12/05/2017 Breakfast


12/05/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay.

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Thousands of weapons have been seized from schools.

:00:08.:00:10.

They include samurai swords, axes and air guns and involve

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Also this morning, Jeremy Corbyn insists he's not a pacifist

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and he'll be strong on defence as Theresa May targets traditional

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Tough times ahead. The Bank of England governor warns that living

:00:40.:00:53.

costs will write than wages this year, so we are looking at what it

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could mean for us and for the election. -- rise faster than wages.

:00:59.:01:00.

His Manchester United side are through to the Europa League final.

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They beat Celta Vigo 2-1 on aggregate to secure their place

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in the Stockholm showpiece, later this month.

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We are live at Manchester's beautiful, glorious, historic

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Victoria baths. The pool has been refilled, ready for the first public

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swim in 24 years. We will have more on the plight of Britain's glorious

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historic pools and the fight to save them in a little while. And Matt has

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the weather. Good morning. Another dry day., but for the rest of you

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there will be the smell of fresh rain in the air and maybe eight

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thunderstorms later. -- dry day for Scotland.

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Thousands of weapons have been seized in schools

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They include swords, axes and air guns.

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Some of the cases involved children as young as five .

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Police chiefs said there had been a "worrying" increase in young

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Some schools have taken to using metal arches to make sure no weapons

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are brought on to their premises. But figures obtained by the press

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Association show that the number of seizures in the last year is up

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about 20% on the previous year. 32 out of 43 police forces in England

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and Wales responded to freedom of information request about weapons

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found in schools. The figures showed that 2579 weapons were found in the

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two years to March this year. Among them were samurai swords, Axa 's and

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air guns. -- axes. Many of the children were below the age of ten,

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and won five-year-old was caught with a knife. Just ones dab wound

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that went straight in his heart. -- stab wound. The national police

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Council said the increase in young people carrying weapons was

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worrying. It said it wanted to educate people that carrying a

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weapon illegally is never acceptable.

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After 6:30 we'll be discussing this with anti-violence campaigner

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Barry Mizen, whose teenage son Jimmy was killed in 2008.

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The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, will this morning give a speech

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on foreign affairs and insist he isn't a pacifist and he's

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prepared to use military force as a last resort.

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The Prime Minister will make her own pitch to traditional Labour voters

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She'll accuse Mr Corbyn of deserting "patriotic working class people."

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Our political correspondent, Eleanor Garnier, is in

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Eleanor, both leaders are addressing perceived weaknesses

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I think Jeremy Corbyn is trying to cast off that image as a pacifist

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and somebody who is unwilling to take military action. Remember, he

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is a former chairman of the Stop the War Coalition, a long-standing

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critic of military intervention in Afghanistan, Iraqi and Syria. But

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today he is putting forward his case as a potential world leader, saying

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he is not a pacifist and he is capable of ordering military action

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as a very last resort and only under international law. He is also going

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to take a dig at Theresa May, saying that she is pandering to Donald

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Trump, and that under him foreign policy would not involve holding the

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hand of the US president. I think Theresa May will also get personal

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today. In her speech in the north-east of England today, she is

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trying to win over voters who might have voted Labour for generations,

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saying that they might feel that down by the party, and accusing

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Jeremy Corbyn of turning his back on people who are patriotic and proud

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working-class people, putting herself forward as the only

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candidate able to take the country through the Brexit negotiations. So

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they are getting personal, while the Lib Dems are getting parental today?

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Yes, the Lib Dems are saying today that under them, they would offer

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fathers and extra month of a paternal leave. They are calling it

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daddy month. A former LibDem minister told us this is all part of

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showing that parenting can be much more equal and also showing how

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important the role of fathers is in bringing up children. The evidence

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shows that when men are more involved in fatherhood there are

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huge benefits. It is better for child development. Children do

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better at school. And the health and well-being of the whole family is

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improved. So what we want to do with this extra leave is to make it

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easier to new fathers to spend time with their children from those alias

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weeks and months. The Lib Dems say this is not just about helping

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families, it could also benefit the UK economy. They say if the

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workforce is more flexible and more motivated, that will help UK

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businesses as well. And if you are wondering, at this time in four

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weeks, we will all be waking up to the general election result. Alan,

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thank you. -- Eleanor. President Trump says he wants

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a quick investigation into allegations of Russian

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interference in the US elections. In a television interview last night

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he called FBI director James Comey a showboat and grandstand.

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In his first extensive television interview since he sacked the FBI's

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director James Comey, he told the American network NBC

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News that he wasn't under investigation himself.

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Our Washington correspondent Laura Bicker reports.

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He has become more famous than me! Famous, or infamous? When did Donald

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Trump decide to sack the towering figure from the FBI? This

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presidential handshake not an act of friendship, it seems, but the

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beginning of the end for James Comey. He is a showboater, he is a

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grandstander. It wasn't until a device from the Deputy

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Attorney-General, as the White House stated, it came directly from the

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President. I was going to fire him. It was my decision. You had already

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made the decision? I was going to fire him. And another apparent

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contradiction. The White House claims that James Comey had little

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or no support within the FBI. The rank and file of the EI have lost

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confidence in their director. Not so, said the acting FBI director,

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who was sitting in for his sacked boss before the senate intelligence

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committee. Director Comey enjoyed broad support within the FBI. And

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still does. At the heart of this row, is the alleged collusion

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between the Trump campaign and Moscow. The president admits that

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Russia was on his mind when he decided to fire James Comey. There

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was no good time to do it. And in fact, when I decided to just do it,

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I said to myself, you know, this Russia thing, with Trump and Russia,

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it is a made up story, it is an excuse by the Democrats for having

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lost an election. Donald Trump denies any collusion with Russia and

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insists that despite sacking the head of the EI, he wants any enquiry

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done properly and quickly. -- the FBI.

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Detectives investigating the death of a businessman who was shot dead

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during a suspected burglary at his home in Dorset have

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Police say a 45-year-old man from Poole is being questioned

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on suspicion of conspiracy to commit aggravated burglary.

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Three men have been charged with murdering Guy Hedger

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during the May Day Bank Holiday weekend.

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A London-based virtual reality firm has secured one of the largest

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investments in a British technology company in recent years.

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Japan's Softbank is investing nearly ?400 million in Improbable,

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a company that was only set up five years ago.

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The deal is seen as evidence the UK's technology sector can

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compete with the best around the world.

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I think it is a big vote of confidence in the talent pool we

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have here, and the potential for this country to produce world

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leading technology firms. If we were able to enter that category that

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would be great for us. If you didn't know already, John is very much

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aware of this, it is the finals of Eurovision tomorrow night.

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Last night, Ireland crashed out of the semi-finals but the UK

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will be represented by the former X Factor contestant

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But there's speculation that Brexit could affect the UK's

:09:24.:09:27.

Our Moscow correspondent Steve Rosenberg reports.

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Love it or hate it, here is one European institution the UK is

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remaining info now. -- in for now. It is the final of the Eurovision

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Song contest this Saturday in Keo. Lucie Jones is flying the UK's flag,

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but will Brexit mean that it meets its Waterloo? Let's face it. In

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recent years it has been hard enough for the United Kingdom to get 1's

:10:03.:10:05.

from our European neighbours when we have been on speaking terms with

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them. -- get points. But now that we are leaving the EU in an atmosphere

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of acute disharmony, will that condemn the UK to eternal runner-up

:10:14.:10:21.

in Eurovision? They may be excited about Eurovision in Kiev, but

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Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May has warned that Brexit could scupper

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the UK's Eurovision party. Welcome is the Prime Minister a Eurovision

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fan? I can't imagine her sat with her flag at home. Honestly, whatever

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happens happens. Brexit is so far out of my hands and my control. The

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signs are that Europe has not fallen out of love with Britain. We have

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discovered that even the French love having the UK in Eurovision. Well,

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so that France would come last. France is very bad, but England is

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worse. And being happy is what Eurovision is all about. It is not

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the winning that counts. Just as well. The UK hasn't won the contest

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for 20 years. Would you say we are being a little defeatist? 20 get our

:11:13.:11:16.

excuses in already? I didn't mind that chap who said he was pleased

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the UK was in because they are so rubbish they will be even worse than

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France. We are happy to help. And we'll be talking to Steve live

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from Kiev after 8:00. Imagine enjoying a swim in the ocean

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just off the coast of California Attention, in the water. This is the

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Orange County sheriff's department. The device, state parks is asking us

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to make an announcement to let you know you are at boarding next to

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approximately 15 great white sharks. They are advising that you Brexit

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the water. In a calm manner. Right, OK! That's easy, then. Because there

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are only 15 of them. That's the Orange County Sheriff's

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Department warning a group of paddle-boarders they're swimming

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next to 15 great white sharks. A police helicopter spotted

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the sharks near Dana Point, A woman was bitten in the area

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at the end of April. So they are obviously very aware and

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everybody is very concerned. 15! I can't believe nobody noticed them.

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Can you imagine just calmly paddle boarding a long? I suppose they need

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to give that much detailing information to tell people they are

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serious. You could just say, shark! That would do it for me. Big shark,

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big fish. Good morning. Here is our big fish. I wish. In a small pond.

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No, that's wrong. Imagine if you were trying to escape from a shark,

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the worst thing you can do is paddle furiously, because you create more

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motion and more disturbance. And you would have to stay on the board.

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It's as if you make yourself look like a turtle, put your arms and

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feet in... Have you had nightmares about this? I have thought about it

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a lot! Let's go to calmer waters. Manchester United are through, they

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have a chance if they can beat Ajax. They made it a bit more difficult

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for themselves than they needed to. Manchester United survived a late

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scare but beat Celta Vigo on aggregate to book their place

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in the Europa League final. Marouane Fellaini scored as United

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drew 1-1 at Old Trafford They'll now face Ajax in the final

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in Stockholm on May 24. Chelsea can win the Premier

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League title tonight. Victory at West Brom would give them

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an unbeatable 10-point lead Victory would make Antonio Contey

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only the fourth manager to lift the Premier League trophy

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in his first season in England. Everton manager Ronald Koeman,

:13:44.:13:45.

is prepared to lose Ross Barkley The England midfielder has just

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a year left on his current deal, and Koeman says the club,

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want an answer by the end And Andy Murray's poor

:13:54.:13:56.

run of form continues. He's out of the Madrid Open,

:13:57.:14:00.

the world number one knocked out Borna Coric beat Murray in straight

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sets to ensure he has failed to reach the quarterfinals in two

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of his last three tournaments. The world number one says he is

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concerned by his recent form. Durham beat Nottinghamshire,

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by 4 wickets in their One Day Cup match, but one astonishing six

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from Alex Hales stole the headlines. He managed a total of three,

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in his innings of 104. But with this one, he found the only

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open window in a radio commentary box and the ball was picked up

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by one of the two gentlemen Here's how it went for

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BBC Radio Nottingham's Dave COMMENTATOR: The first ball

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he bowled round the wicket, Hales hits this towards me -

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it's coming towards me, it's coming! It's coming to our

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commentary position! That is amazing! It is coming

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towards me, it is coming towards me! At least they didn't break the

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glass. That is the voice you want if there are sharks in the water. It is

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coming towards me! That's it for now. We will be going through the

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papers in a moment. Here's Matt with a look

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at this morning's weather. We have been on the back of a long

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dry spell full, looking at some of the records this morning and in

:15:25.:15:27.

parts of western Scotland they have gone 18 days without rain. That is

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about to change. Some have seen rain already in the west of Scotland will

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stay dry again but elsewhere they may find a downpour at some point.

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Sunshine as well and once the sun is out there will feel more humid than

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it has recently. The wind direction has changed from Scandinavia and now

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they are moving from south to north. There have been thunderstorms

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yesterday across the west of the UK and rain in Southern counties of

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England and Wales. Across parts of Wales and East Anglia occasional

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whale takes us through the morning rush-hour before that moves into

:16:08.:16:09.

northern England and starts to fizzle. Northern Ireland sees

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showers on through day but into Scotland, a dry story once again. A

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few showers in the west that much of area is dry and bright. Some rain

:16:20.:16:27.

later in the east and into the Midlands and East Anglia which could

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see heavy showers breaking out. Sunshine in between. Temperatures

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around 20 degrees but the showers could be nasty in a couple of spots.

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The southern counties will see morning clouds break with sunshine

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in the afternoon if a little bit humid although formal will hold on

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to rain and some more rain will return to south-western Wales later.

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The rest of Wales brightens up to sunshine. In Northern Ireland it is

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predominantly cloudy through the afternoon with spots of rain to

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finish the day. Into tonight we will see the rain across parts of

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Scotland and Northern Ireland, even northern England, continue for a

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while. In the south it will be a bit dry. A little bit of mist in some

:17:13.:17:16.

places tonight and the temperatures should hold into double figures for

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most. Into the weekend across the north is a cloudy note. It

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occasional rain through the morning easing into the afternoon. Much of

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England and Wales will have a bright day with sunny spells. Only a couple

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of passing showers and some people will stay completely dry. Certainly

:17:36.:17:40.

feeling pleasant with temperatures into the high teens possibly low

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20s. Finishing the day with rain on Northern Ireland and that rain will

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push east to west overnight into Sunday clearing off into the North

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Sea which leaves us with sunshine and showers on Sunday. Showers will

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be heaviest across Scotland, Northern Ireland and England with

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hail and thunder. The further south and east may not see any showers.

:18:03.:18:07.

With the sun out it will feel pleasant again. With rain in the

:18:08.:18:10.

four custom sure there will be gardeners and farmers very happy

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indeed. Quite pleased to have a little rain. It will be good for the

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garden. Look now at the papers this Friday morning. Many are leading

:18:23.:18:27.

with the election and the fallout from the leaking and the

:18:28.:18:30.

rubberstamping of the manifesto for Labour. The sun are quite damning.

:18:31.:18:39.

They call it a day of disasters. Their headline refers to the fact

:18:40.:18:47.

that their union leader fell down the stairs and BBC cameraman had his

:18:48.:18:52.

Fort run over by a Labour vehicle. Not all of the newspapers are as

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damning, are they? No, not all of them. The Guardian says that Jeremy

:18:58.:19:03.

Corbyn... You can see the picture of him they're coming out after the

:19:04.:19:07.

meeting yesterday to confirm the manifesto with just a couple of

:19:08.:19:11.

tweaks. He is addressing the press and said he will be holding an

:19:12.:19:14.

enquiry into how the document was leaked in the first place but we

:19:15.:19:19.

will not hear the results until after the election. He also said he

:19:20.:19:24.

is not a part of. And that was the thing we're expecting to hear him

:19:25.:19:30.

say officially today. It is clear how various newspapers are lining up

:19:31.:19:38.

for this election. And this is another one that describes the

:19:39.:19:43.

manifesto as a fan fantasy and the Daily Mirror puts the attention on

:19:44.:19:47.

the National health service. It has an exclusive letter sent to the

:19:48.:19:52.

Prime Minister from a group of nurses asking Fred to a 1% pay rise

:19:53.:19:58.

cap, saying that the NHS is in a desperate state. But the break from

:19:59.:20:04.

politics. Do you have anything for us, Ben? No politics here. Three big

:20:05.:20:09.

names on the front of the financial tea, Times. Beating Italian

:20:10.:20:15.

investors that they will cut thousands of jobs but they have also

:20:16.:20:20.

cut the pay of the CEO by ?4 million. The job cuts are mostly in

:20:21.:20:24.

the UK as part of an overhaul of how business works. Underneath that, the

:20:25.:20:30.

story is Emirates with profits falling for the first time in five

:20:31.:20:34.

years. An 82% fall in profits for the airlines because of a

:20:35.:20:40.

combination of election uncertainty, Brexit uncertainty but also the ban

:20:41.:20:43.

on laptops for travellers coming from Middle Eastern countries to the

:20:44.:20:52.

United States. Beneath that, Lloyds says it will generate a populate a

:20:53.:20:59.

?500 million. We had to bail that bank out at one point, we owed about

:21:00.:21:05.

43% at the height of the financial crisis. Now we are just a quarter of

:21:06.:21:09.

1% in the rest will be sold in the coming days. They say overall we

:21:10.:21:13.

will have made a profit of 500 million quid. Not that an investment

:21:14.:21:18.

but then again, with how much we ploughed into it... The Spanish

:21:19.:21:25.

Grand Prix and if Lewis Hamilton had been around in 1896 he may have been

:21:26.:21:30.

driving one of these. Amazingly, this is a at an exhibition in

:21:31.:21:35.

London. The first car to ever get a speeding ticket for doing eight MPh.

:21:36.:21:41.

Surely a carriage could go faster? Read the story. The policeman chased

:21:42.:21:50.

him on a bike to give him a speeding ticket. And then one of the hazards

:21:51.:21:59.

of golf in America. No bunkers but an alligator. This player he has two

:22:00.:22:10.

chip to the green over an alligator. It is quite common in America these

:22:11.:22:14.

days. I don't know if you boys have ever had this happen to you. You

:22:15.:22:18.

turn up at something and everybody else is wearing the same thing? It

:22:19.:22:24.

is a next time thing. We always discuss our neckties. -- neckties.

:22:25.:22:36.

Look at the pictures. I love this. This lady here turned up... I think

:22:37.:22:40.

she went to the Badminton, the horse trials, with that yellow puff at

:22:41.:22:45.

jacket on and quickly realised that it was a popular piece of clothing

:22:46.:22:50.

and managed to take a picture of herself with everybody else she

:22:51.:22:54.

could find wearing exactly the same code. Were they selling them outside

:22:55.:23:01.

at a stall, like a football scarf? I think that is the only option. You

:23:02.:23:06.

have to make a joke if you see somebody else in the same outfit.

:23:07.:23:10.

You cannot run away. You must face up. If this has ever happened to

:23:11.:23:15.

you, and the picture into us this morning we would love to see them.

:23:16.:23:21.

It is 23 minutes past six. Thank you very much and we will see you both

:23:22.:23:23.

later. Did you know you're more likely

:23:24.:23:23.

to be a victim of cybercrime It's one of the fastest growing

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areas of criminal activity. In the fightback, police forces

:23:28.:23:30.

are now offering detectives specialist training to help them

:23:31.:23:33.

catch cybercriminals - and the BBC's technology

:23:34.:23:35.

correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones has In a hotel room, a man who may be

:23:36.:23:47.

part of an international crime gang is preparing a cyber attack. His

:23:48.:23:52.

lair has all the tools of his trade and the police are on their way. But

:23:53.:23:57.

this is not a traditional forensic operation where you look for

:23:58.:24:01.

fingerprints... These police officers are being trained to catch

:24:02.:24:05.

cyber criminals and the hacker in the hotel is the exercise today,

:24:06.:24:10.

based on a real case. They have been given the skills to tackle the

:24:11.:24:13.

fastest-growing area of crime. Some estimates say that up to half of all

:24:14.:24:20.

offences are now cyber. The hacker in this room has popped out for a

:24:21.:24:24.

while and the trainee officers are about to arrive. Let's see what

:24:25.:24:30.

evidence they can find. Stay where you are! We have a warrant! They are

:24:31.:24:40.

taking it seriously. Ring clear! It's not a smart TV, so you should

:24:41.:24:45.

be OK to unplug that. The first priority is to make sure that all

:24:46.:24:50.

the computers stay powered up and do not lock after a certain time. That

:24:51.:24:53.

way they can get access to data far more easily. What did you just

:24:54.:24:59.

discover? I'm still seeing laptop and one phone. Examining the router

:25:00.:25:05.

they have discovered there is another device they have yet to

:25:06.:25:12.

spot. Hidden under a tray, a tablet with more evidence. The techniques

:25:13.:25:15.

they are learning should make hunting hacker is far more

:25:16.:25:20.

efficient. Back in the day, on a scene like this for example the

:25:21.:25:24.

offices would time up and literally just pull the electric supply out of

:25:25.:25:28.

the back of the computer, back in Taggart and then fended away from

:25:29.:25:32.

forensic investigation which could take months before they had any

:25:33.:25:35.

meaningful information back from the system. It's a case of learning

:25:36.:25:44.

skills, practical skills that we can utilise, no different to finding a

:25:45.:25:50.

gun at a scene that we can make assay for the public and then

:25:51.:25:53.

tribute to a criminal. We are doing the same with IT equipment and

:25:54.:25:58.

computers. Although people do not see this as the here and now I think

:25:59.:26:05.

it most certainly will be. These detectives are among thousands going

:26:06.:26:08.

through this type of training. As a try to keep our with a cyber crime

:26:09.:26:15.

wave that is getting bigger by the day. -- as the police try to keep up

:26:16.:26:21.

with. We're talking about the gadgets that

:26:22.:26:22.

were the height of technology in their day but probably did things

:26:23.:26:30.

you can now do with just Vodafone have just announced

:26:31.:26:33.

they won't be making any Later in the programme we're taking

:26:34.:26:37.

a look back at some of the best retro gadgets, and asking

:26:38.:26:42.

which you've still got at home. Most of them. I still have most of

:26:43.:26:52.

them. In a draw that you cannot open? You keep them there when you

:26:53.:26:54.

look for a charger or something. Did you used to be glued

:26:55.:26:57.

to your portable cassette player? Have you still got a mobile phone

:26:58.:27:00.

in a drawer somewhere that looks You can e-mail us at

:27:01.:27:03.

bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk or get in touch on social media,

:27:04.:27:06.

and send us your pictures too if you've got any good

:27:07.:27:10.

old gadgets that you still use. I would love to see a photograph of

:27:11.:27:18.

the oldest mobile phone that some of you may have. One we need to pull

:27:19.:27:27.

out of the area. Or a car phone. -- pull

:27:28.:30:46.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:30:47.:30:54.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay.

