13/05/2017 Breakfast


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13/05/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent.

:00:00.:00:00.

The NHS faces a weekend of disruption following a large-scale

:00:00.:00:07.

cyber attack which has caused hospitals to delay treatments

:00:08.:00:11.

Around 40 NHS trusts and some GP surgeries were hit,

:00:12.:00:19.

but there's no sign that patient data has been compromised.

:00:20.:00:24.

Organisations around the world have been affected by the malicious

:00:25.:00:30.

I am at Saint Barts, the largest NHS Trust in the country, which runs

:00:31.:00:36.

five hospitals here in east London. All of them will be closed here

:00:37.:00:39.

today for routine outpatient appointments.

:00:40.:00:41.

been affected by the malicious software known as "ransomware"

:00:42.:00:44.

with reports of infections in more than 70 countries.

:00:45.:00:59.

Also ahead, Labour's deputy leader Tom Watson warns his party faces

:01:00.:01:05.

a "Margaret Thatcher style" landslide defeat if it doesn't

:01:06.:01:07.

Chelsea can finally celebrate - Michy Batshuayi's late winner

:01:08.:01:14.

ensures they're the Premier League champions in Antonio Conte's first

:01:15.:01:17.

Meanwhile, I've been playing Masters Rugby League,

:01:18.:01:23.

and finding out that age really is no barrier to getting fit,

:01:24.:01:27.

when it all comes down to the colour of the shorts you wear.

:01:28.:01:30.

From horse heads to monkeys, it can only be Eurovision -

:01:31.:01:33.

but will the UK feel the Brexit backlash?

:01:34.:01:37.

Good morning. Despite low pressure across the UK today there is

:01:38.:01:52.

actually quite a lot of dry weather in the offing. I will have more on

:01:53.:01:54.

that in about 15 minutes. Routine appointments and operations

:01:55.:01:55.

at some hospitals remain cancelled this morning after NHS organisations

:01:56.:02:01.

across England and Scotland were disrupted by a

:02:02.:02:04.

global cyber attack. Britain's response to the attack is

:02:05.:02:06.

led by the National Cyber Security But there's no evidence that patient

:02:07.:02:09.

data has been compromised. The first indication that something

:02:10.:02:12.

was wrong was mid-afternoon yesterday, when some hospital trusts

:02:13.:02:14.

and GP surgeries reported Vital informational such as patient

:02:15.:02:17.

records and appointment It meant operations were cancelled,

:02:18.:02:21.

patients were sent home The BBC understands that by late

:02:22.:02:26.

yesterday around 40 trusts and some surgeries in England

:02:27.:02:31.

and Scotland had been affected. Medical staff posted pictures

:02:32.:02:33.

of a pop-up with demands for money. The attack is a form of ransomware,

:02:34.:02:36.

a software that locks computer systems and then demands

:02:37.:02:41.

a payment to unlock the data. The Prime Minister, Theresa May,

:02:42.:02:46.

said the incident was not an attack on the NHS, but part of a wider

:02:47.:02:49.

problem affecting around 70 countries, including

:02:50.:02:53.

Spain and Russia. Andy Moore has more

:02:54.:02:54.

details about the hack. This was the message that flashed up

:02:55.:03:13.

on countless computers across the NHS. The system was locked, it said,

:03:14.:03:19.

and no files could be accessed until a ransom was paid. The cyber attack

:03:20.:03:25.

had an immediate effect on patient services. This man's heart operation

:03:26.:03:30.

in London was cancelled. I was all ready. I've been shaved down the

:03:31.:03:35.

front of my chest because they were going to open the up, my arms have

:03:36.:03:39.

been shaved. I was all ready to go. Nothing in my mouth is this morning.

:03:40.:03:44.

At 1:30pm the surgeon turned up and said, unfortunately we have been

:03:45.:03:47.

hacked, and there is nothing we can do, we cannot operate on you today.

:03:48.:03:52.

The NHS was just one of thousands of organisations dozens of countries.

:03:53.:03:56.

Here at the National Cyber Security Centre we are working around the

:03:57.:04:00.

clock with colleagues in policing, the health service, internationally,

:04:01.:04:04.

and with private-sector experts to lead our response to those cyber

:04:05.:04:09.

attacks as they affect the UK. In Scotland, at least half the health

:04:10.:04:12.

boards have been affected in some way. Wales and Northern Ireland have

:04:13.:04:17.

so far escaped any problems. Disruption in the NHS is likely to

:04:18.:04:22.

last several days at least. The official advice is to use the health

:04:23.:04:25.

service wisely. But make emergency admissions will not be affect.

:04:26.:04:28.

Companies and organisations from Europe to the US and Russia

:04:29.:04:31.

It's believed the malware involved may have been stolen

:04:32.:04:35.

from America's National Security Agency.

:04:36.:04:36.

Here's our technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones.

:04:37.:04:44.

It looked at first like an attack just on hospitals in the UK. ... It

:04:45.:04:51.

is now becoming clear this malicious software has run riot around the

:04:52.:04:56.

world. Russia, the United States and many points in between have been hit

:04:57.:05:00.

by what is now a common form of cyber crime. Ransomware has become

:05:01.:05:04.

the tool of choice for lots of criminals super because it is easy

:05:05.:05:08.

to make money very quickly. You can buy a ransom on life as little as

:05:09.:05:13.

$99. So how does it work? It often arise in the form of a link in an

:05:14.:05:17.

innocuous looking email. When you click on that link the malicious

:05:18.:05:21.

software is downloaded and spreads rapidly through your network,

:05:22.:05:25.

locking up the files on it. Then a message flashes up on the screen

:05:26.:05:28.

warning that if you want your data unlock, you will have to pay a

:05:29.:05:32.

ransom, often in bitcoin, a virtual currency. The irony is that security

:05:33.:05:38.

experts think a hacking tool allegedly leaked from America's

:05:39.:05:41.

national security agency in April may have been used by the attackers.

:05:42.:05:47.

Microsoft warned about the threat that this vulnerability posts, and

:05:48.:05:50.

said anybody who had installed a security update to windows software

:05:51.:05:53.

the previous month would be OK. Health service will point out it is

:05:54.:06:00.

just one of many organisations around the world affected by this

:06:01.:06:03.

attack, but it now faces what could be a lengthy process of cleaning up

:06:04.:06:07.

its computers and making the network safe again. And we will be talking

:06:08.:06:13.

about this story all morning. We will be at one of the affected

:06:14.:06:14.

hospitals in just a few minutes. Labour's deputy leader, Tom Watson,

:06:15.:06:16.

has warned of the Conservatives winning a "Margaret Thatcher-style

:06:17.:06:19.

landslide" if they maintain their current lead

:06:20.:06:21.

in the opinion polls. Mr Watson told the Guardian

:06:22.:06:23.

that it would be "very, very difficult" to turn

:06:24.:06:26.

the poll numbers around, and Labour had

:06:27.:06:28.

a "mountain to climb." Mrs Thatcher won majorities of 144

:06:29.:06:30.

in 1983, and 101 in 1987. The Conservatives want to give

:06:31.:06:38.

people the power to demand that social media companies delete any

:06:39.:06:41.

embarrassing content they posted Labour has questioned

:06:42.:06:46.

whether the legislation would be enforceable, given that most

:06:47.:06:51.

of the largest companies are based Ofsted inspectors have revealed

:06:52.:06:53.

they were jostled and pelted with food by pupils during a two day

:06:54.:06:58.

visit to a secondary school The five-strong team rated

:06:59.:07:01.

the Willenhall Academy, near Walsall, as "inadequate"

:07:02.:07:05.

for leadership, learning, The Ofsted report also found that

:07:06.:07:07.

Year 11 students failed to reach their potential over

:07:08.:07:14.

a three-year period. US President Donald Trump has

:07:15.:07:18.

refused to confirm or deny whether the White House secretly

:07:19.:07:21.

records his telephone Yesterday the president appeared

:07:22.:07:23.

to warn the former FBI director, James Comey, that his administration

:07:24.:07:28.

could produce tapes of their conversations

:07:29.:07:32.

if he spoke to the media. Democrat leaders in Congress have

:07:33.:07:34.

demanded an explanation. Pope Francis will canonise two

:07:35.:07:38.

Portuguese children at a mass today on the spot where they reported

:07:39.:07:40.

seeing the Virgin Mary exactly The service, in Fatima,

:07:41.:07:44.

is expected to attract Alison Roberts sent this

:07:45.:07:47.

report from Portugal. It was 100 years ago today that

:07:48.:08:05.

three children tending sheep near the village of Fatima said the

:08:06.:08:09.

Virgin Mary had appeared to them. Two of the children, Jacinta and

:08:10.:08:14.

France's goal, died young. -- Francisco. They are to be canonised

:08:15.:08:22.

by Pope Francis today after the case of a boy in Brazil who recovered

:08:23.:08:25.

from injuries after his family prayed to the Fatima visionaries.

:08:26.:08:31.

The third child of divisions later wrote down three so-called secrets

:08:32.:08:35.

that Mary had told them. Over the decades Fatima has become one of the

:08:36.:08:38.

world's most important Catholic shrines. We must be here to make

:08:39.:08:44.

stronger our faith, and to show other people that if you want

:08:45.:08:48.

committee can do anything. This is an excellent opportunity, to see him

:08:49.:08:52.

drive via, to celebrate Mass with him. On the eve of his trip, the

:08:53.:08:57.

Pope described himself as a pilgrim of hope and peace. At the shrine, he

:08:58.:09:02.

prayed with the faithful before the traditional candlelight procession.

:09:03.:09:08.

Pope Francis is the fourth Pope to visit Fatima, but the centenary and

:09:09.:09:13.

the canonisation of the two little shepherds give this year's

:09:14.:09:17.

ceremonious special significance for Catholics in Portugal and around the

:09:18.:09:20.

world. -- ceremony a special significance.

:09:21.:09:22.

Tonight it's the Eurovision song Contest, and after failing to make

:09:23.:09:25.

it into the top 10 for the past seven years, could this be the year

:09:26.:09:29.

Our Moscow correspondent, Steve Rosenberg, is in Kiev and has

:09:30.:09:33.

been to meet lots of the contestants, including

:09:34.:09:35.

Lucie Jones, who'll be representing the UK in the tonight's competition.

:09:36.:09:44.

SINGING. It is Eurovision 2017, and it is all

:09:45.:09:55.

rather confusing. Take Azerbaijan's entry. A horse had on a ladder. Why?

:09:56.:10:03.

The audience is not understanding it. I am leaving the whole meaning

:10:04.:10:09.

to them. Well, that's clear, then. And what is going on with one of the

:10:10.:10:14.

favourites, Italy, this year? Why the monkey? Why are the eighth? --

:10:15.:10:27.

the ape. The monkey, he tells me, is a symbol that at the end of the day

:10:28.:10:31.

we are all naked apes. Among the front-runners are Bulgaria and

:10:32.:10:34.

Portugal. But what about the United Kingdom? You know, there was a time

:10:35.:10:39.

when the UK was always a contender in Eurovision. We always seems to be

:10:40.:10:43.

in with a shot at the top spot. More recently we have been propping up

:10:44.:10:46.

the table. At Black could this be the year that written is back? --

:10:47.:10:53.

but could this be the year that Britain is back. At rehearsals,

:10:54.:10:56.

Lucie Jones has been impressing everybody with her power Allied,

:10:57.:11:05.

Never Give Up On You. I am hoping that I will go home with the respect

:11:06.:11:09.

of the nation that watched the show at home. If the UK wants success in

:11:10.:11:13.

Eurovision this could be our golden opportunity.

:11:14.:11:18.

I am just wondering how that voting is going to go tonight. Yes. The

:11:19.:11:27.

prospect of fee nul points looms large tonight. Let's return to our

:11:28.:11:34.

lead story this morning. This is the hacking attack on the NHS trusts

:11:35.:11:38.

across the UK. We will bring you up-to-date with the scale of the

:11:39.:11:42.

problem this morning. A sense from the newspapers of how it has been

:11:43.:11:48.

reported. Hackers hold NHS to ransom, on the front page of the

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Telegraph. Doctors warned that lives are at risk. They are attacking

:11:52.:11:58.

hospitals and computer systems. Essentially, many of the routine

:11:59.:12:01.

business of hospitals is grinding to a halt because the computer systems

:12:02.:12:06.

are unusable. And if you have been into a hospital recently, you'll

:12:07.:12:08.

notice that everybody is wandering around with some kind of device.

:12:09.:12:13.

People have their records on, patient treatment plans. It is

:12:14.:12:17.

hugely important. The front page of the Mirror has the same headline,

:12:18.:12:22.

hackers hold NHS to ransom. Operations axed, IT systems in

:12:23.:12:29.

chaos. Bartz NHS Trust in London, the largest in the country, has

:12:30.:12:32.

cancelled all its appointments today. Andy Moore is live for us. Is

:12:33.:12:37.

there any indication at all of when things might be back to normal? That

:12:38.:12:42.

is the big question, and nobody really at the moment has an answer.

:12:43.:12:46.

Saint Barts, as you said, this big NHS Trust which runs five hospitals,

:12:47.:12:50.

with 15,000 staff and two and a half million patients, all across east

:12:51.:12:56.

London, they say that today all those routine outpatient departments

:12:57.:12:59.

will be cancelled that all the hospitals. But we do not know what

:13:00.:13:02.

is going to happen tomorrow will today after that. We know the

:13:03.:13:07.

disruption is likely to last for some time. There was a hospital in

:13:08.:13:12.

Hollywood in the United States that was hit by a similar software bug,

:13:13.:13:16.

or an attack, last year. It eventually pay the ransom. But it

:13:17.:13:20.

took about ten days before its systems were back to normal. You

:13:21.:13:23.

mentioned an attack in the United States. The government was keen to

:13:24.:13:27.

stress this morning that the NHS is not the only organisation to be

:13:28.:13:30.

targeted. I think there are 70 countries that have been affected by

:13:31.:13:35.

this. Yeah, that number might have gone up overnight. One organisation

:13:36.:13:40.

is saying that 99 countries, it believes, have been attacked. 53,000

:13:41.:13:46.

separate attacks. An incredible indiscriminate global attack. One

:13:47.:13:53.

that cyber security companies are calling the biggest ransomware

:13:54.:13:56.

attack in history. Lots of agencies are working on this. The cyber

:13:57.:14:01.

security centre here in the UK, homeland security and United States

:14:02.:14:05.

offering help to other agencies. Lots of people are working on

:14:06.:14:09.

solving this problem. It seems that the bug may have been stopped in its

:14:10.:14:13.

tracks. It doesn't seem to be affecting any more computers. But

:14:14.:14:16.

getting it fixed will take a long time. Andy Moore, thank you. That is

:14:17.:14:22.

what we will be talking about this morning, how long it will take to

:14:23.:14:26.

actually get things back on track. Yes, later this morning we will be

:14:27.:14:30.

speaking to Amber Rudd, the Home Secretary, for the latest on the

:14:31.:14:34.

situation. Right now, though, it is 6:14am. Let's look at the weather.

:14:35.:14:42.

Good morning. A lovely sunrise this morning. This was taken in Southwark

:14:43.:14:50.

normal ago. There will be a bit of dry weather on offer this weekend.

:14:51.:14:55.

But also you can see for yourself in the Wigan Highland it is foggy this

:14:56.:15:02.

morning. We have quite a lot of low cloud coming off the North Sea at

:15:03.:15:06.

the moment. All of that moisture. It has been muggy. We will move that

:15:07.:15:10.

and the fault will clear. You can see the cloud around. Not plain

:15:11.:15:15.

sailing. We have low pressure across the country. Rain around as well. A

:15:16.:15:20.

few showers elsewhere. They will start to move away. For England and

:15:21.:15:27.

Wales it is an improving picture. We have a few scattered showers.

:15:28.:15:32.

Further north it will take a while longer for the rain to clear. We

:15:33.:15:35.

should have some sunshine coming through as we go through the

:15:36.:15:39.

morning. The low cloud starts to lift. Just a scattering of showers.

:15:40.:15:44.

Temperatures will soon start to respond. Not much on -- sunshine for

:15:45.:15:53.

parts. Ahead of the rain we could have 19- 20 in Scotland. Down on

:15:54.:16:00.

yesterday. For the east of Scotland, the north-east of England, it stays

:16:01.:16:06.

grey and cloudy. And quite cool. The south-westerly winds are pushing in

:16:07.:16:11.

some dry air for a time to Northern Ireland, north-western parts of

:16:12.:16:14.

England and Wales. Some heavy and thundery downpours likely in the

:16:15.:16:17.

afternoon across the Highlands of Scotland. 17- 19. Not bad. You

:16:18.:16:22.

should have some fairly decent weather for the Premier league

:16:23.:16:25.

matches into this afternoon, as you can see. The drier weather continues

:16:26.:16:31.

through the second part of the weekend as well. A brief spell of

:16:32.:16:36.

rain running eastwards overnight. No more than 5- ten millimetres. The

:16:37.:16:41.

concerns of gardeners at the moment. But we should have a little

:16:42.:16:46.

watering. Tomorrow we have more straightforward showers. It takes a

:16:47.:16:50.

while for the rain to clear away. There will be sharp showers around,

:16:51.:16:53.

as you can see, through the Midlands, southern areas and into

:16:54.:16:58.

the north-west, but at 15- 20 it isn't bad. Starting to see them a

:16:59.:17:04.

sunshine. Not as straightforward today and indeed for the weekend.

:17:05.:17:09.

But at least there is this beautiful weather on offer.

:17:10.:17:09.

Thanks very much. We'll be back with a summary

:17:10.:17:11.

of the news at 6:30am. Now it's time for the Film Review,

:17:12.:17:13.

with Jane Hill and Mark Kermode. Hello and welcome to The Film Review

:17:14.:17:38.

on BBC News. Mark Kermode is with us as ever to take us through the

:17:39.:17:42.

releases. We have a political thriller starring Jessica Chastain,

:17:43.:17:50.

Miss Sloane. Alien: Covenant, the latest in the ongoing Alien

:17:51.:17:59.

franchise. And Jawbone, written and starring -- written by and starring

:18:00.:18:04.

