04/05/2017 Breakfast


04/05/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent.

:00:00.:00:08.

A big rise in the number of men and boys seeking help

:00:09.:00:11.

In an exclusive report for this programme we speak to some

:00:12.:00:23.

of the people struggling with the disorder and examine

:00:24.:00:25.

figures showing a 27% increase in males wanting

:00:26.:00:28.

Good morning, it's Thursday, May four.

:00:29.:00:43.

Also this morning: Five weeks ahead of the general election,

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voters go to the polls in local and mayoral elections in England,

:00:46.:00:49.

Shops can stop accepting old style fivers in less than 48 hours but 150

:00:50.:00:58.

The construction sector is growing fast but builders are finding it

:00:59.:01:04.

hard to recruit people to fill the jobs that are being created.

:01:05.:01:07.

In Sport, Italian Champion Juventus took a big stride towards

:01:08.:01:11.

Jose Mourinho has set his sights on winning the Europa League in the

:01:12.:01:20.

semi-final tonight. Also this morning: The story

:01:21.:01:20.

of eight-year-old Marin and her friendship with police

:01:21.:01:23.

dog in training Tag. He is my best friend. He is

:01:24.:01:27.

basically my special BFF. There is a north - south split, in

:01:28.:01:42.

the north it will be sunny, in the south it will be cloudy with showery

:01:43.:01:46.

outbreaks of rain. In the east in the breeze once again it will be

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chilly. I have more in just over ten minutes.

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A BBC Breakfast investigation into the treatment of eating

:01:52.:01:55.

disorder has shown rising numbers of men being affected by conditions

:01:56.:01:58.

Figures obtained through a Freedom of Information request showed

:01:59.:02:02.

the number of males receiving out-patent treatment in England

:02:03.:02:04.

is rising at double the rate of female patients.

:02:05.:02:17.

Figures from 35 NHS Trusts in England showed the number of male

:02:18.:02:20.

patients increasing by 27% in the last three years.

:02:21.:02:23.

The number of women receiving outpatient treatment rose 13% over

:02:24.:02:25.

And rates of treatment for boys under 18 climbed by more

:02:26.:02:31.

Professionals say the rise might be down to changing perceptions over

:02:32.:02:42.

eating disorders. Boys and men are realising that this

:02:43.:02:50.

is an illness and this is not a choice. As a society, we are being

:02:51.:02:57.

fed a daily diet of controversy around what constitutes good and bad

:02:58.:03:02.

food, what a perfect body means. We're going to be talking

:03:03.:03:09.

more about this story through the morning, hearing from

:03:10.:03:12.

experts and by men who've been affected by conditions like anorexia

:03:13.:03:15.

and bulimia. The polls open today for local

:03:16.:03:17.

elections in England, 4,851 council seats will be decided,

:03:18.:03:19.

and six English regions will elect new "metro mayors,"

:03:20.:03:23.

as Tom Symonds reports. It is back to the polling booths in

:03:24.:03:35.

England, Scotland and Wales again. These being local elections, not all

:03:36.:03:40.

seats are up for grabs. In England the focus is on 34 mainly county

:03:41.:03:45.

councils. Eight mayoral elections will take place, six in new post-s

:03:46.:03:51.

in Cambridgeshire, Peter Brock, Greater Manchester, Liverpool city,

:03:52.:03:55.

the West Midlands and the west of England. All of Scotland's 32

:03:56.:04:01.

councils and 22 in Wales are holding elections. The BBC won't report the

:04:02.:04:06.

general election campaign until polls close at 10am. The first

:04:07.:04:13.

results are expected after 2am. Voters from Britain will be back to

:04:14.:04:17.

the booths in five weeks to select their MPs.

:04:18.:04:18.

The two final candidates in the French presidential election

:04:19.:04:21.

have taken part in a heated head-to-head debate ahead

:04:22.:04:23.

Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron traded insults,

:04:24.:04:26.

with both candidates targeting undecided voters.

:04:27.:04:28.

Our Europe correspondent James Reynolds reports.

:04:29.:04:40.

For the first time Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen sat directly

:04:41.:04:47.

across from one another. Right from the start of this debate they began

:04:48.:04:54.

their attacks. TRANSLATION: Mr Macron is the candidate of savage

:04:55.:05:00.

globalisation uberisation, social brutality, every man for himself.

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TRANSLATION: You have shown you are not the candidate for a balanced

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democratic debate. The question is, do the people want your attitude?

:05:10.:05:14.

You say that globalisation is too hard. Let's chop the borders and

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leave the euro because others succeed, not ours. The atmosphere

:05:19.:05:26.

was heated. At times the moderators hardly managed to get a word in.

:05:27.:05:30.

TRANSLATION: I treat their friends like adults. You lie all the time.

:05:31.:05:40.

Marine Le Pen spent much of her time attacking her opponent. She avoided

:05:41.:05:44.

discussion of her own proposals. Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen

:05:45.:05:48.

presented two very different visions of France and theirs was a debate

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marked by attacks and accusations. They head out now to the rest of the

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country for the final days of the campaign.

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We will be live in Paris with a panel of guests

:06:02.:06:04.

Researchers have developed a blood test which could prevent thousands

:06:05.:06:09.

of men with advanced prostate cancer from

:06:10.:06:11.

The technique, which costs less than ?50 a time,

:06:12.:06:14.

will help doctors tell whether patients will respond

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to the standard drugs used to fight the disease.

:06:17.:06:25.

The number of people using the social networking site

:06:26.:06:28.

Facebook has risen to nearly two billion.

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The US tech giant has also announced a 76% rise in profits for the first

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three months of the year but warned growth from advertising

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Last night the Facebook-owned messaging service WhatsApp suffered

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a global outage lasting several hours.

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Time to check your wallets everybody.

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Tomorrow is the last day you can use your old five pound notes

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They're being withdrawn from midnight Friday,

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but the Bank of England says there are still 150 million

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Here's our personal finance correspondent, Simon Gompertz.

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15 years since the paper ?5 note featuring Elizabeth Fry entered

:07:11.:07:17.

circulation. Now she makes way for the Winston Churchill plastic fiver.

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Despite the clock ticking for the old note plenty still have them and

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some traders don't know the end is near. I had no idea. No ID at all.

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Absolute surprise. -- idea. I am told it is finishing. Did you know

:07:34.:07:40.

that the old ?5 note finishes on Friday night? No. It is. Is it is a

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prize? Yes, of course. The Bank of England says 150 million fivers are

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at large, ?750 million worth, three notes for each adult in the UK in

:07:55.:08:00.

Tilse, purses and jam jars. After Friday you will still be able to

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take your ?5 note into your own bank and deposit them or exchange them --

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tills. But shops won't accept them, so you are best off spending them

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before then. The Bank of England says it will accept returns of the

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paper notes for all time but they will stop being legal tender from

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midnight tomorrow. For the first time, scientists have

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started counting endangered birds from space using high

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resolution satellite images. Numbers of the Northern Royal

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albatross, one of the largest of the species, have previously

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been hard to assess, as it only nests on a small group

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of remote and rocky islands east Here's our science

:08:41.:08:43.

correspondent Rebecca Morelle. They're the world's largest flying

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birds but despite being so easy to spot counting

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albatrosses is tricky. Most of these birds nest on islands

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which are extremely remote and difficult to access but now

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there's a new way to get a tally Scientists are using a powerful US

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satellite to zoom in on places like the Chatham Islands

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in the South Pacific. Ultra high-res images can map areas

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down to 30 centimetres, which means each albatross

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appears as a white dot and researchers

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simply top them up. It means we finally

:09:26.:09:27.

have a number for this species, Scientists were unsure how many

:09:28.:09:32.

birds there were but the satellite It's less than conservationists

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hoped but many albatross species They're facing serious threats,

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from the plastics polluting our Researchers say these counts

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from space are essential. Knowing how many albatrosses

:09:50.:09:53.

there are now will help us to track The 29th annual Sunday Times Rich

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List is out this weekend and it might not come as a surprise who has

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been named the richest Yes, she's still in her 20s,

:10:07.:10:09.

but Adele's wealth has reached 125 million pounds, up 50%

:10:10.:10:23.

in the last year alone. Her global tour and her third album

:10:24.:10:25.

"25" has put the British singer at number 19 in the chart,

:10:26.:10:29.

which is topped by Sir Paul McCartney and his

:10:30.:10:32.

wife Nancy Shevell. Adele is also the only female solo

:10:33.:10:34.

artist to make the list. A freeze-frame on her. Well, she is

:10:35.:10:48.

number one. She is doing well. Today is of course the fourth

:10:49.:10:54.

of May, but for fans of a certain sci-fi film franchise

:10:55.:10:58.

it's Star Wars Day. And if you've ever fancied yourself

:10:59.:11:03.

as a budding Han Solo or Princess Leia, then

:11:04.:11:11.

there's a bar for you, in a galaxy far, far away, well,

:11:12.:11:13.

Hollywood to be precise. At 'The Scum and Villainy Cantina'

:11:14.:11:19.

people dress up as their favourite characters, in a pub inspired

:11:20.:11:22.

by the bar that featured I think I saw someone dressed in

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star straight stuff, not Star Wars. He looks just like Hans Solo. That

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is the place to be. Today of all days.

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Are you a fan? Star Wars, or Star Trek? Star Wars. My husband is mad

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on Star Trek and I come home and he is watching it and I am like, no.

:11:58.:12:03.

Not something I would necessarily share on national television. I

:12:04.:12:08.

think he does. He doesn't. Trust me. That would be the end of the

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marriage. Europa League final four Manchester United and listening to

:12:16.:12:21.

Jose Mourinho, he has put his eggs in one basket. He said the Premier

:12:22.:12:25.

League is over, the only way to get into the Champions League is to go

:12:26.:12:29.

through the Europa League. And I am wondering what the fans feel this

:12:30.:12:35.

morning. Should they push? They are only a point behind City in the

:12:36.:12:39.

Premier League. They shouldn't give up. It would be a dull run in. Do

:12:40.:12:44.

you believe him? The mast of reverse psychology.

:12:45.:12:47.

Jose Mourniho appears to have given up on a top four finish

:12:48.:12:50.

It's the first leg of their Europa League semi-final against Celta Vigo

:12:51.:12:54.

tonight and he's set his sights on that to qualify

:12:55.:12:57.

for the Champions League next season.

:12:58.:12:59.

Manchester City's women came from behind to earn a 1-1 draw

:13:00.:13:02.

against Birmingham in the WSL Spring Series.

:13:03.:13:04.

The two sides will meet again in the FA Cup final next weekend.

:13:05.:13:11.

Fernando Alonso will raise at the Indy 500. He passed his rookie test

:13:12.:13:20.

and he described it as fun and said that he wanted to go faster.

:13:21.:13:22.

Ilie Nastase says Wimbledon organisers are "small-minded"

:13:23.:13:25.

after they said he will not be invited to the Royal Box this year.

:13:26.:13:28.

Romania's Fed Cup captain is under investigation for comments he made

:13:29.:13:31.

about Serena Williams' unborn child and to Britain's Jo Konta

:13:32.:13:34.

Very angry about the fact he won't be invited. That row is not going

:13:35.:13:45.

away. He is still under investigation. Wimbledon said

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regardless of the outcome he won't get a special invitation. Well, I

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like it when they take a strong line. It is great.

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Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

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Actually started the day. Plus not all. Yesterday once again parts of

:13:58.:14:11.

north-west Scotland hit 20 Celsius in blue skies. Compared to what

:14:12.:14:15.

happened in the south-east, where we had a lot of cloud. In east Sussex

:14:16.:14:19.

the Cameron Jerome got up to nine. Today it will be fairly similar.

:14:20.:14:23.

This morning we have a lot of cloud in southern areas. The odd spot of

:14:24.:14:30.

rain. As we drift towards the south-west it is cloudy start again.

:14:31.:14:34.

The same across Wales and northern England. Across north-east England,

:14:35.:14:39.

into Scotland and Northern Ireland we've got a chilly start, but the

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sunny. The sunshine will last for much of the day. At the moment it's

:14:45.:14:50.

lapping onshore across the Northern Isles and the mainland of Scotland.

:14:51.:14:55.

The northern England, Scotland and Northern Ireland you will have

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almost unbroken blue skies. Wales will have some of that cloud rake

:15:00.:15:05.

up, in the Midlands and Wales. The far south of England hanging onto

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some cloud. With the onshore breeze it will still feel cold. 20 Celsius

:15:13.:15:18.

is possible once again across the west Highlands. Into the evening and

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overnight there will still be quite noticeable breeze. Gusty across the

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Pennines today. Still gusty through the evening as well. We have all of

:15:29.:15:34.

that cloud maintaining temperatures. Where the cloud is broken it will be

:15:35.:15:38.

cooler, especially in the countryside as these temperatures

:15:39.:15:42.

show. Frost possible, similar to this morning. The rest of the

:15:43.:15:47.

forecast for tomorrow shows the north of the country having a lot of

:15:48.:15:54.

sunshine. After seeing some cloud in parts of the north-east of Scotland

:15:55.:15:57.

and the Northern Isles it will tend to fade and be slower than today.

:15:58.:16:01.

Still a lot of cloud in the south. North Wales, Scotland and Northern

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Ireland getting the lion's share of the sunshine, but temperatures will

:16:06.:16:10.

be down on the day. Still pleasant for the time of year. In the Friday

:16:11.:16:15.

evening and Saturday we have this approaching weather front. Initially

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we have some showers coming in across south-west England and the

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Channel Islands. This is what will happen on Saturday. Some rain moving

:16:24.:16:27.

in across the south-west and southern counties. The timing and

:16:28.:16:33.

position could change. If you have outdoor plans and you are in the

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south of the country on Saturday bet that in mind. Also affecting the

:16:38.:16:40.

Channel Islands. North of that, variable amounts of cloud, sunny

:16:41.:16:45.

skies and sunshine. Then as we had from Saturday and into Sunday that

:16:46.:16:49.

pulls away into the near continent. Things are drier. Not much of a

:16:50.:16:54.

breeze. There will be some sunny skies as well. The wind changes

:16:55.:16:59.

direction. Coming from more of a northerly direction. Feeling fresh

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in some parts, especially in parts of the north where it has been so

:17:05.:17:09.

warm. I believe you are joining us in the

:17:10.:17:12.

latest craze this morning. Is that right? I am!

:17:13.:17:18.

We are already the win them all over the place! Do you know what to do

:17:19.:17:21.

with it? You've got a good one! All I know is

:17:22.:17:27.

you spin it. Somebody said you spin it like that and then you try and

:17:28.:17:31.

hold it. That's right! Perfect! Carol winds

:17:32.:17:36.

already. I will tell you who is losing

:17:37.:17:41.

already. Steph, this is what remains of hers. It already broken and we've

:17:42.:17:46.

been on air how long? 30 seconds... I think Carol has

:17:47.:17:52.

gotten the best one. The idea of the spinner is that it

:17:53.:17:59.

helps people with stress. A lot of people with autism. It's to

:18:00.:18:04.

do with helping concentrate. How is it going for you?

:18:05.:18:13.

She is perfectly balanced. There's not much to it, really. It

:18:14.:18:18.

just sits on your finger and spins. Some people complain and they say

:18:19.:18:24.

all that happens is you go silent and look at it, which isn't great

:18:25.:18:27.

for television. You aren't allowed to take on the

:18:28.:18:30.

school any more because apparently they are too distracting.

:18:31.:18:35.

Your next task, Carol, is to hold your quicker in one hand and that in

:18:36.:18:42.

the other. That's a challenge! I will try! Let's have a look at

:18:43.:18:49.

some of the papers. There's a reason why we aren't doing a front pages,

:18:50.:18:52.

because the local elections are under way and we have very strict

:18:53.:18:57.

rules on what politics we are able to cover. So the front pages are

:18:58.:19:01.

out, but we will go through the inside pages.

:19:02.:19:03.

It gives us time to talk about what's going on inside. I like this

:19:04.:19:08.

story, from the Telegraph. This is a car company that has developed

:19:09.:19:12.

something that means you can put your phone in the glovebox of your

:19:13.:19:16.

car and it will stop your phone getting a signal. Therefore you

:19:17.:19:20.

aren't distracted if your phone beeps, if it wins while you are

:19:21.:19:24.

driving. You just have to make the decision to lock it away and then in

:19:25.:19:32.

locks it. The Times. This is a story about bad

:19:33.:19:40.

behaviour. It is found that nearly half of teachers have to remove

:19:41.:19:43.

children from class at least once a week. Two thirds of pupils were

:19:44.:19:48.

removed at least once a month because of bad behaviour. It is

:19:49.:19:53.

interesting. Is it better to have someone quiet on messing around?

:19:54.:20:02.

And engaged. Yes. Interesting. Why do children always have to be quiet

:20:03.:20:11.

in school? This from the Mail. They say but is over 55 are drinking more

:20:12.:20:16.

than young people. A new survey suggests that 55% of people over 60

:20:17.:20:21.

57 had at least one alcoholic drink in the previous week, making them

:20:22.:20:26.

officially regular drinkers. But if you are of the Facebook generation

:20:27.:20:35.

you have less than half of that. I want to talk about petrol prices.

:20:36.:20:41.

There is a price war going on. One of the papers picks up on it. It

:20:42.:20:48.

says Morrison's, Tesco and Sainsbury's are cutting diesel by 2

:20:49.:20:59.

pence a litre. That's the equivalent of about ?1.10 you would save. And

:21:00.:21:06.

about 55p off unleaded. Not a massive difference when you use your

:21:07.:21:10.

car a lot. My husband likes to drive around looking for the cheapest one.

:21:11.:21:16.

Does he drive around wearing his Star Trek clothes? He does. A nice

:21:17.:21:22.

insight into my family life. Very unusual. This caught my eye about

:21:23.:21:28.

the javelin thrower who announced her retirement. She came fourth at

:21:29.:21:36.

the Olympics, but since then the Russian athlete who won silver has

:21:37.:21:39.

been disqualified for testing positive for banned substances.

:21:40.:21:44.

They've apparently been waiting for ages to be upgraded to get that

:21:45.:21:49.

bronze medal that she rightfully on. Just a really interesting insight

:21:50.:21:56.

into the kind of effect that cheating can have on clean athletes.

:21:57.:22:02.

She has not only been robbed of the moment but of her successful

:22:03.:22:06.

retirement. She has been waiting to announce her retirement because she

:22:07.:22:10.

wanted to retire without bronze medal, but because of the lengthy

:22:11.:22:14.

legal process she hasn't been able to... She says she knows the German

:22:15.:22:18.

athlete who has the medal. She says she could go to Germany and pick up

:22:19.:22:22.

that medal and see her friend at the same time, but she says she can't

:22:23.:22:26.

wait any more. She is angry and it has spoiled how she reflects on her

:22:27.:22:31.

career. But she has had to call time on it. She isn't the only one. Many

:22:32.:22:37.

are in the same position. So frustrating. Thanks very much. See

:22:38.:22:39.

you later. You're watching

:22:40.:22:41.

Breakfast from BBC News. Often when we talk about anorexia

:22:42.:22:44.

and bulimia, the focus is on how these conditions affect

:22:45.:22:47.

girls and women. But a BBC Breakfast investigation

:22:48.:22:49.

has found increasing numbers of men and boys are seeking

:22:50.:22:52.

treatment for them. A Freedom of Information request

:22:53.:22:54.

showed the number of males receiving outpatient treatment

:22:55.:22:57.

for eating disorders in England has increased at twice the rate

:22:58.:22:59.

of female patients in Food just frightens me now. I go for

:23:00.:23:10.

days without eating at all. Simon Bates everyday, but gives everything

:23:11.:23:17.

he makes the friends, family and homeless charities. -- bakes. I get

:23:18.:23:22.

some kind of strange satisfaction out of seeing people enjoy the

:23:23.:23:25.

things that I don't feel able to enjoy myself. Simon has been

:23:26.:23:30.

anorexic for nearly two years. Logically I know that I need to eat

:23:31.:23:36.

to live, otherwise at the end of the day this will kill me and it doesn't

:23:37.:23:41.

make a blind bit of difference because every time I try and it I

:23:42.:23:52.

can't. I've always had an unhealthy relationship with food. I was really

:23:53.:23:57.

quite big, ugly about 23 or 24 stone. I had a heart attack. I guess

:23:58.:24:01.

it had a deep psychological effect. I will do everything they can to

:24:02.:24:06.

reverse the effect of whatever I've eaten. I tend to walk as far as my

:24:07.:24:14.

body will allow me to walk. The number of male patients being

:24:15.:24:18.

treated for eating disorders across England has risen by more than a

:24:19.:24:23.

quarter over the past three years. That's more than double the rise of

:24:24.:24:26.

seeming female patients. The number of boys being treated as corn up by

:24:27.:24:30.

a third in the last year alone. Despite the increase, the total

:24:31.:24:34.

number of male patients treated last year, about 1200, still represents

:24:35.:24:40.

only 8% of the total and these figures don't necessarily mean that

:24:41.:24:44.

more men have eating disorders, it could be that the stigma is lifting

:24:45.:24:50.

and that more as the king help. Boys and men are realising that this is

:24:51.:24:56.

an illness and not a choice. This doctor is based at the Julian

:24:57.:25:02.

hospital in Norwich and treats under-18s with eating disorders. She

:25:03.:25:05.

is seen more boys than ever walk through her door. With boys I see a

:25:06.:25:10.

lot of obsession around shape. Bulking yourself and muscle mass and

:25:11.:25:16.

what does it mean to be a man? As a society we are being fed a daily

:25:17.:25:23.

diet of controversy around what constitutes good food and bad food,

:25:24.:25:28.

what a perfect body means. NHS England says more support like the

:25:29.:25:34.

type offered here is being made available. Treatments include

:25:35.:25:37.

psychotherapy, counselling, sometimes dedication. It's not

:25:38.:25:43.

something you just snap out of, it's not something that goes away, it's

:25:44.:25:47.

an illness. Simon is urging others to speak up and seek help. He feels

:25:48.:25:52.

he waited for too long. And if you would like details on

:25:53.:26:00.

organisations offering information and support about eating disorders

:26:01.:26:05.

of any kind, you can call, visit the BBC Action Line, and we will be

:26:06.:26:08.

talking more about this story throughout the programme this

:26:09.:26:10.

morning. Your thoughts on that I welcome this

:26:11.:26:19.

morning. -- are welcome. Still to come... I missed you so much!