:30:55.:30:57.

We'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment,

:30:58.:31:00.

but also on Breakfast this morning, we're live at one of Britain's

:31:01.:31:04.

oldest public baths as it prepares to welcome swimmers for the first

:31:05.:31:07.

time in nearly a quarter of a century.

:31:08.:31:09.

It was only created five years ago, but a British virtual reality firm

:31:10.:31:13.

has received nearly 400 million pounds of investment

:31:14.:31:20.

We'll find out what's behind this huge boost -

:31:21.:31:26.

and what it means for the UK tech industry.

:31:27.:31:30.

Love it or hate it, Eurovision is back!

:31:31.:31:37.

But will Brexit affect the UK's chances in the competition?

:31:38.:31:40.

We'll be live from Kiev with all the build up to the big

:31:41.:31:44.

Those are not written's entries and to be clear. No, but they look

:31:45.:31:58.

great. Thousands of weapons have

:31:59.:31:59.

been seized in schools Figures provided by 32 police forces

:32:00.:32:02.

to the Press Association shows that in the last 2 years,

:32:03.:32:07.

more than 2,500 weapons had been found in schools including

:32:08.:32:10.

swords, axes and air guns. Police chiefs say there's been

:32:11.:32:13.

a "worrying increase" in young In a few minutes we'll be discussing

:32:14.:32:15.

this with anti-violence campaigner Barry Mizen, whose teenage son

:32:16.:32:25.

Jimmy was killed in 2008. The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn,

:32:26.:32:30.

will this morning give a speech on foreign affairs in which he'll

:32:31.:32:33.

insist he isn't a pacifist. Mr Corbyn will say that he is

:32:34.:32:36.

prepared to use military force Today the Prime Minister will also

:32:37.:32:39.

make her own pitch to traditional Labour voters in the

:32:40.:32:44.

north-east of England. She'll accuse Mr Corbyn of deserting

:32:45.:32:46.

"patriotic working class people." President Trump says he wants

:32:47.:32:49.

a quick investigation into allegations of Russian

:32:50.:32:54.

interference in the US elections. In his first extensive television

:32:55.:33:01.

interview since he abruptly sacked the FBI's director James Comey

:33:02.:33:05.

he told the American network NBC News that he wasn't under

:33:06.:33:08.

investigation himself. I was going to fire James Comey. My

:33:09.:33:18.

decision. You had made the decision? I was going to fire him. There is no

:33:19.:33:24.

good time to do it, by the way. You later said you accepted their

:33:25.:33:27.

recommendations. But you had already made the decision? I was going to

:33:28.:33:30.

fire regardless of recommendations. Detectives investigating

:33:31.:33:31.

the death of a businessman, who was shot dead during a suspected

:33:32.:33:33.

burglary at his home in Dorset, Police say a 45-year-old man

:33:34.:33:37.

from Poole is being questioned on suspicion of conspiracy to commit

:33:38.:33:41.

aggravated burglary. Three men have been charged

:33:42.:33:43.

with murdering Guy Hedger during the May Day

:33:44.:33:46.

Bank Holiday weekend. It's the finals of the Eurovision

:33:47.:33:51.

song contest tomorrow. Last night Ireland crashed out

:33:52.:33:53.

of the semi finals but the UK will be represented by the former

:33:54.:33:56.

X Factor contestant Ten acts from each semifinal have

:33:57.:33:59.

gone through to Saturday's grand final and join the so-called

:34:00.:34:03.

"big five" - France, Germany, Italy, Spain

:34:04.:34:05.

and United Kingdom - Later we'll be chatting

:34:06.:34:07.

about what effect Brexit could have, if any, on Britain's

:34:08.:34:18.

chances this year. I am not sure who that is. I think

:34:19.:34:25.

that is the Portuguese entry. Well, you know more than me. A man who

:34:26.:34:30.

dances with a gorilla, I heard about it on the radio.

:34:31.:34:32.

Could man's best friend be a bear's worst enemy?

:34:33.:34:34.

Here is a bear that has been making a nuisance of itself

:34:35.:34:37.

in San Gabriel Valley in Southern Califronia.

:34:38.:34:39.

Its been going into gardens, chasing other wildlife,

:34:40.:34:41.

walking on walls, rooting through bins and generally scaring

:34:42.:34:44.

But the tables were turned when it came up against one brave dog,

:34:45.:34:48.

who as you can see stared the bear down, and chased it away and back

:34:49.:34:57.

Get off my land! It is like a Disney movie, isn't it? Yes! Coming soon to

:34:58.:35:13.

a big screen near you. The brave dog that chased away the scary bare.

:35:14.:35:16.

Well, that is the morning's their news. Victory to the dog, very good.

:35:17.:35:23.

As a child I always did that with friends, trying to work out which

:35:24.:35:26.

animal would eat which other animal, polar bear versus gorilla. It was

:35:27.:35:32.

like animal top trumps. Dog wins against there, very good. -- against

:35:33.:35:42.

bear. I'm trying to think of a general election equivalent. Well,

:35:43.:35:46.

Manchester United. They almost made their match against Celta Vigo last

:35:47.:35:51.

night. They are through to the Europa League final. It is the one

:35:52.:35:56.

trophy they have never won, even when it was the Uefa Cup. Why did

:35:57.:36:03.

Jose Mourinho call it the most important game in their history?

:36:04.:36:06.

Just building it up, I guess. It is not, not at all. Not compare to a

:36:07.:36:10.

Champions League final. But it is a big one.

:36:11.:36:12.

Manchester United beat Celta Vigo 2-1 on aggregate to reach

:36:13.:36:15.

They went into the second leg at Old Trafford with a single goal

:36:16.:36:20.

lead and Marouane Fellaini doubled their advantage

:36:21.:36:21.

after quarter of an hour with a fantastic header.

:36:22.:36:24.

The Spanish side had numerous chances to pull a goal back

:36:25.:36:27.

and Facundo Roncaglia did just that 5 minutes from time.

:36:28.:36:29.

The Celta goalscorer was then sent off along with United's Eric Bailly

:36:30.:36:33.

It was a nervy end for the home fans but United survived to reach

:36:34.:36:48.

the final on May the 24th in Stockholm.

:36:49.:36:54.

They'll face Dutch side Ajax who, says Mourinho,

:36:55.:36:57.

will have an advantage in their preparations.

:36:58.:37:00.

Ajax plays about the final, thinks about the final. Their league is

:37:01.:37:06.

finished on Sunday and they will have 12 days to prepare for the

:37:07.:37:10.

final. We have three Premier League matches to play. Hopefully...

:37:11.:37:16.

Crystal Palace doesn't need that last game. Because in the last game

:37:17.:37:21.

I am going to make a lot of changes. Chelsea will be crowned

:37:22.:37:24.

Premier League champions for the second time in three seasons

:37:25.:37:26.

if they win at West Brom tonight. They lead Tottenham by seven points,

:37:27.:37:29.

and need just one win from three Our players are totally focused on

:37:30.:37:45.

the moment. They are feeling this moment, this important moment, for

:37:46.:37:52.

us, for the club, for the fans. We are in a good position, a good

:37:53.:38:01.

position. But we mustn't forget that we must take two points to reach

:38:02.:38:03.

this target. Andy Murray's difficulties

:38:04.:38:04.

since returning from He's been knocked out

:38:05.:38:05.

of the Madrid Open at The world number one

:38:06.:38:09.

was beaten in straight sets by the Croatian Borna Corich,

:38:10.:38:13.

who is the world number 59, and only qualified for

:38:14.:38:17.

the tournament as a "lucky loser." Murray has now failed

:38:18.:38:20.

to reach the quarterfinals, in two of his last

:38:21.:38:22.

three tournaments. Rory McIlroy has had

:38:23.:38:24.

a difficult first round at the Players Championship,

:38:25.:38:27.

the American tournament regarded But he is now six strokes behind the

:38:28.:38:36.

leader. One of par, after a round of 73. At the Masters champion, Sergio

:38:37.:38:41.

Garcia, also entered the day on one over. He had a slightly more

:38:42.:38:45.

memorable day, hitting a hole on the 17th. He hadn't had the greatest

:38:46.:38:49.

ground before now. He was three over par for now. He loves it, and the

:38:50.:38:55.

crowd loves it too. Drinks on Sergio.

:38:56.:38:58.

British riders Geraint Thomas and Adam Yates will start stage 7

:38:59.:39:01.

of the Giro d'Italia in second and third place overall,

:39:02.:39:03.

ten seconds behind Bob Jungels of Luxembourg.

:39:04.:39:08.

Having started in Sardinia and Sicily, the race reached

:39:09.:39:10.

the bottom, of the Italian mainland, and is moving north.

:39:11.:39:14.

Stage 6 out of 21 yesterday was won by Swiss rider Silvan Diliali,

:39:15.:39:17.

his first stage victory at a Grand Tour.

:39:18.:39:24.

Jonny Brownlee says he is hungry to put the hurt of last year's

:39:25.:39:28.

He missed out on the world title in the heat of Mexico,

:39:29.:39:32.

in the the last race of the season, as brother Alistair

:39:33.:39:35.

famously had to help an exhaused Jonny over the line.

:39:36.:39:38.

He's back in action in Yokohama tomorrow and if it's going to be hot

:39:39.:39:42.

there, Brownlee will be prepared for it, after working with the Royal

:39:43.:39:45.

I have spent more time in the hot and humid conditions. At home I have

:39:46.:39:56.

converted my conservatory into a kind of heat chamber. So I can get

:39:57.:40:01.

my conservatory going, most people sit around on a nice city, but mine

:40:02.:40:05.

gets up to about 37 degrees in the heat sometimes. I can switch away in

:40:06.:40:10.

there. I have had a few sessions in there to try to get used to your

:40:11.:40:14.

karma. He will have a whopping heating bill. He can grow some plans

:40:15.:40:18.

at the same time. The men's and women's races will be on the red

:40:19.:40:22.

button at two o'clock in the morning. If that is too early,

:40:23.:40:25.

extended highlights on both races at one o'clock in the afternoon on

:40:26.:40:29.

Sunday, hosted by our very own Louise. Looking forward to that.

:40:30.:40:33.

Children as young as 5 have been found with weapons at schools

:40:34.:40:36.

Figures provided by 32 police forces to the Press Association shows that

:40:37.:40:41.

in the last 2 years, more than 2,500 weapons have been

:40:42.:40:45.

At least one in five of those weapons were knives.

:40:46.:40:50.

Others include samurai swords, axes and air guns.

:40:51.:41:03.

To discuss this we're now joined by Barry Mizen whose 16-year-old son

:41:04.:41:06.

Jimmy was killed in an attack by another teenager.

:41:07.:41:09.

He now runs a charity in his memory aimed at stopping young people

:41:10.:41:12.

The figures we are talking about this morning are really very

:41:13.:41:24.

shocking indeed. I would like to start with you by saying, could you

:41:25.:41:28.

tell us a bit about Jimmy, and what happened to him? Jimmy was my second

:41:29.:41:33.

youngest son. He was killed nine years ago this week, actually. We

:41:34.:41:37.

had the ninth anniversary a couple of days ago. Jimmy was a great young

:41:38.:41:42.

lad, he went into a bakery shop on a Saturday morning and was attacked by

:41:43.:41:47.

a local teenager. He had a glass ditch smashed in his face and a

:41:48.:41:50.

piece of glass severed arteries in his neck. We hear the headlines, we

:41:51.:41:57.

hear terrible stories like what happened to Jimmy, and yet still

:41:58.:42:01.

kids are going into schools with all kinds of things. Some obvious

:42:02.:42:04.

weapons, some less obvious weapons. When you see those figures and you

:42:05.:42:09.

hear these headlines today, what do you think, given your experiences?

:42:10.:42:13.

Disappointed, to be honest. Because we are focusing on the wrong area, I

:42:14.:42:19.

think. Yes, getting the weapons off the street, absolutely, but is that

:42:20.:42:22.

all we are going to do? A weapons count every year? We are focusing

:42:23.:42:27.

far too much on the end, rather than the beginning. People don't just get

:42:28.:42:30.

like this, it is a gradual process. So what is the beginning? I think it

:42:31.:42:37.

is a progress. Myself and my wife is at lots of schools and we are being

:42:38.:42:41.

asked to speak more and more now to eight -year-olds and nine

:42:42.:42:43.

-year-olds. As children are growing up they are just going down a

:42:44.:42:47.

particular path. For me, it is about prevention, rather than trying to

:42:48.:42:51.

treat something at the end of it. We do that with the NHS, we see it as

:42:52.:42:54.

preventative health issues rather than trying to treat them at the

:42:55.:42:58.

end. We seem to be focusing on the idea that ever harsher punishment

:42:59.:43:02.

will solve these things for us, and I don't believe it does. People have

:43:03.:43:05.

to face consequences for their actions, absolutely. But if that is

:43:06.:43:08.

all we are going to do, increase punishment all the time, in our

:43:09.:43:13.

frustration at what is going on, I don't believe that is the answer. We

:43:14.:43:18.

need to get in there earlier. Some people have a long history and then

:43:19.:43:22.

eventually they kill somebody. A lot could have been done in the years

:43:23.:43:29.

preceding that. I know that when you go into schools you talk to

:43:30.:43:32.

classrooms about Jimmy. You feel very strongly that if it can happen

:43:33.:43:36.

to him where you were, it can happen everywhere. This isn't something

:43:37.:43:39.

that just happens somewhere else to other people's kids. Unfortunately,

:43:40.:43:43.

we seem to think it is. We think of it being somebody else, not us. We

:43:44.:43:47.

are a very ordinary family. These things always happen to America is.

:43:48.:43:56.

-- to ordinary families. We speak in prisons is welcome and the amount of

:43:57.:44:00.

times that we get people who have committed murder scene, I didn't

:44:01.:44:03.

mean to do it. They never intended to do it. If we just want to hype up

:44:04.:44:07.

the consequences in the belief that that will solve this issue, I think

:44:08.:44:11.

we are seriously misled. You said that you spoke to eight and nine

:44:12.:44:15.

-year-olds. When you speak to those very young children, do you see a

:44:16.:44:19.

change in them when you tell your story? There is a lot of empathy

:44:20.:44:22.

from them, and a lot of questions from them. It was heartbreaking, I

:44:23.:44:26.

was at a school a couple of years ago, and afterwards a young girl

:44:27.:44:30.

came up and she had 50p in her hand and she said, for your charity.

:44:31.:44:34.

There is such empathy in our young people. There is such a

:44:35.:44:37.

determination. They want to work something better and something

:44:38.:44:40.

different. We must come away from this idea that ever harsher

:44:41.:44:44.

punishment will solve these issues. Barry, thank you very much. I know

:44:45.:44:48.

you are coming back to talk to us again later in the programme, so

:44:49.:44:51.

thank you. We'll be talking to the police later as well, about what can

:44:52.:44:53.

be done from the policing side. Here is met with all the weather

:44:54.:45:10.

details. The weather has been on the turn and it has been dry for some

:45:11.:45:14.

time. Across some parts of Northern Ireland it has been 17 days since we

:45:15.:45:23.

saw rain. In the West of Scotland it has been a full 18 days. But all of

:45:24.:45:27.

us will see rain over the next few days. Some have seen some this

:45:28.:45:32.

morning. There will be scattered showers around today, some quite

:45:33.:45:35.

thundery later across central parts. It will feel humid as well and that

:45:36.:45:40.

is because the air comes up from the south. The cloud moves from south to

:45:41.:45:46.

north so that as the wind flow from Iberia and France. It would rain

:45:47.:45:50.

across some parts of Wales and England which is now reaching to

:45:51.:45:55.

north-west England this afternoon. A few showers in Northern Ireland but

:45:56.:46:00.

in Scotland another largely dry day. The showers in the far west, eastern

:46:01.:46:04.

areas cloudy and cool but much of the Central Highlands is 20 degrees

:46:05.:46:10.

possible later. Rain clearing out from north-west England through the

:46:11.:46:13.

latter stage of the afternoon before some thunderstorms deadened for the

:46:14.:46:16.

eating a lot of dry weather here during the second half of the day.

:46:17.:46:20.

The Midlands and East Anglia, this is where the focus for some slogan

:46:21.:46:24.

moving thunderstorms with hail mixed in could be around this afternoon. A

:46:25.:46:28.

lot of rain and a short space of time. It will feel warm and the

:46:29.:46:32.

sunshine, far more such runaround Southern counties after a cloudy

:46:33.:46:37.

morning. As we had to words Cornwall and southern parts of Wales there

:46:38.:46:41.

will be some further rain developing through the day particularly across

:46:42.:46:45.

the western half of Cornwall. A predominantly cloudy story

:46:46.:46:55.

elsewhere. Later tonight we will see the thunderstorms across parts of

:46:56.:46:57.

northern England fade away quite quickly. It could stay down across

:46:58.:47:02.

parts of Northern Ireland and some rain returning to northern England

:47:03.:47:06.

and parts of Scotland overnight. Temperatures stay up further south

:47:07.:47:12.

you are the dry, the weekend to those of you in Scotland and

:47:13.:47:14.

Northern Ireland in northern England in particular starts cloudy and

:47:15.:47:18.

damp. Misty as well across Scotland thirsting that muggy to go with it.

:47:19.:47:23.

Brightening up in the afternoon with some showers around that much of

:47:24.:47:26.

England and Miles has a predominantly dry day. England we

:47:27.:47:33.

will see a couple showers. Nice when the sun is out, not quite as muggy

:47:34.:47:37.

as today with temperatures around 17- 20 degrees. After a spill of

:47:38.:47:42.

overnight rain, and a lot of rain sweeping in. Widespread showers, the

:47:43.:47:48.

heaviest in parts of Scotland in north-west England with rumbles of

:47:49.:47:52.

thunder. The further south and east you are avoid showers altogether. It

:47:53.:47:56.

gets warmer into next week. Certainly some rain in the forecast

:47:57.:48:00.

that we had not seen for a while and, of course, without rain on dry

:48:01.:48:05.

ground we get a lovely delicious scent and it does have a name, it is

:48:06.:48:19.

cold petrichor. It it sounds like an oil company. It is a more natural

:48:20.:48:26.

than that. The governor of the Bank of England has been speaking, giving

:48:27.:48:30.

some analysis of the last summer for the general election and we will

:48:31.:48:31.

start feeling the pinch. The cost of living is set to rise

:48:32.:48:34.

faster than wages this year - that's what the Governor of the Bank

:48:35.:48:40.

of England said in his last big assessment of the economy

:48:41.:48:43.

before the election. Four times a year the Bank publishes

:48:44.:48:48.

an updated report on the state of the economy - but this one

:48:49.:48:51.

is being watched more closely given that it comes just before

:48:52.:48:55.

the general election. Well, they say the economy will grow

:48:56.:48:57.

more slowly this year, by 1.9% rather than the 2%

:48:58.:49:03.

they first thought. And the economy relies

:49:04.:49:05.

on consumers spending cash - That does not seem like a lot but we

:49:06.:49:11.

will discuss it in more detail. but the economy relies

:49:12.:49:15.

on consumers spending cash. We've got less money in our pockets

:49:16.:49:24.

because the cost of living is rising The Bank of England Governor blamed

:49:25.:49:28.

that on a weak pound. Good morning, Hannah. As Sally said

:49:29.:49:36.

there is a lot to get through yesterday we heard a lot from the

:49:37.:49:39.