John Harris. Even looking at the post of Miss Sloane, I so want to

:18:05.:18:10.

write this. It is Washington, The West Wing, you are in with the

:18:11.:18:15.

intrigue. The story is, Jessica Chastain is a lobbyist who gets

:18:16.:18:21.

embroiled in a battle between people who want controls on gun sales and

:18:22.:18:24.

those who want to sell more. Early on she is enlisted by people who say

:18:25.:18:29.

they are trying to make guns become more popular, we want them to appeal

:18:30.:18:33.

to women. She literally last amount the room. The next thing is

:18:34.:18:38.

approached by the other side fighting for the restrictions. She

:18:39.:18:41.

decides she will throw in her lot with them. They want to because of

:18:42.:18:45.

her powerful and sometimes cynical way of lobbying. Here is a clip.

:18:46.:18:52.

What's the best indicator of voter in tension? Grassroots action aimed

:18:53.:18:57.

squarely at soliciting donations. Not named in a petition, not clicks

:18:58.:19:02.

in cyberspace. Will they know how much we are raising? Every

:19:03.:19:08.

congressional staff will be. While you are hustling overwork

:19:09.:19:11.

influential senators who can deliver both. That's the second thing. The

:19:12.:19:15.

third is to identify who holds sway in target states. Employers, workers

:19:16.:19:20.

groups. Don't just waltzing to Senator's office and make your case,

:19:21.:19:25.

I doubt who they trust and convinced that person to make your case. That

:19:26.:19:31.

is how we win. Does she take no prisoners, I'm guessing? That's

:19:32.:19:36.

right. I take no prisoners performance and very strong

:19:37.:19:43.

supporting cast, including Gugu Mbatha-Raw. I like the subject

:19:44.:19:47.

matter, the cast, the director. I came out thinking, it's not as good

:19:48.:19:54.

as it should be. The whole is less than the sum of its parts. There is

:19:55.:19:58.

something that keeps you at a distance. I was never completely

:19:59.:20:03.

engrossed and I never completely believed in the characters. The plot

:20:04.:20:07.

is full of twists and turns and there is a certain point after which

:20:08.:20:10.

those twists and turns of start to sort of defied credibility. That

:20:11.:20:17.

said, Jessica Chastain is always worth watching and the subject

:20:18.:20:22.

matter is interesting and timely and it ought to be more gripping than it

:20:23.:20:26.

is. Like you, I really wanted it to be great and I came out thinking,

:20:27.:20:31.

it's kind of OK, what I wanted it to be more than that. However, it makes

:20:32.:20:36.

sense, which is more than can be said for Alien: Covenant, which is

:20:37.:20:41.

the next instalment in the ongoing saga. Are you a fan of Alien? My

:20:42.:20:49.

goodness, no. I am chicken, there's no way. The first Alien was a horror

:20:50.:20:57.

film, the second was a war film, then the third, now we are into the

:20:58.:21:01.

prequels. Promethius really suffered. They had people in space

:21:02.:21:08.

talking about overtime, work conditions, griping about stuff you

:21:09.:21:11.

could believe in. They started talking about the nature of mankind,

:21:12.:21:17.

odd, existence. This is very much a Promethius sequel rather than an

:21:18.:21:25.

Alien prequel. They get a signal in space, they arrive at a new planet.

:21:26.:21:29.

It actually turned out to be some kind of living hell. What they do

:21:30.:21:34.

all the time is to talk about poetry, art, life, God, in a matter

:21:35.:21:40.

that nobody ever talks in space. We have greatest reruns from Alien and

:21:41.:21:48.

Aliens, but sped up in a way that they make no sense. Ridley Scott is

:21:49.:21:52.

a visual stylist, no question, but he is only ever as good as his

:21:53.:21:56.

script. The fact is, with Alien: Covenant script is very weak. When

:21:57.:22:07.

they were going to do... This is The Da Vinci Code in space. As someone

:22:08.:22:12.

who loved Alien because it was ruthless, and loved Aliens because

:22:13.:22:17.

it's a war movie, it is very much like a massive amount of

:22:18.:22:21.

pontificating and holding forth and also it makes no sense what the

:22:22.:22:26.

weather! I know people don't necessarily go to Alien movies to

:22:27.:22:31.

tie up all loose ends but there were moments in it... There was one where

:22:32.:22:35.

the characters as so little that make sense that I laughed out loud.

:22:36.:22:41.

-- character said so little. I am a little more hopeful about your third

:22:42.:22:49.

choice this week. Jawbone, written and starring John Harrison. --

:22:50.:22:55.

written by. I do nothing about boxing. A washed-up boxers

:22:56.:22:59.

struggling with alcoholism we meet him at the beginning of the film and

:23:00.:23:03.

he is drunk. He lives in a flat which used to be his mother is flat,

:23:04.:23:08.

he is in danger of being as it had. Life is in a mess. He turns up at

:23:09.:23:12.

his old Jim run by Ray Winstone. He gives you a look at else in

:23:13.:23:17.

everything you need to know. He says he can train there but no alcohol

:23:18.:23:21.

and no talk of unlicensed matches. But he needs money and the next

:23:22.:23:25.

thing is having a meeting with Ian McShane. Here is a clip. I think I

:23:26.:23:31.

can get your money. I tell him, I've got the next champion with me who is

:23:32.:23:44.

looking for a fight. Jimmy, you were one of the bravest kids I ever saw.

:23:45.:23:49.

The thing I don't with what kind of Nick you are in now. So if you take

:23:50.:23:53.

this, it's on your back. Whatever happens from there, you are on your

:23:54.:24:01.

own. I know. You're up for it? I'm up for it. Right, make the phone

:24:02.:24:09.

call. Now, I thought this was really intriguing. I went in not knowing

:24:10.:24:14.

much about it, other than it was a boxing movie and I liked the members

:24:15.:24:18.

of the cast. It really drew you into the story. You believed in the

:24:19.:24:22.

character and his dejection and his addiction and his alcoholism and his

:24:23.:24:25.

struggle to come to terms with himself. That first moment when he

:24:26.:24:29.

goes into the gym and Ray Winstone looks at him in a way that tells you

:24:30.:24:33.

everything, there's a wonderful film with Michael Smiley, a terrific

:24:34.:24:37.

actor, it's to do with what they don't say, not what they do say.

:24:38.:24:42.

Cinematography has changed a lot since Martin Scorsese did not Raging

:24:43.:24:51.

Bull. This puts you in the receiving end of the punters. I've never been

:24:52.:24:55.

to a boxing gym, but this had the smack of authenticity and it had

:24:56.:24:59.

heart. It felt like it was a story told by somebody who really believed

:25:00.:25:03.

in all of this and it engages you. It makes you care. It's not

:25:04.:25:08.

fantastically original, but it is done in a way that seems very honest

:25:09.:25:13.

and authentic and very moving. As somebody who is not a boxing fan, I

:25:14.:25:16.

know nothing about boxing, I found it very gripping. And some great

:25:17.:25:21.

British talent in there. Ray Winstone, as far as I'm concerned,

:25:22.:25:26.

walks on water anyway, but this is an understated role and he plays the

:25:27.:25:29.

beautifully. And Michael Smiley was a terrific actor, a terrific screen

:25:30.:25:35.

presence. There are couple of moments between him and Johnny

:25:36.:25:40.

Harris, everything you said in the eyes and the gestures, in the way

:25:41.:25:46.

they hold their heads and next. -- necks. It was a pleasure to see it

:25:47.:25:52.

because it was textured. Box it does turn up in movies a lot because it's

:25:53.:25:56.

a spectacular sport in a way. But this really had something. In the

:25:57.:26:00.

end it's not a boxing movie. In the end it's about somebody overcoming

:26:01.:26:03.

their demons and wrestling with their own demons and overcoming

:26:04.:26:07.

addiction and dealing with alcoholism in a way which seemed

:26:08.:26:09.

honest and truthful and very engaging. Best out? Bless you, you

:26:10.:26:17.

have brought me a Woody Allen! I love Woody Allen. I love the jazz,

:26:18.:26:21.

New York, the anchor, the new process. And the way Manhattan looks

:26:22.:26:26.

means it is one of the Woody Allen films that you should see on a

:26:27.:26:32.

cinema screen. Often many think of Woody Allen you think of the jokes,

:26:33.:26:35.

the characters. But this is brilliant. The combination of the

:26:36.:26:42.

visuals, from the beginning he is a writer and he describes the way he

:26:43.:26:45.

feels about the city. People talk about the classy Woody Allen, any

:26:46.:26:54.

hall, Manhattan -- Annie Hall, Manhattan, I haven't seen Manhattan

:26:55.:26:59.

projected since it first came out, 79, 1980, something like that. To

:27:00.:27:03.

see it projected again, because it's a beautiful film. That's wonderful.

:27:04.:27:08.

I didn't know it was being reissued. Talking of seeing things on a big

:27:09.:27:13.

screen, IME just in this week's DVD because it is La La Land, which I

:27:14.:27:18.

did enjoy hugely. But doesn't that need to be seen on a big-screen? The

:27:19.:27:23.

wonderful opening the Danzig on a Californian sunshine? -- dancing.

:27:24.:27:28.

I've seen it on both and I have to say it worked both times for me. In

:27:29.:27:34.

fact, oddly, when I saw it on the small screen I was in comfortable

:27:35.:27:38.

conditions, because there weren't people talking around me. I really

:27:39.:27:41.

like La La Land. The opening sequence is so beautiful. Glorious!

:27:42.:27:47.

I think Emma Stone's performance is terrific. Some people have

:27:48.:27:49.

complained and said in flight, is not a memorable film in that June. I

:27:50.:27:55.

thought, what are you talking about! It made me happy. I loved the ending

:27:56.:28:00.

and I won't spoil it for anybody who hasn't seen it. But I thought it was

:28:01.:28:05.

spot on. I will say no more because that would be a spoiler. It would

:28:06.:28:10.

really. Incidentally, is a musical in the same way Manhattan is kind of

:28:11.:28:14.

a musical as well. Not really, but thought. It is glorious. The music

:28:15.:28:21.

is driving the story. Thank you very much. That is the DVD viewing for

:28:22.:28:27.

the week. A reminder, you can find much more film news and reviews

:28:28.:28:33.

across the BBC online. And you can find all of our previous programmes

:28:34.:28:37.

on the BBC iPlayer. That's it for this week. Enjoy your cinema going.

:28:38.:28:41.

Goodbye. This is Breakfast. Coming up before

:28:42.:28:59.

7am, all of the weather forecast. First, a summary of the main use.

:29:00.:29:04.

Routine appointments and operations at some hospitals remain cancelled

:29:05.:29:07.

this morning after NHS organisations across England and Scotland

:29:08.:29:09.

were disrupted by a global cyber attack.

:29:10.:29:11.

The first indication that something was wrong was mid-afternoon

:29:12.:29:14.

yesterday when some hospital trusts and GP surgeries reported

:29:15.:29:16.

Dave Lee is our North American technology correspondent.

:29:17.:29:25.

Good morning, Dave. We are just getting a grasp of the scale of the

:29:26.:29:33.

problems here in the UK. We know that it has happened elsewhere. What

:29:34.:29:37.

light can you shed on what is going on? I can confirm, as you mentioned,

:29:38.:29:41.

that it is an international cyber attack. Almost 100 countries have

:29:42.:29:45.

registered this problem. Some of the worst hit have been a Russia. Many

:29:46.:29:49.

of their government systems were hit by this. We have seen it had places

:29:50.:29:54.

in China. In the United States, FedEx has been turning customers

:29:55.:29:57.

away throughout today. It is still Friday here. That has obviously been

:29:58.:30:04.

a big problem. Although in the US, their healthcare system has not

:30:05.:30:07.

suffered the same kind of problems that the NHS has back home. But they

:30:08.:30:14.

are still taking it very seriously, keeping an eye out and trying to

:30:15.:30:17.

minimise the huge amount of damage this attack has caused. Experts are

:30:18.:30:22.

now trying to unravel some of the problems. This has happened once or

:30:23.:30:27.

twice before. What pattern has been set? How has this worked out in the

:30:28.:30:31.

past? It is quite a troubling pattern. We have had a case recently

:30:32.:30:37.

here in Los Angeles where a hospital was affected by ransomware. You get

:30:38.:30:43.

this malicious software that encrypts your files and demands a

:30:44.:30:49.

fee to decrypt them. That happened to a hospital and ended up paying

:30:50.:30:53.

$17,000 to have those files returns to them. I guess what many of these

:30:54.:30:59.

organisations affected might be thinking over the weekend is, do we

:31:00.:31:04.

pay the ransom and get our files? Or would that encourage more of these

:31:05.:31:07.

things to happen in the future? It is a tricky balance. But

:31:08.:31:12.

potentially, some of these organisations may end up paying

:31:13.:31:15.

quite a lot of money to get access back to the files they need. Dave,

:31:16.:31:19.

thank you. That was Dave Lee, our North American technology

:31:20.:31:25.

correspondent, speaking from San Francisco.

:31:26.:31:26.

Labour's deputy leader, Tom Watson, has warned of the Conservatives

:31:27.:31:29.

winning a "Margaret Thatcher-style landslide" if they maintain

:31:30.:31:31.

their current lead in the opinion polls.

:31:32.:31:33.

Mr Watson told the Guardian that it would be "very,

:31:34.:31:36.

very difficult" to turn the poll numbers around,

:31:37.:31:38.

and Labour had a "mountain to climb."

:31:39.:31:40.

Mrs Thatcher won majorities of 144 in 1983 and 101 in 1987.

:31:41.:31:43.

The Conservatives want to give people the power to demand that

:31:44.:31:46.

social media companies delete any embarrassing content they posted

:31:47.:31:49.

Labour has questioned whether the legislation would be

:31:50.:31:53.

enforceable, given that most of the largest companies are based

:31:54.:31:55.

Ofsted inspectors have revealed they were jostled and pelted

:31:56.:32:01.

with food by pupils during a two day visit to a secondary school

:32:02.:32:04.

The five-strong team rated the Willenhall Academy,

:32:05.:32:09.

near Walsall as 'inadequate' for leadership, learning,

:32:10.:32:11.

The Ofsted report also found that Year 11 students failed

:32:12.:32:16.

to reach their potential over a three year period.

:32:17.:32:24.

Pope Francis will canonise two Portuguese children at a mass today

:32:25.:32:27.

on the spot where they reported seeing the Virgin Mary exactly

:32:28.:32:30.

Tens of thousands of pilgrims gathered in Fatima to welcome

:32:31.:32:33.

the pontiff last night and today's mass is expected to attract

:32:34.:32:37.

Francis is the fourth pope to visit the shrine.

:32:38.:32:49.

Mike, this morning, we can say that we know who won something. Finally!

:32:50.:32:56.

Yes, Chelsea. I think we saw it coming. They are the Premier League

:32:57.:33:01.

champions. What an achievement by Antonio Conte, when one year ago

:33:02.:33:04.

Chelsea finished 10th. They were in disarray. And last year we had all

:33:05.:33:08.

that fuss about the two the managers arriving at City and United. But

:33:09.:33:13.

Mariano Kunte -- Antonio Conte kept it quite quiet.

:33:14.:33:18.

So Chelsea have done it - a 1-0 win at West Brom made them

:33:19.:33:22.

Premier League champions with two games to spare.

:33:23.:33:24.

Our sports editor Dan Roan looks back now, at Antonio Conte's,

:33:25.:33:27.

Glory was within their grasp. Chelsea strolled to the title almost

:33:28.:33:36.

complete. West Brom have also enjoyed their season, however, and

:33:37.:33:39.

victory here at the Hawthorn 's would have to be earned. The

:33:40.:33:42.

visitors enjoying more chances, but failing to break down a stubborn

:33:43.:33:47.

defence in a cagey first half. Added urgency after the restart, Victor

:33:48.:33:51.

Moses denied by Ben Foster. Chelsea's frustration beginning to

:33:52.:33:55.

show. Then, in the final ten minutes and with the game seemingly headed

:33:56.:33:59.

for a draw, the pressure finally showed. Michy Batshuayi with the

:34:00.:34:04.

crucial touch. These substitute barely played this season. Now he

:34:05.:34:09.

scored the goal that would seal the title. We started the season with a

:34:10.:34:16.

lot of bombs. -- problems. But I think in the problems, we found the

:34:17.:34:22.

right way to be stronger together. Yeah, to fight in every game. And

:34:23.:34:33.

now I think that they deserved to win the league. From the moment he

:34:34.:34:37.

arrived in England last year, the Italian has been a passionate and

:34:38.:34:42.

animated presence on the line. But his team's March towards the title

:34:43.:34:45.

has been calm and assured. When Chelsea play Watford here at

:34:46.:34:48.

Stamford Ridge on Monday evening they and their fans will be able to

:34:49.:34:53.

celebrate a second Premier League triumph in just three seasons,

:34:54.:34:56.

re-establishing this club is the dominant force in the English game.

:34:57.:35:00.

When you consider what went on here last season, it is an achievement

:35:01.:35:03.

that should not be underestimated. Jose Mourinho was sacked after a

:35:04.:35:08.

chaotic defence of the title, the club finishing 10th and failing to

:35:09.:35:11.

qualify for Europe. Chelsea hired Conte but had to wait until the end

:35:12.:35:16.

of the euro is before the Italy manager was free to join them. There

:35:17.:35:20.

were one or two big signings, Fielder N'Golo Kante signed midyear,

:35:21.:35:26.

but the new coach has largely transformed an underperforming

:35:27.:35:29.

squad. I thought we deserved it. We worked very hard and I think we have

:35:30.:35:33.

been a very good team. There could yet be more success. Conte has also

:35:34.:35:38.

guided Chelsea to the FA Cup final. Other managers may have grabbed more

:35:39.:35:42.

headlines and created more controversy, but the Italian has

:35:43.:35:47.

eclipsed them all. Great scenes the Chelsea fans.

:35:48.:35:48.

There was one other game last night - Everton beat Watford,

:35:49.:35:51.

Celtic are two matches away from completing an unbeaten season

:35:52.:35:56.

in the Scottish Premiership, after winning 3-1 at Aberdeen.

:35:57.:35:58.

All the goals came in a frantic first 12 minutes.

:35:59.:36:03.

