05.

EU himself. And clearly the party also have to Mac by-elections in the

:08:06.:08:11.

coming weeks. -- two. Both of those constituencies are very pro-Leave

:08:12.:08:16.

areas. Is a difficult decisions on Jeremy Corbyn about how hard she

:08:17.:08:20.

could come down on those MPs who may justify him.

:08:21.:08:22.

And we will be getting reaction from Labour's shadow international

:08:23.:08:27.

trade secretary Barry Gardiner in about 15 minutes time.

:08:28.:08:29.

International help has been arriving in Chile to help the country fight

:08:30.:08:32.

So far, 11 people have died and 1,500 homes have been destroyed.

:08:33.:08:37.

Our correspondent Greg Dawson has more.

:08:38.:08:41.

Beneath the rising plumes of smoke you get a sense of the scale

:08:42.:08:44.

of what is now one of the biggest emergencies in this country's

:08:45.:08:48.

Forests incinerated, towns destroyed and lives lost.

:08:49.:08:57.

The fire service is so overwhelmed that residents elect protecting

:08:58.:09:00.

their homes with hose pipes and bottles of water.

:09:01.:09:11.

More than 100 fires are still raging, aided by high winds

:09:12.:09:14.

With services overstretched, teams of firefighters have arrived

:09:15.:09:20.

from Colombia and Mexico has also provide reinforcements.

:09:21.:09:24.

Earlier in the week the world's largest firefighting plane

:09:25.:09:26.

Now Russia is sending a similar aircraft.

:09:27.:09:30.

The damage has left thousands without a home and many

:09:31.:09:32.

forced into temporary shelters, like the school.

:09:33.:09:34.

Others are sleeping in vehicles, clinging to what they have

:09:35.:09:37.

But on Friday came a reminder of those who've lost much more.

:09:38.:09:40.

Funerals were held for a firefighter and policeman, both killed

:09:41.:09:43.

At least ten people are now known to have died,

:09:44.:09:48.

but with so few of these fires under control it's a number

:09:49.:09:51.

that is likely to keep rising in the coming days.

:09:52.:10:00.

Just one other story. The UK's 2017 Eurovision entry has been decided.

:10:01.:10:07.

Former X-Factor contestant Lucie Jones will represent

:10:08.:10:18.

the country in Kiev, in May, with the song

:10:19.:10:21.

It was written by a former Eurovision winner.

:10:22.:10:27.

Lucie was chosen after winning the combined public and jury vote

:10:28.:10:32.

at the end of a live TV show, in which six singers performed.

:10:33.:10:36.

All of the potential acts were former X-Factor contestants.

:10:37.:10:40.

We will see how she gets on. Good luck to her.

:10:41.:10:49.

Tradition has not been good for our contestants, but we wish her well

:10:50.:10:50.

regardless. It is just coming up to 7:11am.

:10:51.:10:59.

Theresa May's visit was seen as something of a diplomatic coup. But

:11:00.:11:04.

with the press conference out of the way, will not attend be pleased with

:11:05.:11:09.

the outcome of the trip? Here is a recap of some of the key moments.

:11:10.:11:14.

Attention! This is the original, folks. The original in many ways. It

:11:15.:11:26.

is a great honour to have Winston Churchill back. Today the United

:11:27.:11:34.

States reviews our deep wand with Britain, military, financial,

:11:35.:11:37.

cultural, and political. -- deep bond. We pledge our lasting support

:11:38.:11:43.

to this most special relationship. On defence and security operation we

:11:44.:11:50.

are united in our recognition of Nato as the bullwork of our

:11:51.:11:53.

collective defence and today we reaffirmed our unshakeable

:11:54.:11:56.

commitment to this alliance. I think Brexit will be a wonderful thing for

:11:57.:11:59.

your country. I have been listening to the president and he has been

:12:00.:12:03.

listening to me. That's the point of having a conversation and dialogue

:12:04.:12:07.

will stop I can often tell how I will get on with someone early and I

:12:08.:12:11.

believe we will have a fantastic relation ship. -- relationship.

:12:12.:12:17.

The Labour Peer and former foreign policy advisor to Gordon Brown,

:12:18.:12:20.

Lord Wood, is in our London newsroom for us.

:12:21.:12:23.

Overall, how do you think the meeting went? Do you think Number 10

:12:24.:12:28.

will be happy? I think they will be pretty happy. It was difficult for

:12:29.:12:32.

Theresa May the course she had to walk a fine line. She had to show

:12:33.:12:36.

Britain was a close friend of the US, but she didn't necessarily want

:12:37.:12:40.

to show that she was going to be the best friend of Donald Trump because

:12:41.:12:43.

he is a controversial figure, coming out with decisions that don't go

:12:44.:12:47.

down well in her party, let alone the rest of the country. I thought

:12:48.:12:50.

the balance was struck pretty well, except the last picture of them

:12:51.:12:54.

holding hands and walking down the steps. I think that was pretty -- a

:12:55.:12:59.

little more on the Chinese side and something they might regret down the

:13:00.:13:03.

line. -- chummy. Do you think that might ruffle feathers? I think the

:13:04.:13:08.

next time Donald Trump says something controversial, he has

:13:09.:13:12.

announcements today on banning refugees from Muslim countries

:13:13.:13:16.

coming in, that will cause controversy here. I think that

:13:17.:13:19.

picture will get relayed a little too often for Theresa May's team's

:13:20.:13:33.

liking. I think apart from that of security and trade issues, the press

:13:34.:13:36.

conference went pretty well. I think her speech went down reasonably

:13:37.:13:39.

well, although some people disagree with the content of it. Until that

:13:40.:13:44.

last picture writing she was walking that line reasonably well. Looking

:13:45.:13:49.

at some of the specifics, especially one of the big wines was about Nato

:13:50.:13:53.

and Theresa May saying that Trump had confirmed he was 100% behind

:13:54.:13:58.

Nato. How important are you think that was? It was important not just

:13:59.:14:03.

for Theresa May to get Donald Trump to commit to Nato, and she quoted

:14:04.:14:07.

him in the press conference something he said in a meeting, I

:14:08.:14:11.

think it was important to be the leader to be the one who got Donald

:14:12.:14:15.

Trump to come back from the more maverick position he was sharing

:14:16.:14:18.

before. She showed she could bring the US back into line and suddenly

:14:19.:14:23.

behind Nato, citing they will be pleased about -- with that. On trade

:14:24.:14:28.

she pushed far that there will be a trade deal for the US and that's

:14:29.:14:32.

important with Brexit. So those core issues I think she got what she

:14:33.:14:38.

wanted. You yourself were working with Gordon Brown when he met

:14:39.:14:41.

president will shut President Obama. How much preparation goes into these

:14:42.:14:47.

meetings? How much goes on behind the scenes? The huge amount. There

:14:48.:14:55.

have been a couple of weeks of negotiation and discussion. The

:14:56.:14:59.

United States administration has dozens of people, the British

:15:00.:15:03.

government has fewer people. The British ambassador will be important

:15:04.:15:06.

in working things out, but the choreography is important, where you

:15:07.:15:10.

stand for that picture. The picture of Theresa May and Donald Trump,

:15:11.:15:15.

with the Churchill bust, that will be the key big debate wanted. There

:15:16.:15:20.

are many negotiations about the press conference as they have, who

:15:21.:15:24.

will ask the questions and these things require a huge amount of

:15:25.:15:27.

effort and patience. But also you have to lobby hard on the British

:15:28.:15:31.

side to get what you want. When you are actually there, is there ever a

:15:32.:15:35.

moment where they get to be by themselves? There is. You walk into

:15:36.:15:40.

the West Wing and everybody stands up, you get show into a room and

:15:41.:15:44.

then the Prime Minister and president, with three or for AIDS

:15:45.:15:51.

have a meeting and then they have some time on the road. This being

:15:52.:15:55.

their first meeting would have been important. -- three or four aides.

:15:56.:16:01.

Then there was a lunch, with President Obama in our case, in the

:16:02.:16:06.

east Wing. That's a much more private occasion where everybody

:16:07.:16:10.

else is shut out. There is time between the two of them and I think

:16:11.:16:14.

the chemistry thing is over rated. I don't think the chemistry between

:16:15.:16:18.

the two is much less important than the solid relationship between the

:16:19.:16:23.

governments and teams. But in crises and chemistry can make a difference,

:16:24.:16:28.

so it is important to get a relationship established.

:16:29.:16:29.

Interesting. Thank you. Here's Chris with a look

:16:30.:16:32.

at this morning's weather. hello to both of you and to you at

:16:33.:16:43.

home. It was a week that saw some really nasty frost around, some

:16:44.:16:47.

dense fog causing problems at the airport but the thaw is really

:16:48.:16:51.

setting in today. Not ask for most parts but we have some wet weather

:16:52.:16:55.

on our hands today. A band of rain pushing in and we are seeing snow in

:16:56.:17:02.

the cold air in the high ground of Scotland. There is the scope for

:17:03.:17:12.

some icy stretches first thing. Through the rest of the day the rain

:17:13.:17:16.

will be reluctant to clear from the north and east but in southern Wales

:17:17.:17:19.

and southern counties we should see an improvement with the weather, as

:17:20.:17:23.

we'll see some bright skies and a scattering of showers this

:17:24.:17:26.

afternoon. Quite breezy, nine in London this afternoon. Relatively

:17:27.:17:32.

mild compared to the week just gone. In Northern Ireland, brightening up

:17:33.:17:36.

quite nicely in the afternoon, a few showers in western counties. Rain

:17:37.:17:40.

reluctant to clear away in Scotland and it will remain quite cold,

:17:41.:17:44.

around four. Overnight there's the risk of icy stretches in parts of

:17:45.:17:48.

the north of the UK as temperatures fall awake. Pockets of frost

:17:49.:17:53.

developing in the countryside but towards the south-west we should see

:17:54.:17:56.

temperatures lifting to the end of the night as a weather system

:17:57.:17:59.

approaches and that will bring cloud and rain the rest of the night. A

:18:00.:18:04.

damp start for Wales and south-west England, a sunny start for many

:18:05.:18:07.

northern and eastern areas of England, Northern Ireland and

:18:08.:18:10.

Scotland but we will see this area of rain go north and east. Turning

:18:11.:18:14.

wet in Northern Ireland, the rain getting into northern England,

:18:15.:18:17.

across the Midlands to East Anglia and the south-east towards the of

:18:18.:18:20.

the date. The best of the sunshine in Scotland where it will be still

:18:21.:18:25.

quite chilly, and looking at the week ahead the Atlantic finally

:18:26.:18:29.

wakes up and we will see a number of weather systems coming our way next

:18:30.:18:33.

week. On the weather menu things will turn unsettled with spells of

:18:34.:18:38.

rain for many of the days. It will be quite windy, especially later in

:18:39.:18:44.

the week with severe gales but also it is expected to be mild with

:18:45.:18:51.

temperatures into the double figures especially in the south-west. That's

:18:52.:18:52.

the weather. Back to you two. Thanks, Chris. We will see you in a

:18:53.:18:55.

bit. It's seven months since the UK voted

:18:56.:18:59.

to leave the European Union but the Labour Party appears

:19:00.:19:02.

to still be conflicted over how Jeremy Corbyn is trying to force

:19:03.:19:05.

MPs to back the bill triggering the formal

:19:06.:19:09.

process to leave the EU. But a growing number have said

:19:10.:19:11.

they intend to rebel. Yesterday a member of his

:19:12.:19:14.

shadow cabinet resigned Labour's shadow international trade

:19:15.:19:16.

secretary Barry Gardiner joins us Thank you very much for your time

:19:17.:19:26.

this morning. This is turning into a real headache for Jeremy Corbyn?

:19:27.:19:31.

Brexit I think is a headache. Half the country wants to remain, half

:19:32.:19:36.

the country wants to leave. I myself voted to remain, my constituency

:19:37.:19:42.

voted to remain and yet I think as politicians in a democracy you have

:19:43.:19:45.

to accept that the democratic will of the people was that we will

:19:46.:19:50.

leave. I think that is what we in the shadow cabinet have tried to put

:19:51.:19:54.

forward this week to the party and say, look, we have to respect that,

:19:55.:20:00.

that means we have to vote on the second reading of this bill to

:20:01.:20:05.

trigger Article 50. But your MPs to respect what Mr Corbyn has said

:20:06.:20:08.

because they're not following their orders. This is an instruction,

:20:09.:20:12.

isn't it? Let's be clear about this, in the way politics works, it's

:20:13.:20:17.

worth being clear about this, you're not asking or questing, Jeremy

:20:18.:20:22.

Corbyn is telling his MPs how they should vote -- requesting. What a

:20:23.:20:27.

number are saying is no, we don't respect you, we respect the views of

:20:28.:20:31.

our constituents more. No, look, it's not about respecting Jeremy

:20:32.:20:36.

Corbyn. It was the shadow cabinet that arrived at the decision about

:20:37.:20:41.

how we would vote on Article 50. But let's be clear, there are two very

:20:42.:20:48.

tough competing principles here. One is the respect for democracy, the

:20:49.:20:51.

fact that the whole of the country decided in that referendum that we

:20:52.:20:57.

should actually leave the European Union. And the other is that in each

:20:58.:21:04.

constituency a Member of Parliament feels a deep loyalty to their

:21:05.:21:07.

constituents to represent their constituents. This is not easy

:21:08.:21:12.

stuff. This is not about," Do I want to do what the leader's telling me?"

:21:13.:21:17.

This is actually members of Parliament grappling with a very

:21:18.:21:21.

complex issue which the country itself is divided on. Sorry to

:21:22.:21:26.

interrupt, help us with your personal decision then. Just to be

:21:27.:21:32.

clear to people, your an MP but the area you represent voted 60/40 in

:21:33.:21:38.

favour of Remain, I think that's correct? 58/42 actually. You have

:21:39.:21:43.

chosen to ignore what they want and follow the party line? Know I

:21:44.:21:47.

haven't. It's not about ignoring anybody. What it's about saying is,

:21:48.:21:54.

look, it's very easy if you're on the fringes of British politics, if

:21:55.:22:00.

you're a LibDem saying," Oh, well, we're just going to focus on the 48%

:22:01.:22:04.

of the country who want to remain in the European Union and therefore

:22:05.:22:08.

come what may that's what we're going to do". Or if you're on the

:22:09.:22:13.

other side, you get all the government's position, we're going

:22:14.:22:17.

to focus on immigration as the issue and side with the 52% and let your

:22:18.:22:22.

immigration policy drive your economic policy. It's very easy to

:22:23.:22:27.

adopt those very winged as Asians. The Labour Party actually has many

:22:28.:22:31.

people in it who are in seats where people actually voted to leave the

:22:32.:22:36.

European Union when they themselves were campaigning to remain. --

:22:37.:22:40.

positions. There are others in the opposite situation. We are a much

:22:41.:22:45.

more differentiated party and in that sense we actually represent the

:22:46.:22:49.

views of the British people much more because actually we contain

:22:50.:22:53.

both the Remainers and the levers in almost equal numbers. That's why

:22:54.:22:57.

we're trying to bring all of the country together and say, look, we

:22:58.:23:03.

accept that the Democratic position from the referendum voted to leave

:23:04.:23:07.

and therefore we will respect that. Can I just ask you... We will then

:23:08.:23:11.

try and shake that through the amendments we're tabling so that we

:23:12.:23:15.

ensure the eventual decision about what the shape of leaving looks like

:23:16.:23:21.

after those negotiations, that we have a meaningful vote about that in

:23:22.:23:25.

parliament. -- shape that. Can I just be clear on one thing, sorry,

:23:26.:23:30.

in relation to the vote and those that choose to go against the wishes

:23:31.:23:34.

of Jeremy Corbyn and the shadow cabinet, should they face any kind

:23:35.:23:39.

of sanction? It is such an odd word to use but they are free to do it?

:23:40.:23:44.

Will there be a consequence for anyone that goes against the wishes

:23:45.:23:47.

of the shadow cabinet? The discipline within the party is a

:23:48.:23:52.

matter for the Chief Whip. What do you think?

:23:53.:23:57.

My own view is actually people like Joe, people like Tulip has made

:23:58.:24:02.

incredibly difficult decisions, principled decisions, and we must

:24:03.:24:06.

respect the fact that they've done that. They have imposed the sanction

:24:07.:24:10.

on themselves by resigning their positions from the front bench and

:24:11.:24:15.

from the shadow cabinet. That's something that no end he would do

:24:16.:24:20.

lightly. I think we have to respect the fact that members of Parliament

:24:21.:24:25.

in all different constituencies have to struggle with their conscience on

:24:26.:24:29.

this issue and that is about a competing principle of democracy and

:24:30.:24:36.

the principle of representing your constituents. Different MPs will

:24:37.:24:39.

have to make their own minds up about that. That's why it said tough

:24:40.:24:44.

job and that's why I have absolute respect both for Tube it and indeed

:24:45.:24:48.

for Joe in the way they've handled this. They haven't been moaning,

:24:49.:24:52.

they have simply said I understand the position of the shadow cabinet

:24:53.:24:55.

and I understand why the Labour Party has said we will respect the

:24:56.:24:59.

wish of the British people to leave the European Union even though we

:25:00.:25:03.

were against it in principle and campaigned against it. But we will

:25:04.:25:11.

not be able to reconcile that with our own conscience and therefore

:25:12.:25:14.

we're stepping down. I respect them making that tough decision. We

:25:15.:25:16.

apologise for interruptions, tied for time, thank you for your time

:25:17.:25:22.

this morning, Barry Gardiner, the Shadow Secretary of state for trade.

:25:23.:25:27.

Talking about those voting against in the shadow cabinet.

:25:28.:25:30.

Waxwings, redwings and fieldfares are just some of the more unusual

:25:31.:25:33.

birds that might be taking up residence in our gardens thanks

:25:34.:25:36.

to a harsh winter in Russia and Scandinavia.

:25:37.:25:39.

They are among the species the RSPB will be hoping people spot

:25:40.:25:45.

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to get

:25:46.:25:49.

out their binoculars and fill up their feeders this weekend

:25:50.:25:52.

to take part in one of the world's largest wildlife surveys

:25:53.:25:55.

Over half a million people took part in 2016 with more than 8 million

:25:56.:26:06.

birds counted. The house sparrow was the most common bird in 2016 with

:26:07.:26:12.

61% of the UK's Gardens containing them. Since the first ever Big

:26:13.:26:19.

Garden Birdwatch there have been some changes with an 80% drop of

:26:20.:26:26.

starlings per garden since 1979 and an increase of blue tips by 15%. The

:26:27.:26:32.

wood pigeon has seen the biggest jump, being seen in ten times as

:26:33.:26:38.

many gardens last year compared to 1979. These are the birds we're

:26:39.:26:43.

being told to look out for this year. A harsh winter in Russia and

:26:44.:26:48.

Scandinavia is expected to cause more unusual birds to come to the UK

:26:49.:26:51.

to enjoy our berry crop. Richard Bashford from

:26:52.:26:54.

the RSPB joins us now Good morning. First up, massive

:26:55.:27:03.

respect for the shirt because it has parrots on it. Down to my daughter

:27:04.:27:08.

Molly. I don't think you would see them in our gardens. No. Tell them

:27:09.:27:14.

about how this bird watch works in our gardens? It's a very simple

:27:15.:27:19.

event, it's been going on for 38 years, it's simple because it only

:27:20.:27:23.

takes an hour, if you got a busy weekend, sit down with a cup of tea,

:27:24.:27:27.

count the birds in your garden and send the results to the RSPB and

:27:28.:27:31.

that's it. It is something people can get involved in and it makes a

:27:32.:27:41.

big difference to you? Because it's quite straightforward, we're talking

:27:42.:27:43.

about familiar birds, blackbirds, house sparrows, starlings and

:27:44.:27:46.

