29/01/2017 Breakfast


29/01/2017

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This is Breakfast, with Ben Thompson and Sally Nugent.

:00:00.:00:12.

Campaigners win a legal challenge against Donald Trump's

:00:13.:00:21.

A statue of Diana, Princess of Wales, is to be built

:00:22.:00:48.

in Kensington Palace by her sons Prince Harry

:00:49.:00:50.

A warning that living standards could be set to fall

:00:51.:00:54.

because of higher inflation and stagnating wages.

:00:55.:00:57.

Carl Frampton has been beaten for the first time in his career,

:00:58.:01:01.

losing his featherweight title to Leo Santa Cruz in Las Vegas.

:01:02.:01:04.

we are looking at a dry and bright start to the day, with some

:01:05.:01:15.

sunshine, but it will cloud over to the south and west later, with

:01:16.:01:18.

patchy rain on the way. A full forecast in the next half-hour.

:01:19.:01:20.

Good morning. First, our main story.

:01:21.:01:22.

A judge in New York has upheld a legal challenge aimed at stopping

:01:23.:01:25.

the deportation of people being detained under Donald Trump's

:01:26.:01:28.

President Trump has denied that the measures are a ban

:01:29.:01:33.

on Muslims and said that the plan was "working out nicely".

:01:34.:01:36.

There have been protests at airports around the United States.

:01:37.:01:39.

Our correspondent Simon Clemison has this report.

:01:40.:01:47.

Donald Trump says his ban on foreign nationals travelling to America from

:01:48.:01:53.

seven Muslim countries is, in his words, working out very nicely. But

:01:54.:01:58.

the order has provoked protest at airports across the country. Inside,

:01:59.:02:03.

lawyers worked to free passengers being detained. Some were already on

:02:04.:02:06.

the way in when the president may be order, and they aren't the only ones

:02:07.:02:12.

affected. I've heard from colleagues in London that people aren't allowed

:02:13.:02:17.

to board flights. These are CEOs of American companies that happen to

:02:18.:02:20.

have an Iranian passport and it is insane. We're in disbelief that this

:02:21.:02:25.

is happening. At Los Angeles airport a 60-year-old Iranian American broke

:02:26.:02:30.

down after learning his brother, who had come to visit him, wasn't going

:02:31.:02:37.

to be allowed in. I don't know what to do. We didn't know we would have

:02:38.:02:45.

the situation here. I am a US citizen for 15- 20 years and my

:02:46.:02:50.

brother has done nothing wrong and I did nothing wrong. On the election

:02:51.:02:57.

trail, Donald Trump suggested what he said would be a complete shutdown

:02:58.:03:01.

of Muslims entering the United States. He denies the measures he

:03:02.:03:05.

has now brought in, which include suspending the entire refugee

:03:06.:03:09.

programme, aimed at the Islamic faith. It is working out very nicely

:03:10.:03:15.

and we are going to have a very strict ban and extreme vetting,

:03:16.:03:19.

which we should have had in this country for many years. But

:03:20.:03:21.

campaigners have already launched a series of legal actions to block his

:03:22.:03:25.

plans and a judge has now temporarily halted moves to deport

:03:26.:03:32.

people travelling without visas to be held at airports. -- with visas.

:03:33.:03:39.

When on constitutional laws are enacted the courts are there to

:03:40.:03:43.

defend people's writes. But with immigration central to Donald

:03:44.:03:46.

Trump's campaign for the presidency, he is unlikely to give up.

:03:47.:03:54.

Theresa May has been criticised for not condemning Donald Trump for his

:03:55.:03:59.

decisions. At an earlier news conference

:04:00.:04:03.

in Turkey, Mrs May said it was up Her refusal to openly challenge

:04:04.:04:07.

the ban had prompted criticism from politicians,

:04:08.:04:11.

including Conservative MPs. Theresa May was somewhat slow. She

:04:12.:04:16.

was certainly seen as being somewhat slow in condemning President Trump's

:04:17.:04:20.

new approach. How much will that overshadow what could have been

:04:21.:04:23.

potentially two very successful visits? Think it will overshadow it

:04:24.:04:27.

because she was asked three times at a press conference in Turkey

:04:28.:04:33.

yesterday and she was asked about it and she didn't answer the first two

:04:34.:04:37.

times and on the third occasion she said it was a matter for the US

:04:38.:04:43.

government, whether or not they decided to let in refugees. So she

:04:44.:04:47.

was criticised for that, not just from opposite political parties but

:04:48.:04:51.

even from MPs within her own party and some of her own MPs are being

:04:52.:04:55.

affected by this. We understand and British citizen, Iraqi born, said he

:04:56.:05:00.

would not be allowed into the US as a result of this policy that Donald

:05:01.:05:05.

Trump has introduced. So Theresa May has faced a lot of criticism in the

:05:06.:05:09.

past 24 hours or so. She was very late to then offer another statement

:05:10.:05:15.

from Downing Street, saying that she didn't agree with Donald Trump and

:05:16.:05:20.

that the UK government would look into what has been set out by the US

:05:21.:05:25.

government and make representations on behalf of its citizens.

:05:26.:05:28.

There's been a lot of reaction internationally on this. How will it

:05:29.:05:32.

play out for Theresa May? I think it's a difficult one for her. A

:05:33.:05:37.

couple of days ago we saw Theresa May hand-in-hand with Donald Trump.

:05:38.:05:41.

She wanted to emphasise that special relationship that Britain is

:05:42.:05:44.

perceived to have with the US, and in particular as written perceives

:05:45.:05:49.

leaving the EU as looking for alternative trading partners. So she

:05:50.:05:53.

came away from that meeting having a very good meeting with Donald Trump

:05:54.:05:56.

and Downing Street were very positive about it. Now she will be

:05:57.:06:02.

in a position where she has to criticise him. She said before she

:06:03.:06:07.

would criticise Donald Trump, at on the occasion yesterday she was slow

:06:08.:06:10.

to act, and so people will be looking to her to be more forceful

:06:11.:06:12.

in her criticism. Thank you. Prince William and Prince Harry have

:06:13.:06:16.

announced plans to erect a statue of their mother, Diana Princess

:06:17.:06:19.

of Wales, in the grounds of Kensington Palace,

:06:20.:06:22.

20 years after her death. The two princes said

:06:23.:06:25.

that the time was right "to recognise her positive impact"

:06:26.:06:27.

with a permanent statue. Diana's home became the focus for

:06:28.:06:41.

the outpouring of grief following her death in a car crash in 1997.

:06:42.:06:46.

Now it will take centre stage again for a new commemoration of her life.

:06:47.:06:50.

In a statement the Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry said, it has been

:06:51.:06:54.

20 years since our mother's death and the time is right to recognise

:06:55.:06:58.

the positive impact in the UK and around the world with a permanent

:06:59.:07:02.

statue. A mother touched so many lives. The statue will be erected

:07:03.:07:06.

here in the public gardens of Kensington Palace. The royal

:07:07.:07:10.

brothers say they hope it will allow all those who visit here to reflect

:07:11.:07:14.

on Diana's life and legacy. Work on the design will begin shortly, with

:07:15.:07:22.

it expected to be finished later this year. A very involved. It will

:07:23.:07:28.

be faced with criticism, whether it's a true likeness and true

:07:29.:07:32.

likeness is in the eyes of the beholder. Some will say it is, some

:07:33.:07:35.

will say it isn't, so it's a difficult task when they choose the

:07:36.:07:39.

artist and the artist has to get it absolutely right. Until now the main

:07:40.:07:43.

memorial has been a fountain in a park in London. Diana's sister will

:07:44.:07:47.

be on the committee tasked with commissioning and privately raising

:07:48.:07:52.

the funds. At Kensington Palace there is enthusiasm for the project.

:07:53.:07:56.

She was the people's Princess so it's a good idea. A lot of people

:07:57.:08:01.

were attached to Diana, so I think they would like to see it. I would

:08:02.:08:05.

like to see it. The unveiling will be one of several events this year

:08:06.:08:09.

due mark Diana's life and work 20 years on.

:08:10.:08:10.

Living standards could be set to fall this year,

:08:11.:08:12.

according to a report by a leading think tank.

:08:13.:08:16.

The Resolution Foundation said that although the UK

:08:17.:08:19.

experienced a mini-boom from 2014 to the beginning of 2016,

:08:20.:08:21.

rising prices and stagnating wages mean a bigger squeeze on our income.

:08:22.:08:27.

Our business correspondent Joe Lynam reports.

:08:28.:08:33.

It may not feel like it for some of us, but we've enjoyed a mini boom in

:08:34.:08:39.

living standards over the past 2.5 years. That's thanks to low

:08:40.:08:43.

inflation, low interest rates and growing employment levels. But

:08:44.:08:48.

that's set to end, according a think tank. The audit says the weaker

:08:49.:08:55.

pound will reduce our spending power, especially among low earners,

:08:56.:08:59.

and employers weren't able to increase wages as fast. While

:09:00.:09:02.

employment rates will slow down or fall this year. There are big things

:09:03.:09:08.

the government can do, but they can't deal with inflation, the

:09:09.:09:12.

government, but they can deal with getting more people into work and

:09:13.:09:16.

solving some problems around productivity. The government said

:09:17.:09:20.

the UK under Theresa May had the fastest growing economy in the G7

:09:21.:09:24.

and it was determined to build an economy that worked for all. But the

:09:25.:09:28.

government's on the official forecast expects the economy to

:09:29.:09:31.

weaken somewhat this year and that couldn't leave many of us little

:09:32.:09:33.

poorer. -- that could leave. French voters will choose today

:09:34.:09:35.

who is to be the socialist candidate Benoit Hamon, who was sacked

:09:36.:09:38.

from the government in 2014, won the first

:09:39.:09:44.

round of the selection process. He's seen as a left wing rebel

:09:45.:09:47.

and he faces the former prime Wildfires in Chile are now known

:09:48.:09:50.

to have killed at least 11 people and left several

:09:51.:09:57.

thousand homeless. Firefighters and volunteers

:09:58.:09:59.

are tackling more than 100 separate fires, half

:10:00.:10:01.

of which are still out of control. The authorities have detained more

:10:02.:10:03.

than 20 people suspected of arson. Our correspondent Tim

:10:04.:10:09.

Allman has the latest. In some places the

:10:10.:10:11.

fires are now gone. The town of Santa Olga,

:10:12.:10:14.

all but destroyed. Hundreds of homes

:10:15.:10:20.

burned to the ground. For the people who lived

:10:21.:10:26.

here the awful task of coming home You can see that for some it's

:10:27.:10:29.

almost too much to bear. Lives have been lost,

:10:30.:10:41.

but there have been some Silvana Garcia and her daughters

:10:42.:10:43.

were trapped as the fires closed in. They threw themselves into a ditch

:10:44.:10:49.

covered with a few sheets "I thought we were going to burn",

:10:50.:10:52.

she said, "but I though this hole with the water and metal

:10:53.:11:01.

above us would save us." "The flames passed above us

:11:02.:11:04.

and burned everything," said her daughter,

:11:05.:11:06.