Lee Griffiths with Celtic's third - and that took their league tally

:36:04.:36:06.

Celtic will be going for the double in two weeks' time, when they take

:36:07.:36:11.

on Aberdeen, again, in the Scottish Cup final.

:36:12.:36:14.

Birmingham City Ladies say they will not fear Manchester City,

:36:15.:36:17.

in today's Women's FA cup final at Wembley.

:36:18.:36:20.

Birmingham will have to overcome a side aiming to seal

:36:21.:36:25.

It is exciting for us. This is the third year that the women's FA Cup

:36:26.:36:37.

final has been at Wembley. We want to put on a great performance. We

:36:38.:36:41.

are not just going there to be another team that has been in the FA

:36:42.:36:45.

Cup final. We want to do better, we want to win, we want to showcase

:36:46.:36:50.

what we are about. We are a football team and we show grit and

:36:51.:36:53.

determination. We can't wait to go and play at Wembley.

:36:54.:36:54.

You always dream at playing at Wembley, and you always dream of

:36:55.:37:00.

capping your side. Ever since I have joined this club it is about try to

:37:01.:37:05.

win the FA Cup and we are one step closer to doing that. Definitely up

:37:06.:37:08.

there with the stuff I have achieved so far.

:37:09.:37:09.

And while we're on the subject, voting for the annual,

:37:10.:37:11.

BBC Women's Footballer of the Year award closes on Monday

:37:12.:37:14.

Jonny Brownlee has suffered an issue in Yokohama. He was caught up in a

:37:15.:37:38.

crash on the last lap of the bike leg. Look at that, flying over the

:37:39.:37:42.

railings. But isn't giving up. You are allowed to carry on, carrying

:37:43.:37:46.

your damaged bike to the transition point, because it was the last lap.

:37:47.:37:52.

Barefoot! Well, he has been in the pedals, he has got to get his

:37:53.:37:55.

running shoes on. Real drama, you can watch that live on the BBC sport

:37:56.:37:59.

website. Highlights tomorrow at one o'clock on BBC Two. Amazing. At this

:38:00.:38:04.

would have cost him some time. -- obviously would have.

:38:05.:38:06.

Lewis Hamilton said his Mercedes team had done an amazing job

:38:07.:38:09.

with the upgrades to his car, after going quickest

:38:10.:38:12.

in both practice sessions ahead of the Spanish Grand Prix.

:38:13.:38:14.

He just edged out his team-mate Valterry Bottas.

:38:15.:38:17.

They were comfortably clear of the two Ferraris.

:38:18.:38:20.

Third practice starts at 10:00 with qualifying at 1:00.

:38:21.:38:23.

Gloucester lost to Stade Francais in rugby union's Challenge Cup final

:38:24.:38:26.

at a rainy Murrayfield, going down by 25 points to 17.

:38:27.:38:32.

This interception from Jonny May gave the English side a 10-0 lead.

:38:33.:38:39.

Racing towards this trophy to a third time. But Stade Francais are

:38:40.:38:44.

fed up in runners-up. They scored three tries to finally lift this

:38:45.:38:51.

trophy. This is European cup rugby's second-tier competition, but try

:38:52.:38:54.

telling them that. Look at them sold it in.

:38:55.:38:55.

Today, it's the turn of Saracens, who'll be hoping,

:38:56.:38:57.

to retain their European Champions Cup title when they take on French

:38:58.:39:01.

Saracens are also on track to successfully defend

:39:02.:39:04.

their domestic title too and they're on the verge

:39:05.:39:06.

of establishing themselves as one of the game's

:39:07.:39:08.

We have learned through experience, we have learnt the hard way. We have

:39:09.:39:17.

gradually built up this European pedigree. I do not think it is

:39:18.:39:21.

something that happens overnight. It is a gradual improvement and the

:39:22.:39:24.

understanding of how to finish games. We are nowhere near the

:39:25.:39:28.

finished article. There is a long way to go. We are obviously pleased

:39:29.:39:32.

to know that we have players who pride ourselves on being able to

:39:33.:39:34.

stay in that fight the whole game. In rugby league, Salford Red Devils

:39:35.:39:42.

were given a scare by Hull Kingston Rovers, but they came from behind to

:39:43.:39:46.

make it to the quarter-finals of the challenge cup. They were losing at

:39:47.:39:49.

half-time but Salford scored 18 unanswered points to win 24- 14. But

:39:50.:39:54.

try was from Ben Murdoch. But ensured Salford advanced to the last

:39:55.:39:57.

eight, along with last night's other winners, Wakefield, and the holders,

:39:58.:40:02.

whole. Now, rugby league is one of the most physical sports of all, but

:40:03.:40:06.

now there is a way of playing into your 70s. It is all down to your

:40:07.:40:09.

shorts. Ahead of this week and Posner challenge cup matches on the

:40:10.:40:13.

BBC I went to Castleford to see why Masters rugby league is breaking

:40:14.:40:15.

down all the age barriers. Playing rugby league again at the

:40:16.:40:25.

age of 82. Jimmy Ayres is taking on players nearly 50 years younger, and

:40:26.:40:29.

it has been life changing. It is good fun. I get the ball, I get

:40:30.:40:35.

plenty of running. And I've got this great mates again. It is a great

:40:36.:40:39.

spirit, it is the comradeship after the game. Absolutely fantastic. The

:40:40.:40:44.

best thing I've ever done. Rugby league is one of the most brutal and

:40:45.:40:48.

physical contact sports of all. But in Masters, there is a way of

:40:49.:40:53.

reducing impact on ageing limbs. And it is down to the shorts. Well,

:40:54.:40:59.

Masters begins at the age of 35, when you can wear the white shorts.

:41:00.:41:03.

I can only dream. It does mean full contact, doesn't it, Chris? Yes!

:41:04.:41:09.

Over 40 and black shorts. I hope this will be slightly less contact.

:41:10.:41:15.

No, OK. Luckily, I'm over 50, so I get the red shorts. What does that

:41:16.:41:21.

mean? Just contact. What a relief. Then when you get to 60, look, you

:41:22.:41:26.

whether gold shorts, with the tags. So, Chris... That's all there is to

:41:27.:41:33.

it? Look at that! If you tackle a player in Greens shorts you no doubt

:41:34.:41:37.

over 70, so you treat them with even more respect as you remove their

:41:38.:41:40.

tags. And finally... Is that all right? Sorry! Jimmy was the only

:41:41.:41:46.

player over 80, able to wear the special blue shorts. Admittedly,

:41:47.:41:52.

even in the blue shorts, you do get some accidental contact. But Jimmy

:41:53.:41:58.

got straight back onto his feet. And the older players in Masters also

:41:59.:42:02.

get an advantage when it comes to tackling, as they only have to tag

:42:03.:42:05.

their opponents, rather than take them down. Lots of people have never

:42:06.:42:10.

played rugby before when they come to Masters. It is just the

:42:11.:42:14.

camaraderie that gets them. If you retire from sport 27, 28, 30, 35,

:42:15.:42:22.

you've got 50 years ahead of you. It has the same thrills and spills as

:42:23.:42:26.

they professional game, with scrums and bursts of speed. Since coming to

:42:27.:42:30.

the UK from New Zealand, the sport has boomed, with 50 clubs and 1000

:42:31.:42:33.

players now wearing the multicoloured shorts. I was so dizzy

:42:34.:42:38.

looking at the shorts, I forgot where the line was! Whatever their

:42:39.:42:42.

physical condition they can come and play and have fun. That really

:42:43.:42:45.

impacts on the community clubs, the amateur clubs as we used call them,

:42:46.:42:49.

and the professional clubs as well, because people are getting more

:42:50.:42:53.

involved. It has kickstarted many sporting ambitions. Eventually the

:42:54.:42:56.

deadlock was broken. Nothing to do with me, but a turn of pace from a

:42:57.:43:01.

man in the 40s. In Masters, ages that barrier.

:43:02.:43:06.

Yeah, BBC One at 2:30 p.m., Castleford versus Saints, which is

:43:07.:43:11.

where we film that, at Castleford. Jimmy was amazing. So he is 82? 82,

:43:12.:43:18.

playing rugby league. That he was the fellow we saw taking a tumble?

:43:19.:43:23.

He said he has got fat bones. He got straight back up. Castleford versus

:43:24.:43:28.

Saints, BBC One, this afternoon at 2:30pm. It should be a great watch.

:43:29.:43:33.

We are going to talk about children's TV. A new TV show is

:43:34.:43:37.

coming on trying to invent the idea of Saturday morning children was my

:43:38.:43:41.

television, which was such a big feature of the 70s and 80s. I'm not

:43:42.:43:45.

sure we should be talking about other Saturday morning shows. But

:43:46.:43:47.

they've got exciting things coming up. We don't have a puppet. We need

:43:48.:43:52.

a gopher or something like that. Feel free to introduce one. I'm sure

:43:53.:43:56.

I've got something in my cupboard. Yes, the BBC is coming up with plans

:43:57.:44:01.

for a return to live shows on Saturday mornings. Not just us! It

:44:02.:44:06.

will be broadcast on Sea BBC from the autumn and has a working title

:44:07.:44:15.

of live and dangerous. -- CBBC. Can it live up to those fantastic shows

:44:16.:44:20.

of the 70s, 80s, and even the 90s? Let's remind ourselves of them.

:44:21.:44:25.

I dare you to wear a pair of shorts on one of your programmes. And it is

:44:26.:44:36.

time for Saturday Superstore! By the way, Mike, where is Nicky? I

:44:37.:44:47.

think she is in the coffee shop. Good morning! Good morning to you.

:44:48.:45:00.

Good morning! That will do. It sounds like a Scottish meal, doesn't

:45:01.:45:19.

it? A letter from Shetland, gaudy. I've got a little present.

:45:20.:45:27.

is fun. What was your favourite? The

:45:28.:45:36.

character who took dangerous to a new level.

:45:37.:45:46.

I love live and kicking. The thing is, probably help and

:45:47.:45:50.

safety kicks in now. Some of the dangerous things...

:45:51.:45:59.

Gophers bite, apparently! Share your thoughts about children's

:46:00.:46:02.

TV. We've already heard from Anna, who

:46:03.:46:09.

says there was a mermaid doll that you could win and she always wanted

:46:10.:46:13.

that. She also recalls the imaginative packaging methods for

:46:14.:46:17.

sending in unusually shaped crisps on Live and Kicking.

:46:18.:46:22.

Alice remembers having to stop her dad phoning Swap Shop because he

:46:23.:46:30.

wanted to swap my mum for Kate Bush! Those stories have become legendary.

:46:31.:46:36.

He is probably never allowed to play her songs any more. I wonder if I

:46:37.:46:42.

can guess what your favourite Saturday morning kids show was? I

:46:43.:46:47.

would like to guess! I am with Charlie! That was

:46:48.:46:52.

nostalgic. And I still watch children's programme. That's very

:46:53.:46:59.

exciting news. The weather is exciting for some. An inspiring shot

:47:00.:47:07.

of the sunrise. A lovely shot from Ramsgate in Kent. In contrast,

:47:08.:47:14.

further north, really cloudy skies. This is the radar picture. There's

:47:15.:47:19.

all the cloud we have with us this morning. It doesn't look that

:47:20.:47:24.

inspiring but it is an improving picture. We have the low pressure

:47:25.:47:27.

and rain across Northern Ireland and Scotland, northern England north, it

:47:28.:47:35.

is an improving picture. Scattered showers in the southern half of the

:47:36.:47:39.

country, but fewer than recent days and more sunshine coming through.

:47:40.:47:43.

Today we are getting rid of the muggy air and making it feel more

:47:44.:47:47.

fresh. South-westerly wind comes in later. All of the mist and murk that

:47:48.:47:51.

we have the north-east England, eastern Scotland, will clear away.

:47:52.:47:57.

The rain is with us. In north-west Scotland, they got the Jack pot.

:47:58.:48:03.

They will probably see the highest temperatures again today early on.

:48:04.:48:06.

As the day wears on the moisture heads northwards and we will have

:48:07.:48:12.

downpours. Drive north-west England and north Wales, but we have more

:48:13.:48:17.

rain waiting in the wings later. The south-westerly is that in the blue

:48:18.:48:21.

cloud away from the east coast. 16- 19 isn't bad for this time of year.

:48:22.:48:29.

Decent weather for the Tigers facing. A small chance of showers. A

:48:30.:48:37.

smattering of rain for most of us in southern Andes in areas -- and

:48:38.:48:41.

eastern areas. We will have some rain. Tomorrow it is hit and miss.

:48:42.:48:47.

Sunny spells and showers. Strong sunshine coming through. The focus

:48:48.:48:55.

for the heavy showers will again be in the north-west of Scotland.

:48:56.:48:57.

Thanks very much. We're back with

:48:58.:48:58.

the headlines at 7am. Now it's time for the latest

:48:59.:49:00.

technology news, with Click. Energy - as our demand for it grows,

:49:01.:49:25.

the world is faced with a challenge. When we burn coal, the energy that

:49:26.:49:33.

has been stored inside for millions of years is released,

:49:34.:49:36.

to power our pir our But so, of course, is all the bad

:49:37.:49:39.

stuff that is polluting Countries have met and agreed

:49:40.:49:44.

to reduce carbon emissions and invest in clean

:49:45.:49:53.

energy solutions. We are harnessing more

:49:54.:49:55.

solar and wind energy than ever, and last month the UK had its first

:49:56.:49:57.

day of electricity supply But green power is still a long way

:49:58.:50:00.

from taking over from fossil fuels. But what if there was a clean energy

:50:01.:50:14.

source that could release 10 million times more energy than fossil fuels,

:50:15.:50:18.

with an almost limitless supply which could keep the planet running

:50:19.:50:21.

for millions of years? Well, turns out, there is,

:50:22.:50:27.

and the answer lies in the stars. In the heart of the Sun,

:50:28.:50:30.

under intense pressure and heat, hydrogen atoms change from gas

:50:31.:50:35.

into superhot plasma, and, in this burning soup,

:50:36.:50:37.

they fuse together forming helium, and releasing immense

:50:38.:50:40.

amounts of energy. This is nuclear fusion and this

:50:41.:50:45.

is what scientists have been trying for more than 60 years

:50:46.:50:48.

to recreate down here on Earth. We have to do something similar

:50:49.:50:59.

to a star, which has gravity, and to do that we use

:51:00.:51:02.

magnetic fields. And we're talking about

:51:03.:51:04.

magnetic fields that create more pressure than the water

:51:05.:51:07.

pressure at the bottom So you've got this huge pressure

:51:08.:51:17.

trying to compress the plasma, and you've got to hold it in place

:51:18.:51:21.

for a very long time as well, to get If you can keep the superhot plasma

:51:22.:51:26.

in place for long enough, the energy released can keep

:51:27.:51:34.

everything hot, without the need The fusion then becomes

:51:35.:51:37.

self-sustaining, that's We are making progress, though,

:51:38.:51:39.

we have already achieved fusion, and some of the best fusion happens

:51:40.:51:52.

inside machines called tokamaks. Now this one is just outside Oxford,

:51:53.:51:55.

which turns out to be a bit of an epicentre

:51:56.:52:06.

for fusion technology. The world's largest tokamak is just

:52:07.:52:15.

15 minutes up that way. There is a problem with these

:52:16.:52:18.

machines, and that is that you end up having to put much more energy

:52:19.:52:21.

into these things than you ever But the company here

:52:22.:52:25.

is taking a different route. This is the lab of Tokamak Energy,

:52:26.:52:33.

which is developing relatively small Smaller prototypes can be

:52:34.:52:36.

tested and improved much quicker and more cheaply,

:52:37.:52:39.

as the science is understood This approach means the team may be

:52:40.:52:41.

the first to work out how to produce Inside here, we are generating

:52:42.:52:47.

plasma, which is a gas with electricity flowing through it

:52:48.:53:07.

and we're going to fuse atoms together, join them together,

:53:08.:53:10.

to generate fusion energy. And this light show

:53:11.:53:12.

isn't even fusion. This is just a warm up

:53:13.:53:14.

which is hoped will happen And then what we're going to do

:53:15.:53:17.

is heated up to over 10 million degrees, up

:53:18.:53:23.

towards 100 million degrees... We won't be able to keep

:53:24.:53:31.

our face this close We will have to be further

:53:32.:53:34.

away outside some sort But it will actually

:53:35.:53:39.

start to go transparent, as the plasma gets really hot,

:53:40.:53:42.

ten times the temperature of the sun, 100 times

:53:43.:53:44.

the temperature of the sun. Once they have achieved

:53:45.:53:48.

the temperatures, they need to keep the plasma in place long enough

:53:49.:53:51.

for it to become self-sustaining and this is what the team hopes

:53:52.:53:54.

will create magnetic fields Instead of thick copper cables,

:53:55.:53:57.

a strip of super-thin superconductor All this sounds hopeful,

:53:58.:54:05.

but the joke is that nuclear fusion If successful, it will mean the end

:54:06.:54:10.

of our reliance on fossil fuels, but there's still a lot of science

:54:11.:54:23.

to do between now and then. It could be a fantastic source

:54:24.:54:27.

of energy, likely to be the most important source of energy

:54:28.:54:30.

in the 22nd century. The point is, we need it now,

:54:31.:54:33.

and so we want to make faster It's one of the biggest

:54:34.:54:36.

fund-raising events of the year. Nearly 40,000 people ran this year's

:54:37.:54:51.