Robbins, these are the birds people know and if enough people take part,

:27:47.:27:50.

we get the results and that tells us over 30 years how birds like how

:27:51.:27:55.

starlings and sparrows have been doing. So far, you've been doing it

:27:56.:28:00.

for many years, have you got patterns of which birds are doing

:28:01.:28:05.

best? Those we are seeing less of? There's been quite a lot of changes.

:28:06.:28:10.

Most concern to the RSPB are things like starlings, which we think of...

:28:11.:28:14.

You take them for granted but starlings have declined by three

:28:15.:28:18.

quarters in that time period and house sparrows by more than half.

:28:19.:28:23.

There are some areas, some of our big urban areas don't have house

:28:24.:28:27.

sparrows, or very few. On the plus side there's birds like the

:28:28.:28:31.

goldfinch moving in and we're putting out some wonderful food in

:28:32.:28:36.

our gardens and things like goldfinches are coming into enjoy

:28:37.:28:39.

that. Tell us more about those unusual birds like the waxwings,

:28:40.:28:46.

what do they look like? Well, yeah. There's certain birds, the waxwings

:28:47.:28:51.

in particular... You can see one there as you're speaking. Dramatic,

:28:52.:28:55.

exotic looking thing, these actually come from the East. We are talking

:28:56.:29:01.

Scandinavia, Russia. If there is no berries in the winter, this is what

:29:02.:29:06.

they feed on predominantly in the winter, they'll come to our lovely

:29:07.:29:10.

winter climate, which is a lot warmer than were therefrom and

:29:11.:29:13.

that's what's happened this year. They come to Gardens. We plant a lot

:29:14.:29:24.

of very plants and that's a real bonus for people coming to count

:29:25.:29:29.

them. If you have any pictures of the birds in your garden then let us

:29:30.:29:31.

know. Thanks, Richard. The RSPB's Big Garden Birdwatch

:29:32.:29:36.

starts today and finishes on Monday. This is Breakfast,

:29:37.:29:41.

with Charlie Stayt and Steph Coming up before 8am,

:29:42.:30:17.

we'll have an update But first, a summary of this

:30:18.:30:22.

morning's main news. He starred in around 200 films

:30:23.:30:26.

including Harry Potter and was nominated for an Oscar

:30:27.:30:32.

for his roles in The Elephant Man Sir John continued working

:30:33.:30:36.

despite being diagnosed Tributes have been

:30:37.:30:41.

pouring in online. Actor Elijah Wood tweeted,

:30:42.:30:53.

saying, "Very sad to hear It was such an honour

:30:54.:30:55.

to have watched you work, US director Mel Brooks said,

:30:56.:31:01.

"No one could have played Actor David Schneider

:31:02.:31:04.

in a tweet has said, "I was in a film with him

:31:05.:31:10.

and he was so mesmerising And Stephen Fry posted this tribute:

:31:11.:31:14.

"What terrible news. As great on the stage,

:31:15.:31:19.

small screen and big. Theresa May and Donald Trump have

:31:20.:31:21.

stressed their commitment to Nato The Prime Minister and

:31:22.:31:30.

the President both reiterated the importance of the special

:31:31.:31:34.

relationship in the first visit of a foreign leader to Washington

:31:35.:31:37.

since Donald Trump's inauguration. Theresa May urged the United States

:31:38.:31:41.

not to lift sanctions against The US President is due to speak

:31:42.:31:44.

to Vladimir Putin today. I will be representing

:31:45.:31:48.

the American people very, very strongly and forcefully

:31:49.:31:53.

and if we have a great relationship with Russia and other

:31:54.:31:56.

countries and if we go after Isis that's an evil that has to be

:31:57.:32:00.

stopped, I will consider that a good Following the trip to Washington,

:32:01.:32:09.

Theresa May is now on her way to Turkey for talks

:32:10.:32:13.

with President Erdogan. The talks are expected to focus

:32:14.:32:15.

on trade and security but she's facing pressure to discuss concerns

:32:16.:32:19.

about alleged human rights Lorry drivers should be

:32:20.:32:21.

banned from using sat navs That's what councils

:32:22.:32:30.

are calling for after a spate of incidents caused by heavy goods

:32:31.:32:33.

vehicles using bridges where they're The Local Government Association

:32:34.:32:36.

wants legislation brought in to make it compulsory for all lorry drivers

:32:37.:32:40.

to use sat-navs specifically A draft letter of abdication

:32:41.:32:44.

from King George III has been The unsent letter,

:32:45.:32:49.

which includes crossings out, redrafts, blotches and scrawls,

:32:50.:32:55.

was written during the American War of Independence, and is one

:32:56.:32:58.

of thousands of his private papers We will be having a more detailed

:32:59.:33:11.

look at some of those documents are little later in the programme.

:33:12.:33:15.

Some brilliant stuff. Those are the main stories. Mike's here. There's

:33:16.:33:23.

so much to talk about. The tennis, of course. And the football.

:33:24.:33:29.

Cracking last night. Derby against Leicester. A reminder, for anyone

:33:30.:33:36.

playing this weekend, be careful what you do on the goal line!

:33:37.:33:39.

Derby went so close to upsetting their neighbours

:33:40.:33:41.

and the Premier League champions Leicester City.

:33:42.:33:47.

as Darren Bent showed why he's a striker.

:33:48.:33:51.

He loves to find the net, but usually not his own.

:33:52.:33:57.

But after this slice of luck for his opponents

:33:58.:33:59.

Bent made amends, popping up again at the right end to make

:34:00.:34:02.

Derby then went ahead before half time, and they held

:34:03.:34:06.

on until with four minutes to go as Leicester equalised

:34:07.:34:08.

through Wes Morgan to force a replay.

:34:09.:34:11.

As I said, proud of the players, to come against champions,

:34:12.:34:22.

Another game against them, I look forward to it.

:34:23.:34:27.

Five Premier League teams are facing lower league sides

:34:28.:34:35.

today, including Liverpool at home to Wolves in the 12:30 kick off.

:34:36.:34:38.

Liverpool's only win in any competition in 2017 so far

:34:39.:34:41.

came when they beat Plymouth Argyle in a third round replay.

:34:42.:34:44.

But Wolves have already knocked out premier league Stoke City.

:34:45.:34:46.

I don't like the results but I see that we are still fighting for each

:34:47.:34:51.

point, for each little victory, for each success.

:34:52.:34:54.

That's what we are doing and that's the job we have to do.

:34:55.:35:01.

I'm absolutely more than OK and look forward

:35:02.:35:03.

Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger won't be in the dug-out

:35:04.:35:10.

for their FA Cup match at Southampton.

:35:11.:35:12.

He's been banned from the touchline for four matches

:35:13.:35:14.

and fined ?25,000 after verbally abusing and pushing

:35:15.:35:16.

an official during last weekend's game against Burnley.

:35:17.:35:23.

Niall McGinn scored two and set up another,

:35:24.:35:25.

as Aberdeen beat Dundee 3-0 in the Scottish Premiership.

:35:26.:35:27.

McGinn's volley on the stroke of half time

:35:28.:35:29.

The win moved Abderdeen above Rangers into second place

:35:30.:35:37.

in the table, but they're still 21 points behind Celtic.

:35:38.:35:48.

There's a real throwback feel to the Australian Open tennis.

:35:49.:35:51.

You have to go back to 2008 to find these four players

:35:52.:35:54.

This morning, Serena Williams takes on her sister Venus

:35:55.:35:59.

and tomorrow's men's decider will be between Roger Federer

:36:00.:36:01.

That's after Nadal spent almost five hours on court yesterday

:36:02.:36:05.

seeing off Grigor Dimitrov, before eventually winning

:36:06.:36:06.

But Nadal hasn't won a major title for three years,

:36:07.:36:10.

We never thought that we have the chance to be again in a final

:36:11.:36:17.

So I think we both worked very hard to be

:36:18.:36:26.

where we are, so it's great and he's great at the game.

:36:27.:36:32.

Great that we are in a moment like this and we have

:36:33.:36:36.

the chance to enjoy a moment like this.

:36:37.:36:38.

And one more line from Melbourne - Britain's Andy Lapthorne lost

:36:39.:36:41.

to Australia's Paralympic champion Dylan Alcott in the quad

:36:42.:36:43.

The Welsh boxer Lee Selby was almost in tears

:36:44.:36:47.

after his IBF featherweight world title defence

:36:48.:36:49.

against Jonathan Victor Barros was called off just a little over

:36:50.:36:52.

24 hours before it was due to take place.

:36:53.:36:55.

The decision was announced on stage just before the weigh-in,

:36:56.:36:58.

American media have reported that Barros had tested

:36:59.:37:02.

Tiger Woods told reporters he was "rusty" after missing

:37:03.:37:09.

the cut in his first competitive tournament for 18 months.

:37:10.:37:12.

He managed a par round, but he was always in peril

:37:13.:37:15.

He said he needed to get more rounds under his belt

:37:16.:37:19.

He's a shot clear of the field on eight-under-par.

:37:20.:37:24.

Whichever Williams sister wins later this morning,

:37:25.:37:26.

they'll have to go a long way to better the celebrations

:37:27.:37:29.

of the pair that won the women's doubles.

:37:30.:37:31.

Bethanie Mattek-Sands and Lucie Safarova,

:37:32.:37:36.

or Team Bucie as they call themselves.

:37:37.:37:40.

I can't see the Murray brothers doing that.

:37:41.:37:58.

Eight miles of fire, freezing water, huge obstacles,

:37:59.:38:05.

It's why thousands are flocking to the West Midlands this weekend,

:38:06.:38:16.

and after 30 years it's the final ever Tough Guy race this weekend.

:38:17.:38:20.

It's led to hundreds of other extreme races being established.

:38:21.:38:24.

There's now even a movie out to explore why so many

:38:25.:38:27.

I've been on the course near Wolverhampton ahead of this

:38:28.:38:31.

It's the end of an era, on a farm in the West Midlands,

:38:32.:38:35.

where for decades people from around the world

:38:36.:38:37.

Pushing their bodies over eight miles to the extreme.

:38:38.:38:49.

But after this weekend there will be no more Tough Guy.

:38:50.:38:52.

It's been a huge part of my life.

:38:53.:38:54.

It'll be a huge part of my life that will cease to be.

:38:55.:39:02.

Hundreds of thousands of people have attempted this Tough Guy

:39:03.:39:05.

But for those doing it this Sunday, it will be the last ever.

:39:06.:39:17.

Behind it all, the man known as Mr Mouse.

:39:18.:39:20.

A former soldier who 30 years ago wanted to add more of a challenge

:39:21.:39:24.

to fun runs, and so reinvented the obstacles.

:39:25.:39:29.

This is mild compared to the electric shocks before.

:39:30.:39:38.

I decided to put people through something that they'd never

:39:39.:39:42.

Fear, pain, claustrophobia - all of the terrible things that

:39:43.:39:46.

They come through and they say, thank you!

:39:47.:39:52.

And you get this medal put around your neck and there's nothing

:39:53.:40:08.

As Mr Mouse now brings the curtain down on this world-famous event,

:40:09.:40:13.

he is the subject of a movie that looks at why people of today

:40:14.:40:17.

willingly pay to experience such pain and suffering.

:40:18.:40:19.

If you can come back with a Flight Club-esque scar

:40:20.:40:24.

on Monday morning and a story that goes with it about

:40:25.:40:32.

running through fire, sounds awesome.

:40:33.:40:33.

Mr Mouse's cultural impact is massive.

:40:34.:40:35.

All of these things have exploded because of Tough Guy.

:40:36.:40:37.

Not many people know about it and I just thought

:40:38.:40:40.

To mark the final Tough Guy, competitors will be joined

:40:41.:40:44.

on the course by the star of the War Horse film.

:40:45.:40:51.

Mr Mouse wants entrants to remember the suffering that was real

:40:52.:40:54.

And thanks to what started here, obstacle racing is now one

:40:55.:40:58.

of the fastest growing sports in the world.

:40:59.:41:09.

It was one degree when we jumped into the water, but nothing compared

:41:10.:41:14.

to what the actual competitors go through tomorrow. The legacy of Mr

:41:15.:41:19.

Mouse. The film explores why people do this. It seems people living,

:41:20.:41:24.

certainly in the first world, obstacles have been removed.

:41:25.:41:28.

Would you do it again? I think it is addictive. By the end,

:41:29.:41:33.

the feeling of euphoria and achievement is second to none.

:41:34.:41:34.

Well done. Thank you. Ghanian-born artist John Akomfrah

:41:35.:41:38.

has spent his career exploring centuries of struggle

:41:39.:41:41.

and persecution experienced by migrants

:41:42.:41:42.

and refugees. He's now won the Artes Mundi,

:41:43.:41:49.

one of the Uk's most prestigious art prizes, for his film

:41:50.:41:55.

which was inspired while he was teaching

:41:56.:41:57.

in Barbados in 2009. This is an art prize that maybe a

:41:58.:42:06.

lot of people haven't heard of, but it looks at not only your current

:42:07.:42:10.

work but your work over a period of time, six or seven years. Yes, what

:42:11.:42:15.

happens with most prices is that I think it is about a specific work.

:42:16.:42:24.

They take a long view of your work and say, OK, what have you done the

:42:25.:42:27.

last five years? You have been looking at migration. Something that

:42:28.:42:33.

caught your attention. Not exclusively, but yes, I've done

:42:34.:42:37.

quite a bit on migration. I'm from one of those families anyway, so

:42:38.:42:41.

it's a subject that's close my heart. Tell us a bit about the film.

:42:42.:42:51.

I did a number of courses across the world and this particular one was in

:42:52.:42:56.

Barbados, where I saw this cemetery which has basically European Jews.

:42:57.:43:04.

It started me thinking about how many people lived and died in

:43:05.:43:09.

different places because they've had to basically run for their lives. So

:43:10.:43:18.

what you've got in Auto Da Fe are six stories across 400 years of

:43:19.:43:22.

different communities who have two escape persecution. What we saw,

:43:23.:43:29.

maybe we can see more of the images, we saw a split screen. So when

:43:30.:43:33.

people actually go and see your work, there are two separate screens

:43:34.:43:38.

with concurrent things happening at the same time. Is that right? Yes,

:43:39.:43:43.

but sometimes you would just get the same scene but played from different

:43:44.:43:48.

angles. So you see the back of a person, you see where they are and

:43:49.:43:52.

what they are thinking. Almost like a 360 degrees... Exactly, you've got

:43:53.:44:00.

it. It has to be said that current events are very much drawing

:44:01.:44:03.

attention to the storylines that you are illustrating. President Trump

:44:04.:44:08.

has closed the borders of the United States to refugees, to a number of

:44:09.:44:13.

countries, for a period of time, a matter of months. It couldn't be

:44:14.:44:17.

more timely in some respects in relation to what you why doing. It

:44:18.:44:22.

is tragic, but I have to say I saw this coming, which is one of the

:44:23.:44:27.

reasons why I worked on this. The story of refugees... People see it

:44:28.:44:36.

as either something from the past or recent, but it is constant and

:44:37.:44:40.

continuing. When you say that, how did you know it was coming? Just the

:44:41.:44:45.

way in which people were talking about refugees coming to this

:44:46.:44:51.

country. Thinking about the same in 2009, you could hear in the

:44:52.:44:54.

language. They are cockroaches, this and that. It felt as if something

:44:55.:45:00.

was different. The difference in how we talked about strangers. Where

:45:01.:45:04.

were you hearing that? When you are out and about? I would be in

:45:05.:45:10.

different countries and you would hear it, whether in Germany or

:45:11.:45:13.

Scandinavia, wherever. Here it to some extent. You could just feel

:45:14.:45:18.

this difference in attitude towards outsiders coming in. I just thought

:45:19.:45:23.

it would be a good thing to do to counteract that in some ways. John,

:45:24.:45:27.

thank you very much. And congratulations for winning. John

:45:28.:45:34.

Akomfrah has won at the exhibition in Wales it will run until the 26th

:45:35.:45:37.

of Eddery. Hello to both of you, good morning.

:45:38.:45:46.

We're looking at things getting milder over the course of this

:45:47.:45:53.

weekend. It been a cold week with the nasty fog but different this

:45:54.:45:56.

weekend, a weather front bringing outbreaks of rain widely across the

:45:57.:46:01.

country and with the cold air in Scotland we are seeing some snow in

:46:02.:46:05.

the higher ground, about 300 metres. That means stretches of the 89 and a

:46:06.:46:10.

85 at the moment are seeing heavy snow, the risk of icy stretches

:46:11.:46:19.

across some higher areas. -- the A89 and the A85. Further south the

:46:20.:46:24.

early-morning rain will clear out of the way and a breezy afternoon for

:46:25.:46:28.

southern England, south Wales and the south Midlands. Some sunshine

:46:29.:46:32.

with a few passing showers and mild, nine in London. The rain reluctant

:46:33.:46:36.

to move out of northern England so cool and wet here. Northern Ireland

:46:37.:46:40.

brightening up quickly with sunshine this afternoon, a few showers in the

:46:41.:46:44.

west and cloudy and cold in Scotland today, only around four degrees for

:46:45.:46:48.

many. Overnight as the rain eases away we'll see a few showers falling

:46:49.:46:58.

as snow in the tops of the Pennines, still some snow in the hills in

:46:59.:47:02.

Scotland as well. A cold night with a touch of frost developing in the

:47:03.:47:05.

countryside in northern areas hence the risk of icy stretches on

:47:06.:47:08.

untreated roads and services. On Sunday, another weather system will

:47:09.:47:12.

move in of the Atlantic and will bring rain into Northern Ireland,

:47:13.:47:14.

Wales and south-west England during the morning and that wet weather

:47:15.:47:18.

will push north and east through the afternoon. With Scotland we should

:47:19.:47:21.

see sunshine into the afternoon and temperatures in the sunshine still

:47:22.:47:24.

quite cold, 4-6, the milder air is where the cloud and rain is. Next

:47:25.:47:29.

week it looks like a complete change in the weather patterns as low

:47:30.:47:32.

pressure dominates, the Atlantic wakes up and we see weather systems

:47:33.:47:36.

moving across the UK. That means that next week it will be unsettled

:47:37.:47:41.

with spells of rain, it will become windy perhaps with severe gales

:47:42.:47:44.

around particularly later in the week but the winds will often come

:47:45.:47:48.

from the south-west and that's a mild direction. Frost will be

:47:49.:47:52.

relatively rare, especially towards the end of next week. That's how the

:47:53.:47:57.

weather's shaping up. Back to you two.

:47:58.:47:59.

I'm very pleased it's getting milder. See you next week.

:48:00.:48:02.

This week, Samira Ahmed has reaction to coverage of President Trump's

:48:03.:48:07.

Hello and welcome to Newswatch with me, Samira Ahmed.

:48:08.:48:14.

It's been a long week in US politics but did BBC News go overboard in how

:48:15.:48:18.

it covered Donald Trump's inauguration and first few

:48:19.:48:20.

And was it in the UK public interest to focus in news bulletins

:48:21.:48:28.

on the failure of a Trident missile test last year?

:48:29.:48:34.

It's been a busy and controversial first week in office

:48:35.:48:37.

for Donald Trump and we've heard plenty about it on BBC News.

:48:38.:48:40.

It all started of course last Friday in Washington, DC.

:48:41.:48:46.

I, Donald John Trump do solemnly swear...

:48:47.:48:48.

That I will faithfully execute... That I will faithfully execute...

:48:49.:48:53.

The office of President of the United States...

:48:54.:49:03.

And will do the best of my ability...

:49:04.:49:07.

Preserve, protect and defend... Preserve, protect and defend...

:49:08.:49:09.

The constitution of the United States...

:49:10.:49:11.

The constitution of the United States.

:49:12.:49:16.

Before and after Donald Trump took the presidential oath of office

:49:17.:49:20.

there were hours of coverage of the ceremony plus speeches

:49:21.:49:29.