:26:20.:26:24.

A remarkable pair who've formed a remarkable bond.

:26:25.:26:27.

We'll find out how a trainee police puppy called Tag has made a huge

:26:28.:26:30.

impact on eight-year old Marina's life.

:26:31.:26:32.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:26:33.:29:53.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent.

:29:54.:30:03.

We'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment,

:30:04.:30:07.

You get relaxed when it spins and it is really satisfying. Sometimes

:30:08.:30:23.

children, they get distracted. Then they don't concentrate on their

:30:24.:30:24.

work. They're the tiny toys taking

:30:25.:30:25.

over the playground. We'll ask if "fidget spinners" can

:30:26.:30:28.

help kids concentrate in class, or if they're just another

:30:29.:30:31.

distraction. Have you still got

:30:32.:30:32.

an old fiver in your There are still 150 million

:30:33.:30:35.

of them in circulation, but after tomorrow they'll no

:30:36.:30:38.

longer be legal tender. We'll find out what

:30:39.:30:41.

you can do with them. Her first thriller, Girl on a Train,

:30:42.:30:48.

was a huge hit on both sides of the Atlantic, now her new novel

:30:49.:30:52.

centres on a murky river in Northern England,

:30:53.:30:55.

which claims the lives Paula Hawkins will

:30:56.:30:57.

join us on the sofa. But now a summary of this

:30:58.:31:00.

morning's main news. A BBC Breakfast investigation

:31:01.:31:04.

into the treatment of eating disorders has shown rising numbers

:31:05.:31:06.

of men being affected by conditions Figures obtained through

:31:07.:31:09.

a Freedom of Information request showed the number of males

:31:10.:31:12.

receiving out-patent treatment in England is rising at double

:31:13.:31:14.

the rate of female patients, although women still account

:31:15.:31:18.

for the majority of people treated. The polls open today for local

:31:19.:31:24.

elections in England, 4,851 council seats will be decided,

:31:25.:31:27.

and six English regions will elect new "metro mayors",

:31:28.:31:30.

as Tom Symonds reports. It's back to the polling booths

:31:31.:31:48.

in England, Scotland These being local elections,

:31:49.:31:50.

not all council seats In England the focus is on 34

:31:51.:31:53.

mainly county councils. Eight mayoral elections will take

:31:54.:31:59.

place, six for new posts in Cambridgeshire, Peterborough,

:32:00.:32:01.

Greater Manchester, Liverpool city, Tees Valley, the West Midlands

:32:02.:32:06.

and the west of England. All of Scotland's 32 councils and 22

:32:07.:32:09.

in Wales are holding elections. The BBC won't report the general

:32:10.:32:13.

election campaign until polls The first results are

:32:14.:32:15.

expected after 2am. British voters will be back

:32:16.:32:20.

to the booths in five weeks' time The two final candidates

:32:21.:32:24.

in the French presidential election have taken part in a heated

:32:25.:32:32.

head-to-head debate. Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron

:32:33.:32:34.

traded insults while debating Both candidates are targeting

:32:35.:32:37.

undecided voters with nearly a fifth of people reportedly yet

:32:38.:32:41.

to make up their mind ahead The safety of our people, the fight

:32:42.:33:01.

against terror and extremism, you don't want to take it on. And I know

:33:02.:33:06.

why, against terrorism we have to close the borders straightaway, and

:33:07.:33:10.

immediately, and that is what I will do the moment I take power.

:33:11.:33:15.

TRANSLATION: Closing borders achieves nothing. Many countries

:33:16.:33:20.

outside the Schengen area have been hit as hard as us from terrorism and

:33:21.:33:24.

since 2015 we have put back border controls to fight terrorism.

:33:25.:33:29.

The number of people using the social networking site

:33:30.:33:31.

Facebook has risen to nearly two billion.

:33:32.:33:33.

The US tech giant has also announced a 76% rise in profits for the first

:33:34.:33:37.

three months of the year but warned growth from advertising

:33:38.:33:40.

Last night the Facebook-owned messaging service WhatsApp suffered

:33:41.:33:43.

a global outage lasting several hours.

:33:44.:33:48.

A diver has been rescued after spending ten hours in the waters off

:33:49.:33:57.

Orkney in Scotland, lifeboats and rescue helicopters were launched

:33:58.:34:01.

after a boat reported a missing person yesterday evening.

:34:02.:34:06.

The diver was found by a passing sailboat at 3:15am and taken

:34:07.:34:09.

For the first time, scientists have started counting endangered birds

:34:10.:34:13.

from space using high resolution satellite images.

:34:14.:34:15.

Numbers of the Northern Royal albatross, one of the largest

:34:16.:34:18.

of the species, have previously been hard to assess,

:34:19.:34:20.

as it only nests on a small group of remote and rocky islands east

:34:21.:34:24.

Here's our science correspondent Rebecca Morelle.

:34:25.:34:29.

They're the world's largest flying birds but despite being so easy

:34:30.:34:32.

to spot counting albatrosses is tricky.

:34:33.:34:35.

Most of these birds nest on islands which are extremely remote

:34:36.:34:38.

and difficult to access but now there's a new way to get a tally

:34:39.:34:42.

Scientists are using a powerful US satellite to zoom in on places

:34:43.:34:50.

like the Chatham Islands in the South Pacific.

:34:51.:34:54.

Ultra high-res images can map areas down to 30 centimetres which mean

:34:55.:34:57.

each albatross appears as a white dot

:34:58.:35:05.

It means we finally have a number for this species,

:35:06.:35:09.

Scientists were unsure how many birds there were

:35:10.:35:12.

but the satellite tally comes in at about 4,000 nests.

:35:13.:35:18.

It's less than conservationists hoped but many albatross species

:35:19.:35:20.

They're facing serious threats, from the plastics polluting our

:35:21.:35:24.

Researchers say these counts from space are essential.

:35:25.:35:27.

Knowing how many albatrosses there are now will help us to track

:35:28.:35:30.

Brad Pitt has revealed he has quit drinking and started therapy

:35:31.:35:46.

to help him get through his divorce from Angelina Jolie.

:35:47.:35:48.

In his first interview since the split, he admitted to GQ

:35:49.:35:51.

Style that he'd drunk heavily in the past,

:35:52.:35:53.

He also confirmed that he and Angelina are working together

:35:54.:35:57.

to resolve their issues "amicably and privately."

:35:58.:36:13.

A lucky sheep has a narrow escape after falling into a gully.

:36:14.:36:17.

The 50 kilogram animal - named Dolly by her rescuers -

:36:18.:36:20.

needed ten firefighters to help winch her out.

:36:21.:36:22.

Fortunately West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service has confirmed

:36:23.:36:24.

that Dolly was protected by her thick coat and is now

:36:25.:36:27.

Later on, she is fine by the way, they said she is alive and wool!

:36:28.:36:42.

That is from their statement, we didn't say that. You enjoy it saying

:36:43.:36:48.

that. Straight from a cracker, that joke, isn't it? She won't be doing

:36:49.:36:54.

that again. They are not the brightest animals, are they?

:36:55.:36:58.

Manchester United's semi-final in the Europa League and coming for

:36:59.:37:05.

them the three biggest games coming up, the Europa league finals - if he

:37:06.:37:12.

wins it, they will be in the Champions League, which Jose

:37:13.:37:18.

Mourinho says coming in the top four of the Premier League isn't

:37:19.:37:19.

possible. Jose Mourinho said it was "too late"

:37:20.:37:20.

for a top four finish in the Premier League,

:37:21.:37:23.

so he'd switched his focus to the Europa League,

:37:24.:37:26.

as a route to Champions League They take on Celta Vigo in Spain

:37:27.:37:29.

tonight, boosted by the potential return of several injured players -

:37:30.:37:33.

Paul Pogba, Juan Mata, Chris Smalling and Phil Jones

:37:34.:37:35.

all have a chance of starting the match, which takes

:37:36.:37:38.

on new significance. I think it is a big achievement with

:37:39.:37:47.

so many problems we have, and it would allow us to be back to the

:37:48.:37:52.

Champions League next season, so we will have to try, that is what we

:37:53.:37:58.

are going to do and, honestly, the Europa League becomes for us now

:37:59.:38:01.

more important. In the first leg of the other

:38:02.:38:03.

Europa League semi-final, Ajax beat Lyon 4-1, so they're

:38:04.:38:06.

likely to be United's opponents Juventus closed in on a second

:38:07.:38:09.

Champions League final in three seasons, as Gonzalo Higuain scored

:38:10.:38:13.

both goals in their 2-0 win at Monaco in the first leg

:38:14.:38:16.

of their semi-final. Monaco had knocked out Tottenham

:38:17.:38:19.

and Manchester City on their way Manchester City's women came

:38:20.:38:22.

from behind to draw 1-1 with Birmingham in

:38:23.:38:28.

the WSL Spring Series. It was a dress rehearsal for next

:38:29.:38:30.

weekend's FA Cup final. After City fell behind

:38:31.:38:33.

to Emily Westwood's header, England fullback Lucy Bronze

:38:34.:38:35.

scored the equaliser. There were wins too

:38:36.:38:37.

for Chelsea and Bristol City. Garth Crooks, of the

:38:38.:38:49.

anti-discrimination organisation Kick It out, wants players

:38:50.:38:50.

in Italy's top flight to boycott matches this weekend,

:38:51.:38:53.

unless a suspension is overturned. The former Portsmouth striker -

:38:54.:38:56.

Sully Muntari - was playing for Pescara against Cagliari

:38:57.:38:59.

when he was booked for dissent, after complaining to the referee

:39:00.:39:02.

about racist abuse from the crowd. He was booked again after walking

:39:03.:39:05.

off the pitch and banned I am calling on players in Italy,

:39:06.:39:25.

black and white, to make it clear to the Federation of Italy that this is

:39:26.:39:30.

unacceptable and if the decision is not reversed then they withdraw

:39:31.:39:32.

their services until it is. Everton say winger Aaron Lenin has

:39:33.:39:46.

a stress-related illness The 30-year-old was detained under

:39:47.:39:48.

the Mental Health Act by police over It's understood he's not suffering

:39:49.:39:53.

from a long-standing mental health issue and is expected to make a full

:39:54.:39:57.

recovery in the short term. Ilie Nastase has called Wimbledon's

:39:58.:40:01.

organisers "small minded" after they said he'd not be invited

:40:02.:40:03.

into the royal box at this year's tournament Nastase was Romania's

:40:04.:40:07.

captain for their Fed Cup match against Great Britain last month

:40:08.:40:09.

but he was ejected after swearing He's been provisionally suspended by

:40:10.:40:12.

the International Tennis Federation as they investigate a number

:40:13.:40:16.

of comments he made. We condemn his behaviour,

:40:17.:40:18.

in the Fed Cup against The ITF are conducting

:40:19.:40:21.

an investigation at the moment. He is subject to a temporary

:40:22.:40:24.

suspension and we will await the outcome of the ITF

:40:25.:40:27.

investigation, and we will honour that suspension for at

:40:28.:40:30.

long as it is in place. Fernando Alonso has been given

:40:31.:40:33.

the go-ahead to compete at the Indy He successfully completed a series

:40:34.:40:36.

of tests and said he wanted to go faster but he's right

:40:37.:40:42.

foot wouldn't let him. He was only going over

:40:43.:40:52.

220 miles an hour! So, that is Fernando Alonso going

:40:53.:41:06.

for the Triple Crown in motor racing, the Monaco Grand Prix, which

:41:07.:41:12.

he has won a couple of times, the Indy 500, and...

:41:13.:41:18.

(INAUDIBLE). Ambitious, hey? Well, if it is in

:41:19.:41:25.

your blood, you will be driving racing cars for the rest of his

:41:26.:41:26.

life, when he? Thanks. Every year, around 46,000 men

:41:27.:41:29.

in the UK are diagnosed One in four of them are already

:41:30.:41:32.

in the advanced stages of the disease, but now scientists

:41:33.:41:36.

hope a new discovery could help these patients avoid

:41:37.:41:39.

unnecessary treatment. Researchers say a simple

:41:40.:41:41.

blood test can predict which patients are likely to respond

:41:42.:41:43.

to new targeted drugs, and which might be better served

:41:44.:41:46.

by alternative therapies. Let's speak to Dr Iain Frame

:41:47.:41:48.

from Prostate Cancer UK. Thank you very much for your time

:41:49.:41:57.

this morning, Doctor. So, let's be very clear about this, this is for

:41:58.:42:01.

patients who have already had advanced stages of prostate cancer?

:42:02.:42:06.

Yes, this is a test that will determine whether a man is going to

:42:07.:42:11.

respond to one or two drugs that are used when all other treatment

:42:12.:42:19.

options have been exhausted. Explained for us what that would

:42:20.:42:27.

mean? One is a simple, cheap blood test. It means that the men who have

:42:28.:42:31.

gone through a lot to get to where they have got to advanced prostate

:42:32.:42:39.

cancer can be told whether it will work not. Some men are on this for

:42:40.:42:45.

at least three months before they are told it is not working. This is

:42:46.:42:51.

a much better way to go about treatment. It is looking at the

:42:52.:42:55.

precision medicine approach. We are looking at the treatment at

:42:56.:43:04.

the right We are looking at the treatment at

:43:05.:43:08.

the right time. So, judging from what you are

:43:09.:43:10.

the right time. So, judging from what you are saying, given the

:43:11.:43:14.

conditions, that they are in advanced stages, what is the

:43:15.:43:17.

prognosis, what other benefits for getting right treatment? Well, a

:43:18.:43:20.

prognosis, what other benefits for getting right treatment? Well, a lot

:43:21.:43:22.

of men survive a long time on these drugs. When it works, it works well.

:43:23.:43:28.

There is a range of different prostate cancer is responding to

:43:29.:43:32.

different drugs. The idea is that if you get it right, the prognosis will

:43:33.:43:36.

be better and these men will survive much longer than they would if they

:43:37.:43:39.

were not responding to the drug and he had to have different options.

:43:40.:43:43.

Now, often with developments in medical science, cost is an issue.

:43:44.:43:48.

Just give an idea of the cost of this and also how soon anyone can

:43:49.:43:50.

take this and also how soon anyone can

:43:51.:43:52.

take advantage of it. That is another good thing about this.

:43:53.:43:56.

Researchers put the cost at around ?50 per test. So, that's reasonable.

:43:57.:44:03.

Even this is a test that uses quite high precision science, scientific

:44:04.:44:04.

tools, high precision science, scientific

:44:05.:44:09.

tools, they've looked at it as how to give it as a test in real life.

:44:10.:44:15.

They have tested it on 265 men. They plan to test it on 1000 men. It is a

:44:16.:44:21.

sort of real-life situation to ensure the results from the early

:44:22.:44:26.

studies translate to the lab. Certainly they are looking at cost

:44:27.:44:31.

and they are looking at a cost that is reasonable to the NHS and to help

:44:32.:44:36.

save money. And, clearly, the issue of early detection is absolutely

:44:37.:44:42.

crucial. Yes, it is big for me and for Prostate Cancer UK. This example

:44:43.:44:49.

of precision medicine, getting the right treatment at the right time,

:44:50.:44:56.

it has to be good. If we can have a risk assessment tool to do that and

:44:57.:44:57.

it has to be good. If we can have a risk assessment tool to do that and

:44:58.:44:59.

develop a screening programme, we can get men into the system who need

:45:00.:45:03.

to be Ian and give them the right treatment, so then their outcomes

:45:04.:45:06.

will be much better. You are right, this is key to what we are trying to

:45:07.:45:11.

do. Thank you very much. Director of research at Prostate Cancer UK.

:45:12.:45:14.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:45:15.:45:16.

The main stories this morning: A BBC Breakfast investigation has found

:45:17.:45:19.

a stark rise in the number of men seeking treatment for eating

:45:20.:45:22.

Voters head to the polls in parts of Wales and Scotland today in local

:45:23.:45:30.

elections to decide nearly 5,000 council seats and six

:45:31.:45:34.

It was warm and sunny in the north, cool in the south. Shall we see what

:45:35.:45:50.

it is around in London this morning? Looking quite murky. Over to

:45:51.:45:57.

Glasgow. A little bit brighter. One person can tell us whether that is

:45:58.:46:00.

an accurate reflection of what it will be like today! Good morning,

:46:01.:46:02.

Carol. Good morning. Under the cloud in the south-east it

:46:03.:46:21.

was only nine and it will be the same today. A beautiful Weather

:46:22.:46:24.

Watchers picture in this morning, showing the sun already rising after

:46:25.:46:29.

a chilly start. If you are under the cloud further south it's a different

:46:30.:46:38.

set up altogether. A couple of showers dotted around but not as

:46:39.:46:41.

cold. A cloudy start in south-eastern areas and into the

:46:42.:46:44.

south-east of England and Wales this morning. But as we move into

:46:45.:46:47.

northern England, Scotland and Northern Ireland it's a sunny start

:46:48.:46:54.

the day. Low cloud across the Northern Isles and the far

:46:55.:46:58.

north-east of England. That will melt away and we will have blue

:46:59.:47:03.

skies. Northern Ireland, chilly, but another belter of a day in terms of

:47:04.:47:07.

sunshine. Through the day we hang on the north-easterly breeze. It will

:47:08.:47:11.

be windy at times. Gusty in the Pennines. Their that in mind if you

:47:12.:47:15.

are travelling. It will take the edge off the temperatures. Look out

:47:16.:47:20.

the cloud belts towards the Midlands and parts of Wales as well. We will

:47:21.:47:24.

have sunshine by the afternoon. Top temperatures will be across

:47:25.:47:29.

north-west Scotland again. 20 Celsius, 6-8 Fahrenheit. Overnight

:47:30.:47:37.

we still have this keen breeze. A couple of showers, not many. Under

:47:38.:47:43.

the clear skies further north it will be cold enough for a cut of

:47:44.:47:46.

frost. These temperatures indicate what we can expect in towns and

:47:47.:47:53.

cities. But in the countryside -2, perhaps freezing around the Central

:47:54.:47:57.

Lowlands. Tomorrow morning we start off on a cold motorbike and will be

:47:58.:48:01.

a lot of sunshine again. Still this keen breeze. Down the North Sea

:48:02.:48:07.

coastline. We still have the cloud in southern areas. Temperatures down

:48:08.:48:14.

a touch on where we would expect them today, especially in the north.

:48:15.:48:18.

By the evening we start to have showers coming in. That will bring

:48:19.:48:25.

some rain on Saturday. The timing and placement of this could change,

:48:26.:48:29.

so if you have outdoor plans on Saturday bet that in mind. This is

:48:30.:48:34.

what we think coming across the south-west in southern counties and

:48:35.:48:36.

the Channel Islands. Behind it, dry weather and a bit more cloud.

:48:37.:48:42.

Heading into Sunday that moves away. Sunday will be largely dry. Not much

:48:43.:48:47.

of a breeze. More cloud in the north and not as warm in the north as it

:48:48.:48:52.

has been. Into the new week things are changing.

:48:53.:48:58.

The construction sector is growing fast but builders are finding it

:48:59.:49:01.

hard to recruit people to fill the jobs that are being created.

:49:02.:49:05.

I do talk about the skills shortage quite a lot and today it is the

:49:06.:49:13.

construction industry talking about it. Good morning.

:49:14.:49:14.

Latest industry figures show building trade expanding

:49:15.:49:16.

at the fastest rate so far this year.

:49:17.:49:18.

Great news for companies in the industry, but

:49:19.:49:25.

there is a problem with filling the jobs that are created.

:49:26.:49:28.

Caroline Oberman is from the construction recruitment

:49:29.:49:30.