"I didn't know what to do." Thousands are now homeless,

:11:07.:11:12.

many find themselves in local "We never imagined this

:11:13.:11:14.

was going to happen in our country," Once again we're struggling,

:11:15.:11:22.

trying to lift ourselves up. It's not just people who've been

:11:23.:11:31.

affected, animals too. This shelter tending to injured

:11:32.:11:33.

dogs, their paws burnt. The cleanup operation has begun,

:11:34.:11:36.

the army doing what it can to help, so are local volunteers,

:11:37.:11:40.

beginning the massive task of clearing up the mess,

:11:41.:11:42.

waiting to rebuild. But in many places the fires

:11:43.:11:48.

still rage, dozens out of control. The hot, dry weather

:11:49.:11:52.

is forecast to continue. Chile's worst wildfires in half

:11:53.:11:55.

a century are not over yet. David Beckham has been chosen

:11:56.:11:58.

as the castaway for the 75th anniversary episode

:11:59.:12:11.

of Desert Island Discs. He revealed he and his wife

:12:12.:12:15.

Victoria used to have dates in restaurant car parks in the early

:12:16.:12:20.

days of their relationship, There have been more than 3,000

:12:21.:12:23.

episodes of the Radio 4 And in case you are wondering,

:12:24.:12:34.

his record choices included I Am The Resurrection,

:12:35.:12:42.

by the Stone Roses, he loves them, and his luxury

:12:43.:12:45.

item was his England caps. And later in the programme,

:12:46.:12:47.

we'll be talking to the author Ian Rankin about his appearance

:12:48.:12:55.

on Desert Island Discs. Time to have a look at the papers.

:12:56.:13:05.

The Sunday papers. If I can reach them! You might have longer arms

:13:06.:13:10.

than me. Starting with the Sunday Telegraph. They have a fantastic

:13:11.:13:15.

picture of the John Hurt on the front. A lovely black and white

:13:16.:13:19.

picture, paying tribute to Sir John Hurt who died at the age of 77.

:13:20.:13:25.

Their main story is they are talking about soldiers who they say have

:13:26.:13:29.

been failed by the enquiry into Northern Ireland and they also have

:13:30.:13:32.

a story about Prince Harry and the Duke of Cambridge pledging a

:13:33.:13:35.

permanent memorial for Princess Diana. A different picture of the

:13:36.:13:42.

John Hurt on the Sunday Times, his role as an Englishman in New York.

:13:43.:13:47.

The main story has a different twist on what we hear from Donald Trump

:13:48.:13:50.

and immigration policy, suggesting Prince Charles and Donald Trump

:13:51.:13:54.

could go head-to-head in a row over climate change. The president will

:13:55.:13:58.

not take a lecture from the prince, it said, but of course Prince

:13:59.:14:02.

Charles is very active and vocal in the field of climate change.

:14:03.:14:07.

The front page of the Sunday mail has a story that I can't find

:14:08.:14:11.

anywhere else in the papers. They say new NHS guidelines issued by the

:14:12.:14:15.

medical associations suggest you shouldn't call pregnant patients

:14:16.:14:23.

mothers. They say it is in order to avoid offending transgender people.

:14:24.:14:28.

More on immigration policies here on the Observer. Called -- global

:14:29.:14:35.

furious. We know a judge in the US has now granted a stay on some of

:14:36.:14:39.

those deportations. " You see the grassroots Labour revolt, suggesting

:14:40.:14:45.

Jeremy Corbyn faces a serious revolt over grassroots supporters who

:14:46.:14:49.

initially backed him as leader but they say there is now a growing

:14:50.:14:52.

crisis over Brexit. We will be talking to an American

:14:53.:14:56.

political expert over Donald Trump's new policies and the effect they may

:14:57.:14:58.

have. That's coming up after 7am. President Trump's ban on refugees

:14:59.:15:04.

has run into trouble in the courts, after a US judge issued a temporary

:15:05.:15:09.

stay on deportations. 20 years after her death,

:15:10.:15:12.

a statue of Diana, Princess of Wales will be built in Kensington Palace

:15:13.:15:15.

by her sons Prince Harry Mark Kermode will be

:15:16.:15:18.

giving his verdict on Danny Boyle's new T2 Trainspotting and running

:15:19.:15:24.

through the rest of this week's Here's Chris with a look

:15:25.:15:27.

at this morning's weather. Good morning to you. I thought we

:15:28.:15:48.

would start off with this. What looks like snow was actually hail.

:15:49.:15:52.

This was a Weather Watcher picture sent in last night from Cumbria. You

:15:53.:15:58.

can see hail covering the ground. The storms came in across the Irish

:15:59.:16:02.

Sea. There is Whitehaven and the clump of showers moving through. We

:16:03.:16:07.

have showers coming in over south-west England and a few showers

:16:08.:16:11.

working in from the Irish Sea. Where we see the showers falling in on the

:16:12.:16:16.

cold ground, there is a risk of ice. They that in mind. The rain is

:16:17.:16:22.

coming in very fast. We will start to see it arriving in the south-west

:16:23.:16:26.

England, Wales, towards the middle part of the day. It will make slow

:16:27.:16:30.

progress eastwards. Throughout the day, we will have dry weather across

:16:31.:16:35.

that it is Midland and East Anglia. -- East Midlands. Around the middle

:16:36.:16:41.

part of the day at across northern England and into Scotland, we should

:16:42.:16:45.

keep fine spells. Followed by showers up in Shetland. As we go

:16:46.:16:53.

through the coming night, again, at the risk of icy stretches across the

:16:54.:16:58.

northern part of the UK. Further south and west, with mist anthill

:16:59.:17:08.

fog patches, it will be mild. -- mist and hill fog. At the weekend,

:17:09.:17:13.

unsettled. We are looking at spells of rain. It will become a windy. We

:17:14.:17:20.

are looking at potential severe gales. Here is Monday. A lot of

:17:21.:17:25.

cloud coming in from south-western areas. Mist and hill fog patches,

:17:26.:17:31.

turning murky quite again. Temperatures up to 12 degrees and

:17:32.:17:36.

still quite chilly across the north and east of the country. That is

:17:37.:17:40.

where we will keep right spells and some spells of sunshine. The weekend

:17:41.:17:43.

is looking quite turbulent with areas of high pressure pushing in.

:17:44.:17:52.

-- low pressure. It could be fierce with severe gales on the cards, may

:17:53.:17:57.

be running into southern parts of England. Something to watch out for

:17:58.:17:58.

in the week ahead. We will watch that. Damp. Not a good

:17:59.:18:04.

start. You can e-mail us at

:18:05.:18:08.

bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk or share your thoughts with other

:18:09.:18:10.

viewers on our Facebook page. And you can Tweet about today's

:18:11.:18:13.

stories using #bbcbreakfast or follow us for the latest

:18:14.:18:15.

from the programme. This week Mark Kermode

:18:16.:18:18.

and Gavin Esler take us through T2 Trainspotting,

:18:19.:18:22.

Sing and Hacksaw Ridge. Hello, and welcome to

:18:23.:18:26.

the Film Review on BBC News. To take us through this

:18:27.:18:29.

week's cinema releases, as ever, Mark Kermode is with me,

:18:30.:18:31.

and what will you be telling us Trainspotting T2, they meet

:18:32.:18:37.

up after 20 years. Then we have Singh, an animated

:18:38.:18:42.

feature from the people that gave us And Hacksaw Ridge,

:18:43.:18:45.

Mel Gibson at war. One of those titles you can't

:18:46.:18:52.

quite get a measure of. 20 years later, the original

:18:53.:19:00.

characters are reunited. Renton is drawn back into his past

:19:01.:19:04.

for reasons which are not immediately explained and we find

:19:05.:19:09.

the old crew ravaged not so much by heroin as by age

:19:10.:19:14.

and by disappointment and by a degree of emasculation

:19:15.:19:18.

and the way in which their lives have not worked out

:19:19.:19:22.

as they will have expected. Begbie has been in prison and Spud,

:19:23.:19:24.

when Renton first finds him, has basically all but lost

:19:25.:19:27.

the will to live, until hi friend It's not getting it out

:19:28.:19:31.

of your body that's the problem, You think I haven't heard

:19:32.:20:04.

that 100,000 times. You have got to channel it,

:20:05.:20:09.

you have got to control it. That clip's interesting

:20:10.:20:20.

because it was funny but it ends As somebody who saw the original 20

:20:21.:20:38.

years ago, I remember being really But people forget about

:20:39.:20:44.

how shocking it was. What I liked about this was it felt

:20:45.:20:55.

like a film about middle age, about the way in which the world

:20:56.:21:01.

changes, about the way in which the characters'

:21:02.:21:04.

bodies have changed, their characteristics have changed,

:21:05.:21:06.

and as with so many of Danny Boyle's films, it's about friendship,

:21:07.:21:09.

the way the present loops back to the past and has this elegiac

:21:10.:21:13.

longing for the past. But it's also very

:21:14.:21:19.

much a modern movie. My only reservation with this,

:21:20.:21:21.

I thought it worked really well, because I didn't

:21:22.:21:25.

want to be let down. I didn't want them to be

:21:26.:21:27.

revisiting this for cash, for money, because that is

:21:28.:21:30.

an easy thing to do. The screenwriter John Hodge

:21:31.:21:33.

created something new. They have created

:21:34.:21:42.

something artistic. My only question would be,

:21:43.:21:43.

I don't know what it would look like if you were a young viewers

:21:44.:21:50.

seeing it for the first time, not having all that history

:21:51.:21:53.

with Trainspotting, because a lot of what it is doing

:21:54.:21:56.

is playing with the past. But I like that about it -

:21:57.:21:59.

the interplay between the past It's like meeting these characters

:22:00.:22:02.

again and genuinely seeing what time And the screenplay of the original,

:22:03.:22:06.

from the Irvine Welsh book, I think Hodge has

:22:07.:22:11.

done a brilliant job. There are an awful

:22:12.:22:23.

lot of laughs in it. It is definitely more

:22:24.:22:26.

melancholy than the original. It doesn't have that vampiric bite

:22:27.:22:31.

that the original had, not the venomous feeling

:22:32.:22:34.

of the original. But what it does have

:22:35.:22:35.

is a sense of ennui, that life is full of

:22:36.:22:39.

disappointment but giving voice A sense that life is full

:22:40.:22:43.

of disappointments, but somehow finding vibrancy and giving

:22:44.:22:53.

a voice to those characters who would otherwise have been

:22:54.:22:56.

written off as deadbeats again, I am looking forward

:22:57.:22:58.

to your other choice. It's about a group of animals

:22:59.:23:01.

in a singing competition. It owes a lot more to Mickey Rooney,

:23:02.:23:12.