Channel was showing exactly the same coverage with live coverage

:49:30.:49:33.

from Washington by the BBC's Jon Sopel and Katty Kay,

:49:34.:49:36.

while BBC Parliament was showing the same live feed provided

:49:37.:49:40.

by American public service network C-SPAN but without

:49:41.:49:42.

It was all too much for Leo McCann and Kate Reed, who wrote:

:49:43.:50:04.

enough before the end, e-mailing:

:50:05.:50:14.

Well, we put those points to BBC News and they told us:

:50:15.:50:45.

Since last Friday we've heard further complaints

:50:46.:50:49.

about the prominence in news headlines of the activities

:50:50.:50:52.

and pronouncements of the new president.

:50:53.:50:55.

The White House is accused of telling falsehoods in a battle

:50:56.:50:58.

with the media about President Trump's inauguration.

:50:59.:51:01.

The president opens his first full week in office by signing an order

:51:02.:51:05.

withdrawing the US from a major free-trade deal with

:51:06.:51:08.

He meets business leaders at the White House and once

:51:09.:51:14.

He meets business leaders at the White House and warns

:51:15.:51:17.

he will penalise American companies that move jobs overseas.

:51:18.:51:19.

More executive orders signed by President Trump,

:51:20.:51:21.

this time he revives plans to build two oil pipelines

:51:22.:51:24.

He promised a wall, now he says he's going to start building

:51:25.:51:28.

Donald Trump sets out his plans on immigration control.

:51:29.:51:33.

Stepping down for the first time from Air Force One,

:51:34.:51:36.

President Trump looks ahead to his meeting with Mrs May.

:51:37.:51:41.

I'm meeting with her tomorrow, I don't have my commerce secretary

:51:42.:51:46.

and they'll want to talk trade so I'll have to handle it myself!

:51:47.:51:50.

Speaking last night, the president again said

:51:51.:51:53.

he was determined to build a wall between Mexico and the US

:51:54.:51:56.

and suggested taxing their goods to pay for it.

:51:57.:51:58.

So has BBC News been getting a bit carried away by the new presidency?

:51:59.:52:02.

Victoria Wells thought so, writing:

:52:03.:52:24.

Brian Gardner had this question:

:52:25.:52:36.

Meanwhile, Teresa Reilly wrote to us on Monday

:52:37.:52:39.

after she had settled down to watch a report on the Supreme Court

:52:40.:52:42.

Do let us know your thoughts

:52:43.:53:11.

on the BBC's coverage of Donald Trump's presidency

:53:12.:53:13.

Details of how to contact us coming up at the end of the programme.

:53:14.:53:20.

Now for some of your other concerns this week, starting

:53:21.:53:27.

with the BBC's coverage following a report

:53:28.:53:28.

in the Sunday Times that an unarmed missile went offcourse

:53:29.:53:31.

On his show that morning, Andrew Marr asked the Prime Minister

:53:32.:53:35.

When you made that first speech in July in the House of Commons

:53:36.:53:41.

about our Trident nuclear defence, did you know that

:53:42.:53:43.

Well, I have absolute faith in our Trident missiles,

:53:44.:53:50.

when I made that speech in the Commons, what we were talking

:53:51.:53:54.

about is whether or not we should renew our Trident,

:53:55.:54:04.

whether or not we should have Trident missiles,

:54:05.:54:06.

an independent nuclear deterrent, in the future.

:54:07.:54:08.

I think we should defend our country, I think we should

:54:09.:54:13.

play our role in Nato with an independent nuclear deterrent.

:54:14.:54:15.

Jeremy Corbyn things differently, Jeremy Corbyn things we shouldn't

:54:16.:54:18.

This is a very serious incident, did you know about it when you told

:54:19.:54:23.

The issue we were talking about in the House of Commons

:54:24.:54:27.

on BBC News bulletins over the next

:54:28.:54:32.

couple of days but some viewers thought the concentration

:54:33.:54:34.

Maurice Sharrock echoed that, e-mailing:

:54:35.:55:04.

Now, we've been getting regular complaints on Newswatch

:55:05.:55:09.

about the way BBC News online words some of its headlines in two weeks

:55:10.:55:13.

about the way BBC News online words some of its headlines in tweets

:55:14.:55:17.

On Wednesday the Supreme Court ruled that Parliament must vote on whether

:55:18.:55:25.

the government can start the process of leaving the European Union.

:55:26.:55:27.

One of the campaigners who brought the case was Gina Miller,

:55:28.:55:30.

who has been subjected to a number of violent threats online.

:55:31.:55:33.

That prompted BBC News to post a tweet asking:

:55:34.:55:38.

It linked to a woman's hour discussion

:55:39.:55:47.

about her treatment, but led to a number of angry

:55:48.:55:50.

Martin Phelps answered the question posed like this:

:55:51.:55:52.

Dave McNally thought:

:55:53.:55:56.

Well, BBC News gave us a statement in response.

:55:57.:56:09.

Wednesday's News at Ten took some viewers by surprise

:56:10.:56:33.

with its lead story, a special report from Ed Thomas

:56:34.:56:36.

on the marked increase in knife crime in the UK.

:56:37.:56:47.

In five years' time I could be in jail, could be dead,

:56:48.:56:50.

could be the biggest drug dealer in the country,

:56:51.:56:53.

Tonight it's Liverpool but this story could be told in many cities.

:56:54.:56:57.

It's one of knives, fear and wasted lives.

:56:58.:57:01.

When did you start carrying knives? 12.

:57:02.:57:16.

And Annie Good was flabbergasted by the report:

:57:17.:57:34.

Finally, it's been noticed this week that BBC political correspondent

:57:35.:57:36.

Carol Walker is an early riser.

:57:37.:57:39.

On Wednesday she was on air in the cold just after 6am.

:57:40.:57:43.

Our political correspondent Carol Walker is outside the houses

:57:44.:57:45.

Good morning to you once again, Carol, it's been a busy few days

:57:46.:57:56.

but we heard in Tom's piece about that Tory rebellion,

:57:57.:57:59.

how large a rebellion is that likely to be?

:58:00.:58:01.

It looks like the number of Tories rebelling against the government

:58:02.:58:04.

And she was braving the elements in the same spot at the same

:58:05.:58:09.

doesn't she, between trying to get on with Donald Trump,

:58:10.:58:18.

with the president, but also not annoying everyone back

:58:19.:58:21.

She's under a lot of pressure, isn't she?

:58:22.:58:25.

This is going to be a very important, significant but also

:58:26.:58:28.

Carol was also out and about first thing on Tuesday,

:58:29.:58:32.

Let's speak to our political correspondent Carol Walker

:58:33.:58:36.

who is outside the Supreme Court this morning.

:58:37.:58:40.

I know they don't decide until 9:30am but what

:58:41.:58:45.

are the thoughts, Carol?

:58:46.:58:48.

Well, the expectation widely is that the judgement will go

:58:49.:58:51.

against the government, that Theresa May will be told

:58:52.:58:53.

of parliament before she can trigger Article 50.

:58:54.:58:57.

As we've mentioned, the judgement did indeed go

:58:58.:59:00.

against her but Steve Ketteringham had a question:

:59:01.:59:24.

Thank you for all your comments this week.

:59:25.:59:26.

If you want to share your opinions on BBC News and current affairs

:59:27.:59:30.

or even appear on the programme, you can call us on:

:59:31.:59:34.

And do have a look at our website,

:59:35.:59:43.

We'll be back to hear your thoughts about BBC News coverage

:59:44.:59:51.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern.

:59:52.:00:28.

The veteran actor Sir John Hurt has died aged 77.

:00:29.:00:30.

He appeared in 200 films and television productions

:00:31.:00:34.

and was twice nominated for an Oscar.

:00:35.:00:52.

Hand in hand in the White House - Donald Trump and Theresa May

:00:53.:01:02.

pledge their commitment to the special relationship.

:01:03.:01:08.

I am a people person. I think you are also, Theresa. I can often tell

:01:09.:01:15.

how I will get along with somebody very early, and I believe we are

:01:16.:01:19.

going to have a fantastic relationship.

:01:20.:01:20.

After a spate of accidents, a call for lorry drivers to be

:01:21.:01:23.

banned from using satnavs designed for cars.

:01:24.:01:25.

They haven't met in a grand slam final for eight years, but in the

:01:26.:01:32.

next half-hour Serena Williams takes on her sister Venus for the

:01:33.:01:35.

Australian title and a record-breaking 23rd major crown.

:01:36.:01:37.

It is not as cold as has been over recent days, but we have got some

:01:38.:01:46.

rain to contend with today and it is still just about code and for some

:01:47.:01:50.

of that rain to fall as snow in the hills of Scotland.

:01:51.:01:51.

He was 77 and had recently been ill with cancer.

:01:52.:02:05.

He starred in around 200 films including Harry Potter

:02:06.:02:07.

and was nominated for an Oscar for his roles in The Elephant Man

:02:08.:02:10.

Our correspondent Nick Higham reports.

:02:11.:02:12.

Everything seemed to come to a head today. John Hurt, as the political

:02:13.:02:20.

diarist Alan Clark. Both my back wisdom teeth have disintegrated into

:02:21.:02:24.

blackened stumps, or stalagmites. Not a nice man, but unexpectedly

:02:25.:02:28.

sympathetic one, the sort of complex character John Hurt played with such

:02:29.:02:33.

ease and subtlety. His talent was spotted early in a succession of

:02:34.:02:40.

leading stage and television roles. His first big breakthrough came in

:02:41.:02:48.

1966. In a man for all seasons. A small part, but in a high-profile,

:02:49.:02:52.

Oscar-winning film. A few years later, he was starring opposite

:02:53.:02:56.

Richard Attenborough Intel Rillington place. He played the

:02:57.:03:00.

illiterate Timothy Evans, wrongly hanged for a murder he didn't

:03:01.:03:03.

commit. On television, he was the mad Roman Emperor Caligula in the

:03:04.:03:11.

BBC's I, Claudius. You order does not to order any. And you took me at

:03:12.:03:17.

my word, didn't you? And then came the naked civil servant. I wear

:03:18.:03:22.

Roush, I wear mascara on my eyelashes, I dye my hair, I buy

:03:23.:03:26.

flamboyant clothes, far more outre than those I am wearing out. Many

:03:27.:03:30.

people said don't do that, you will never work again. But I said, it is

:03:31.:03:35.

not about homosexuality, it is about the tenderness of the individual as

:03:36.:03:41.

opposed to the cruelty of the crowd. He earned an Oscar nomination for

:03:42.:03:44.

Midnight Express, in which he played a heroin addict in a Turkish prison.

:03:45.:03:49.

And there was another Oscar nomination for his performance as

:03:50.:03:52.

the hideously disfigured John Merrick in The Elephant Man. His

:03:53.:04:00.

lined and weathered face meant he was perfect in the film 1984 as

:04:01.:04:05.

George or dwell's reluctant rebel Winston Smith. -- George Orwell's

:04:06.:04:10.

rabble. He accepted all the television roles he was offered,

:04:11.:04:12.

although that meant stage appearances like this were rare. He

:04:13.:04:18.

played Stephen Ward, Society schema and later victim of the Profumo

:04:19.:04:23.

affair and scandal. I can do wonders with you, little baby. You're my

:04:24.:04:28.

future selves? Late in his career, he made a guest appearance in Doctor

:04:29.:04:32.

Who. Why are you pointing your screwdrivers like that? Almost 200

:04:33.:04:40.

screen roles alone. Few actors were as reliably and engagingly

:04:41.:04:41.

watchable. Theresa May and Donald Trump have

:04:42.:04:50.

stressed their commitment to Nato The Prime Minister and the President

:04:51.:04:54.

both reiterated the importance of the special relationship

:04:55.:04:57.

in the first visit of a foreign leader to Washington

:04:58.:05:00.

since Donald Trump's inauguration. Theresa May urged the

:05:01.:05:03.

United States not to lift The US President is due to speak

:05:04.:05:06.

to Vladimir Putin today. I'll be representing

:05:07.:05:12.

the American people very, very strongly, very,

:05:13.:05:15.

very forcefully, and if we have a great relationship with Russia

:05:16.:05:17.

and other countries, and if we go after Isis together,

:05:18.:05:22.

which has to be stopped, that's an evil that has to be

:05:23.:05:25.

stopped, I will consider that a good Theresa May has travelled

:05:26.:05:28.

from Washington to Turkey for talks on trade and security with President

:05:29.:05:39.

Erdogan. The Prime Minister is also facing

:05:40.:05:41.

pressure to discuss concerns Our Turkey Correspondent Mark

:05:42.:05:43.

Lowen is in Istanbul. Is she there already? Give us a

:05:44.:05:57.

sense of what the discussions might include. She lands in about an hour

:05:58.:06:03.

and she will be focusing very much on trade with President Erdogan and

:06:04.:06:07.

the Prime Minister during talks here. It is a quick visit, four or

:06:08.:06:11.

five hours in Turkey. The two countries are already big trading

:06:12.:06:15.

partners, but they want to increase trade, especially when the UK leads

:06:16.:06:19.

the European Union. It and take you will be on the fringes of the EU and

:06:20.:06:22.

they want to increase trade. They will also be addressing so-called

:06:23.:06:27.

Islamic State. Both of them are part of the coalition against IS. They

:06:28.:06:31.

will also be talking about ongoing attempts to reunite -- reunify

:06:32.:06:35.

Cyprus. There are also calls on Theresa May to address more

:06:36.:06:38.

difficult issues here of human rights abuses and the fact that

:06:39.:06:42.

140,000 people have now been arrested, dismissed or suspended

:06:43.:06:46.

since the failed coup last year. So she goes from one controversial

:06:47.:06:49.

president to another, and there are calls for her to raise those issues.

:06:50.:06:53.

Downing Street officials say she will reiterate support for the

:06:54.:06:56.

Turkish government, but also stressed that Turkey's response to

:06:57.:06:59.

the failed coup needs to be proportionate. Thank you.

:07:00.:07:04.

A growing number of Labour MPs have said they will defy Jeremy Corbyn

:07:05.:07:07.

and vote against triggering the formal process to leave the EU.

:07:08.:07:10.

Yesterday, a member of his shadow cabinet resigned from the front

:07:11.:07:12.

Our Political Correspondent Ellie Price is in our London newsroom.

:07:13.:07:23.

If so growing dissent amongst the Labour Party? That's right.

:07:24.:07:29.

Yesterday, the Shadow Welsh Secretary resigned, saying she

:07:30.:07:32.

thought Brexit would be a terrible mistake. Intriguingly, two of the

:07:33.:07:36.

Labour whips that they would vote against triggering article 50. In

:07:37.:07:39.

political terms, it gets complicated because it is their job to enforce

:07:40.:07:44.

party discipline. Jeremy Corbyn has tried to be conciliatory. He said he

:07:45.:07:50.

has told his MPs from prop Remain constituencies that he understands

:07:51.:07:54.

they are torn. But he needs to provide labour with a coherent

:07:55.:07:57.

position on Brexit. He says he wants Labour to respect the outcome of the

:07:58.:08:07.

EU referendum and it is important to remember that the majority of Labour

:08:08.:08:12.

constituencies voted to leave the EU. So it puts him in a difficult

:08:13.:08:16.

position with his MPs. Number crunching suggests that 70 MPs

:08:17.:08:20.

represent Labour constituencies that voted to remain. Not all of those

:08:21.:08:24.

will defy Jeremy Corbyn, but a number will. So it provides Jeremy

:08:25.:08:27.

Corbyn with some difficult navigation through these Brexit

:08:28.:08:35.

times. A draft letter of application from King George III has been made

:08:36.:08:39.

public for the first time. The unsent letter, including crossings

:08:40.:08:44.

out, read drafts, blotches and scrolls, was written during the

:08:45.:08:46.

American war of independence and is one of thousands of his private

:08:47.:08:51.

papers released by the royal archives. Later this morning, we

:08:52.:08:53.

will take a more detailed look at some of those extraordinary

:08:54.:08:54.

documents. The UK's 2017 Eurovision

:08:55.:08:56.

entry has been decided. Former X Factor contestant

:08:57.:09:10.

Lucie Jones will represent the country in Kiev in May

:09:11.:09:16.

with the song Never Give Up On You, which was written by

:09:17.:09:20.

a former Eurovision winner. Lucie was chosen after winning

:09:21.:09:22.

the combined public and jury vote at the end of a live TV show

:09:23.:09:24.

in which six singers performed. All of the potential acts

:09:25.:09:28.

were former X Factor contestants. The we wish her well, albeit it

:09:29.:09:38.

hasn't gone too well recently at Eurovision. But things can change.

:09:39.:09:44.

Change is a mantra at the moment. Nothing is predictable. Now back to

:09:45.:09:48.

one of our lead stories. It started with an Oval Office photo

:09:49.:09:50.

call in front of the bust of Sir Winston Churchill,

:09:51.:09:53.

and ended with agreement on the importance of

:09:54.:09:55.

the so-called special relationship. Theresa May's visit

:09:56.:09:58.

to President Donald Trump is the front page of most

:09:59.:10:02.

of the papers, but was it a success Here is a recap of some of the key

:10:03.:10:20.

moments. This is the original, folks, in many ways. It is a great

:10:21.:10:26.

honour to have Winston Churchill back. Today, the United States

:10:27.:10:33.

renews our deep bond with Britain - military, financial, cultural and

:10:34.:10:36.

political. We pledge our lasting support to this most special

:10:37.:10:43.

relationship. On defence and security cooperation, we are united

:10:44.:10:46.

in our recognition of Nato as the bulwark of our collective defence.

:10:47.:10:49.

Today, we have reaffirmed our unshakeable commitment to this

:10:50.:10:54.

alliance. I think Brexit is going to be a wonderful thing for your

:10:55.:10:57.

country. I have been listening to the president and the president has

:10:58.:11:01.

listened to me, that is the point of having a conversation. I can tell

:11:02.:11:04.

how I will get along with somebody very early, and I believe we are

:11:05.:11:07.

going to have a fantastic relationship.

:11:08.:11:11.

American journalist Beth Gardiner joins us from our London newsroom

:11:12.:11:13.

and political commentator Charlie Woolf joins us on the sofa.

:11:14.:11:22.

Charlie, let's get one thing out of the way first, the handholding. It

:11:23.:11:27.

is on the front page of all the papers. This was after the press

:11:28.:11:31.

conference. Many will have seen it already. They were just stepping out

:11:32.:11:36.

of the White House along one of the verandas, and Donald Trump laid his

:11:37.:11:39.

hand on Theresa May's wrist to help her down the steps. But that is the

:11:40.:11:46.

shot everyone has taken. The man is a gentleman, and that is why he did

:11:47.:11:51.

it. We will make sure he knows not to do that with Her Majesty when he

:11:52.:11:54.

comes for the state visit, although Michelle Obama did that and got away

:11:55.:11:57.

with it. I think it was a win-win from both sides. The speech Mrs May

:11:58.:12:03.

gave to the Republican retreat, where she talked about not making

:12:04.:12:08.

the world in our image any more, and minor point I disagree with, but I

:12:09.:12:14.

guess if you can put 1000 McDonald's in Iraq, it is not going to turn

:12:15.:12:18.

into America. That went down pretty well. In the press conference, you

:12:19.:12:23.

could see that Great Britain is in prime position. This is the ally. He

:12:24.:12:33.

wants to roll his sleeves up. Beth, what are your thoughts on it? A

:12:34.:12:37.

people are talking about how Trump was very calm. We certainly saw the

:12:38.:12:43.

well-behaved Trump yesterday. I think he kept his cool in a way that

:12:44.:12:47.

we certainly didn't see at his previous press conference a couple

:12:48.:12:51.

of weeks ago in New York before his inauguration, where he really lashed

:12:52.:12:53.

out at some of the questions that were asked. We will have to wait and

:12:54.:13:01.

see how this relationship pans out. Theresa May has clearly decided to

:13:02.:13:06.

cast her lot with Donald Trump. As you said, that handholding photo was

:13:07.:13:10.

on the cover for the papers this morning. And I think it may become

:13:11.:13:14.

an indelible image. We will have to wait and see, as this president

:13:15.:13:20.

moves forward, whether that is a relationship she may come to regret

:13:21.:13:28.