Good morning. What are the types of jobs you are finding that people are

:49:31.:49:40.

struggling to fill? It could be anything from the nonskilled worker,

:49:41.:49:46.

the labourer, right up to more skilled workers such as joiners, the

:49:47.:49:49.

players and other management as well. There's a lack of skill in

:49:50.:49:56.

every area the board. In terms of getting people to fill these jobs,

:49:57.:50:00.

why did you think there's a problem? Why have we got the skills gap? I

:50:01.:50:04.

think there are couple of reasons for the gap at the moment. It is

:50:05.:50:08.

quite expensive for people to join the industry. I think that's put

:50:09.:50:12.

people off a little bit. For example, if you wanted to join as a

:50:13.:50:18.

labourer, an entry-level position, to get your card would cost you

:50:19.:50:23.

about ?180. For somebody out of work that would be a lot of money.

:50:24.:50:27.

There's not a lot of help from the government or the employer

:50:28.:50:32.

themselves. The cost is on the worker, which could put people.

:50:33.:50:35.

Another thing probably contributed to it is education. In schools and

:50:36.:50:41.

colleges that have been construction is something that is especially

:50:42.:50:45.

highlighted the people. And it's not seen as a job to go for, it's more

:50:46.:50:49.

academic courses that are pushed towards people rather than the

:50:50.:50:52.

construction industry is seen as a good industry to go into. You see

:50:53.:50:57.

that a lot with vocational work. It is often tricky to get people into

:50:58.:51:05.

it. I think it's a shame. It is seen as a second-rate job rather than

:51:06.:51:09.

something to be proud of and obviously the building industry is a

:51:10.:51:13.

fantastic industry to work in and should be more highlighted people, I

:51:14.:51:17.

think. The image of a builder, even from that picture behind you, is of

:51:18.:51:21.

people working in tough conditions out on sites in all weathers, in

:51:22.:51:26.

hard hats, which is great for some people but can put a lot of people

:51:27.:51:30.

off. Why is it a good industry to be in? I suppose it's a job for life as

:51:31.:51:35.

well. We always need people to build buildings. You don't have to be out

:51:36.:51:40.

on site. There are even more academic courses if you want to be a

:51:41.:51:44.

surveyor, or a plumber or something like that. But in terms of job

:51:45.:51:51.

satisfaction you can look at it for years to come. There aren't many

:51:52.:51:56.

other vocations where you have that satisfaction. What's the money like?

:51:57.:52:00.

It's definitely got better in the past years. Everybody suffered in a

:52:01.:52:08.

recession, so it was difficult for everyone, but the money is good for

:52:09.:52:12.

people if you work hard. You can earn a good decent wage. What a

:52:13.:52:16.

company is doing if they can't fill the gaps? It's a difficult question.

:52:17.:52:23.

People try to attract people just by paying more money. I think once you

:52:24.:52:26.

get to the higher level positions like the management side of things

:52:27.:52:30.

people are now interested in incentives, what will bring people

:52:31.:52:33.

into the industry. Vince like flex the hours, which previously were

:52:34.:52:39.

unheard of. There was a stigma of it being old-fashioned in that way. So

:52:40.:52:45.

to bring it a little bit more into the current times, things like flex

:52:46.:52:49.

the hours and things like that. To make it more flexible. Tanks very

:52:50.:52:55.

much for your time this morning. That's it from me for now. We should

:52:56.:52:59.

all be builders, basically! Thank you.

:53:00.:53:04.

Another special story now about an Thank you.

:53:05.:53:06.

Another special story now about an eight-year-old girl and her

:53:07.:53:07.

relationship with a police dog. When eight-year-old Marina was born,

:53:08.:53:10.

her arms and legs had In recent months, she's struck

:53:11.:53:13.

up a firm friendship with an eight-month

:53:14.:53:17.

old police puppy called Tag. Can we go and see Tag? With lessons

:53:18.:53:21.

old police puppy called Tag. Can we go and see Tag? With lessons

:53:22.:53:27.

finished for another day, eight-year-old Marina is desperate

:53:28.:53:30.

to get home. I did loads of art today in the afternoon. Waiting back

:53:31.:53:38.

at home is Tag. Daddy, I can't wait! He hears her coming and rushes to

:53:39.:53:48.

meet her. Hi! You're a good boy! Tag is an eight-month-old trainee police

:53:49.:53:51.

dog who for the next year will live with Marina's family. I missed you

:53:52.:53:58.

so much! Are you work a? But the pair have already developed a

:53:59.:54:03.

remarkable bond. -- are you OK? He is my best friend. He is basically

:54:04.:54:08.

my special BFF. The focus they've got is always on each other. They

:54:09.:54:12.

are always looking to each other to see where the other one is and what

:54:13.:54:16.

the other one doing and that the connection they've got and I just

:54:17.:54:20.

think it is wonderful to see it. It's been there from the very first

:54:21.:54:23.

time that I saw them and it's impossible to analyse it. He

:54:24.:54:26.

instinctively has an ability to know that he has got to behave himself in

:54:27.:54:30.

certain situations and not eat too rough and boisterous and he seems to

:54:31.:54:36.

understand Marina's situation. As a baby Marina was left in a Russian

:54:37.:54:40.

orphanage after being born without legs or an arm. When she was two

:54:41.:54:44.

years old she was adopted and given a home back here in Devon. What

:54:45.:54:50.

difference has it made, having Tag? She is really confident in her own

:54:51.:54:54.

comfort zone and with people she knows. But as soon as we are out,

:54:55.:54:58.

she is nearly nine and is becoming more self-aware and she knows people

:54:59.:55:03.

are looking. She is very different and she gets very nervous. Now when

:55:04.:55:08.

we are out with Tag she is confident in telling people about him. She is

:55:09.:55:13.

very proud of what we are doing and she is proud that she has this

:55:14.:55:16.

amazing bond with him. But Tag isn't a normal dog. With a career in the

:55:17.:55:21.

police waiting for him, by the end of the year she will have left

:55:22.:55:26.

Marina. IMO to be very sad, but I know he will be a very cool police

:55:27.:55:31.

dog and he is going to catch loads of baddies. An exceptional bond

:55:32.:55:36.

formed by an exceptional pair. A very cool police dog and a very

:55:37.:55:43.

formed by an exceptional pair. A very cool police dog and a very

:55:44.:55:46.

cool young lady. She knows he will have to go off and

:55:47.:55:49.

do his job. Absolutely.

:55:50.:55:51.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:55:52.:59:10.

also the latest news, travel and weather available

:59:11.:59:13.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent.

:59:14.:59:48.

A big rise in the number of men and boys seeking help

:59:49.:59:51.

In an exclusive report for this programme we speak to some

:59:52.:00:02.

of the people struggling with the disorder and examine

:00:03.:00:04.

figures showing a 27% increase in males wanting

:00:05.:00:06.

Also this morning: Five weeks ahead of the general election,

:00:07.:00:25.

voters go to the polls in local and mayoral elections in England,

:00:26.:00:28.

Three of the big four supermarkets have cut the price of petrol

:00:29.:00:32.

and diesel on their forecourts today but the RAC says fuel should

:00:33.:00:36.

In Sport: Too late for United in the Premier League,

:00:37.:00:42.

Instead, he's set his sights on winning the Europa League.

:00:43.:00:46.

Also this morning, the new craze sweeping schools -

:00:47.:00:56.

they're called fidget spinners - but are they a useful learning tool

:00:57.:01:00.

or an annoying distraction in class?

:01:01.:01:01.

There is a north-south split, in the north it will be sunny,

:01:02.:01:08.

in the south it will be cloudy with showery outbreaks of rain.

:01:09.:01:13.

In the east in the breeze once again it will be chilly.

:01:14.:01:20.

A BBC Breakfast investigation into the treatment of eating

:01:21.:01:25.

disorder has shown rising numbers of men being affected by conditions

:01:26.:01:28.

Figures obtained through a Freedom of Information request showed

:01:29.:01:32.

the number of males receiving out-patent treatment in England

:01:33.:01:34.

is rising at double the rate of female patients.

:01:35.:01:43.

Women still account for the majority treated.

:01:44.:01:52.

Food frightens me now. Simon Bates for the majority treated.

:01:53.:01:57.

Food frightens me now. Simon Bates every day but gives everything he

:01:58.:02:01.

makes for friends, family and homeless charity. I get some kind of

:02:02.:02:06.

strange satisfaction out of seeing people enjoy the things that I don't

:02:07.:02:11.

feel able to enjoy myself. Simon has been anorexic for most two years.

:02:12.:02:20.

Logically I know that I need to eat. To live, otherwise at the end of the

:02:21.:02:25.

day this will kill me. Every time I try and eat, I can't. I have always

:02:26.:02:35.

had an unhealthy relationship with food, so I was really quite big,

:02:36.:02:42.

probably around 23- 34 stone. I had a heart attack. It had a deep

:02:43.:02:47.

psychological effect. I will do everything that I can to reverse the

:02:48.:02:52.

effect of whatever I've eaten. I tend to walk as far as my body will

:02:53.:02:58.

allow me to walk. The number of male patients being treated for eating

:02:59.:03:02.

disorders across England has risen by more than a quarter over the past

:03:03.:03:07.

three years. It has more than doubled the rise seen in female

:03:08.:03:11.

patients. The number of boys being treated has gone up by a third in

:03:12.:03:15.

the last year alone. Despite the increase, the total number of male

:03:16.:03:20.

patients treated last year, around 1200, still represents only 8% of

:03:21.:03:24.

the total. And these figures don't necessarily mean that more men have

:03:25.:03:28.

eating disorders. It could be that the stigma is lifting and that more

:03:29.:03:35.

are seeking help. Boys and men are realising that this is an illness

:03:36.:03:40.

and this is not a choice. This doctor is based at the Julian

:03:41.:03:45.

Hospital in Norwich and streets under 18s with eating disorders. She

:03:46.:03:49.

is seeing more boys than ever walk through her door. With boys we might

:03:50.:03:55.

see a lot of obsession around shape. So it is bulking yourself and muscle

:03:56.:03:59.

mass and what does it mean to be a man. NHS England says more support

:04:00.:04:03.

like the type offered here is being made available.

:04:04.:04:04.

We're going to be talking more about this story

:04:05.:04:06.

through the morning, hearing from experts and by men

:04:07.:04:09.

who've been affected by conditions like anorexia and bulimia.

:04:10.:04:14.

The polls open today for local elections in England,

:04:15.:04:17.

4,851 council seats will be decided, and six English regions will elect

:04:18.:04:21.

new "metro mayors," as Tom Symonds reports.

:04:22.:04:30.

It's back to the polling booths in England, Scotland

:04:31.:04:32.

These being local elections, not all council seats

:04:33.:04:35.

In England the focus is on 34 mainly county councils.

:04:36.:04:44.

Eight mayoral elections will take place, six for new posts

:04:45.:04:47.

in Cambridgeshire, Peterborough, Greater Manchester, Liverpool city,

:04:48.:04:49.

Tees Valley, the West Midlands and the west of England.

:04:50.:04:51.

All of Scotland's 32 councils and 22 in Wales are holding elections.

:04:52.:04:55.

The BBC won't report the general election campaign until polls

:04:56.:04:57.

The first results are expected after 2am.

:04:58.:05:00.

British voters will be back to the polling booths in five weeks'

:05:01.:05:03.

The two final candidates in the French presidential election

:05:04.:05:22.

have taken part in a heated head-to-head debate ahead

:05:23.:05:25.

Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron traded insults, with both candidates

:05:26.:05:28.

Our Europe correspondent James Reynolds reports.

:05:29.:05:45.

For the first time, Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen sat directly

:05:46.:05:49.

Right from the start of this debate they began their attacks.

:05:50.:06:04.

TRANSLATION: Mr Macron is the candidate of savage

:06:05.:06:10.

globalisation, uberisation, economic uncertainty,

:06:11.:06:16.

social brutality, of "every man for himself."

:06:17.:06:18.

TRANSLATION: You have shown you are not the candidate

:06:19.:06:20.

The question is, do the people want your attitude?

:06:21.:06:27.

You say that globalisation is too hard for us, so is Europe.

:06:28.:06:31.

"Let's shut the borders and leave the euro because others

:06:32.:06:33.

At times the moderators barely managed to get a word in.

:06:34.:06:41.

TRANSLATION: I treat the French like adults.

:06:42.:06:42.

Marine Le Pen spent much of her time attacking her opponent.

:06:43.:06:52.

She avoided discussion of her own proposals.

:06:53.:06:54.

Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen presented two very different visions

:06:55.:06:57.

of France and theirs was a debate marked by attacks and accusations.

:06:58.:07:00.

They head out now to the rest of the country for the final days

:07:01.:07:04.

Researchers have developed a blood test which could prevent thousands

:07:05.:07:17.

of men with advanced prostate cancer from

:07:18.:07:19.

The technique, which costs less than ?50 a time,

:07:20.:07:23.

will help doctors tell whether patients will respond

:07:24.:07:25.

to the standard drugs used to fight the disease.

:07:26.:07:31.

At the moment these men are on a to fight the disease.

:07:32.:07:35.

At the moment these men are on a drug for maybe at least three months

:07:36.:07:39.

before they are told whether the drug is working for them or not, so

:07:40.:07:44.

to provide the reassurance that they have accounts of which drugs they

:07:45.:07:48.

will respond to is a much better way to go about treatment.

:07:49.:07:50.

The number of people using the social networking site

:07:51.:07:52.

Facebook has risen to nearly two billion.

:07:53.:07:54.

The US tech giant has also announced a 76% rise in profits for the first

:07:55.:07:58.

three months of the year but warned growth from advertising

:07:59.:08:01.

Last night the Facebook-owned messaging service WhatsApp suffered

:08:02.:08:04.

a global outage lasting several hours.

:08:05.:08:18.

Three of the big four supermarkets have cut the price of petrol

:08:19.:08:21.

and diesel on their forecourts this week.

:08:22.:08:23.

Yes, good morning. This is something forecourts this week.

:08:24.:08:25.

Yes, good morning. This is something that gets the shoppers in. The

:08:26.:08:29.

supermarkets use it as a price war to get people into the shops. It is

:08:30.:08:34.

Morrisons, Tesco and Sainsbury's, reducing diesel 2p to litre and

:08:35.:08:39.

petrol 1p a litre. In terms of what it will save you, it is ?1.10 when

:08:40.:08:44.

filling up the average car with diesel and 55p for petrol. Now,

:08:45.:08:50.

interestingly, the RAC motoring group, they have some research today

:08:51.:08:54.

and they say that fuel should be cheaper than that and they should

:08:55.:08:57.

have brought it down even further because we have seen the price of

:08:58.:09:02.

oil fall recently. And also, the value of the pound, which we have

:09:03.:09:07.

talked about, it has started to pick up again, so the RAC has said for

:09:08.:09:11.

those reasons we should see the cost of fuel go down a little more. It is

:09:12.:09:16.

good news if you are feeling your car today. Interestingly, Asda, one

:09:17.:09:23.

of the other big supermarkets, isn't cutting and they say because they

:09:24.:09:27.

are cheaper than their rivals. People say, oh, things are more

:09:28.:09:32.

pricey than they used to be. Is it a signal of anything else, or is it a

:09:33.:09:40.

moment in time? It is hard to predict what next bite at the moment

:09:41.:09:44.

it is about supermarkets competing with each other and the fact that

:09:45.:09:48.

they can use the fact that oil prices have fallen in the short

:09:49.:09:52.

term. In the long-term it is hard to say whether they will go down or up.

:09:53.:09:58.

Actually, I would be minted if I could tell. Can you tell us? Well, I

:09:59.:10:01.

can't, so... LAUGHTER thank you. For the first time, scientists have

:10:02.:10:05.

started counting endangered birds from space using high

:10:06.:10:08.

resolution satellite images. Numbers of the Northern Royal

:10:09.:10:10.

albatross, one of the largest of the species, have previously

:10:11.:10:13.

been hard to assess, as it only nests on a small group

:10:14.:10:15.

of remote and rocky islands east It is the first time any species on

:10:16.:10:29.

earth has had the population assessed from earth. That is how

:10:30.:10:30.

closely they can watch. The 29th annual Sunday Times Rich

:10:31.:10:33.

List is out this weekend and it might not come as a surprise who has

:10:34.:10:37.

been named the richest Yes, she's still in her 20s,

:10:38.:10:40.

but Adele's wealth has reached 125 million pounds, up 50%

:10:41.:10:48.

in the last year alone. Her global tour and her third album

:10:49.:10:50.

"25" has put the British singer at number 19 in the chart,

:10:51.:10:54.

which is topped by Sir Paul McCartney and his

:10:55.:10:57.

wife Nancy Shevell. We're looking at eating

:10:58.:11:06.

disorders this morning, after an investigation for this

:11:07.:11:09.

programme found that increasing numbers of men and boys

:11:10.:11:11.

are seeking treatment for them. The number of males receiving

:11:12.:11:14.

outpatient treatment for conditions like anorexia and bulimia in England

:11:15.:11:16.

has increased by 27% over the last three years, compared

:11:17.:11:20.

to 13% for women. We're joined now by

:11:21.:11:22.

Doctor William Rhys Jones, a consultant psychiatrist

:11:23.:11:24.

from the Yorkshire Centre for Eating Good morning to you. Really

:11:25.:11:36.

distressing figures that we uncovered in the research for BBC

:11:37.:11:40.

Breakfast. What is behind this? First of all, I think the figures

:11:41.:11:44.

are interesting and important and I am glad they are on the programme.

:11:45.:11:47.

This is something we have seen in eating disorder services for

:11:48.:11:51.

sometime, just those increased numbers of referrals from young men

:11:52.:11:54.

and boys with eating disorders. I suppose more people are talking

:11:55.:12:00.

about it and the stigma of being a man with an eating disorder. I

:12:01.:12:04.

suppose in terms of what might explain the figures, and also what

:12:05.:12:07.

might potentially cause the rise, it is a bit unclear. The numbers show a

:12:08.:12:12.

rise but we know exactly what it means. Two things come to mind, one

:12:13.:12:17.

is increased awareness around the fact men have eating disorders too,

:12:18.:12:22.

that is in terms of individuals who are going through the illness, and

:12:23.:12:29.

suffering with those symptoms, and also the loved ones, the family

:12:30.:12:32.

members around them, they are likely to pick up on the symptoms, they are

:12:33.:12:38.

more likely to seek help, see the GP or the school nurse as well.

:12:39.:12:42.

Traditionally it has been something associated with women. When you hear

:12:43.:12:47.

these numbers and statistics, possibly you see it in practice more

:12:48.:12:52.

often, what do you think, what do you think is the reason that more

:12:53.:12:55.

men are prepared to present themselves? Look, I think more

:12:56.:13:01.

awareness, I suppose, there is more confidence in seeking help and

:13:02.:13:04.

opening up about that, which I think is a positive thing. I think there

:13:05.:13:08.

is increased awareness among people like GPs and school nurses as well.

:13:09.:13:13.

I suppose another strand is really about the increase in male body

:13:14.:13:19.

image concerns. That seems to be on the rise over the last 20- 30 years,

:13:20.:13:23.

if not longer, with men and young boys worrying about their look,

:13:24.:13:28.

similar to women for much longer, decades, centuries longer,

:13:29.:13:32.

potentially. When you log at women treated for these disorders, there

:13:33.:13:36.

are classic triggers, you know, emotional upheaval, life events. And

:13:37.:13:41.

the rise in social media, everyone taking pictures of themselves,

:13:42.:13:44.

comparing themselves with unrealistic small bodies. Either

:13:45.:13:51.

triggers the same for men? There are lots of similarities between men and

:13:52.:13:54.

women, more than differences, but I think the difference is our very

:13:55.:14:01.

important. It is important for clinicians and health professionals

:14:02.:14:04.

to be aware of the differences, albeit subtle at times. For example,

:14:05.:14:08.

men are worried about certain areas of their body which women are not

:14:09.:14:15.

worried about. Men want to be bigger, a little buffer, shall we

:14:16.:14:19.

say, whereas women worry about the waist down, though I am

:14:20.:14:23.

generalising. And also the behaviour is mentally engage in as opposed to

:14:24.:14:28.

slightly different behaviours with women. Women would be about the diet

:14:29.:14:33.

and certain forms of exercise, whereas men might not have a drive

:14:34.:14:43.

to be thin, it might be to get lean. If that image thing you talk about

:14:44.:14:48.

is correct, and they are looking more buff, whatever that is, if that

:14:49.:14:52.

is what they look for, how does it macro do with the notion of an

:14:53.:15:00.

eating disorder -- tie in with the notion of an eating disorder, rather

:15:01.:15:03.

than wanting to look and feel better. You can see it in the kids

:15:04.:15:08.

toys that come out. When I was a kid, Luke skywalker toys I played

:15:09.:15:12.

with, he was a normal looking guy. Now he looks like he is on steroids.

:15:13.:15:17.

Those images are being betrayed in all aspects of the media --

:15:18.:15:21.