Judy Garland, old school, let's put the show on here rather

:23:13.:23:17.

than a singing competition. It starts out as a singing

:23:18.:23:22.

competition, but moves At the beginning I thought

:23:23.:23:24.

it was sweet-natured fun, but as it went on, it

:23:25.:23:31.

started to have that charm, that old-fashioned throwback charm

:23:32.:23:35.

which I loved from all You can tell it's not just something

:23:36.:23:39.

which is just fluff. Yes, it's bright and shiny with more

:23:40.:23:47.

pop tunes in it than you could wave a stick at, but it has

:23:48.:23:51.

something more important. It has a bit of heart in it

:23:52.:23:54.

and that is down to Garth Jennings. Mel Gibson reinventing

:23:55.:23:58.

himself again? It's the film that

:23:59.:24:01.

rehabilitated Mel Gibson. This is about someone

:24:02.:24:03.

who volunteered as a medic in World War Two and refused

:24:04.:24:07.

to carry a weapon into the unfolding Pacifism says to turn

:24:08.:24:11.

the other cheek, don't it? I don't think this is a question

:24:12.:24:39.

of religion, fellas. I think this is cowardice,

:24:40.:24:42.

plain and simple. I'll tell you what, I'm

:24:43.:24:47.

going to give you a free shot. The peculiar thing about this

:24:48.:24:56.

film is before I saw it, I heard people comparing it

:24:57.:25:10.

to Apocalypto, which I think is Mel Gibson's best

:25:11.:25:12.

work but this is not it. This is two films

:25:13.:25:15.

fighting for supremacy. The first half of

:25:16.:25:17.

it is almost cheesy. Then we move to the war scenes

:25:18.:25:19.

and they are brutal and bloody and if you have seen

:25:20.:25:27.

the Passion of the Christ, you know that Mel Gibson absolutely

:25:28.:25:29.

really does that well. What that means is you get two

:25:30.:25:33.

separate movies going on. Sometimes the battle scenes

:25:34.:25:38.

are absolutely horrific and up there with the Stephen Spielberg

:25:39.:25:43.

stuff from Saving Private Ryan, but sometimes they teeter over

:25:44.:25:46.

into something which approach is parody, almost Tropic Thunder,

:25:47.:25:49.

so you get a weird mix. The movie feels like it is pulling

:25:50.:25:56.

in a number of different ways. I came out of this slightly baffled,

:25:57.:25:59.

because there are things in it that are very cheesy, some things that

:26:00.:26:03.

are really sentimental and saccharine, other things that

:26:04.:26:06.

are brutal and gory I think it has It is a true story and I have read

:26:07.:26:10.

a bit about him in the past. Obviously the point of that is he's

:26:11.:26:20.

a very brave man not to fight. Just because the story is great,

:26:21.:26:28.

doesn't mean the film I wondered if the saccharine start

:26:29.:26:31.

at the beginning was Mel Gibson trying to prepare the American

:26:32.:26:36.

public to find someone who was a conscientious

:26:37.:26:39.

objector heroic. I don't know if that's

:26:40.:26:42.

what was going on. I literally spent the first third

:26:43.:26:44.

of the film thinking, when is this going to turn

:26:45.:26:47.

into the great movie that everyone Once we had got into the war

:26:48.:26:50.

sequences as I said, he can do that stuff really well,

:26:51.:26:54.

but he can also push it too far. No, but that is an interesting

:26:55.:26:59.

comparison, because his movies are different to an American

:27:00.:27:04.

audience than to a British audience. What more can we say

:27:05.:27:10.

about La La Land? I think everyone who keeps saying,

:27:11.:27:13.

is it as good as everyone says? People are concerned that it is not

:27:14.:27:17.

as good as we have been saying, like it is overhyped,

:27:18.:27:21.

but I haven't stopped singing it That little phrase

:27:22.:27:24.

he plays on the piano. By the way it is clearly

:27:25.:27:29.

ripped off Mad World. Best film and Best Director

:27:30.:27:32.

for the Baftas and the Oscars? Yes, I think it will

:27:33.:27:37.

absolutely sweep the board. Which is a shame because

:27:38.:27:40.

I loved Moonlight. Finally, Under The Shadow,

:27:41.:27:42.

which I haven't seen yet. You must, because you will

:27:43.:27:46.

absolutely love it. It is a British production set

:27:47.:27:48.

in Tehran, shot in Jordan. It is about a mother

:27:49.:27:54.

and her daughter in an apartment building being shelled

:27:55.:27:58.

in the Iraq/Iran war, but they are being

:27:59.:28:00.

terrorised by a gin spirit. It owes a debt to things

:28:01.:28:03.

like Rosemary's Baby. It is smart, it is intelligent,

:28:04.:28:05.

suprising, influenced by the Babadook and I promise

:28:06.:28:12.

you you will love it. Right, that is my homework

:28:13.:28:23.

for the weekend. You will find more film news

:28:24.:28:25.

and reviews across the BBC including all our previous

:28:26.:28:31.

shows on the website. This is Breakfast,

:28:32.:28:33.

with Ben Thompson and Sally Nugent. Coming up before 7am,

:28:34.:28:54.

Chris will have the weather. But first, a summary of this

:28:55.:28:57.

morning's main news. American civil liberties campaigners

:28:58.:29:02.

have won a partial victory in their challenge to Donald Trump's

:29:03.:29:04.

ban on some people entering the US. The president had ordered that entry

:29:05.:29:11.

be refused to all refugees for 120 days, and to citizens of seven

:29:12.:29:14.

particular countries for 90 days. A number of travellers

:29:15.:29:19.

who were in the air when the ban came into force were detained

:29:20.:29:23.

on arrival in the US. But a federal judge in New York said

:29:24.:29:25.

that visitors who'd set off with valid visas should

:29:26.:29:29.

not be deported. It is not a Muslim band, but we

:29:30.:29:40.

think it is working out nicely. You see it at the airport and all over,

:29:41.:29:45.

it is working out nicely and we will have a very, very strict ban and

:29:46.:29:50.

extreme vetting, which we should have had in this country for many

:29:51.:29:52.

years. A statue of Princess Diana has been

:29:53.:29:52.

commissioned by her sons, the Duke of Cambridge

:29:53.:29:55.

and Prince Harry. They will help pay

:29:56.:29:57.

for the sculpture, which will be placed

:29:58.:29:59.

in the grounds of her former home, The princes said that 20

:30:00.:30:02.

years after her death the time was right to recognise

:30:03.:30:05.

their mother's positive impact Buckingham Palace said the Queen

:30:06.:30:08.

supported their wishes. Living standards could be

:30:09.:30:13.

set to fall this year, according to a report

:30:14.:30:16.

by a leading think tank. Research organisation

:30:17.:30:18.

the Resolution Foundation says that a mini-boom in living

:30:19.:30:20.

standards between 2014 and 2016 They warn that household incomes

:30:21.:30:23.

are now growing at their slowest rate since 2013, as rising inflation

:30:24.:30:30.

and stagnant wages lower living French voters will choose today

:30:31.:30:33.

who is to be the socialist candidate Benoit Hamon, who was sacked

:30:34.:30:40.

from the government in 2014, won the first

:30:41.:30:45.

round of the selection process. He's seen as a left wing rebel

:30:46.:30:47.

and he faces the former prime Wildfires in Chile are now known

:30:48.:30:51.

to have killed at least 11 people and left several

:30:52.:30:58.

thousand homeless. Firefighters and volunteers

:30:59.:31:00.

are tackling more than 100 separate fires, half

:31:01.:31:03.

of which are still out of control. The authorities have detained more

:31:04.:31:09.

than 20 people suspected of arson. It's one of the most colourful

:31:10.:31:15.

events in the calendar. Yesterday people all over the world

:31:16.:31:18.

celebrated the start In Hong Kong, thousands took

:31:19.:31:20.

to the streets to watch the parades. Many of the 3,000 performers wore

:31:21.:31:25.

gold, yellow and brown, which are considered lucky colours

:31:26.:31:30.

in the year of the Rooster. The festival also marked the 20th

:31:31.:31:37.

anniversary of the handover of the territory from British

:31:38.:31:40.

rule back to China. Great pictures. Time for the sport.

:31:41.:31:54.

Holly's with us, and all about boxing?

:31:55.:31:57.

A huge disappointment for Carl Frampton. I think everyone was

:31:58.:32:01.

watching at home, eating him on, along with 5000 Irish fans. --

:32:02.:32:08.

egging him. He was defending his title but just couldn't manage to do

:32:09.:32:14.

it. Very disappointing. But there is talk of a possible rematch.

:32:15.:32:17.

Carl Frampton has suffered the first defeat of his professional career.

:32:18.:32:20.

After 12 gruelling rounds at the MGM in Las Vegas,

:32:21.:32:23.

Leo Santa Cruz is the new WBA featherweight champion.

:32:24.:32:28.

This, of course, was the Northern Irishman's first

:32:29.:32:32.

defence of the title which he won narrowly against Santa Cruz in July,

:32:33.:32:36.

but this time round it was Santa Cruz who edged it,

:32:37.:32:39.

winning with a majority points decision and ending

:32:40.:32:41.

Afterwards, he called on Santa Cruz to complete the trilogy with a final

:32:42.:32:45.

There were plenty of shocks in the fourth round of the FA Cup.

:32:46.:32:51.

Wolves claimed the biggest scalp, knocking out Liverpool,

:32:52.:32:54.

while non-League Lincoln City will be in the last 16 for the first

:32:55.:32:58.

And there could have been more, as Patrick Gearey reports.

:32:59.:33:11.

It is the salute of the underdog. A clap first performed by Iceland at

:33:12.:33:21.

last summer's Euros, whose upstart example will for Rampton followed.

:33:22.:33:24.

Liverpool made nine changes and were just getting acquainted when Wolves

:33:25.:33:30.

went ahead. Later in half the championship run again. All it

:33:31.:33:38.

needed was to stay calm. Liverpool got one back but still went out of

:33:39.:33:42.

their second cup in a week. The cathedral was once the tallest

:33:43.:33:46.

building in the world. The football club sits at a lower level, but kids

:33:47.:33:51.

reaching new heights in the cup. They -- Brighton seemed to lose

:33:52.:33:57.

their bearings. It was made to- one to the nonleague side who couldn't

:33:58.:34:02.

believe their luck, but they didn't rely on fortune. As against Ipswich

:34:03.:34:06.

in the last round a mixed adrenaline with the cool head of the Robertson.

:34:07.:34:15.

-- Theo. Lincoln City are through to the last 16 in the FA Cup! From post

:34:16.:34:20.

match bubbly to a pre- match cup of tea at white Hart Lane, Gareth

:34:21.:34:24.