Patty implements some of the contentious policies he has

:13:29.:13:32.

outlined, starting this morning with the news of a clamp-down on refugees

:13:33.:13:41.

with a religious caste to it. Issues immediately arise. During the press

:13:42.:13:44.

conference, we know that President Trump is going to be speaking to

:13:45.:13:47.

Vladimir Putin by phone today. A very direct question was asked about

:13:48.:13:51.

what to do about Russia. Theresa May gave it a straight answer - we

:13:52.:13:55.

believe sanctions should remain. Donald Trump has a different

:13:56.:14:00.

standpoint, and they stood together on stage saying different things.

:14:01.:14:07.

But there was a mutual respect. Everyone was saying, she should tell

:14:08.:14:12.

him what to do. Instead, I think she has built a relationship where I

:14:13.:14:15.

could see him picking up the phone after talking to Putin or before

:14:16.:14:20.

talking to him, saying, what do you think? The sort of relationship Iraq

:14:21.:14:24.

Obama had with Mrs Merkel. That is a good position to be in -- the

:14:25.:14:29.

position Barack Obama had with Mrs Merkel. Already, the US papers, who

:14:30.:14:35.

probably weeks ago didn't know who Mrs May was, now consider her to be

:14:36.:14:41.

Margaret Thatcher. I think it has done well for both her and for him.

:14:42.:14:48.

The question from Laura Kuenssberg, from an American sense, I thought it

:14:49.:14:51.

was a bit on the edge. That said, he handled it. He gave that New York

:14:52.:14:57.

laughed and said, this is the first question you give me? It is worth

:14:58.:15:02.

reminding people of that question from Laura Kuenssberg from the BBC.

:15:03.:15:07.

It was the one about, maybe people find you, looking from overseas, it

:15:08.:15:11.

is hard to understand you as the leader of the free world when there

:15:12.:15:14.

are things you said that people might find hard to understand. That

:15:15.:15:18.

was a moment when he could have gone in a different direction, but he

:15:19.:15:24.

showed a sense of humour. He did try to deflect the question with a joke

:15:25.:15:30.

that his guest, Theresa May, in an uncomfortable spot, as well as Laura

:15:31.:15:35.

Kuenssberg, who asked it. A more mature leader might have taken that

:15:36.:15:40.

question as an opportunity to try to reassure some of the people who are,

:15:41.:15:48.

as Laura said, deeply frightened and concerned by some of the things we

:15:49.:15:52.

have heard from Donald Trump over the past 18 months of his

:15:53.:15:58.

ascendancy. Trump did not do that. What he did was reflective of what

:15:59.:16:02.

we have seen from him all along. He told us just a week ago that he was

:16:03.:16:07.

in a running war with the media at that press conference in New York.

:16:08.:16:12.

He lashed out in a shouting match with the CNN reporter. We saw him

:16:13.:16:16.

over the course of the campaign lead arenas full of thousands of people

:16:17.:16:21.

in chants against journalists. He likes to turn the tables and use

:16:22.:16:27.

journalism as his whipping boy. I think Laura Kuenssberg, with her

:16:28.:16:32.

question, was trying to hold him to account for some of the things he

:16:33.:16:38.

said. He doesn't like that. He is going to find that as president,

:16:39.:16:40.

there are going to be hard questions. It is a two-way street.

:16:41.:16:49.

For instance, the whole dossier turned out to be fake news. So they

:16:50.:16:54.

will have to develop a mutual respect for each other. I think he

:16:55.:16:58.

handled it well and Mrs May handled it well. We have to leave it there.

:16:59.:17:03.

Thank you. Venus and Serena Williams are no

:17:04.:17:07.

strangers to sibling rivalry They have played each other

:17:08.:17:11.

in eight grand slam finals. But today's Australian

:17:12.:17:17.

Open is a special one. Let's have a look at what's

:17:18.:17:20.

at stake for the sisters. When I am playing on the floor with

:17:21.:18:08.

her, I think I am playing the best competitor in the game.

:18:09.:18:20.

I never lost hope of us being able to play each other in a final. I

:18:21.:18:28.

couldn't write a better ending, so this is a great opportunity for us

:18:29.:18:29.

to start our new beginning. Former British number one John Lloyd

:18:30.:18:34.

who will be commentating It really is a big day. We have been

:18:35.:18:49.

talking about it over the last few days and saying it feels really

:18:50.:18:52.

retro to go back to grand slams with the Williams sisters in the final.

:18:53.:19:00.

To me, it is the greatest sports story in history, the Williams

:19:01.:19:04.

sisters. When they finally make a film about them, it will be just

:19:05.:19:09.

reward and I hope they do them justice because it is the most

:19:10.:19:12.

extraordinary sports story, what they have achieved. To be in the

:19:13.:19:16.

final again, particularly from Venus' side, with the illness she

:19:17.:19:19.

has had and being out of the finals for so many years, it is

:19:20.:19:23.

spectacular. Some people follow tennis only on these big occasions.

:19:24.:19:27.

Remind us of the journey they have been on. There was a period of time,

:19:28.:19:32.

and it has happened to others like Roger Federer, and Nadal, both in

:19:33.:19:35.

the final as well, where people have said, that Iraq has passed. -- that

:19:36.:19:43.

era has passed. And here we are! Class will always come through. As

:19:44.:19:46.

long as the people you are talking about have that love for the game

:19:47.:19:50.

and the desire. The Williams sisters have handled their career so well. A

:19:51.:19:56.

lot of people said they have other things they like doing. Serena liked

:19:57.:20:01.

acting and Venus like designing clothes, but they got it right. They

:20:02.:20:06.

played tennis hard but they also had time off and did other things and

:20:07.:20:10.

kept themselves fresh. They are still playing now and they love the

:20:11.:20:14.

game as much as when they first set foot on Wimbledon. That is the

:20:15.:20:19.

beauty of it. They have handled their careers perfectly. The whole

:20:20.:20:23.

Australian Open has been interesting from many perspectives, because of

:20:24.:20:27.

how well Evans did to get as far as he did, but also, you have Nadal and

:20:28.:20:30.

Federer against each other in the final. And that interesting stat

:20:31.:20:34.

about the final in both the men's and women's is people over 30. It is

:20:35.:20:41.

fantastic. Everybody I talked to wanted these finals. And no one

:20:42.:20:47.

expected it. Again, it shows you that there is still life left in

:20:48.:20:53.

older players. A few years back, what you reached 30, it was time to

:20:54.:20:56.

quit. They have proven that as long as you have the attitude and these

:20:57.:21:00.

days with sports science, you have the training they have now and the

:21:01.:21:04.

nutrition and other stuff, in my day, before a match you had steak

:21:05.:21:08.

and chips. And what it down with three Coca-Cola 's! Now, you have

:21:09.:21:13.

all this sports science and they keep themselves in amazing shape and

:21:14.:21:17.

they love the game. Let me ask you to do the awkward thing. You are

:21:18.:21:22.

going to be commentating on today's game and the men's final tomorrow.

:21:23.:21:26.

Give us a quick talk through what might happen and what is your

:21:27.:21:29.

instinct about who will win? The obvious one with the ladies is

:21:30.:21:38.

Serena. If I was Venus, and my big sis, who has won these tournaments

:21:39.:21:42.

before and I had not won 148 while, I would be saying at dinner time,

:21:43.:21:48.

give me one! But I think Serena is too good and she will win. In the

:21:49.:21:56.

men's, it is more difficult in terms of, you don't know how the Rafael

:21:57.:22:03.

Nadal much 55 cents was one of the great matches -- the match with five

:22:04.:22:11.

sets. Now he hasn't been in the final for a while and his body is

:22:12.:22:15.

not used to it. That will certainly help Federer. Having said that, I

:22:16.:22:18.

would still go for Rafael Nadal to win. And it is worth mentioning the

:22:19.:22:24.

wheelchair men's doubles, because Gordon Reid completed a career Grand

:22:25.:22:30.

Slam in winning that. It is amazing. We are blessed. We have got good

:22:31.:22:34.

champions in all areas of the sport, and it is fantastic. Tennis is

:22:35.:22:38.

booming in Britain. And you are going straight into your commentary

:22:39.:22:42.

booth now, because it is starting in the next 15 minutes. Thank you for

:22:43.:22:44.

coming to see us. Let's find out what is happening

:22:45.:22:53.

with the weather. We are finally thawing out after a freezing cold

:22:54.:22:59.

week, with some nasty fog problems. Temperatures are now rising and it

:23:00.:23:02.

is a relatively mild start to the day across England and Wales. That

:23:03.:23:06.

is because we have a weather system that has moved in, bringing Atlantic

:23:07.:23:11.

air and quite a lot of rain. It is a wet start of the day for many areas

:23:12.:23:16.

of the UK. Across the high ground in Scotland, some of the rain is

:23:17.:23:20.

falling as snow. That means some of the higher routes like the Anine and

:23:21.:23:26.

A85 are getting stoked. There is a risk of icy stretches here for a

:23:27.:23:32.

time. For Wales and Southern counties of England, it is not a bad

:23:33.:23:38.

day. Quite a breezy afternoon. The winds are coming from the West, so

:23:39.:23:42.

it is a relatively mild direction. There will be a number of showers

:23:43.:23:48.

across south-western areas. The rain is reluctant to clear in northern

:23:49.:23:51.

England. Northern Ireland should brighten up, and Scotland stays

:23:52.:23:56.

quite grey and cloudy. Overnight, there was a risk of icy stretches

:23:57.:24:00.

across northern parts as we see a frost setting in the countryside.

:24:01.:24:03.

There will be some showers falling as snow over the hills of Scotland

:24:04.:24:09.

and also over the Pennines. Later in the night, temperatures will rise

:24:10.:24:13.

across Wales and south-west England as the next system comes in. This

:24:14.:24:17.

will bring more rain for the second half of the weekend. It will turn

:24:18.:24:21.

wet quickly for Wales and south-west England. Then the band of rain

:24:22.:24:25.

extends north and eastwards through the rest of Sunday. To the north of

:24:26.:24:29.

this, it stays dry in Scotland, but it will stay cold. The milder areas

:24:30.:24:34.

towards the south-west, with that cloud and rain. Next week, it is an

:24:35.:24:45.

unsettled looking weak. Then we see bigger systems towards the end of

:24:46.:24:49.

the week. This means we are looking at spells of rain next week. It is

:24:50.:24:53.

going to become windy, perhaps with severe gales developing. Bursts of

:24:54.:24:58.

wind are often coming from the south-west. It will be on the mild

:24:59.:25:01.

side. I don't think there will be a great deal of frost around.

:25:02.:25:06.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:25:07.:25:08.

It's time now for a look at the newspapers.

:25:09.:25:10.

Guardian film critic Peter Bradshaw is here to tell us

:25:11.:25:12.

We are of course talking about the death of Sir John Hurt this morning.

:25:13.:25:30.

77 years old. The breadth of his work and the scale of what he did...

:25:31.:25:34.

It is amazing. It is not a shock because he had been ill for some

:25:35.:25:38.

time, but he always wanted to keep working. It was not just his work,

:25:39.:25:46.

it was his vocation and his life. The most recent of his performances

:25:47.:25:51.

was in the movie Jackie. He plays a fictional composite role of her

:25:52.:25:57.

father confessor, her priest that Jackie goes to in the movie and

:25:58.:26:00.

tries to talk about her relationship with President Kennedy and the

:26:01.:26:03.

question of their marriage and his fidelity and the rest of it. It is a

:26:04.:26:08.

brilliant cameo for John Hurt. It is exactly what he always supplied,

:26:09.:26:12.

this incredible potency and power, particularly in a small part. He

:26:13.:26:16.

gave any film that texts and depth, and he was a class act. He made

:26:17.:26:23.

anything look like $1 million. Such a wonderful actor. People of my

:26:24.:26:28.

generation remember him first of course as Caligula in I, Claudius.

:26:29.:26:32.

We remember him bringing his horse on and making his horse a consort.

:26:33.:26:36.

He had that androgynous, boyish face in the late 70s. But there was a

:26:37.:26:44.

hint of what was to come. And a couple of years later, The Elephant

:26:45.:26:49.

Man, John Merrick. You have come to review the papers and there was only

:26:50.:26:53.

one story dominating. I know, that was always going to be the main

:26:54.:26:57.

story. I don't know whether it is a success or not. All the papers are

:26:58.:27:02.

full of the hand shots. Unlike normal people holding hands, they

:27:03.:27:05.

are not holding hands with their arms down, they are holding hands

:27:06.:27:09.

the way when you are a little kid, your mum grabbed your hand when you

:27:10.:27:17.

were crossing the road. Clearly, it was Mr Trump's idea to hold her

:27:18.:27:19.

hand. She obviously didn't think, I will hold Donald's hand. It was his

:27:20.:27:26.

idea. So you have this extraordinary shot. It is absolute catnip for the

:27:27.:27:32.

papers. Intimate and yet bizarre. It is on the steps, so it is a moment.

:27:33.:27:39.

He is guiding her down. No one else would have got away with that. I

:27:40.:27:43.

don't think Ronald Reagan would have dared hold Margaret Thatcher's hand.

:27:44.:27:48.

It is the part as well. In the papers, you don't see the pattern --

:27:49.:27:59.

pat. Journalists, cynically, want it to be a disaster, and yet the

:28:00.:28:03.

Patriots wanted to be a success. We are sick of Mr Trump terrifying us

:28:04.:28:06.

all. We want him to calm down and do the decent special relationship

:28:07.:28:10.

thing. And in a way, Mrs May seems to have done that. She has got him

:28:11.:28:17.

to reaffirm his commitment. In your paper, the Guardian, on the issue of

:28:18.:28:23.

Trump, Melania Trump is on the front page of Vanity Fair in Mexico. I

:28:24.:28:27.

didn't know Mexico have a special edition, but it does. And Melania

:28:28.:28:32.

Trump has chosen this moment to appear on the Mexican edition,

:28:33.:28:34.

posing with a string of jewels on a plate as if it is spaghetti, and she

:28:35.:28:43.

is about to eat them with a fork. Which is quite odd, especially when

:28:44.:28:46.

Mexico is suffering from a malnutrition and poverty crisis. And

:28:47.:28:51.

the president has cancelled his visit. He wants to build and own

:28:52.:28:55.

enormous wall at their expense to keep them out. Pick another one,

:28:56.:29:02.

other than Trump related. I am a huge fan of the movie La La Land.

:29:03.:29:07.

Any story about La La Land warms my heart. The FT have got this profile

:29:08.:29:10.

today of the director of La La Land, a remarkable young guy, Damien

:29:11.:29:17.

Chazelle. He's 31 or 32 years old, poised for a historic victory with

:29:18.:29:21.

La La Land. And the Guardian has former Strictly judge Arlene

:29:22.:29:25.

Phillips judging the dance numbers. I think she gives them nine. I would

:29:26.:29:32.

give them ten! I am going to be controversial. I didn't love it! Go

:29:33.:29:37.

what?! This is what I call the La La Land backlash. It happens every

:29:38.:29:42.

year. All of us critics are usually pretty unanimous. We write our

:29:43.:29:46.

reviews and about this time of year, there is the pundit backlash, where

:29:47.:29:50.

other people are nagged beyond endurance to see these films that

:29:51.:29:53.

the critics have been jabbering about. And they go and see it, and

:29:54.:29:56.

it is our fault for overselling them. If only you could have seen it

:29:57.:30:01.

without having to listen to a jabbering chorus of people like me

:30:02.:30:05.

ordering you to see it! You don't want to be told what to do. Even if

:30:06.:30:11.

it is good. You will be back in the next hour. Headlines coming up in

:30:12.:30:14.

just a moment. Hello, this is Breakfast with

:30:15.:30:58.

Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern. Coming up before 9,

:30:59.:31:01.

we'll have an update But first at 8.31am, a summary

:31:02.:31:03.

of this morning's main news: He starred in around 200 films,

:31:04.:31:10.

including Harry Potter and was nominated for an Oscar

:31:11.:31:20.

for his roles in 'The Elephant Man' Sir John continued working

:31:21.:31:24.

despite being diagnosed Many tributes have been

:31:25.:31:26.

pouring in online. Let's look at the other news this

:31:27.:32:12.

morning. Theresa May and Donald Trump have

:32:13.:32:15.

stressed their commitment to Nato The Prime Minister and the President

:32:16.:32:18.

both reiterated the importance of the special relationship

:32:19.:32:21.

in the first visit of a foreign leader to Washington

:32:22.:32:24.

since Donald Trump's inauguration. Theresa May urged the

:32:25.:32:26.

United States not to lift The US President is due to speak

:32:27.:32:28.

to Vladimir Putin today. I will be representing

:32:29.:32:37.

the American people very, very strongly, very forcefully,

:32:38.:32:44.

and if we have a great relationship with Russia

:32:45.:32:46.

and other countries, and if we go after Isis together,

:32:47.:32:48.

which has to be stopped, that's an evil that has to be

:32:49.:32:51.

stopped, I will consider that a good Following the trip to Washington,

:32:52.:32:54.

Theresa May is now on her way to Turkey for talks

:32:55.:32:59.

with President Erdogan. The talks are expected to focus

:33:00.:33:00.

on trade and security but she's facing pressure to discuss

:33:01.:33:03.

concerns about alleged human Lorry drivers should be

:33:04.:33:07.

banned from using sat That's what councils are calling

:33:08.:33:13.

for after a spate of incidents caused by heavy goods vehicles

:33:14.:33:17.

using bridges where they're The Local Government Association

:33:18.:33:20.

wants legislation brought in to make it compulsory for all lorry drivers

:33:21.:33:28.

to use sat-navs specifically A draft letter of abdication

:33:29.:33:31.

from King George III has been The unsent letter - you can see

:33:32.:33:40.

here, which includes crossings out, redrafts, blotches and scrawls -

:33:41.:33:48.

was written during the American War of Independence, and is one

:33:49.:33:51.

of thousands of his private papers Those are the main

:33:52.:33:53.

stories this morning. Of course, a big day for sport. You

:33:54.:34:03.

know what I'm talking about, the grand slam final. The greatest

:34:04.:34:07.

sporting story ever, the story of the Williams sisters. The odds

:34:08.:34:12.

before the Australian open started of the Williams sisters meeting in

:34:13.:34:22.

the women's final and Nadal playing Federer were very long. It so

:34:23.:34:27.

mesmerising, the contest, it's not just the sporting battle but the

:34:28.:34:31.

mental battle, two sisters who have competed against each other so long.

:34:32.:34:36.

And Serena with that record so close, who can mess it up... Her

:34:37.:34:38.

sister! Given that Serena is 35 and Venus

:34:39.:34:41.

a year older, it's remarkable that they are contesting

:34:42.:34:44.

a grand slam trophy again, Then it was on the grass of

:34:45.:34:46.

Wimbledon, on a day that Serena won. Venus has since had to battle

:34:47.:34:51.

a illness that affects her immune system, and Serena has

:34:52.:34:54.

had her injury problems but if she can now win, it

:34:55.:34:58.

would be her 23rd grand slam title, taking her past Steffi Graff's

:34:59.:35:01.

record. There's a retro feel

:35:02.:35:04.

to the Australian Open tennis. You have to go back to 2008

:35:05.:35:07.

to find these four players, This morning, Serena Williams takes

:35:08.:35:10.

on her sister Venus, and tomorrow's men's

:35:11.:35:16.

decider will be between Another throwback. How weird is

:35:17.:35:18.

this? That's after Nadal, spent almost

:35:19.:35:27.

five hours on court yesterday, against Grigor Dimitrov,

:35:28.:35:29.

before eventually Nadal hasn't won a major

:35:30.:35:31.

title for three years - We never thought that we had

:35:32.:35:34.

the chance again to be in a final, and especially in

:35:35.:35:39.

the first of the year. I think both of us,

:35:40.:35:40.

we worked very hard to be It's great that, again,

:35:41.:35:46.

we're in a moment like this, and we're going to have

:35:47.:35:54.

the chance to enjoy again And one more line from Melbourne -

:35:55.:35:57.