Skywalker. And I suppose it is from a young age. For most people it is

:15:22.:15:25.

not a problem. Sometimes, if there are other vulnerabilities and risk

:15:26.:15:29.

factors that play, it can be a problem. There is a real sense that

:15:30.:15:34.

to feel happy or satisfied and to deal with other problems in their

:15:35.:15:37.

life, you have to look at certain way. It is what we call body

:15:38.:15:41.

objectification. The idea or the concept that what you look like is

:15:42.:15:45.

more important than who you are. And I suppose your appearance is more

:15:46.:15:48.

important than your values, your beliefs et cetera. We know that it

:15:49.:15:53.

is a risk factor for men and women to develop in an eating disorder.

:15:54.:15:58.

Usually it is not something that we would say would immediately cause

:15:59.:16:01.

eating disorder. Other things are usually at play as well. The

:16:02.:16:05.

information we have is that there is an increase in the number of men and

:16:06.:16:10.

boys reported with eating disorders, but boys, isn't it, and for anyone

:16:11.:16:15.

watching, you know, a young man or a parent of a young boy who is concern

:16:16.:16:19.

and doesn't know that there is a problem and is looking for signs of

:16:20.:16:23.

a problem, what advice would you give them? A couple of things, just

:16:24.:16:27.

be aware that men and boys have eating disorders too. It is not just

:16:28.:16:31.

a female condition, though it affects more women than men.

:16:32.:16:34.

Certainly it is about being aware that men have eating disorders too.

:16:35.:16:39.

And just also recognising the symptoms. The symptoms to be aware

:16:40.:16:44.

of, so, increased dieting, concerns about body image, which are starting

:16:45.:16:47.

to impact their lives, affecting school attendance and other things.

:16:48.:16:53.

If you are worried, see a GP and raise it with your GP and say, I am

:16:54.:16:58.

worried about my son. There are a lot of good websites as well. Men

:16:59.:17:03.

get eating disorders too. It is a website based in Brighton. It is

:17:04.:17:09.

online as well. I would advise to see a GP first. Thank you very much

:17:10.:17:17.

for that. You mentioned the charity Men Get Eating Disorders Too and the

:17:18.:17:21.

founder of that, Sam Thomas, a former sufferer, will be with us

:17:22.:17:22.

just after 8am this morning. If you'd like details

:17:23.:17:26.

for organisations offering information and support

:17:27.:17:28.

about eating disorders, you can call or visit the BBC

:17:29.:17:30.

Actionline using the details below. And we'll be talking more about this

:17:31.:17:33.

story throughout the morning. You're watching

:17:34.:17:36.

Breakfast from BBC News. Our main story this morning: A BBC

:17:37.:17:45.

Breakfast investigation has found a stark rise in the number of men

:17:46.:17:48.

seeking treatment for eating Voters head to the polls

:17:49.:17:51.

in parts of England, Wales and Scotland today in local

:17:52.:17:55.

elections to decide nearly 5,000 council seats and six

:17:56.:17:58.

new metro mayors. Let's see what the weather is up to

:17:59.:18:12.

today. You can see a picture of London. Carol can say this word

:18:13.:18:18.

properly. I am going to try. Is it murk? Very good!

:18:19.:18:21.

This is what it will be like in the countryside. A touch of frost,

:18:22.:20:14.

especially where we have clear skies. That means tomorrow morning

:20:15.:20:17.

and other beautiful start if you like it sunny and dry. Still a keen

:20:18.:20:23.

wind. You will notice it too. We have this cloud in southern areas.

:20:24.:20:27.

The temperatures about 14 Celsius. Temperatures coming down in the

:20:28.:20:31.

north, but still pleasant in the sunshine. Into Friday evening we

:20:32.:20:36.

have weather fronts approaching us which will introduce showers and

:20:37.:20:40.

then rain. That will sweep across southern counties during the course

:20:41.:20:44.

of Saturday. There's the rain. The timing and position of this could

:20:45.:20:48.

change. It will also affect the Channel Islands. North of that there

:20:49.:20:51.

will be more cloud around, even so there will be sunshine. Temperatures

:20:52.:20:56.

down in the north and up in the south thing at a high of 17. In the

:20:57.:21:01.

Sunday there goes the front. Off into the near continent. Light

:21:02.:21:06.

winds. The wind changes direction, so we have more of a northerly. It

:21:07.:21:10.

will feel cool. A lot of dry weather. Next week it will end as

:21:11.:21:14.

the wind changes direction again not as cold. What it would be warm

:21:15.:21:19.

either in the north-west. Mixed fortunes.

:21:20.:21:20.

For the first time in decades, France will elect a President that

:21:21.:21:27.

doesn't belong to one of the country's two

:21:28.:21:29.

Sunday's election is viewed as crucial for the future direction

:21:30.:21:32.

of the EU, and last night's TV debate saw the two candidates clash

:21:33.:21:36.

Our Europe reporter Gavin Lee is in Paris.

:21:37.:21:39.

At times it looked like the moderators had almost lost control.

:21:40.:21:50.

What has the reaction been like there?

:21:51.:21:54.

On Twitter there were appeals saying the reaction been like there?

:21:55.:21:57.

On Twitter there were appeals saying the presenters haven't seen since

:21:58.:22:01.

nine a.m.. The debate went on for two hours and it was spectacularly

:22:02.:22:05.

different from British TV debates and elsewhere in the world because

:22:06.:22:10.

they were allowed to speak, some say perhaps too much, but they spoke,

:22:11.:22:14.

debated, interrupted. Many say it was the most intense TV contest

:22:15.:22:19.

there has been. On paper says there were low points, Marine Le Pen

:22:20.:22:23.

launched multiple attacks, but ultimately a manual the crime held

:22:24.:22:29.

the card of reason. -- Emmanuel Macron. Many said from the start it

:22:30.:22:34.

was emotionally ugly. Marine Le Pen said Mr Macron was responsible for

:22:35.:22:39.

savage globalisation. She said it would either be herself or Angela

:22:40.:22:46.

Merkel who would be ruling. The far right of course are calling for a

:22:47.:22:50.

separate currency, to leave the euro. Mr Macron said she was the

:22:51.:22:56.

high priestess of fear. He was trying to be calm and considered,

:22:57.:23:05.

trying to interrupted are saying, Madame Le Pen. From your point of

:23:06.:23:10.

you who were the winners and losers? I would say he wins on points,

:23:11.:23:15.

definitely, but they both lose overall because it wasn't a

:23:16.:23:19.

dignified debate and I would say most lost out because it was a free

:23:20.:23:24.

for all, a fight from Twitter more than a political debate. From both

:23:25.:23:29.

of them. Drawing emotional barbs at each other. Yes, she was lecturing,

:23:30.:23:37.

she was aggressive. He won on points. And he was more dignified.

:23:38.:23:47.

Some of the voters who didn't know... She made good point on only

:23:48.:23:51.

one issue, which was terrorism, because he is weak on that. Because

:23:52.:23:57.

he has supporters who belong to a militant organisation in France and

:23:58.:24:00.

she got him with details. But that's about the only time where she

:24:01.:24:04.

debated well. The rest of the time he was much better. Marine Le Pen

:24:05.:24:08.

was pressed more on what her plans were for France having a separate

:24:09.:24:14.

currency. Going back to a new Frank and the euro. Did we learn anything

:24:15.:24:20.

from Emmanuel Macron? We didn't. This new policy has been debated by

:24:21.:24:26.

people in her team. She isn't an economist, she is a barrister by

:24:27.:24:31.

trade. She was serving a few arguments and he is the technocrat.

:24:32.:24:36.

Both of them were terrible on this. It was impossible to understand and

:24:37.:24:41.

frankly it was something they shouldn't have debated. I

:24:42.:24:50.

appreciated. Thank you. Two more days of campaigning. Mr Macron is at

:24:51.:25:00.

60%, Marine Le Pen on 40%. Mr Macron is heading south today and Marine Le

:25:01.:25:05.

Pen is heading north. Thank you. Paris is looking rather beautiful.

:25:06.:25:11.

You can see the cloud way off in the distance. We will be back in Paris

:25:12.:25:15.

later. Tomorrow is the last day you can use your old ?5 notes in shops

:25:16.:25:19.

and banks. They are being withdrawn on Friday.

:25:20.:25:24.

The Bank of England says there are still 150 million 50 million of them

:25:25.:25:33.

in use. It is exactly 15 years since the paper ?5 note entered

:25:34.:25:38.

circulation. Now she is making way for the Winston Churchill plastic

:25:39.:25:42.

fibre. Despite the clock ticking for the old note, plenty of shoppers

:25:43.:25:45.

still have them and some traders don't know the end is nigh. I had no

:25:46.:25:52.

idea. No idea. Absolute surprise. I've been told it is finishing. Are

:25:53.:25:56.

you still getting people bringing them in? Absolutely. Did you know

:25:57.:26:02.

that the old ?5 note finishes on Friday night? No. It is. Is that a

:26:03.:26:09.

surprise? Yes, of course. The Bank of England says 150 million paper

:26:10.:26:15.

fivers remain at large. That ?750 million worth. After Friday, you

:26:16.:26:26.

will still be able to put your old ?5 notes into your own bank, or

:26:27.:26:32.

deposit or exchange them, but shops won't be accepting them see what we

:26:33.:26:35.

better off spending member for them. The Bank of England says it will

:26:36.:26:42.

accept returns of the old note for all time but they will stop legal

:26:43.:26:44.

tender from midnight tomorrow. And in one-hour we have a note

:26:45.:26:47.

tender from midnight tomorrow. And in one-hour we have a note

:26:48.:26:51.

expert here to tell us what to do with those fivers.

:26:52.:26:54.

Kind of fascinating, when it stops becoming legal tender. There's a

:26:55.:26:57.

cut-off point. I get the banks will be busy for the

:26:58.:27:01.

next couple of days. Let us know if you have

:27:02.:27:02.

More in around half an hour of course and there's

:27:03.:30:21.

also the latest news, travel and weather available

:30:22.:30:23.

The time is just on 7:30am. The main with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent.

:30:24.:30:37.

The time is just on 7:30am. The main stories this morning:

:30:38.:30:39.

There's been a sharp rise in the number of men being treated

:30:40.:30:42.

for eating disorders like for anorexia and bulimia,

:30:43.:30:44.

according to a BBC Breakfast investigation.

:30:45.:30:46.

Figures obtained by this programme showed the number of males receiving

:30:47.:30:49.

out-patent treatment in England is rising at double the rate

:30:50.:30:51.

of female patients, although women still account

:30:52.:30:53.

Voters are heading to the polls today for local

:30:54.:30:59.

Seats on 88 councils will be decided, including all those

:31:00.:31:02.

Voters in England will select new members of 32 councils

:31:03.:31:06.

and in six English regions Metro Mayors will be elected

:31:07.:31:09.

The first results are expected in the early hours of tomorrow morning.

:31:10.:31:19.

The two final candidates in the French presidential election

:31:20.:31:22.

have taken part in a heated head-to-head debate.

:31:23.:31:24.

Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron traded insults while debating

:31:25.:31:26.

Both candidates are targeting undecided voters with nearly a fifth

:31:27.:31:31.

of people reportedly yet to make up their mind ahead

:31:32.:31:33.

Researchers have developed a blood test which could prevent thousands

:31:34.:31:40.

of men with advanced prostate cancer from

:31:41.:31:42.

The technique, which costs less than ?50 a time,

:31:43.:31:51.

will help doctors tell whether patients will respond

:31:52.:31:53.

to the standard drugs used to fight the disease.

:31:54.:31:55.

The number of people using the social networking site

:31:56.:31:58.

Facebook has risen to nearly two billion.

:31:59.:32:00.

The US tech giant has also announced a 76% rise in profits for the first

:32:01.:32:04.

three months of the year but warned growth from advertising

:32:05.:32:07.

Last night the Facebook-owned messaging service WhatsApp suffered

:32:08.:32:10.

a global outage lasting several hours.

:32:11.:32:40.

A diver has been rescued after spending almost ten hours

:32:41.:32:43.

in the waters off Orkney in Scotland.

:32:44.:32:45.

The diver was found by a passing yacht in the early hours and taken

:32:46.:32:49.

Brad Pitt has revealed he has given up drinking and started therapy

:32:50.:32:54.

to help him get through his divorce from Angelina Jolie.

:32:55.:32:56.

In his first interview since they seperated,

:32:57.:32:58.

he admitted to GQ Style that he'd drunk heavily in the past,

:32:59.:33:02.

He also confirmed that he and Angelina are working together

:33:03.:33:05.

to resolve their issues "amicably and privately."

:33:06.:33:07.

A lucky sheep has a narrow escape after falling into a gully.

:33:08.:33:10.

The 50 kilogram animal, named Dolly by her rescuers,

:33:11.:33:13.

needed ten firefighters to help winch her out.

:33:14.:33:15.

Fortunately West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service has confirmed

:33:16.:33:17.

that Dolly was protected by her thick coat in a statement

:33:18.:33:20.

it is their joke, not ours. The sheep is fine. Good morning. Talking

:33:21.:33:47.

about Jose Mourinho, is he playing mind games? What do you think? He

:33:48.:33:53.

said in 2014 during the race between Chelsea and City for the title that

:33:54.:33:57.

everything he says and does is mind games and the results are what are

:33:58.:34:04.

not gains. And he is in fifth place, just one point behind Manchester

:34:05.:34:07.

City, saying they are not going to catch Manchester City. And maybe

:34:08.:34:12.

sometimes it works for his players, they are like, OK, we are going to

:34:13.:34:14.

prove him wrong. Jose Mourinho said it was "too late"

:34:15.:34:15.

for a top four finish in the Premier League,

:34:16.:34:18.

so he'd switched his focus to the Europa League,

:34:19.:34:21.

as a route to Champions League They take on Celta Vigo in Spain

:34:22.:34:24.

tonight, boosted by the potential return of several injured players -

:34:25.:34:28.

Paul Pogba, Juan Mata, Chris Smalling and Phil Jones

:34:29.:34:30.

all have a chance of starting the match, which takes

:34:31.:34:33.

on new significance. I think it is a big achievement

:34:34.:34:37.

with so many problems we have, and it would allow us to be back

:34:38.:34:41.

to the Champions League next season, so we will have to try,

:34:42.:34:44.

that is what we are going to do and, honestly, the Europa League becomes

:34:45.:34:48.

for us now more important. In the first leg of the other

:34:49.:34:58.

Europa League semi-final, Ajax beat Lyon 4-1, so they're

:34:59.:35:01.

likely to be United's opponents Juventus closed in on a second

:35:02.:35:04.

Champions League final in three seasons, as Gonzalo Higuain scored

:35:05.:35:10.

both goals in their 2-0 win at Monaco in the first leg

:35:11.:35:13.

of their semi-final. Monaco had knocked out Tottenham

:35:14.:35:15.

and Manchester City on their way Manchester City's women came

:35:16.:35:18.

from behind to draw 1-1 with Birmingham in

:35:19.:35:26.

the WSL Spring Series. It was a dress rehearsal for next

:35:27.:35:30.

weekend's FA Cup final. After City fell behind

:35:31.:35:36.

to Emily Westwood's header, England fullback Lucy Bronze

:35:37.:35:38.

scored the equaliser. There were wins too

:35:39.:35:40.

for Chelsea and Bristol City. Garth Crooks, of the

:35:41.:35:47.

anti-discrimination organisation Kick It out, wants players

:35:48.:35:48.

in Italy's top flight to boycott matches this weekend,

:35:49.:35:51.

unless a suspension is overturned. The former Portsmouth striker -

:35:52.:35:53.

Sully Muntari - was playing for Pescara against Cagliari

:35:54.:35:56.

when he was booked for dissent, after complaining to the referee

:35:57.:35:59.

about racist abuse from the crowd. He was booked again after walking

:36:00.:36:02.

off the pitch and banned I'm calling on players in Italy,

:36:03.:36:05.

black and white, to make it clear to the Federation of Italy that this

:36:06.:36:21.

position is unacceptable and if the decision is not reversed

:36:22.:36:23.

then they withdraw their services The professional football is

:36:24.:36:36.

association said the number of players seeking help for mental

:36:37.:36:37.

health problems is soaring. Everton say winger Aaron Lenin has

:36:38.:36:38.

a stress-related illness Last year 62 current and 98 former

:36:39.:36:49.

players requested support from the welfare department.

:36:50.:36:51.

Ilie Nastase has called Wimbledon's organisers "small minded"

:36:52.:36:53.

after they said he'd not be invited into the royal box at this year's

:36:54.:36:57.

Nastase was Romania's captain for their Fed Cup match

:36:58.:37:00.

against Great Britain last month but he was ejected after swearing

:37:01.:37:03.

He's been provisionally suspended by the International Tennis Federation

:37:04.:37:07.

We condemn his behaviour, in the Fed Cup against

:37:08.:37:10.

The ITF are conducting an investigation at the moment.

:37:11.:37:13.

He is subject to a temporary suspension and we will await

:37:14.:37:16.

the outcome of the ITF investigation, and we will honour

:37:17.:37:19.

that suspension for at long as it is in place.

:37:20.:37:32.

The Wimbledon organisers have also confirmed that former champion

:37:33.:37:34.

Maria Sharapova has yet to apply for a wildcard.

:37:35.:37:37.

After returning from her doping ban, she's well down the rankings

:37:38.:37:40.

and could be reliant on help from the powers that be

:37:41.:37:43.

if she doesn't perform well in her next couple of tournaments.

:37:44.:37:46.

Fernando Alonso has been given the go-ahead to compete at the Indy

:37:47.:37:49.

McLaren's two-time Formula One World Champion will miss

:37:50.:37:52.

the Monaco Grand Prix to compete at the iconic event and turned

:37:53.:37:56.

a wheel in anger on track for the first time yesterday.

:37:57.:37:59.

He successfully completed a series of tests and said he wanted to go

:38:00.:38:02.

faster but he's right foot wouldn't let him.

:38:03.:38:04.

He was only going over 220 miles an hour!

:38:05.:38:13.

Apparently if you want to be on pole 220 miles an hour!

:38:14.:38:15.

Apparently if you want to be on pole you need to get to do hundreds of

:38:16.:38:20.

the MPH, so not far for him, but he said, it is like the awful sheep

:38:21.:38:24.

joke that we did, he said it was just good to get up to speed. No,

:38:25.:38:28.

that's worse. I don't even know if he knew that he said something was

:38:29.:38:35.

so terrible. 220 is still very fast. That's the whole point of the Indy

:38:36.:38:40.

500. While you were doing your sport could you see me fiddling with this?

:38:41.:38:44.

Yes, I could, most distracting. Was it annoying? Only because you are

:38:45.:38:51.

not good at it, so I was worried... I haven't seen one of these before

:38:52.:38:56.

until today. Have you seen one? I haven't seen one in real life. It is

:38:57.:39:02.

a fidget spinners and you play around with it like that. Would it

:39:03.:39:08.

be annoying for people? The idea was that they were designed to relieve

:39:09.:39:09.

stress and help people concentrate. But they've since become

:39:10.:39:18.

the latest must-have toy - and some schools say

:39:19.:39:20.

they're disrupting lessons. We'll speak to Naomi,

:39:21.:39:23.

who has her fidget spinner with her, First, Newsround's Ricky Boleto has

:39:24.:39:26.

been to a school in Manchester Fidget spinners are taking over

:39:27.:39:48.

playgrounds. The small toys have become the latest must have gadget.

:39:49.:39:54.

My spinner is a glow-in-the-dark one. You get relaxed when it spins

:39:55.:40:00.

and it is really satisfying. You can have challenges with other people

:40:01.:40:05.

and you can customise as well. These little things are causing headaches

:40:06.:40:10.

for lots of teachers. Sometimes children get distracted. Then they

:40:11.:40:16.

don't concentrate on their work. They try to rush so they can play

:40:17.:40:20.

with it and they don't produce quality work. They have since been

:40:21.:40:25.

banned in a number of schools but here in Manchester teachers are more

:40:26.:40:29.

relaxed. They are happy for kids to play with them but only outside the

:40:30.:40:37.

classroom. You can play with them at lunch time but not during class.

:40:38.:40:40.

They have been banned during class and around the school environment

:40:41.:40:45.

and you are only allowed with them at lunch. We are happy for kids to

:40:46.:40:49.

play with fidget spinners on the playground. They are developing fine

:40:50.:40:53.

motor skills. We have asked that they put them away when they enter

:40:54.:40:57.

the building so they are not a distraction in the lessons. We found

:40:58.:41:00.

that children were more interested in watching each other do tricks

:41:01.:41:04.

than they were watching the teacher. They only cost a couple of pounds

:41:05.:41:08.

and websites have started to charge a lot more as the popularity

:41:09.:41:13.

increases. Which one is better? Online videos showing tricks have

:41:14.:41:19.

had millions of views until the next big thing in the playground, it

:41:20.:41:22.

looks like the fidget spinner will be at least the summer.

:41:23.:41:28.

They are quite a lot better than me. be at least the summer.

:41:29.:41:32.