Bank of England. What was the standout moment? The really came

:49:40.:49:45.

takeaway is that there will be extra pressure on household income that

:49:46.:49:50.

your wages will not purchase so much over the next year. It pays to look

:49:51.:49:53.

after your own money and make sure you are not spending anything on

:49:54.:49:57.

stuff you do not need. We look at wage growth on average it does not

:49:58.:50:01.

impact everybody in the same way that you can take positive action to

:50:02.:50:04.

make sure you are maximising your income and not paying anyone

:50:05.:50:08.

anything you shouldn't be. None of this was unexpected. The bank had

:50:09.:50:12.

been warning us of inflation and that the cost of living would carry

:50:13.:50:16.

on going up and our wages would not keep pace. It is not a huge surprise

:50:17.:50:21.

but we have narrowed it now, haven't we? The average wage growth is

:50:22.:50:25.

matching inflation at the moment and inflation is expected to go up, the

:50:26.:50:29.

speed at which prices is rising, and wage growth is expected to slow but

:50:30.:50:34.

the good news is that after this year it is anticipated to get

:50:35.:50:38.

better. That said, with the election and with Brexit, the Bank of England

:50:39.:50:42.

simply do not know and, of course, they are warning us, they are

:50:43.:50:45.

cautious, they were very measured. They simply do not know what to

:50:46.:50:49.

expect. Hopefully will not be terrible and hopefully it will be

:50:50.:50:54.

positive after this. Certainly they said there is a lot of investment in

:50:55.:50:58.

business which gives them good confidence in the British economy

:50:59.:51:01.

from next year forward so the thing is, you know, we spent a lot last

:51:02.:51:05.

year, the Bank of England warned that were borrowing too much. So now

:51:06.:51:09.

we have taken notice and are spending less and that is why people

:51:10.:51:13.

are starting to become concerned. The key is to spend what you can

:51:14.:51:18.

afford, and know what you can afford and estate that. How do you mitigate

:51:19.:51:24.

against this? That is the thing. You touched on what we can be doing that

:51:25.:51:29.

is their light at the end of the tunnel? Will things get better? The

:51:30.:51:34.

Bank of England are positive. The revised growth down but only

:51:35.:51:37.

slightly. They set from next year it should increase again and that next

:51:38.:51:42.

year inflation should taper off and wage growth should continue upwards

:51:43.:51:46.

to match it. The feeling that is preventing weight or is increasing

:51:47.:51:50.

at the moment is because employers simply do not know what will happen

:51:51.:51:54.

with the election and with Brexit so they are being cautious. Please

:51:55.:51:57.

remember, unemployment is at an all-time low so that is not the big

:51:58.:52:01.

issue. The figures are positive, we just... We need to be protective and

:52:02.:52:05.

how we are looking after our finances going forward and making a

:52:06.:52:09.

few simple switches. Looking at the money you have coming in, watching

:52:10.:52:14.

where it is going. A little bit of self budgeting, that is the advice.

:52:15.:52:18.

Thank you very much. More from me after seven o'clock.

:52:19.:52:20.

Many of Britain's historic swimming pools have been closed over

:52:21.:52:25.

the years - but now community groups are helping restore and re-open them

:52:26.:52:29.

This weekend, one of the oldest pools in the UK will welcome

:52:30.:52:37.

swimmers for the first time in nearly a quarter of a century.

:52:38.:52:40.

It does look beautiful. Good morning. It is these beautiful

:52:41.:52:59.

tiles, isn't it? That makes you think it is historic pools and how

:53:00.:53:02.

fantastic they are. But have a look through here. This is the glorious

:53:03.:53:10.

Victoria baths in Manchester. A hive of activity. Good morning to you

:53:11.:53:16.

all. There is something wrong with these curtains. They are a little

:53:17.:53:20.

short. Ladies out there. Good morning. They are an Bunting duty

:53:21.:53:25.

because this is the big weekend for a big swing to raise money to reopen

:53:26.:53:30.

this place. There are fights like this happening right across the

:53:31.:53:31.

country. This is a special moment in the new

:53:32.:53:43.

history of this old pool. How excited are you for this moment? Oh,

:53:44.:53:47.

really excited because it has been 24 years says the public has had

:53:48.:53:52.

access to the pool so I think it will be really good fun. This

:53:53.:53:55.

weekend, Manchester's Victoria baths will be filled with the sounds of

:53:56.:54:01.

swimming once again. Another historic pools saved from closure by

:54:02.:54:05.

a dedicated team of local heroes, exactly what happened in leads. --

:54:06.:54:22.

Leeds. We were afraid of losing it. Here, in Leeds, in 2013 the future

:54:23.:54:27.

of the pool was threatened. We were inspired by the people who did not

:54:28.:54:31.

want it to close and become a museum. It was a team effort. The

:54:32.:54:36.

public step that is a bit and now support us. A rallying cry went out

:54:37.:54:40.

for volunteers to turn it around. Today, it is run by the community as

:54:41.:54:46.

a social enterprise. How old are you? Can I ask? I am 86. And you

:54:47.:54:53.

have been coming here since you were...? Since I was five. It was

:54:54.:54:57.

beautiful back then. It has always been like this. Will you be coming

:54:58.:55:02.

here for quite sometime? I do hope so. I hope to hit 100 if I am lucky.

:55:03.:55:09.

In Newcastle the community came together when the threat of closure

:55:10.:55:15.

turned into reality. When we heard that the Turkish baths were going to

:55:16.:55:19.

close, I can't tell you the reaction. The site has been used by

:55:20.:55:26.

generations before me and I thought that future generations would not

:55:27.:55:30.

have use of it and that thought was so sad. This pool in the Turkish

:55:31.:55:35.

bath which lie beneath closed in 2013. A victim of council cuts. At

:55:36.:55:40.

another dedicated local campaign means that they will soon reopen. It

:55:41.:55:45.

is coming up towards its 100th year. It will have every chance now of

:55:46.:55:51.

moving into its second century. That does not hop on and off in this day

:55:52.:55:56.

and age. The pool is magnificent but this... This is the real gem, isn't

:55:57.:56:07.

it? When you came down those stairs with the towel you are going down

:56:08.:56:13.

into a place of rest and relaxation. The jewel in the crown of the pool.

:56:14.:56:20.

So, early next year after a ?5 million redevelopment by a charity

:56:21.:56:24.

this place will reopen. Britain has lost just under half of its historic

:56:25.:56:27.

pools. Campaigns like this are race against time.

:56:28.:56:38.

It really is a race against time. Half of the pools of gone, half of

:56:39.:56:52.

them as lost the fight to be bought back to life. We will have more for

:56:53.:56:57.

you later. We lost the sound a little bit there but we got the

:56:58.:57:00.

gist. It looks unbelievably beautiful. It made me want to go for

:57:01.:57:07.

a swim. How gorgeous. I might do it in a

:57:08.:00:28.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay.

:00:29.:00:31.

Thousands of weapons have been seized from schools.

:00:32.:00:33.

They include samurai swords, axes and air guns and involve

:00:34.:00:35.

Also this morning, Jeremy Corbyn insists he's not a pacifist

:00:36.:01:00.

and he'll be strong on defence as Theresa May targets traditional

:01:01.:01:03.

No phone signal is a problem affecting more than two thirds

:01:04.:01:09.

of businesses - this morning I'm looking at why they're pushing

:01:10.:01:12.

companies to give them better coverage.

:01:13.:01:18.

In sport, joy for Jose - his Manchester United side

:01:19.:01:21.

are through to the Europa League final.

:01:22.:01:24.

They beat Celta Vigo 2-1 on aggregate to secure their place

:01:25.:01:29.

in the Stockholm showpiece, later this month.

:01:30.:01:35.

Good morning from all of us here at Manchester's historic pool. How

:01:36.:01:45.

inviting does it look? It has been refilled for the first public 24

:01:46.:01:50.

years. More on the fight to bring these beautiful places back to life

:01:51.:01:55.

later on. There you to jump in. Matt has the weather for us. Actually, he

:01:56.:02:00.

doesn't, right now. He will be back later on. It is changeable, a bit

:02:01.:02:04.

misty in the south. You would be glad of an indoor swimming pool.

:02:05.:02:07.

Thousands of weapons have been seized in schools

:02:08.:02:10.

They include swords, axes and air guns.

:02:11.:02:13.

Some of the cases involved children as young as five.

:02:14.:02:16.

Police chiefs said there had been a "worrying increase" in young

:02:17.:02:19.

Some schools have taken to using metal arches to make sure

:02:20.:02:26.

no weapons are brought on to their premises.

:02:27.:02:29.

But figures obtained by the Press Association show

:02:30.:02:31.

that the number of seizures in the last year is up about 20%

:02:32.:02:35.

32 out of 43 police forces in England

:02:36.:02:41.

and Wales responded to freedom of information requests

:02:42.:02:43.

The figures showed that 2,579 weapons were found in the two years

:02:44.:02:52.

Among them were samurai swords, axes and

:02:53.:02:59.

Many of the children were below the age of ten,

:03:00.:03:08.

and one 5-year-old was caught with a knife.

:03:09.:03:10.

Just one stab wound, that went straight in his heart.

:03:11.:03:13.

The National Police Chiefs Council said the increase in young

:03:14.:03:16.

people carrying weapons was worrying.

:03:17.:03:17.

It said it wanted to educate people that carrying a weapon illegally

:03:18.:03:20.

And we will be speaking about that much more throughout the programme

:03:21.:03:35.

this morning. The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn,

:03:36.:03:36.

will this morning give a speech on foreign affairs and insist

:03:37.:03:39.

he isn't a pacifist and he's prepared to use military

:03:40.:03:42.

force as a last resort. The Prime Minister will make her own

:03:43.:03:45.

pitch to traditional Labour voters She'll accuse Mr Corbyn of deserting

:03:46.:03:48.

"patriotic working class people." Our political correspondent

:03:49.:03:54.

Eleanor Garnier is in Westminster Eleanor, both leaders are addressing

:03:55.:03:56.

perceived weaknesses That is right. Jeremy Corbyn,

:03:57.:04:09.

remember, is a former chairman of the Stop the War Coalition, a

:04:10.:04:11.

long-standing critic of military intervention in Iraq, Syria and the

:04:12.:04:16.

Denistone. Today he is putting forward his case full being a

:04:17.:04:20.

potential world leader, saying that he is not a pacifist and is capable

:04:21.:04:24.

of ordering military action as a genuine last resort and only under

:04:25.:04:29.

international law. He will also have a pop at Theresa May, saying that

:04:30.:04:32.

she is pandering to Donald Trump, and saying that under him, Labour's

:04:33.:04:36.

foreign policy would not involve holding the hands of the US

:04:37.:04:40.

president. Theresa May is getting pretty personal today as well. Her

:04:41.:04:43.

speech in the north-east of England is designed to win over people who

:04:44.:04:47.

have voted for Labour generation after generation. She will accuse

:04:48.:04:51.

Jeremy Corbyn of turning his back on proud patriot it working class

:04:52.:04:55.

people. Putting herself forward is the only candidate who can take the

:04:56.:05:00.

country through Brexit negotiations. The Lib Dems are focusing on

:05:01.:05:04.

parenting today. They say that under them, dads would get an extra month

:05:05.:05:08.

of paid eternity leave. They are calling its daddy month. A former

:05:09.:05:12.

Lib Dem minister told us that it was all about putting forward equal

:05:13.:05:16.

parenting and putting a value on the amount of input that fathers can

:05:17.:05:21.

have in children's lives. , thank you. -- Eleanor, thank you.

:05:22.:05:29.

Donald Trump has been defending his decision to sack

:05:30.:05:31.

In a TV interview last night he called him a showboat

:05:32.:05:36.

In his first extensive television interview since he sacked the FBI's

:05:37.:05:39.

director James Comey, he told the American network NBC

:05:40.:05:42.

News that he wasn't under investigation himself.

:05:43.:05:44.

Our Washington correspondent Laura Bicker reports.

:05:45.:05:45.

When did Donald Trump decide to sack the towering

:05:46.:05:51.

This presidential handshake not an act of friendship,

:05:52.:05:56.

it seems, but the beginning of the end for James

:05:57.:05:58.

He's a showboater, he's a grandstander.

:05:59.:06:03.

Attorney-General, as the White House stated, it came directly

:06:04.:06:10.

The White House claims that James Comey had little

:06:11.:06:20.

The rank and file of the FBI have lost

:06:21.:06:24.

Not so, said the Acting FBI Director,

:06:25.:06:32.

who was sitting in for his sacked boss before the Senate intelligence

:06:33.:06:35.

Director Comey enjoyed broad support within the FBI,

:06:36.:06:38.

At the heart of this row is the alleged collusion

:06:39.:06:44.

between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

:06:45.:06:48.

The President admits that Russia was on his mind when he decided

:06:49.:06:51.

And in fact, when I decided to just do it,

:06:52.:06:57.

I said to myself, you know, this Russia thing, with Trump

:06:58.:07:00.

and Russia, it's a made-up story, it's

:07:01.:07:06.

an excuse by the Democrats for having lost an election.

:07:07.:07:08.

Donald Trump denies any collusion with Russia and insists that

:07:09.:07:11.

despite sacking the head of the FBI, he wants any enquiry

:07:12.:07:14.

Detectives investigating the death of a businessman,

:07:15.:07:26.

who was shot dead during a suspected burglary at his home in Dorset,

:07:27.:07:29.

Police say a 45-year-old man from Poole is being questioned

:07:30.:07:33.

on suspicion of conspiracy to commit aggravated burglary.

:07:34.:07:35.

Three men have been charged with murdering Guy Hedger

:07:36.:07:38.

during the May Day Bank Holiday weekend.

:07:39.:07:48.

It's the finals of the Eurovision song contest tomorrow.

:07:49.:07:50.

Last night Ireland crashed out of the semifinals but the UK

:07:51.:07:53.

will be represented by the former X-factor contestant

:07:54.:07:55.

But there's speculation that Brexit could affect the UK's

:07:56.:07:59.

Steve Rosenberg reports from the Ukraine.

:08:00.:08:15.

Love it or hate it, here's one European institution the UK

:08:16.:08:18.

It's the final of the Eurovision Song contest this Saturday in Kiev.

:08:19.:08:32.

Lucie Jones is flying the UK's flag, but will Brexit mean that it meets

:08:33.:08:36.

In recent years it has been hard enough

:08:37.:08:46.

for the United Kingdom to get points from our European neighbours

:08:47.:08:49.

when we have been on speaking terms with

:08:50.:08:51.

But now that we are leaving the EU in an atmosphere

:08:52.:08:55.

of acute disharmony, will that condemn the UK to eternal

:08:56.:08:57.

They may be excited about Eurovision in Kiev,

:08:58.:09:04.

but Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May

:09:05.:09:06.

has warned that Brexit could scupper the UK's Eurovision party.

:09:07.:09:10.

Well, is the Prime Minister a Eurovision fan?

:09:11.:09:17.

I can't imagine her sat with her flag at home.

:09:18.:09:20.

Brexit is so far out of my hands and my control.

:09:21.:09:25.

The signs are that Europe has not fallen

:09:26.:09:27.

We have discovered that even the French love

:09:28.:09:31.

Well - so that France wouldn't come last.

:09:32.:09:35.

France is very bad, but England is worse,

:09:36.:09:37.

And being happy is what Eurovision is all about.

:09:38.:09:40.

The UK hasn't won the contest for 20 years.

:09:41.:09:56.

Eurovision is tomorrow night. We will beat the King lives to Steve in

:09:57.:10:05.

Kiev just after eight o'clock. -- we will ease speaking. -- be speaking.

:10:06.:10:09.

Imagine enjoying a swim in the ocean just off the coast of California

:10:10.:10:12.

This is the Orange County Sheriff's Department.

:10:13.:10:18.

Be advised, State Parks is asking us to make an announcement to let

:10:19.:10:22.

you know you are paddle-boarding next to approximately 15

:10:23.:10:24.

They are advising that you exit the water in a calm manner.

:10:25.:10:38.

That's the Orange County Sheriff's Department warning a group

:10:39.:10:46.

of paddle-boarders they're swimming next to 15 great white sharks.

:10:47.:10:50.

Just to let you know. Just 15. Just thought you might want to be away UI

:10:51.:10:58.

next to a predator. You might want to calmly leave the water. A woman

:10:59.:11:05.

was bitten there last month, you would think people would be very,

:11:06.:11:09.

very much away. I couldn't get out of that water soon enough.

:11:10.:11:11.

Matt will have the weather in around 10 minutes.

:11:12.:11:16.

It looks like the weather will be breaking over the next few days. Not

:11:17.:11:22.

so much sunshine, but he will be talking about who will be hit by the

:11:23.:11:24.

rains soon. We're about half way

:11:25.:11:24.

through the general election campaign now with just over four

:11:25.:11:27.

weeks to go until polling day. The deadline's now passed

:11:28.:11:30.

for the political parties We'll be getting the official list

:11:31.:11:32.

of who is standing where on Monday but let's chat about what we know

:11:33.:11:37.

so far with political analyst Good morning, John. Thank you for

:11:38.:11:53.

joining us. Good morning. What are you looking for, when you go through

:11:54.:11:57.

these potential lists on Monday, of who is work, in terms of numbers and

:11:58.:12:01.

parties and who is fielding how many candidates, what are the biggest

:12:02.:12:06.

changes since the last election? I think undoubtedly the biggest

:12:07.:12:09.

changes will be that we will have fewer Ukip candidates. Last time

:12:10.:12:14.

around, Ukip fought all the seats in England and Wales. We already know

:12:15.:12:18.

that that will not be the case this time. We will also be interested to

:12:19.:12:22.

see how much the Greens will be fighting this time. I believe that

:12:23.:12:25.

will also be less. Lots of interest and speculation is already going on,

:12:26.:12:29.

because we can see the lists in many individual councils, as to what

:12:30.:12:33.

extent this standing down by Ukip and the Greens is simply an accident

:12:34.:12:38.

solve, you know, we simply cannot find a candidate or we do not have

:12:39.:12:44.

enough money to fight the election, and to what extent it is deliberate,

:12:45.:12:48.

ie trying to help out another party. We know that the Greens will not be

:12:49.:12:53.

fighting in at least half of the constituencies that the Liberal

:12:54.:12:56.

Democrats are trying to defend, and in some cases that looks to be

:12:57.:13:05.

deliberate. There is not one constituency the Lib Dems are not

:13:06.:13:12.

going to fight, and that is Brighton Billion, whether Greens want to hang

:13:13.:13:16.

onto their one and only seat equally, there is a lot of

:13:17.:13:19.

speculation that Ukip are standing down in some places to help out the

:13:20.:13:29.

Conservatives. That is some discussion with the Brexiteer MPs,

:13:30.:13:32.

they seem to be holding onto that promise. There are some places were

:13:33.:13:36.

Ukip of standing against the Lib Dems, not to help the Lib Dems but

:13:37.:13:40.

to help the Conservatives. And there are quite a few constituencies

:13:41.:13:43.