Britain's Andy Lapthorne lost to Australia's Paralympic champion

:35:58.:36:02.

Dylan Alcott in the quad Let me keep an eye on the women's

:36:03.:36:15.

Williams final, if you like. We will keep you updated. Highlights later

:36:16.:36:17.

at 1:15pm. The fourth round of the FA Cup got

:36:18.:36:19.

of to a flying start last night, with Derby going so close

:36:20.:36:23.

to upsetting their neighbours, the Premier League

:36:24.:36:25.

champions Leicester City. Derby of the Championship,

:36:26.:36:28.

made it hard for themselves, as Darren Bent showed why

:36:29.:36:31.

he's a striker... A striker trying to defend, not

:36:32.:36:39.

particularly well. He did make amends, levelling for Derby, went

:36:40.:36:43.

ahead before half-time and hung on until quad minute -- four minutes

:36:44.:36:49.

from the end when Wes Morgan. Replay.

:36:50.:36:52.

What a cup tie, what a great game, great atmosphere.

:36:53.:36:55.

As I said, proud of the players, coming against the champions,

:36:56.:36:57.

to perform like that and give them a real good game.

:36:58.:37:00.

I just said, another game against them, look forward to it.

:37:01.:37:02.

There's no Dan Walker on the sofa today -

:37:03.:37:08.

because he's on the road with Football Focus, at non-league

:37:09.:37:11.

Lincoln City, giant-killers in the last round, hoping to knock

:37:12.:37:13.

out Championship leaders Brighton today.

:37:14.:37:16.

Five Premier League sides, are facing lower league

:37:17.:37:18.

opposition this afternoon - including Liverpool, at home

:37:19.:37:20.

Liverpool's only win in any competition in 2017 so far,

:37:21.:37:26.

came when they beat Plymouth Argyle, in a third round replay.

:37:27.:37:29.

But Wolves have already knocked out Premier League Stoke City.

:37:30.:37:34.

I don't like the results, but I see that we're really fighting,

:37:35.:37:38.

still fighting for each point, for each little victory, for each

:37:39.:37:41.

That's what we're doing, and it's the job we have to do.

:37:42.:37:47.

I'm absolutely more than OK, and looking forward to the next

:37:48.:37:50.

Niall McGinn, scored two goals and set up another,

:37:51.:38:03.

as Aberdeen beat Dundee 3-0 in the Scottish Premiership.

:38:04.:38:05.

McGinn's volley on the stroke of half time was an absolute cracker.

:38:06.:38:08.

The win moved Abderdeen above Rangers into second

:38:09.:38:10.

place in the table - but they're still 21

:38:11.:38:12.

The Welsh boxer Lee Selby, was almost in tears,

:38:13.:38:18.

after his IBF featherweight, world title defence, against,

:38:19.:38:24.

Jonathan Victor Barros was called off, just a little over

:38:25.:38:26.

24 hours before it was due to take place.

:38:27.:38:29.

The decision was announced on stage, just before

:38:30.:38:31.

the weigh-in in Las Vegas - American media have reported

:38:32.:38:33.

that Barros had tested positive for hepatitis.

:38:34.:38:37.

Saracens have gone top of their Pool, in Rugby

:38:38.:38:39.

Union's Anglo Welsh Cup, thanks to a 32-17 away to Scarlets.

:38:40.:38:44.

And Gloucester fought back in the last few minutes to earn

:38:45.:38:52.

Ben Vellacott's late try and James Hook's conversion rounded

:38:53.:38:55.

Olympic team pursuit champion Katie Archibald eased to victory

:38:56.:39:05.

in the individual pursuit at the British National Track

:39:06.:39:07.

Archibald, wearing blue here, fought off the challenge

:39:08.:39:10.

of Emily Nelson for her second victory in the event.

:39:11.:39:19.

Excuse me if I make a quick exit, I'm going to watch the Williams

:39:20.:39:25.

grand slam final, something I never thought I would say a few years ago!

:39:26.:39:35.

Nearly a quarter of a million people who care for someone

:39:36.:39:38.

with a disability are losing out on pension credits which could leave

:39:39.:39:41.

This is because many aren't claiming this extra benefit.

:39:42.:39:44.

Paul Lewis from Radio 4's Money Box is in our London studio and has been

:39:45.:39:47.

Good morning. Tell us a bit about what this is about and who can get

:39:48.:39:53.

help? These contributions toward your state pension, if you had to

:39:54.:39:57.

buy them date cost you several hundred pounds a year, so they are

:39:58.:40:00.

free in that sense and each year will boost your state pension by

:40:01.:40:05.

about 200 odd pounds a year. But out of a quarter of million people who

:40:06.:40:10.

could get them, only about 11,000 actually have, the others have just

:40:11.:40:14.

not applied or they don't know about them or they find the whole process

:40:15.:40:18.

too daunting. But they really are missing out on important help,

:40:19.:40:22.

because if they don't get it, there could be gaps in their national

:40:23.:40:27.

insurance record and get reduced payments when they get to pension

:40:28.:40:31.

age. The people we are talking about our carers who will be very busy and

:40:32.:40:35.

as you say, trying to claim that this might seem very daunting than

:40:36.:40:39.

they might not have time to do it. How can you claim? It can be

:40:40.:40:43.

daunting. I was wondering why they had claimed and then I looked at the

:40:44.:40:46.

forms online on the government website. I must say, they are long.

:40:47.:40:54.

I think it might put people off. Really am trying to encourage

:40:55.:40:59.

people, as I often do an Breakfast, don't be put off, it is your right

:41:00.:41:03.

and you should do it. It's a long form but you just have to figure out

:41:04.:41:06.

with details and sometimes get a statement from a health professional

:41:07.:41:09.

you really are caring for at least 20 hours a week, for someone who

:41:10.:41:14.

gets disability benefits and you don't get other benefits yourself

:41:15.:41:17.

and you can get this help. But you have to claim it. I don't know why,

:41:18.:41:21.

the government know who they are or should do, they could give it

:41:22.:41:24.

automatically stoplight interesting, thank you for that.

:41:25.:41:26.

You can hear more on Money Box on Radio 4, at midday.

:41:27.:41:30.

Tributes have been pouring in for the actor Sir John

:41:31.:41:35.

The Oscar nominated star continued working, despite being diagnosed

:41:36.:41:40.

Our Entertainment Correspondent Colin Paterson is here.

:41:41.:41:46.

Good morning. 200 films he's been in, it's such a varied career he's

:41:47.:41:57.

had. Varied is the word. I was trying to think what made John Hurt

:41:58.:42:00.

so special and it's when he took on a role he gave a sense of gravity as

:42:01.:42:06.

and a sense of fun at the same time. 1978, he took two role that year,

:42:07.:42:11.

the voice of haze the rabbit in Water Ship Down. And nominated for

:42:12.:42:21.

an award for playing a heroin addict in Midnight Express. Then he played

:42:22.:42:25.

The Elephant Man, Oscar nominated again. For a whole generation he's

:42:26.:42:29.

known for Harry Potter for selling magic wands. He even has his Doctor

:42:30.:42:35.

Who action figure. What variety. He was one of those actors who had a

:42:36.:42:38.

stamp of quality. When you knew he was in a film it was almost like you

:42:39.:42:43.

thought, this film is going to be something special, interesting or

:42:44.:42:47.

good. Like a brand of quality. A sense of relief if you knew he was

:42:48.:42:50.

in it. He's in cinemas at the moment, Jackie, the film that could

:42:51.:42:56.

get Natalie Portman Best actresses here. Towards the end of the film up

:42:57.:43:04.

pops John Hurt is appreciate 57. You think everything is all right now

:43:05.:43:09.

he's on-screen. Fashion some were very popular films. The alien was

:43:10.:43:16.

voted, that moment in the film many people remember, where the alien

:43:17.:43:22.

burst out of the chest is voted by many people as their favourite

:43:23.:43:25.

moment in the cinema. We've spoken to Sedona Weaver, an interview done

:43:26.:43:29.

two years ago, where she talked about that moment in the scene and

:43:30.:43:32.

the actors preparing themselves for what was about to happen.

:43:33.:43:38.

It was in the script and when we got down to the set everyone was wearing

:43:39.:43:47.

ponchos, which made us think something is going to happen that's

:43:48.:43:50.

not usual. But I don't think anything could have prepared us

:43:51.:43:55.

first of all for John's performance. Such brilliant acting. I didn't

:43:56.:43:59.

realise he was acting. You thought something had gone wrong. All I

:44:00.:44:06.

thought was, John is dying. Then the next take, this was with a couple of

:44:07.:44:11.

guys underneath the table, no CGI, no anything, no green screen, with a

:44:12.:44:16.

couple of little tubes and bulbs, and they made this little, honestly,

:44:17.:44:22.

they did a quick change, then this thing came out of John Hurt's fake

:44:23.:44:27.

chest, sat on the table, looked around and ran off the table, all in

:44:28.:44:35.

one shot. There is a master where all five of us are... And we're not

:44:36.:44:40.

acting, because we just went... What just happened? You know, it happened

:44:41.:44:46.

so seamlessly that it seemed so real.

:44:47.:44:52.

Wonderful to hear. One of the most famous deaths in cinema history. But

:44:53.:44:56.

three or four years ago he had been playing Quentin crisp in the naked

:44:57.:45:03.

civil servant. And before that he played Caligula.

:45:04.:45:09.

He was never typecast. That's why so many tributes have been coming in

:45:10.:45:14.

for him because he meant so much to many people. Mel Brooks was the

:45:15.:45:20.

producer of The Elephant Man, he paid tribute saying no one could

:45:21.:45:26.

have played The Elephant Man better. J K rolling because of the Harry

:45:27.:45:36.

Potter films. And the final tribute, to show the breadth of fan base John

:45:37.:45:44.

Hurt had, Axl Rose from guns and Roses has tweeted. He says,

:45:45.:45:50.

"Archibald, you speak, one must never underestimate the healing

:45:51.:45:55.

power of hatred". We all now know Axl Rose's favourite John Hurt roll.

:45:56.:46:03.

Thank you. It is 8:45am. Time to find out what's happening with the

:46:04.:46:05.

weather. Good morning, Chris. Good morning, we are changing the

:46:06.:46:15.

weather, things turning much milder. You can see the green on the map and

:46:16.:46:20.

even tinges of yellow as those temperatures rise through the

:46:21.:46:23.

weekend. It is all change and the changes brought about by area of low

:46:24.:46:27.

pressure, also bringing some wet weather. A wet start to the day for

:46:28.:46:31.

many of us. This rain still working into the cold air is still with us

:46:32.:46:35.

in Scotland, bringing some snowfall. Most the snow above 300 metres

:46:36.:46:43.

elevation. But the A9 could be icy for a time to be some slow to clear

:46:44.:46:49.

rain from northern areas but different further south, where we

:46:50.:46:52.

get rid of the rain and replace it with sunshine and showers. There

:46:53.:46:56.

will be a brisk westerly breeze and that will bring in the mild

:46:57.:46:59.

temperatures, up to 9 degrees in London. Staying on the cool side in

:47:00.:47:06.

Northern Ireland. And in Scotland, staying quite cloudy and damp with

:47:07.:47:11.

the rain, four degrees as good as it gets the many areas. Overnight

:47:12.:47:15.

tonight, as the skies clear, a touch of frost developing in rural areas.

:47:16.:47:20.

The risk of some icy stretches there will still be some snow showers

:47:21.:47:24.

across the of Scotland and also over the Pennines as well. Further south

:47:25.:47:29.

and west, milder air will be working in as the next Atlantic system

:47:30.:47:32.

pushes and in time for Sunday. Here is Sunday's weather. Outbreaks of

:47:33.:47:37.

rain for Wales in south-west England, swinging northwards and

:47:38.:47:40.

eastwards across Northern Ireland. Holding onto some sunshine in the

:47:41.:47:47.

north-east of England. Still quite cold, temperatures 4-6. In the

:47:48.:47:50.

south-west we will be into double figures with cries of ten in

:47:51.:47:54.

Plymouth. Looking for the weather for the week ahead, and unsettled

:47:55.:47:58.

week. Outbreaks of rain. One of the system is quite slow moving across

:47:59.:48:02.

the UK, but then it will get barged out of the way by more active

:48:03.:48:07.

weather systems. Spells of rain next week, going to become quite windy.

:48:08.:48:10.

We may have some severe gales towards the end of the week. The

:48:11.:48:14.

wind often coming in from the south-west, so it will be quite a

:48:15.:48:18.

mild week compared with what we have seen. I think frost will be fairly

:48:19.:48:21.

rare, particularly late in the week. That's how the weather is shaping

:48:22.:48:25.

up. Thank you, unsettled but mild.

:48:26.:48:33.

It is 8:48am. The veteran British actor Sir John Hurt has died at the

:48:34.:48:40.

age of 77, after battling pancreatic cancer.

:48:41.:48:42.

After yesterday's meeting with Theresa May, Donald Trump is due to

:48:43.:48:45.

speak to Vladimir Putin later. For the first time in about 40

:48:46.:48:50.

years, the Government is planning a scheme to recruit specialist maths

:48:51.:48:53.

and physics teachers from abroad. It is willing to pay up

:48:54.:48:55.

to ?300,000 to attract people from Czech Republic,

:48:56.:48:58.

Germany, Poland and the US in the hope it will help schools

:48:59.:49:00.

to fill vacant posts. Joining us now is Malcolm Trobe,

:49:01.:49:02.

acting general secretary of the Association of School

:49:03.:49:07.

and College Leaders, a union And we are hoping to speak to Patsy

:49:08.:49:23.

Kane, with a secondary school in Greater Manchester.

:49:24.:49:27.

Explain to us the problem they are trying to address.

:49:28.:49:31.

The problem basically is we have a national shortage of teachers around

:49:32.:49:37.

the country. In some subjects, maths and science, maths and physics

:49:38.:49:42.

particularly, the shortage is acute. But it is a national problem. In

:49:43.:49:48.

some parts of the country they are saying recruitment is that crisis

:49:49.:49:51.

level. Why? Quite simply we don't have enough

:49:52.:49:55.

teachers in the system. We're not training enough teachers, the

:49:56.:50:01.

retention rate is not as high as it should be, and so we are finding we

:50:02.:50:08.

have a significant shortage, as I say, particularly in maths, science

:50:09.:50:12.

and modern languages. Surely we must have seen this coming? Yes, there's

:50:13.:50:16.

always a time lag when you have to deal with the sort of difficulties

:50:17.:50:19.

because you have to get people through the degree system and

:50:20.:50:22.

through the training system, in terms of preparation. So we've not

:50:23.:50:28.

been recruiting teachers over the last four or five years, so the

:50:29.:50:31.

problem has simply got to severe level.

:50:32.:50:37.

Does it make sense, then, to look elsewhere and recruit from overseas?

:50:38.:50:41.

Yes, we have traditionally always brought in teachers, often

:50:42.:50:45.

Australia, New Zealand and Canada, we have a good reputation in terms

:50:46.:50:48.

of bringing teachers from over there. And we do recruit from EC

:50:49.:50:52.

countries at the moment. So it is good the government is actually

:50:53.:50:58.

taking action here, to recruit. But it's not actually an aspirational

:50:59.:51:03.

target. To recruit 50 teachers when we have over 3000 secondary schools,

:51:04.:51:06.

it's going to have an impact on less than 2% of the schools. As we say,

:51:07.:51:12.

the problem is really severe. It needs action. We as a profession

:51:13.:51:17.

wants with the government come out with an overarching strategy to deal

:51:18.:51:20.

with this problem. It's an interesting time to be talking about

:51:21.:51:24.

bringing in people from other countries to do jobs here, given

:51:25.:51:27.

everything that's happening with Brexit? We don't know what the

:51:28.:51:31.

impact of Brexit would be. Rules that are set up yet to be

:51:32.:51:36.

determined. At the we do use teachers from it easy. When vote

:51:37.:51:45.

leaves came through it created a bit of uncertainty with EC teachers who

:51:46.:51:48.

are currently working in the system. We've yet to see what the impact

:51:49.:51:53.

will be and what the rules will be, but we certainly at the moment need

:51:54.:51:57.

those teachers helping to build up their teaching community that we've

:51:58.:52:01.

got in the country. Do you have any concerns about the quality of the

:52:02.:52:04.

teaching? The impression is your slightly desperate, thinking, where

:52:05.:52:10.

is there a maths teacher? Anyone, come in and teach maths here. Is

:52:11.:52:14.

there a worry about standards? Yes, you have to ensure you are getting

:52:15.:52:18.

high-quality teachers coming in. What we would do is have a programme

:52:19.:52:25.

of adjustment, teaching about the English system, to ensure there are

:52:26.:52:28.

aware of what the teaching methodologies that are used in this

:52:29.:52:32.

country, and how they work within the English system. There needs to

:52:33.:52:38.

be a conversion programme, a conversion course, as part of their

:52:39.:52:41.

induction. Surely that there's more we could be doing here as well?

:52:42.:52:46.

Absolutely. That's why we say we want an overarching strategy, we

:52:47.:52:53.

want to work the government to do this. We need to simplify the routes

:52:54.:52:56.

into training at the moment. We need to promote teaching more as a

:52:57.:53:00.

profession. We've seen some advertising campaigns, but we need

:53:01.:53:03.

to build up better links with universities and schools, in order

:53:04.:53:08.

to get undergraduate and to enthuse about teaching. They've all been

:53:09.:53:12.

taught and inspired at some stage in their life by teachers. What about

:53:13.:53:16.

people who aren't young and newly qualified but taking people move

:53:17.:53:26.

perhaps had other careers. That's what schools lack, where people have

:53:27.:53:31.

used maths or science in their jobs? We don't just want to recruit at 22.

:53:32.:53:37.

In fact, the average age coming into teaching is now, I think it's just

:53:38.:53:43.

under 30. So we are recruiting people with significant experience,

:53:44.:53:48.

that have not just come straight through the pipeline of university,

:53:49.:53:51.

training course and straight into teaching. It's important to bring

:53:52.:53:56.

that industrial, business knowledge and experience into teaching. Thank

:53:57.:53:57.

you very much, Malcolm. He is best known as the monarch that

:53:58.:54:03.

went mad but has history misjudged Thousands of documents

:54:04.:54:07.

are being made available for the first time with a view

:54:08.:54:10.

to learning more about Britain's The project is also

:54:11.:54:13.

the subject of a new documentary and we will be speaking

:54:14.:54:16.

to Daily Mail journalist and historian Robert

:54:17.:54:18.

Hardman in a moment. First, here is a look at one

:54:19.:54:20.

of the most important discoveries. George, at the end of the line,

:54:21.:54:25.

try to work out what you do with this inability to form

:54:26.:54:28.

a government which he can He wants to be the person

:54:29.:54:31.

who ends party, brings together the most able,

:54:32.:54:37.

to work in the national interest. What this speech is basically

:54:38.:54:39.

saying is, "I've failed". What we see here, he's really

:54:40.:54:43.

troubled here, isn't he? There's a lot of free drafting

:54:44.:54:46.

and crossing out going on. This is written in a state

:54:47.:54:53.

of high agitation, I think. You do get a sense of the troubled

:54:54.:54:57.

mind, the blotches on the scrawling and the scratchings out and we begin

:54:58.:55:05.

to come to the end of the line, "I am therefore resolved to resign

:55:06.:55:09.

my Crown and all the dominions appertaining to it to the Prince

:55:10.:55:13.

of Wales, my eldest son and lawful successor,

:55:14.:55:15.

and to retire to the care Daily Mail journalist and historian

:55:16.:55:18.