London Marathon and wealth funds are still being counted,

:54:52.:54:54.

organisers are hopeful they will smash last year's record

:54:55.:54:56.

of ?59 million raised. Online fundraising platforms

:54:57.:55:04.

now play a big role in attracting more donations,

:55:05.:55:06.

pushing the charities' causes across to users whilst also

:55:07.:55:08.

enabling them to give money JustGiving, one of the biggest

:55:09.:55:11.

players, raised just under This is a figure that charities may

:55:12.:55:20.

not have been able to raise without these sites, but these

:55:21.:55:25.

donations are also big business. JustGiving takes up to 5%

:55:26.:55:28.

commission, whilst others, They say the fees cover operational

:55:29.:55:30.

costs and innovations to ultimately But for charities, this

:55:31.:55:39.

commission is money that's not So the majority of our funding comes

:55:40.:55:51.

from individual fundraisers. For example, one of our runners

:55:52.:55:55.

is currently on ?1500, and the commission

:55:56.:55:58.

on that is going to be about ?100. And on the ground, that translates

:55:59.:56:01.

into care for ten kids that could have received a top to toe

:56:02.:56:04.

checkup, HIV testing and TB testing and be insured their

:56:05.:56:07.

health and well-being. Starfish is a small charity

:56:08.:56:09.

which helps vulnerable children in South Africa,

:56:10.:56:18.

who are affected by HIV and poverty, and a lot of its money goes

:56:19.:56:21.

into running a mobile health clinic. In the UK, the charity Big Kid helps

:56:22.:56:24.

vulnerable young people in south Both organisations have been

:56:25.:56:28.

experimenting with Kind Link, a site which promises to give

:56:29.:56:38.

charities although collected donations and will not

:56:39.:56:40.

make its money from commissions. I went to meet its founder,

:56:41.:56:46.

Iskren Kulev, who traded in corporate life and set

:56:47.:56:48.

up a home office, just KindLink didn't start as a company,

:56:49.:56:51.

KindLink started as an idea to be a social enterprise/charity

:56:52.:56:56.

that helps charities. For him, it's all

:56:57.:56:57.

about transparency. He wanted to create a platform

:56:58.:56:59.

where charities would post updates. The biggest problem

:57:00.:57:06.

with the charities is how they communicate

:57:07.:57:08.

with their donors and do the donors trust

:57:09.:57:13.

where the money is going? About 70% of donors say

:57:14.:57:23.

they would donate more if they knew what was happening

:57:24.:57:26.

with their donation. They have also added a feature

:57:27.:57:27.

to show people how much money the charity has received and how

:57:28.:57:31.

much it has spent. How has your background in financial

:57:32.:57:33.

tech helped you to put this together and also maybe to work the system

:57:34.:57:37.

a bit, because it's all about making money, it's just making money

:57:38.:57:41.

now not for businesses It's always a matter

:57:42.:57:43.

of negotiation, I would say. I would go firstly through volume

:57:44.:57:51.

is important, so how you present When I know where they can make

:57:52.:57:54.

a compromise, I can try to come up with a deal which would work

:57:55.:57:59.

for both of us. See, this is a guy you want

:58:00.:58:02.

on your side, because he knows how And so far it's proving

:58:03.:58:06.

successful, with more than 170 How would you improve

:58:07.:58:09.

on what you are doing on the pitch? For Big Kid, it's able to spend more

:58:10.:58:13.

money on its programs, like this one, which trains young

:58:14.:58:17.

people to be football coaches. It has helped me, definitely,

:58:18.:58:20.

especially with school In school, I wasn't the good

:58:21.:58:22.

kid, if you understand. So how does KindLink

:58:23.:58:29.

cover its costs? Well, instead of taking

:58:30.:58:31.

commission from donors, it plans to take the

:58:32.:58:32.

money from businesses. They've developed this platform

:58:33.:58:35.

for companies to build a profile for themselves,

:58:36.:58:38.

showcasing the good causes they support

:58:39.:58:40.

while building the brand name. And the companies will be

:58:41.:58:42.

charged a monthly fee. I think it's quite fitting that

:58:43.:58:46.

KindLink have set themselves up just across the river

:58:47.:58:49.

from Canary Wharf, where the financial industry

:58:50.:58:51.

makes its billions. And I think it takes a certain

:58:52.:58:53.

kind of person to give all that up and come over

:58:54.:58:56.

here and work for charities. Hello, and welcome

:58:57.:58:59.

to the Week in Tech. It was the week that Microsoft

:59:00.:59:09.

released an urgent software update after discovering a flaw

:59:10.:59:12.

in the windows operating system. The bug could give hackers access,

:59:13.:59:14.

by simply sending an e-mail, A 16-year-old's tweet

:59:15.:59:17.

about chicken nuggets became A US plane returned to Earth this

:59:18.:59:24.

week after two years in space. Having landed at the Kennedy Space

:59:25.:59:32.

Centre, all the Pentagon declared about the Air Force's

:59:33.:59:39.

robotic mini space shuttle is that it was performing risk

:59:40.:59:42.

reduction, experimentation and concept of

:59:43.:59:47.

operations development. And, finally, Hollywood quality

:59:48.:59:48.

animation comes to the masses. The Smartsuit Pro camera-free motion

:59:49.:59:55.

tracking system costs a fraction of the pro kit,

:59:56.:00:04.

but at $2,500 it could prove game changing for independent

:00:05.:00:08.

movie-makers and game designers. That's it for the short

:00:09.:00:14.

version of Click this week. The full version is up on iPlayer

:00:15.:00:17.

for you to watch right now. Next week's show is going to be

:00:18.:00:27.

rather epic too, so do find Follow us on Twitter and Facebook

:00:28.:00:31.

throughout the week, Thanks for watching

:00:32.:00:34.

and see you soon! Hello, this is Breakfast,

:00:35.:00:55.

with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent. The NHS faces

:00:56.:00:58.

a weekend of disruption following a large-scale cyber attack

:00:59.:01:00.

which has caused hospitals to delay Around 40 NHS Trusts and some GP

:01:01.:01:03.

surgeries were hit but there's no sign that patient data

:01:04.:01:08.

has been compromised. I am at Saint Barts, the largest NHS

:01:09.:01:25.

Trust in the country. It runs five hospitals here in east London, and

:01:26.:01:29.

all of them will be closed today for routine outpatient appointments.

:01:30.:01:30.

Organisations around the world have been affected by the malicious

:01:31.:01:33.

software known as "ransomware" with reports of infections in dozens

:01:34.:01:35.

Also today, Labour's deputy leader Tom Watson warns his party faces

:01:36.:01:56.

a "Margaret Thatcher style" landslide defeat if it doesn't

:01:57.:01:58.

They can finally celebrate after a late win at West Brom

:01:59.:02:05.

secured the Premier League title in Antonio Conte's first

:02:06.:02:07.

And you cannot stop a Brownlee. Johnny refuses to give up in

:02:08.:02:26.

Yokohama. After a nasty trashy picks up his bike and runs with it. -- a

:02:27.:02:30.

nasty crash he picks up. From horse heads to monkeys,

:02:31.:02:34.

it can only be Eurovision. But will the UK feel

:02:35.:02:36.

the Brexit backlash? Good morning. Despite low pressure

:02:37.:02:45.

across the UK today there is lots of dry weather in the offing. I will

:02:46.:02:49.

have more on that in about 15 minutes.

:02:50.:02:49.

Routine appointments and operations at some hospitals remain cancelled

:02:50.:02:52.

this morning after NHS organisations across England and Scotland

:02:53.:02:54.

were disrupted by a global cyber attack.

:02:55.:02:56.

Some doctors have been unable to access patient records,

:02:57.:02:58.

while a number of hospitals are asking patients not to attend

:02:59.:03:01.

There's no evidence that patient data has been stolen.

:03:02.:03:06.

The first indication that something was wrong was mid-afternoon

:03:07.:03:09.

yesterday, when some hospital trusts and GP surgeries reported

:03:10.:03:12.

Vital information such as patient records and appointment

:03:13.:03:21.

It meant operations were cancelled, patients were sent home

:03:22.:03:28.

The BBC understands that by late yesterday around 40 trusts and some

:03:29.:03:32.

surgeries in England and Scotland had been affected.

:03:33.:03:35.

The Prime Minister, Theresa May, said the incident was not an attack

:03:36.:03:38.

on the NHS but part of a wider problem affecting up

:03:39.:03:41.

Work to restore NHS computer systems will continue throughout

:03:42.:03:47.

This was the message that flashed up on countless computers

:03:48.:03:53.

The system was locked, it said, and no files could be accessed

:03:54.:04:03.

The cyber attack had an immediate effect on patient

:04:04.:04:06.

This man's heart operation in London was cancelled.

:04:07.:04:09.

I've been shaved down the front of my chest

:04:10.:04:12.

because they were going to open me up, my arms

:04:13.:04:15.

Nothing in my mouth since this morning.

:04:16.:04:20.

At 1:30pm the surgeon turned up and said, unfortunately we've been

:04:21.:04:23.

hacked, and there's nothing we can do, we can't operate on you today.

:04:24.:04:27.

The NHS was just one of thousands of organisations

:04:28.:04:30.

Here at the National Cyber Security Centre we are working around

:04:31.:04:37.

the clock with colleagues in policing,

:04:38.:04:39.

the health service, internationally, and with private-sector experts

:04:40.:04:41.

to lead our response to those cyber attacks as they affect the UK.

:04:42.:04:46.

In Scotland, at least half the health

:04:47.:04:48.

boards have been affected in some way.

:04:49.:04:50.

Wales and Northern Ireland have so far escaped any problems.

:04:51.:04:55.

Disruption in the NHS is likely to last several days at least.

:04:56.:04:59.

The official advice is to use the health

:05:00.:05:01.

service wisely - but emergency admissions will not be affected.

:05:02.:05:09.

And we can get the very latest now from Andy,

:05:10.:05:12.

who's outside St Bartholomew's Hospital in east London.

:05:13.:05:14.

Well, there are large parts of the NHS that are not affected. Northern

:05:15.:05:32.

Ireland and Wales have not been hit. But if you are in an area where

:05:33.:05:36.

systems have been affected, if you are an outpatient hopefully you

:05:37.:05:40.

should be told about it. You should check the hospital website if you

:05:41.:05:43.

are due to go to the hospital, or maybe they have contacted you. So it

:05:44.:05:48.

is very sporadic. So faults of people using the NHS this weekend

:05:49.:05:52.

they will not be affected at all. But for people like here, at the

:05:53.:05:57.

Barts Health NHS Trust, they have been told that routine outpatient

:05:58.:06:01.

appointments have been cancelled. Nobody knows what will happen

:06:02.:06:04.

tomorrow or the day after that. Nobody really at the moment has an

:06:05.:06:08.

answer as to how long it will take to fix this problem. Do we know how

:06:09.:06:12.

it started in the first place? Well, it seems to be an indiscriminate

:06:13.:06:17.

global attack. Lots of people are saying the NHS wasn't targeted, but

:06:18.:06:21.

it was hit, because its operating systems are very old, something like

:06:22.:06:26.

16 years old. Maybe they should have been updated with a patch to fix

:06:27.:06:30.

this problem. Maybe they were not. This might explain why some NHS

:06:31.:06:34.

trusts were hit and others were not. But it is not just the NHS that has

:06:35.:06:39.

been affected. There are something like 57,000 incidents around the

:06:40.:06:42.

world, affecting 99 countries. FedEx has been hit in America, as has the

:06:43.:06:48.

German railway system. Lots of people in addition to the NHS have

:06:49.:06:52.

been hit by this particular cyber attack. Andy, thank you.

:06:53.:06:58.

We'll be bringing you the latest information and more detail about

:06:59.:07:03.

what Andy was talking about, as to what you should do if you have

:07:04.:07:06.

appointments are expecting an operation this weekend in the areas

:07:07.:07:08.

that have been affected. Labour's deputy leader,

:07:09.:07:09.

Tom Watson, has urged voters to support their local Labour MP

:07:10.:07:12.

to prevent the Conservatives winning a "Margaret Thatcher-style

:07:13.:07:15.

landslide." to The Guardian, Mr Watson admitted

:07:16.:07:16.

that it would be very difficult to turn the poll numbers around,

:07:17.:07:19.

and that Labour had Our political correspondent

:07:20.:07:22.

Leila Nathoo joins us now Good morning. Can you take us

:07:23.:07:30.

through some of what Tom Watson has said? Well, I think the reality for

:07:31.:07:36.

Labour is that the polls have been predicting that they are as much as

:07:37.:07:41.

20 points behind the Conservative Party going into this election. Of

:07:42.:07:45.

course, we all know by now that polls can be wrong. Obviously this

:07:46.:07:50.

is still a worry for Labour. The deputy leader, Tom Watson, has

:07:51.:07:54.

warned today that if this sticks until the election, Theresa May

:07:55.:07:57.

could be on course for having a majority of 100 plus MPs in the

:07:58.:08:02.

House of Commons. Before the election, the Conservatives have a

:08:03.:08:07.

working majority of about 17 MPs. That meant rebellious backbenchers

:08:08.:08:12.

could cause trouble. Tom Watson's argument is that if there is a

:08:13.:08:15.

Conservative majority of 100 plus, that means a government under

:08:16.:08:19.

Theresa May would we able to do pretty much what it liked. -- would

:08:20.:08:24.

be able. There are a couple of interpretations of this at this

:08:25.:08:27.

stage. We have less than four weeks until the election. One is that this

:08:28.:08:31.

is a stark warning to Labour supporters to say, look, you'd

:08:32.:08:34.

better turn up, you'd better go and vote, it is this is what might

:08:35.:08:37.

happen if you don't. Another possible reading is that it could

:08:38.:08:43.

you admission that Labour is not on course to form the next government

:08:44.:08:47.

and this is a plea to say, well, look, let's at least not give our

:08:48.:08:55.

party a driving -- drubbing, which some are predicting. Of course,

:08:56.:08:58.

Jeremy Corbyn says this election is not a foregone conclusion and he is

:08:59.:09:02.

fighting to win. Our lead story today is about cyber problems with

:09:03.:09:06.

this hacking attack. The Conservatives, we understand, will

:09:07.:09:09.

be making an announcement today in connection with some of your records

:09:10.:09:12.

that lie in social media and some other places, up to the age of 18.

:09:13.:09:17.

What is that about? Charlie, this is a bit of a coincidence, actually.

:09:18.:09:21.

This announcement was not timed in connection with what has happened

:09:22.:09:25.

with the cyber attack. But the Conservatives are today promising to

:09:26.:09:29.

do more on internet security, and one of their main pledges is to say

:09:30.:09:33.

that social media users should have the right to demand from the social

:09:34.:09:38.

media companies that any records, any photos, perhaps, embarrassing

:09:39.:09:41.

comments or posts that they want to get rid of, before they were aged

:09:42.:09:45.

18, they should be able to demand from social media companies that

:09:46.:09:50.

they can be deleted. There are other promises in there about digital

:09:51.:09:53.

signatures for businesses, and doing more, asking social media companies

:09:54.:09:59.

to do more to tackle abuse and protect children from harmful

:10:00.:10:03.

content. But the big question about this is how they can possibly

:10:04.:10:06.

enforce it, because social media czar of course not based in the UK.

:10:07.:10:12.

It is a global phenomenon. This is a broad intention, really, and Labour

:10:13.:10:15.

is saying that these are just promises that cannot be delivered.

:10:16.:10:19.

Interesting timing, that the Conservatives chose to launch this

:10:20.:10:21.

today, given what has happened. Thank you.

:10:22.:10:23.

Ofsted inspectors have revealed they were jostled and pelted

:10:24.:10:26.

with food by pupils during a two-day visit to a secondary school

:10:27.:10:29.

The five-strong team rated the Willenhall Academy,

:10:30.:10:32.

near Walsall, as "inadequate" for leadership, learning,

:10:33.:10:34.

The Ofsted report also found that Year 11 students failed

:10:35.:10:37.

to reach their potential over a three year period.

:10:38.:10:41.

US President Donald Trump has refused to confirm or deny

:10:42.:10:44.

whether the White House secretly records his telephone

:10:45.:10:46.

Yesterday the president appeared to warn the former FBI director,

:10:47.:10:51.

James Comey, that his administration could produce tapes

:10:52.:10:55.

of their conversations if he spoke to the media.

:10:56.:10:58.

Democrat leaders in Congress have demanded an explanation.

:10:59.:11:03.

Pope Francis will canonise two Portuguese children at a mass today

:11:04.:11:06.

on the spot where they reported seeing the Virgin Mary exactly

:11:07.:11:09.

The service, in Fatima, is expected to attract

:11:10.:11:12.

Francis is the fourth Pope to visit the shrine.

:11:13.:11:32.

Tonight it's the Eurovision song Contest and after failing to make it

:11:33.:11:35.

into the top 10 for the past seven years, could this be the year

:11:36.:11:39.

Our Moscow correspondent, Steve Rosenberg, is in Kiev,

:11:40.:11:42.

Not sure. It feels a bit unlikely, to tell you the truth.

:11:43.:11:48.

Steve Rosenberg, is in Kiev, and has been to meet some

:11:49.:11:52.

of the contestants ahead of tonight's competition.

:11:53.:11:54.

It's Eurovision 2017, and it's all rather confusing.

:11:55.:11:59.

The audience is not understanding it.

:12:00.:12:09.

I am leaving the whole meaning to them.

:12:10.:12:18.

And what is going on with one of the favourites,

:12:19.:12:24.

"The monkey," Francesco Gabbani tells me, "is a symbol that

:12:25.:12:30.

at the end of the day we are all naked apes."

:12:31.:12:36.

Among the front-runners are Bulgaria and

:12:37.:12:37.

You know, there was a time when the UK was always a contender

:12:38.:12:50.

We always seemed to be in with a shot at the top spot.

:12:51.:12:55.

More recently we have been propping up

:12:56.:12:57.

But could this be the year that Britain is back?

:12:58.:13:01.

At rehearsals, Lucie Jones has been impressing

:13:02.:13:02.

everybody with her power ballad, Never Give Up On You.

:13:03.:13:05.

I am hoping that I will go home with the respect

:13:06.:13:10.

of the nation that watched the show at home.

:13:11.:13:13.

If the UK wants success in Eurovision, this could be

:13:14.:13:16.

Much more on that later on today. It is 6:13am -- 7:13am.

:13:17.:13:35.

England and Scotland are amongst more than seventy countries to be

:13:36.:13:38.

affected by a global cyber attack that targeted the NHS yesterday.

:13:39.:13:41.

The health service was amongst tens of thousands of organisations

:13:42.:13:44.

to have been caught out by a computer virus which locks

:13:45.:13:47.

Cyber attacks, often carried out by criminal organisations,

:13:48.:13:51.

have become more frequent in recent times.

:13:52.:13:53.

Emily Orton is a cyber security analyst.

:13:54.:13:58.