Ainsworth would need something medicinal by the end. His side pour

:34:25.:34:29.

into Tottenham. Paul Haines has done the rounds in his career but he will

:34:30.:34:33.

remember this goal as well is any, and the penalty that came later.

:34:34.:34:37.

Spurs brought it back to but with words done. Gary Thompson, 3-2. Only

:34:38.:34:45.

seven minutes of normal time left. Ecstasy slipped slowly into anxiety.

:34:46.:34:49.

Delhi Ali were still out there, again change. 89 minutes, 3-3. Still

:34:50.:34:57.

good enough to bring Spurs back to Buckinghamshire. In the final

:34:58.:35:01.

seconds of stoppage time the replay was cancelled. Wander is left

:35:02.:35:02.

wondering. Arsenal sailed through to the fifth

:35:03.:35:05.

round of the FA Cup after thrashing Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger had

:35:06.:35:09.

to watch from the stands after his recent touchline ban,

:35:10.:35:15.

but saw his side put five past Two goals from the returning

:35:16.:35:18.

Danny Welbeck and a Theo Walcott hat-trick ensured the Gunners safely

:35:19.:35:22.

reached the next round. Manchester City came out on top

:35:23.:35:27.

against Crystal Palace, Yaya Toure's free-kick

:35:28.:35:29.

adding to earlier goals The result means Sam Allardyce has

:35:30.:35:32.

just one win in eight since taking Premier league leaders Chelsea

:35:33.:35:41.

are also safely through to the last 16 after they beat Brentford

:35:42.:35:48.

4-0 at Stamford Bridge. Branislav Ivanovic got

:35:49.:35:51.

the pick of their goals. The defender is linked with a move

:35:52.:35:53.

away from Chelsea before the transfer window

:35:54.:35:56.

shuts on Tuesday. Rangers are back-up to second

:35:57.:35:59.

in the Scottish Premiership after beating Motherwell 2-0

:36:00.:36:02.

in a heated game at Fir Park. Both sides had a player sent

:36:03.:36:05.

off in the first half. Rangers left it late with goals

:36:06.:36:09.

from Kenny Miller and Emerson There were also wins

:36:10.:36:12.

for Kilmarnock and St Johnstone. They've got 31 Grand Slam titles

:36:13.:36:15.

between them but they haven't met Two of tennis's all time greats,

:36:16.:36:24.

Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal , will be battling it out

:36:25.:36:34.

for the Australian Open title They've met in eight

:36:35.:36:39.

Grand Slam finals before, He is an incredible tennis player.

:36:40.:36:53.

He's got shots that nobody else has and when you have that you are

:36:54.:36:58.

unique and special, plus he's got the Greek, the mental and physical

:36:59.:37:03.

ability to sustain a super high level of play for years and four

:37:04.:37:09.

hours and weeks, he is proving that time and time the -- again and I

:37:10.:37:13.

really respect that. He is a special player. He is great

:37:14.:37:21.

and it is exciting for me and for both of us that we are still there

:37:22.:37:28.

and still fighting for important events. That's important for us, I

:37:29.:37:30.

think. That's very special. Now yesterday's jump-racing

:37:31.:37:35.

at Cheltenham was billed as a mini version of the famous March

:37:36.:37:40.

festival, with some of the sport's But the day ended in tragedy

:37:41.:37:43.

when Many Clouds, who'd surprised everyone by just beating

:37:44.:37:48.

favourite Thistlecrack in the big race, The Cotswold Chase,

:37:49.:37:51.

then collapsed and died shortly Many Clouds won the same race back

:37:52.:37:53.

in 2015 before going-on to win Going back to Las Vegas. Carl

:37:54.:38:08.

Frampton's rain has come to an end overnight. Boxing correspondent is

:38:09.:38:12.

at the Arena this morning. Good morning, or should I say grieving?

:38:13.:38:20.

-- good evening. Even Carl Frampton thought it was a good win. How did

:38:21.:38:26.

you call it? I thought he was a wider winner than any of the judges.

:38:27.:38:38.

I 41 x four rounds. The main thing was could Santa Cruz do anything

:38:39.:38:41.

different from the last contest in July? Carl Frampton and his trainer

:38:42.:38:45.

were convinced that he would be able to do anything different, in other

:38:46.:38:49.

words he spent most of the time on the front foot last July and they

:38:50.:38:53.

doubted his ability to box on the back foot and let Carl Frampton come

:38:54.:38:57.

to him, but he was very adept on the back foot this evening and that made

:38:58.:39:00.

the difference. He was more clinical, more accurate and they

:39:01.:39:04.

also thought he box like the man who lost first time round. There was

:39:05.:39:08.

more a bigger about his work and he seemed so determined to avenge that

:39:09.:39:12.

defeat last July. And maybe Carl Frampton will now have that

:39:13.:39:16.

advantage if they do fight for a third time. You mentioned a third

:39:17.:39:20.

and final fight. Are they talking about Belfast? Yes. Santa Cruz said

:39:21.:39:26.

at the press conference, I am talking to you from the media

:39:27.:39:30.

centre, just a short walk from the venue where the fight took place, he

:39:31.:39:35.

said he is an honourable man and that Carl Frampton gave him the

:39:36.:39:38.

rematch after he won last July and so he will now do likewise. I think

:39:39.:39:43.

there is still a question mark as to where it will be, because if it is

:39:44.:39:47.

going to be in Belfast it looks like it will have to happen in due for

:39:48.:39:52.

all sorts of logistical reasons. -- happen in June. I think these two

:39:53.:39:57.

have been involved in very hard fights within six months and they

:39:58.:40:01.

might not want to go at it again so quickly. So this might stretch

:40:02.:40:05.

things to later in the year, but there are no guarantees in boxing.

:40:06.:40:10.

Both men have said they would do it and we hope it will happen. There

:40:11.:40:14.

will be great excitement around it again and it could be potentially

:40:15.:40:18.

one of the best fights of the year, as this may turn out to be. And last

:40:19.:40:22.

year in July the fight was one of the very best of 2016. Thanks very

:40:23.:40:26.

much. Despite the loss there will be huge celebrations in Vegas from some

:40:27.:40:29.

of those northern Irish and Irish fans.

:40:30.:40:33.

Because it was only a couple of hours ago? I imagine they will

:40:34.:40:40.

almost be celebrating? Apparently there are 5000 fans out

:40:41.:40:45.

there and they say wherever Carl Frampton goes it always feels like

:40:46.:40:49.

Belfast, so I would say that will be true, even in Vegas tonight.

:40:50.:40:51.

Thank you. Prince William and Prince Harry have

:40:52.:40:53.

announced plans to erect a statue of their mother,

:40:54.:40:56.

Diana Princess of Wales. The two princes said

:40:57.:40:58.

that the time was right or who the sculptor might be,

:40:59.:41:00.

but it's hoped the figure will be unveiled in the public gardens

:41:01.:41:07.

of Diana's former home, Kate Williams is a royal

:41:08.:41:10.

historian and joins us Good morning. As we said, a

:41:11.:41:24.

significant year of course, the 20th anniversary of Diana's death. Some

:41:25.:41:27.

have questioned why we haven't had a statue before. It does seem as if a

:41:28.:41:32.

statue is very fitting now. Certainly William and Harry have

:41:33.:41:36.

talked about a statue before. Harry said it was time to have a statue

:41:37.:41:40.

and he talked about how his mother was so important to him. Certainly I

:41:41.:41:44.

think it is very fitting that this year there is a statue. We did have

:41:45.:41:52.

the Diana memorial gardens, but we haven't had an official statue, so I

:41:53.:41:56.

think many will welcome this news and welcome the fact that Diana is

:41:57.:42:00.

to be commemorated in this way on the 20th anniversary of her tragic

:42:01.:42:04.

and untimely death. And of course William and Harry were so young at

:42:05.:42:09.

the time of her death. Perhaps some criticism that they weren't able to

:42:10.:42:13.

be as involved in those proceedings as perhaps they would have liked. So

:42:14.:42:18.

this is maybe their way of putting their stamp on things? I think it

:42:19.:42:22.

is. They talk about how their mother touched so many lives, about how

:42:23.:42:26.

important she was, about her legacy, and yes, Harry was 12 and William

:42:27.:42:32.

15, it was a terrible shock for them and they were surrounded by so many

:42:33.:42:36.

people. Harry said recently that many of his memories of the time

:42:37.:42:39.

were very negative because he felt as if he was chased either paparazzi

:42:40.:42:44.

and I the media. -- chased either paparazzi. It is time to put their

:42:45.:42:51.

stamp on it. This is her legacy and especially her legacy as this great

:42:52.:42:56.

charitable patron, the person who thinks of others and puts out a hand

:42:57.:43:02.

to the affection of others and I think Prince Harry said he couldn't

:43:03.:43:06.

ever feel her boots in that way, because she was such a great patron

:43:07.:43:10.

of charity. I wanted to pick up on that, because clearly the statue is

:43:11.:43:14.

a physical embodiment to all of that, but the prince is also active

:43:15.:43:18.

in following up her charity work, in the same sort of issues that Diana

:43:19.:43:25.

did. Yes. The printers really have taken up the lion's share of the

:43:26.:43:32.

charity work. -- princes. Especially looking at the causes that don't get

:43:33.:43:35.

much attention. Their recent campaign for mental health awareness

:43:36.:43:39.

and mental health discussion is exactly the kind of thing that Diana

:43:40.:43:43.

would have done, engagement with charities like that. Although they

:43:44.:43:48.

are respected, they aren't really in the front line. That idea, of

:43:49.:43:54.

looking at those people who are sometimes forgotten and sometimes

:43:55.:43:58.

suffering, is exactly what Diana engaged with. So the fact that the

:43:59.:44:02.

princes have continued that legacy, it is important that they continue

:44:03.:44:07.

that legacy. They do a lot of our conservation. People's charities and

:44:08.:44:12.

thinking about those people who sometimes get left behind in the

:44:13.:44:16.

busy pace of modern life. A just word on a statue, no details yet

:44:17.:44:22.

about the sculptor or where it will go exactly. Keen to avoid the

:44:23.:44:30.

criticism of the fountain no doubt? Yes, that it wasn't quite fitting

:44:31.:44:37.

and of course there is a long to get a sculpture ready to put it up, but

:44:38.:44:40.

many people have had thoughts about how Diana should be commemorated.

:44:41.:44:48.

She is still... She was the princes' mother, but many people will have

:44:49.:44:51.

their thoughts about what they want to see. There is a very experienced

:44:52.:44:55.

committee here thinking about the sculpture and how it will embody

:44:56.:45:00.