Robert Hardman joins us now. What a delight, to even see those

:55:19.:55:31.

things. Set the scene for us. The cameras have been allowed into this

:55:32.:55:34.

place. This is Windsor Castle, a vault. The Royal archive, where they

:55:35.:55:41.

put all the royal treasures. If you look at Windsor Castle, the big

:55:42.:55:45.

tower at the top, at the top of that is the Royal archives, where they

:55:46.:55:50.

put all the papers and documents of every monarch, including our current

:55:51.:55:53.

queen. We were allowed in there, the first time camera crews have been

:55:54.:55:57.

allowed in properly, ever, to look at these extraordinary papers of

:55:58.:56:00.

George III. They will be available to the public as of next week. They

:56:01.:56:05.

are going on a new website. We were allowed in to watch that process

:56:06.:56:09.

happening and it is extraordinary. This is inside the Royal

:56:10.:56:21.

archives academics who always dreams of being able to look at these

:56:22.:56:24.

papers. They are finally being allowed in for their first rummage

:56:25.:56:26.

in these historic documents. Hundreds of thousands of documents.

:56:27.:56:28.

The results, it will take many years before they are all put online and

:56:29.:56:31.

digitised but we were able to see it get under way. It was extraordinary

:56:32.:56:34.

to see papers like abdication documents, private letters, to hold

:56:35.:56:37.

them in your hand, and that's what's going on here. Why do you think you

:56:38.:56:42.

were allowed, what's changed? These are papers that have basically sat

:56:43.:56:47.

in boxes for over 200 years. A few years ago the Queen decided to allow

:56:48.:56:51.

Queen Victoria's journals to be digitalised. That was a great

:56:52.:56:55.

success. So they thought, let's let George III, let's open him up.

:56:56.:57:00.

History has been very unkind to George III. They the only thing

:57:01.:57:06.

people know about him is he went mad and lost America. Is the Queen

:57:07.:57:10.

looking around some of her great great great great grandfather's

:57:11.:57:15.

papers. Those letters, we saw the one right at the beginning. What

:57:16.:57:19.

clues that they give us to what George III, what was really going on

:57:20.:57:22.

in his head? What did you learn? I think we learned stress of kingship

:57:23.:57:27.

in this period. This was a period when the whole world was in turmoil.

:57:28.:57:30.

He's just lost the war of independence in America, he's just

:57:31.:57:35.

lost a child, all his politicians squabbling scream scheming, he

:57:36.:57:40.

thinks everyone is corrupt and out to get him so he writes this

:57:41.:57:44.

extraordinary letter of application. You drew attention to the scrawls,

:57:45.:57:49.

the bits crossed out, is musing and writing as he goes. He had no

:57:50.:57:53.

secretary, he sat down... We find this time and time again in the

:57:54.:57:57.

documents, the amount of detail and anguish that goes into these letters

:57:58.:58:01.

on these documents. It's quite extraordinary. We think of the

:58:02.:58:05.

abdication of Henry VIII, but this is a king that twice drafted an

:58:06.:58:08.

abdication, never got round to it and went on to be the longest

:58:09.:58:12.

reigning king we ever had. He saw the application there but he reigned

:58:13.:58:17.

for another 30 years. And had 15 children. One of the big fines is

:58:18.:58:21.

the lock of hair. Very early on we were going through some of the

:58:22.:58:24.

papers from Queen Charlotte, his wife. Out of nowhere pops this

:58:25.:58:28.

letter with a little envelope in it. We open it up and it is a lock of

:58:29.:58:33.

hair of Prince Alfred, child number 14, he died very young. We can have

:58:34.:58:38.

a look at that moment now. It's a short note from Queen

:58:39.:58:43.

Charlotte to Lady Charlotte finch, the governess. With a little paper

:58:44.:58:53.

included. Just labelled, Prince Alfred's hair, cut during his...

:58:54.:59:01.

Illness. 1782, at the lower Lodge, Windsor. And then a lock of Prince

:59:02.:59:10.

Alfred, little Prince Alfred who died, a little golden lock of his

:59:11.:59:18.

hair. For her to remember him by an thanking him for looking after him.

:59:19.:59:23.

That is amazing to see. I must ask you whilst you are here, President

:59:24.:59:28.

Trump met Theresa May yesterday and Theresa May announced President

:59:29.:59:30.

Trump will be coming here to meet the Queen. That is going to be a big

:59:31.:59:35.

moment, isn't it? A very big moment. The Queen has met

:59:36.:59:39.

all the great world leaders since pretty much the Second World War. It

:59:40.:59:44.

was I suppose inevitable a new president would come, but that he is

:59:45.:59:47.

coming so soon is very interesting. The question is, where will he be

:59:48.:59:51.

hosted? Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle?

:59:52.:59:54.

There could be some breaks the protocol.

:59:55.:59:58.

They are saying maybe Balmoral for the golf but I don't think now what

:59:59.:59:59.

happened. Great to see you. George III - The Genius

:00:00.:00:03.

of The Mad King is on BBC 2 Hello, this is Breakfast, with

:00:04.:00:07.

Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern. The veteran actor Sir John

:00:08.:00:29.

Hurt has died aged 77. He appeared in 200 films

:00:30.:00:34.

and television productions and was twice nominated

:00:35.:00:36.

for an Oscar. Also ahead: Hand in hand

:00:37.:00:53.

in the White House - Donald Trump and Theresa May

:00:54.:01:00.

pledge their commitment I can often tell how I'll get along

:01:01.:01:02.

with somebody very early, and I believe we are going

:01:03.:01:12.

to have a fantastic relationship. After a spate of accidents,

:01:13.:01:16.

a call for lorry drivers to be banned from using satnavs

:01:17.:01:19.

designed for cars. In sport: They haven't met

:01:20.:01:23.

in a grand slam final for eight years, but Serena Williams

:01:24.:01:35.

is taking on her sister Venus for the Australian title

:01:36.:01:37.

and a record-breaking It is not as cold as it has

:01:38.:01:39.

been over recent days, but we have got some rain to contend

:01:40.:01:47.

with today and it is still just about cold enough for some of that

:01:48.:01:51.

rain to fall as snow He was 77 and had recently

:01:52.:01:54.

been ill with cancer. He starred in around 200 films

:01:55.:02:01.

including Harry Potter and was nominated for an Oscar

:02:02.:02:03.

for his roles in The Elephant Man Our correspondent

:02:04.:02:07.

Nick Higham reports. A stirring and memorable role as

:02:08.:02:31.

Joseph in The Elephant Man. He will also be remembered for his part in

:02:32.:02:34.

the film Alien, this scene often voted as one of cinema's most

:02:35.:02:42.

shocking moments. John Hurt certainly demonstrated his

:02:43.:02:45.

versatility as an actor, starring in more than 200 films and television

:02:46.:02:49.

series in a career spanning six decades. His talent was recognised

:02:50.:02:55.

with four Bafta awards, including for his role as Quentin crisp, the

:02:56.:02:59.

flamboyant gay writer in The Naked Civil Servant. I wear rouge, I wear

:03:00.:03:05.

mascara on my eyelashes, I dye my hair, iWeb clubwear clothes, far

:03:06.:03:08.

more outre than those I am wearing now. Many people said, don't do

:03:09.:03:14.

that, you will never work again. I said, but it's not about

:03:15.:03:16.

homosexuality, is about the tenderness of the individual as

:03:17.:03:20.

opposed to the cruelty of the crowd. Younger fans may remember him for

:03:21.:03:23.

his more recent parts as the wand maker in the Harry Potter films and

:03:24.:03:29.

here in the TV show Doctor Who. Why are you pointing your screwdrivers

:03:30.:03:34.

like that? Fellow stars have been paying tribute. Actor in Niger

:03:35.:03:35.

tweeted, saying: -- Elijah Wood. He became Sir John in 2015 after

:03:36.:04:03.

getting a knighthood for services to drama. That same year, he revealed

:04:04.:04:07.

he had grabbed a cancer, but was determined to continue working and

:04:08.:04:11.

was later given the all-clear. Asked how he felt about death after the

:04:12.:04:18.

initial diagnosis, he said, I can't say I worry about mortality, when

:04:19.:04:21.

are all just passing time and occupy our chair very briefly.

:04:22.:04:24.

Theresa May and Donald Trump have stressed their commitment to Nato

:04:25.:04:29.

The Prime Minister and the President both reiterated the importance

:04:30.:04:34.

of the special relationship in the first visit of a foreign

:04:35.:04:37.

leader to Washington since Donald Trump's inauguration.

:04:38.:04:40.

Theresa May urged the United States not to lift

:04:41.:04:43.

The US President is due to speak to Vladimir Putin today.

:04:44.:04:55.

President Trump has also announced stringent controls on immigration

:04:56.:04:57.

which he said would keep what he called "radical

:04:58.:04:59.

Islamic terrorists" out of the United States.

:05:00.:05:01.

Earlier we asked David Willis to give us more

:05:02.:05:03.

Donald Trump vowed in his inauguration address to,

:05:04.:05:06.

as he put it, eradicate Islamic terrorism from the face

:05:07.:05:08.

He has now signed an executive order banning refugees from the country,

:05:09.:05:16.

indefinitely in the case of those from Syria, temporarily in the case

:05:17.:05:19.

Mr Trump believes that terrorists often pose as refugees in order

:05:20.:05:27.

He wants people only allowed in who support America

:05:28.:05:40.

He also announced plans for a temporary ban on the issuing

:05:41.:05:44.

of visas to citizens from seven majority Muslim countries,

:05:45.:05:46.

countries that have been linked to terrorism.

:05:47.:05:48.

The Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer described it as

:05:49.:05:52.

He said that tears would be running down the cheeks

:05:53.:05:58.

America's grand tradition of welcoming immigrants,

:05:59.:06:03.

he said, had been stomped upon with these measures.

:06:04.:06:09.

Theresa May has travelled from Washington to Turkey for talks

:06:10.:06:11.

on trade and security with President Erdogan.

:06:12.:06:19.

The Prime Minister is also facing pressure to discuss concerns

:06:20.:06:21.

Employers are being offered advice about how to reduce the gender pay

:06:22.:06:32.

gap before new regulations come into force in April.

:06:33.:06:34.

Ministers say progress has been made but more needs to be done.

:06:35.:06:37.

Companies with at least 250 workers will be forced to reveal the pay

:06:38.:06:40.

International help has been arriving in Chile to help the country fight

:06:41.:06:44.

So far, 11 people have died and 1,500 homes have been destroyed.

:06:45.:06:49.

Our correspondent Greg Dawson has more.

:06:50.:06:53.

Beneath the rising plumes of smoke, you get a sense of the scale

:06:54.:06:57.

of what is now one of the biggest emergencies

:06:58.:06:59.

Forests incinerated, towns destroyed and lives lost.

:07:00.:07:08.

The fire service is so overwhelmed that residents are protecting

:07:09.:07:11.

their homes with hosepipes and bottles of water.

:07:12.:07:14.

More than 100 fires are still raging, aided by high

:07:15.:07:17.

With services so stretched, teams of firefighters have

:07:18.:07:26.

arrived from Columbia, with Mexico also

:07:27.:07:28.

Earlier in the week, the world's biggest firefighting

:07:29.:07:35.

Now Russia is sending a similar aircraft.

:07:36.:07:39.

The damage has left thousands without a home, with many forced

:07:40.:07:42.

into temporary shelters like this school.

:07:43.:07:44.

Others are sleeping in vehicles, clinging to what they have left.

:07:45.:07:49.

But on Friday came a reminder of those who have lost much more.

:07:50.:07:55.

Funerals were held for a firefighter and policeman, both killed

:07:56.:07:57.

At least ten people are now known to have died,

:07:58.:08:03.

but with so few of these fires under control, it is a number

:08:04.:08:06.

that is likely to keep rising in the coming days.

:08:07.:08:15.

A draft letter of abdication from King George III has been

:08:16.:08:17.

The unsent letter - which includes crossings out,

:08:18.:08:24.

was written during the American War of Independence, and is one

:08:25.:08:28.

of thousands of his private papers released by the Royal Archives.

:08:29.:08:37.

The UK's 2017 Eurovision entry has been decided.

:08:38.:08:45.

Former X Factor contestant Lucie Jones will represent

:08:46.:08:57.

the country in Kiev in May with the song Never Give Up On You,

:08:58.:09:02.

which was written by a former Eurovision winner.

:09:03.:09:07.

Lucie was chosen after winning the combined public and jury vote

:09:08.:09:10.

at the end of a live TV show in which six singers performed.

:09:11.:09:13.

All of the potential acts were former X Factor contestants.

:09:14.:09:16.

We wish her well. We haven't got a great track record in Eurovision,

:09:17.:09:23.

but who knows? Anything can happen. She has got some lungs on her, my

:09:24.:09:29.

goodness. All the sport and weather are coming up in a few minutes.

:09:30.:09:32.

Successive UK Prime Ministers have crossed the Atlantic to cement

:09:33.:09:35.

the so-called special relationship, knowing a positive Washington trip

:09:36.:09:38.

This time, both Theresa May and the US President Donald Trump

:09:39.:09:42.

had a lot to gain from the UK-US summit.

:09:43.:09:44.

We will be analysing the trip from both perspectives in a moment

:09:45.:09:47.

but first, here is a recap of some of the key moments.

:09:48.:09:58.

This is the original, folks, in many ways.

:09:59.:10:06.

It's a great honour to have Winston Churchill back.

:10:07.:10:10.

Today, the United States renews our deep bond with Britain -

:10:11.:10:13.

military, financial, cultural and political.

:10:14.:10:18.

We pledge our lasting support to this most special relationship.

:10:19.:10:24.

On defence and security cooperation, we are united in our recognition

:10:25.:10:27.

of Nato as the bulwark of our collective defence.

:10:28.:10:29.

Today, we have reaffirmed our unshakeable commitment

:10:30.:10:31.

I think Brexit is going to be a wonderful thing for your country.

:10:32.:10:36.

I have been listening to the president and the president

:10:37.:10:38.

has listened to me, that is the point of

:10:39.:10:41.

I can tell how I will get along with somebody very early,

:10:42.:10:45.

and I believe we are going to have a fantastic relationship.

:10:46.:10:52.

We are joined on the sofa by the journalist and political

:10:53.:10:54.

analyst Carol Gould and from our London newsroom by the Independent's

:10:55.:11:02.

We were just seeing some of the key moments and lots of talk about the

:11:03.:11:08.

special relationship. How do you think it went? It went well, but

:11:09.:11:13.

Theresa May needs Trump, because she is in a lot of hot water here with

:11:14.:11:17.

the controversy over Brexit, the Supreme Court decision, the ongoing

:11:18.:11:24.

public discourse about it. So she needs an ally. I hate to say it, but

:11:25.:11:30.

he doesn't really need her. That is what came across to me even before

:11:31.:11:34.

this meeting, that she needed to get to the States to meet him, to make

:11:35.:11:39.

this acquaintance. In my estimation, I don't think it will be like Ronald

:11:40.:11:45.

Reagan and Margaret Thatcher. The fact that he admitted that he

:11:46.:11:49.

supports Nato is a shift from his campaign rhetoric, when he said Nato

:11:50.:11:53.

was a waste of time. That was an interesting moment in the press

:11:54.:11:56.

conference, because effectively, Theresa May spoke for him. She said,

:11:57.:12:04.

I think you said you are 100% behind Nato, and he didn't say that himself

:12:05.:12:08.

in the press conference. A lot of people have said he was effectively

:12:09.:12:14.

on his best behaviour. That's right, she couldn't have done that with Her

:12:15.:12:17.

Majesty the Queen because of confidentiality, but that was a

:12:18.:12:20.

clever move. He would likely have said it to her in a private session,

:12:21.:12:27.

and then she threw it at him. She forced him to be on his best

:12:28.:12:33.

behaviour, as you said. He is going to have to have allies in the Senate

:12:34.:12:39.

to get through some of the programmes he will have discussed

:12:40.:12:42.

with her. He is a bilateral list, not a multilateralist. That is why

:12:43.:12:46.

the first thing he did was to get rub Trans-Pacific Partnership. Then

:12:47.:12:52.

he will try and dismantle Nafta, the North American Free Trade Agreement

:12:53.:12:56.

with Mexico and Canada. People need people like Bernie Sanders, who was

:12:57.:12:59.

a huge voice in the Senate. He has been in Washington 20 years. People

:13:00.:13:04.

say, who cares about Bernie Sanders any more?. Bernie Sanders was for

:13:05.:13:08.

getting rid of TPP, and he was for getting rid of Nafta. Let's turn to

:13:09.:13:21.

John Rentoul from the Independent. We were talking about some of the

:13:22.:13:26.

domestic policies in the US, but we had that moment when Laura

:13:27.:13:31.

Kuenssberg from the BBC presented it directly to the President, some of

:13:32.:13:34.

the things people might find less palatable about why he said about

:13:35.:13:37.

abortion and torture amongst other things. And that prompted an

:13:38.:13:41.

interesting reaction from him. Absolutely, he really didn't like

:13:42.:13:47.

it. He sort of turned to Theresa May and said, this is your question,

:13:48.:13:56.

that is another relationship gone. But in a sense, that was fine,

:13:57.:13:59.

because he was saying to Theresa May, my goodness, your media is just

:14:00.:14:05.

as bad as my media, we do have something in common after all. One

:14:06.:14:12.

of the things that stood out to me was the fact that Theresa May said,

:14:13.:14:16.

there is much of which we agree. Carol, do you think there is? There

:14:17.:14:22.

is, but on the issue of torture, I wouldn't have thought she agrees

:14:23.:14:25.

with him. I remember when Donald Rumsfeld, the former Defence

:14:26.:14:27.

Secretary, used to use an expression, we visit with them,

:14:28.:14:32.

which is a euphemism for what we do to people who are extraordinarily

:14:33.:14:38.

rendered. Extraordinary rendition was the practice of taking prisoners

:14:39.:14:41.

to country where torture was allowed. I don't think Theresa May

:14:42.:14:45.

is going to agree with President Trump on that. There will be a

:14:46.:14:49.

couple of other issues on which they will disagree. But in a broad sense,

:14:50.:14:56.

she has to handle Brexit. He's getting rid of multilateral

:14:57.:14:58.

agreements, which puts him in a position like Britain in Europe. The

:14:59.:15:04.

US is out of international trade agreements and it will require a lot

:15:05.:15:08.

of work. He may even call on her for advice. John, some huge issues on

:15:09.:15:14.

the table, but to be fair, you will notice from your newspaper

:15:15.:15:16.

experience. Here is one picture that dominated this morning, and that was

:15:17.:15:19.

that moment as they were walking around the White House and Donald

:15:20.:15:25.

Trump took Theresa May's hand. Just for a couple of seconds. That is

:15:26.:15:30.

going to be an enduring image. It is. But in a way, I am not sure that

:15:31.:15:36.

will be as bad for Theresa May as a journalists assume. We did a poll

:15:37.:15:43.

for the Independent the other day about asking people whether Theresa

:15:44.:15:46.

May should be trying to pursue a closer relationship with Donald

:15:47.:15:50.