Labour are trying to defend, where again, Ukip are not putting up a

:13:44.:13:47.

candidate. How much of that is deliberate and how much is

:13:48.:13:51.

accidental is difficult to tell. But it will inevitably cause speculation

:13:52.:13:54.

as to whether it will make it more difficult for Labour candidates to

:13:55.:13:57.

win their constituents, if people who would otherwise vote for Ukip

:13:58.:14:02.

will switch the Conservatives. So lots of speculation about

:14:03.:14:05.

consequences of this fact that there will be fewer green and Ukip

:14:06.:14:08.

candidates. There seems to be considerably more obvious this time

:14:09.:14:12.

round. Is that right? More parties deciding to field here, but not bad,

:14:13.:14:17.

that sort of thing. It might be more out of necessity rather than

:14:18.:14:20.

politics, as you said, but it is not trained in politics. Yes and no is

:14:21.:14:25.

the answer to your question. At the end of the day there was lots of

:14:26.:14:28.

speculation about whether or not they would be co-ordination between

:14:29.:14:31.

the Greens, the Liberal Democrats and the Labour Party in terms of not

:14:32.:14:35.

standing down. Labour are standing everywhere, apart from against the

:14:36.:14:38.

Speaker in Buckingham, which is tradition. The Liberal Democrats are

:14:39.:14:43.

Mr Dhanin won the seat. It has basically been the Greens, who at

:14:44.:14:48.

basically in favour of a soft Brexit, unhappy about the UK

:14:49.:14:53.

leaving. Ukip, of course, other party of Brexit. It is those fringe

:14:54.:14:57.

parties who have to decide to make a decision about whether, in certain

:14:58.:14:59.

circumstances, they would prefer try to help somebody else when rather

:15:00.:15:03.

than stand a candidate themselves. Relatively unusual, it has always

:15:04.:15:07.

been the case of smaller parties to not necessarily fight everywhere,

:15:08.:15:11.

and they were set to make a choice. We have also had the same kind of

:15:12.:15:15.

debate in Northern Ireland, as to what extent there would be, on the

:15:16.:15:19.

one hand, a pact between the parties who are opposed to Northern Ireland

:15:20.:15:22.

leaving the European Union, that has not happened. Sinn Fein, as DLP,

:15:23.:15:29.

they are standing everywhere. With the unions, we are again seeing that

:15:30.:15:32.

the Ulster Unionists are being given a free run by the Democratic

:15:33.:15:38.

Unionists. Meanwhile, that is being reciprocated in north Belfast.

:15:39.:15:43.

Beyond that, again, we'll see unionist candidates fighting each

:15:44.:15:46.

other in the north. I think in the end we will find that there was a

:15:47.:15:50.

lot more speculation about pacts then we see in practice from get the

:15:51.:15:54.

full list of nominations. OK, John, thank you. We are halfway through to

:15:55.:15:56.

the big night. humid. Here we have the details from

:15:57.:16:14.

the roof of the BBC. Good morning to you all. Something else in the air,

:16:15.:16:16.

the lovely scent of wet ground. it is called. We have rain in the

:16:17.:16:29.

forecast. Many gardeners and farmers will be rejoicing.

:16:30.:16:36.

Yesterday we had showers with heavy thunder later. Let's look at the

:16:37.:16:45.

details then because we have the air coming up from Iberia and France.

:16:46.:16:49.

Bands of cloud are sweeping the rain northwards. That band you can see

:16:50.:16:55.

stretching into Wales and Midlands is where we have rain. Raining on

:16:56.:16:59.

and off at through the next few hours. Brightening up towards the

:17:00.:17:05.

south after overnight rain but the rain will continue to edge

:17:06.:17:08.

northwards into north-west England in south-west Scotland later.

:17:09.:17:12.

Northern Ireland sunshine and showers on. Scotland should be

:17:13.:17:16.

largely die except a few showers in the west and with central Scotland

:17:17.:17:20.

seeing the best of the sunshine again, highs of around 20 Celsius.

:17:21.:17:24.

After a cloudy spell in northern England, the sunshine comes out with

:17:25.:17:27.

heavy thunder showers moving in. Through the afternoon though showers

:17:28.:17:32.

in the Midlands and East Anglia will be pretty nasty with how mixed in.

:17:33.:17:37.

Southernmost counties, very few showers in the forecast and many dry

:17:38.:17:40.

after the wet night. Wash sunshine this afternoon, and quite humid but

:17:41.:17:45.

parts of Cornwall and into the south-west Wales will see further or

:17:46.:17:49.

rain at times. Wales brightens up again with a few heavy showers that

:17:50.:17:54.

cannot be ruled out that the Northern Ireland there will be

:17:55.:17:57.

showers not through the day. Predominantly cloudy with a little

:17:58.:18:02.

bit of sunshine. Tonight it will be reining in Scotland for once. Rain

:18:03.:18:06.

on and off through the night and into the start of Saturday. Rain is

:18:07.:18:09.

wharf in Northern Ireland and parts of north-west England. Elsewhere it

:18:10.:18:13.

should be largely dry, especially the further south and east you are.

:18:14.:18:18.

A cold start to the weekend and 11 degrees the general minimum. The

:18:19.:18:21.

northern half of the country, citing the week cloudy, misty and muggy

:18:22.:18:26.

across Scotland with outbreaks of rain. It eases off to sunshine and a

:18:27.:18:35.

few clouds. Warm enough in the sunshine as well. In Sunday,

:18:36.:18:42.

overnight rain from east to west across the UK. The thunder has

:18:43.:18:47.

showers wide across the country will. Most of the showers will be in

:18:48.:18:50.

the north-west of the country. You've been sending in photos

:18:51.:18:56.

of your retro gadgets. You know, the gadgets you do not use

:18:57.:19:06.

any more, they are little clunky. You think you may need them one day.

:19:07.:19:13.

Vodafone have decided to stop making a pager. I used to have one as a

:19:14.:19:17.

reporter. It would buzz on your belt. And many nurses and doctors

:19:18.:19:23.

had them as well. You have been sending in photos from years gone

:19:24.:19:28.

boy. Some of the Mars still in use. -- some of them are still in use.

:19:29.:19:30.

This is Karl Formstone's first mobile from the late '80s.

:19:31.:19:41.

Jason Crick sent us a photo of his MiniDisc player.

:19:42.:19:44.

Graham Richardson said he still uses this 14-year-old phone every day.

:19:45.:19:46.

Dawda Sanneh sent in this photo of her old Game Boy console.

:19:47.:19:56.

Look, there is a picture of as behind it to prove that it is today.

:19:57.:20:02.

Dawda Sanneh sent in this photo of her old Game Boy console.

:20:03.:20:09.

Lots of people signing here saying that they remember this.

:20:10.:20:12.

I wonder what he does with all of those phones. He even has a Frankie

:20:13.:20:26.

goes to Hollywood T-shirt. Hello? Hello? I feel like we are in a bad

:20:27.:20:36.

1987 movie. This is not actually a phone. Children, this is what used

:20:37.:20:43.

to be called a cassette player. This was a cassette and you would put

:20:44.:20:51.

this in. You would take the top 40 highly illegally off radio one. I

:20:52.:20:56.

remember doing that. You had to stop before the DJ started. This is a

:20:57.:21:05.

television. And now we have a 52 inch HDTV. How about this? A pager.

:21:06.:21:16.

I thought I was so cool when I had a pager. I had won a university, can

:21:17.:21:22.

you believe it? I thought I was so cool. Why would I need one? Yes,

:21:23.:21:32.

why? I got it second hand. This is really humiliating... Everybody

:21:33.:21:37.

referred to you is the guy with the pager? I think there could be some

:21:38.:21:46.

retro chic with pages. They have been in the news this week because

:21:47.:21:51.

Vodafone was the only network that still run a pager network and the

:21:52.:21:55.

point is that they want to get rid of it. The competition authority

:21:56.:22:01.

said no. It is still very valuable for people in the emergency

:22:02.:22:02.

services. Good morning. I will bring you up-to-date with

:22:03.:22:07.

some other technology stories. A London firm which makes virtual

:22:08.:22:10.

reality games has had a massive boost - a ?400m investment

:22:11.:22:13.

from a Japanese bank. It's one of the largest ever

:22:14.:22:16.

investments in a British technology The business called 'Improbable'

:22:17.:22:20.

was only set up five years ago. The deal is seen as evidence

:22:21.:22:24.

the UK's technology sector can compete with the best

:22:25.:22:27.

around the world. And finally housing charity Shelter

:22:28.:22:34.

say that half a million people are having to borrow

:22:35.:22:37.

money to pay the rent - This includes credit cards,

:22:38.:22:40.

taking out loans or borrowing Their research comes after the Bank

:22:41.:22:44.

of England lowered growth forecasts and predicted a tighter squeeze

:22:45.:22:48.

on incomes this year. experience either 'not-spots'

:22:49.:23:00.

or partial "not-spots" in their local area -

:23:01.:23:03.

that's where there is coverage The British Chamber of Commerce -

:23:04.:23:06.

who conducted the survey - is calling on mobile firms

:23:07.:23:11.

to improve reception Can I just say that you should have

:23:12.:23:23.

seen what is going on. This is perfect. I called be working in the

:23:24.:23:31.

city in the 1980s working with this. I think you could speak to the

:23:32.:23:35.

planet Mars with this. I used to have a phone that you would pull the

:23:36.:23:44.

aerial out of. Does anybody have four HP 11 batteries. They have a

:23:45.:23:49.

tape in, I want to know what is in it. I was trying to read my script

:23:50.:23:54.

and all I could hear was used to linger around with that. One problem

:23:55.:24:00.

that you did not have with a cassette player like that or a phone

:24:01.:24:06.

like that was cyber crime, did you? It did not happen. Such a modern

:24:07.:24:08.

technological issue. Did you know you're more likely

:24:09.:24:08.

to be a victim of cybercrime It's one of the fastest growing

:24:09.:24:11.

areas of criminal activity. In the fightback, police forces

:24:12.:24:15.

are now offering detectives specialist training to help them

:24:16.:24:18.

catch cybercriminals - and the BBC's technology

:24:19.:24:20.

correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones has In a hotel room, a man who may be

:24:21.:24:22.

part of an international crime gang His lair has all the tools

:24:23.:24:28.

of his trade and the police But this is not a traditional

:24:29.:24:33.

forensic operation where These police officers

:24:34.:24:37.

are being trained to catch cyber criminals and the hacker

:24:38.:24:41.

in the hotel is the exercise today, They have been given the skills

:24:42.:24:44.

to tackle the fastest-growing Some estimates say that up to half

:24:45.:24:48.

of all offences are now cyber. The hacker in this room has popped

:24:49.:24:58.

out for a while and the trainee Let's see what evidence

:24:59.:25:04.

they can find. It's not a smart TV,

:25:05.:25:08.

so you should be OK to unplug that. The first priority is to make sure

:25:09.:25:22.

that all the computers stay powered up and do not lock

:25:23.:25:25.

after a certain time. That way they can get access

:25:26.:25:28.

to data far more easily. I'm still seeing one

:25:29.:25:32.

laptop and one phone. Examining the router,

:25:33.:25:40.

they have discovered Hidden under a tray,

:25:41.:25:41.

a tablet with more evidence. The techniques they are learning

:25:42.:25:51.

should make hunting hackers Back in the day, on a scene

:25:52.:25:53.

like this for example the officers would turn up and literally just

:25:54.:26:03.

pull the electric supply out of the back of the computer,

:26:04.:26:08.

bag and tag it and then send it away from forensic investigation

:26:09.:26:12.

which could take months before they had any meaningful information

:26:13.:26:14.

back from the system. It's a case of learning skills,

:26:15.:26:17.

practical skills that we can utilise, no different to finding

:26:18.:26:19.

a gun at a scene that we can make safe for the public and then

:26:20.:26:31.

attribute to a criminal. We are doing the same with IT

:26:32.:26:34.

equipment and computers. Although people do not see this

:26:35.:26:37.

as the here and now I think it most These detectives are among thousands

:26:38.:26:41.

going through this type of training. As they try to keep up with a cyber

:26:42.:26:46.

crime wave that is getting bigger You do need to be very aware of that

:26:47.:26:50.

now, more than we used to be. Hello this is Breakfast,

:26:51.:30:34.

with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay. Thousands of weapons have

:30:35.:30:37.

been seized in schools Figures provided by 32 police forces

:30:38.:30:40.

to the Press Association shows that in the last 2 years,

:30:41.:30:46.

more than 2,500 weapons had been found in schools including

:30:47.:30:49.

swords, axes and air guns. Police chiefs say there's been

:30:50.:30:51.

a "worrying" increase in young Just after 8:00 we'll be discussing

:30:52.:30:54.

this with anti-violence campaigner Barry Mizen, whose teenage son

:30:55.:31:03.

Jimmy was killed in 2008. The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn,

:31:04.:31:09.

will this morning give a speech on foreign affairs and insist

:31:10.:31:13.

he isn't a pacifistt. Mr Corbyn will say that he is

:31:14.:31:15.

prepared to use military force Today the Prime Minister will also

:31:16.:31:18.

make her own pitch to traditional Labour voters in the

:31:19.:31:23.

northeast of England. While the Liberal Democrats

:31:24.:31:25.

are announcing that they'd bring in an additional month of paid

:31:26.:31:27.

parental leave for fathers. The evidence shows that when men are

:31:28.:31:37.

more involved in fatherhood, there are huge benefits. It is better for

:31:38.:31:41.

Child development. Children do better at school. The health and

:31:42.:31:45.

well-being of the whole family is improved. What we want to do with

:31:46.:31:49.

this extra leave is make it easier for new fathers to spend time with

:31:50.:31:53.

their children from those very earliest weeks and months.

:31:54.:31:56.

Detectives investigating the death of a businessman who was shot dead

:31:57.:31:59.

during a suspected burglary at his home in Dorset have

:32:00.:32:02.

Police say a 45-year-old man from Poole is being questioned

:32:03.:32:06.

on suspicion of conspiracy to commit aggravated burglary.

:32:07.:32:08.

Three men have been charged with murdering Guy Hedger

:32:09.:32:10.

during the May Day Bank Holiday weekend.

:32:11.:32:18.

President Trump says he wants a quick investigation

:32:19.:32:20.

into allegations of Russian interference in the US elections.

:32:21.:32:23.

In his first extensive television interview since he abruptly sacked

:32:24.:32:26.

the FBI's director James Comey, he told the American network NBC

:32:27.:32:28.

News that he wasn't under investigation himself.

:32:29.:32:35.

Could man's best friend be a bear's worst enemy?

:32:36.:32:37.

Here is a bear that has been making a nuisance of itself

:32:38.:32:41.

in San Gabriel Valley in Southern Califronia.

:32:42.:32:42.

Its been going into gardens, chasing other wildlife,

:32:43.:32:45.

walking on walls, rooting through bins and generally scaring

:32:46.:32:50.

Just being a general will leave. Going through the bins, scaring

:32:51.:33:00.

people, basically. Yeah, look at that. But Hang on a minute! It was

:33:01.:33:08.

not ready for that brave dog. He chased the bear down and he ran

:33:09.:33:13.

away. That is what you should do to all bullies, stare them down. A

:33:14.:33:18.

brave dog. I don't think he had read the text books. They, it's not all

:33:19.:33:26.

about size. In fact, there are whole websites dedicated to this debate of

:33:27.:33:29.

which animal would beat which animal in the ring. And apparently the top

:33:30.:33:35.

trumps animal is the elephant. Because it can just sit down on

:33:36.:33:40.

anything? Well, it has got its tasks, it has got its weight. Top

:33:41.:33:48.

trunks. Yes, exactly. Well, Manchester United are into the

:33:49.:33:52.

Europa League final. That is a trophy they have never won. It gets

:33:53.:33:55.

them into the Champions League if they can beat Ajax.

:33:56.:33:59.

Manchester United beat Celta Vigo 2-1 on aggregate to reach

:34:00.:34:02.

They went into the second leg at Old Trafford

:34:03.:34:06.

And Marouane Fellaini doubled their advantage

:34:07.:34:12.

after quarter of an hour with a fantastic header.

:34:13.:34:15.

The Spanish side had numerous chances to pull a goal back

:34:16.:34:18.

and Facundo Roncaglia did just that 5 minutes from time.

:34:19.:34:24.

The Celta goalscorer was then sent off along with United's Eric Baie

:34:25.:34:27.

It was a nervy end for the home fans - look how close the Spanish team

:34:28.:34:34.

came to winning it here, but United survived to reach

:34:35.:34:37.

They'll face Dutch side Ajax who, says Mourinho,

:34:38.:34:40.

will have an advantage in their preparations.

:34:41.:34:49.

Ajax plays the final, thinks about the final. Their league finishes

:34:50.:34:59.

Sunday and they will have 12 days to prepare. We still have three Premier

:35:00.:35:02.

League matches to play. Hopefully Crystal Palace doesn't need our last

:35:03.:35:08.

game. Because in the last game I am going to make a lot of changes.

:35:09.:35:12.

Chelsea will be crowned Premier League champions

:35:13.:35:14.

for the second time in three seasons if they win at West Brom tonight.

:35:15.:35:17.

They lead Tottenham by seven points, and need just one win from three

:35:18.:35:21.

The players are totally focused on the moment. They are feeling that

:35:22.:35:37.

this is an important moment for us, for the club, for the fans. We are

:35:38.:35:46.

in a good position, in a good position. But we mustn't forget that

:35:47.:35:51.

it will take two points to reach this target.

:35:52.:35:53.

Everton manager Ronald Koeman is prepared to lose one of his star

:35:54.:35:56.

players if he doesn't sign a new contract soon.

:35:57.:35:59.

England midfielder Ross Barkley still has a year left on his current

:36:00.:36:02.

deal but Koeman wants an answer from the player about his future

:36:03.:36:05.

by the end of the season in nine days' time.

:36:06.:36:08.

Andy Murray's difficulties since returning from

:36:09.:36:09.

He's been knocked out of the Madrid Open at

:36:10.:36:16.

The world number one was beaten in straight sets by the Croatian,

:36:17.:36:24.

Borna Corich, who is the world number 59 -

:36:25.:36:26.

and only qualified for the tournament as a "lucky loser."

:36:27.:36:29.

Murray has now failed to reach the quarter finals,

:36:30.:36:31.

in two of his last three tournaments.

:36:32.:36:33.

Rory McIlroy is six shots behind the leader

:36:34.:36:35.

at the Players Championship in America, after a difficult first

:36:36.:36:38.

He finished one over par after a round of 73.

:36:39.:36:42.

Masters champion Sergio Garcia, also ended the day on one over,

:36:43.:36:45.

but had a slightly more memorable round.

:36:46.:36:47.

Mainly because he hit a hole-in-one on the 17th.

:36:48.:36:57.

He hadn't had the greatest round until then, he was 3 over par

:36:58.:37:01.

until this point, but he likes it, the crowd loves it.

:37:02.:37:03.

Durham beat Nottinghamshire, by 4 wickets in their One Day Cup

:37:04.:37:06.

match, but one astonishing six from Alex Hales stole the headlines.

:37:07.:37:10.

He managed a total of three, in his innings of 104.

:37:11.:37:12.

But with this one, he found the only open window

:37:13.:37:15.

And the ball was picked up by one of the two gentlemen from the BBC

:37:16.:37:21.

Here's how it went for BBC Radio Nottingham's Dave

:37:22.:37:24.

COMMENTATOR: Hales hits this towards me -

:37:25.:37:26.

It's coming to our commentary position!

:37:27.:37:31.

That is his catchphrase from now on. Actually, he is not as unlucky as

:37:32.:37:46.

Edward Bevan, who has been hitting the common terry box. He has been

:37:47.:37:51.

hit three times! It has come through the window, smashed the window, and

:37:52.:37:55.

hit him in the head. Occupational hazard! Yes, they should have to

:37:56.:37:59.

have an extra player on watch for the ball coming for him. I love it.

:38:00.:38:05.