Miriam Gwynne joins us on the sofa, alongside her daughter Naomi,

:41:33.:41:35.

who has autism and has benefited from using a fidget spinner

:41:36.:41:38.

So you are going to use your spinner while we chat to your mum, is that

:41:39.:41:49.

OK? Yes. Good. How does it help? Definitely it helps children with

:41:50.:41:55.

autism. It helps concentrate, focus and relax. Is it more relaxing? Yes.

:41:56.:42:05.

For a lot of children it really is something extra to focus on to take

:42:06.:42:09.

away from the pressure of school. The constant demand they are put

:42:10.:42:13.

under when they have autism. For some children it can be

:42:14.:42:18.

overwhelming. Lights can be buzzing, there is constant noise, and this

:42:19.:42:22.

can give them something to focus on so that they can concentrate on

:42:23.:42:26.

work. Naomi, can you show me what you can do, what different things

:42:27.:42:32.

can you do? To you spend it like that, or can you do other things?

:42:33.:42:38.

What do you do? You show him. That's it. And it is just kind of calming.

:42:39.:42:46.

Yes. It is repetitive. Anything that is repetitive is very relaxing. So

:42:47.:42:53.

it is not the case that, forgive me for this, in our experience we hear

:42:54.:43:00.

about the noise and alight at school, lots of other people, it can

:43:01.:43:05.

be too distracting for children with autism, it can be difficult to

:43:06.:43:09.

maintain concentration. This doesn't add another thing was yellow no, it

:43:10.:43:16.

is a focus for them. That buzzing noise can take away from everything

:43:17.:43:21.

else. They can focus on that and it will desensitise them from other

:43:22.:43:28.

things. Has Naomi used it for a while? Not only that, but this as

:43:29.:43:33.

well. Would you like to show? What is that one? What is called. It is

:43:34.:43:42.

called Tangle. A little bit shy. You're not the first person. What

:43:43.:43:49.

happens. Do you want to show? So you kind of untangle it and move it

:43:50.:43:53.

around? You're just moving it around and it is just something to fidget

:43:54.:43:58.

with and to use your hands with. Do you want to have a turn? Can I see?

:43:59.:44:05.

Sometimes Charlie fidget at and did you notice a change? Yes. When she

:44:06.:44:11.

is at home, she has a twin brother with complex needs, and he can cause

:44:12.:44:16.

stress, he can get agitated and he can be aggressive, so this helps her

:44:17.:44:21.

to calm down. Just a way to sit and be in your own zone. Can you

:44:22.:44:26.

understand why schools have been banning these? I can because

:44:27.:44:32.

unfortunately now they are mainstream they are not used for

:44:33.:44:36.

this, they are being tossed about, they are getting thrown, they are

:44:37.:44:43.

getting all sorts. That wasn't the original... Is Naomi allowed to use

:44:44.:44:49.

hers? Yes. Naomi goes to a wonderfully inclusive school with a

:44:50.:44:54.

nurture group for children with emotional difficulties. They are

:44:55.:45:00.

used to children on the spectrum and children with other difficulties so,

:45:01.:45:05.

yes, her school will continue to use it. I think your toy has totally

:45:06.:45:09.

stumped Charlie. Can I give that back to you? Thank you for coming in

:45:10.:45:14.

to show us. Thank you for having us on.

:45:15.:45:16.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:45:17.:45:18.

The main stories this morning: A BBC Breakfast investigation has found

:45:19.:45:21.

a stark rise in the number of men seeking treatment for eating

:45:22.:45:25.

Voters head to the polls in parts of Wales and Scotland today in local

:45:26.:45:33.

elections to decide nearly 5,000 council seats and six

:45:34.:45:36.

Let's go over to Carol who I don't think is using a fidget spinner

:45:37.:45:49.

right at the moment. This is a picture from Wakefield. We

:45:50.:46:09.

have another one showing a fair bit of cloud again in Doncaster. This

:46:10.:46:15.

one is a beautiful one from Wales. Again, quite a bit of cloud and a

:46:16.:46:19.

bit of sunshine coming through. A lot of the cloud we have is in

:46:20.:46:23.

northern England. It will fade away and we will have sunshine. We hang

:46:24.:46:28.

onto the cloud in the south. Some spots of rain. Nothing too heavy and

:46:29.:46:32.

a noticeable breeze. A breeze in the Pennines today. What it will be

:46:33.:46:37.

sunny. The sun again across the north Midlands, heading steadily

:46:38.:46:41.

northwards through northern England. Temperatures responding nicely.

:46:42.:46:44.

That's away from the east coast because on the east coast of

:46:45.:46:49.

Scotland and England it will feel nippy. Low cloud clears from the

:46:50.:46:56.

north-east. Broken blue skies. Although we start on a cloudy note

:46:57.:47:00.

in Wales, the cloud melts away and we have sunshine. On Southwest

:47:01.:47:06.

England is a bit more cloud. Just the odd break. The cloud began fear

:47:07.:47:11.

and therefore a shower, but the showers will be hit and miss. It is

:47:12.:47:18.

south Midlands and towards Kent and east Anglia, Cambridgeshire, you

:47:19.:47:21.

might find there is a bit more cloud at times. Overnight we hang on to

:47:22.:47:26.

the cloud with the odd spot of rain. Still breezy. Further north it will

:47:27.:47:32.

be colder. These temperatures, between about six and nine, indicate

:47:33.:47:36.

what you can expect in towns and cities. Lower in the countryside. A

:47:37.:47:40.

touch of frost in parts of Scotland. Here we have the sunshine tomorrow,

:47:41.:47:45.

as in northern England and north Wales and Northern Ireland. Further

:47:46.:47:49.

south we still have this plague of cloud and along the east coast,

:47:50.:47:54.

coming off the North Sea, it will feel cold. But temperatures

:47:55.:47:59.

generally coming down a touch. On Friday evening the showers

:48:00.:48:02.

approached the south-west of England and on Saturday we have low pressure

:48:03.:48:07.

near us, which will bring rain. The timing and position of this could

:48:08.:48:12.

change. In the south-west, affecting the Channel Islands, very bill

:48:13.:48:18.

amounts of cloud. -- variable. For Sunday, there goes the weather

:48:19.:48:21.

front, pulling into the near continent. Behind it, dry and bright

:48:22.:48:27.

conditions. A change in wind direction. Still feeling cold down

:48:28.:48:31.

east coast. Coolalinga north. Still a lot of dry weather around. --

:48:32.:48:37.

cooler in the north. If you are sick of the wind, it will change next

:48:38.:48:42.

week in east. But it won't feel as warm where it has felt warm in the

:48:43.:48:47.

north-west. We don't like a nagging wind! We

:48:48.:48:50.

don't like a nagging anything! A lot of people talk about this,

:48:51.:49:10.

when I am out and about, paying for things and fuel is one of them. Good

:49:11.:49:12.

morning. A year ago a litre of petrol cost

:49:13.:49:14.

one pound and 8p on average - and a litre of diesel

:49:15.:49:18.

was one pound and 9p. Those prices have crept up

:49:19.:49:21.

in the last 12 months. Up to ?1 for petrol and ?1 for

:49:22.:49:26.

in the last 12 months. Up to ?1 for petrol and ?1 for

:49:27.:49:31.

diesel. Now they are coming down again.

:49:32.:49:36.

That will have changed yesterday, though, when three of the big four

:49:37.:49:39.

All of them dropped the price of unleaded by 1p and the price

:49:40.:49:44.

James Spencer is managing director of fuel traders Portland Fuel.

:49:45.:49:47.

Good morning. What's happening? Why of fuel traders Portland Fuel.

:49:48.:49:49.

Good morning. What's happening? Why are they bringing down prices?

:49:50.:49:52.

There's an element of supermarkets always been keen to get off the

:49:53.:49:56.

blocks first and get in first with a price reduction. But oil prices have

:49:57.:50:01.

been ticking down. About one month ago they were $57 a barrel, now

:50:02.:50:09.

about $50, so that's filtering through. Why have the prices been

:50:10.:50:14.

coming down? What has actually happened is as the price kind of

:50:15.:50:19.

crept up on the back of the OPEC cuts, which were agreed back in

:50:20.:50:24.

November, in November they agreed they would cut production. That sent

:50:25.:50:30.

prices going upwards. Certainly the US attack on the Syrian air base

:50:31.:50:36.

pushed prices up further. But really what happened is shale oil prices

:50:37.:50:40.

have come back into the market. The price went up in the $50 and shale

:50:41.:50:45.

oil has come back in. So now the price is coming back down. And the

:50:46.:50:48.

currency market is making a difference? They make a huge

:50:49.:50:52.

difference, but probably from a p per litre perspective, when post-

:50:53.:50:58.

Brexit the pound went down in value that pushed prices up by about 4

:50:59.:51:02.

cents per litre. But the exchange rate is sat at about the .25 level

:51:03.:51:08.

against the dollar for about six months, so that's having a big

:51:09.:51:12.

impact at the moment. What's going to happen next? I know that's the

:51:13.:51:17.

question, but in terms of what the forecast offers. I think in the

:51:18.:51:23.

short term there will be a softening of prices. Normally what happens if

:51:24.:51:26.

the supermarkets lead and the rest of the retail industry, the

:51:27.:51:31.

independent forecourts, follow. They have a longer supply chain so it

:51:32.:51:34.

takes longer for their... They may have fuel that was bought two weeks

:51:35.:51:40.

ago. So they tend to be slower. But all eyes on the 25th of May. That's

:51:41.:51:45.

the next OPEC meeting and to be honest their strategy of strangling

:51:46.:51:49.

production and pushing up prices looks like it will this allowed. Are

:51:50.:51:55.

they going to cut even more? The argument is there isn't anybody who

:51:56.:51:59.

can, other than Saudi Arabia. They will certainly maintain the

:52:00.:52:05.

production costs, but if they decided to do further production

:52:06.:52:08.

cuts that could push prices back. One other thing. Whenever I talk

:52:09.:52:12.

about petrol fuel prices people go mad and say, it is much cheaper

:52:13.:52:16.

here, or more expensive. Why are there that regional variations?

:52:17.:52:20.

That's more market forces. In more competitive areas, especially the

:52:21.:52:25.

supermarkets have to be competitive in their pricing. If you look at the

:52:26.:52:29.

difference in the supply chain cost of getting fuel to the north-east to

:52:30.:52:34.

Wales, for example, it's only about 1p per litre. So from a supply

:52:35.:52:38.

perspective there isn't a great difference. So where there are big

:52:39.:52:42.

differences it is typically market forces. Thank you. I am sure I will

:52:43.:52:48.

get lots of messages from you about where you have seen the most

:52:49.:52:51.

expensive or the cheapest! Thanks very much.

:52:52.:52:54.

For 125 years Norland College in Bath has been training nannies

:52:55.:52:57.

that go on to work for some of the richest and most famous

:52:58.:53:00.

Now you might expect students to learn about colic,

:53:01.:53:04.

cooking and children's education, but what about the murky

:53:05.:53:06.

As part of their degree course, Norland nannies are now

:53:07.:53:15.

being trained by former military intelligence officers.

:53:16.:53:17.

Breakfast's John Maguire has been finding out why.

:53:18.:53:19.

The immaculate uniform, brown hat been finding out why.

:53:20.:53:22.

The immaculate uniform, brown hat and white gloves are reminders of

:53:23.:53:29.

the Norland nannies' heritage. At this trading is preparing for life

:53:30.:53:33.

and work in a very modern world. Is there anything now that you notice

:53:34.:53:36.

on this route? I have noticed there's been a car behind us now the

:53:37.:53:41.

whole time, following the same route. That's kind of suspicious for

:53:42.:53:47.

me. You are right. The Ford car behind us has been following our

:53:48.:53:50.

route ever since we left the car park. Well spotted. This

:53:51.:53:54.

undergraduate is being put through her paces in this driver training

:53:55.:53:57.

exercise by a former military intelligence officer. It is slowing.

:53:58.:54:03.

We need to be slowing as well. We need to be stopping so that we can

:54:04.:54:07.

see the bottom of the tyres of the car in front. Taking a standard map

:54:08.:54:11.

is brilliant. You don't have to rely on your phone, you can look at it

:54:12.:54:14.

and highlight bits on there, especially hospitals, leases that

:54:15.:54:18.

are safe that you need to go to. When they complete their degree

:54:19.:54:24.

course, Norlanders may well find work with royalty and other VIPs,

:54:25.:54:28.

people who take their family's security very seriously. I think it

:54:29.:54:35.

is vital that this Norland nannies, going into some very high profile

:54:36.:54:38.

families, very high end in terms of wealth, to have an understanding of

:54:39.:54:43.

what the threats are, how they can mitigate the risks and how they can

:54:44.:54:47.

make sense of plans to avoid getting themselves into unfortunate

:54:48.:54:51.

positions. High on the day's agenda is cyber security and the potential

:54:52.:54:55.

risks of social media. Have any of you here got apps that will GO tag

:54:56.:55:04.

you? As a nanny you have to understand when you pick your kids

:55:05.:55:08.

up, what clubs they go to and when you are exposed to a range of

:55:09.:55:12.

different threats this is when their research can be used against you.

:55:13.:55:16.

Instructors are actively involved in the fields of counter-terrorism,

:55:17.:55:20.

security and personal protection. The training encourages the students

:55:21.:55:24.

not to be paranoid, but to be alert. I think it's just made me more

:55:25.:55:30.

conscious of how I use... What I do in my everyday life and being more

:55:31.:55:33.

aware of my surroundings and stuff Musso that if there ever was an

:55:34.:55:37.

incident on might be able to either prevented or I will no hopefully how

:55:38.:55:42.

to deal with it. When I was out there driving with you guys a

:55:43.:55:45.

thought, actually, having that bit of space and difference could make a

:55:46.:55:49.

difference if there was a big situation going on. Yeah, it is so

:55:50.:55:53.

easy to do. It's all common sense once you've been told it. As a

:55:54.:55:57.

person, you don't expect to ever be put in a situation where somebody

:55:58.:56:01.

would do that to you. Nannies of course have always been well versed

:56:02.:56:04.

in children's health, education and their happiness, but these students

:56:05.:56:09.

are now being trained to cope in a crisis.

:56:10.:56:13.

Mary Poppins wouldn't have had that crisis.

:56:14.:56:15.

Mary Poppins wouldn't have had that kind of problem!

:56:16.:56:19.

She was fully trained. And armed and ready!

:56:20.:56:20.

Umbrella! Time now to get the news,

:56:21.:56:21.

travel and weather where you are. Hello this is Breakfast,

:56:22.:59:40.

with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent. A big rise in the number of men

:59:41.:59:51.

and boys seeking help Logically I know that I need to eat

:59:52.:00:00.

to live, otherwise at the end of the day this will kill me and it doesn't

:00:01.:00:02.

make a blind bit of difference. In an exclusive report for this

:00:03.:00:06.

programme we speak to some of the people struggling

:00:07.:00:08.

with the disorder and examine five weeks ahead of

:00:09.:00:11.

the General Election, voters go to the polls in local

:00:12.:00:32.

and mayoral elections in England, Shops can stop accepting old style

:00:33.:00:35.

fivers in less than 48 hours - but 150 million reman

:00:36.:00:40.

in circulation. Three of the big four supermarkets

:00:41.:00:49.

have cut the price of petrol and diesel on forecourts but the RAC

:00:50.:00:54.

says fuel should be even cheaper. I will have more on that shortly.

:00:55.:00:58.

In Sport - too late for United in the Premier League

:00:59.:01:00.

Instead he's set his sights on winning the Europa League -

:01:01.:01:04.

Also this morning, the story of eight-year-old Marina

:01:05.:01:10.

and her friendship with police dog in training - Tag.

:01:11.:01:12.

Good morning, we have a north-south divide in the weather today, in the

:01:13.:01:26.

north it will be sunny and warm once again and in the South more clout

:01:27.:01:30.

and one or two showers but if you are on the east coast it will feel

:01:31.:01:33.

chilly with an onshore breeze. I will have more in 15 minutes.

:01:34.:01:36.

Carol, thank you. There's been a sharp rise

:01:37.:01:39.

in the number of men being treated for eating disorders

:01:40.:01:43.

like for anorexia and bulimia, according to a BBC

:01:44.:01:45.

Breakfast investigation. Figures obtained by this programme

:01:46.:01:47.

show the number of men and boys receiving out-patent treatment

:01:48.:01:49.

in England is rising at double the rate of female patients -

:01:50.:01:52.

although women still account Simon bakes every day,

:01:53.:01:54.

but gives everything he makes to friends,

:01:55.:02:11.

family and homeless charities. I get some kind of strange

:02:12.:02:14.

satisfaction out of seeing people enjoy the things that I don't feel

:02:15.:02:18.

able to enjoy myself. Simon has been anorexic

:02:19.:02:22.

for nearly two years. Logically I know that

:02:23.:02:26.

I need to eat to live, otherwise at the end of the day this

:02:27.:02:28.

will kill me and it doesn't make a blind bit of difference

:02:29.:02:32.

because every time I try and eat I've always had an unhealthy

:02:33.:02:35.

relationship with food. I was really quite big,

:02:36.:02:48.

about 23 or 24 stone. I guess it had a deep

:02:49.:02:51.

psychological effect. I will do everything I can

:02:52.:02:58.

to reverse the effect of whatever I tend to walk as far as my body

:02:59.:03:02.

will allow me to walk. The number of male patients

:03:03.:03:10.

being treated for eating disorders across England has risen

:03:11.:03:14.

by more than a quarter over That's more than double

:03:15.:03:16.

the rise of female patients. The number of boys being treated

:03:17.:03:23.

has gone up by a third Despite the increase,

:03:24.:03:25.

the total number of male patients treated last year,

:03:26.:03:29.

about 1,200, still represents only 8% of the total and these

:03:30.:03:31.

figures don't necessarily mean that more men have eating disorders,

:03:32.:03:36.

it could be that the stigma is lifting and that

:03:37.:03:40.

more are seeking help. Boys and men are realising that this

:03:41.:03:46.

is an illness and not a choice. This doctor is based

:03:47.:03:54.

at the Julian Hospital in Norwich and treats under-18s

:03:55.:03:58.

with eating disorders. She's seeing more boys than ever

:03:59.:04:02.

walk through her door. With boys I see a lot

:04:03.:04:05.

of obsession around shape. Bulking yourself and muscle mass

:04:06.:04:09.

and what does it mean to be a man? NHS England says more support

:04:10.:04:15.

like the type offered To view have got in touch with your

:04:16.:04:29.

own experiences. Sam Thomas, who was a former eating disorder sufferer,

:04:30.:04:38.

founded his own charity for men after suffering with bulimia.

:04:39.:04:41.

The polls are now open for local elections in England,

:04:42.:04:43.

4,851 council seats will be decided, and six English regions

:04:44.:04:48.

will elect new mayors, as Tom Symonds reports.

:04:49.:04:50.

It's back to the polling booths in England,

:04:51.:04:52.

These being local elections, not all council seats are up for grabs.

:04:53.:05:02.

In England the focus will be on 34 mainly county councils.

:05:03.:05:05.

Eight mayoral elections will take place,

:05:06.:05:07.

six for new posts in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, Greater

:05:08.:05:09.

Manchester, Liverpool City, Tees Valley, the West Midlands

:05:10.:05:11.

All of Scotland's 32 councils and 22 in Wales are

:05:12.:05:17.

The BBC won't report the general election campaign

:05:18.:05:20.

The first results are expected after 2am.

:05:21.:05:30.

British voters will be back in the polling booths in five weeks'

:05:31.:05:33.

If you have filled up your car in the last couple of days you might

:05:34.:05:49.

have noticed a drop in the prices at the pumps. What is happening, Steph?

:05:50.:05:57.

There is a price war going on at the supermarkets, that's a way to bring

:05:58.:05:59.

customers in bringing down fuel costs, in the hope they will spend

:06:00.:06:04.

money in the shop too. Also the price of oil has been falling a bit

:06:05.:06:09.

recently. And also the value of the pound has been going up a little

:06:10.:06:14.

bit. Not as much as it was last year. If you look at the figures it

:06:15.:06:18.

was something like ?1.08 for a litre of petrol last year. And now it's

:06:19.:06:25.

about ?1.18 on average, so it's gone up a fair bit. What the supermarkets

:06:26.:06:29.

are doing today and this week is bringing petrol down by 1p per litre

:06:30.:06:36.

and diesel down by 2p per litre. If you think how much is that going to

:06:37.:06:41.

be when I fill up the car? That would save ?1.10 filling up with the

:06:42.:06:49.

average tank of diesel. And 55p on petrol. It's the thing most people

:06:50.:06:52.

talk to me when I'm out and about. When I talk to people in different

:06:53.:06:55.

companies about what they really feel, is the cost of fuel. If you

:06:56.:07:00.

use your car all the time you notice a difference if during the week you

:07:01.:07:04.

pay ?10 more or less on your fuel. It is something that bothers people.

:07:05.:07:07.