Trump and there are a lot of people opposed to it, but more people

:15:51.:15:55.

thought she was right to pursue a close relationship with the

:15:56.:15:58.

president of the United States. I think people will take a pragmatic

:15:59.:16:01.

view of that. The holding hands was a symbolic moment to capture that

:16:02.:16:09.

relationship. I think it would be Theresa May nothing but good. The

:16:10.:16:15.

whole visit for her was a triumph. All the gossip in Westminster was

:16:16.:16:18.

about how terrified her inner circle were that something was going to go

:16:19.:16:22.

wrong, that Donald Trump was going to say something untoward in the

:16:23.:16:26.

news conference. As Carol said, he was as meek as a lamb. One of the

:16:27.:16:32.

other relationships that will come under scrutiny is with Russia, and

:16:33.:16:36.

that was mentioned by Theresa May and President Trump yesterday, with

:16:37.:16:39.

Theresa May being clear about the sanctions against Russia. But

:16:40.:16:42.

President Trump was not being very committal about it. We know he will

:16:43.:16:47.

talk to Vladimir Putin later, so how significant is that? He is going to

:16:48.:16:53.

talk to Vladimir Putin tomorrow. You have to remember that he still has

:16:54.:17:07.

to consult. There is a concept of consent in the Senate and Congress,

:17:08.:17:09.

and there are Republicans who don't agree with President Trump. So he is

:17:10.:17:14.

going to talk to Putin, but we don't know what his colleagues will say.

:17:15.:17:19.

He has to consult the Cabinet, the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He thinks

:17:20.:17:23.

he's going to be an emperor and just do what he wants, executive order

:17:24.:17:26.

after executive order, like he has done this week. But at some point,

:17:27.:17:33.

the idea of consulting Congress is going to be important. And don't

:17:34.:17:40.

underestimate the power of the doyens of Congress, John McCain and

:17:41.:17:46.

Bernie Sanders, who are highly respected. He can't toss them aside.

:17:47.:17:50.

And Dick Cheney, the former vice president, came out yesterday and

:17:51.:17:55.

said unequivocally, Republicans and Conservatives cannot have a ban on

:17:56.:17:58.

people coming here from Muslim countries. We have to leave it

:17:59.:18:02.

there. Thank you both. Chris is here with the weather. Good

:18:03.:18:18.

morning. We are finally coming out from the deep freeze. We had lots of

:18:19.:18:21.

frost and fog in the last week, but temperatures are rising. For many of

:18:22.:18:28.

us, it is a mild start of the day. The reason for the changes that we

:18:29.:18:31.

have an area of low pressure that is bringing some rain. Still some cold

:18:32.:18:37.

air with this in Scotland. So we have seen some of the rainfall as

:18:38.:18:40.

smoke over the higher ground, most of which has been over 300 metres in

:18:41.:18:54.

elevation. Nevertheless, some of the A routes could be affected by snow.

:18:55.:18:58.

There could be slippery conditions here for a time. The rain will be

:18:59.:19:01.

slow to clear away from northern parts. Further south, the rain will

:19:02.:19:06.

clear, followed by sunshine and showers this afternoon. The showers

:19:07.:19:10.

will not last because there will be brisk winds bringing relatively mild

:19:11.:19:17.

air. It will stay quite cold in northern England. Brighter skies in

:19:18.:19:22.

Northern Ireland. In Scotland, the rain and hill snow will be reluctant

:19:23.:19:27.

to clear away. Overnight, the rain does ease off, followed by some

:19:28.:19:31.

showers. They will fall as snow over the higher ground in Scotland and

:19:32.:19:36.

over the Pennines as well. It touch of frost in rural parts. Towards

:19:37.:19:41.

Wales and south-west England, it will turn milder later in the night

:19:42.:19:44.

as the next Atlantic system begins to move in. For the second half of

:19:45.:19:48.

the weekend, more rain on the way. After a bright start to the day,

:19:49.:19:52.

more rain will move in and that band of wet weather will continue to push

:19:53.:19:57.

northwards and eastwards. But it is not reaching Scotland. Here, it is a

:19:58.:20:02.

decent day, but quite cold. Milder in the south-west. In the week

:20:03.:20:10.

ahead, it will be unsettled. Slow-moving weather fronts are

:20:11.:20:13.

crossing the UK initially. Later in the week, we will see more oomph

:20:14.:20:16.

from these weather systems moving in of the Atlantic. Spells of rain,

:20:17.:20:31.

certainly. But by and large, frost will become quite rare, certainly

:20:32.:20:32.

towards the end of next week. It's time now

:20:33.:20:39.

for a look at the newspapers. Guardian film critic

:20:40.:20:41.

Peter Bradshaw is here to tell us A lot of people are waking up to the

:20:42.:20:53.

news that Sir John Hurt has died at 77 years old. A lot of reflections

:20:54.:20:58.

on a remarkable career. A remarkable career. I have been thinking about

:20:59.:21:01.

the wonderful roles he has played. The generation of children have

:21:02.:21:04.

grown up with him as Mr Ollivander as the proprietor of the magic wand

:21:05.:21:09.

shop in the Harry Potter movies. I remember him in so many roles.

:21:10.:21:13.

Obviously, John Merrick in The Elephant Man, his extraordinary

:21:14.:21:15.

performance that he had to sell just with his incredible voice. That

:21:16.:21:22.

delicate, quavering, but courageous voice of a survivor. But for me, his

:21:23.:21:28.

absolute masterpiece is the movie Scandal, about the Profumo affair,

:21:29.:21:34.

where he played the osteopath Doctor Stephen Ward and Ian McKellen played

:21:35.:21:40.

Profumo. And Joanne Whalley played Christine Keeler. And John Hurt

:21:41.:21:44.

nailed it. He embodied everything he wanted to embody. He nailed British

:21:45.:21:50.

snobbery and fear of sex and everything about that made such a

:21:51.:21:57.

great satire, a great anatomy of the British ruling classes then, as now.

:21:58.:22:02.

It was encapsulated by John Hurt's brilliant performance. It is worth

:22:03.:22:11.

downloading it right now. On that recommendation, I am sure a lot of

:22:12.:22:15.

people will be revisiting his films. You have been looking at the papers.

:22:16.:22:20.

Where are you starting? The Daily Mirror. A good old-fashioned social

:22:21.:22:26.

interest story on homelessness in Britain. Homelessness has doubled in

:22:27.:22:33.

the last two years. There is a stunning statistic in this report.

:22:34.:22:41.

There are around 4000 people on the streets. It was under 2000 two years

:22:42.:22:47.

ago. There are a number of different determinant factor is for this.

:22:48.:22:52.

Mental health cuts and so on, problems with housing, people who

:22:53.:22:55.

are vulnerably housed and the rest of it. But we have all seen homeless

:22:56.:23:01.

people that we walked past, particularly in cities. And now with

:23:02.:23:05.

the weather so terrible, minus two degrees, this is a terrific story.

:23:06.:23:16.

It is a classic Mirror story, good old-fashioned social justice. Let's

:23:17.:23:22.

look at a story from the Daily Express. This is about everyone's

:23:23.:23:27.

utter dependence, our hypnosis when it comes to sat-nav. Wendy sat-nav

:23:28.:23:31.

is switched on, we become mesmerised by the voice saying go 300 yards

:23:32.:23:35.

forward and then turn right. And this voice tells us what to do and

:23:36.:23:42.

we abandon our common. What is happening is that truckers get told

:23:43.:23:46.

what to do by sat-navs which are designed for tiny little country

:23:47.:23:52.

lanes. The Express has a funny gallery of pictures of trucks which

:23:53.:23:56.

literally jammed into these winding little byways. And it is true. We

:23:57.:24:01.

are all mesmerised by sat-navs. We think they know. So the idea is that

:24:02.:24:07.

they should have their own special sat-navs. But also, use your common

:24:08.:24:12.

sense. If the lane in front of you is flooded and you as an experienced

:24:13.:24:15.

driver think, I can't drive into that without getting into trouble,

:24:16.:24:18.

then don't be overridden by this voice telling you to drive on. The

:24:19.:24:25.

local Government Association once legislation on this now, for lorries

:24:26.:24:29.

to have specific sat-navs for them. It is horrible, but they are funny

:24:30.:24:33.

pictures in the Express of huge trucks getting jammed in tiny

:24:34.:24:38.

country lanes. To the world of photography now and trends with

:24:39.:24:41.

cameras. I never thought I would live to see the day. I am as the

:24:42.:24:46.

addicted to everyone else to taking pictures on my smartphone because of

:24:47.:24:49.

all the filters you can use which can surely approximate everything

:24:50.:24:52.

that an old-fashioned roll camera can take? No. Kodak have reported

:24:53.:24:56.

that people are crying out for old-fashioned roll films. And in the

:24:57.:25:01.

world of film too, people still want celluloid. They think it has a

:25:02.:25:07.

warmth and a richness and a colour tone which digital can't match. Do

:25:08.:25:13.

we liken it to people wanting to buy vinyl? Partly that, yes. Whether or

:25:14.:25:18.

not it is rational, people still want vinyl. Kodak are hard-headed

:25:19.:25:27.

business people. They wouldn't do it if they didn't think it wasn't

:25:28.:25:30.

profitable. They are going to bring back rolls of film. I am a bad

:25:31.:25:37.

photographer, but one of the things that having film in economic is that

:25:38.:25:41.

it makes you think about what pictures you are taking. If you take

:25:42.:25:44.

as many as you like, you don't think. I remember when you only had

:25:45.:25:53.

34 exposures, and you would save it and come back from your holiday and

:25:54.:25:56.

go to the chemist. Is all of that going to make a comeback? Maybe it

:25:57.:26:01.

is. And the fish and chip revolution. Yes, the FT is reporting

:26:02.:26:08.

from the national fish and chip championships, which I never knew

:26:09.:26:14.

existed. The revolution is that more and more people are eating fish and

:26:15.:26:19.

chips. It is up 4% in the last year. You would think that with burgers

:26:20.:26:24.

and Vietnamese food and sushi, no one would be interested in fish and

:26:25.:26:28.

chips. No. People are really into fish and chips! Is it comfort food,

:26:29.:26:34.

something to do with Brexit? There is a new phenomenon known as dining

:26:35.:26:39.

down, and I are going back to fish and chips. I haven't had

:26:40.:26:42.

old-fashioned fish and chips for a while. I used to love them with too

:26:43.:26:49.

much salt and vinegar, and it getting too cold and three quarters

:26:50.:26:53.

of the way through, and continuing to eat it. You would power through.

:26:54.:27:00.

I love it. And the best chips from Whitby, without a doubt lovely to

:27:01.:27:02.

see you. We're on BBC One until ten

:27:03.:27:03.

o'clock this morning, when Angela Hartnett takes over

:27:04.:27:07.

in the Saturday Kitchen. With all that talk about food, I bet

:27:08.:27:15.

there was not fish and chips on the menu there? No fish and chips this

:27:16.:27:18.

morning. We have a few other delights for you. Our special guest

:27:19.:27:26.

today is a fabulous food writer and critic, Tom Parker Bowles. Feeling

:27:27.:27:32.

very good this morning. Bright and early. Not as early as me. What is

:27:33.:27:38.

your food heaven? Broth, consomme, the essence of the animal. Delicious

:27:39.:27:48.

soup. And your food hell? Goats cheese. We have some amazing chefs

:27:49.:27:52.

as well, Ken Hom, to celebrate Chinese new year. How are you? Ready

:27:53.:28:01.

to go. What are you going to cook? Session one dumplings, as I know Tom

:28:02.:28:07.

likes spicy food. And steamed salmon with black bean sauce. And Adam,

:28:08.:28:12.

your first time on Saturday Kitchen. Feeling good? I am excited. Nervous,

:28:13.:28:18.

but looking forward to it. You are going to be fine. You have to do

:28:19.:28:22.

some delicious beef for us. We have already had beef, salmon and

:28:23.:28:26.

dumplings. Tune in and see you at ten o'clock. We will do.

:28:27.:28:30.

Heartbreak, separation and living in the present.

:28:31.:28:40.

Singer-songwriter Ryan Adams will be here to tell us

:28:41.:28:43.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern.

:28:44.:29:56.

Coming up before ten we'll have an update

:29:57.:29:57.

But first at 9.30am, a summary of this

:29:58.:30:07.

He starred in around 200 films including Harry Potter

:30:08.:30:15.

and was nominated for an Oscar for his roles in The Elephant Man

:30:16.:30:18.

Sir John continued working despite being diagnosed

:30:19.:30:20.

Tributes have been pouring in online.

:30:21.:31:07.

Let's have a look at the other news this morning.

:31:08.:31:11.

Theresa May and Donald Trump have stressed their commitment to Nato

:31:12.:31:14.

The Prime Minister and the President both reiterated

:31:15.:31:17.

the importance of the special relationship in the first visit

:31:18.:31:20.

of a foreign leader to Washington since Donald Trump's inauguration.

:31:21.:31:22.

Theresa May urged the United States not to lift

:31:23.:31:25.

The US President is due to speak to Vladimir Putin today.

:31:26.:31:30.

I will be representing the American people very,

:31:31.:31:35.

very strongly, very forcefully, and if we have

:31:36.:31:37.

a great relationship with Russia and other countries,

:31:38.:31:42.

and if we go after Isis together, which has to be stopped,

:31:43.:31:45.

that's an evil that has to be stopped, I will consider that a good

:31:46.:31:49.

Following her trip to Washington, Theresa May is now on her way

:31:50.:31:58.

to Turkey for talks with President Erdogan.

:31:59.:32:00.

The talks are expected to focus on trade and security

:32:01.:32:02.

but she's facing pressure to discuss concerns about alleged human

:32:03.:32:05.

Lorry drivers should be banned from using

:32:06.:32:07.

That's what councils are calling for after a spate of incidents

:32:08.:32:14.

caused by heavy goods vehicles using bridges where they're

:32:15.:32:16.

The Local Government Association wants legislation brought in to make

:32:17.:32:21.

it compulsory for all lorry drivers to use sat-navs specifically

:32:22.:32:23.

A draft letter of abdication from King George the third has been

:32:24.:32:31.

The unsent letter - which includes crossings out,

:32:32.:32:35.

redrafts, blotches and scrawls - was written during the American War

:32:36.:32:38.

of Independence, and is one of thousands of his private papers

:32:39.:32:40.

Those are the main stories this morning.

:32:41.:32:50.

Mike is here. Did you just spritz some aftershave?

:32:51.:32:59.

That is just my natural aroma! You smell lovely.

:33:00.:33:05.

I've been watching the tennis. We are not in an episode of Doctor Who,

:33:06.:33:10.

it's not 2009, its 2017 and the Williams sisters are in another

:33:11.:33:15.

grand slam final. As you would expect, Serena is on top, chasing

:33:16.:33:20.

that record, the 23rd grand slam title that would take her beyond

:33:21.:33:25.

Steffi Graf's total. Serena went into this game against Venus, for

:33:26.:33:31.

the first time in eight years, as firm favourites,

:33:32.:33:35.

as she tries to win a record breaking 23rd grand slam title.

:33:36.:33:38.

Serena hasn't lost a set so far at this Australian Open,

:33:39.:33:40.

and she broke her sister's serve early on to seize the early

:33:41.:33:43.

However, if anyone is able to tame the Serena serve,

:33:44.:33:47.

But Serena, who has won more of their matches to date,

:33:48.:33:51.

was able to seize the initiative with her greater power and took

:33:52.:33:54.

that shows how close it was, that it took that time to get the first set.

:33:55.:34:02.

Lets get the latest from Melbourne and speak to our tennis

:34:03.:34:05.

As someone who watches the game all the time, put it in context for ask

:34:06.:34:12.

how surprising is we are witnessing this throwback final mark --? Very

:34:13.:34:20.

surprising. If you did a survey of everyone who works in tennis I don't

:34:21.:34:23.

think anyone would have picked this to be the final on the last day of

:34:24.:34:26.

the tournament. Venus Williams hasn't been in a grand slam final

:34:27.:34:29.

for eight years. They haven't played each other for that long at this

:34:30.:34:37.

sort of stage. Venus Williams, aged 36, not young for a tennis player

:34:38.:34:42.

and she has had real health difficulties, a fatiguing illness

:34:43.:34:44.

for many years now. She hasn't really looks like getting to this

:34:45.:34:48.

stage of a tournament for a long, long time. But she is here on merit.

:34:49.:34:53.

She's having a fantastic run. Serena Williams, this is much more familiar

:34:54.:34:58.

for her. As you say, going for history today. If she can win this

:34:59.:35:01.

match, she moves ahead of Steffi Graf. It would be a monumental

:35:02.:35:11.

achievement from her and she has the first set on the board, 6-4. It is

:35:12.:35:14.

more competitive in the second set. 2-1. A strange atmosphere, two

:35:15.:35:16.

sisters who love each other trying to beat each other. That's amazing

:35:17.:35:20.

on its own, then you add the fact tomorrow we have this retro men's

:35:21.:35:24.

final between Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer. Absolutely. 36, Nadal, he

:35:25.:35:31.

beat Grigor Dimitrov in five hours last night, amazing match. Roger

:35:32.:35:36.

Federer, aged 35. This is a grand slam final that we always remember.

:35:37.:35:40.

Think of 2008, that's the only time the Venus and Serena Williams final

:35:41.:35:46.

and Federer and Nadal both happened at the same tournament. That was the

:35:47.:35:50.

greatest men's match I think we'd ever seen. We probably thought we

:35:51.:35:55.

would never seek Nadal and Federer in a grand slam final again, I

:35:56.:35:58.

certainly didn't expect to see it again. This is an extraordinary

:35:59.:36:02.

grand slam tournament, the Australian open, and one to cherish.

:36:03.:36:06.

What is it down to, that we've seen these two finals, the odds against

:36:07.:36:12.

which were 5001 at the start. Is it others of all like Murray and

:36:13.:36:16.

Djokovic or have they got there by their incredible stamina and able to

:36:17.:36:21.

-- ability to fight back? I think it's a combination. If you

:36:22.:36:25.

asked the majority of people in tennis virtually everyone thought it

:36:26.:36:28.

would be Djokovic and Murray in the final. I certainly thought that

:36:29.:36:32.

would be the case, given the last two or three years. But they lost

:36:33.:36:37.

early. They were fatigued, not really mentally fresh compared to

:36:38.:36:40.

Federer, who has had six months out because of injury. What it did it it

:36:41.:36:45.

refreshed him. He was so excited to be back on the circuit. But even he

:36:46.:36:48.

didn't think he would reach the final. He said, I might win a few

:36:49.:36:53.

matches but I've had six months off, how can I go all the way? Nadal has

:36:54.:36:57.

incrementally worked his way back and we have one for the ages

:36:58.:37:01.

tomorrow. David, thank you for the updates. We will keep you updated on

:37:02.:37:03.

that Williams final. The fourth round of the FA Cup got

:37:04.:37:07.

of to a flying start last night, with Championship side Derby

:37:08.:37:11.

going so close to upsetting their neighbours, the Premier League

:37:12.:37:13.

champions Leicester City. It began with a bizarre own goal,

:37:14.:37:15.

Darren Bent giving Leicester the lead with an awful slice

:37:16.:37:17.

into his own net. He did make amends,

:37:18.:37:19.

levelling for Derby, who then went ahead before half time

:37:20.:37:22.

and held on until four minutes from the end,

:37:23.:37:25.

when Wes Morgan forced a replay. The biggest giant killers

:37:26.:37:28.

from the last round, non league, Lincoln City,

:37:29.:37:34.

are hoping home advantage, will help them cause

:37:35.:37:36.

another big upset. Their manager Danny Cowley,

:37:37.:37:38.

says beating Ipswich of the Championship,

:37:39.:37:41.

in Round 3, was like climbing a mountain, and so thinks today's

:37:42.:37:43.

match against the leaders of the Championship, Brighton,

:37:44.:37:45.

is like trying to get to the moon. Niall McGinn, scored two

:37:46.:37:48.

goals and set up another, as Aberdeen beat Dundee 3-0

:37:49.:37:51.

in the Scottish Premiership. McGinn's volley

:37:52.:37:54.

on the stroke of half time The win moved Abderdeen

:37:55.:37:58.

above Rangers into second place in the table -

:37:59.:38:05.

but they're still 21 Now 8 miles of fire,

:38:06.:38:07.

freezing water, huge obstacles, muddy trenches and

:38:08.:38:11.

electric shocks... It's why thousands

:38:12.:38:14.

are flocking to the west Midlands this weekend,

:38:15.:38:18.

from all over the world. After 30 years, it's the final ever

:38:19.:38:23.