I think Mike might also remember some of the next little gadgets we

:38:06.:38:06.

are going to be talking about. VHS players, fax machines

:38:07.:38:08.

and portable cassette players - the gadgets of years gone by,

:38:09.:38:11.

once cutting edge but now taken over by things like smartphones

:38:12.:38:14.

and tablet computers. The pager is a device most would put

:38:15.:38:16.

in that category but they're still used by some groups,

:38:17.:38:20.

such as workers in the emergency services, who value the beeper's

:38:21.:38:23.

reliability and wide coverage. There are only two providers left

:38:24.:38:25.

in the UK and now one of them, Vodafone, has announced they're

:38:26.:38:29.

shutting the service down. I don't even really know what this

:38:30.:38:35.

is. We are going to find out. And that is a pager.

:38:36.:38:43.

There are only two providers left in the UK and now one of them,

:38:44.:38:47.

Vodafone, has announced they're shutting the service down.

:38:48.:38:49.

So does that mean the pager will join the other

:38:50.:38:52.

Nigel Linge, professor of telecommunications,

:38:53.:38:54.

That is a great title. Good morning. Good morning. So, have pages had it?

:38:55.:39:11.

Pagers as a pager, yes. At I would say the function is not obsolete. I

:39:12.:39:15.

carry a smartphone with me every day which has all these functions

:39:16.:39:19.

integrated. What happens is that technology evolves and changes its

:39:20.:39:22.

shape and function. The pager divided an important function. That

:39:23.:39:27.

messaging function, as you said, lots of people still needed. It is a

:39:28.:39:31.

small group of people. The emergency services. We all remember pictures

:39:32.:39:35.

of doctors wearing the white coat with the pocket, a couple of pens

:39:36.:39:40.

and a pager. That was there to alert them that somewhere in the hospital

:39:41.:39:44.

they needed to be contacted. And in lots of hospitals you cannot use

:39:45.:39:49.

phones. No, you can't. But the pager and the mobile phone are different

:39:50.:39:52.

technologies. They work in a different frequency, on a different

:39:53.:39:56.

network. And in fact, the pager, in many ways, has better coverage. The

:39:57.:40:02.

pager itself basically changed the way we lived and worked, didn't it?

:40:03.:40:06.

It meant you could always be contacted. It was OK if you are near

:40:07.:40:10.

a phone, but the pager came with you. It is the early stages of the

:40:11.:40:14.

mobile technology, the wearable technology that you carry with you.

:40:15.:40:20.

With most users, the pager user was the business and professional user

:40:21.:40:24.

rather than us, the general public. But also, the design was quite

:40:25.:40:29.

innovative. This is like a phone, you are chatting away, but is it

:40:30.:40:34.

just a phone? No! Open it out and there is a whole keyboard inside it.

:40:35.:40:40.

That is a Nokia communicator, one of the later versions. I feel like Star

:40:41.:40:49.

Trek. Yes, indeed. It is also personal organiser, it has

:40:50.:40:52.

applications on there. That is really where you start to see the

:40:53.:40:56.

integration of technology. Nokia were not the first to do that. I

:40:57.:41:04.

brought along the Ericsson. The Ericsson R380, not the first company

:41:05.:41:08.

to integrate technology in this way, but the first to use that important

:41:09.:41:12.

word on the box to describe what this thing has become, the

:41:13.:41:16.

smartphone. Just incredible. Looking at your phone that you have brought

:41:17.:41:20.

in, and this phone, from 30 years ago. Yes, that is the brick, from

:41:21.:41:26.

1987. What you could do on that, was make phone calls. What you can do on

:41:27.:41:30.

this tiny thing now, I mean, it controls your entire life. Yes, but

:41:31.:41:36.

the thing in your left hand, the big one, is truly a mobile phone. That

:41:37.:41:40.

is all that did. There is no text capability. It is an analogue phone,

:41:41.:41:44.

it made phone calls. The thing in your right hand, the smartphone,

:41:45.:41:48.

that makes everything. The fact that it makes a phone call is incidental.

:41:49.:41:53.

It is my camera, diary, email, my television. We talked about the fact

:41:54.:41:58.

that making phone calls was way down the table of things that we use our

:41:59.:42:02.

mobile phones for. Yes, in fact, mobile phone call minutes are

:42:03.:42:06.

declining every year. When we had that mobile phone I bet we never

:42:07.:42:10.

imagined that we would end up with a smartphone that runs your life.

:42:11.:42:14.

Well, that was also ?2500 when it first came out. That was another

:42:15.:42:17.

little problem. It is going to be about more integration. We see

:42:18.:42:21.

things like the smart watch. Early days, starting to develop. We have

:42:22.:42:27.

got a bit more wearable technology. What is also changing is our

:42:28.:42:32.

interfaces. So now, things are more voice-activated. I bought a new

:42:33.:42:37.

smart television before Christmas and I can speak to it gentler to

:42:38.:42:40.

change the channel. Voice activation... I have a wife to do

:42:41.:42:48.

that. Careful! Mrs Kay, don't worry, I will clip around the year. Anyway,

:42:49.:42:53.

all that sort of technology is going to continue to evolve and become

:42:54.:42:57.

more and more integrated. Yes, it is unbelievable. We are not talking

:42:58.:43:01.

about phone technology alone, this is an old cassette player, some

:43:02.:43:04.

people say that they still listen to them and love them. Well, vinyl

:43:05.:43:07.

records are selling again, surprisingly. Maybe these things

:43:08.:43:11.

will never go away entirely. I think we need to bring ourselves back into

:43:12.:43:15.

the modern era right now. Let's go to Matt, who has the first of

:43:16.:43:24.

everything. Matt? Yeah, I'm with the technology here. We were scouring

:43:25.:43:28.

the BBC office and we found this. What a beauty. At least this one has

:43:29.:43:34.

a rewind button. Can't you remember those days of rewinding a tape with

:43:35.:43:40.

a pencil? Ask your parents. Anyway, one bit of technology which has

:43:41.:43:44.

stood the test of time is the design of the umbrella. Some of you may

:43:45.:43:47.

actually need that today. Rain is back in the forecast for the next

:43:48.:43:51.

few days. It has been a while, well over two weeks as we had any

:43:52.:43:55.

recorded. There will be heavy showers today, especially for

:43:56.:43:57.

England and Wales. Some of those will be foundry. Rayudu get a

:43:58.:44:01.

sunshine, it will feel warm and humid. -- where you do. The change

:44:02.:44:06.

is because of where it is coming from. The air is coming up from

:44:07.:44:11.

Spain, France and Portugal, so it is inherently a little bit warmer. Lots

:44:12.:44:15.

of cloud at the morning, and rain at the moment across the Midlands and

:44:16.:44:18.

East Anglia. Fairly sporadic, pushing into north-west England

:44:19.:44:22.

around lunchtime. Southern areas will brighten up a little bit.

:44:23.:44:26.

Northern Ireland, a bit of sunshine breaking through the cloud amid

:44:27.:44:29.

occasional rain. The best of the driest weather will be in Scotland.

:44:30.:44:33.

This area is fairly cloudy and cool. West has a morning showers

:44:34.:44:36.

brightening up. It is in the central highlands where we could hit 20

:44:37.:44:40.

degrees. After a spell of patchy rain through lunchtime in northern

:44:41.:44:42.

England, things Bright and appear before heavy showers mid-on later.

:44:43.:44:47.

Those thundery showers through England, Wales and East Anglia in

:44:48.:44:50.

the afternoon, some with hail as well. The southernmost counties of

:44:51.:44:54.

England, with the exception of Cornwall, much of the day will be

:44:55.:45:00.

dry. Temperatures up to 20. For Wales, as well as rain returning to

:45:01.:45:04.

the south was later, after a brief bright spell, the rest of Wales will

:45:05.:45:07.

see thunderstorms developing later on. We shouldn't get any thunder in

:45:08.:45:10.

Northern Ireland, but predominantly cloudy and the organs of sunshine.

:45:11.:45:15.

Some occasional bursts of rain too. Into tonight, rain affecting parts

:45:16.:45:18.

of Northern Ireland, northern England and Scotland as well.

:45:19.:45:21.

Turning misty across Scotland. A fairly muggy night here compare to

:45:22.:45:25.

what we have been used to. Further south it should stay dry. Around 11

:45:26.:45:30.

degrees on Saturday. The start of the weekend, Scotland, Northern

:45:31.:45:33.

Ireland and northern England cloudy to begin with, outbreaks of rain,

:45:34.:45:35.

slowly brightening through the still some showers around. The further

:45:36.:45:39.

south you are, you are publish they drive. Only one of two light showers

:45:40.:45:43.

in the forecast. Warmun the sunshine with high as in the midteens to the

:45:44.:45:47.

low 20s. Sunday, after a spell of overnight rain, showers fairly

:45:48.:45:50.

widespread. South-eastern area is probably the driest throughout.

:45:51.:45:53.

Across Scotland, Northern Ireland and northern England, the showers

:45:54.:45:57.

could be heavy and thundery. Is it enough and sunshine comes out. Into

:45:58.:46:00.

next week we could see temperatures climb up that little bit further

:46:01.:46:04.

across southern and eastern areas. Mid- 20s possible, but only for a

:46:05.:46:07.

short while. That is your weekend forecast. As I said, a bit of

:46:08.:46:13.

welcome rain in the forecast for many of you over the next few days.

:46:14.:46:32.

That's a part of the country where your phone doesn't work -

:46:33.:46:36.

and research out this morning suggests a majority of small

:46:37.:46:38.

businesses have a not-spot in their local area.

:46:39.:46:40.

Ben's here to explain how it can be bad for business.

:46:41.:46:43.

Yes - this drives me mad - not being able to get phone signal.

:46:44.:46:47.

But as well as being annoying, it's affecting business.

:46:48.:46:50.

More than two thirds of firms say not being able to stay in touch

:46:51.:46:53.

is affecting trade including this firm in North Wales.

:46:54.:46:59.

It is a huge problem. We have installation teams we cannot reach,

:47:00.:47:06.

we do not know where they are and we cannot let clients know when they

:47:07.:47:10.

will be there. We use three G wherever we can on side so they send

:47:11.:47:19.

through pictures and checklists to make sure everything has been

:47:20.:47:22.

installed. The fact that we can not get those signals creates a huge

:47:23.:47:27.

problem. We pride ourselves on custom customer service and no

:47:28.:47:34.

phones in nor makes it difficult for us -- and no phone signal makes that

:47:35.:47:36.

difficult for us. Dan Howdle is a telecoms expert

:47:37.:47:37.

with cable.co.uk and joins me now. There are three different ways that

:47:38.:47:47.

we understand mobiles and the UK. First, the coverage from providers.

:47:48.:47:55.

The coverage maps are calculated using a map. You have a mask and a

:47:56.:48:01.

covers a certain area and measures the topography because that plays a

:48:02.:48:06.

part if there are hills in the wake and it gives you a rough idea of of

:48:07.:48:10.

where the signal hits. The problem is that as soon as you go inside a

:48:11.:48:16.

building with thick walls or a metal lift or something like that where

:48:17.:48:19.

things diminish. The second way of measuring youths... A report last

:48:20.:48:30.

week based on open signal data and that is an app that people have on

:48:31.:48:35.

their phone takes a silent measure of this phone signal level. The

:48:36.:48:39.

problem is that people do not stand in the middle of a field to take a

:48:40.:48:46.

measurement. We have holes in that sort of data as well. And then the

:48:47.:48:50.

third Way we understand it is through people 's own experience

:48:51.:48:54.

which is different from all the rest. From day today we find there

:48:55.:48:58.

are times when you cannot get signal and it is quite annoying for us and

:48:59.:49:02.

for business if they cannot do their job and that is a worry. Depending

:49:03.:49:07.

on the type of business, absolutely. This world is increasingly connected

:49:08.:49:10.

and it is increasingly difficult to do many types of business online. I

:49:11.:49:16.

can think of examples of people who are graphic designers all work in an

:49:17.:49:22.

industry where they are able to go and work at home so they think oh,

:49:23.:49:26.

what an ideal lifestyle. I will live in the country and do my work and

:49:27.:49:30.

then I can upload... No, that does not happen. So we see people calling

:49:31.:49:38.

on these phone phone companies to improve coverage. The reality can be

:49:39.:49:44.

sometimes different. We solve this problem. Is putting up more of these

:49:45.:49:52.

masts? In wide open areas of countryside where there are very few

:49:53.:49:58.

hills, the problem is easy to solve. In inner cities where there are many

:49:59.:50:02.

buildings and man-made structures in the way they create these little

:50:03.:50:06.

pockets where there is no signal at all. The solution is simply to

:50:07.:50:09.

shrink down the technology and rather than having a master it have

:50:10.:50:13.

a small cell, a smaller version of the items that are attached to

:50:14.:50:19.

mobile masts that send and receive a signal and to dock them in places in

:50:20.:50:24.

the urban environment, on the side of buildings and, you know, on posts

:50:25.:50:31.

as street furniture, essentially. That gets us into a whole other

:50:32.:50:35.

argument which is that nobody wants them on their doorstep, do they?

:50:36.:50:39.

Thank you for coming to talk to us. More from me after eight o'clock.

:50:40.:50:43.

Many of Britain's historic swimming pools have been closed over

:50:44.:50:46.

the years but now community groups are helping restore and re-open them

:50:47.:50:49.

This weekend, one of the oldest pools in the UK will welcome

:50:50.:50:54.

swimmers for the first time in nearly a quarter of a century.

:50:55.:50:57.

Jayne McCubbin is there - thinking of an early dip,

:50:58.:51:00.

It does look a glorious. Good morning. Isn't it beautiful? Good

:51:01.:51:12.

enough to dive in although I won't. And, look at the gang up here. Good

:51:13.:51:19.

morning. That is some of the 700 friends of Victoria Baths were

:51:20.:51:23.

fought to try and keep this place open. They are still fighting to get

:51:24.:51:27.

it open fully further public in the future. Chris, it is still chilly

:51:28.:51:32.

down here, 19 degrees I am told although it will get hotter for the

:51:33.:51:35.

big swing this weekend. Certainly it well. It will reach at least 27

:51:36.:51:40.

degrees. Listen, there are pools like this stoutly across the country

:51:41.:51:44.

that have not been reopened that are lying empty right now but the

:51:45.:51:47.

public, as you say, really is trying to fight back and save them.

:51:48.:51:54.

This is a special moment in the new history of this old pool.

:51:55.:51:58.

Oh, really excited because it has been

:51:59.:52:04.

24 years sinc the public has had access to the pool so I think it

:52:05.:52:08.

This weekend, Manchester's Victoria Baths

:52:09.:52:14.

will be filled with the sounds of swimming once again.

:52:15.:52:17.

Another historic pools saved from closure by

:52:18.:52:20.

Here, in Leeds, in 2013 the future of the pool was threatened.

:52:21.:52:42.

We were inspired by the people who did not

:52:43.:52:46.

want it to close and become a museum.

:52:47.:52:49.

A rallying cry went out for volunteers to turn it around.

:52:50.:52:58.

Today, it is run by the community as a social enterprise.

:52:59.:53:02.

And you have been coming here since you

:53:03.:53:09.

Will you be coming here for quite sometime?

:53:10.:53:20.

In Newcastle the community came together when the threat of closure

:53:21.:53:28.

When we heard that the Turkish Baths were going to close,

:53:29.:53:34.

The site has been used by generations before me

:53:35.:53:41.

and I thought that future generations would not

:53:42.:53:44.

have use of it and that thought was so sad.

:53:45.:53:47.

This pool and the Turkish baths which lie beneath closed in 2013.

:53:48.:53:51.

Another dedicated local campaign means that they will soon reopen.

:53:52.:54:02.

It is coming up towards its 100th year.

:54:03.:54:04.

It will have every chance now of moving into its second century.

:54:05.:54:07.

That does not happen often in this day and age.

:54:08.:54:11.

When you came down those stairs with the towel you are going down

:54:12.:54:26.

So, early next year after a ?5 million redevelopment by a charity

:54:27.:54:37.

Britain has lost just under half of its historic

:54:38.:54:42.

Campaigns like this are a race against time.

:54:43.:54:58.

It is sad, isn't it? I mean, look at the detail. All over the country

:54:59.:55:06.

there are places like this. Historic pools Registry records says that

:55:07.:55:10.

there was once about 370. Today, only are about 200. I am hearing

:55:11.:55:17.

from social media that you are disappointed that these beautiful

:55:18.:55:22.

pools are closed. So many have not been as lucky as this place and they

:55:23.:55:28.

have not been able to reopen. Let me bring Gill in now and who is part of

:55:29.:55:35.

the historic pools organisation. Why are so many lying empty when people

:55:36.:55:40.

love them? The buildings can be challengers. We had to spend ?30

:55:41.:55:44.

million on this and many people would just give up. But we are

:55:45.:55:47.

determined that this building shall not be lost. It is so important to

:55:48.:55:51.

Manchester and the country. The finest swimming pool in the country.

:55:52.:55:54.

Beautiful architecturally and history historically. This is not

:55:55.:56:02.

all bad news story. Many pools are reopening. Look at this. Croissants

:56:03.:56:06.

and coffee for the workers this morning. Neil, this is part of your

:56:07.:56:11.

history, this place. You learn to swim here. It was just fantastic. We

:56:12.:56:17.

used to have our galas in this pool and the children were shouting and

:56:18.:56:22.

screaming, you know... That they were bouncing off these tiles. Oh,

:56:23.:56:27.

yes. How about in 1993 when it closed? That was quite sad. People

:56:28.:56:33.

were campaigning in trying to get it reopened. We succeeded in 2003 with

:56:34.:56:37.

the restoration to start doing part of the building. But it is a work in

:56:38.:56:43.

progress, isn't it? They still have a long way to go. Doesn't it look

:56:44.:56:52.

gorgeous? We need to see Jane having a jump in there by the end of the

:56:53.:56:57.

programme. I don't think she well. We will have the headlines for you

:56:58.:56:59.

in a moment Hello, this is Breakfast

:57:00.:00:27.

with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay. Thousands of weapons have been

:00:28.:00:30.

seized from schools. They include samurai swords,

:00:31.:00:38.

axes and air guns, and involve Also this morning: Jeremy Corbyn

:00:39.:00:40.

insists he's not a pacifist and he'll be strong on defence,

:00:41.:00:55.

as Theresa May targets Japan invests ?400 million

:00:56.:00:57.

in a British startup, one of the biggest

:00:58.:01:06.

investments of its kind. I'll speak to the boss to find out

:01:07.:01:10.

how they'll use the money. I will report from key overhead of

:01:11.:01:18.

the Eurovision Song contest grand final tomorrow. Will Brexit scupper

:01:19.:01:26.

our chances or will our entry strike a chord with European neighbours?

:01:27.:01:32.

His Manchester United side are through to the Europa League final.

:01:33.:01:37.

They beat Celta Vigo 2-1 on aggregate, to secure their place

:01:38.:01:39.

in the Stockholm showpiece later this month.

:01:40.:01:39.

We will be live at Manchester's beautiful historic Victoria bus.

:01:40.:01:49.

Good morning, everybody. They reopen for the first public swim in the

:01:50.:01:53.

record of the century. They will have more on that in a little while.

:01:54.:01:58.

Eurovision maybe tomorrow but today the forecast comes with

:01:59.:02:04.

thunderstorms and maybe just a little bit humid and if you're

:02:05.:02:10.

making your mind up what to do this weekend I will have the full

:02:11.:02:12.

forecast in 15 minutes. Nil points! Thousands of weapons have

:02:13.:02:24.

been seized in schools They include swords,

:02:25.:02:31.

axes and air-guns. Some of the cases involved

:02:32.:02:36.

children as young as five. Police chiefs said there had been

:02:37.:02:38.

a "worrying" increase in young Some schools have taken

:02:39.:02:40.

to using metal arches to make sure no weapons are brought

:02:41.:02:47.

on to their premises. But figures obtained

:02:48.:02:49.

by the Press Association show that the number of seizures

:02:50.:02:52.

in the last year is up about 20% 32 out of 43 police forces

:02:53.:02:54.

in England and Wales responded to Freedom of Information requests

:02:55.:03:04.

about weapons found in schools. The figures showed that 2,579

:03:05.:03:07.

weapons were found in the two Among them were samurai

:03:08.:03:10.

swords, axes and air guns. At least 47 children

:03:11.:03:24.

were below the age of ten, and one five-year-old

:03:25.:03:28.

was caught with a knife. Just one stab wound,

:03:29.:03:31.

that went straight in his heart. The National Police Chiefs Council

:03:32.:03:33.

said the increase in young people It said it wanted to educate people

:03:34.:03:36.

that carrying a weapon illegally We'll be discussing this in just

:03:37.:03:41.

a moment with anti-violence campaigner Barry Mizen,

:03:42.:03:48.

whose teenage son Jimmy The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn,

:03:49.:03:50.

will this morning give a speech on foreign affairs and insist

:03:51.:03:59.

he isn't a pacifist and he's prepared to use military

:04:00.:04:03.

force as a last resort. The Prime Minister will make her own

:04:04.:04:08.

pitch to traditional Labour voters She'll accuse Mr Corbyn of deserting

:04:09.:04:11.