Diana in the most memorable and peaceful way, because it's a statue

:45:01.:45:03.

that will be there for generations and generations to come, just like

:45:04.:45:07.

the Queen Victoria statue in Kensington Gardens. It will be there

:45:08.:45:11.

to be remembered, viewed and looked at and just as many people think

:45:12.:45:13.

this is well overdue. There we will be talking about some Royal

:45:14.:45:32.

scoops later. We would be speaking to her just after eight.

:45:33.:45:34.

Here's Chris with a look at this morning's weather.

:45:35.:45:40.

Starting off with a wintry scene from Cumbria. This picture is from

:45:41.:45:47.

last night. It is not snow but hail. There was a big hailstorm that went

:45:48.:45:51.

through last night and I can show you it on the radar picture going

:45:52.:45:56.

through here. For the time being, showers straight around coastal

:45:57.:46:01.

areas. With the temperature is around freezing, it leads to the

:46:02.:46:06.

risk of icy stretches on untreated roads and pavements first thing this

:46:07.:46:10.

morning. Should be a fair bit of sunshine, that aside. But we will

:46:11.:46:14.

see rain coming into south-west England. There is uncertainty about

:46:15.:46:21.

the northward and eastward spread of this rain. It might be a little fast

:46:22.:46:27.

to come in on the computer models and that means across parts of the

:46:28.:46:30.

Midlands and south-east England, it might not arrive until after dark.

:46:31.:46:35.

Northwest, Northern Ireland, rein in the middle part of the day. Scotland

:46:36.:46:40.

and north-eastern England, dry and fine. Showers for Orkney and

:46:41.:46:46.

Shetland. -- rain. Overnight, another ice risk in the north but

:46:47.:46:53.

then it turns milder in the south-west. Mist and hill fog

:46:54.:47:03.

patches. Looking at the picture for next week, spells of rain on the

:47:04.:47:08.

weather menu. Becoming windy with potential severe gales later in the

:47:09.:47:15.

week. The south-westerly winds bring us milder weather. Mist and hill fog

:47:16.:47:21.

and patches in Monday. Getting into Northern Ireland and Wales. Reaching

:47:22.:47:29.

double figures, in Plymouth. Still call up north that at least some

:47:30.:47:34.

sunshine. It will cloud over a bit in the afternoon. For the rest of

:47:35.:47:38.

the week ahead, the Atlantic wakes up and we will see a number of

:47:39.:47:41.

weather fronts bringing pulses of rain across the UK. It will turn

:47:42.:47:46.

increasingly windy for the end of the week and there is potential for

:47:47.:47:50.

severe gales and that potential exists particularly across the

:47:51.:47:51.

south-west of the UK. There's a big birthday today for

:47:52.:47:54.

a hugely popular radio programme. More than 3,000 famous faces have

:47:55.:48:00.

been castaway since the Radio 4 programme was first

:48:01.:48:06.

broadcast in 1942. Each episode sees a guest

:48:07.:48:10.

choose eight songs, a book and a luxury item that

:48:11.:48:13.

would give them comfort Do you think you would be fine on a

:48:14.:48:33.

desert island? Yes, I would. I would be to find because I have a tendency

:48:34.:48:36.

to isolate myself so it would probably be the worst place for me.

:48:37.:48:41.

You would be better off to put me in a shopping centre. You are one of

:48:42.:48:44.

the very few people with an unimpeachable quality. How does one

:48:45.:48:53.

peach David Attenborough? That would be letting on. I did half of my

:48:54.:49:00.

community service with people with mental health problems and I also

:49:01.:49:04.

scrubbed down some very dirty rooms and made chicken for heaters for

:49:05.:49:10.

some homeless people which was nice. At 16 you are going to be a pageboy

:49:11.:49:15.

at a wedding and tell me what she wanted to wear, young David Beckham.

:49:16.:49:21.

I had the option of burgundy velvet knickerbockers and white ballet

:49:22.:49:25.

shoes and white tights. Did you feel that these knees? I felt great. --

:49:26.:49:31.

bees knees. Simon O'Hagan is from

:49:32.:49:32.

the Radio Times, and joins us now. The thing that is a striking about

:49:33.:49:40.

the clips we have heard is that people are so honest and give away

:49:41.:49:44.

really personal information. What is it about the programme that makes

:49:45.:49:48.

people comfortable enough to do that? I think they are comfortable

:49:49.:49:51.

because they realise it is a huge honour to go on the programme.

:49:52.:49:58.

What's great about it. Well, there are lots of great things about it.

:49:59.:50:03.

It is not a chat show. That is the crucial thing. You never get the

:50:04.:50:07.

feeling that people are on there to sell their new book or their new

:50:08.:50:11.

film. They are just there to present themselves and you have to give

:50:12.:50:14.

enormous credit to all the presenters over the years and

:50:15.:50:17.

particularly Kirsty Young who is just fantastic at, you know,

:50:18.:50:24.

bringing people out. It's been running since 1940 which in itself

:50:25.:50:28.

is a very big achievement. It is a winning formula that hasn't changed.

:50:29.:50:35.

That's right. I was thinking that the creator still get his name

:50:36.:50:40.

mentioned at the end of the programme. He has been dead for many

:50:41.:50:44.

years and still get his name on radio every week. He was sort of

:50:45.:50:49.

like Buzz feed ahead of his time. He had this list idea ahead of his

:50:50.:50:54.

time. No one had thought that way before. Now we have a 23 greatest

:50:55.:51:01.

songs almost ever. His original idea was to have ten. Presumably,

:51:02.:51:05.

somebody decided it would make the programme for too long so it comes

:51:06.:51:11.

down to eight. Yes, as you say, it's a completely winning formula. It's a

:51:12.:51:15.

very, very simple idea and the point about the music is the music gives

:51:16.:51:21.

you a strong sense of the person. You can see that the person is a

:51:22.:51:27.

genuine music lover or ask their friends. You have got the music and

:51:28.:51:35.

the sections in between which are revealing. Are there any programmes

:51:36.:51:41.

that stick out for you over the years? That is a hard one. I did

:51:42.:51:49.

look back over a few. I went back and listened to a couple of VoIP

:51:50.:52:01.

Plumley's. -- Roy. He wasn't as searching as Kirsty plums. Captain

:52:02.:52:07.

Moran was absolutely brilliant last week. We are coming to David Beckham

:52:08.:52:17.

who will be a calmer present in the studio. Invariably, I particularly

:52:18.:52:23.

enjoyed Jackie Kay, the Scottish poet. She had a wonderful story to

:52:24.:52:29.

tell about her life and she told it very beautifully. She was very warm

:52:30.:52:33.

and open. You want people to be themselves, mean natural, be warm

:52:34.:52:38.

and be open. So David Beckham, a good choice? We heard bits. I think

:52:39.:52:49.

yes. He is a global figure. You know, he is the biggest sports

:52:50.:52:52.

celebrity that this country has reduced. On that level, you can't

:52:53.:52:57.

possibly argue with it. I want to hear much more about it. Simon,

:52:58.:53:05.

thank you. They are celebrating their 75th birthday with the

:53:06.:53:06.

interview with David neck. -- David Beckham today

:53:07.:53:12.

at 11.15am on BBC Radio 4. An extended version of the interview

:53:13.:53:15.

will be available online. When the cast of the new

:53:16.:53:20.

Trainspotting film walked the red carpet at Monday's World

:53:21.:53:23.

premiere in Edinburgh, they were joined by

:53:24.:53:25.

the filmmaker Garry Fraser. Back in the 1990s,

:53:26.:53:27.

when the original was released, Garry was a heroin user

:53:28.:53:29.

immersed in crime - but he survived the drugs

:53:30.:53:32.

and violence, and managed Garry found a new life

:53:33.:53:34.

in filmmaking, and took up a senior role behind-the-scenes

:53:35.:53:45.

in the new Trainspotting movie. He made this piece for BBC

:53:46.:53:47.

Scotland's new 'Timeline' programme Choose life, choose a job, choose a

:53:48.:54:02.

career. It's a cult classic and it's one of Britain's greatest ever

:54:03.:54:07.

films. Train-spotting and all its cast. In 1996 when the first

:54:08.:54:15.

train-spotting came out, I was dealing and taking heroin. My life

:54:16.:54:19.

was spiralling out of control and I was chaotic. At the time, I didn't

:54:20.:54:26.

feel like anything represented my culture. The drugs destroyed

:54:27.:54:32.

communities and very quickly I had the realisation when I looked in my

:54:33.:54:36.

son's eyes that I had to turn my life around. That's exactly what I

:54:37.:54:44.

did. I started making short films. Then I enrolled in a course at

:54:45.:54:48.

Edinburgh College. It was a new life but I was or is trying to tell the

:54:49.:54:54.

lot story of the old one. A lot of people died in his. They have just

:54:55.:55:00.

been forgotten. My first feature film got me a dark and attention. --

:55:01.:55:12.

BAFTA. It was Danny Boyle that said I should get involved in a sequel.

:55:13.:55:18.

The new film looks at life after addiction. A battle that I know

:55:19.:55:26.

well. You are an addict. Dew think I haven't heard that 100,000 times? Do

:55:27.:55:32.

you have 12 steps for me? Be addicted, the addicted to something

:55:33.:55:41.

else. Danny Boyle, once he came along to acting workshops, he

:55:42.:55:47.

decided to cast these guys as well. We just felt really welcome with

:55:48.:55:51.

Danny Boyle. We talked about normal stuff, football, music, he treated

:55:52.:55:57.

us just like normal people. The addiction stuff. You know, they

:55:58.:56:03.

really got it across in the film. It was really good. It's doing

:56:04.:56:08.

something positive and making healthy choices. I think they

:56:09.:56:12.

captured that well. I think its great how they looked at addiction

:56:13.:56:20.

and not just covering drugs, but Facebook, porn, food. Exercise.

:56:21.:56:26.

Addiction covered a wide range of stuff and I think train-spotting did

:56:27.:56:33.

that. I'm looking forward to you guys having your position where you

:56:34.:56:37.

are sitting in a cinema that is absolutely packed and you are in the

:56:38.:56:43.

most anticipated film of 2017. -- part of the most anticipated film.

:56:44.:56:47.

And bro as massively changed since the first film. There is a new

:56:48.:56:52.

Parliament, lots of money flowing in. There has also been

:56:53.:56:55.

gentrification and working class communities have been pushed to the

:56:56.:56:58.

outskirts of the city and of course, it's impossible not to notice all

:56:59.:57:03.

the homelessness. It's definitely become more multicultural and I

:57:04.:57:06.

think that diversity is a good thing. I think now I can appreciate

:57:07.:57:11.

train-spotting more as a film and what I did back then. After all

:57:12.:57:18.

these years, what I worked out his train-spotting is a work of fiction

:57:19.:57:21.

made Hollywood and not a documentary. You are creating

:57:22.:57:27.

something for a large audience. You have to make something magical and

:57:28.:57:31.

now I'm part of that magic, too. T2 Trainspotting is in cinemas now,

:57:32.:57:39.

and Timeline is on BBC Two Scotland First Bake Off turned us

:57:40.:57:44.

all into a nation of cake makers, and now thousands of us

:57:45.:57:53.

are apparently picking up Yes, we're talking sewing before

:57:54.:57:56.