Another thing that bothers people is regional differences. Whenever I say

:07:08.:07:13.

an average figure I get a million messages from people saying it's

:07:14.:07:16.

expensive here, it is cheaper here. Obviously these are average figures

:07:17.:07:20.

and there are big differences based on market forces in different areas

:07:21.:07:26.

where there is more competition for fuel and how much it costs to

:07:27.:07:29.

transport fuel around can make a difference in price.

:07:30.:07:33.

Is the time of year when the supermarkets, with figures. We have

:07:34.:07:36.

Morrisons this morning. Morrisons have good figures, their

:07:37.:07:39.

share price has gone up to reflect that. They have said this morning

:07:40.:07:43.

that their sales, like-for-like sales, when you look at stores that

:07:44.:07:46.

have been open for more than a year, they have gone up by 3.4% in the

:07:47.:07:52.

last quarter, 13 weeks until the end of April, better than what people

:07:53.:07:57.

expected, because as I was saying, yesterday I interviewed the boss of

:07:58.:08:00.

Sainsbury's and we talked about the competition in supermarkets as a

:08:01.:08:04.

challenging environment and there have been price was bringing the

:08:05.:08:07.

cost of food down because of the pressures of the pound, the value of

:08:08.:08:10.

the pound and the cost of oil has meant food prices are starting to

:08:11.:08:14.

cost more and that is obviously putting a lot of pressure on

:08:15.:08:18.

families. Interesting results from Morrisons and they will be pleased

:08:19.:08:21.

because the share price has gone up. Thank you.

:08:22.:08:23.

The two final candidates in the French presidential election

:08:24.:08:25.

have taken part in a heated head-to-head debate

:08:26.:08:27.

Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron traded insults, with both candidates

:08:28.:08:31.

Our Europe reporter Gavin Lee is in Paris.

:08:32.:08:38.

Gavin, what impact will the debate have on Sunday's vote?

:08:39.:08:43.

What a wonderful backdrop you have. We said it was a heated debate, that

:08:44.:08:50.

doesn't quite cover it, it was a free for all really.

:08:51.:08:53.

I think you're absolutely right, as people wake up this morning and try

:08:54.:08:58.

and work out who came out on top, there was a poll that was done

:08:59.:09:02.

straight afterwards suggesting 20 million people watched this last

:09:03.:09:05.

night and 60% of them feel Emmanuel Macron came out on top. They spoke

:09:06.:09:10.

for two hours, it was quite unbelievable because unlike British

:09:11.:09:13.

TV debates there was a tense to interrupt by the presenters but it

:09:14.:09:17.

was mainly both Macron and Le Pen talking to each other, very

:09:18.:09:22.

different visions. We got a very emotionally charged interview, some

:09:23.:09:24.

of the papers this morning talking about the right-wing Le Pen, the

:09:25.:09:28.

emotional assassin, going for the emotional tactics and unravelling

:09:29.:09:32.

her arrival by getting him wound up. It didn't work because he has been

:09:33.:09:39.

described as mystical because he deliberately tried to sit back, some

:09:40.:09:44.

accused him of being patronising. In the two hours, perhaps the quote of

:09:45.:09:48.

the day when Marine Le Pen described Emmanuel Macron as a global savage,

:09:49.:09:52.

somebody who would be responsible for the downfall of France, in reply

:09:53.:09:57.

he said she was the high priestess of fear. We have two days after

:09:58.:10:01.

this, two more full days of campaigning, he's on top by about 20

:10:02.:10:05.

percentage points and is heading south before his campaigning today

:10:06.:10:08.

and Marine Le Pen is heading north and we will be with her tomorrow on

:10:09.:10:12.

the final day. Thank you, Gavin. We will speak to you later.

:10:13.:10:15.

The number of people using the social networking

:10:16.:10:17.

site Facebook has risen to nearly two billion.

:10:18.:10:19.

The US tech giant has also announced a 76% rise in profits for the first

:10:20.:10:23.

three months of the year but warned growth from advertising

:10:24.:10:25.

Last night the Facebook-owned messaging service WhatsApp stopped

:10:26.:10:28.

For the first time, scientists have started counting

:10:29.:10:34.

endangered birds from space - using high resolution

:10:35.:10:36.

Numbers of the Northern Royal albatross - one

:10:37.:10:40.

of the largest of the species - have previously been hard to assess,

:10:41.:10:46.

as it only nests on a small group of remote and rocky islands east

:10:47.:10:49.

Here's our science Correspondent Rebecca Morelle.

:10:50.:10:55.

They're the world's largest flying birds,

:10:56.:10:58.

but despite being so easy to spot, counting albatrosses is tricky.

:10:59.:11:07.

Most of the sea birds nest on islands, which

:11:08.:11:09.

are extremely remote and difficult to access, but now

:11:10.:11:11.

there's a new way to get a tally of the birds - from space.

:11:12.:11:14.

Scientists are using a powerful US satellite to zoom in on places

:11:15.:11:17.

like the Chatham Islands in the South Pacific.

:11:18.:11:23.

Ultra high-res images can map areas down to 30 centimetres, which means

:11:24.:11:26.

each albatross appears as a white dot and researchers

:11:27.:11:29.

It means we finally have a number for this species,

:11:30.:11:33.

Scientists were unsure how many birds there were but the satellite

:11:34.:11:39.

It's less than conservationists hoped but many albatross

:11:40.:11:45.

They're facing serious threats, from the plastics polluting our

:11:46.:11:53.

Researchers say these counts from space are essential.

:11:54.:12:00.

Knowing how many albatrosses there are now will help us to track

:12:01.:12:03.

The 29th annual Sunday Times Rich List is out this weekend,

:12:04.:12:17.

and it might not come as a surprise to hear who has

:12:18.:12:20.

been named the richest musician under 30.

:12:21.:12:21.

reached ?125 million, up 50% in the last year alone.

:12:22.:12:38.

She's the only female solo artist to make the list, which is topped

:12:39.:12:41.

It is eight to 12am. You're watching Breakfast on BBC News and we are

:12:42.:12:47.

looking at eating disorders this morning.

:12:48.:12:50.

After an investigation for this programme found that more men

:12:51.:12:52.

and boys are seeking treatment for them.

:12:53.:12:54.

The number of males receiving outpatient treatment for conditions

:12:55.:12:56.

like anorexia and bulimia in England has increased by 27% over

:12:57.:12:59.

the last three years - compared to 13% for women.

:13:00.:13:01.

We're joined now by Sam Thomas, who founded charity

:13:02.:13:03.

Men Get Eating Disorders Too after his own experiences

:13:04.:13:05.

Good morning, thank you for coming in to talk about this. I know it

:13:06.:13:17.

can't be easy to talk about what has obviously been a really distressing

:13:18.:13:21.

time in your life. Can you just explain to us all what happened to

:13:22.:13:25.

you and how it started? My experience began when I was 13 which

:13:26.:13:30.

might seem very young but not unusual for the sort of issues we

:13:31.:13:33.

are talking about today like eating disorders and general mental health.

:13:34.:13:37.

For me it wasn't anything to do with body image or trying to look good,

:13:38.:13:42.

or slimmed down or anything like that, it was literally not being

:13:43.:13:46.

able to cope for me. It was all kind of linked to bullying at school and

:13:47.:13:51.

that was just my way of having a coping mechanism to deal with those

:13:52.:13:55.

issues. Is that because an eating disorder is sometimes about control?

:13:56.:14:00.

Taking control of something you can control. I get asked about that

:14:01.:14:04.

quite a bit and it's about a sense of control rather than actually

:14:05.:14:06.

being in control because if you think about it you are going to be

:14:07.:14:11.

quite erratic and chaotic in that way and that's the nature of eating

:14:12.:14:14.

disorders so it's not necessarily about being in control. But it's a

:14:15.:14:19.

sense of control. Sam, so what happened? You change your eating,

:14:20.:14:27.

you are doing different things. Is anybody aware this is going on? This

:14:28.:14:32.

is interesting because I had bulimia and the nature of bulimia is

:14:33.:14:36.

secretive and people don't necessarily notice at all. I don't

:14:37.:14:40.

think my mother had any suspicion of anything really. I think she

:14:41.:14:47.

probably just thought I was a hungry teenager. If food went missing it

:14:48.:14:52.

wasn't anything unusual at that age. How bad did it get for you? It did

:14:53.:14:57.

get very bad. Unfortunately I wasn't able to get the help I needed.

:14:58.:15:02.

Eventually I was able to find different sources of support, a

:15:03.:15:07.

network of support, but for me it did get really bad, definitely. What

:15:08.:15:15.

I have to describe of an eating disorder is its like a full-time job

:15:16.:15:18.

with overtime because it takes over everything, literally. There is no

:15:19.:15:22.

escape and as they always. You were at school at this time, how did you

:15:23.:15:27.

get through the day? I didn't, that was the problem. For me are used to

:15:28.:15:31.

run out of lessons and avoid lessons completely and hide in the boys'

:15:32.:15:34.

toilets where I could binge and purge. Whatever happened during the

:15:35.:15:40.

school day, whether it was bullying or pressures that I might be

:15:41.:15:45.

experiencing at that time. Obviously being a teenager. That was just my

:15:46.:15:49.

way to cope. One of the things you will know all about is the stigma

:15:50.:15:55.

attached to eating disorders. Dikili for men, maybe. Lots of people have

:15:56.:15:59.

got in touch this morning. This one is an anonymous e-mail --

:16:00.:16:02.

particularly for men. I have had bulimia since I was in my

:16:03.:16:06.

20s, it has taken its toll on my body including ruining my teeth

:16:07.:16:09.

which I have had to spend thousands on. I feel that one day I will only

:16:10.:16:14.

be able to eat period food. He says I have never sought help as I find

:16:15.:16:17.

it far too embarrassing to talk to anyone about it. My wife has no idea

:16:18.:16:22.

how bad it's been over the years. That is someone who is 58 years old

:16:23.:16:27.

who has been living with this and not been able to for whatever

:16:28.:16:35.

reason, seek help. And unfortunately it is not the only case. It is

:16:36.:16:40.

something I hear about almost on a daily basis on e-mail and support

:16:41.:16:45.

groups. That is not unusual. For a lot of particularly older men, in

:16:46.:16:49.

relation to the guy you mentioned, does mean that sometimes it takes a

:16:50.:16:52.

much older age to be able to recognise issues, because I guessed

:16:53.:16:55.

ten years ago, 15 years ago, we probably wouldn't be having this

:16:56.:16:59.

chat on the sofa, you know what I mean? I think it is still an issue

:17:00.:17:02.

that I think people are becoming increasingly aware of. Can I just

:17:03.:17:08.

asked, how are you now? I am fine now. My eating disorder was over ten

:17:09.:17:13.

years ago, when I was a teenager. So my experience is quite historic in

:17:14.:17:18.

that respect. But obviously I am always aware of the issues, because

:17:19.:17:21.

of course I work with people every day. So I guess in some ways that is

:17:22.:17:25.

a bit of earning Kirchmann or reinforcement if you want to call it

:17:26.:17:30.

that. Good to see morning, thank you very much.

:17:31.:17:33.

If you'd like details for organisations offering

:17:34.:17:35.

information and support about eating disorders,

:17:36.:17:36.

you can call or visit the BBC Actionline using the

:17:37.:17:39.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:17:40.:17:42.

A BBC Breakfast investigation has found a stark rise in the number

:17:43.:17:48.

of men seeking treatment for eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia.

:17:49.:17:54.

Voters head to the polls in parts of England,

:17:55.:17:56.

Wales and Scotland today in local elections to decide nearly 5,000

:17:57.:17:59.

council seats and six new "metro mayors".

:18:00.:18:10.

Let's have a look and see what the weather is up to today. This is the

:18:11.:18:16.

shot in London this morning. A bit murky. Let's have a look outside in

:18:17.:18:22.

Salford, looking a bit more sunny, perhaps clearer skies but one person

:18:23.:18:25.

who can tell us what it will actually be like the rest of the day

:18:26.:18:31.

and the days it is Carol. Good morning, both and to you as Lamacq.

:18:32.:18:35.

For some of us it is a gorgeous start of the day, if you like it

:18:36.:18:38.

sunny and dry. This is one of our Weather Watchers pictures taken in

:18:39.:18:41.

Stornoway, just unbroken blue sky. We will hang onto that for much of

:18:42.:18:47.

the day. In North Yorkshire again a beautiful start to the day, some

:18:48.:18:50.

sunshine, and then as we come into Wakefield, a bit more cloud around.

:18:51.:18:56.

Similarly so in Doncaster, a bit more cloud around. Across northern

:18:57.:18:59.

England, you will find it will improve through the course of the

:19:00.:19:02.

day if you currently have cloud, it will melt away and you will join

:19:03.:19:06.

Scotland and Northern Ireland with the blue skies. Even as we push

:19:07.:19:09.

further south, watch other cloud has been eroded. The North Midlands,

:19:10.:19:17.

rails, -- Wales and one or two showers. We have an onshore breeze

:19:18.:19:21.

dummies coast of England and Scotland. If you are on the

:19:22.:19:25.

coastline itself you will feel cold. Come inland, the temperature will

:19:26.:19:28.

quite quickly rise as it is doing at the moment. North-west Highlands

:19:29.:19:31.

once again today could see just over 20 Celsius. For Northern Ireland,

:19:32.:19:36.

another lovely day for you if you like it dry and sunny and warm. For

:19:37.:19:40.

Wales, similar story, the cloud melting away, sunny spells coming

:19:41.:19:43.

through though at times you will see areas of cloud as you will across

:19:44.:19:48.

south-west England. One or two breaks developing. The cloud will be

:19:49.:19:52.

thick enough of the odd shower as we move across southern counties.

:19:53.:19:55.

Having said that, the showers will be hit and miss and many of us will

:19:56.:20:00.

miss them all together. Through the evening and overnight, we still have

:20:01.:20:03.

this onshore breeze, gusty winds across the Pennines. And a fair bit

:20:04.:20:09.

of cloud around. You can say whether cloud has broken the temperature

:20:10.:20:13.

will be lowest for stock a range roughly five to eight in towns and

:20:14.:20:16.

cities but below freezing where we have got the clear skies. Cold

:20:17.:20:21.

enough for a touch of frost. That means tomorrow starting off once

:20:22.:20:24.

again on a sunny note. Still a lot of cloud in the south and this

:20:25.:20:30.

onshore brews making it feel cold along eastern areas. Temperatures

:20:31.:20:33.

tomorrow down a touch in the north. We are looking at highs of 40 now 15

:20:34.:20:37.

as we come further south. As we move from Friday into Saturday, as we see

:20:38.:20:43.

the France approach, some showers across south-west England. For

:20:44.:20:47.

Saturday, that front is draped across the south-west, the Channel

:20:48.:20:50.

Islands and parts of southern England bringing in some rain. The

:20:51.:20:53.

timing and placement of this could change. North of that it is dry,

:20:54.:20:57.

brighter and some sunshine, articulately in the far north. That

:20:58.:21:03.

clears away and then on Sunday we have a dry day, mostly dry, a bit

:21:04.:21:06.

more cloud around, more in the north and we have seen in the course of

:21:07.:21:09.

this week. Temperatures down a touch as well. The wind changes direction.

:21:10.:21:14.

Along the East coast at Worcester Wycherley but not as cold. That will

:21:15.:21:18.

ease as we go through next week. Highs up to 17 in London. How useful

:21:19.:21:32.

is this? That is a lovely good old-fashioned ?5 note. At the moment

:21:33.:21:35.

you can still take that to a shop and buy things with it. But not for

:21:36.:21:39.

much longer. Because what you really want is one of these. That is the

:21:40.:21:44.

new one that came out back in September. According to the Bank of

:21:45.:21:49.

England, the old one, there are 150 million of them left that we now

:21:50.:21:50.

have to move on from the fees. We're joined now by Philip Mussell

:21:51.:21:56.

from Coin News magazine. The old banknote, how long have we

:21:57.:22:04.

got to use it? 24 hours, just over, 36 hours. Midnight on Friday night.

:22:05.:22:12.

That is correct was the after that the shopkeepers will say no.

:22:13.:22:17.

Theoretically, yes, they should say no. What we are saying is that

:22:18.:22:21.

shopkeepers can use them at their discretion, because the banks will

:22:22.:22:25.

always take them, the Bank of England will always take them. Banks

:22:26.:22:28.

say they will take them but shopkeepers don't have to. The Bank

:22:29.:22:32.

of England always will. Because they are promises to pay on demand there

:22:33.:22:38.

are the some of whatever it is. As a consequence, the Bank of England is

:22:39.:22:41.

obliged for the rest of time to take that note back. The individual banks

:22:42.:22:44.

might do so, they are under no obligation to but they probably

:22:45.:22:48.

will. So on a practical note, if you have old-style fivers in your

:22:49.:22:53.

pocket, life will get a bit tricky after Saturday morning. Absolutely,

:22:54.:22:57.

a lot of shopkeepers out there don't even realise it is being

:22:58.:22:59.

demilitarised, which is the reason we are talking about it today I

:23:00.:23:03.

think. It doesn't seem that long since that new smaller fiver came

:23:04.:23:15.

in. September. Since like a very fast turnaround. It has been. Not

:23:16.:23:17.

quite sure why that is. Normally there is a bit more of a gap. But I

:23:18.:23:21.

think because we have 24 hour news, Twitter, Facebook and all the rest

:23:22.:23:24.

of it, I think the Bank of England expects the message to get out there

:23:25.:23:28.

quicker. It is interesting, we spoke to quite a few shopkeepers, market

:23:29.:23:31.

stallholders and people like that, most were unaware of the deadline. I

:23:32.:23:36.

know, it is a problem, and that is why we are doing things like this,

:23:37.:23:39.

it is fantastic because it gets the message out there. Most people if

:23:40.:23:43.

you are waiting in a supermarket queue, and people are spending less

:23:44.:23:46.

than a tenner, very often they just use contactless cards now. Sadly, I

:23:47.:23:53.

am not going to comment on that, I run a magazine on coins, I don't

:23:54.:23:57.

want people to use contactless! Do you think there is a bit of a threat

:23:58.:24:02.

to paper money? Inevitably people will go over the contactless cards

:24:03.:24:06.

and mobile phones. Technology is wonderful but there was something

:24:07.:24:09.

about cash, something about holding notes and coins that is very

:24:10.:24:15.

important. On that note, can we get a close-up? This is a picture of ?1

:24:16.:24:20.

notes over the years. Just talk was through, what are we looking at? The

:24:21.:24:26.

?1 note was introduced way back in 1797 winner was a lack of gold

:24:27.:24:30.

because of the Napoleonic Wars. Over the years it has evolved into the

:24:31.:24:34.

pound note that many of us will remember. That design was introduced

:24:35.:24:40.

in 1928, this one is from the 1950s. During the war about 1940 because

:24:41.:24:42.

they were worried about forgeries, they change the colour. This one was

:24:43.:24:48.

1940, and then in 48 they went back to this one, and then in 1960 the

:24:49.:24:53.

introduced that one. That was the one that came in during the

:24:54.:24:56.

decimalisation era, and the 1978, the one most of us will remember,

:24:57.:25:00.

and then of course in 83 we have a pound coin. You notice they are all

:25:01.:25:04.

getting smaller. Yes, notes have been getting smaller over the years,

:25:05.:25:09.

the old white fivers and the white ?10 notes are very big. People just

:25:10.:25:14.

want smaller notes. And the technology has changed significantly

:25:15.:25:19.

over the years. Without a shadow of the doubt. The technology,

:25:20.:25:24.

particularly the anti-counterfeiting technology has got to the point

:25:25.:25:29.

where now we are able to make notes with polymer, clear plastic windows,

:25:30.:25:33.

to make forging very difficult. So you are a fan of the plastic notes?

:25:34.:25:38.

To a certain extent, I don't like the way when you crease it at the.

:25:39.:25:43.

Folded in two like that anywhere be to get that crease out. You have now

:25:44.:25:47.

ruined that one, just as well it wasn't a collectable one. It is not

:25:48.:25:52.

ruined, though is it? From a collector's point of view. You can

:25:53.:25:57.

still spend it of course. If people are thinking they might keep a

:25:58.:26:03.

fiver, whenever would a fiver become worth more than a fiver? They are

:26:04.:26:08.

worth more now, certain ones. There are five is out there were ?50,000.

:26:09.:26:14.

There was a micro artist, a guy called Graham Short, had actually

:26:15.:26:16.

managed to put some little tiny pictures of Jane Austen by the Big

:26:17.:26:22.

Ben tower. Because he is such a famous artist, if you find one of

:26:23.:26:26.

those, that is worth about ?50,000. It is on the note but you can't see

:26:27.:26:30.

it in daylight, you have to look at it under a magnifying light. Not

:26:31.:26:35.

that one, it is on the new ones. They are worth quite a lot. But

:26:36.:26:38.

collectors want notes that have certain serial numbers. Double A01

:26:39.:26:44.

followed by a low series of numbers, that is what the collectors want.

:26:45.:26:47.

That is what you are looking out for. I have checked it! But they

:26:48.:26:56.

have to be in pristine condition. That is what collectors are after.