"patriotic working class people". Our Political Correspondent

:04:12.:04:17.

is in Westminster for us. What are their tactics? We are going

:04:18.:04:31.

to see some pretty personal attacks today. Jeremy Corbyn, a

:04:32.:04:38.

long-standing critic of military intervention in Iraq, Afghanistan

:04:39.:04:43.

and Syria and the former chair of the Stop the War Coalition, is

:04:44.:04:46.

putting forward a case for himself as being a future world leader

:04:47.:04:51.

saying he is not a pacifist and he is capable of ordering military

:04:52.:04:55.

action as long as it is a genuine last resort and under international

:04:56.:05:01.

law. He is going to have a pop at Theresa May by saying she has been

:05:02.:05:06.

pandering to Donald Trump and any Labour foreign policy under him

:05:07.:05:10.

would not involve holding the hand of the US president. May-mac is

:05:11.:05:14.

getting personal as well. Her speech in the Rockies of England is

:05:15.:05:19.

designed to win over people who have voted Labour for generations. She

:05:20.:05:24.

will say Jeremy Corbyn has turned his back on the working class people

:05:25.:05:28.

and put herself forward as the only candidate that can take the country

:05:29.:05:36.

through the Brexit negotiations. The Liberal Democrats say that under

:05:37.:05:40.

them fathers would get an extra month of paid paternal leave saying

:05:41.:05:45.

this would highlight the importance of shared parental responsibilities

:05:46.:05:48.

and the value that dads can have in children's lives. Halfway through

:05:49.:05:55.

the election campaign apparently. Another have to go.

:05:56.:06:01.

Detectives investigating the death of a businessman,

:06:02.:06:03.

who was shot dead during a suspected burglary at his home in Dorset,

:06:04.:06:06.

Police say a 45-year-old man from Poole is being questioned

:06:07.:06:10.

on suspicion of conspiracy to commit aggravated burglary.

:06:11.:06:13.

Three men have been charged with murdering Guy Hedger during

:06:14.:06:15.

Donald Trump has been defending his decision to sack

:06:16.:06:20.

In a TV interview last night he called him a showboat

:06:21.:06:25.

In his first extensive television interview since he sacked the FBI's

:06:26.:06:30.

director James Comey, he told the American network NBC

:06:31.:06:33.

News that he wasn't under investigation himself.

:06:34.:06:36.

Our Washington Correspondent Laura Bicker reports.

:06:37.:06:42.

When did Donald Trump decide to sack the towering figure from the FBI?

:06:43.:06:50.

This presidential handshake not an act of friendship, it seems,

:06:51.:06:52.

but the beginning of the end for James Comey.

:06:53.:06:57.

He's a showboater, he's a grandstander.

:06:58.:06:59.

It wasn't on advice from the Deputy Attorney-General,

:07:00.:07:02.

as the White House stated, it came directly from the President.

:07:03.:07:05.

The White House claims that James Comey had little or no

:07:06.:07:19.

The rank and file of the FBI had lost confidence in their director.

:07:20.:07:25.

Not so, said the Acting FBI Director, who was sitting

:07:26.:07:28.

in for his sacked boss before the Senate intelligence committee.

:07:29.:07:34.

Director Comey enjoyed broad support within the FBI, and still does.

:07:35.:07:39.

At the heart of this row is the alleged collusion between

:07:40.:07:42.

The President admits that Russia was on his mind

:07:43.:07:46.

And in fact, when I decided to just do it, I said to myself,

:07:47.:07:57.

you know, this Russia thing, with Trump and Russia,

:07:58.:08:01.

it's a made-up story, it's an excuse by the Democrats

:08:02.:08:03.

Donald Trump denies any collusion with Russia and insists that

:08:04.:08:12.

despite sacking the head of the FBI, he wants any enquiry done

:08:13.:08:15.

A London firm which makes virtual reality games has

:08:16.:08:24.

had a massive boost, a ?400 million investment

:08:25.:08:26.

It's one of the largest ever investments in a British

:08:27.:08:30.

The business, called Improbable, was only set up five years ago.

:08:31.:08:36.

The deal is seen as evidence the UK's technology sector can

:08:37.:08:39.

compete with the best around the world.

:08:40.:08:42.

We will be talking to the boss in about ten minutes.

:08:43.:08:51.

Imagine enjoying a swim in the ocean just off the coast of California

:08:52.:08:55.

This is the Orange County Sheriff's Department.

:08:56.:09:02.

Be advised, State Parks is asking us to make an announcement to let

:09:03.:09:05.

you know you are paddle-boarding next to approximately 15

:09:06.:09:08.

They are advising that you exit the water in a calm manner.

:09:09.:09:17.

That's the Orange County Sheriffs Department warning a group

:09:18.:09:26.

of paddle-boarders they're swimming next to 15 great white sharks.

:09:27.:09:26.

I like that. They are advising that you exit the water. Get out! 15. You

:09:27.:09:36.

would wonder how they did not spot them.

:09:37.:09:40.

A woman was bitten in the area at the end of April.

:09:41.:09:41.

She's arrived. I would not be getting back in the water.

:09:42.:09:54.

It's the finals of the Eurovision song contest tomorrow.

:09:55.:10:00.

Last night Ireland crashed out of the semi finals.

:10:01.:10:01.

The fourth year running that Ireland have failed to meet, make the

:10:02.:10:05.

finals. The UK will be

:10:06.:10:15.

represented by the former X-factor contestant

:10:16.:10:18.

Lucie Jones in Kiev. But there's speculation

:10:19.:10:20.

that Brexit could affect Our Moscow correspondent

:10:21.:10:23.

Steve Rosenberg is live for us Are we heading for nil points? I

:10:24.:10:31.

hope not. We have a great song and a great singer. You need the whole

:10:32.:10:41.

package. Everything. I think Lucy Johns is a very strong contender.

:10:42.:10:45.

She's edgy was a little bit nervous and she wants to do our country

:10:46.:10:51.

proud and I think that is going to happen. Good Brexit put people off

:10:52.:10:58.

about? That is what Theresa May said a couple of days ago. She said

:10:59.:11:04.

current circumstances could affect the amount of points the UK could

:11:05.:11:09.

get but remember it is not the EU contest or begin a paean contest, it

:11:10.:11:13.

is the Eurovision and there are countries taking part like Israel

:11:14.:11:19.

and Australia. I have been speaking to fans from across Europe and to

:11:20.:11:24.

journalists from across Europe and there is still of love out there for

:11:25.:11:30.

Britain and the United Kingdom and people appreciate that our country

:11:31.:11:36.

is famous for pop music and popular culture and a lot of people across

:11:37.:11:40.

Europe wants the UK to take Eurovision seriously and to do well.

:11:41.:11:49.

I was completely distracted by what we are seeing, the semi-finals on

:11:50.:11:55.

the television. These are some of the more normal ones. There are some

:11:56.:12:03.

white key acts out there. I do not know what you mean! Is there

:12:04.:12:08.

anything strange about standing on a ladder wearing a course's head? We

:12:09.:12:24.

are so used to talking to you as our Moscow correspondent but Eurovision

:12:25.:12:36.

is your passion. Absolutely. This reminds me of the Swedish winner.

:12:37.:12:40.

You learn something new about people everyday. I did not realise he was

:12:41.:12:45.

at an expert. His party pieces he can play on the piano anything that

:12:46.:12:52.

has won the Eurovision contest over whatever that is, 60 years, he can

:12:53.:12:57.

play it on the piano. That is a level of devotion I was not aware

:12:58.:13:04.

of. It looked beautifully sunny there. This is what it is like in

:13:05.:13:09.

Glasgow, looking lovely. A nice bit of sunshine. There is a bit of rain

:13:10.:13:15.

around this morning after a dry couple of weeks.

:13:16.:13:23.

The sun was shining on Glasgow. We are flying the flag for gardeners

:13:24.:13:29.

and farmers because we desperately need the rain and it is in the

:13:30.:13:34.

forecast. If you are after rain, some of the showers could be heavy

:13:35.:13:39.

and fungi and in between it is going to feel quite humid. The weather is

:13:40.:13:46.

coming from the south. Close working northwards. That is a cross East

:13:47.:13:57.

Anglia. Outbreaks of rain here for the rest of the rush-hour and the

:13:58.:14:00.

morning and pushing into northern parts of England. A few parts of

:14:01.:14:05.

rain for Northern Ireland. The driest weather in Scotland. This

:14:06.:14:13.

afternoon in the sunshine the central highlands could be 20

:14:14.:14:16.

degrees. Rain for Dumfries and Galloway. Brightening up for

:14:17.:14:20.

northern England before heavy showers moving for the evening

:14:21.:14:25.

rush-hour. Under a showers for the Midlands and East Anglia which could

:14:26.:14:28.

be nasty and places. Quite a lot of rain and a short space of time.

:14:29.:14:39.

Feeling humid once the sun is out. Western parts of Cornwall we will

:14:40.:14:44.

see some rain on and off through the day and some of that will spread

:14:45.:14:48.

into the south west of Wales this afternoon. Across the rest of Wales

:14:49.:14:53.

after a cloudier spell sunshine for a time then heavy and thundery

:14:54.:14:58.

showers. Showers not quite thundery in Northern Ireland but they will

:14:59.:15:03.

come and go throughout the day. Tonight the showers will fade away

:15:04.:15:06.

especially the thundery showers across England and Wales but it will

:15:07.:15:10.

turn dump across Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales. Temperatures

:15:11.:15:18.

foremost in double figures. Saturday, Scotland, Northern

:15:19.:15:20.

Ireland, northern England, predominantly cloudy, misty across

:15:21.:15:26.

the hills of Scotland. Things will slowly brighten up to sunshine and a

:15:27.:15:30.

few showers. Much of England and Wales it will be largely dry with

:15:31.:15:36.

some sunshine, one or two isolated showers. Overnight rain spreading

:15:37.:15:41.

from west to east and on Sunday sunshine and showers across the

:15:42.:15:46.

country, some heavy and thundery, particularly Scotland, Northern

:15:47.:15:49.

Ireland and north-west England. Feeling warm in the sunshine. Save

:15:50.:15:57.

all your kisses for me because I have 25 degrees next week! Somebody

:15:58.:16:05.

else with a detailed knowledge of your vision.

:16:06.:16:10.

I reckon somebody was not very early getting ready for those. -- with a

:16:11.:16:18.

detailed knowledge of Eurovision. Children as young as five years old

:16:19.:16:22.

have been found with weapons at schools across England and Wales.

:16:23.:16:26.

Out of the 45 forces in England and Wales, 32 provided data.

:16:27.:16:29.

Since April 2015 they found more than 2,000 weapons in schools.

:16:30.:16:33.

-- Since April 2015 they found more than 2,500 weapons in schools.

:16:34.:16:35.

At least one in five were knives. Others included samurai swords. They

:16:36.:16:44.

have also heard about taxes and airguns being confiscated. We are

:16:45.:16:54.

joined in the studio by an anti-violence campaign Barry Mizen.

:16:55.:17:04.

Council's lead for knife crime, Chief Constable Alf Hitchcock.

:17:05.:17:08.

Barry, you know about the unexpected consequences. Tell us what happened

:17:09.:17:15.

to your son, Jimmy. It was nine weeks ago today. He went to the

:17:16.:17:20.

bakery in the morning. He was attacked by a well-known local

:17:21.:17:24.

person of violent character. He had a glass dish. He smashed it in his

:17:25.:17:29.

face. It went through his neck. He died within a few minutes. Totally

:17:30.:17:33.

unprovoked. A totally innocent young man. Horrible thing to have

:17:34.:17:38.

happened. When you hear these figures about the numbers of

:17:39.:17:41.

weapons, all kinds that have been found in schools, and children as

:17:42.:17:45.

young as five have had some of them, probably not even realise what could

:17:46.:17:49.

happen if you have these things. What goes through your mind when you

:17:50.:17:51.

contemplate what you've been through? We are focusing on the

:17:52.:17:57.

wrong area. Absolutely fine, take the weapons away, but if we keep

:17:58.:18:01.

thinking about the end result rather than the beginning, why are young

:18:02.:18:05.

people carrying weapons, what is the need, what is the path some young

:18:06.:18:10.

people are going down? A lot of the perpetrators have an ever-growing

:18:11.:18:13.

history of more and more criminal behaviour, if you like. Are we doing

:18:14.:18:16.

enough early enough? I don't think we are. We are focused so much of

:18:17.:18:22.

punishment. Yes, there must be consequences, but what happened in

:18:23.:18:26.

their lies to get them to the way they are now? I hope you can hear

:18:27.:18:30.

what Barry is saying. Is it the case that once the knife is in the

:18:31.:18:34.

child's hand, or bag, going into school, it is simply too late, you

:18:35.:18:39.

have to start your work much sooner than that? Absolutely correct. Spot

:18:40.:18:46.

on. Knife crime for us is an issue of parenting. It's an issue of peer

:18:47.:18:53.

group. Those two factors in child psychology development will affect

:18:54.:18:59.

the child. Once you get to the point where they are taking a knife to

:19:00.:19:04.

school you are too late. The police service in particular are right at

:19:05.:19:07.

the end of the process when everything else in society has

:19:08.:19:11.

failed, we deal with it. You have got to do as Barry said, get in

:19:12.:19:15.

right at the start. You say it is parenting and peer groups, but it is

:19:16.:19:18.

also at issue of policing, what should the police be doing? The

:19:19.:19:24.

police work closely with schools. We work closely with the local

:19:25.:19:30.

councils. We in force. We have something called operation septa,

:19:31.:19:33.

which is a combination of intelligence, education, and

:19:34.:19:36.

enforcement. We are working very hard in this area. We are at the end

:19:37.:19:42.

of the process, not the start. Barry, you go into schools, you talk

:19:43.:19:46.

to young people about your experiences, Jimmy, what your family

:19:47.:19:50.

has been through. What do you see change in a young audience when you

:19:51.:19:54.

tell your story? How much impact can it have? The vast majority of young

:19:55.:19:59.

people, we should be proud of them, love them and nurture them. We get a

:20:00.:20:03.

great deal of empathy. There has been change in behaviour. The worry

:20:04.:20:08.

as we are focusing at the end result. What is going on in some

:20:09.:20:14.

young lives? What can we do? The worst thing we can do is ignore it

:20:15.:20:18.

and have an annual knife count and think that will solve the problem.

:20:19.:20:23.

Such a big question. It is. It touches all part of life.

:20:24.:20:28.

Absolutely. If we can change the narrative. OK, this has happened, we

:20:29.:20:34.

are annoyed, these are the consequences. But that isn't enough.

:20:35.:20:38.

What is going on in young people's lives to get to this point? From the

:20:39.:20:44.

report we hear that people as young as five are being spoken to. I know

:20:45.:20:47.

children at the age of eight and nine are having to learn more about

:20:48.:20:52.

knife crime and knife culture. In your experience, how bad is it? We

:20:53.:20:59.

have found from research that the peak offending pages used to be 16

:21:00.:21:05.

to 17. What we have found with research more recently is that the

:21:06.:21:07.

peak offending age is moving downwards. We see the range going

:21:08.:21:15.

from 14, 15, 16, 17. That is the peak area. There are these outliers.

:21:16.:21:20.

Sometimes the younger children are used to carrying for older children.

:21:21.:21:24.

They are learning from their siblings. They are learning from

:21:25.:21:29.

their peer groups. These cases are worrying. You don't catch those

:21:30.:21:33.

young people now, they will go on to be more serious offenders. Thank you

:21:34.:21:39.

very much indeed. And Barry, thank you for coming in and talking to us

:21:40.:21:45.

about Jimmy. We have a business story now. It is

:21:46.:21:52.

Saturday... It is Friday...

:21:53.:21:55.

What did I say? Saturday.

:21:56.:21:59.

Sorry, I'm normally hear on a Saturday.

:22:00.:22:07.

LAUGHTER Not the weekend just yet. Then his

:22:08.:22:21.

-- Ben is here to talk about this. Improbable, that is a firm you

:22:22.:22:26.

probably haven't heard about, but they create virtual reality

:22:27.:22:29.

software. It has attracted lots of interest. It has 180 staff. It is

:22:30.:22:34.

one of the biggest investments ever a tech start in Europe.

:22:35.:22:39.

So let's speak to the Chief Executive

:22:40.:22:40.

Good morning. Congratulations are in order first. As we said, people may

:22:41.:22:50.

not have heard of you. We said you are a virtual reality gaming company

:22:51.:22:52.

but it isn't just about games, is it? Not at all. What we are building

:22:53.:22:58.

could be the foundation of a new industry, the ability to make mass

:22:59.:23:04.

simulations for the world. To make better decisions, even doing your

:23:05.:23:08.

research. Let's talk about that. I've been looking at some of what

:23:09.:23:13.

you do. I find it fascinating. You may be looked at a city, think maybe

:23:14.:23:18.

we need to put in a new road, but what impact will it have, will it

:23:19.:23:22.

make the traffic worse? It is the everyday scenarios you can model out

:23:23.:23:26.

in this virtual world. Absolutely. And things like economic policy.

:23:27.:23:30.

These are things large-scale simulation can make an impact in.

:23:31.:23:36.

This Japanese firm have invested a lot of money in you, what will you

:23:37.:23:41.

do with it? Our vision is eventually to enable the ability to create huge

:23:42.:23:45.

wealth millions of people can participate in. That won't be easy.

:23:46.:23:50.

It will involve a lot of technical investment, a huge amount of

:23:51.:23:54.

additional research, and a lot of people. This is about laying the

:23:55.:23:56.

foundations for a long-term journey. What does Japan get out of this? We

:23:57.:24:08.

have a convergence of vision. They want to make big progressive

:24:09.:24:10.

technologies to make an impact on the world. Like a lot of investors

:24:11.:24:16.

out there in that space. This is a convergence of vision for us. You

:24:17.:24:23.

started in 2012. Well, the firm did. Forgive me, you look pretty young to

:24:24.:24:28.

have a ?400 million investment. What does it mean for you and the

:24:29.:24:32.

company? For us it is a huge validation of the journey we started

:24:33.:24:36.

a few years ago just out of college. It is an indication that the market

:24:37.:24:38.

we perceive is bigger than we imagine. It is great for me to

:24:39.:24:43.

continue to bring together some of the best people in the world to make

:24:44.:24:48.

this happen. People like my co-founders have sort of helped to

:24:49.:24:52.

galvanise us. And the additional funding will help go further. Thanks

:24:53.:25:01.

very much. It is also about confident in tech in this country.

:25:02.:25:05.

We've heard a lot about what companies are doing well. ?400

:25:06.:25:09.

million, one of the biggest investments into a British start-up

:25:10.:25:14.

company from Japan. We are going to stay with

:25:15.:25:17.

technology, in a way. Retro technology.

:25:18.:25:19.

Everybody loves this. This morning we're talking

:25:20.:25:27.

about retro gadgets after the news that Vodafone are going

:25:28.:25:30.

to stop making pagers. Still being used by

:25:31.:25:32.

some people though. You had one, didn't you?

:25:33.:25:44.

I did come as a reporter. Ben had one when he was a student.

:25:45.:25:46.