9:00, and we're joined by Great British Sewing Bee

:57:57.:58:00.

semi-finalist Deborah Simms. You're going to be giving us some

:58:01.:58:05.

tips and making a Breakfast brooch before the end of the programme

:58:06.:58:11.

aren't you, Deborah? Why is it so popular now? I think

:58:12.:58:20.

it's based around a lot of things. People wanting something unique for

:58:21.:58:26.

their home. Slow moving things have been coming into fashion recently.

:58:27.:58:30.

Having a creative outlet. A lot of people are in office jobs. We

:58:31.:58:36.

haven't got long with you. So you are going to make something during

:58:37.:58:41.

the course of the programme? Yes. It's different pieces of petals and

:58:42.:58:45.

I have done an embroidery of the BBC. So you cut it all out and you

:58:46.:58:50.

are going to assemble it over the course of the morning? Yes. Just

:58:51.:58:55.

over an hour it should take. And then we are going to fight over it

:58:56.:59:00.

as to who will wear it in the end. We will catch up with you a little

:59:01.:59:02.

later. This is Breakfast,

:59:03.:59:02.

with Ben Thompson and Sally Nugent. Campaigners win a legal challenge

:59:03.:00:16.

against Donald Trump's But there's chaos and confusion

:00:17.:00:18.

as America closes its borders Good morning.

:00:19.:00:27.

It's Sunday the 29th January. A statue of Diana, Princess

:00:28.:00:46.

of Wales, is to be built in Kensington Palace

:00:47.:00:50.

by her sons Prince Harry A warning that living standards

:00:51.:00:53.

could be set to fall because of higher inflation

:00:54.:00:57.

and stagnating wages. Carl Frampton has been beaten

:00:58.:01:01.

for the first time in his career, losing his featherweight title

:01:02.:01:07.

to Leo Santa Cruz in Las Vegas. We are looking at a dry

:01:08.:01:11.

and bright start to the day, with some sunshine, but it

:01:12.:01:16.

will cloud over to the south and west later, with

:01:17.:01:19.

patchy rain on the way. A full forecast in

:01:20.:01:22.

the next half-hour. Good morning.

:01:23.:01:25.

First, our main story. A judge in New York has upheld

:01:26.:01:28.

a legal challenge aimed at stopping the deportation of people

:01:29.:01:31.

being detained under Donald Trump's President Trump has denied

:01:32.:01:34.

that the measures are a ban on Muslims and said that the plan

:01:35.:01:39.

was "working out nicely". There have been protests at airports

:01:40.:01:44.

around the United States. Our correspondent Simon

:01:45.:01:47.

Clemison has this report. Donald Trump says his ban on foreign

:01:48.:01:51.

nationals travelling to America from seven Muslim countries is,

:01:52.:01:54.

in his words, But the order has provoked protest

:01:55.:01:56.

at airports across the country. Inside, lawyers worked to free

:01:57.:02:04.

passengers being detained. Some were already on the way

:02:05.:02:08.

in when the president made and they're not the

:02:09.:02:11.

only ones affected. I've heard from

:02:12.:02:14.

colleagues in London. People aren't allowed

:02:15.:02:17.

to board flights. These are CEOs of American companies

:02:18.:02:20.

who happen to have an Iranian We're in disbelief

:02:21.:02:23.

that this is happening. At Los Angeles airport,

:02:24.:02:29.

a 60-year-old Iranian American broke down after learning his brother,

:02:30.:02:33.

who had come to visit him, But we didn't know we would

:02:34.:02:36.

have the situation here. I am a US citizen for 15-20 years

:02:37.:02:53.

and my brother has done nothing wrong and I

:02:54.:02:57.

did nothing wrong. On the election trail,

:02:58.:02:59.

Donald Trump suggested what he said would be "a complete

:03:00.:03:05.

shutdown" of Muslims entering He denies the measures

:03:06.:03:07.

he has now brought in, which include suspending

:03:08.:03:10.

the entire refugee programme, It is working out very nicely

:03:11.:03:12.

and we're going to have a very strict ban and we're

:03:13.:03:18.

going to have extreme vetting, which we should have had in this

:03:19.:03:21.

country for many years. But campaigners have already

:03:22.:03:24.

launched a series of legal actions to block his plans and a judge has

:03:25.:03:27.

now temporarily halted moves to deport people travelling with

:03:28.:03:36.

visas of being held at airports. When President Trump enacts laws

:03:37.:03:44.

or orders that are unconstitutional, the courts are there

:03:45.:03:49.

to defend people's rights. But with immigration central

:03:50.:03:51.

to Donald Trump's campaign for the presidency,

:03:52.:03:54.

he is unlikely to give up. Theresa May has been criticised

:03:55.:03:56.

for not condemning Donald Trump Downing Street says Theresa May

:03:57.:04:01.

"does not agree" with some Our political correspondent is

:04:02.:04:16.

London. Some say Theresa May was slow in condemning this move from

:04:17.:04:20.

President Trump. Will that damage on reflection what could have been two

:04:21.:04:25.

very successful trips for her? It certainly puts a shadow over it. The

:04:26.:04:33.

reason they were the about -- was asked about it three times while in

:04:34.:04:37.

Turkey. All she said was it was a matter for the US government. That

:04:38.:04:42.

was met by condemnation from many MPs here, even those in her own

:04:43.:04:48.

party. One of her own MPs is an Iraqi born citizen and he said that

:04:49.:04:52.

he himself would be affected by this. And so this is something that

:04:53.:04:56.

has been met with a lot of condemnation. Last night we got that

:04:57.:05:01.

statement from Number 10 Downing St, which said in the case that British

:05:02.:05:05.

nationals were affected the British government would make appeals to the

:05:06.:05:10.

US government. But certainly this will I suppose make people question

:05:11.:05:14.

whether or not she can truly say what she thinks the Donald Trump.

:05:15.:05:17.

She said the special relationship was on where you could be candid and

:05:18.:05:22.

say what you think, but on this occasion she was quite slow in

:05:23.:05:26.

expressing her opinion and she will no doubt be criticised for that.

:05:27.:05:27.

Thank you. Prince William and Prince Harry have

:05:28.:05:30.

announced plans to erect a statue of their mother, Diana Princess

:05:31.:05:33.

of Wales, in the grounds of Kensington Palace,

:05:34.:05:36.

20 years after her death. The two princes said

:05:37.:05:41.

that the time was right "to recognise her positive impact"

:05:42.:05:43.

with a permanent statue. Diana's home became the focus

:05:44.:05:45.

for the outpouring of grief following her death

:05:46.:05:51.

in a car crash in 1997. Now it will take centre stage again

:05:52.:05:56.

for a new commemoration of her life. In a statement, the Duke

:05:57.:06:00.

of Cambridge and Prince Harry said: The statue will be erected

:06:01.:06:15.

here in the public gardens The royal brothers say they hope it

:06:16.:06:18.

will allow all those who visit here to reflect on Diana's

:06:19.:06:24.

life and legacy. Work on the design will begin

:06:25.:06:27.

shortly, with the unveiling expected William and Harry

:06:28.:06:30.

will be very involved. It will be difficult,

:06:31.:06:41.

as it will always face criticism,

:06:42.:06:46.

whether it's a true likeness and true likeness is in

:06:47.:06:47.

the eyes of the beholder. Some will say it is,

:06:48.:06:50.

some will say it isn't, so it's a difficult task

:06:51.:06:53.

when they choose the artist and the artist has to get

:06:54.:06:55.

it absolutely right. Until now the main memorial has been

:06:56.:06:58.

a fountain in a park in London. Diana's sister will be

:06:59.:07:02.

on the committee tasked with commissioning and privately

:07:03.:07:04.

raising the funds for the statue. At Kensington Palace

:07:05.:07:07.

there is enthusiasm for the project. She was the People's Princess,

:07:08.:07:09.

so I think it's a good idea. A lot of people were very attached

:07:10.:07:12.

to Diana, so I think personally they would

:07:13.:07:17.

The unveiling will be one of several events this year to mark Diana's

:07:18.:07:23.

Living standards could be set to fall this year,

:07:24.:07:27.

according to a report by a leading think tank.

:07:28.:07:29.

The Resolution Foundation said that although the UK

:07:30.:07:31.

experienced a mini-boom from 2014 to the beginning of 2016,

:07:32.:07:34.

rising prices and stagnating wages mean a bigger squeeze on our income.

:07:35.:07:40.

Our business correspondent Joe Lynam reports.

:07:41.:07:45.

It may not feel like it for some of us, but we've enjoyed a mini boom

:07:46.:07:49.

in living standards over the past 2.5 years.

:07:50.:07:51.

That's thanks to low inflation, low interest rates

:07:52.:07:53.

But that's set to end, according to a think tank.

:07:54.:08:04.

The Resolution Standard's annual audit says the weaker pound

:08:05.:08:06.

especially among low earners, and employers won't be able

:08:07.:08:12.

While employment rates will slow down or fall this year.

:08:13.:08:16.

There are big things the government can do,

:08:17.:08:19.

but they can't deal with inflation, the government, but it can deal

:08:20.:08:24.

with trying to get even more people into work and solving some

:08:25.:08:30.

problems around productivity, we might see wages growing quicker.

:08:31.:08:32.

The government said the UK under Theresa May had the fastest growing

:08:33.:08:35.

economy in the G7 and it was determined to build an economy that

:08:36.:08:39.

But the government's own official forecaster expects the economy

:08:40.:08:42.

to weaken somewhat this year and that could leave

:08:43.:08:45.

Wildfires in Chile are now known to have killed at least 11

:08:46.:08:52.

people and left several thousand homeless.

:08:53.:08:54.

Firefighters and volunteers are tackling more than 100

:08:55.:08:56.

separate fires, half of which are still out of control.

:08:57.:08:59.

The authorities have detained more than 20 people suspected of arson.

:09:00.:09:04.

French voters will choose today who is to be the socialist candidate

:09:05.:09:07.

Benoit Hamon, who was sacked from the government

:09:08.:09:12.

in 2014, won the first round of the selection process.

:09:13.:09:15.

He's seen as a left wing rebel and he faces the former prime

:09:16.:09:18.

David Beckham has been chosen as the castaway for the 75th

:09:19.:09:22.

anniversary episode of Desert Island Discs.

:09:23.:09:27.

He revealed he and his wife Victoria used to have dates

:09:28.:09:30.

in restaurant car parks in the early days of their relationship,

:09:31.:09:33.