:26:57.:26:59.

Really interesting to talk to you, thank you very much. Time to get the

:27:00.:27:02.

news, Hello, this is Breakfast

:27:03.:30:21.

with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent. There's been a sharp rise

:30:22.:30:33.

in the number of men being treated for eating disorders

:30:34.:30:36.

like for anorexia and bulimia, according to a BBC

:30:37.:30:38.

Breakfast investigation. Figures obtained by this programme

:30:39.:30:41.

showed the number of males receiving outpatient treatment in England

:30:42.:30:44.

is rising at double the rate of female patients -

:30:45.:30:49.

although women still account The polls have opened for today's

:30:50.:30:51.

local and mayoral elections. Seats on 88 councils will be

:30:52.:30:55.

decided, including all those Voters in England will select

:30:56.:30:59.

new members of 32 councils and in six English regions

:31:00.:31:03.

Metro Mayors will be The first results are expected in

:31:04.:31:06.

the early hours of tomorrow morning. The two final candidates

:31:07.:31:14.

in the French presidential election have taken part

:31:15.:31:16.

in a heated head-to-head debate. Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron

:31:17.:31:18.

traded insults while debating Both candidates are targeting

:31:19.:31:20.

undecided voters with nearly a fifth of people reportedly yet to make

:31:21.:31:27.

up their mind ahead Researchers have developed a blood

:31:28.:31:29.

test which could prevent thousands of men with advanced prostate cancer

:31:30.:31:35.

from undergoing The technique, which costs

:31:36.:31:37.

less than ?50 a time, will help doctors tell

:31:38.:31:41.

whether patients will respond to the standard drugs used

:31:42.:31:45.

to fight the disease. The number of people

:31:46.:31:50.

using the social networking site Facebook has risen

:31:51.:31:52.

to nearly two billion. The US tech giant has also announced

:31:53.:31:54.

a 76% rise in profits for the first three months of the year but warned

:31:55.:31:58.

growth from advertising Last night the Facebook-owned

:31:59.:32:00.

messaging service WhatsApp stopped A diver has been rescued

:32:01.:32:04.

after spending almost ten hours in the waters off

:32:05.:32:12.

Orkney in Scotland. An extensive search involving

:32:13.:32:16.

lifeboats and rescue helicopters was launched after a boat

:32:17.:32:24.

reported a missing The man was reported to be conscious

:32:25.:32:26.

and "in a reasonable condition" when he was found by a passing yacht

:32:27.:32:30.

in the early hours and taken Brad Pitt has revealed he has given

:32:31.:32:34.

up drinking and started therapy to help him get through his divorce

:32:35.:32:38.

from Angelina Jolie. In his first interview

:32:39.:32:40.

since they separated, he admitted to GQ Style that he'd

:32:41.:32:42.

drunk heavily in the past, He also confirmed that he and

:32:43.:32:45.

Angelina are working together to resolve their issues

:32:46.:32:50.

"amicably and privately". Today is 4th May, but for fans

:32:51.:32:59.

of a certain sci-fi And if you've ever fancied yourself

:33:00.:33:02.

as a budding Han Solo or Princess Leia then there's a bar

:33:03.:33:11.

for you in a galaxy far, far away - At The Scum And Villainy Cantina,

:33:12.:33:15.

people dress up as their favourite characters in a pub inspired

:33:16.:33:20.

by the bar that featured I don't think they are all Star Wars

:33:21.:33:33.

characters, definitely a bit of Star Trek in there.

:33:34.:33:35.

Must be warm inside those suits. Let's see what is coming up. I have

:33:36.:33:52.

missed you so much! Have you missed me?

:33:53.:33:54.

A remarkable pair who've formed a remarkable bond.

:33:55.:33:56.

We'll find out how a trainee police puppy called Tag has made a huge

:33:57.:33:59.

impact on eight-year-old Marina's life.

:34:00.:34:00.

Her first thriller The Girl On The Train was a huge hit on both

:34:01.:34:03.

sides of the Atlantic, now her new novel centres on a murky

:34:04.:34:07.

river in Northern England which claims the lives

:34:08.:34:09.

Paula Hawkins will join us on the sofa.

:34:10.:34:13.

It can contribute to diabetes, dementia and some types of cancer,

:34:14.:34:16.

but can stress sometimes be good for you?

:34:17.:34:21.

Presenter Fiona Phillips has been putting the idea to the test

:34:22.:34:23.

in a unique TV experiment - she'll tell us what she found.

:34:24.:34:32.

Maybe we should be asking Manchester United fans whether stress is a good

:34:33.:34:38.

thing?! According to Jose Mourinho, he has

:34:39.:34:41.

given up on the stress of the Premier League. He said, I'm giving

:34:42.:34:48.

up on the Premier League, we are never going to get into the

:34:49.:34:51.

Champions League places, even though they are only one point behind city,

:34:52.:34:58.

in fifth place, so they could. He said, I'm stopping focusing on the

:34:59.:35:01.

Premier League, I am going to go for the Europa League and win that, so

:35:02.:35:05.

three potentially very big matches coming up the Jose Mourinho and

:35:06.:35:08.

Manchester United, and the first of those is tonight.

:35:09.:35:12.

Jose Mourinho says the only way to Champions League football next

:35:13.:35:15.

United take on Celta Vigo in Spain tonight, boosted by the potential

:35:16.:35:19.

return of several injured players - Paul Pogba, Juan Mata,

:35:20.:35:22.

Chris Smalling and Phil Jones all have a chance of starting

:35:23.:35:24.

the match, which takes on new significance.

:35:25.:35:29.

I think it would be a good achievement with many problems we

:35:30.:35:37.

have and would allow us to be back to the Champions League next season.

:35:38.:35:43.

So we have to try, that is what we are going to do and honestly the

:35:44.:35:48.

Europa League becomes for us now more important.

:35:49.:35:53.

Manchester City's women went through last season unbeaten,

:35:54.:35:55.

and they came from behind to draw 1-1 with Birmingham in the WSL

:35:56.:35:58.

It was a dress rehearsal for next weekend's FA Cup final,

:35:59.:36:02.

and City fell behind to Emily Westwood's header.

:36:03.:36:04.

Before England full-back Lucy Bronze scored the equaliser.

:36:05.:36:07.

There were wins too for Chelsea and Bristol City.

:36:08.:36:11.

Garth Crooks of the anti-discrimination organisation

:36:12.:36:14.

Kick It Out wants players in Italy's top flight to boycott

:36:15.:36:17.

matches this weekend, unless a suspension is overturned.

:36:18.:36:19.

The former Portsmouth striker Sully Muntari was playing

:36:20.:36:22.

for Pescara against Cagliari when he was booked for dissent,

:36:23.:36:26.

after complaining to the referee about racist abuse from the crowd.

:36:27.:36:29.

He was booked again after walking off the pitch

:36:30.:36:32.

I'm calling on players in Italy to make it absolutely clear to the

:36:33.:36:47.

Federation in Italy that their position is unacceptable and if the

:36:48.:36:51.

decision is not reversed then they withdraw their services until it is.

:36:52.:36:55.

The Professional Footballers' Association say the number

:36:56.:36:56.

of players seeking help for mental health problems is soaring.

:36:57.:36:59.

Everton winger Aaron Lennon is currently receiving treatment

:37:00.:37:01.

for a stress-related illness, after being detained under

:37:02.:37:03.

Last year, 62 current and 98 former players requested

:37:04.:37:07.

support from the PFA player welfare department.

:37:08.:37:13.

Ilie Nastase has called Wimbledon's organisers "small-minded"

:37:14.:37:16.

after they said he wouldn't be invited into the royal box

:37:17.:37:19.

Nastase was Romania's captain for their Fed Cup match

:37:20.:37:24.

against Great Britain last month, but he was ejected after swearing

:37:25.:37:27.

He's been provisionally suspended by the International Tennis Federation.

:37:28.:37:34.

The Wimbledon organisers have also confirmed that former champion

:37:35.:37:37.

Maria Sharapova has yet to apply for a wildcard.

:37:38.:37:39.

After returning from her doping ban, she's well down the rankings

:37:40.:37:43.

and could be reliant on help from the powers that be

:37:44.:37:45.

if she doesn't perform well in her next couple of tournaments.

:37:46.:37:51.

We are waiting to hear whether she get a wild card into the event if

:37:52.:37:56.

she needs it, but you were talking to Andy Murray, was it yesterday?

:37:57.:38:02.

Day before, he was interesting about it, he has obviously thought about

:38:03.:38:05.

it in some detail and reading between the lines, what he was

:38:06.:38:08.

saying was that some tournaments might need Maria Sharapova because

:38:09.:38:12.

of the publicity she brings but bigger tournaments might simply not

:38:13.:38:15.

want her. They don't have Serena either this

:38:16.:38:19.

year because she is away pregnant. We will have to wait and see. And

:38:20.:38:24.

Andy said that Maria Sharapova could get that under her own steam anyway

:38:25.:38:28.

if she comes back and plays well. Who knows? Thank you.

:38:29.:38:33.

With just three days to go until the vote opens,

:38:34.:38:35.

French voters had their last chance to see both Presidential

:38:36.:38:38.

candidates side-by-side last night during a TV debate.

:38:39.:38:43.

It's got very feisty, I can tell you.

:38:44.:38:46.

The latest polls suggest that nearly a fifth of voters have yet

:38:47.:38:49.

Our Europe reporter Gavin Lee is in Paris.

:38:50.:38:52.

Gavin, will last night have helped people decide who to go for?

:38:53.:39:00.

20 million people watched the TV debate, incredible audience figures.

:39:01.:39:09.

The one thing that strikes me is, for two weeks pretty solid, the

:39:10.:39:14.

centrist, the man behind the new party, Emmanuel Macron, potentially

:39:15.:39:16.

the youngest president in France, has been steady in the polls, about

:39:17.:39:23.

60%, and Marine le Pen, the far right anti-EU, anti-immigration

:39:24.:39:27.

leader has been about 40%. Last night was all about emotion, it was

:39:28.:39:32.

intense. Looking at some of the papacy, Le Figaro, they talk about

:39:33.:39:38.

Macron holding firm in the face of Marine le Pen, they call it an

:39:39.:39:45.

unedited, brutal debate. Le Parisien, they say in the history of

:39:46.:39:50.

French TV debates it has never been so intense. And then this one

:39:51.:39:58.

perhaps says it all, Liberation, the lower front for Marine le Pen, she

:39:59.:40:03.

attacked and was propagating but ultimately Emmanuel Macron played

:40:04.:40:05.

the card of reason. For me, watching it, in the two out

:40:06.:40:09.

as they spoke, the presenters barely got a look in, they tried to

:40:10.:40:13.

interrupt, they were jousting with each other, she called him someone

:40:14.:40:17.

who would rip up France, a wild savage, she said. He called her the

:40:18.:40:22.

high priestess of fear. Did we learn anything? Ultimately, Emmanuel

:40:23.:40:27.

Macron try to stay cool to show, to those who think that he is perhaps

:40:28.:40:33.

not ready yet, that he could be presidential. Marine le Pen went on

:40:34.:40:36.

the attack. Perhaps it didn't work. They have two more days to convince

:40:37.:40:45.

those remaining voters, because 20% of the population are still saying

:40:46.:40:50.

they will put a vote for neither of the candidates. There is still 48

:40:51.:40:56.

hours and all to play for. Can I just ask, sometimes when those

:40:57.:41:00.

presidential debates get very feisty, as they did, it can engage

:41:01.:41:05.

people more in a debate, in the election process, but sometimes it

:41:06.:41:08.

can switch people. Have you got a sense of what the effect was?

:41:09.:41:13.

It is a really good point. Because the level of people who were perhaps

:41:14.:41:19.

disinterested was quite low, last night 20 million people, a third of

:41:20.:41:22.

the population of France, were watching, which is a big number of

:41:23.:41:27.

people. We got to see them, I think, in a way that, for the past few

:41:28.:41:30.

weeks, we have not seen them, unedited to that degree. It has been

:41:31.:41:35.

careful, controlled, but they were able to have gloves off with each

:41:36.:41:38.

other and show how they would be so maybe a few more people are engaged,

:41:39.:41:42.

and that is why it is interesting now as they go to these areas in the

:41:43.:41:49.

south and north where manager was big, can be eating into his support?

:41:50.:41:55.

It sounds busy on the bridge, what is going on?

:41:56.:41:58.

It is fascinating! We were talking to somebody who just got married,

:41:59.:42:02.

from Brazil, they were going to be our humour newspaper stand but they

:42:03.:42:05.

had to go because they had another wedding shoot to go to. We can see a

:42:06.:42:11.

wedding but in the distance, I am told they got married and hour ago,

:42:12.:42:15.

another couple got engaged in front of me. Some of them are quite shy,

:42:16.:42:22.

but this is the Alexander III bridge, it is romantic, look at that

:42:23.:42:25.

backdrop. Anything could happen in the next

:42:26.:42:26.

half an hour there! Joining us on the sofa

:42:27.:42:29.

is Professor Jocelyn Evans Life goes on, people get married,

:42:30.:42:40.

the city is buzzing! Give us your sense of where we are today after

:42:41.:42:45.

the debate last night? Political debates by definition will be

:42:46.:42:48.

confrontational but the debate last night was striking, so ill tempered

:42:49.:42:53.

and contempt I think is the word to use for both candidates, it was

:42:54.:42:57.

apparent from the beginning. The moment Marine le Pen opened her

:42:58.:43:01.

mouth to discuss what was meant to be as you would address

:43:02.:43:05.

unemployment, she just went for Macron, she went for him as a former

:43:06.:43:09.

banker, as a member of the elite, and she never let up for two and a

:43:10.:43:13.

half hours. Macron defended himself very well, he managed to put a more

:43:14.:43:20.

positive spin on what he wanted to do but France, compared with Marine

:43:21.:43:24.

le Pen, who very rarely spoke about what her programme was, it was about

:43:25.:43:28.

what his programme was and why it is wrong. You could see at times there

:43:29.:43:33.

was a kind of snarling confrontation between the two of them, sitting

:43:34.:43:36.

directly opposite each other, to the point where the people who were

:43:37.:43:39.

meant to be moderating the conversation lost control of it

:43:40.:43:43.

completely. The moderators might as well not have been there.

:43:44.:43:57.

Again, a feature of French presidential debates, the candidates

:43:58.:44:00.

will always try to talk over the moderator to get that last point

:44:01.:44:03.

across. Of the two, you would say Macron looked more slick but did

:44:04.:44:05.

continually repeated many times, madame le Pen, again and again, as

:44:06.:44:08.

if trying to wind her up? The National front in France is a

:44:09.:44:12.

political clan that has been around for 40 years, her father until 2011

:44:13.:44:20.

ran the party, incredibly inflammatory. Marine le Pen has

:44:21.:44:23.

tried to turn that down, the question is whether her party has

:44:24.:44:26.

changed, but she is definitely far more conciliatory. But last night

:44:27.:44:31.

the le Pen DNA came out, she went back to her father's style of

:44:32.:44:35.

extremely aggressive attacks and Macron was goading her. He was

:44:36.:44:40.

making the most of that name, wasn't he? Exactly, the number of times he

:44:41.:44:44.

referred to her as a liar, telling her she was talking nonsense. From

:44:45.:44:46.

someone like Macron who is, at the end of the day, and member of

:44:47.:45:03.

the elite, he has been an economics Minister, somebody far more

:45:04.:45:05.

comfortable in terms of talking about policy, how he would run a

:45:06.:45:08.

Government, even he was rising to the challenge that she was driving

:45:09.:45:10.

down of aggression. When you have a debates like this, which is so

:45:11.:45:13.

aggressive, in a way, so hostile, what does that show in terms of the

:45:14.:45:17.

future? Because one person will be president, is that an indication

:45:18.:45:24.

that the country will be more divided in the future? Whoever wins,

:45:25.:45:28.

and the polls indicate it should be Emmanuel Macron, the country will

:45:29.:45:36.

not suddenly then be united. Clearly le Pen's supporters are absolutely

:45:37.:45:40.

against what Macron stands for, last night when we got to the ideology

:45:41.:45:44.

these are two worldviews that are fundamentally opposed on pretty much

:45:45.:45:48.

every single issue, there is no point of agreement between the two

:45:49.:45:52.

of them, so even if Macron wins it might mobilise more moderate support

:45:53.:45:56.

but will also entrench a divide within the radical right. Within the

:45:57.:46:00.

radical left, who have not said they will vote for Macron, they have not

:46:01.:46:03.

said they will vote for le Pen, because to them both of the

:46:04.:46:08.

candidates are anathema so they would prefer to cast blank votes.

:46:09.:46:11.

Just a bit on the mechanics, when will we know the results? The voting

:46:12.:46:16.

is on Sunday... The results should be known pretty much immediately,

:46:17.:46:21.

polling stations are closing later than they'd use due to allow people

:46:22.:46:24.

to vote but we should be fairly clear on who the winner is by about

:46:25.:46:27.

8pm our time. Good to see you. I vote for Carol with the weather.

:46:28.:46:44.

Good morning. This is Herne Bay, a picture from

:46:45.:46:48.

one of our weatherer watchers. Beautiful blue skies in Cumbria and

:46:49.:46:52.

Stornoway. The north-west of Scotland has some of the highest

:46:53.:46:57.

temperatures in the land, that was yesterday, and it's set to do the

:46:58.:47:01.

same again today. My clicker has just stopped working. But we have a

:47:02.:47:05.

north south divide in the weather. From the morning into the afternoon,

:47:06.:47:10.

some cloud across northern England. That will fade away. The same across

:47:11.:47:19.

Scotland. Northern Ireland, a chilly start. You will hang on to the

:47:20.:47:23.

sunshine from the word go with again almost unbroken blue skies. After a

:47:24.:47:27.

cloudy start in Wales and the north Midlands, the cloud will melt away,

:47:28.:47:31.

leaving some sunshine. At times, there'll be cloud coming and going

:47:32.:47:34.

across Wales and south-west England. Here too, we could see the odd

:47:35.:47:38.

shower. The showers today are going to be fairly hit and miss. You can

:47:39.:47:44.

see all this cloud across southern counties into East Anglia. As we

:47:45.:47:49.

head on through the evening, this keen breeze making it feel cold,

:47:50.:47:55.

especially in the east. Gusty winds by day across the Pennines. Where we

:47:56.:47:59.

have the clearer skies, that's where the lowest temperatures will be. In

:48:00.:48:04.

towns and cities, five to eight. In the countryside, some below freezing

:48:05.:48:08.

so there'll be a touch of frost around. We start with a lot of

:48:09.:48:13.

sunshine where we have had clear skies in the evening times. The keen

:48:14.:48:18.

north-easterly wind, so it will feel cold along the East Coast. Inland,

:48:19.:48:22.

it's not as cold. In the north, we have seen highs of 19 and 20, but

:48:23.:48:27.

it's not going to be that warm. Friday evening, some showers

:48:28.:48:33.

approach the south-west. We'll have some rain across south-west England

:48:34.:48:36.

we think and the Channel Islands and across some southern counties during

:48:37.:48:40.

the course of Saturday. The positioning and timing of that could

:48:41.:48:43.

change. Further north, variable amounts of cloud and sunshine.

:48:44.:48:47.

Through the evening, into Sunday, the rain pushes off into the near

:48:48.:48:53.

continent. The isobars swing around. Still feeling cool down this East

:48:54.:48:57.

Coast but not as much cloud. It's not an on shore wind this time.

:48:58.:49:02.

We'll see again quite a bit of sunshine for some, quite a bit of

:49:03.:49:06.

cloud for others. It's really mixed fortunes. Temperatures by then well

:49:07.:49:11.

down in the north and they're starting to climb in the south. As

:49:12.:49:15.

we go into the new week, if you are fed up of the cold feel in the east,

:49:16.:49:20.

as the wind changes direction, we'll lose the nagging wind, it won't feel

:49:21.:49:24.

so cold. Temperatures he come down where they've been so high in north

:49:25.:49:29.

so it's not going to feel so warm. Winners and losers in every

:49:30.:49:31.

scenario, Charlie and Sal. It's about an eight-year-old

:49:32.:49:37.

girl and her friendship When Marina was born,

:49:38.:49:39.

her arms and legs had In recent months, she's struck

:49:40.:49:43.

up a firm friendship With lessons finished for another

:49:44.:49:47.

day, eight-year-old Marina I did loads of art

:49:48.:49:58.

today in the afternoon. He hears her coming

:49:59.:50:06.

and rushes to meet her. Tag is an eight-month-old trainee

:50:07.:50:13.

police dog who, for the next year, But the pair have already

:50:14.:50:22.

developed a remarkable bond. The focus they've got

:50:23.:50:33.

is always on each other. They're always looking to each other

:50:34.:50:42.

to see where the other one is and what the other one's doing

:50:43.:50:45.

and that's the connection they've got and I just think it's

:50:46.:50:48.

wonderful to see it. It's been there from the very first

:50:49.:50:51.

time that I saw them and it's He instinctively has an ability

:50:52.:50:54.

to know that he has got to behave himself in certain situations

:50:55.:51:00.

and not be too rough and boisterous and he seems

:51:01.:51:02.

to understand Marina's situation. As a baby, Marina was left

:51:03.:51:07.

in a Russian orphanage after being born without legs

:51:08.:51:10.

or an arm. When she was two years

:51:11.:51:14.

old she was adopted and given What difference has

:51:15.:51:17.

it made, having Tag? She is really confident

:51:18.:51:24.

in her own comfort zone But as soon as we're out,

:51:25.:51:27.

she's nearly nine and is becoming more self-aware and she knows

:51:28.:51:32.

people are looking. She is very different

:51:33.:51:34.

and she gets very nervous. Now when we are out

:51:35.:51:37.

with Tag she is confident She is very proud of what we're

:51:38.:51:40.

doing and she is proud that she has With a career in the police waiting

:51:41.:51:47.

for him, by the end of the year I'm going to be very sad,

:51:48.:51:56.

but I know he will be a very cool police dog and he is going to catch

:51:57.:52:03.

loads of baddies. An exceptional bond formed

:52:04.:52:08.

by an exceptional pair. I think she should keep the dog.