Yes, that bothers me. You've been sending in photos

:25:47.:25:48.

of your favourite bits of tech of his 1983 Apple computer,

:25:49.:25:51.

the first one Apple made - You can see that on the screen, it

:25:52.:25:56.

is still working. Brian still uses this phone,

:25:57.:26:01.

he got it almost 20 years ago! What is the music? Labyrinth

:26:02.:26:08.

soundtrack. Brilliant.

:26:09.:26:13.

Brian still uses this phone. He got it 20 years ago.

:26:14.:26:18.

I bet he did not use it to send us the picture.

:26:19.:26:20.

We've had a message from Abby, a junior doctor in Kendal -

:26:21.:26:23.

she still carries three pagers every day!

:26:24.:26:24.

I wonder why three. Battery life? One doctor earlier said in hospitals

:26:25.:26:35.

you cannot have your phone near imported equipment.

:26:36.:26:38.

The pager can still be used for communication. Because it doesn't

:26:39.:26:41.

send out a signal constantly. I would love to hear more about that

:26:42.:26:45.

as doctors are still using them. We have been hearing about cassette

:26:46.:26:49.

players, minidisks, mobile phones as big as your arm.

:26:50.:26:55.

My first computer was a Spectrum. I don't even know if it did anything.

:26:56.:26:59.

Commodore 64, was that one? travel and weather of course

:27:00.:27:01.

on our website at the usual address. Till then, it's back

:27:02.:30:20.

to Jon and Sally. Hello, this is Breakfast

:30:21.:30:22.

with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay. Thousands of weapons have

:30:23.:30:31.

been seized in schools Figures provided by 32 police forces

:30:32.:30:36.

to the Press Association show that, in the last two years,

:30:37.:30:40.

more than 2,500 weapons had been found in schools including

:30:41.:30:42.

swords, axes and air guns. Police chiefs say there's been

:30:43.:30:45.

a "worrying" increase in young Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn

:30:46.:30:47.

will this morning give a speech on foreign affairs and insist

:30:48.:30:55.

he isn't a pacifist. Mr Corbyn will say that he is

:30:56.:30:57.

prepared to use military force Today, the Prime Minister

:30:58.:31:00.

will also make her own pitch to traditional Labour voters

:31:01.:31:04.

in the north-east of England. While the Liberal Democrats

:31:05.:31:07.

are announcing that they'd bring in an additional month of paid

:31:08.:31:09.

parental leave for fathers. Detectives investigating

:31:10.:31:14.

the death of a businessman, who was shot dead during a suspected

:31:15.:31:16.

burglary at his home in Dorset, Police say a 45-year-old man

:31:17.:31:19.

from Poole is being questioned on suspicion of conspiracy

:31:20.:31:25.

to commit aggravated burglary. Three men have been charged

:31:26.:31:29.

with murdering Guy Hedger during President Trump says he wants

:31:30.:31:32.

a quick investigation into allegations of Russian

:31:33.:31:37.

interference in the US elections. In his first extensive television

:31:38.:31:40.

interview since he abruptly sacked the FBI's director James Comey,

:31:41.:31:44.

President Trump told the American network NBC News that he wasn't

:31:45.:31:47.

under investigation himself. I was going to fire James Comey. It

:31:48.:32:05.

was my decision. I was going to fire Comey. There is no good time to do

:32:06.:32:10.

it. May you said you accepted their recommendations, you had Audie made

:32:11.:32:16.

the decision. I was going to fire him regardless of recommendations.

:32:17.:32:19.

It's the finals of the Eurovision Song Contest tomorrow.

:32:20.:32:22.

Last night, Ireland crashed out of the semifinals, but the UK

:32:23.:32:24.

will be represented by former X Factor contestant

:32:25.:32:26.

Ten acts from each semifinal have gone through to Saturday's grand

:32:27.:32:30.

final and join the so-called big five - France, Germany,

:32:31.:32:32.

Italy, Spain and the UK - and host country Ukraine.

:32:33.:32:35.

Later, we'll be chatting about what effect Brexit could have,

:32:36.:32:37.

What's going on there?! That if Italy's entry apparently. Man with

:32:38.:32:51.

gorilla. Will be asking if Brexit might have an effect on the way

:32:52.:32:57.

people vote. A man takes on a gorilla, we have a story about

:32:58.:32:58.

another wildlife conflict. Here is a bear that has been making

:32:59.:33:04.

a nuisance of itself in San Gabriel Valley

:33:05.:33:07.

in Southern Califronia. It's been going into gardens,

:33:08.:33:08.

chasing other wildlife, walking on walls, rooting

:33:09.:33:10.

through bins and generally But the tables were turned when it

:33:11.:33:12.

came up against one brave dog, who as you can see stared the bear

:33:13.:33:23.

down, and chased it away and back The Bear retreats, the dog chases.

:33:24.:33:30.

How brave is that doggie?! Their licks wounds and planned its next

:33:31.:33:33.

target! Apparently there is a well-known

:33:34.:33:46.

game called animal versus animal. My nephews did it all the time. Random

:33:47.:33:51.

battles with animals. Apparently normally the bear would wind unless

:33:52.:33:55.

the gorilla had home advantage in the jungle. What about gorilla

:33:56.:34:01.

versus man in Eurovision? Has to be the gorilla if it's things! -- if it

:34:02.:34:07.

sings. Joanna Gosling has the Victoria

:34:08.:34:10.

Derbyshire programme at 9am Here's Joanna with details

:34:11.:34:12.

of what's coming up. Good morning. Today in the studio we

:34:13.:34:19.

are talking to Caitlin Jenna. As Bruce Jenner she won Olympic gold in

:34:20.:34:23.

the decathlon one and went on to become a reality TV star. Now she is

:34:24.:34:29.

the most famous transgender person in the world having made the full

:34:30.:34:33.

transition to living as a woman in her 60s. If you've got a question or

:34:34.:34:37.

experience you'd like to share with Caitlin, please get in touch.

:34:38.:34:42.

That's coming up on BBC Two at 9am this morning.

:34:43.:34:44.

Stress, sleep and switching off - GP Dr Rangan Chaterjee looks

:34:45.:34:49.

at the lifestyle factors playing havoc with our health

:34:50.:34:53.

as he moves in with two families to find out what could be

:34:54.:34:56.

He's been helping me, I'm going to tell you all about it!

:34:57.:35:08.

Britain's lost nearly half of its historic swimming pools,

:35:09.:35:10.

but some are being restored and reopened once again.

:35:11.:35:12.

We'll be at one of the UK's oldest baths to see how they're preparing

:35:13.:35:15.

to welcome swimmers for the first time in nearly

:35:16.:35:18.

After last night's semifinal, we'll find out who the UK's toughest

:35:19.:35:27.

competition will be in Saturday's showdown in Kiev.

:35:28.:35:35.

Will also be asking if Brexit will be a factor in the votes we might

:35:36.:35:42.

get ahead of the showdown tomorrow night in Kiev. I don't think that

:35:43.:35:53.

the lyrics matter in Eurovision. Boom Bang a Bang? Did the gorilla

:35:54.:36:04.

make it through?! Well, Manchester United have a Europa League final

:36:05.:36:09.

song to prepare for the match against Ajax. It's the first time

:36:10.:36:13.

they are trying to wind this trophy to complete their collection. -- win

:36:14.:36:19.

this trophy. Manchester United beat Celta Vigo

:36:20.:36:23.

2-1 on aggregate to reach They went into the second leg

:36:24.:36:25.

at Old Trafford with a single-goal lead, and Marouane Fellaini

:36:26.:36:29.

doubled their advantage after a quarter of an hour

:36:30.:36:31.

with a fantastic header. The Spanish side though had numerous

:36:32.:36:33.

chances to pull a goal back, and Facundo Roncaglia did that

:36:34.:36:36.

with just five minutes left. Both sides had a player sent off

:36:37.:36:39.

late on, but United survived to reach the final in Stockholm,

:36:40.:36:41.

where they face Dutch side Ajax. Ajax plays the final, thinks about

:36:42.:36:55.

the final. They will have 12 days to prepare for the final, and we have

:36:56.:36:58.

three Premier League matches to play. Hopefully Crystal Palace

:36:59.:37:08.

doesn't need the last game. Because in the last game I am going to make

:37:09.:37:10.

a lot of changes. Chelsea can win the Premier

:37:11.:37:14.

League title tonight. A win at West Brom would give

:37:15.:37:16.

them an unassailable ten-point lead over

:37:17.:37:19.

second-placed Tottenham. Victory would make Antonio Conte

:37:20.:37:20.

only the fourth manager to lift the Premier League trophy

:37:21.:37:22.

in his first season in England. Andy Murray's difficulties

:37:23.:37:26.

since returning from injury He's been knocked out of

:37:27.:37:27.

the Madrid Open in the third round. The world number one

:37:28.:37:39.

was beaten in straight sets by Croatian Borna Coric,

:37:40.:37:41.

the world number 59, who only qualified for

:37:42.:37:43.

the tournament as a lucky loser. Murray says he's

:37:44.:37:45.

concerned by the defeat. It's a huge weekend of rugby

:37:46.:37:48.

league, with the sixth round of the Challenge Cup,

:37:49.:37:50.

and with league leaders Castleford facing St Helens live

:37:51.:37:53.

on the BBC tomorrow afternoon. Already through to the

:37:54.:37:55.

quarterfinals, for the first time in 20 years, are Featherstone

:37:56.:37:57.

Rovers. They beat Halifax 24-12,

:37:58.:38:01.

with Scott Turner scoring two tries. And on tomorrow's programme,

:38:02.:38:08.

I'll be playing the version of rugby league in which the colour

:38:09.:38:11.

of your shorts depends on you age and determines how

:38:12.:38:13.

hard you can be tackled. To cricket, and Durham beat

:38:14.:38:20.

Nottinghamshire by four wickets in their One Day Cup match,

:38:21.:38:22.

but one astonishing six He managed a total of three

:38:23.:38:24.

in his innings of 104. But with this one, he found

:38:25.:38:31.

the only open window in a radio commentary box,

:38:32.:38:34.

and the ball was picked up by one of the two gentlemen

:38:35.:38:37.

from the BBC covering the match. Here's how it went for BBC Radio

:38:38.:38:39.

Nottingham's Dave Bracegirdle. Hales hits this towards me, it's

:38:40.:38:59.

coming towards me, it's coming! It's come into our commentary position!

:39:00.:39:01.

I've got it! Wow, wow, wow! Edward Bevan was even more

:39:02.:39:10.

fortunate, or unfortunate, he's been hit three times in the commentary

:39:11.:39:15.

box. On both occasions the ball came through the glass and hit him on the

:39:16.:39:25.

back or the head! Do remember a couple of hours ago we did a

:39:26.:39:30.

newspaper review and I said this problem rarely happens for men.

:39:31.:39:34.

Going somewhere and wearing exactly the same thing as someone else. We

:39:35.:39:39.

picked up this story in the Daily Mail. This lady bought herself a

:39:40.:39:44.

nice new yellow jacket... Do you remember I said this normally

:39:45.:39:52.

happens to ladies? It happened to me this morning everybody! It turns

:39:53.:39:57.

out, my blouse is also being worn this morning by TV presenter Leone

:39:58.:40:04.

from the Netherlands, today! It is totally tropical! So who's going to

:40:05.:40:13.

change it?! I don't mind, we'll style it out! Good morning breakfast

:40:14.:40:23.

television in Holland! How strange is that?! Thank you for all your

:40:24.:40:24.

messages! Most of the time when you visit

:40:25.:40:28.

a GP, you might get around ten minutes to chat to them,

:40:29.:40:31.

but in a new TV series, one doctor spends time living

:40:32.:40:34.

alongside his patients to see how their daily lifestyle could be

:40:35.:40:36.

affecting their health. Dr Rangan Chatterjee wants

:40:37.:40:40.

to highlight how things like sleep patterns,

:40:41.:40:41.

diet and stress can have a major impact on lots of different

:40:42.:40:44.

conditions, and aims to tackle his patients' problems

:40:45.:40:47.

without prescribing any medication. Before we chat to him,

:40:48.:40:55.

let's take a look at one of the women he tries

:40:56.:40:57.

to help, Gemma. Meet the Hughes family from

:40:58.:41:08.

Macclesfield. Nine-year-old Ethan, two-year-old Siena, dad Simon, 45

:41:09.:41:15.

and an aircraft engineer, and mum Gemma, 34. The 13 years she has

:41:16.:41:20.

suffered from excruciating headaches up to 16 times a day. Right in the

:41:21.:41:32.

back of my head at the moment. It's like somebody's driving a hot poker

:41:33.:41:36.

into your eye but it's in the back of my head as well. I've given birth

:41:37.:41:44.

twice and it doesn't even compare. Doctors have diagnosed her with a

:41:45.:41:48.

condition called cluster headaches, sometimes referred to as suicide

:41:49.:41:52.

headaches because the pain is said to be the worst any human could

:41:53.:42:01.

experience. It is so distressing to watch that.

:42:02.:42:04.

It looks like you had your work cut out there.

:42:05.:42:08.

We've been talking about these headaches on the programme. People's

:42:09.:42:15.

lives are restricted by them if they are suffering from them. You don't

:42:16.:42:20.

want to go in and give a tablet, do you? What do you do? Gemma was one

:42:21.:42:26.

of the toughest cases of my career. Watching that footage again, it is

:42:27.:42:31.

harrowing. It's one of the most uncomfortable places I've been in

:42:32.:42:35.

terms of being in someone's house, watching them in excruciating agony

:42:36.:42:39.

and feeling powerless as a doctor. The important thing is that Gemma

:42:40.:42:44.

has been under new urologist. She's already under regular care, she's

:42:45.:42:52.

Amber Heard GP -- neurologists. It wasn't helping her and it was making

:42:53.:43:01.

her feel and -- unwell. At one point she was getting between 80 and 90

:43:02.:43:05.

headaches are weak. I didn't know how I was going to help her. I went

:43:06.:43:11.

back to basics to try to figure out what could be driving her headaches.

:43:12.:43:17.

I identified about four or five things and tackled them all

:43:18.:43:20.

systematically. The results were fantastic. Probably one of my

:43:21.:43:23.

proudest achievements of the Doctor is to see how much I was able to

:43:24.:43:28.

help with those headaches. Obviously people will want to see in more

:43:29.:43:34.

depth but broadly what kind of things were they? The four factors

:43:35.:43:39.

with Gemma were, I changed her diet because there were certain things in

:43:40.:43:45.

the diet that can trigger headaches. I thought, what if there is

:43:46.:43:48.

something that may be contributing. I didn't know if it would be but I

:43:49.:43:53.

tried it. She was very, very stressed. A very busy mum, lots of

:43:54.:44:00.

parent child classes. She was taking her kids everywhere like lots of

:44:01.:44:05.

parents. I needed to teach her how to meditate and switch off. I needed

:44:06.:44:09.

to help her to understand how important it was to go for walks in

:44:10.:44:13.

nature. It also gave her two things which we often don't think about us

:44:14.:44:18.

doctors. There were some supplements I gave her that early studies have

:44:19.:44:23.

shown can help some people with some headaches. It's not going to help

:44:24.:44:28.

everyone but its risk-free so I gave her some of that. I also got a sense

:44:29.:44:33.

they could be something going on with her neck. I sent her to a

:44:34.:44:39.

muscular skeletal therapist. This combination approach saw a dramatic

:44:40.:44:47.

improvement. Some days she wasn't getting any headaches. I'm so

:44:48.:44:50.

passionate that if we start looking for the root cause of a problem, we

:44:51.:44:56.

can actually do so much. I think the viewers are going to find across the

:44:57.:45:02.

series we deal with cluster headaches, mental health problems,

:45:03.:45:07.

childhood obesity. Unexplained fatigue. We've got so many problems.

:45:08.:45:12.

The take home for the viewer is, and I'm telling you this after 16 years

:45:13.:45:18.

of seeing patients, but I think the majority of what we see comes down

:45:19.:45:23.

to four key areas in lifestyle. People know about food. I always say

:45:24.:45:28.

to people, you've got to eat well, move well, sleep well and relax

:45:29.:45:30.

well. The last two often get missed. You guys must be early risers to do

:45:31.:45:42.

this job, but for many of us without a job like your own, how many times

:45:43.:45:47.

are we tempted by the extra episode on Netflix rather than going to bed?

:45:48.:45:51.

An extra hour of sleep can have a profound impact on your health. We

:45:52.:45:57.

are all wired these days. We are on, we get up, on Twitter, social media,

:45:58.:46:02.

and the stream of information goes on the whole day until we go to bed.

:46:03.:46:07.

People need to learn how to relax and switch off. This is not soft

:46:08.:46:12.

medicine, this is real medicine. If we want to save the NHS, lifestyle

:46:13.:46:18.

medicine is what is going to do it. You get a ten minute appointment

:46:19.:46:22.

with a GP, you know, it is not long enough. How do you help GPs to look

:46:23.:46:29.

at things in a different way? Instead of prescribing tablets

:46:30.:46:33.

straight away? Great question. Time is clearly a problem. GPs around the

:46:34.:46:39.

country recognise that and are very frustrated we only have ten minutes.

:46:40.:46:44.

They do fantastic jobs in difficult circumstances. But it is not just

:46:45.:46:48.

time. Even with more time, we are not taught to think about cases in

:46:49.:46:54.

this way. For cluster headaches, we are taught to make the diagnosis and

:46:55.:46:58.

give a pill. We are not taught to look for the root causes. I am

:46:59.:47:02.

prescribing lifestyle medicine courses, teaching doctors now, doing

:47:03.:47:07.

more and more of that going forward, so I can show doctors how you can

:47:08.:47:12.

apply this. Some doctors I have already taught are applying this

:47:13.:47:16.

within ten minute consultations, but if you don't know in the first, you

:47:17.:47:20.

are never going to think about it. The way we educate doctors needs to

:47:21.:47:25.

change subtly. We recognise we are very good attitude problems, heart

:47:26.:47:30.

attacks, pneumonia, so many advances in medicine. But I think we are

:47:31.:47:35.

not... We could do better with chronic problems. They don't respond

:47:36.:47:39.

to this magic bullet approach, you have to do multiple things. I always

:47:40.:47:43.

say to people, think about these four pillars, eat, mood, sleep,

:47:44.:47:51.

relax. Figure out in your life... Are you neglecting one of these

:47:52.:47:55.

areas? For the next week, could you spend ten minutes every day

:47:56.:48:01.

meditating? Just switching off? Doing something mindfully? It is

:48:02.:48:05.

achievable and you can get results. People want this information. I get

:48:06.:48:11.

asked all the time by patients, I am writing a book to help them, because

:48:12.:48:17.

I am so passionate about the NHS... We can save it, not just by pouring

:48:18.:48:22.

more money into it, but by recognising that actually it's

:48:23.:48:25.

lifestyle problems putting it under strain, so we have to help.

:48:26.:48:31.

Interesting. I have to say you help me by my favourite piece of exercise

:48:32.:48:38.

advice ever, do less exercise! Can I tell you why? Lots of us are just

:48:39.:48:43.

working so much, we are burned out. Many women I see in particular, I

:48:44.:48:49.

find in any spare time, they are hammering it at the gym. Most people

:48:50.:48:54.

need to move more, no question, but some people need to move less,

:48:55.:49:00.

differently. My advice was to cut a high-intensity session and do some

:49:01.:49:05.

yoga. It is fabulous, it has changed my life. You look shocked! I am.

:49:06.:49:12.

Doctor In The House is on BBC One on Monday at 9pm.

:49:13.:49:14.

And if you have any questions to put to the doctor himself,

:49:15.:49:17.

Rangan will be doing a live chat with Sally,

:49:18.:49:20.

on the Breakfast Facebook page, after the programme.

:49:21.:49:24.

I will message on my ancient phone! Thank you very much. We need to

:49:25.:49:31.

spend a couple of minutes meditating and relaxing.

:49:32.:49:34.

Matt has the forecast from the rooftop of BBC HQ in London.

:49:35.:49:39.