There have been more than 3,000 episodes of the Radio 4

:09:34.:09:38.

And in case you are wondering, his record choices included

:09:39.:09:44.

I Am The Resurrection, by the Stone Roses, he loves them,

:09:45.:09:47.

and his luxury item was his England caps.

:09:48.:09:51.

And later in the programme, we'll be talking to the author

:09:52.:09:54.

Ian Rankin about his appearance on Desert Island Discs.

:09:55.:09:57.

It is an honour to be asked to go on it.

:09:58.:10:02.

It's a real ability to make people open up.

:10:03.:10:05.

I think it is the destruction of the music. When you think about the

:10:06.:10:12.

music they are very honest about themselves. I can't wait to hear

:10:13.:10:14.

what David Beckham says. A full version available online as

:10:15.:10:16.

well. It is 7:10am. That was how one American civil

:10:17.:10:22.

rights organisation described Donald Trump's decision to ban

:10:23.:10:28.

immigration from a string Overnight, a US judge issued

:10:29.:10:30.

a stay temporarily halting the deportation of visa holders

:10:31.:10:34.

or refugees under the President's executive order, but the case

:10:35.:10:41.

won't get a full hearing Joining us now is Scott Lucas,

:10:42.:10:44.

Professor of American studies Good morning. There is so much to

:10:45.:10:56.

talk about, what lets talk about that news overnight. They stay on

:10:57.:11:02.

that ban on immigration. Clearly a lot of worry for a lot of people.

:11:03.:11:08.

We've seen people at airports. I imagine the protests will keep

:11:09.:11:12.

growing? They will. The worry is still there, despite this day. All

:11:13.:11:18.

it means is people will not be removed from the US but they can

:11:19.:11:21.

still be held in detention. This could affect potentially thousands

:11:22.:11:24.

of people. You mentioned the protests. This is the big thing. If

:11:25.:11:30.

the statue of liberty are weeping she may be lifting her rise to these

:11:31.:11:35.

people who are saying there are fundamental issues here and you

:11:36.:11:38.

can't just sweep them away with an executive order, which is what

:11:39.:11:41.

Donald Trump did on Friday. It looks little bit like foreign policy, but

:11:42.:11:47.

it is in fact Donald Trump showing the nation what sort of president he

:11:48.:11:50.

intends to be? That's right. He is playing to his domestic race. It may

:11:51.:11:55.

be a minority, but it isn't just Trump. Some have been calling for

:11:56.:12:01.

years to keep Muslims out of America. Can Trump's minority be

:12:02.:12:07.

vocal enough to support him? We will see these protests grow in Congress,

:12:08.:12:13.

the courts. Not just this protests, you remember the marchers one week

:12:14.:12:20.

ago? On the protest in a way what he wants? He wants the protest to get a

:12:21.:12:25.

little bit out of hand, so therefore there are two extremes of opinion

:12:26.:12:30.

and the middle ground is gone? But millions of people marched last

:12:31.:12:36.

week, zero arrests. Last night the protests at JFK and other airports,

:12:37.:12:40.

no violence. I think Trump is gambling that like in the primaries

:12:41.:12:45.

he can stir things up. It is one thing to do that when you are

:12:46.:12:48.

candidate, what to do it when you are president, more difficult.

:12:49.:12:51.

Donald Trump supporters will say he is doing exactly what he promised,

:12:52.:12:55.

this is part of his campaign rhetoric and perhaps why he was

:12:56.:12:59.

elected, but you might say Mike Pence, a very different view now

:13:00.:13:03.

that he is in office. A real turnaround and reversal on what he

:13:04.:13:06.

was talking about on things like social media and that campaign.

:13:07.:13:13.

Absolutely. Trump was an outsider, so Mike Pence and Paul Ryan, nobody

:13:14.:13:20.

will support this. Now their choices they either right with this guy in

:13:21.:13:24.

the White House or they break. Not an easy decision. I think for now

:13:25.:13:28.

they will stick with him. How powerful is this executive order? Is

:13:29.:13:33.

it enforceable? Does it have to go to Congress? Do they have to approve

:13:34.:13:39.

it? America has a 2-step system in which the president has a lot of

:13:40.:13:42.

powers under the constitution in the name of security, but it's a system

:13:43.:13:46.

where Congress can't be pushed away, the courts can't be pushed away and

:13:47.:13:50.

that's what we are going to see now, how much resistance will come from

:13:51.:13:55.

there. We've seen so many other issues from President Trump. What

:13:56.:14:00.

will be the most significant and the most controversial? Will it be

:14:01.:14:04.

immigration? How much time do we have? One that has been pushed back

:14:05.:14:09.

has been the extension of these pipelines in the northern US, which

:14:10.:14:14.

crossed sacred Native American land and caused a lot of damage. I think

:14:15.:14:19.

the withdrawal of the Americans from international trade organisations

:14:20.:14:21.

like the transpacific partnership has huge repercussions and I think

:14:22.:14:28.

even a specific question that still lingers, is the US really committed

:14:29.:14:33.

to Nato or not? Very briefly, how has Theresa May's visit played out

:14:34.:14:38.

over there? I was looking online and in the papers to see if there had

:14:39.:14:42.

been much about her, but they didn't seem to be anything. She looked

:14:43.:14:46.

nice, but it is now over. Interesting. Thank you very much.

:14:47.:14:51.

Let's check in on the weather forecast. It looks little bit cold!

:14:52.:14:56.

It looks like It does look like that, this is

:14:57.:15:06.

hailed that fell last night in Whitehaven. Thanks to one of our

:15:07.:15:10.

Weather Watchers for sending us this picture. The hailstorm came in off

:15:11.:15:14.

the Irish Sea. There are a number of showers they

:15:15.:15:28.

continually follow us. Many of us will start off with the risk of ice

:15:29.:15:33.

but they should be a fair bit of sunshine. We will see rain arriving

:15:34.:15:36.

today that this rain is not straightforward. There is

:15:37.:15:39.

uncertainty about exactly how far north eastwards it is getting. It

:15:40.:15:43.

will turn wet for Southern Wales and south-west England through this

:15:44.:15:47.

morning. Rain may not arrive through the north-east Midlands and past of

:15:48.:15:52.

its Anglia and the south of England to after dark -- like East Anglia.

:15:53.:15:57.

For Northern Ireland, some wet weather around the middle part of

:15:58.:16:00.

the day. For Scotland and northern England, it should state bind. Quite

:16:01.:16:07.

cold. -- fine. Overnight again, snowy stretchers. Clear skies will

:16:08.:16:16.

allow Frost. It will be relatively mild, 10 degrees in Plymouth.

:16:17.:16:23.

Looking at the weather in the week ahead, we are looking at an

:16:24.:16:27.

unsettled week with spells of rain. We haven't seen much of it over the

:16:28.:16:30.

last few weeks. It will become windy as well with severe gales possible

:16:31.:16:34.

towards the end of the week. The wind is often coming from the

:16:35.:16:37.

south-west which is a mild direction. Some mist and hill fog

:16:38.:16:49.

patches. It will cloud over a bit. Mild to the south-east. Still have

:16:50.:16:55.

the colder air. The milder air will push in eventually. We are looking

:16:56.:16:58.

at an unsettled week with a succession of weather fronts

:16:59.:17:02.

crossing the UK. Initially, it will be slow-moving but later in the week

:17:03.:17:05.

as the weather systems get bigger and more powerful, that is when we

:17:06.:17:09.

could see severe gales locking in towards the south of the UK in

:17:10.:17:12.

particular. That's how the weather is shaping up.

:17:13.:17:22.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:17:23.:17:24.

Time now for a look at the newspapers.

:17:25.:17:26.

Rabbi Laura Janner-Klausner is here to tell us what's

:17:27.:17:28.

Good morning to you. There is a lot to get through. Let's delve straight

:17:29.:17:40.

in. You have picked up the Telegraph for us this morning. A lot of news

:17:41.:17:45.

about Donald Trump, unsurprisingly. Yes. It is the ban of refugees and

:17:46.:17:52.

how it will affect UK passport holders. This fits into an strategy

:17:53.:17:57.

against Muslims. The idea of Muslims having to register. What I would

:17:58.:18:08.

call Muslimophobia instead of Islamaphobia. It happened on

:18:09.:18:13.

Holocaust Memorial Day. There is an international movement for other

:18:14.:18:16.

people who are not Muslims to say that they will register. Madeline

:18:17.:18:20.

Albright, the past Secretary of State, said, as a Dew, I'm going to

:18:21.:18:23.

register with a Muslim. -- as a due. Donald Trump will deny he is anti-

:18:24.:18:39.

Muslim. Well, he is wrong. If you start bringing in laws very quickly

:18:40.:18:45.

and miss using your power the he has. He has extensive executive

:18:46.:18:50.

power that feels supreme in the way he uses it. He comes in with a

:18:51.:18:57.

massively heavy hand. How many executive laws are you going to make

:18:58.:19:00.

within the first week. What does that say about how you see

:19:01.:19:07.

democracy, authoritarian rule? That is much more concerning. Slightly

:19:08.:19:11.

off subject but interesting considering your job. Did you pay

:19:12.:19:15.

any attention as to how he marked Holocaust Memorial Day? Yes, the

:19:16.:19:23.

words were fine. Whoever wrote those words, good. The actions are not.

:19:24.:19:29.

Issue many people will have our looking at what he's done on the

:19:30.:19:34.

campaign trail. It shouldn't be a surprise. He promised to do this and

:19:35.:19:37.

here's an acting it. It's what people were voting for, is it not?

:19:38.:19:43.

Yes but what is the fear behind it? The fear is about lives, economy,

:19:44.:19:50.

health, terrorism. Then you deal with each of those fears. One of the

:19:51.:19:56.

ways is looking at migration law and refugee laws carefully. To say

:19:57.:20:00.

within one week," I am going to blast it! " Doesn't deal carefully

:20:01.:20:08.

with human rights and long-term solutions. Let's move on to the

:20:09.:20:13.

observer. The story you have picked out about Theresa May's

:20:14.:20:23.

counterterrorism Bill. She has used it works. Extremism and British

:20:24.:20:29.

values. They are very hard to define, these words. They are often

:20:30.:20:33.

used as a stick instead of the current. To reason they met with

:20:34.:20:41.

President Trump this week. Did she call him out on any of these? No.

:20:42.:20:47.

I'm very glad to say that what he is doing does not represent the

:20:48.:20:51.

majority of British people or the consensus in Britain and as our

:20:52.:20:56.

Prime Minister, I would expect her to raise hesitations so that when we

:20:57.:21:00.

look back at history, the time that she met and the first foreign leader

:21:01.:21:05.

that he meets, she is already bringing those questions because she

:21:06.:21:09.

has seen in our own home in Britain that when you try to do laws that

:21:10.:21:13.

are so Hammer really, rather than help, but they are very problematic.