She joins us now. Good morning, Emily. I would like to talk first

:13:59.:14:07.

about the scale of this attack. 70 countries, and obviously huge parts

:14:08.:14:11.

of the NHS affect from yesterday. And as far as we know, still very

:14:12.:14:15.

severely affected today. How bad is it? It looks like this is probably

:14:16.:14:20.

the biggest case of ransomware that we have seen in the world. Obviously

:14:21.:14:25.

we don't know how many files have been affected, but the scale in the

:14:26.:14:28.

number of countries looks like this is one of the most significant cyber

:14:29.:14:32.

attacks that we have seen in the cyber community so far, and the fact

:14:33.:14:36.

that this is obviously affecting health patients makes it even worse.

:14:37.:14:41.

When we look at the threat, what happens, people have seen it by now,

:14:42.:14:45.

this page appears on a computer screen. Maybe we have it now, we can

:14:46.:14:49.

show it as we are talking. The page details what has happened to your

:14:50.:14:53.

computer, and the threat is there. In this case it is a time to that,

:14:54.:14:59.

isn't it? The material will be deleted if money is not paid within

:15:00.:15:03.

a certain time. Does that fit into a pattern of how ransomware works?

:15:04.:15:10.

That's right, it happens very quickly once it gets in. They can

:15:11.:15:14.

encrypt files quickly and you are faced with this ultimatum. There's a

:15:15.:15:22.

lot of fear and they say the files will be deleted if you don't pay the

:15:23.:15:25.

ransom. Supposedly they will then unlock the files, but there's no

:15:26.:15:31.

guarantee. One thing that is not particularly clear, from early in

:15:32.:15:37.

incident, the NHS as patient data has not been stolen. It sounds to

:15:38.:15:42.

me, we don't understand is the level you do, but it seems quite clearly

:15:43.:15:47.

the data has been stolen, or is it just because it has been held to

:15:48.:15:52.

ransom? They are locking down and encrypting the files where they are

:15:53.:15:55.

and it could be that they are potentially deleting the original

:15:56.:16:00.

copies. So far it seems like the actual date in the files hasn't been

:16:01.:16:06.

accessed. -- data. We have no evidence of the data coming out of

:16:07.:16:10.

those organisations. It has been locked down and if you want the key

:16:11.:16:15.

to unlock them, pay up. And in the past people have paid the ransom?

:16:16.:16:19.

That is the history of people paying the ransom, yes. So paying the

:16:20.:16:26.

ransom will presumably free it, we will talk more about this later, the

:16:27.:16:30.

principles around it, in the absence of that we are told experts are

:16:31.:16:34.

working around the clock. What are people trying to do? What's

:16:35.:16:38.

happening? A lot of activity behind the scenes. The first, which will be

:16:39.:16:45.

investigated, is how much backup these organisations have. Your best

:16:46.:16:50.

case scenario is that you have a very healthy backup system and you

:16:51.:16:55.

have files... Just explain it, that's in case you can't cure the

:16:56.:16:58.

problem, then you start thinking about whether the material they are

:16:59.:17:03.

threatening you with, whether you have that elsewhere? Exactly. That's

:17:04.:17:08.

if they execute the threat. I'm furious about the efforts that can

:17:09.:17:15.

be made to crack... Very difficult. -- I am curious about. If you don't

:17:16.:17:21.

have the key, it is locked down. I'm sure there's lots of work going on

:17:22.:17:25.

behind the scenes to see what is technically possible, but that's a

:17:26.:17:29.

very difficult challenge. More likely you will look at trying to

:17:30.:17:33.

this or from somewhere else if you can. There is a suggestion that

:17:34.:17:36.

maybe some of the systems weren't as up-to-date as they might have been.

:17:37.:17:40.

Is that a problem? A huge problem. Many organisations, not just the

:17:41.:17:46.

NHS, have had vulnerabilities. The reality is there are vulnerabilities

:17:47.:17:52.

all over the place. They should perhaps patch certain systems, but

:17:53.:17:56.

cyber security will always be an issue and there will always be holes

:17:57.:18:02.

that criminals and hackers are going to try to exploit. Thank you very

:18:03.:18:06.

much for your time this morning. We will be discussing this more little

:18:07.:18:13.

later and we will speak to the Home Secretary just after 8am, to find

:18:14.:18:17.

out the latest picture across the UK.

:18:18.:18:17.

Here's Helen with a look at this morning's weather.

:18:18.:18:22.

It is not looking quite so cheery out the window here!

:18:23.:18:29.

We have a lot of low cloud around at the women's and the low pressure is

:18:30.:18:32.

sitting over the country. That said, even though it is low pressure,

:18:33.:18:36.

there's quite a lot of dry weather today and through the weekend. This

:18:37.:18:41.

was Ramsgate, in Kent, about half an hour ago. Further north it is rather

:18:42.:18:48.

grey and dreary. That's the case across many parts of the east coast

:18:49.:18:52.

of Scotland, around the Murray Firth and the north-east of England. We've

:18:53.:18:57.

had all of this muggy air. There is the cloud sitting over the

:18:58.:19:00.

north-west of England at the moment. Rain to go with it. That's the low

:19:01.:19:05.

pressure. Gradually it will pull its way northwards and westwards,

:19:06.:19:09.

allowing dry weather to come in. A scattering of showers. Dry and

:19:10.:19:14.

brighter weather coming through quickly in the south. Some warm

:19:15.:19:18.

sunshine as well, which is what you would expect. Further north it is

:19:19.:19:24.

rather grey first thing. There are some outbreaks of rain. This

:19:25.:19:28.

afternoon, dry and for a time we have the rain in Northern Ireland.

:19:29.:19:31.

Again, a dry interlude in the afternoon here. The warm weather in

:19:32.:19:35.

the north-west Highlands of Scotland will disappear in the afternoon,

:19:36.:19:39.

with heavy showers. Not for all. It will still be warm in between the

:19:40.:19:43.

showers. That's because we have had all of this easily activity.

:19:44.:19:47.

South-westerly winds are coming in. It will start to feel more fresh.

:19:48.:19:51.

Showers into the afternoon, away from the north and west, because of

:19:52.:19:56.

this next weather front, which threw the evening and overnight will bring

:19:57.:19:59.

most gardens and little bit of rain. We should escape the showers for St

:20:00.:20:10.

Helens and the Castleford Tigers. It won't be a lot of rain but it will

:20:11.:20:14.

at least dampen the ground. That allows the south-westerly, fresh air

:20:15.:20:18.

in across the country, which means the southern and western coast will

:20:19.:20:22.

enjoy a lovely day tomorrow, plenty of sunshine and fewer showers

:20:23.:20:25.

generally tomorrow in the north-west Highlands of Scotland. Still

:20:26.:20:30.

showery. Sunshine and showery day elsewhere. Some areas could have

:20:31.:20:34.

shower after shower in the south-west peninsula, parts of south

:20:35.:20:38.

Wales and the Midlands, and other areas will stay dry. It will feel

:20:39.:20:43.

warm as well, with temperatures getting up to about 16- 18 tomorrow.

:20:44.:20:48.

But the dry weather doesn't last. The wind and rain is coming in

:20:49.:20:53.

through Sunday night and into the start of next week.

:20:54.:20:54.

Thanks and talk to you soon! For patients who need palliative

:20:55.:20:57.

care in the final days of their lives, the option

:20:58.:20:59.

to be cared for, and die, at home isn't something

:21:00.:21:02.

that's always available. A new survey suggests that one

:21:03.:21:04.

of the main barriers is a shortage of specialists,

:21:05.:21:07.

who can also offer the right My husband, Roger, I'd be married to

:21:08.:21:29.

for 47 years and he was RAF aircrew. A brave man. 13 years ago he was

:21:30.:21:36.

diagnosed with cancer. When his condition was terminal, the only

:21:37.:21:40.

thing he wanted to do was to die in his own house, with his own things

:21:41.:21:48.

and me looking after him. OK, so we will practice with some water. We

:21:49.:21:54.

will just draw out 1mm of water. She took part in a trial project, with

:21:55.:21:59.

the help of a district nurse she was trained to give controlled doses of

:22:00.:22:03.

pain relief to her husband at home. How easy did you find this process?

:22:04.:22:08.

Yes, it was easy for me. With adequate instruction. She didn't

:22:09.:22:13.

have to actually inject the pain relief into her husband Costa arm, a

:22:14.:22:18.

thin cannula was already in place and the dosage was controlled. It

:22:19.:22:22.

allowed her to believe her husband's pain in the dying days, without

:22:23.:22:26.

relying on a nursery could be several hours away. This was such a

:22:27.:22:31.

godsend to me, to be able to do with that. It took away all of the

:22:32.:22:34.

hopeless feeling you have the see someone you have loved for so long

:22:35.:22:39.

in pain and it was wonderful. It is so important for people to have the

:22:40.:22:43.

deaf they want, where they wanted to be. -- death. It has a lasting

:22:44.:22:47.

effect on the family they leave behind and I think that family can

:22:48.:22:52.

see they died peacefully and pain-free, at home, where they

:22:53.:22:55.

wanted to be, and that the overriding factor. And we just

:22:56.:23:00.

secured at... According to the national council for palliative

:23:01.:23:03.

care, as people would prefer to die at home, but a survey today of three

:23:04.:23:07.

than 70 healthcare professionals suggest for many it's not happening.

:23:08.:23:12.

More than one third of nurses and GPs who support dying people at home

:23:13.:23:15.

is a staffing levels are not sufficient to meet a management

:23:16.:23:19.

needs. 20% said their caseload was not manageable and nearly one third

:23:20.:23:24.

said the availability of end of life care training in their area was

:23:25.:23:29.

inadequate. Our study shows that we are really failing people who want

:23:30.:23:32.

to spend their final days and weeks at home. We know that pain is

:23:33.:23:37.

people's greatest fear and if it is not controlled that will lead to

:23:38.:23:42.

emergency admissions to hospital and bad memories for the families who

:23:43.:23:45.

will live on. The Department of Health in England as everyone should

:23:46.:23:50.

be involved as much as they want in plans around their death. Having

:23:51.:23:53.

family members administer pain relief won't be for everyone, but it

:23:54.:23:58.

is becoming one option in the final days of life. It certainly gave me

:23:59.:24:02.

such a feeling that I've been here to the end with Roger and made his

:24:03.:24:08.

last days completely pain free. And he died with me and both his sons

:24:09.:24:14.

here, holding his hand, just as he would have wanted.

:24:15.:24:18.

That was Graham Satchall reporting there, and to discuss this we're now

:24:19.:24:21.

joined by the Director of Policy and External Affairs

:24:22.:24:23.

at The National Council for Palliative Care,

:24:24.:24:25.

Good morning and thank you for coming in. We saw Zilla's story. She

:24:26.:24:33.

spoke so movingly about the help she was able to give to her husband in

:24:34.:24:37.

the final days. That's an unusual case, isn't it? That's not seem very

:24:38.:24:44.

much as yet? It is unusual at the moment, but we need to see more of

:24:45.:24:49.

it because actually most of us want to die at home. It is where we find

:24:50.:24:56.

familiarity, privacy, peace. Actually, our relatives, friends and

:24:57.:24:59.

the want to look after us in relation to the -- to that and we

:25:00.:25:04.

will never have enough workforce in professional health and care staff

:25:05.:25:07.

to help with that. Of course having more specialists will be important

:25:08.:25:14.

but we have to look at what we are asking them to do in training and

:25:15.:25:18.

supporting carers so they can administer pain relief. Sometimes

:25:19.:25:21.

people are waiting with the drugs in the house for three or four hours,

:25:22.:25:25.

for a nurse to come up and administer it, and they can do it

:25:26.:25:28.

themselves. In considerable distress. Really distressing to see

:25:29.:25:32.

someone in pain when you can do something about it. Yes, you imagine

:25:33.:25:36.

those scenarios and how agonising that would be for both parties, for

:25:37.:25:41.

everyone involved, but that's happening because people don't have

:25:42.:25:44.

the confidence, they haven't been given skills to give that treatment

:25:45.:25:49.

to their loved one. Is that what has happened? It's about giving them the

:25:50.:25:52.

skills and as as a society giving people permission to do it. The

:25:53.:25:58.

mission, but that's not in a legal sense. -- permission. If you like

:25:59.:26:03.

it's a moral permission in relation to it. We tend to rely too much on a

:26:04.:26:08.

professional level, in terms of supporting people to die at home.

:26:09.:26:13.

Actually what we need to do is to really support and empower

:26:14.:26:16.

communities, neighbours, family, friends and neighbours to provide

:26:17.:26:20.

the care they want, if they want to do it. That's an important point, if

:26:21.:26:25.

they want to do it. I can imagine for some people it would be

:26:26.:26:28.

difficult, because in the final days of someone's life, if you are

:26:29.:26:32.

administering pain medication, as much as you want them to be out of

:26:33.:26:36.

pain it can be dangerous because you could potentially hasten their

:26:37.:26:40.

death. Not if you've been properly supported and monitored and trained.

:26:41.:26:43.

The difference in wired between the amount of medication to deaden pain

:26:44.:26:49.

and to kill someone is quite high in those circumstances because you

:26:50.:26:52.

build up a tolerant to morphine the longer you are on it. -- build up a

:26:53.:26:57.

tolerance. Where do we look for a model of how to handle this

:26:58.:26:59.

incredibly sensitive subject that works? We are seeing this being

:27:00.:27:06.

tried in adult palliative care in London and elsewhere. Also in

:27:07.:27:12.

children's palliative care. Parents are already administering medicines

:27:13.:27:15.

and providing lots of care and support to their terminally ill

:27:16.:27:18.

children and this is something we can accept and learn from. It is the

:27:19.:27:23.

situation in now, in places where this is not happening? How does it

:27:24.:27:27.

work? If you are looking after someone at home who is in distress,

:27:28.:27:32.

what do you do? How do you wrap it up and say, this person needs extra

:27:33.:27:37.

work now? Who do you call? Sometimes this can be difficult and that

:27:38.:27:41.

default is that people will end up calling the ambulance service or

:27:42.:27:45.

take people to hospital. Which is adding stress to an already stressed

:27:46.:27:50.

system. This is about taking some of the stress off the NHS. It requires

:27:51.:27:54.

us to think differently about how we ask healthcare staff to support, the

:27:55.:28:00.

coach, the look after carers in relation to this. There will be

:28:01.:28:04.

people watching this now you have a family member, who may have been

:28:05.:28:08.

through it in the past, or it's an ongoing situation. What is the

:28:09.:28:12.

advice? Who do they talk to? Who do they turn to for advice? At moment,

:28:13.:28:17.

again, that will depend throughout the country. Sometimes they might

:28:18.:28:22.

turn to a GB, sometimes a hospice, sometimes a care co-ordination

:28:23.:28:27.

service -- GP. But if you want to care for somebody at home, start by

:28:28.:28:32.

talking to whoever your healthcare team is, people in charge of the

:28:33.:28:36.

person 's care. Say that this is something you might be interested in

:28:37.:28:41.

doing. Thank you so much for talking to us. Very interesting subject. And

:28:42.:28:50.

thank you as well to Zilla, who was talking about her experience with

:28:51.:28:55.

her husband. Thank you. The headlines are coming up. Stay with

:28:56.:28:56.

us. Hello, this is Breakfast

:28:57.:30:01.

with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent. Coming up before 8:00,

:30:02.:30:03.

Helen will have the weather. But first at 7:30, a summary of this

:30:04.:30:08.

morning's main news. Routine appointments and operations

:30:09.:30:10.

at some hospitals remain cancelled this morning after NHS organisations

:30:11.:30:13.

across England and Scotland were disrupted by a

:30:14.:30:15.

global cyber attack. Earlier I spoke to our North America

:30:16.:30:17.

technology correspondent, Dave Lee, and asked him about

:30:18.:30:20.

the scale of the attack worldwide. Well, I can certainly confirm that

:30:21.:30:34.

has you mentioned, it is an international cyber attack. Almost

:30:35.:30:38.

100 countries now have registered this problem. Some of the worst hit

:30:39.:30:42.

include Russia, many of their government systems were affected eye

:30:43.:30:47.

this, we have seen it in places like China. Where I am, in the US, FedEx

:30:48.:30:52.

has been turning away customers throughout today, it is still Friday

:30:53.:30:57.

here. That has obviously been a big problem. It is worth saying in the

:30:58.:31:00.

US, their healthcare system has not suffered the same kind of blondes

:31:01.:31:05.

that the NHS has. -- problems that the NHS has. But they are taking it

:31:06.:31:11.

very seriously, keeping an eye out and trying to manage the damage that

:31:12.:31:14.

this cyber attackers course. And the experts are now trying to unravel

:31:15.:31:19.

some of the problems. This has happened once or twice before. What

:31:20.:31:22.

pattern has been set, and how has this worked out in the past? It is

:31:23.:31:27.

quite a troubling pattern, really. We had a case here recently in Los

:31:28.:31:32.

Angeles were a hospital was affected by ransomware. This idea is that you

:31:33.:31:37.

get malicious software which encrypts your files and demands a

:31:38.:31:42.

fee to decrypt them. That happened to a hospital and they ended up

:31:43.:31:47.

paying $17,000 to have those files returned to them. I guess what many

:31:48.:31:53.

of these organisations affected might be thinking over the weekend

:31:54.:31:57.

is, do we pay the ransom and get our files? Or could start in courage

:31:58.:32:02.

more of these things to happen in the future? -- could that encourage.

:32:03.:32:07.

But potentially some of these organisations will end up paying

:32:08.:32:11.

lots of money to get access to the files they need. That was Dave Lee,

:32:12.:32:16.

our technology correspondent in San Francisco.

:32:17.:32:17.

Labour's deputy leader, Tom Watson, has warned of the Conservatives

:32:18.:32:20.

winning a "Margaret Thatcher-style landslide" if they maintain

:32:21.:32:22.

their current lead in the opinion polls.

:32:23.:32:24.

Mr Watson told the Guardian that it would be "very,

:32:25.:32:27.

very difficult" to turn the poll numbers around,

:32:28.:32:28.

and Labour had a "mountain to climb."

:32:29.:32:31.

Mrs Thatcher won majorities of 144 in 1983 and 101 in 1987.

:32:32.:32:34.