As long as you listen while you are meditating! It has been dry over the

:49:40.:49:46.

past few weeks. In western Scotland, we have had 18 consecutive dry days,

:49:47.:49:52.

unbelievable. In Northern Ireland, a place with 17 days. It is all

:49:53.:49:56.

change, though, because there will be some rain in the next few days.

:49:57.:50:01.

Some showers could be heavy and thundery, particularly across

:50:02.:50:04.

England and Wales later. A bit of sunshine today, and feeling warm and

:50:05.:50:08.

a bit humid in contrast to where we have been. We have a layer coming up

:50:09.:50:14.

from Iberia and France. The cloud pushing northwards. The thickest

:50:15.:50:19.

across Wales, the Midlands and East Anglia, bringing rain into parts of

:50:20.:50:23.

northern England and eventually Northern Ireland and south-west

:50:24.:50:26.

Scotland later. Southern areas will brighten up, a few showers and

:50:27.:50:30.

thunderstorms through the heart of England in particular. In Northern

:50:31.:50:33.

Ireland, showers on and off through the day. Much of Scotland will be

:50:34.:50:40.

dry, cloud in the east, bright in western and central areas.

:50:41.:50:44.

Temperatures there about 20 this afternoon. Some rain in Dumfries and

:50:45.:50:49.

Galloway later. Brightening up again in northern England before

:50:50.:50:53.

thunderstorms move in this evening. The worst storms across the Midlands

:50:54.:50:58.

and East Anglia this afternoon, some with hail. Sunshine in between. And

:50:59.:51:03.

a bit more sunshine across southern counties, the exception being parts

:51:04.:51:08.

of Cornwall, which will see rain all day long. South-west Wales, a bit

:51:09.:51:12.

wetter this afternoon. Across Wales, more sunshine than at the moment,

:51:13.:51:18.

but be warned, some nasty thunderstorms around. A lot of rain

:51:19.:51:22.

in a short space of time. Northern Ireland, cloudy, some brightness but

:51:23.:51:28.

rain on and off. Showers and England and Wales will fade away tomorrow.

:51:29.:51:37.

Misty and muggy tomorrow to start in Scotland. Grey, and a cloudy start

:51:38.:51:42.

in Northern Ireland and northern England. Brightening up, with

:51:43.:51:46.

showers later on. Much of England and Wales, not a bad start to the

:51:47.:51:53.

weekend. More sunshine than today. A few light showers, predominantly dry

:51:54.:52:00.

by the south coast. A largely dry day in prospect. Temperatures in the

:52:01.:52:04.

high teens. Same on Sunday. After a spell of overnight rain, the

:52:05.:52:11.

heaviest showers across Scotland, Northern Ireland and parts of

:52:12.:52:13.

northern England. A rumble of thunder cannot be ruled out. A

:52:14.:52:20.

breeze on Sunday too. Early next week in eastern areas, the

:52:21.:52:23.

temperatures will rise further. We could see highs around 25 degrees

:52:24.:52:29.

for some in the south and east. For the time being, rain in the forecast

:52:30.:52:32.

this weekend, good news for the gardeners and the farmers. If you

:52:33.:52:36.

have a faint whiff of rain, the smell as it heads the dry ground,

:52:37.:52:44.

there is a word for it. It is called pedgicle.

:52:45.:52:48.

Many of Britain's historic swimming pools have been

:52:49.:52:54.

closed over the years, but now community groups are helping

:52:55.:52:56.

restore and reopen them for a new generation to enjoy.

:52:57.:52:58.

This weekend, one of the oldest pools in the UK will welcome

:52:59.:53:01.

swimmers for the first time in nearly a quarter of a century.

:53:02.:53:04.

Maybe not? There is no water! I am not, no! Sally, listen to this. You

:53:05.:53:22.

are not going to like this. This is the male first-class entrance where

:53:23.:53:25.

the water came first, it was then sent to the male second-class

:53:26.:53:30.

entrance. And it was sent to the female pool last. How things have

:53:31.:53:38.

changed. Isn't a gorgeous? Manchester's water palace. Good

:53:39.:53:43.

morning, team. Part of the team that has fought so hard to try and keep

:53:44.:53:47.

this place open. Working to get it ready for the weekend. We have

:53:48.:53:52.

prepared something special for you. Not a synchronised swim, a

:53:53.:53:56.

synchronised sweep. Take it away. Poetry in motion.

:53:57.:54:00.

There are teams like this up and down the country, fighting really

:54:01.:54:06.

hard to save their local historic pool. Not all of them are working,

:54:07.:54:08.

but some of them are. This is a special moment in the new

:54:09.:54:25.

history of this old pool. How excited are you for this moment?

:54:26.:54:31.

Really excited. It's been 24 years since the public had access to the

:54:32.:54:35.

pool, so I think it's going to be a great day, really good fun. This

:54:36.:54:40.

weekend, Manchester's Victoria baths will be filled with the sounds of

:54:41.:54:44.

swimming once again. Another historic pool saved from closure by

:54:45.:54:49.

a dedicated team of local heroes, exactly what happened in Leeds.

:54:50.:54:55.

The fear was losing it. Hello. This way? In Leeds in 2013, council cuts

:54:56.:55:08.

looked as if they would threaten the future of this pool. We were

:55:09.:55:13.

inspired by people who did not want it to close and become a museum. It

:55:14.:55:18.

was a team effort, the public so that up to save it and now support

:55:19.:55:25.

us. -- the public stepped up. Volunteers turned it around and it

:55:26.:55:28.

is now run by the community as a social enterprise. We had to

:55:29.:55:32.

convince the council. We met every week. We put a bid to the council

:55:33.:55:39.

saying we will manage this building and, what's more, we will run a

:55:40.:55:43.

proper swimming and sports centre for you. They did it, and today they

:55:44.:55:48.

are back in profit, and cherished by the community. I am 86. Coming since

:55:49.:55:58.

I was five. How did it look then? Crikey. Much the same. You will be

:55:59.:56:05.

coming for quite some time. I hope so. Looking to get to 100, if I'm

:56:06.:56:12.

lucky. In Newcastle, the community came together when the threat of

:56:13.:56:17.

closure turned into reality. When we heard the Turkish baths were going

:56:18.:56:20.

to close, I can't tell you the reaction. This facility has been

:56:21.:56:25.

used by generations before me, and I thought that future generations

:56:26.:56:29.

should have use of it. It was so sad. This pool and the Turkish baths

:56:30.:56:37.

which lie beneath closed in 2013, a victim of council cuts. But another

:56:38.:56:42.

dedicated local campaign means they will soon reopen. It's coming up

:56:43.:56:49.

towards its 100th year, and every chance of moving into its second

:56:50.:56:52.

century. That doesn't often happen in this day and age. The pool is

:56:53.:56:59.

magnificent, but this... This is the real gem, isn't it?

:57:00.:57:05.

When you came down those steps in a towel, you were going down into a

:57:06.:57:14.

place of rest and relaxation. The jewel in the crown of the pool. And

:57:15.:57:18.

this is where you would end up, fully relaxed, ready for a chat.

:57:19.:57:27.

Absolutely. Take me back. How did it look? It was so rich in clientele,

:57:28.:57:33.

always different. You might have an opera singer, the cleaners from the

:57:34.:57:39.

Civic Centre. You might have, and we did have ones, Victoria Wood, asking

:57:40.:57:43.

the cleaners how she could get her upper arms less flabby. They said,

:57:44.:57:48.

do a bit of cleaning, pet. They will came here. After a ?5 million

:57:49.:57:54.

redevelopment by a charity, this place will reopen next year. Britain

:57:55.:58:00.

has lost just under half of its historic throwing balls and

:58:01.:58:03.

campaigns like this are a race against time, but they can and are

:58:04.:58:06.

succeeding. -- historic pools. Such beautiful places. If Walls

:58:07.:58:18.

could talk. They had two Massow is in the Turkish baths in Newcastle,

:58:19.:58:24.

they were twins, I will say no more. It is so sad when these pools become

:58:25.:58:30.

derelict. So many people talking about this on Twitter and Facebook.

:58:31.:58:35.

These are pools in Wales, Birmingham, Manchester, right now

:58:36.:58:39.

derelict this by people desperately wanting to bring them back to life.

:58:40.:58:46.

It is so sad. This is Jill Wright, you have worked on this campaign for

:58:47.:58:50.

20 years but you know about the big picture too. Why are so many closed?

:58:51.:58:56.

What is going wrong? Traditionally we thought heritage meant stately

:58:57.:59:01.

homes and castles, but it is much wider than that. Historic pools, as

:59:02.:59:06.

well as being useful in the 21st century, they hold social history

:59:07.:59:10.

and sporting history. So much important sporting history within

:59:11.:59:13.

these walls and other historic pools around the country. The fightback is

:59:14.:59:19.

beginning. Hopefully we can see some pictures of other pools in other

:59:20.:59:23.

parts of the country where the campaigns have worked. Things are

:59:24.:59:28.

changing. Absolutely, the tide is turning. A lot of people saw us on

:59:29.:59:33.

TV in 2003 and said they were inspired that we were fighting to

:59:34.:59:37.

save Victoria baths and now we hear of more that are successfully run,

:59:38.:59:42.

in Blackburn, Northampton. So many of them. We are inspired by them

:59:43.:59:47.

now. When is it going to reopen properly? At least five years but we

:59:48.:59:53.

are determined to keep going. We can meet these people over here, Alison,

:59:54.:59:57.

who is by the way a very clever girl. Show me your certificate.

:59:58.:00:06.

For passing your 25 yard swimming test in 1969, right here! Wheeze to

:00:07.:00:15.

come with the school one day a week for our swimming lessons. Where the

:00:16.:00:21.

teachers believes? If you could swim you were OK but if you couldn't it

:00:22.:00:26.

was literally sink or swim! LAUGHTER These guys will be back for the

:00:27.:00:30.

first public swim and a quarter of the century this Sunday. What's it

:00:31.:00:35.

going to be like? It's going to be really exciting. As a heritage

:00:36.:00:39.

fanatic it's not only seeing something that's been such a big

:00:40.:00:43.

part of our history but we are going to be part of a historic moment,

:00:44.:00:48.

it's an opportunity we can't miss. Give us a spin, you look fantastic!

:00:49.:00:55.

Thank you so much for coming down. Come and see this. What's happening

:00:56.:01:02.

in the changing rooms? You see, they're going to be ready.

:01:03.:01:06.

Everything is fine. It's going to be so exciting. Tickets for this event

:01:07.:01:12.

sold out quicker than Glastonbury. Chris, put your mop down for one

:01:13.:01:16.

second. Normally this pool is empty but lots of fundraising goes on.

:01:17.:01:21.

You've had raves... We had raves, weddings, we have a gin festival.

:01:22.:01:30.

Then we have a beer convention in October. Fantastic. Long may it

:01:31.:01:34.

continue, they need all the money they can raise so good luck this

:01:35.:01:38.

weekend. Thank you very much for joining us. STUDIO: Congratulations

:01:39.:01:47.

on managing to not have to get into the water today! I add my new! No

:01:48.:01:49.

way! LAUGHTER Love it or loath it,

:01:50.:01:54.

the Eurovision contest is back this Saturday night -

:01:55.:01:57.

but will our chances of success Former X Factor contestant

:01:58.:01:59.

Lucie Jones is flying the flag for the UK, but Ireland is out

:02:00.:02:04.

of the running after failing to get Our Moscow correspondent

:02:05.:02:07.

Steve Rosenberg is live in Kiev Steve, what's the

:02:08.:02:11.

atmosphere like there? I know you are a fan of Eurovision.

:02:12.:02:25.

Tension must be mounting. It's really getting exciting. As you can

:02:26.:02:29.

see here in the centre they are trying to make Kiev look perfect

:02:30.:02:33.

before the big Eurovision party. They've been planting all morning.

:02:34.:02:39.

This reminds me of the famous Eurovision winner from 1984. This is

:02:40.:02:44.

the place people have been coming to get their photos taken. Down the

:02:45.:02:48.

Main Street, there are giant video screens where people can watch the

:02:49.:02:54.

grand final tomorrow if they don't have a ticket. Very exciting indeed.

:02:55.:03:00.

Theresa May the other evening suggested that maybe the UK's

:03:01.:03:04.

chances could be reduced this year, if they could be any more reduced

:03:05.:03:08.

than normal, because of Brexit. There could be a Brexit factor. The

:03:09.:03:13.

voting is always political but is that really a factor? The decades

:03:14.:03:20.

people have been saying that Eurovision has this political

:03:21.:03:23.

element. But this isn't the EU Song contest all the European Song

:03:24.:03:29.

contest, it is the Eurovision Song contest. There are countries taking

:03:30.:03:33.

part from outside of the EU, for example Australia. Chatting to

:03:34.:03:37.

people from across Europe I get the feeling there's a lot of love out

:03:38.:03:41.

there for the UK. What people in Europe want is for our country to

:03:42.:03:46.

take Eurovision seriously. Plus, we can't use Brexit as an excuse. Over

:03:47.:03:50.

the last two years the UK hasn't done very well in the Eurovision

:03:51.:03:57.

Song contest. When I caught up with Lucie Jones a few days ago I asked

:03:58.:04:02.

whether that made her feel nervous? Yes I'm nervous but if I wasn't, I

:04:03.:04:07.

think I'd probably about myself, if I wasn't nervous to sing in front of

:04:08.:04:11.

200 million people that would be crazy. The first time I sang on the

:04:12.:04:24.

stage I was like, this is overwhelming! But now I feel very

:04:25.:04:28.

comfortable there and I'm really looking forward to the final. That's

:04:29.:04:32.

Lucie Jones looking impressive but what we really want to see the weird

:04:33.:04:37.

and wonderful. What's the strangest act to look forward to? Perhaps you

:04:38.:04:47.

might think that a Romania yodelling rapper might be quite wacky. The

:04:48.:04:52.

Azerbaijan entry includes a man wearing a horse's head standing on a

:04:53.:04:58.

ladder. The Eurovision that is quite normal! We are seeing a dancing

:04:59.:05:03.

gorilla, who is that? The dancing gorilla is the favourite to win the

:05:04.:05:11.

contest. The Italian singer with a very fun, colourful song and

:05:12.:05:15.

accompanied by a dancing gorilla. This is the Eurovision Song contest

:05:16.:05:20.

so why not? I have to say, the UK has a really strong entry this year.

:05:21.:05:25.

Lucie Jones, I hope fingers crossed, can do very well for the UK. That's

:05:26.:05:31.

what we need. We need the UK to do well at Eurovision. If we have a

:05:32.:05:35.

good song and a good thing and great staging, then we can win. I love

:05:36.:05:43.

your optimism! Thank you very much. I didn't know he was such a big

:05:44.:05:47.

Eurovision fan! We just need to get back gorilla out the way.

:05:48.:05:50.

In a moment, we'll be joined by Fraser Corsan,

:05:51.:05:53.

a wingjump pilot who jumps out of planes wearing a special suit

:05:54.:05:56.

We'll be hearing how he plans to break not one

:05:57.:06:03.

But first, let's get a last, brief look at the headlines

:06:04.:06:07.

You might notice this man who's blending into the sofa right now,

:06:08.:07:59.

dressed all in red! It's Fraser and we are going to talk to him in a

:08:00.:08:07.

moment. Fraser is about to do something very, very, very brave.

:08:08.:08:12.

Brave is one word. He is attempting to become the fastest flying person

:08:13.:08:17.

in the world and break four world records.

:08:18.:08:48.

That list of potential aims, objectives, I've never read anything

:08:49.:09:02.

like it! Talk us through it. How did this start? You were originally

:09:03.:09:11.

assessing risk! My background is aviation safety and air accident

:09:12.:09:14.

investigation. It has been for around 20 years. I started skydiving

:09:15.:09:21.

in 1996. Ironically made the 12th was my first skydive. So 21

:09:22.:09:26.

yesterday I started this journey. So where I am today is flying flying

:09:27.:09:31.

the wing suits. I effectively did 700 normal skydives and then I took

:09:32.:09:34.

up wing suit flying. There were three others at the time in the

:09:35.:09:38.

country. We read the manual, decided to fly, went out and did it. 1300 in

:09:39.:09:47.

wing suits later we are here. You've done this 1300 times? With a wing

:09:48.:09:53.

suit, yes. Where do you do this? All over the world but I trained mainly

:09:54.:09:59.

in the UK. I train in Salisbury and Devon. That's my main training

:10:00.:10:04.

place. On top of that there's a load of physiology and training aspects

:10:05.:10:11.

that we have to cover. Oxygen systems, massive cardio fitness,

:10:12.:10:15.

lots of specific protocol about how we are going to fly because we

:10:16.:10:20.

flying above commercial airlines. The Americans and Canadians have

:10:21.:10:23.

given us the clearance require. I have a phenomenal team who have

:10:24.:10:29.

pulled this altogether. After so many flights you're probably quite

:10:30.:10:33.

blase about it. When you're doing that, what does it feel like? So,

:10:34.:10:39.

all I can explain, because it's one of those sensations that is really

:10:40.:10:43.

special. Take all the pressure of your body, put yourself into a flat

:10:44.:10:48.

position and imagine you are a bird and you can fly. I see a .5 miles

:10:49.:10:56.

away and I can targeted. How? Because I'm gliding. The suit in

:10:57.:11:00.

flight around me as a wing. The airflow rushes into them and

:11:01.:11:04.

inflates them. The suit is quite large and allows you to glide.

:11:05.:11:10.

Instead of falling at 120 mph I'm falling at 30 mph while flying

:11:11.:11:18.

forwards at around 120-160 mph. Said a crucial piece of equipment is the

:11:19.:11:23.

suit. Do you want to stand up and we can have a look at it. The suit has

:11:24.:11:28.

a number of features. It's huge which gives me a massive surface

:11:29.:11:32.

area which gives me the optimum shape and form to fly for a long

:11:33.:11:38.

time. The human arm isn't very effective as an aerofoil so we have

:11:39.:11:43.

high density foam which is shaped to take away bumps and shapes that you

:11:44.:11:47.

have naturally in your arm. It gives you an aerofoil which gives you lots

:11:48.:11:57.

of performance. These are semirigid. I thought that was to put your phone

:11:58.:12:03.

in! I will be carrying a phone in a pocket inside. I've got carbon fibre

:12:04.:12:08.

blades and they effectively allow me to maintain stability when flying at

:12:09.:12:13.

a high speed. Overall it's massive, there's a lot of technology. There's

:12:14.:12:18.

over 200 parts to the suit. You must be incredibly fit. Yes, training is

:12:19.:12:23.

pretty intense. I do aerial training with the wing suit and on top of

:12:24.:12:30.

that I'm also doing training in the altitude chamber. So I'm aware

:12:31.:12:34.

basically of what altitude feels like. I'm also doing training with a

:12:35.:12:39.

lot of data analytics feedback. All around us we've got data from

:12:40.:12:44.

whatever systems. I'm flying with GPS units that track everything I'm

:12:45.:12:48.

doing, they can tell my speed, descent rate giving me real-time

:12:49.:12:53.

feedback. We were talking about the four things, the altitude, the

:12:54.:12:57.

speed, the duration and the distance. Which of those four is the

:12:58.:13:03.

most difficult? The altitude is a massive technical challenge because

:13:04.:13:07.

getting teams together who have the ability to get you that high is a

:13:08.:13:14.

big challenge. 42,000 feet is 12,000 feet above Everest. Commercial

:13:15.:13:18.

airlines don't go there. Military aircraft don't go there

:13:19.:13:22.

unpressurised. We've had to get some specialist kit to do that. Time

:13:23.:13:27.

flight is basically ten minutes freefall, that's a massive workload

:13:28.:13:32.

on the body. Sadly we are out of time! It's fascinating, we look

:13:33.:13:34.

forward to hearing all about it. We asked you to tell us what's left

:13:35.:13:38.

you feeling ripped off and you contacted us in your

:13:39.:13:41.

thousands. You've told us about the companies

:13:42.:13:44.

that you think get it wrong and the customer service that simply is not

:13:45.:13:47.

up to scratch. They just want to take money from

:13:48.:13:50.

people.

:13:51.:13:54.