:21:14.:21:22.

It's very, very hard to define. Another controversial issue. Cancer

:21:23.:21:37.

drug bills soar by more -- more than 1100% in five years. I witnessed

:21:38.:21:42.

this in a clinic. We had 42 people taken for an Art slot into doctors.

:21:43.:21:48.

At 310, the woman came in and she had been there for an 1130

:21:49.:21:55.

appointment. --A slot for two doctors. The NHS needs love, care,

:21:56.:22:03.

budgeting. Think we have time for one more story. You have picked it

:22:04.:22:08.

out from the Sunday Times. A little bit more cheery? Yes a little bit.

:22:09.:22:14.

It's about how elephants got from Africa across the sea are using

:22:15.:22:20.

their tail as a snorkel, sorry, their trunk as a snorkel. It's a

:22:21.:22:25.

wonderful idea. In all my meetings at work, I have an elephant on my

:22:26.:22:34.

table. We are always took about the elephant in the room. Here we see a

:22:35.:22:43.

super survival mechanism. Has that trunk shrunk over the course of the

:22:44.:22:51.

gears? The things we learn. -- years. They also give me hope! There

:22:52.:22:58.

is a solution for everything. We will talk to you a bit later.

:22:59.:23:02.

It might be illegal, but you don't have to look far

:23:03.:23:05.

to see drivers using their mobile phones at the wheel.

:23:06.:23:08.

So if people aren't put off breaking the law -

:23:09.:23:11.

would it make more sense to confiscate their smartphones

:23:12.:23:13.

One police officer says it might be the only way to get drivers

:23:14.:23:18.

We'll hear from her in a moment, but first here's what people

:23:19.:23:23.

I think it should be confiscated. And any other way to stop from doing

:23:24.:23:35.

it. I think I have more of an issue with the police cop is getting my

:23:36.:23:39.

own property. I understand it is a crime. I think it would act as a

:23:40.:23:44.

good deterrent because people would think twice about it because of the

:23:45.:23:47.

bureaucracy and a hassle of getting it back. To second on the phone.

:23:48.:23:56.

Think about it. Think about it. It depends. How long will they

:23:57.:24:00.

confiscate it? It's affecting other people 's' lives.

:24:01.:24:05.

-- other peoples lives. I'm addicted to my phone so I would definitely

:24:06.:24:12.

think twice. Good morning. It seems that the

:24:13.:24:22.

threat of points on your licence or fines is not enough. You want to see

:24:23.:24:26.

tougher penalties? I went to a conference on Thursday. The big

:24:27.:24:33.

talking point at the moment is the change in legislation that comes in

:24:34.:24:37.

on the first of March. It is the increase of penalty points to six

:24:38.:24:43.

and the fines to ?200. I decided to put the comment out there, what do

:24:44.:24:47.

we think about harsher penalties, should we go further than just that

:24:48.:24:51.

deterrence and I'm quite surprised and relieved that the media did pick

:24:52.:24:59.

it up like it has. How would you enforce it? Very difficult. We have

:25:00.:25:08.

less than 5000 police officers. However, we have campaigns

:25:09.:25:13.

regularly. We have just last week one that targeted specifically road

:25:14.:25:17.

users that used mobile phones, whether it was a car or a lorry and

:25:18.:25:21.

we are waiting for those figures to see what it's been like. If you make

:25:22.:25:25.

a parallel with other things. For example, drink driving. It is now

:25:26.:25:29.

socially unacceptable to do that. Many people agree and they accept

:25:30.:25:34.

that you do not drink and a driver. Had we get to that point with a

:25:35.:25:38.

mobile phone because some people say it is actually Mordt dangerous. --

:25:39.:25:47.

more dangerous. I say it is on par. We have to change society. The

:25:48.:25:51.

enforcement has to go hand in hand with a robust education system. We

:25:52.:25:57.

offer a robust education. Some drivers are offered what is called a

:25:58.:26:01.

driver improvement screen that where there was a financial cost to them

:26:02.:26:05.

that it means that once they have attended in our own time, they were

:26:06.:26:09.

get points on the licence. There is a tendency and the temptation. You

:26:10.:26:13.

have the phone in the car, it beats, maybe what to look at the message,

:26:14.:26:16.

you need to be looking at directions to the weight you are going. You've

:26:17.:26:22.

on your phone. Had you get people to put the phone away? -- where you are

:26:23.:26:31.

going. The phone isn't just a phone. It is a minicomputer. It does so

:26:32.:26:35.

many things. We need hard-hitting evidence of casualties figures will

:26:36.:26:39.

stop show people what the risk is. My message would be no social media

:26:40.:26:44.

message text message is worth risking your life or other while --

:26:45.:26:49.

road users because we are so distracted about taking selfies, a

:26:50.:26:53.

social media update. It's not just picking up the phone and using it in

:26:54.:26:57.

a traditional way that is all these other things having an impact and

:26:58.:27:00.

distracting drivers. Unfortunately, we have seen the evidence all too

:27:01.:27:04.

many times. People being killed. People getting seriously injured in

:27:05.:27:07.

road traffic accidents that has happened at a result of people using

:27:08.:27:12.

a mobile phone. Absolutely. One might lost in this way is one life

:27:13.:27:19.

to many. --1 life lost. People don't realise that when they scroll

:27:20.:27:23.

through to choose a tune or take a text message. It can be

:27:24.:27:27.

catastrophic. We have seen it. I was driving on a motorway yesterday

:27:28.:27:32.

behind a lorry that was weaving in the middle lane. I thought that the

:27:33.:27:36.

driver was asleep. He was not asleep, he was text in. Sadly,

:27:37.:27:42.

people see it all the time. We are now getting members of the public

:27:43.:27:45.

who are willing to report other drivers. I was looking at Twitter

:27:46.:27:49.

yesterday and they were motorists yesterday actively put -- putting

:27:50.:27:54.

vehicle registration numbers up on Twitter and reporting it to the

:27:55.:27:58.

police. We have to leave it there. Good to talk to you. Thank you very

:27:59.:28:00.

much. The Andrew Marr Programme

:28:01.:28:00.

is on BBC One this morning at 9:00. A lot of controversy overnight about

:28:01.:28:11.

Donald Trump's travel ban on millions of people from Muslim

:28:12.:28:14.

countries who will be affected by this? I have one example will stop a

:28:15.:28:20.

Tory MP Nadine is a wholly who is going to come in and talk about his

:28:21.:28:24.

feelings about being excluded from the UK if it goes ahead. I also have

:28:25.:28:29.

David Gore gone the same subject and Brexit. Tim Farron of the Liberal

:28:30.:28:34.

Democrats and finally, looking back on more than 30 years of the heart

:28:35.:28:38.

of Labour politics, Harriet Harman. Plus Matthew McConnochie, the actor.

:28:39.:28:47.

Coming up in the next half an hour, we will have all the latest on the

:28:48.:28:49.

protest in America. This is Breakfast,

:28:50.:28:52.

with Ben Thompson and Sally Nugent. Coming up before 8am,

:28:53.:29:37.

Chris has the weather. But first, a summary of this

:29:38.:29:41.

morning's main news. American civil liberties campaigners

:29:42.:29:46.

have won a partial victory in their challenge to Donald Trump's

:29:47.:29:49.

ban on some people entering the US. The president had ordered that entry

:29:50.:29:54.

be refused to all refugees for 120 days, and to citizens of seven

:29:55.:29:58.

particular countries for 90 days. A number of travellers

:29:59.:30:03.

who were in the air when the ban came into force were detained

:30:04.:30:06.

on arrival in the US. But a federal judge in New York said

:30:07.:30:10.

that visitors who'd set off with valid visas should

:30:11.:30:14.

not be deported. Downing Street says Theresa May does

:30:15.:30:23.

not agree with the refugee ban and will appeal to the US if it will

:30:24.:30:29.

protect British citizens. The PM was criticised for refusing to condemn

:30:30.:30:33.

the suggestive order on Saturday. At an earlier news conference Mrs May

:30:34.:30:37.

said it was up to the US to decide its own policy. Her refusal to

:30:38.:30:41.

openly challenge the ban had evoked criticism from politicians,

:30:42.:30:43.

including Conservative MPs. A statue of Princess Diana has been

:30:44.:30:44.

commissioned by her sons, the Duke of Cambridge

:30:45.:30:48.

and Prince Harry. They will help pay for

:30:49.:30:50.

the sculpture, which will be placed in the grounds of her former home,

:30:51.:30:52.

Kensington Palace in London. The princes said that,

:30:53.:30:55.

20 years after her death, the time was right to recognise

:30:56.:30:58.

their mother's positive impact Living standards could be

:30:59.:31:00.

set to fall this year, according to a report

:31:01.:31:04.

by a leading think tank. Research organisation

:31:05.:31:07.

the Resolution Foundation says that a mini-boom in living

:31:08.:31:10.

standards between 2014 and 2016 They warn that household incomes

:31:11.:31:13.

are now growing at their slowest rate since 2013, as rising inflation

:31:14.:31:22.

and stagnant wages lower living Wildfires in Chile are now known

:31:23.:31:25.

to have killed at least 11 people and left several

:31:26.:31:33.

thousand homeless. Firefighters and volunteers

:31:34.:31:34.

are tackling more than 100 separate fires, half

:31:35.:31:37.

of which are still out of control. The authorities have detained more

:31:38.:31:39.

than 20 people suspected of arson. It's one of the most colourful

:31:40.:31:43.

events in the calendar. Yesterday people all over the world

:31:44.:31:47.

celebrated the start In Hong Kong, thousands took

:31:48.:31:50.

to the streets to watch the parades. Many of the 3,000 performers wore

:31:51.:31:55.

gold, yellow and brown, which are considered lucky colours

:31:56.:32:00.

in the year of the Rooster. The festival also marked the 20th

:32:01.:32:06.

anniversary of the handover of the territory from British

:32:07.:32:09.

rule back to China. We're here on the BBC News Channel

:32:10.:32:12.

until 9am this morning. And coming up before

:32:13.:32:15.

the end of the programme: It's just an hour till tennis giants

:32:16.:32:20.

Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer go head to head in the

:32:21.:32:23.

Australian Open final. We'll be asking former British

:32:24.:32:25.

number one John Lloyd which of the old rivals he thinks

:32:26.:32:28.

will come out on top today. Bake Off made cup cake stars of us

:32:29.:32:31.

all, but could sewing be the next I had the option of Burgundy,

:32:32.:32:35.

velvet... He's often named as one of the most

:32:36.:32:46.

stylish men on the planet, now David Beckham's revealed how

:32:47.:32:50.

he always had an eye But this is where we say goodbye

:32:51.:32:52.

to viewers on BBC One.

:32:53.:32:58.