The Conservatives want to give people the power to demand that

:32:35.:32:37.

social media companies delete any embarrassing content they posted

:32:38.:32:41.

Labour has questioned whether the legislation would be

:32:42.:32:47.

enforceable, given that most of the largest companies are based

:32:48.:32:49.

Pope Francis will canonise two Portuguese children at a mass today

:32:50.:32:57.

on the spot where they reported seeing the Virgin Mary exactly

:32:58.:33:00.

Tens of thousands of pilgrims gathered in Fatima to welcome

:33:01.:33:04.

the pontiff last night and today's mass is expected to attract

:33:05.:33:07.

Francis is the fourth pope to visit the shrine.

:33:08.:33:13.

Tonight it's the Eurovision song Contest and, after failing to make

:33:14.:33:18.

it into the top 10 for the past seven years, could this be the year

:33:19.:33:22.

Lucie Jones will be representing the UK in tonight's

:33:23.:33:25.

She'll be singing her ballad, Never Give Up On You.

:33:26.:33:29.

A selection of padlocks, or so called "love locks" that

:33:30.:33:47.

Something tells me that the title of that will come back to haunt us.

:33:48.:33:53.

Europe's vest wine waiters have been going head-to-head. It is a contest

:33:54.:33:58.

to find the most accomplished sommelier. Competitors at the

:33:59.:34:02.

European sommelier cutback championships in Vienna had to face

:34:03.:34:05.

challenges like pouring 40 glasses of champagne with exactly the same

:34:06.:34:08.

amount in each, and impressing the judges with their knowledge of

:34:09.:34:12.

different phone lines. -- fine wines. I know they do it for a

:34:13.:34:19.

reason. It is a proper job and it is important. But it takes the fun out

:34:20.:34:23.

of it, in a way. Is there a championship for everything these

:34:24.:34:28.

days? There is. I think that is a very prestigious completion. It is,

:34:29.:34:32.

I'm not knocking it. The one that springs to mind is the tent erecting

:34:33.:34:36.

championships, which I once attended. You are making that up. It

:34:37.:34:42.

meant a lot to the people competing. And the caravan reversing

:34:43.:34:46.

championships. Seriously! I love pictures like this. Well, we should

:34:47.:34:51.

really recognise the achievement of the Chelsea manager, Antonio Conte.

:34:52.:34:54.

And he took over a year ago Chelsea when disarray after the Jose

:34:55.:35:00.

Mourinho era, they were tense. There is a brilliant article in the BBC

:35:01.:35:04.

sports website, which goes into how much detail Antonio Conte put into

:35:05.:35:09.

the setup at Chelsea. He replaced the pre- match meal, scrambled eggs,

:35:10.:35:13.

chicken past, with dried fruits, and seeds, because it digests quicker.

:35:14.:35:18.

He attended all the Christmas parties, he gave every member of

:35:19.:35:24.

staff at Christmas a bottle of present go -- prosecco, which had

:35:25.:35:31.

the inscription "We shall either find a way or make a way". That is

:35:32.:35:35.

what Hannibal told the elephants they crossed the Alps. Well, it

:35:36.:35:41.

worked. It officials, because are champions now.

:35:42.:35:43.

Our sports editor Dan Roan looks at Antonio Conte's remarkable

:35:44.:35:46.

Chelsea strolled to the title almost complete.

:35:47.:35:52.

West Brom have also enjoyed their season,

:35:53.:35:54.

however, and victory here at the Hawthorns would have

:35:55.:35:56.

The visitors enjoying more chances, but failing to break down a stubborn

:35:57.:36:01.

Added urgency after the restart, Victor Moses denied by Ben Foster.

:36:02.:36:11.

Chelsea's frustration beginning to show.

:36:12.:36:12.

Then, in the final ten minutes and with the game seemingly headed

:36:13.:36:16.

for a draw, the pressure finally showed.

:36:17.:36:19.

Michy Batshuayi with the crucial touch.

:36:20.:36:23.

The substitute barely played this season.

:36:24.:36:26.

Now he scored the goal that would seal the title.

:36:27.:36:29.

We started the season with a lot of problems.

:36:30.:36:33.

But I think in the problems, we found the right way

:36:34.:36:36.

And now I think that they deserved to win the league.

:36:37.:36:51.

From the moment he arrived in England last year,

:36:52.:36:54.

the Italian has been a passionate and animated presence

:36:55.:37:02.

But his team's march towards the title has been

:37:03.:37:05.

When Chelsea play Watford here at Stamford Ridge on Monday

:37:06.:37:09.

evening, they and their fans will be able to celebrate a second

:37:10.:37:12.

Premier League triumph in just three seasons -

:37:13.:37:14.

re-establishing this club as the dominant force

:37:15.:37:16.

When you consider what went on here last season,

:37:17.:37:20.

it's an achievement that should not be underestimated.

:37:21.:37:22.

Jose Mourinho was sacked after a chaotic defence

:37:23.:37:24.

of the title, the club finishing 10th and failing

:37:25.:37:27.

Chelsea hired Conte but had to wait until the end of the Euros before

:37:28.:37:32.

the Italy manager was free to join them.

:37:33.:37:34.

There were one or two big signings, midfielder N'Golo Kante signed

:37:35.:37:37.

midyear, but the new coach has largely transformed

:37:38.:37:39.

We worked very hard and I think we have been a very good team.

:37:40.:37:49.

Conte has also guided Chelsea to the FA Cup final.

:37:50.:37:56.

Other managers may have grabbed more headlines and created more

:37:57.:37:58.

controversy, but the Italian has eclipsed them all.

:37:59.:38:11.

Yes, congratulations to Antonio Conte and to Chelsea.

:38:12.:38:14.

There was one other game last night - Everton beat Watford,

:38:15.:38:17.

Celtic are two matches away from completing an unbeaten season

:38:18.:38:21.

in the Scottish Premiership, after winning 3-1 at Aberdeen.

:38:22.:38:24.

All the goals came in a frantic first 12 minutes.

:38:25.:38:27.

Lee Griffiths with Celtic's third - and that took their league tally

:38:28.:38:30.

Celtic will be going for the double in two weeks' time, when they take

:38:31.:38:36.

on Aberdeen, again, in the Scottish Cup final.

:38:37.:38:38.

Birmingham City Ladies say they will not fear Manchester City,

:38:39.:38:43.

in today's Women's FA cup final at Wembley.

:38:44.:38:45.

Birmingham will have to overcome a side aiming to seal

:38:46.:38:50.

This is the third year that the women's FA Cup final has

:38:51.:38:55.

We want to put on a great performance.

:38:56.:38:58.

We're not just going there to be another team that has been in the FA

:38:59.:39:02.

We want to do better, we want to win, we want to showcase

:39:03.:39:06.

We're a football team and we show grit and determination.

:39:07.:39:10.

We can't wait to go and play at Wembley.

:39:11.:39:14.

You always dream of playing at Wembley, and you always dream

:39:15.:39:17.

Ever since I have joined this club it's about trying to win the FA Cup

:39:18.:39:22.

and we're one step closer to doing that.

:39:23.:39:24.

Definitely up there with the stuff I have achieved so far.

:39:25.:39:28.

What a dramatic day it's been for Jonny Brownlee,

:39:29.:39:30.

in the World Triathlon Series race in Japan.

:39:31.:39:32.

In treacherous conditions in Yokohama, he was caught up

:39:33.:39:34.

in a crash, on the last lap of the bike leg and was sent flying

:39:35.:39:39.

over the railings - but he refused to give up,

:39:40.:39:41.

carrying his damaged bike to the transition point,

:39:42.:39:44.

to get his running shoes on, before eventually finishing down

:39:45.:39:47.

in 42nd place - but what determination.

:39:48.:39:49.

You can see highlights tomorrow at 1:00 on BBC 2.

:39:50.:39:59.

He doesn't appear to be hurt, that is good.

:40:00.:40:02.

Lewis Hamilton said his Mercedes team had done an amazing job

:40:03.:40:05.

with the upgrades to his car, after going quickest in both

:40:06.:40:08.

practice sessions ahead of the Spanish Grand Prix.

:40:09.:40:10.

He just edged out his team-mate Valterry Bottas.

:40:11.:40:12.

They were comfortably clear of the two Ferraris.

:40:13.:40:14.

Third practice starts at 10:00 with qualifying at 1:00.

:40:15.:40:20.

Gloucester lost to Stade Francais in rugby union's Challenge Cup final

:40:21.:40:23.

at a rainy Murrayfield, going down by 25-17.

:40:24.:40:25.

This interception from Jonny May gave the English side a 10-0 lead.

:40:26.:40:28.

Racing towards this trophy to a third time.

:40:29.:40:30.

But Stade Francais are fed up in runners-up.

:40:31.:40:37.

They scored three tries to finally lift this trophy.

:40:38.:40:39.

This is European Cup rugby's second-tier competition,

:40:40.:40:41.

Today, it's the turn of Saracens, who'll be hoping to retain

:40:42.:40:53.

their European Champions Cup title when they take on French side

:40:54.:40:55.

Saracens are also on track to successfully defend

:40:56.:41:02.

their domestic title too, and they're on the verge

:41:03.:41:05.

of establishing themselves as one of the game's all time

:41:06.:41:08.

We have learned through experience, we have learned the hard way.

:41:09.:41:14.

We have gradually built up this European pedigree.

:41:15.:41:16.

I do not think it is something that happens overnight.

:41:17.:41:18.

It is a gradual improvement and the understanding of how

:41:19.:41:21.

We are nowhere near the finished article.

:41:22.:41:24.

We are obviously pleased to know that we have players who pride

:41:25.:41:29.

ourselves on being able to stay in that fight the whole game.

:41:30.:41:32.

In rugby league, Salford Red Devils were given a scare by

:41:33.:41:35.

Hull Kingston Rovers, but they came from behind to make it

:41:36.:41:39.

into the quarter-finals of the Challenge Cup.

:41:40.:41:42.

They were losing at half time, but Salford scored 18 unanswered

:41:43.:41:46.

This try from Ben Murdoch Masila ensured Salford advance to the last

:41:47.:41:50.

eight, along with last night's other winners Wakefield and holders Hull.

:41:51.:41:55.

Rugby league is one of the most physical sports of all,

:41:56.:41:59.

but now there's a way of playing into your 70s or even 80s,

:42:00.:42:03.

Ahead of the weekend's challenge cup matches on the BBC,

:42:04.:42:07.

I've been to Castleford to see why Masters rugby league is breaking

:42:08.:42:10.

In warning, if you are eating your breakfast, there are some shots of

:42:11.:42:15.

me wearing shorts coming up. Playing rugby league

:42:16.:42:21.

again at the age of 82. Jimmy Airnes is taking on players

:42:22.:42:23.

nearly 50 years younger, I get the ball, I get

:42:24.:42:26.

plenty of running. And I've got these

:42:27.:42:36.

great mates again. It's a great spirit,

:42:37.:42:38.

it's the comradeship after the game. Rugby league is one of the most

:42:39.:42:42.

brutal and physical contact But in Masters, there's a way

:42:43.:42:49.

of reducing impact on ageing limbs. Well, Masters begins at the age

:42:50.:42:56.

of 35, when you can wear It does mean full contact,

:42:57.:43:01.

doesn't it, Chris? I hope this will be

:43:02.:43:07.

slightly less contact. Luckily, I'm over 50,

:43:08.:43:14.

so I get the red shorts. Then when you get to 60, look,

:43:15.:43:18.

you wear the gold shorts, If you tackle a player in green

:43:19.:43:30.

shorts you know they're over 70, so you treat them with even more

:43:31.:43:40.

respect as you remove their tags. Jimmy was the only player

:43:41.:43:43.

over 80, able to wear Admittedly, even in the blue shorts,

:43:44.:43:48.

you do get some accidental contact. But Jimmy got straight

:43:49.:43:56.

back onto his feet. And the older players in Masters

:43:57.:43:58.

also get an advantage when it comes to tackling, as they only have

:43:59.:44:01.

to tag their opponents, Lots of people have never

:44:02.:44:05.

played rugby before It's just the camaraderie

:44:06.:44:09.

that gets them. If you retire from sport at 27, 28,

:44:10.:44:12.

30, 35, you've got 50 years It has the same thrills and spills

:44:13.:44:16.

as the professional game, Since coming to the UK

:44:17.:44:20.

from New Zealand, the sport has boomed, with 50 clubs

:44:21.:44:24.

and 1,000 players now wearing I was so busy looking at the shorts,

:44:25.:44:27.

I forgot where the line was! Whatever their physical condition

:44:28.:44:34.

they can come and play and have fun. That really impacts on the community

:44:35.:44:42.

clubs, the amateur clubs as we used call them, and the professional

:44:43.:44:45.

clubs as well, because people It has kickstarted many

:44:46.:44:49.

sporting ambitions. Nothing to do with me,

:44:50.:44:56.

but a turn of pace from a man For once, I was relieved to be

:44:57.:45:16.

slightly older so I could wear the red shorts and not get flattened

:45:17.:45:20.

again. But what a great idea. That was quite feisty at times! Jimmy was

:45:21.:45:26.

OK. We filmed that at Castleford, and Castleford is live in the

:45:27.:45:30.

challenge cup six round on the BBC at 2:30pm today. BBC One.

:45:31.:45:49.

Here's Helen with a look at this morning's weather.

:45:50.:45:52.

I am hoping the rain across the north-west of England

:45:53.:45:54.

will clear away, but what about the speeds of some of those players!

:45:55.:45:58.

Lovely pictures coming through at the moment. This is the picture from

:45:59.:46:03.

Ramsgate. You can see the reflections of the water. Further

:46:04.:46:06.

north, it is in fine and dry elsewhere. This is Aberdeen city

:46:07.:46:09.

area. Grey and murky and likely in the north-east of Scotland to stay

:46:10.:46:13.

grey and murky for much of the day. The eastern coast as well. We have

:46:14.:46:16.

the onshore breeze. We are freshening the air and getting the

:46:17.:46:19.

south-westerly wind in. It doesn't mean it will be dry altogether, but

:46:20.:46:24.

there is a lot of usable web. You can see the rain in Northern

:46:25.:46:29.

Ireland, moving into Scotland. Good sunshine this morning in northern

:46:30.:46:34.

Scotland. Cool and grey for the east coast, even foggy in north-east

:46:35.:46:38.

England. There's the rain in the north-west of England early on, but

:46:39.:46:43.

everything is moving northwards. The showers in England and Wales are

:46:44.:46:46.

well scattered. It won't be completely dry. There will be a lot

:46:47.:46:51.

of dry weather for many of us. The exception this morning will be parts

:46:52.:46:56.

of Northern Ireland, north-west England, south-west Scotland. It

:46:57.:46:59.

will dry up in Northern Ireland for a time. The rain heads northwards,

:47:00.:47:04.

rakes up and becomes heavy in north-west Scotland. Elsewhere,

:47:05.:47:08.

showers around. Drier than in recent days. We saw the next weather fronts

:47:09.:47:17.

coming into Northern Ireland by teatime. That provides some rain for

:47:18.:47:22.

the gardens, but hopefully it will hold off at Wembley, so the football

:47:23.:47:26.

should be fine. As for tomorrow, a cooler start, perhaps frost in the

:47:27.:47:31.

north and west. Otherwise it looks like a decent day. Almost April

:47:32.:47:38.

showers tomorrow. Good spells of sunshine in between with highs of

:47:39.:47:43.

17- 20, about average. A lot of usable and dry and fine weather. But

:47:44.:47:46.

look what's coming behind me. Even I know what that means! Thanks

:47:47.:47:56.

very much. The headlines are coming up.

:47:57.:47:56.

Hello and welcome to Newswatch with me, Samira Ahmed.

:47:57.:48:07.

She won't take part in a televised leaders debate.

:48:08.:48:10.

Could the BBC have done more to make a head-to-head happen?

:48:11.:48:20.

And are the Green Party being given a fair share of airtime

:48:21.:48:24.

on the BBC's special election programmes?

:48:25.:48:29.

There's been a bit of a phoney war feel to the election

:48:30.:48:32.

Before the parties began publishing their manifestos.

:48:33.:48:37.

Many questions had been fobbed off with this answer, given to Laura

:48:38.:48:40.

Kuenssberg by Jeremy Corbyn on Tuesday.

:48:41.:48:42.

Well, you will have to wait for the manifesto for the details.

:48:43.:48:46.

Those manifestos will be officially unveiled next week, but on Wednesday

:48:47.:48:50.

night we got a sneak preview of what Labour's might contain.

:48:51.:48:55.

Somehow, an earlier version had ended up in the

:48:56.:48:57.

I can't claim I've read it all, but here it is.

:48:58.:49:01.

Stamped right through the middle of the document,

:49:02.:49:03.

about 20,000 words in total, draft, confidential.

:49:04.:49:05.

In other words, they hadn't quite anticipated

:49:06.:49:07.

But I can do, because we've received this leaked draft.

:49:08.:49:18.

Well, he could wave it around on the telly,

:49:19.:49:20.

Tim Grant was among several Newswatch viewers who

:49:21.:49:24.

And David Gregory elaborated on that.

:49:25.:49:41.

This is, in effect, a stolen document, and

:49:42.:49:44.

therefore should have not been used in the way that it was.

:49:45.:49:52.

We didn't discover much about the Conservative Party's

:49:53.:49:55.

policy plans on Tuesday night's One Show, but we did get a few

:49:56.:49:58.

insights into the personalities and marriage of Mr and Mrs May.

:49:59.:50:01.

I get to decide when I take the bins out.

:50:02.:50:04.

There's boy jobs and girl jobs, you see.

:50:05.:50:08.

Now, we're not leaving that as well, are we?

:50:09.:50:11.

I'm tempted to say in current circumstances I'm not sure how many

:50:12.:50:15.

Alison Norcross found that a stomach churning interview,

:50:16.:50:25.

The format in which senior politicians appear in set piece

:50:26.:50:46.

election programmes only started in 2010, but has since become

:50:47.:50:49.

In 2015, David Cameron refused to follow the example

:50:50.:50:53.

of his predecessor as Prime Minister, Gordon Brown,

:50:54.:50:55.

and take part in a head-to-head discussion on

:50:56.:50:57.

Five of whom appeared without him in a so-called challengers debate.