:52:09.:52:25.

That is the agreement though, they go to a family then they leave after

:52:26.:52:31.

a year. I know. You still think she should keep the dog. Yes, but the

:52:32.:52:35.

arrangement is, Sal... LAUGHTER. She knows it's going to

:52:36.:52:40.

happen. I know. She should still keep it!

:52:41.:52:46.

The Girl On The Train broke sales records on both sides

:52:47.:52:49.

of the Atlantic when it was released in early 2015.

:52:50.:52:51.

A Hollywood blockbuster followed just over a year later.

:52:52.:52:53.

The remarkable success of her first thriller made Paula Hawkins one

:52:54.:52:57.

of the best-paid authors of last year.

:52:58.:53:00.

Quite a result for a book she described as "the last

:53:01.:53:03.

Good morning, Paula. I guess you probably don't even try and top

:53:04.:53:17.

that, do you, you just start writing again? Yes. You can't think about

:53:18.:53:25.

topping things. I started writing Into the Water before the Girl on

:53:26.:53:30.

the Train became a huge success, so I've been writing it for a while. So

:53:31.:53:33.

how long have you been doing this now? Three years. Wow. Having read

:53:34.:53:40.

it, I'm quite scared. It takes you to some really dark places, a bit

:53:41.:53:47.

like the Girl on the Train did. You trick us into suspecting everybody

:53:48.:53:51.

of awful things? Yes. It's a very dark book, a wide class of

:53:52.:53:55.

characters. Yes, I want to make the reader wonder about everybody in

:53:56.:53:59.

this town, about all the secrets they're keeping and why they're

:54:00.:54:02.

keeping them and what they might be capable of. So yes, I'm glad you

:54:03.:54:06.

suspected everyone. Paula, the narrative, the way you tell the

:54:07.:54:11.

story is, I don't know whether it's unusual but certainly very stylised

:54:12.:54:15.

so you tell it individually through a number of characters? Yes. As I

:54:16.:54:19.

said, because I gave everyone a secret to keep, that seemed to me to

:54:20.:54:22.

be the best way of telling the story. I couldn't have just one

:54:23.:54:27.

narrator because they wouldn't know all of these things. I had to widen

:54:28.:54:33.

the cast out. You had the chorus of voices telling the story of what is

:54:34.:54:37.

going on. It's an ambitious structure to have. I have 11

:54:38.:54:42.

narrators. So you might hear one person's account of a sequence and

:54:43.:54:45.

the next chapter might be the other side of the coin through their

:54:46.:54:50.

voice? Yes. So you see the same event sometimes from different

:54:51.:54:53.

Points of View and you realise that you might have imagined that

:54:54.:54:58.

something was going on. Then you think actually, this is a different

:54:59.:55:02.

slant on the situation. With the previous book, a lot of the book you

:55:03.:55:07.

would suspect you had an unreliable narrator. Here you've got a whole

:55:08.:55:15.

host of them? It's my view that that is unreliable having multiple

:55:16.:55:20.

narrators because someone's lying. Sometimes we exaggerate, everyone is

:55:21.:55:24.

unreliable to a greater or lesser degree, not always by design but

:55:25.:55:29.

just sometimes because we don't remember what happened correctly.

:55:30.:55:33.

This is specific things about a specific piece of water, isn't it?

:55:34.:55:38.

Yes. Is it the real place? Were you inspired by a real place? I invented

:55:39.:55:45.

a town which I have placed in Northumberland, sort of. I was

:55:46.:55:49.

inspired by Northumberland, it was a beautiful place. I wanted somewhere

:55:50.:55:53.

that felt wild and sparsely populated and it has that amazing

:55:54.:55:58.

bleak beauty and it's very green and lush and full of water. So it seemed

:55:59.:56:02.

like the right sort of place. It's one of the places in England what

:56:03.:56:06.

has some history of witch-hunting which is a history I wanted for the

:56:07.:56:10.

book. The book isn't about witch-hunting but it has the gothic,

:56:11.:56:15.

dark history. That is one of the features of the book, as far as I've

:56:16.:56:19.

got so far, is that mythical, slightly spiritual thing that is

:56:20.:56:26.

lurking around the place? This book is about stories we tell about

:56:27.:56:30.

ourselves, families and places. Myths have built up around this town

:56:31.:56:34.

which date back to a time where allegedly they brought women to the

:56:35.:56:38.

water, accused of witchcraft, and put them into the water to see if

:56:39.:56:42.

they sink or swim. I wanted to create this very dark history for

:56:43.:56:45.

this place and it is tied up with myth and fear of the supernatural.

:56:46.:56:50.

Paula, it's going to make a great film. Is that going to happen? I

:56:51.:56:58.

believe so. Dreamworks have optioned this book too and we are just in the

:56:59.:57:02.

very early stages talking about who might write the screen play. Wow!

:57:03.:57:06.

Yes. Your life must have changed hugely over the last few years. Yes,

:57:07.:57:12.

of course. I mean my work life's obviously changed radically and I'm

:57:13.:57:16.

busy and travel a lot doing all sorts of exciting things like

:57:17.:57:19.

meeting Hollywood people. But the rest of my life's the same.

:57:20.:57:23.

Musicians sometimes talk about that moment where they're in a public

:57:24.:57:26.

place and they hear their song play on the radio. Is there an equivalent

:57:27.:57:31.

for an author of, you know, you're sitting somewhere and maybe see

:57:32.:57:35.

someone reading your book? Yes, I mean I have seen people reading it

:57:36.:57:39.

on the tube or on planes and things and the first time it was actually,

:57:40.:57:44.

it's a strange experience and you find yourself watching them to see

:57:45.:57:48.

if you can gauge anything from their expression. Do you ever go like, oh,

:57:49.:57:54.

that's me? ! No, you're always worried they'll go, oh, no, it's

:57:55.:57:59.

terrible. That's fascinated. I would be tempted, or maybe not, a bit of

:58:00.:58:03.

me might be thinking, what do you think so far? But what if they don't

:58:04.:58:09.

like it? Well, the fact is it was an incredible success, you know,

:58:10.:58:12.

extraordinary literary success. When was the point that you knew that it

:58:13.:58:15.

was something out of the ordinary that it was going to do phenomenally

:58:16.:58:22.

well? Well, it went and did very well in the US, went to the torch of

:58:23.:58:29.

the best-selling list very quickly. That was shocking and unexpected.

:58:30.:58:33.

How do you find those things out, your publicist ring up or what? The

:58:34.:58:38.

publicist let me know this was happening. We'd been optimistic and

:58:39.:58:42.

hopeful but an unknown British author, you know, on what they

:58:43.:58:48.

thought was a debut. The book, there was like a word-of-mouth thing about

:58:49.:58:54.

it though wasn't there. I didn't see lots and lots of posters, it

:58:55.:58:58.

exploded from people like on social media? Yes, there was a lot of buzz

:58:59.:59:02.

on social media before it came out and that's good work by the

:59:03.:59:08.

publishers. Oh, I see! It's not all organic. I probably shouldn't say

:59:09.:59:09.

that. More in the pipeline? Give me a chance! I have some ideas,

:59:10.:59:22.

but they are just ideas at the moment. You are not writing at the

:59:23.:59:27.

moment? No, I'm running around the country talking to journalists at

:59:28.:59:30.

the moment but I will be writing soon. Any ideas on where it will be

:59:31.:59:36.

set? At the moment all I've got is a few characters but I haven't decided

:59:37.:59:40.

what I'm going to do with them or how they are going to interact with

:59:41.:59:43.

each other. Lovely to see you this morning.

:59:44.:59:44.

Paula Hawkins' new book is called Into The Water.

:59:45.:59:49.

Mention nannies and you might think of Mary Poppins, Joe Prost and her

:59:50.:59:55.

naughty step, but how will the next generation of Child carers deal with

:59:56.:59:59.

the needs of the 21st-century? At one college it means teaching

:00:00.:00:02.

future nannies of the rich and famous about the murky world of

:00:03.:00:06.

counterterrorism alongside lessons on child behaviour and helping with

:00:07.:00:07.

homework. The immaculate uniform is a reminder

:00:08.:00:19.

of their heritage but this training is to prepare for life and work in a

:00:20.:00:24.

very modern world. Is there anything you have noticed

:00:25.:00:28.

on this would? I have noticed that has been a car behind us the whole

:00:29.:00:31.

time following the same route as well, which is kind of suspicious.

:00:32.:00:38.

You are right, it is the Ford behind us which has been following our

:00:39.:00:41.

route since we left the car park, well done for observing that.

:00:42.:00:45.

Undergraduate Lorna is being put through her paces in a driver

:00:46.:00:48.

training exercise by a former military intelligence officer. It is

:00:49.:00:52.

slowing, we need to be serving as well, we need to see the bottom of

:00:53.:00:58.

the tyres of the car in front of us. Taking a standard map is brilliant,

:00:59.:01:02.

you don't have to rely on your phone, you can look at it, highlight

:01:03.:01:06.

bits, especially hospitals, places that are safe that you might need to

:01:07.:01:09.

go to if something happens. When they degree their degree course,

:01:10.:01:17.

Norlanders might find work with the royalty, VIPs, people who take their

:01:18.:01:26.

family's security very seriously. I think it is vital that these Norland

:01:27.:01:30.

nannies do have an understanding of what the threats are, how they can

:01:31.:01:33.

mitigate the risks and how they can make sensible plans to avoid getting

:01:34.:01:41.

themselves into unfortunate positions. High on the agenda today

:01:42.:01:45.

is cyber-security and the potential risks of social media. Have any of

:01:46.:01:50.

you got apps that geo- tag you? In your role as a nanny with children

:01:51.:01:54.

with you, they can understand when you take them to school, pick them

:01:55.:01:57.

up, what clubs they are going to, and when you are exposed to a range

:01:58.:02:02.

of threats, this is when their research can be used against you.

:02:03.:02:07.

Instructors are actively involved in the fields of counterterrorism,

:02:08.:02:12.

security, and personal protection, and training encourages the students

:02:13.:02:16.

not to be paranoid but to be alert. It has made me more conscious of how

:02:17.:02:22.

I use, what I do in my everyday life and being more aware of my

:02:23.:02:25.

surroundings and Stubbs owed that if there ever was an incident I might

:02:26.:02:30.

be able to prevent it or I will know hopefully how to deal with it. When

:02:31.:02:35.

I was out there driving with you guys, having that little space and

:02:36.:02:39.

distance could make a little bit of difference if there was a big

:02:40.:02:43.

situation going on. It is all common sense once you have been told it. As

:02:44.:02:48.

a person, you don't expect to ever be put in a situation where somebody

:02:49.:02:52.

would do that to you. Nannies have always been well versed in

:02:53.:02:55.

children's health, education and happiness, but these students are

:02:56.:02:58.

now being trained to cope in a process.

:02:59.:03:05.

Nannies, but not as you know them! It's something the TV presenter

:03:06.:03:08.

Fiona Phillips has been finding out. She'll be here in

:03:09.:03:14.

just a few minutes. First though, here's a last,

:03:15.:03:15.

brief look at the headlines hope you can join me then,

:03:16.:03:18.

bye bye. Do you know what can be stressful? "

:03:19.:05:07.

on live television eating your Breakfast!

:05:08.:05:12.

I had not noticed, you had got away with it until you mentioned it!

:05:13.:05:15.

Racing thoughts, an increased heart rate and sweaty palms.

:05:16.:05:17.

Have you got them now? No, it is fine!

:05:18.:05:23.

It's a surprisingly common condition, which is thought

:05:24.:05:25.

to account for around 45% of all sick days taken

:05:26.:05:27.

When the broadcaster Fiona Phillips left her job because of it,

:05:28.:05:32.

she decided it was time to find out more about stress

:05:33.:05:35.

She's made a new documentary about it.

:05:36.:05:38.

Beating heart, twisting stomach, dry mouth, sweaty skin -

:05:39.:05:41.

Stress, I guess. No.

:05:42.:05:44.

Acute stress? No?

:05:45.:05:45.

No, they're also symptoms of excitement.

:05:46.:05:46.

Our emotions - excitement, anxiety, ange - they're

:05:47.:05:52.

all the same bodily symptoms, so you can perform magic.

:05:53.:05:59.

You can change these from one emotion...

:06:00.:06:02.

Just by writing that little line of code in your mind saying,

:06:03.:06:14.

stand up straight, power pose, Superman pose, and say,

:06:15.:06:19.

Say it again. I feel excited, because I'm with you two this

:06:20.:06:40.

morning! We are excited as well! It sounds

:06:41.:06:44.

almost like a terribly simplistic approach to stress, if you tell

:06:45.:06:48.

yourself it is excitement not stress, that might do the trick?

:06:49.:06:52.

When I saw that on paper, filming it that day, I thought, do me a favour!

:06:53.:06:57.

No-one is going to make me get on a zip wire by standing there like

:06:58.:07:04.

Superman and saying, I feel excited! I can't tell you, it really works! I

:07:05.:07:10.

was shivering going up to the top of the platform, my legs went to jelly,

:07:11.:07:14.

all the adrenaline was coming round my body, and I got to the top of the

:07:15.:07:18.

platform feeling so nervous despite the fact that I had a harness and

:07:19.:07:23.

everything, and I did the Superman pose, which gives you the positive

:07:24.:07:27.

sort of stance, you are going to take on a challenge, and I said, I

:07:28.:07:31.

feel excited, and I just went, and I was excited. It is transforming

:07:32.:07:38.

anxiety or stress into excitement. There is a serious reason why you

:07:39.:07:42.

were so interested in stress and anxiety and the affect it has on all

:07:43.:07:46.

of us, because, to look at you, perhaps people remember when you

:07:47.:07:49.

were doing Breakfast television a bit like us, they would probably

:07:50.:07:54.

think, gosh, she has it all, great job, how glamorous must that be...

:07:55.:07:58.

Teenagers, everyone with teenagers will know the downside of that! But

:07:59.:08:03.

real life is not like that, is it? No, because the only place you do

:08:04.:08:07.

get yourself together when you have things going on is in your

:08:08.:08:10.

professional job, and when I was doing that, that was the only place

:08:11.:08:14.

that my mind was not running off to do things I was dealing with

:08:15.:08:19.

behind-the-scenes, which was two parents with early-onset Alzheimer's

:08:20.:08:22.

and two very small children at the time, as well as getting up at

:08:23.:08:27.

3:30am, and my little son had chronic eczema, we had to wrap him

:08:28.:08:36.

up like a mummy every night, so all this was going on and I didn't

:08:37.:08:39.

realise it, I was totally at the end of my tether, just trying to do

:08:40.:08:41.

everything, keep everything going while giving nothing to myself,

:08:42.:08:43.

nothing to my poor husband, who is still around... Good morning!

:08:44.:08:56.

Back to the documentary, one of the things I am curious about, you are

:08:57.:08:59.

on a zip wire, you have the tools to deal with that, it is a one-off

:09:00.:09:03.

occasion, you can trick yourself into thinking it is OK. Most

:09:04.:09:07.

people's notion of stress is a different thing, it could be

:09:08.:09:10.

financial pressure, it could be something to do with the family.

:09:11.:09:13.

Those things you cannot approach in the same way, stand there and say,

:09:14.:09:18.

I'm excited about the financial pressures on the household when I

:09:19.:09:21.

can't afford to put food on the table. Yes, that is for dealing with

:09:22.:09:26.

acute stress, dealing with being scared of doing something. There are

:09:27.:09:32.

all kinds of stress. When you experience too much acute stress,

:09:33.:09:35.

when that butterfly does not switch off and you are in bed worrying

:09:36.:09:38.

about finances, whether your kids will pass their exams, what you have

:09:39.:09:44.

got in the fridge, all these things, what you have to do is, and I was

:09:45.:09:48.

very cynical again about this, mindfulness, it really does work.

:09:49.:09:54.

What is that? What is mindfulness? My mind is so desperate, I am

:09:55.:09:58.

sitting here now thinking, actually, what have I got in the fridge for

:09:59.:10:02.

tonight?! It is keeping the shouting in your mind out of it and

:10:03.:10:07.

concentrate on what you doing at the moment, I'm concentrating now,

:10:08.:10:10.

thankfully, on what I am doing now, being here with you, not thinking,

:10:11.:10:15.

what am I doing after this? Not looking towards the future and what

:10:16.:10:18.

might happen, not looking back to horrible things that might have

:10:19.:10:29.

happened in the past and bringing those up again, it is about being in

:10:30.:10:32.

the moment and breathing deeply and exhaling slowly and it does work. I

:10:33.:10:35.

was cynical, but it does work. In the programme you monitor the stress

:10:36.:10:37.

levels of three people, different types of jobs, doing different

:10:38.:10:41.

things that we might look at and think, you wouldn't possibly be

:10:42.:10:44.

stressed, would you? From the outside, you cannot tell whatever

:10:45.:10:50.

someone is experiencing in their daily life can be extremely

:10:51.:10:54.

stressful. There was a guy, was he a plumber? And did a plumber, yes,

:10:55.:10:59.

self-employed, which is stressful in itself. Constantly on the phone.

:11:00.:11:04.

When he is doing a job, another customer is always calling him up

:11:05.:11:07.

saying, the job you did the other day is not working, when can you

:11:08.:11:10.

come around? He is constantly up against deadlines, the phone is

:11:11.:11:15.

going all the time, he has four children to try to get home to to

:11:16.:11:19.

see at night. Society is more stressful now, we are switched on

:11:20.:11:25.

24/7, even travelling, when we went on holiday to use to bone up the

:11:26.:11:28.

travel agent, they would send you the ticket in the post, you knew

:11:29.:11:34.

where they were so you did not have a panic about printing out your

:11:35.:11:37.

boarding pass, checking in online. I am getting worked up thinking about

:11:38.:11:42.

it! When you are on holiday you can check your work e-mails while you

:11:43.:11:48.

are sitting by the pool. Exactly. In the programmes you put yourself in

:11:49.:11:51.

stressful situations, not life or death, but we can look at one of

:11:52.:11:55.

them now, a maths test. I am going to give you some

:11:56.:12:00.

questions, with three seconds to answer... Three seconds?! Notepaper

:12:01.:12:05.

to do my sons or anything? 12 times six minus 18. 54? 15 divided by

:12:06.:12:19.

three plus 11. My brain is going weird. That is easy as well. 14-8

:12:20.:12:25.

times 12. 72. Flooded with stress hormones, I

:12:26.:12:34.

lose the ability to focus. 47-3... My brain is going.

:12:35.:12:44.

It is literally brain freeze, your stress hormones are really rising to

:12:45.:12:49.

the challenge and what happens is they overcome your rational brain in

:12:50.:12:54.

the end, and you become more emotional and unable to deal with

:12:55.:12:59.

the task at hand. It is really quite surprising. Has the programme helped

:13:00.:13:05.

you? How are you now? I have only just finished it, but I do try to

:13:06.:13:09.

stay in the moment. Exercise is brilliant, the whole thing, diet and

:13:10.:13:14.

exercise, every problem comes back to that. Also, acute stress is

:13:15.:13:18.

really good for us, it can arm you, that is what it is therefore, arm

:13:19.:13:22.

you for the challenge that you face every day, but it is when that

:13:23.:13:26.

becomes chronic it is really damaging and it can affect your DNA,

:13:27.:13:30.

that is in the programme as well, and lead to heart disease, cancer,

:13:31.:13:37.

dementia. But you can relax now, because it is over!

:13:38.:13:39.

The Truth About Stress is on BBC One tonight at 9pm.

:13:40.:13:42.

We asked you to tell us what's left you feeling ripped off,

:13:43.:13:48.

and you contacted us in your thousands.

:13:49.:13:50.

You've told us about the companies you think get it wrong and the

:13:51.:13:53.

customer service that simply is not up to scratch.

:13:54.:13:57.

It would seem that, once they've got your money, they're not

:13:58.:14:00.

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