Tough Guy race this weekend, and it has led to hundreds of other

:38:24.:38:26.

extreme races being established. There's now even a movie out,

:38:27.:38:30.

to explore why so many want to do I've been on the course

:38:31.:38:33.

near Wolverhampton ahead It's the end of an era, on a farm in

:38:34.:38:45.

the West Midlands, where for decades people from around the world have

:38:46.:38:50.

come together. Why? To share the ultimate pain and fear. Pushing

:38:51.:38:57.

their bodies over eight miles to the extreme, but after this weekend,

:38:58.:39:01.

there will be no more Tough Guy. It's been a huge part of my life,

:39:02.:39:06.

for sure, it's changed my life. It's a huge part of my life that will

:39:07.:39:11.

cease to be. Hundreds of thousands of people have

:39:12.:39:17.

attempted this Tough Guy challenge in the last 30 years. But for this

:39:18.:39:25.

doing it this time, it will be the last ever.

:39:26.:39:31.

Behind it all, the man known as Mr mouse, a former soldier who 30 years

:39:32.:39:34.

ago wanted to add more of a challenge to fun runs and so

:39:35.:39:39.

reinvented the obstacle course. Keep going!

:39:40.:39:44.

This is mild compared to the electric shocks and fire.

:39:45.:39:50.

I decided to put people through something they hadn't seen in the

:39:51.:39:55.

past, fear, pain, claustrophobia, all the things you fear come and

:39:56.:39:59.

lived here. Then they come through and say, thank you.

:40:00.:40:05.

I cried, I was so unhappy... And you get this medal put around your neck.

:40:06.:40:13.

There's nothing else like it. I'm terrified, what can I say?

:40:14.:40:19.

But as Mr mouse brings the curtain down on this world-famous event he

:40:20.:40:23.

is the subject of a movie that look at why people of today willingly

:40:24.:40:27.

paid to experience such pain and suffering. If you can come with a

:40:28.:40:31.

fight club -esque scar on Monday morning and a story about what you

:40:32.:40:36.

did... Running through fire... It sounds awesome. Mr mouse's cultural

:40:37.:40:45.

impact is massive. All these things have exploded because of Tough Guy.

:40:46.:40:48.

Not many people know about it. I thought it was a really compelling

:40:49.:40:51.

story. To mark the final Tough Guy,

:40:52.:40:55.

competitors will be joined on the course by the star of the warhorse

:40:56.:40:59.

film. To remember the suffering that was for real in the trenches 100

:41:00.:41:05.

years ago. And thanks to what started here, obstacle racing is now

:41:06.:41:09.

one of the fastest growing sports in the world.

:41:10.:41:15.

Time to call it a day, so many other events around like Tough Mother. He

:41:16.:41:25.

will keep the equivalent for people that want to train for the sort of

:41:26.:41:31.

events. These super fests, you can download from the usual sites.

:41:32.:41:37.

How are you? Just about warmed up again. It was

:41:38.:41:42.

about -1 in the air, imagine how cold the water was! LAUGHTER

:41:43.:41:47.

Thank you, Mike. It is 9:41am. Back to our lead story.

:41:48.:41:51.

Tributes have been pouring in for the actor Sir John

:41:52.:41:54.

The Oscar nominated star continued working despite being diagnosed

:41:55.:41:58.

The actor Clare Higgins worked with Sir John on Doctor Who.

:41:59.:42:02.

Thank you for joining us. Very, very sad news to wake up to today. Tell

:42:03.:42:14.

us a bit about your thoughts on him. Good morning. It's appallingly sad

:42:15.:42:22.

news. John Hurt was the perfect actor, as far as I'm concerned. He

:42:23.:42:28.

was a complete actor. He made so many ground-breaking performances,

:42:29.:42:32.

and all of us looked up to him. I was thinking this morning that

:42:33.:42:36.

whenever actors get together and start arguing about who's the

:42:37.:42:39.

greatest actor and who they admire the most, there are often a lot of

:42:40.:42:46.

disagreements. John Hurt was acknowledged by all. There were

:42:47.:42:50.

never any arguments about John. He was simply the most brilliant,

:42:51.:42:54.

complete actor. Which is not surprising when you

:42:55.:42:58.

consider how many roles he did. 200 films he was in. It's not he was

:42:59.:43:02.

typecast in any of them because they were so extreme, weren't they?

:43:03.:43:07.

I think that was part of his essence. He was a chameleon. He gave

:43:08.:43:12.

himself to his roles, and in doing so, John had this wonderful quality

:43:13.:43:18.

that so rare, he had a real tenderness and gentleness, which is

:43:19.:43:23.

rare in a Male actor. He also crossed not only emotional

:43:24.:43:26.

boundaries in his work, but I'm remembering now the seminal Quentin

:43:27.:43:34.

crisp in 1975, when he crossed gender boundaries. To such an extent

:43:35.:43:38.

it was a ground-breaking performance, not just as an actor,

:43:39.:43:42.

but also in a societal way. He opened a lot of doors for gay people

:43:43.:43:46.

with that performance. A beautiful man.

:43:47.:43:51.

On a personal note, I know you spent some time with him at Doctor Who

:43:52.:43:54.

conventions. What was he like when he was meeting people, being more

:43:55.:43:58.

private? This is what sealed my deep

:43:59.:44:04.

affection for him. I spent three days with him last year, I think it

:44:05.:44:11.

was one of his last public performances at Doctor Who

:44:12.:44:14.

convention in Los Angeles. I watched him interact with fans who were

:44:15.:44:18.

overwhelmed to meet him. What was touching and lovely about John, this

:44:19.:44:21.

was not an actor talking to fans, this was a person talking to a

:44:22.:44:26.

person. It was very moving and lovely to watch.

:44:27.:44:30.

A beautiful gentleman. Thank you so much for sharing your memories with

:44:31.:44:33.

us this morning. Clare Higgins, who worked with him on Doctor Who.

:44:34.:44:36.

Our Entertainment Colin Paterson joins us now.

:44:37.:44:40.

Good morning. Hearing that, so many tributes coming in for him.

:44:41.:44:47.

The big ones coming in a JK Rowling, because he was the magic wand seller

:44:48.:44:50.

in the original Harry Potter films. Said so sad to hear the immensely

:44:51.:44:54.

talented and deeply beloved John Hurt has died.

:44:55.:44:57.

Mel Brooks, one of the producers of The Elephant Man, where he got an

:44:58.:45:03.

Oscar nomination for playing John Merrick, Mel Brooks said no one

:45:04.:45:06.

could have played The Elephant Man more memorably, he carries that film

:45:07.:45:12.

into cinematic memory. And a tribute paid by Axl Rose from guns and

:45:13.:45:15.

Roses. Slightly misquote him but has treated" Archibald, you speak, one

:45:16.:45:24.

must never underestimate the healing power of hatred". If you can get Axl

:45:25.:45:29.

Rose to be your fan, that shows his breadth of acting.

:45:30.:45:32.

Younger fans will know him from films more recently but he is a link

:45:33.:45:37.

to a different generation. His first role was in a man for all

:45:38.:45:42.

seasons in 1966, starring with Orson Welles. Roles like I, Claudius. You

:45:43.:45:50.

could sit here all day listing his great parts. Alien, we heard earlier

:45:51.:45:56.

about one of the great cinematic deaths of all time. Indiana Jones he

:45:57.:46:00.

was in as well. You forget about them all. 1984 was another really

:46:01.:46:08.

memorable role for him. Clare was talking about his role as Clinton

:46:09.:46:15.

Crisp, he twice visited that, the naked civil servant and an inclusion

:46:16.:46:19.

in New York. He started as an artist, he asked for volunteers who

:46:20.:46:24.

he could paint naked and one of the people was Quentin crisp. And years

:46:25.:46:28.

later he would play him. Finally, in the cinema right now, and Jackie,

:46:29.:46:36.

with Natalie Portman. He turns up three quarters of the way in.

:46:37.:46:40.

Whenever you saw John hurt in a film you thought, quality has arrived.

:46:41.:46:46.

Thank you so much. It is 9:46am. Let's look at the weather.

:46:47.:46:53.

Good morning, we are falling out after a cold week with widespread

:46:54.:47:00.

frost. That is behind us now. The weather turning a lot more mild. The

:47:01.:47:07.

milder air brought in by an area of low pressure, also bringing some wet

:47:08.:47:11.

weather northwards. As this begins there is some cold air in Scotland

:47:12.:47:17.

and it will fall us know. A lot of the snow high up in the hills but

:47:18.:47:22.

nonetheless we have had some in Perth. Thank you to that weather

:47:23.:47:28.

watcher for that picture. The A9 have had some icy patches reported.

:47:29.:47:35.

Further south and west there will be an improvement in the weather. Sunny

:47:36.:47:39.

spells this afternoon, some blustery showers working in. Milder,

:47:40.:47:43.

temperatures nine or possibly ten in London. Northwards into North

:47:44.:47:48.

England, quite a cold morning. Northern Ireland a bit brighter, a

:47:49.:47:52.

few showers in the West, six in Belfast. In Scotland quite a lot of

:47:53.:47:56.

cloud, rain and hill snow lingering this afternoon, highs of four

:47:57.:48:01.

degrees at best. Overnight the rain clears away followed by some

:48:02.:48:05.

showers. Temperatures will fall away across northern parts. A touch of

:48:06.:48:09.

frost in the countryside. A risk of icy stretches developing. There will

:48:10.:48:13.

be some snow in those showers for the hills of Scotland and the hills

:48:14.:48:17.

of the Pennines. Later in the night, the next weather system comes in.

:48:18.:48:21.

Sunday morning that will bring some wet weather across Wales, south-west

:48:22.:48:24.

England, the rain arriving in Northern Ireland. After a bright

:48:25.:48:27.

star in northern England, tending to cloud over with some rain later. In

:48:28.:48:32.

north-east England and Scotland, you should hold onto some decent

:48:33.:48:35.

sunshine. It will still be quite cold and the mildest weather in the

:48:36.:48:37.

south-west, where temperatures reached double

:48:38.:48:56.

figures in Plymouth. The week ahead looking pretty turbulent.

:48:57.:48:58.

Slow-moving weather fronts bringing rain initially and then the Atlantic

:48:59.:49:01.

wakes up late in the week with some strong areas of low pressure. All in

:49:02.:49:03.

all this means it will be an unsettled week, spells of rain,

:49:04.:49:06.

quite windy at times but also on the mild side. Thank you, have a lovely

:49:07.:49:08.

day. Many of us may have found ourselves

:49:09.:49:11.

in unexpectedly narrow roads because we've blindly

:49:12.:49:14.

followed our sat nav. But in a lorry it can

:49:15.:49:15.

be a different matter. The Local Government Association

:49:16.:49:20.

is blaming a reliance on sat navs for a spate of heavy good vehicles

:49:21.:49:22.

getting stuck under low bridges. They want legislation brought

:49:23.:49:25.

in to make it compulsory for all lorry drivers to only use

:49:26.:49:27.

devices specifically We're joined by Joanna Morris

:49:28.:49:30.

joins who's been a lorry 16, 17 years. In the time you've

:49:31.:49:41.

been driving, sat-navs have arrived. Paint a picture of you in your truck

:49:42.:49:45.

with a sat-nav. Does it take you to places you shouldn't be? It does. I

:49:46.:49:51.

have a truck sat-nav and I can put something in but it has tried taking

:49:52.:49:57.

me down certain roads, mainly on country lanes and stuff. But

:49:58.:50:02.

obviously using common sense you'd say, my truck isn't going to get

:50:03.:50:06.

down there so you either get a normal map out or phone the

:50:07.:50:09.

transport office and see if they can re-route you anywhere. You wouldn't

:50:10.:50:15.

go down, you are five foot long... It must be tricky when you don't

:50:16.:50:18.

know if something like a bridge is going to come up? If you're only

:50:19.:50:25.

relying on your sat-nav, you're not looking at road signs. As a

:50:26.:50:28.

professional driver driving a truck you should be looking at road signs

:50:29.:50:32.

as well, not just relying on the red line. I love my sat-nav. When I

:50:33.:50:37.

first started I didn't have a sat-nav so I had to do map-reading.

:50:38.:50:41.

But having a sat-nav has come in handy, but I wouldn't rely on it

:50:42.:50:45.

totally, you can't rely on it totally because you have to use

:50:46.:50:49.

common sense. Is there such a thing as a sat-nav that is geared towards

:50:50.:50:57.

driving a truck? You can put into the system what you're driving and

:50:58.:50:59.

it can find appropriate routes? Mine does. You can put width and length.

:51:00.:51:10.

Does it work? Not always. It does get you out of some situations, it

:51:11.:51:15.

will sort of beep a warning that there is a bridge but it's sensible

:51:16.:51:19.

to look at the road signs. If you don't look at the road signs... A

:51:20.:51:23.

roadside will point, when you come to a bridge, a bridge makes my heart

:51:24.:51:28.

flutter, I've never gone near one, thankfully, but they make my heart

:51:29.:51:31.

flutter. What I do is look at the road signs, and it points to which

:51:32.:51:36.

way the bridge is. If you don't look at that road signs, you don't know

:51:37.:51:39.

if it's to your left or to your right or straight on. You have to

:51:40.:51:45.

read the road signs as well as using your sat-nav. That sounds obvious

:51:46.:51:48.

but still you get those pictures where you see the lorry stuck and

:51:49.:51:53.

the local government Association are so worried about it they want the

:51:54.:51:57.

laws to change. What do lorry drivers tell you about what they

:51:58.:52:03.

rely on? Some don't. Some are ready good navigators and don't use a

:52:04.:52:09.

sat-nav at all. That's good, they are not lazy and know the way. But

:52:10.:52:13.

something like that... You would know, you can tell. If you're a

:52:14.:52:16.

professional driver, that's what we are, you should be able to know,

:52:17.:52:21.

even if you don't come from this country, if you're going round a

:52:22.:52:25.

bend and you're going to come towards houses, you can't risk it. I

:52:26.:52:32.

know you are back in the truck today. I am. Drive safely. Thank

:52:33.:52:38.

you. Thank you, Joanna. It is 9:52am.

:52:39.:52:42.

Over the last couple of years, our next guest has toured the world,

:52:43.:52:45.

picked up two Grammy nominations and has even covered an album

:52:46.:52:47.

by the popstar, Taylor Swift - much to her delight.

:52:48.:52:52.

Ryan Adams now has a brand new record out, which includes

:52:53.:52:55.

some of his most raw and reflective material to date.

:52:56.:52:58.

We'll speak to him in a moment, but first lets have a listen.

:52:59.:53:07.

# Do you still love me, babe # Do you still Love me, babe

:53:08.:53:27.

# Do you still love me... # Another gear will pass

:53:28.:53:39.

# I will count the days # Another sun goes down

:53:40.:53:43.

# And will never see the rays

:53:44.:53:59.

# Is my heart blind #. I hear you caused chaos in

:54:00.:54:10.

Manchester last night. You performed a gig randomly, Tulisa happened? I

:54:11.:54:16.

got here in the afternoon and went for some food. I was just sitting

:54:17.:54:20.

there with one of my managers and I thought to myself, how can I make

:54:21.:54:25.

this job harder today. I thought, I should go my tour and say, where

:54:26.:54:30.

shall I play? I did it thinking nothing would happen, but like an

:54:31.:54:35.

hour later we had a place to play. So this is an arranged, nothing

:54:36.:54:39.

planned, nothing arranged before you turn up. Where did you go, a cafe?

:54:40.:54:46.

I was going to go to the southward lads club because that place is

:54:47.:54:52.

awesome. And it sounds nice in there and they've been really kind to me.

:54:53.:54:55.

It was last-minute and they were having boxing. Then this place, the

:54:56.:55:03.

Soup Kitchen offered. I waited to tell people this is what it's going

:55:04.:55:08.

to be. As soon as I posted this anti-war hole soup can I think

:55:09.:55:12.

people caught on. Your fans will know this, I'm sure,

:55:13.:55:16.

but it shows how much you love to play. Simple as that, playing music.

:55:17.:55:20.

You turn up at a place, find somewhere to play, get a guitar and

:55:21.:55:25.

you're off. Yes, I was going to be like read my

:55:26.:55:29.

book in no time get bored or go and play and try to create some pleasant

:55:30.:55:36.

chaos. I opted for the second. This is your 19th album, isn't it?

:55:37.:55:40.

Tell us about this, what's different and what's new in it?

:55:41.:55:47.

I probably have way more silver has! I'm not seeing them anywhere. --

:55:48.:55:53.

silver hairs. This one is different, maybe, the

:55:54.:55:57.

second or third in a row I have produced myself. I've kind of gone

:55:58.:56:00.

from playing almost all acoustic shows to playing with the band. I've

:56:01.:56:06.

spent time thinking about how I want staff to sound on record, how is it

:56:07.:56:12.

exciting to me? And then I end up challenging myself more, which is

:56:13.:56:16.

really cool. Trying new things, trying to leave things more sparse,

:56:17.:56:23.

it's nice, reverse editing. Some artists are happy to kind of play

:56:24.:56:30.

out their private lives, talk about what's happening in their lives in

:56:31.:56:33.

their music. That's something you do as well. Are there decisions about

:56:34.:56:38.

how much you offer up of yourself in your music? Is that tricky sometimes

:56:39.:56:41.

question that this is quite a personal album, isn't it? Yes, but I

:56:42.:56:46.

don't think anyone would accuse me of making an impersonal record or a

:56:47.:56:52.

record about UFOs or something, not that I won't or I'm not

:56:53.:56:55.

interested... But they always deal with that kind of subject matter. I

:56:56.:57:04.

grew up listening to a band from here, The Smiths. When I was

:57:05.:57:10.

listening to this record, I thought, they are making things that matter

:57:11.:57:15.

in day-to-day life, things that might get overlooked or things that

:57:16.:57:19.

impact us that we forget about. They illuminated them so much. I think I

:57:20.:57:26.

found a way to tap into that and sort of try... It sounds strange,

:57:27.:57:30.

but there's so many records and bands where it's just about

:57:31.:57:34.

partying, and just doing that stuff, which is great, because I'm a

:57:35.:57:39.

goofball in my life... I haven't heard anyone say that for so long!

:57:40.:57:44.

It's true, but I think it's nice to be on the side of trying to

:57:45.:57:48.

illuminate the more complicated stuff. It's good, it makes me feel

:57:49.:57:52.

like I'm leaving a map for people if they're in a hard place. You have an

:57:53.:57:56.

eclectic taste in terms of your inspiration. The Smiths on one hand

:57:57.:58:00.

and Taylor Swift on the other hand. You did a cover of her album. Taylor

:58:01.:58:12.

Smith! A mash up. It is eclectic customer I guess so,

:58:13.:58:16.

I tend to play music when I'm not playing music.

:58:17.:58:19.

It's still something I enjoy doing. I live in California. Some of my

:58:20.:58:23.

friends we like to get together and play. That is what we did that week.

:58:24.:58:29.

Will you be doing live stuff in the UK?

:58:30.:58:33.

Yes, there is a tour, it's not announced yet but I'm very excited.

:58:34.:58:36.

It's going to be awesome. Lovely to see you here this morning.

:58:37.:58:42.

Not everybody's cup of tea, early morning on the sofa!

:58:43.:58:44.

Ryan's album Prisoner is released on February 17th.

:58:45.:58:48.

That is it from us this morning. Have a great weekend from everyone

:58:49.:58:56.

here, bye-bye. Have a lovely day.

:58:57.:58:59.