:50:58.:51:05.

Theresa May has followed his example and Jeremy Corbyn has said he won't

:51:06.:51:08.

take part in such a programme either, if she doesn't.

:51:09.:51:12.

So this time round we were told this week the BBC

:51:13.:51:15.

will be showing a debate featuring senior representatives from Labour,

:51:16.:51:18.

the Conservatives, the Liberal Democrats,

:51:19.:51:21.

the SNP, Plaid Cymru, Ukip and the Green party.

:51:22.:51:26.

The press release also announced Question Time

:51:27.:51:33.

specials and election questions programmes featuring separately

:51:34.:51:36.

the leaders of six of those parties, but not the Green party, to the

:51:37.:51:40.

annoyance of many viewers, including Christopher Corey.

:51:41.:51:44.

I understand that the BBC, in their forthcoming election

:51:45.:51:48.

specials, have invited Ukip to take part and have excluded

:51:49.:51:51.

I think this is unfair and ludicrous, to be honest.

:51:52.:51:58.

I am not a Green party supporter, and I am certainly not a Ukip

:51:59.:52:02.

supporter, however, I do think that the Green party should qualify

:52:03.:52:05.

far above Ukip to have their voice heard in these election specials.

:52:06.:52:14.

Other viewers were annoyed about the absence of a

:52:15.:52:17.

televised debate between the two main candidates to lead the next

:52:18.:52:21.

Some comparing it to the long established tradition of

:52:22.:52:25.

American presidential hopefuls squaring up to each other,

:52:26.:52:29.

a debate in March between the two leading candidates to become

:52:30.:52:32.

Prime Minister of the Netherlands, and the TV

:52:33.:52:34.

discussions before the recent presidential election in France.

:52:35.:52:41.

If those countries can do it, wondered Terry Pearson,

:52:42.:52:43.

why should our potential leaders avoid that sort

:52:44.:52:45.

Well, let's discuss some of those issues with the BBC's head of news

:52:46.:53:11.

Jonathan, let's start with whether the BBC should have

:53:12.:53:17.

done more to try to get Theresa May to take part

:53:18.:53:20.

in a leaders debate by threatening to go ahead with her seat empty.

:53:21.:53:24.

Well, we're really disappointed the Prime Minister's not doing

:53:25.:53:27.

the leaders debate, we would have liked to have done a leaders

:53:28.:53:30.

debate featuring the party leaders themselves.

:53:31.:53:31.

The day after the Easter weekend the Prime Minister announced

:53:32.:53:34.

Number one, there would be a general election.

:53:35.:53:37.

And number two, she would not take part in television debates.

:53:38.:53:40.

And our judgment was that wasn't a negotiating position,

:53:41.:53:43.

So threatening to empty chair would have led to an empty

:53:44.:53:47.

Ultimately, the viewer doesn't learn anything from an empty chair.

:53:48.:53:51.

She has paid no price for refusing the leaders debate.

:53:52.:53:53.

In fact, there she is on The One Show sofa,

:53:54.:53:56.

and viewers have said, whatever you say, they feel that's

:53:57.:53:59.

wrong, and maybe she would have given in.

:54:00.:54:01.

But she hasn't paid a price for saying no.

:54:02.:54:03.

We don't know that she's not paid a price.

:54:04.:54:06.

Some viewers may decide that they're going to change

:54:07.:54:08.

their vote as a result of the strategy of the leaders of the

:54:09.:54:12.

But it doesn't help anybody to say that because the Prime Minister

:54:13.:54:17.

isn't going to appear in one format she can't therefore

:54:18.:54:20.

appear in other programmes, whether it's Question Time or election

:54:21.:54:25.

questions or Andrew Neil interviews, or The One Show or Jeremy Vine

:54:26.:54:28.

or any of the other programmes that are

:54:29.:54:31.

It's only since 2010 that we've actually had leader debates,

:54:32.:54:34.

and people thought we were going to get them every time.

:54:35.:54:37.

It's a shame that we're not getting them.

:54:38.:54:43.

Basically what happened in 2010 is that all the main party leaders

:54:44.:54:46.

at the time, by which I mean just three of them, we didn't include

:54:47.:54:50.

the seven in 2010, they all felt, for whatever reason,

:54:51.:54:52.

it was in their interest, it was the right moment to say yes

:54:53.:54:56.

That changed by 2015 with, as you say, David Cameron not

:54:57.:55:02.

A very complicated negotiation then followed about exposure of parties

:55:03.:55:05.

So we didn't have Nick Clegg in the TV debate either.

:55:06.:55:09.

And it's changed again this time round with the Prime Minister

:55:10.:55:12.

Let's hope we can get them back again in future elections.

:55:13.:55:17.

The BBC is going to run these special Question Time format

:55:18.:55:20.

programmes, with individual party leaders and studio audience.

:55:21.:55:22.

At the start of this week, the BBC said the Greens wouldn't be

:55:23.:55:26.

A lot of viewers complained to Newswatch.

:55:27.:55:29.

And they complained to us, too, and I've heard the comments your

:55:30.:55:32.

Let me explain the formula we use, not in too much detail.

:55:33.:55:37.

We are obliged by our regulations to take into account the electoral

:55:38.:55:40.

support over two election cycles, that means two general elections,

:55:41.:55:43.

in other words back to 2010, and all the elections that happened

:55:44.:55:46.

So lots of local elections in that time,

:55:47.:55:49.

obviously, and some European elections.

:55:50.:55:51.

If you take all those figures, the Ukip support over that

:55:52.:55:54.

period is significantly greater than the Greens.

:55:55.:55:56.

The Greens have been stable, but very low.

:55:57.:56:03.

Ukip have been up and down and we saw, as you know,

:56:04.:56:06.

a week or so ago, they didn't do so well in the local elections.

:56:07.:56:10.

But over the seven-year period we are obliged to count, there is a

:56:11.:56:13.

But when you apply that formula to the schedule,

:56:14.:56:17.

the programmes we are actually going to make, we do

:56:18.:56:19.

think in retrospect, actually, that the gap between what

:56:20.:56:22.

Ukip is getting and what the Greens are getting is too great, so we're

:56:23.:56:26.

going to make a change and we've invited the Green party in the last

:56:27.:56:30.

24 hours to take part in an extra programme on the Election Questions

:56:31.:56:34.

format in the last weekend of the campaign, on June the 4th.

:56:35.:56:37.

They've accepted that and we're really pleased to have that extra

:56:38.:56:40.

programme going into the BBC One schedule.

:56:41.:56:42.

So you've either caved in to pressure or you got it wrong.

:56:43.:56:45.

We're not going to cave in to pressure from political

:56:46.:56:50.

We looked at the schedule in retrospect, what we'd lined up,

:56:51.:56:54.

and the differences between the parties.

:56:55.:56:55.

There were two differences, effectively, that the Greens were

:56:56.:56:58.

One was the Question Time election questions programmes,

:56:59.:57:01.

The other was the series of Andrew Neil interviews, which are

:57:02.:57:06.

going out the week after next on BBC One.

:57:07.:57:08.

So what we've done is we've said to the Green party,

:57:09.:57:11.

we think the gap's too great at the moment,

:57:12.:57:14.

but you can't have equivalents to the other

:57:15.:57:16.

parties because of that electoral support issue.

:57:17.:57:18.

So we've given them, we hope, a really good compromise

:57:19.:57:20.

and an offer that I'm really pleased to say they've accepted.

:57:21.:57:23.

Away from the election, shock waves were created this week

:57:24.:57:27.

by President Trump's sacking of the FBI director,

:57:28.:57:29.

The White House has said he was fired because he'd mishandled

:57:30.:57:33.

the investigation into Hillary Clinton's e-mail server.

:57:34.:57:35.

Here's Jon Sopel on Wednesday night's News at Ten.

:57:36.:57:37.

But if it really is all about the way the FBI conducted

:57:38.:57:41.

the Hillary Clinton investigation, why sack him now?

:57:42.:57:43.

Why not do it when Donald Trump first came to office?

:57:44.:57:47.

And how do you reconcile it with the praise that was heaped

:57:48.:57:50.

Roger Witt from Poole felt there was a lack of

:57:51.:57:54.

balance in the reporting of Mr Comey's sacking:

:57:55.:58:18.

Finally, Alexander Blackman, known as Marine A, was freed two weeks ago

:58:19.:58:22.

after serving three years in prison for killing a wounded Taliban

:58:23.:58:25.

An incident recorded on a helmet camera.

:58:26.:58:33.

On Tuesday, Clinton Rogers met the former Royal Marine Sergeant

:58:34.:58:36.

To be fair, you can put quite a few different spins on what's said.

:58:37.:58:42.

And, unless you were actually there, you don't know the full story.

:58:43.:58:47.

Obviously, I told my version of events when I was at trial.

:58:48.:58:52.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing and, given especially what's

:58:53.:58:56.

happened to us in our life, if you could go back,

:58:57.:58:59.

One viewer was watching that and recorded her response

:59:00.:59:05.

I have absolutely no sympathy with the allegiances of his Taliban

:59:06.:59:12.

victim, but allowing a man who breached the Geneva Convention

:59:13.:59:15.

and killed an injured prisoner of war to justify himself

:59:16.:59:21.

He was provided with a platform and allowed

:59:22.:59:28.

to minimise his actions and suggest there was justification not

:59:29.:59:30.

Thanks for all your comments this week.

:59:31.:59:34.

If you want to share your opinions on BBC News and current affairs,

:59:35.:59:39.

or even appear on the programme, you can call us on:

:59:40.:59:44.

And do have a look at our website for previous discussions.

:59:45.:59:52.

We'll be back to hear your thoughts about BBC news

:59:53.:59:56.

Hello this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent.

:59:57.:00:40.

The NHS faces a weekend of disruption following a large-scale

:00:41.:00:43.

cyber attack which has caused hospitals to delay treatments

:00:44.:00:45.

Around 40 NHS Trusts and some GP surgeries were hit,

:00:46.:00:49.

but there's no sign that patient data has been compromised.

:00:50.:01:01.

I am at Saint Barts. It runs five hospitals in East London and all

:01:02.:01:09.

have cancelled outpatient appointments today.

:01:10.:01:11.

Organisations around the world have been affected by the malicious

:01:12.:01:14.

software known as "ransomware", with reports of infections

:01:15.:01:16.

Good morning, it's Saturday the 13th of May.

:01:17.:01:29.

Labour's deputy leader Tom Watson warns his party faces

:01:30.:01:34.

a "Margaret Thatcher style" landslide defeat, if it doesn't

:01:35.:01:36.

They can finally celebrate after a late winner at West Brom

:01:37.:01:44.

secured the Premier League title in Antonio Conte's

:01:45.:01:46.

Johnny refuses to give up in the World Series triathlon -

:01:47.:01:58.

after a nasty crash, he picks up his bike

:01:59.:02:00.

From horse heads to monkeys, it can only be Eurovision.

:02:01.:02:04.

But will the UK feel the Brexit backlash?

:02:05.:02:06.

Good morning, despite low pressure across the UK, there is a lot of dry

:02:07.:02:20.

weather. I will have more in about 15 minutes.

:02:21.:02:22.

Routine appointments and operations at some hospitals remain cancelled

:02:23.:02:26.

this morning after NHS organisations across England and Scotland were

:02:27.:02:28.

Some doctors have been unable to access patient records,

:02:29.:02:36.

while a number of hospitals are asking patients not

:02:37.:02:38.

There's no evidence that patient data has been stolen.

:02:39.:02:42.

The first indication that something was wrong

:02:43.:02:44.

was mid-afternoon yesterday, when some hospital trusts and GP

:02:45.:02:49.

surgeries reported being locked out of their computers.

:02:50.:02:52.

Vital information such as patient records and appointment

:02:53.:02:55.

It meant operations were cancelled, patients were sent home

:02:56.:03:00.

The BBC understands that by late yesterday around 40 trusts and some

:03:01.:03:07.

surgeries in England and Scotland had been affected.

:03:08.:03:11.

The Prime Minister, Theresa May, said the incident was not

:03:12.:03:13.

an attack on the NHS, but part of a wider problem

:03:14.:03:16.

Work to restore NHS computer systems will continue

:03:17.:03:21.

throughout the weekend, as Andy Moore reports.

:03:22.:03:29.

He is outside Saint Barth -- Barts Hospital. Here at Barts the message

:03:30.:03:41.

has gone out to anybody with an outpatient appointment that it will

:03:42.:03:44.

be cancelled and they should not come along today. There are large

:03:45.:03:50.

parts of the NHS is not affected. For example, Wales and Northern

:03:51.:03:55.

Ireland have not been hit. About 40 NHS organisations affected in

:03:56.:03:58.

England and Scotland, but large parts of the country not hit. I

:03:59.:04:02.

think the message from NHS England is the National Health Service is up

:04:03.:04:08.

and running and you should use it as normal unless you hear otherwise.

:04:09.:04:12.

Problems will continue in some areas, like at this hospital, and

:04:13.:04:19.

others run by Barts NHS Trust. We know the problems are continuing

:04:20.:04:24.

today. We do not know the situation tomorrow nor the day after that and

:04:25.:04:28.

it is likely problems will take some time to fix where they are

:04:29.:04:30.

experience. Thanks. the NHS is not the only victim

:04:31.:04:38.

of this international attack. Here's our technology

:04:39.:04:43.

correspondent, Rory Cellan Jones. It looked at first like

:04:44.:04:44.

an attack just on hospitals But it's now becoming

:04:45.:04:47.

clear this malicious software has run riot

:04:48.:04:52.

around the world. Russia, the United States and many

:04:53.:04:55.

points in between have been hit by what is now a common

:04:56.:04:58.

form of cyber crime. Ransomware has become the tool

:04:59.:05:02.

of choice for a lot of criminals simply because it's very easy

:05:03.:05:05.

to make money very quickly. You can buy ransomware online

:05:06.:05:12.

for as little as $39. It often arrives in

:05:13.:05:14.

the form of a link in When you click on that

:05:15.:05:18.

link the malicious software is downloaded and spreads

:05:19.:05:21.

rapidly through your network, Then a message flashes

:05:22.:05:23.

up on the screen warning that if you want your data

:05:24.:05:26.

unlocked, you will have to pay a ransom, often

:05:27.:05:29.

in bitcoin, a virtual The irony is that security experts

:05:30.:05:31.

think a hacking tool allegedly leaked from

:05:32.:05:35.

America's National Security Agency in April may have been

:05:36.:05:38.

used by the attackers. Microsoft warned about the threat

:05:39.:05:47.

that this vulnerability posed, and said anybody who had installed

:05:48.:05:49.

a security update to Windows software the previous

:05:50.:05:52.

month would be OK. The health service will point

:05:53.:05:54.

out that it is just one around the world affected by this

:05:55.:05:57.

attack, but it now faces what could be a lengthy

:05:58.:06:00.

process of cleaning up its computers and making

:06:01.:06:03.

the network safe again. Just a note in half an hour, 8:40am,

:06:04.:06:16.

we will speak to the Home Secretary and find out the latest on the

:06:17.:06:18.

situation. Labour's deputy leader,

:06:19.:06:20.

Tom Watson, has urged voters to support their local

:06:21.:06:21.

Labour MP to prevent the Conservatives winning a

:06:22.:06:25.

"Margaret Thatcher-style landslide". Speaking to the Guardian,

:06:26.:06:28.

Mr Watson admitted that it would be very difficult to turn the poll

:06:29.:06:33.

numbers around, and that Labour had Our political correspondent

:06:34.:06:36.

Leila Nathoo joins us now Tom Watson is a significant figure

:06:37.:06:47.

in the Labour Party, what has he been saying? Hears and this is a

:06:48.:06:52.

candid admission weeks away from the general election of the scale of

:06:53.:06:58.

Labour's task ahead. The polls put the Conservatives in front by as

:06:59.:07:01.

much as 20 points and we know we must take them with a pinch salt but

:07:02.:07:07.

still the picture does not look good for labour and Tom Watson says if

:07:08.:07:10.

things carry on like this Theresa May could be on course for a

:07:11.:07:15.

majority of more than 100 Conservative MPs in the Commons

:07:16.:07:18.

which he worries will allow her to push through policies without having

:07:19.:07:23.

much Parliamentary opposition. He says, our manifesto is packed with

:07:24.:07:26.

ideas, vote for your local candidate. One reading of this is a

:07:27.:07:32.

rallying cry in warning to say if you do not vote this is what could

:07:33.:07:36.

happen and another possible reading is he is resigned to the fact Labour

:07:37.:07:42.

will only be in opposition and he is trying to damage limitation, saying

:07:43.:07:46.

we can at least hope for a stronger position. Jeremy Corbyn campaigning

:07:47.:07:52.

like he will win and saying the election is not a Foregone

:07:53.:07:55.

Conclusion and he is in it to win it. The Conservatives talking about

:07:56.:08:02.

internet security today and about whether you have the power to delete

:08:03.:08:05.

things, that may have happened to you. They are picking out the age of

:08:06.:08:12.

18. Explain what they are saying. It is a coincidental announcement by

:08:13.:08:17.

the Conservatives as part of their campaign on internet security as

:08:18.:08:20.

nothing connected to the cyber attack on the NHS but the

:08:21.:08:24.

Conservatives say social media users should have the right to demand any

:08:25.:08:29.

posts they have made, any photographs, comments, they made

:08:30.:08:35.

before they were aged 18 can be deleted and that social media

:08:36.:08:37.

companies should have a legal obligation to do that. There are

:08:38.:08:42.

other proposals bound up in this, asking social media companies to do

:08:43.:08:47.

more to protect children from harmful content online and making it

:08:48.:08:52.

easier to do business online but the proposal to delete this content made

:08:53.:08:56.

under 18, that will be tricky to enforce, because many companies are

:08:57.:09:02.

based abroad. It is worth saying Labour are campaigning today on

:09:03.:09:04.

pensions and promising pensions should go up by 2.5% per year and

:09:05.:09:10.

the Lib Dems are talking about housing today, so plenty more from

:09:11.:09:11.

the campaign trail over the weekend. Drayton Manor Theme Park

:09:12.:09:15.

will reopen today, four days after an 11-year-girl died

:09:16.:09:18.

after falling from a ride. Evha Jannath, from Leicester,

:09:19.:09:21.

fell from a boat on the The park's owners say

:09:22.:09:24.

the ride will remain shut, along with ones that overlook it,

:09:25.:09:27.

as a mark respect to her family. Italy's highest court has upheld

:09:28.:09:33.

the 16-year jail sentence imposed on the captain of the shipwrecked

:09:34.:09:40.

cruise liner Costa Concordia. 32 people died when the vessel hit

:09:41.:09:42.

the rocks off an Italian of abandoning his ship,

:09:43.:09:45.

before the passengers and crew. Pope Francis will canonise two

:09:46.:09:54.

Portuguese children at a mass today on the spot where they reported

:09:55.:09:57.

seeing the Virgin Mary The service is expected to attract 1

:09:58.:09:59.

million worshippers. It was 100 years ago today that

:10:00.:10:10.

three children tending sheep near the village of Fatima

:10:11.:10:12.

said the Virgin Mary had Two of the children,

:10:13.:10:15.

Jacinta and Francisco Marto, They are to be canonised by Pope

:10:16.:10:19.

Francis today becaue of the case of a boy in Brazil who recovered

:10:20.:10:31.

from injuries after his family The third little shepherd,

:10:32.:10:34.

Lucia dos Santos, later wrote down three so-called secrets

:10:35.:10:42.

that Mary had told them. Over the decades, Fatima has become

:10:43.:10:45.

one of the world's most important We must be here to make

:10:46.:10:48.

stronger our faith, and to show other people that, if you want,

:10:49.:10:52.

you can do anything. This is an excellent

:10:53.:10:58.

opportunity to see him drive by, to celebrate

:10:59.:10:59.

Mass with him. On the eve of his trip,

:11:00.:11:02.

the Pope described himself At the shrine, he prayed

:11:03.:11:04.

with the faithful before the traditional

:11:05.:11:09.

candlelight procession. Francis is the fourth

:11:10.:11:12.

Pope to visit Fatima, but the centenary and

:11:13.:11:16.

the canonisation of the two little shepherds give this year's ceremony

:11:17.:11:20.

a special significance for Catholics Those are the main stories this

:11:21.:11:34.

morning and the sport and weather is coming up.

:11:35.:11:36.

The UK's multi-million-pound National Cyber Security Centre

:11:37.:11:38.

will be leading Britain's response to yesterdays hack

:11:39.:11:43.

will be leading Britain's response to yesterday's hack

:11:44.:11:45.

The health service was amongst tens of thousands of organisations

:11:46.:11:48.

to have been caught out by a computer virus which locks

:11:49.:11:51.

Brain Lord is the former GCHQ Deputy Director of Intelligence

:11:52.:11:57.

Good morning. I imagine in your former role this sort of incident is

:11:58.:12:08.

something you would have dreaded happening. Yes, I think any kind of

:12:09.:12:19.

large-scale offensive cyber activity is always something one dreads but

:12:20.:12:23.

what is most important at this point is to put it into perspective,

:12:24.:12:27.

because some of the headlines can be quite dramatic. This was not an

:12:28.:12:32.

attack, an attempt to bring the NHS down, it was not an attack to steal

:12:33.:12:39.

patient data. This was an organised criminal attack for large-scale

:12:40.:12:44.

extortion and I think we need to keep it in that perspective. One

:12:45.:12:48.

thing we hear suggested is the actual virus might be leaked, a

:12:49.:12:54.

leaked hacking tool from the American security agency. Is that

:12:55.:12:59.

something you have heard? Yes, that has been widely reported on all

:13:00.:13:06.

kinds of media. It is worth saying vulnerability to systems are

:13:07.:13:10.

developed all the time, by nations and on the dark side by criminals

:13:11.:13:15.

and hackers. What is worth bearing in mind with this strain of malware

:13:16.:13:20.

is Microsoft themselves had issued a patch, halfway through March, which

:13:21.:13:26.

would have protected organisations with up-to-date operating systems

:13:27.:13:31.

from this virus. We are aware a ransom is being demanded. Is it a

:13:32.:13:35.

simple case of you pay it or lose the information? Once again, it

:13:36.:13:44.

depends on the organisation attacks. If the NHS has good back-up systems

:13:45.:13:50.

and can restore data from a healthy back-up regime, the amount of data

:13:51.:13:56.

that is lost could well be limited. However, if the back-up regime has a

:13:57.:14:02.

big delay from back-up to current vulnerability, there are no

:14:03.:14:05.

back-ups, people then have to make a decision. Do they not pay, do they

:14:06.:14:11.

pay in order to get back critical data? I would not rule out the fact

:14:12.:14:17.

there may be targets globally who will now be paying to have data

:14:18.:14:21.

restored. Is that something you would think the NHS might be able to

:14:22.:14:29.

countenance? It is not for me to determine what advice they are given

:14:30.:14:33.

from the National Cyber Security Centre and what they will

:14:34.:14:38.

countenance. Paying any kind of ransom provides an emboldening

:14:39.:14:41.

action for crime groups. That said there is always a tactical decision

:14:42.:14:47.

to be made about the restoration of data and services affected against

:14:48.:14:55.

permanent loss of data. I am probably fairly sure the National

:14:56.:14:59.

Health Service probably does for wider IT purposes have a healthy

:15:00.:15:03.

back-up regime to allow data to be restored without that kind of

:15:04.:15:10.

extortion being met. That may be the case, but for this to happen, the

:15:11.:15:14.

system must be vulnerable. Do you think there are areas of the NHS

:15:15.:15:18.

system that are perhaps out of date and should have been patched and

:15:19.:15:24.

were not? I think that is very much the case. One has to bear in mind

:15:25.:15:30.

the NHS is a wide, complex IT systems supplied by a number of

:15:31.:15:35.

suppliers and older systems such as Windows XP, though longer supported,

:15:36.:15:41.

will be vulnerable. This kind of sustained, wide attack on an

:15:42.:15:47.

organisation, forces it to look at its IT update regime making sure its

:15:48.:15:51.

operating systems are up to scratch but it's protected regimes are up to

:15:52.:15:55.

scratch and it is properly worth the NHS and national centre to look at

:15:56.:16:01.

that to make sure there were not basic health measures that could

:16:02.:16:04.

have been put in place that could have stopped this before they look

:16:05.:16:08.

at the longer term investment necessity for an organisation that

:16:09.:16:12.

is IT dependent. You work as an adviser. What would you advise the

:16:13.:16:17.

NHS to do today in this most critical situation to try to restore

:16:18.:16:26.

order? I would ensure that it continues to safely patch all the

:16:27.:16:34.

systems it can. From this particular device. Restore the back-up data

:16:35.:16:39.

safely. In a critical order. And certainly ensure that poor example

:16:40.:16:45.

all unnecessary ports, in effect the doorways in and out of computers,

:16:46.:16:49.

all quite often a number of ports are left open and should be shot.

:16:50.:16:54.

There are basic security health regimes that can be put in place --

:16:55.:16:59.

they should be shot. And the messaging out to the service user

:17:00.:17:07.

is, balanced and explains what has not happened just as much as it

:17:08.:17:08.

explains what has happened. Let's look at the weather.

:17:09.:17:20.

Good morning. It is a mixed bag with a lot of dry weather today. This was

:17:21.:17:26.

sunrise in Suffolk and we have seen lovely photos coming through. Thank

:17:27.:17:33.

you, everybody. Those pictures, in contrast, this is Aberdeen city, and

:17:34.:17:38.

it will stay great in north-eastern parts of Scotland and England for

:17:39.:17:41.

much of the day, slowly brightening up. We have rain. That is around low

:17:42.:17:47.

pressure which is why I say it is not plain sailing weather wise

:17:48.:17:52.

today. Showers will tend to fade across southern areas. The rain

:17:53.:17:56.

taking longer to clear from Northern Ireland, the north-west of England

:17:57.:18:01.

and Northern Wales. In Scotland, the north-west seeing decent weather,

:18:02.:18:10.

the East is score. Further south, rain. The showers will migrate south

:18:11.:18:15.

later. We have super sunshine coming up across the -- across England and

:18:16.:18:27.

Wales. This will break up anywhere across Scotland into big, thundery

:18:28.:18:31.

showers later. There will be sunshine in between. More rain in

:18:32.:18:35.

the south-west of England and Northern Ireland later in the day.

:18:36.:18:40.

For many, it will feel warm with increasing amounts of sunshine

:18:41.:18:45.

compared with recent days. As we lose the easterly wind and behind

:18:46.:18:49.

the brief spell of rain, we pick up the south-westerly. Many areas will

:18:50.:18:54.

have rain overnight which is good news for farmers, at least dampening

:18:55.:18:59.

the ground. Tomorrow, the rain is hit and miss in the form of showers.

:19:00.:19:06.

Areas will see showers, others will escape. Eastern coasts, a lot of

:19:07.:19:11.

sunshine here. Showers close to the low pressure in north-west Scotland.

:19:12.:19:18.

In the sunshine, up to 20 degrees. It could potentially get warmer next

:19:19.:19:23.

week across southern and eastern areas with humidity rising. For most

:19:24.:19:28.

of the UK, wind and rain moving in, it is how far south and east it will

:19:29.:19:35.

come and how quickly. As for this weekend, a mixed bag, but a lot of

:19:36.:19:39.

dry weather. Thanks. We will chat to you later.

:19:40.:19:42.

For patients who need palliative care in the final

:19:43.:19:45.

days of their lives, the option to be cared for, and die,

:19:46.:19:48.

at home, isn't something that's always available.

:19:49.:19:49.

A new survey suggests that one of the main barriers

:19:50.:19:53.

is a shortage of specialists who can also offer the right

:19:54.:19:55.

My husband, Roger, I'd be married to for 47 years

:19:56.:20:10.

13 years ago, he was diagnosed with cancer.

:20:11.:20:19.

When his condition was terminal, the only thing he wanted to do

:20:20.:20:22.

was to die in his own house, with his own things and me

:20:23.:20:26.

OK, so we'll practise with some water.

:20:27.:20:31.

With the help of a district nurse, she was trained to give controlled

:20:32.:20:43.

doses of pain relief to her husband at home.

:20:44.:20:46.

Yes, it was easy for me, with your adequate instruction.

:20:47.:20:55.

Zilla didn't have to actually inject the pain relief into her husband's

:20:56.:21:05.

arm - a thin tube or cannula was already in place

:21:06.:21:08.

It allowed her to relieve her husband's pain in the dying days,

:21:09.:21:12.

without relying on a nurse, who could be several hours away.

:21:13.:21:15.

This was such a godsend to me, to be able to do that.

:21:16.:21:18.

It took away all of the helpless feeling you have to see someone

:21:19.:21:21.

you have loved for so long in pain, and it was wonderful.

:21:22.:21:24.

It is so important for people to have the death they want,

:21:25.:21:27.

It has a lasting effect on the family they leave behind

:21:28.:21:34.

and I think that if that family can see they died

:21:35.:21:37.

at home, where they wanted to be, then that's the overriding factor.

:21:38.:21:43.

According to the National Council for Palliative Care,

:21:44.:21:46.

most people would prefer to die at home, but a survey of 370

:21:47.:21:49.

health care professionals suggests, for many, it's not happening.

:21:50.:21:53.

More than one third of nurses and GPs who support dying people

:21:54.:21:56.

at home say staffing levels are not sufficient to meet

:21:57.:22:00.

20% said their caseload was not manageable and nearly one third said

:22:01.:22:05.

the availability of end of life care training

:22:06.:22:07.

Our study shows that we are really failing people who want to spend

:22:08.:22:15.

We know that pain is people's greatest fear and if it is not

:22:16.:22:22.

controlled, that will lead to emergency admissions to hospital

:22:23.:22:27.

and bad memories for the families who live on.

:22:28.:22:30.

The Department of Health in England says everyone should be involved

:22:31.:22:33.

as much as they want in plans around their death.

:22:34.:22:35.

Having family members administer pain relief won't be for everyone,

:22:36.:22:37.

but it is becoming one option in the final days of life.

:22:38.:22:42.

with Roger and made his last days completely pain free.

:22:43.:22:53.

And he died with me and both his sons here,

:22:54.:22:55.

holding his hand, just as he would have wanted.

:22:56.:23:02.

Very moving hearing that story. Our thanks to Zilla for taking part and

:23:03.:23:12.

explaining how it affected her and her husband.

:23:13.:23:13.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:23:14.:23:15.

Time now for a look at the newspapers.

:23:16.:23:26.

There is really one story. In the Daily Telegraph, hackers on the

:23:27.:23:38.

front page. From page of the Guardian, actually

:23:39.:23:48.

a story about Tom Watson saying do not let Theresa May have a landslide

:23:49.:23:51.

victory equivalent to that of Margaret Thatcher.

:23:52.:23:58.

And again, the NHS hacked service. Same story again. This story is

:23:59.:24:05.

everywhere today. You could not make it up. It is like a film script,

:24:06.:24:11.

something out of the sci-fi drama. I was taken with the front page of the

:24:12.:24:16.

Financial Times. This story is elsewhere also. These hackers have

:24:17.:24:22.

used stolen cyber security weapons from the US spy agency. Apparently a

:24:23.:24:33.

system called Eternal Blue, developed by US spies to supercharge

:24:34.:24:37.

an existing form of criminal malware. That is something Brian

:24:38.:24:43.

Lord was talking about. Do we understand it? No, it is a

:24:44.:24:49.

complicated subject but this targets older systems, systems where files

:24:50.:24:58.

are shared. If NHS users, and they use different types of systems, if

:24:59.:25:02.

some of them are older, they are more vulnerable to attack because

:25:03.:25:08.

the security systems built in are not as robust. This spreads. It has

:25:09.:25:12.

spread across Europe and apparently there are 45,000 different attacks.

:25:13.:25:18.

It is worth saying on the issue of what this malware is, there is no

:25:19.:25:22.

official line, because we cannot trace it at this point. This is

:25:23.:25:27.

speculation around who or what might be responsible. I talked to a Seung

:25:28.:25:36.

Ju -- to a cyber security expert who said cybercrime will become the new

:25:37.:25:40.

bank robbery, because the rewards are as great. The chances of getting

:25:41.:25:46.

caught are slim, and the penalties are low. That is what has happened.

:25:47.:25:52.

We are speaking to the Home Secretary Amber Rudd in about 20

:25:53.:25:55.

minutes and we'll find out more from her. From new problems to old

:25:56.:26:01.

problems and one that happens over again. The weather, don't we love

:26:02.:26:07.

the weather? It appears we have had the driest winter in 20 years. Some

:26:08.:26:14.

of the rivers are drying up. We have rain this weekend and baby

:26:15.:26:18.

thunderstorms on Monday. Ten rivers in England have been designated as

:26:19.:26:24.

having exceptionally low flows and the highest number since the drought

:26:25.:26:29.

prompted hosepipe bans in 2012. Nobody is saying hosepipe bans are

:26:30.:26:34.

on the cards but the water companies are trying to warn people to use

:26:35.:26:43.

water sensibly, to shower not bath, to use a full dishwasher load. 18

:26:44.:26:50.

months ago, Storm Desmond devastated much of people in northern England,

:26:51.:26:57.

and people in Carlisle are still affected. The summer looks like it

:26:58.:27:06.

will be pretty dry. Consumer choice, comparing things, price comparisons,

:27:07.:27:09.

particularly with insurance. This is in the Daily Mail. These are

:27:10.:27:15.

shocking statistics as to how you pay and how much it costs. The Daily

:27:16.:27:19.

Mail have done an investigation into the cost of car insurers. They say

:27:20.:27:25.

drivers and homeowners are being charged up to ?450 more a year for

:27:26.:27:31.

insurance, if they choose to pay monthly, which a lot of people do.

:27:32.:27:37.

If you pay annually, you might get a good rate, but paying monthly, you

:27:38.:27:42.

have to read the small print. Apparently, typically an interest

:27:43.:27:47.

rate between 25 and as much as 45% and people don't realise that. They

:27:48.:27:51.

look at the monthly payment and do not add up the 12 months. Most

:27:52.:27:57.

people do pay monthly. Car insurance is expensive and the chances of

:27:58.:28:04.

people paying a lump sum. And have each change, if you pay

:28:05.:28:08.

monthly, it just rolls on. You have to use the price websites. If you

:28:09.:28:15.

check, you can get it much lower. You will come back in an hour. The

:28:16.:28:26.

story, avocados. The avocado crisis we will be talking about.

:28:27.:28:28.

Lucie Jones is hoping to be Britain's golden ticket to the top

:28:29.:28:33.

The fans think she's got what it takes -

:28:34.:28:36.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent.

:28:37.:29:49.

Coming up before nine Helen will have the weather

:29:50.:29:53.

But first a summary of this morning's main news.

:29:54.:29:55.

Routine appointments and operations at some hospitals remain cancelled

:29:56.:29:59.

this morning after NHS organisations across England and Scotland were

:30:00.:30:03.

The first indication that something was wrong

:30:04.:30:07.

was mid-afternoon yesterday when some hospital trusts and GP

:30:08.:30:09.

surgeries reported being locked out of their computers.

:30:10.:30:13.

There's no evidence that patient data has been compromised.

:30:14.:30:17.

Britain's response to the attack is led by the National

:30:18.:30:19.

We are working around the clock with colleagues and policing the health

:30:20.:30:32.

service internationally and with experts to lead our response to

:30:33.:30:35.

those cyber attacks as they affect the UK.

:30:36.:30:38.

Labour's deputy leader, Tom Watson, has warned of the Conservatives

:30:39.:30:41.

winning a "Margaret Thatcher-style landslide" if they maintain their

:30:42.:30:44.

Mr Watson told the Guardian that it would be "very,

:30:45.:30:50.

very difficult" to turn the poll numbers around, and Labour had

:30:51.:30:52.

Mrs Thatcher won majorities of 144 in 1983 and 101 in 1987.

:30:53.:31:00.

The Conservatives want to give people the power to demand that

:31:01.:31:03.

social media companies delete any embarrassing content they posted

:31:04.:31:05.

Labour has questioned whether the legislation

:31:06.:31:11.

would be enforceable, given that most of the largest

:31:12.:31:13.

Drayton Manor Theme Park will reopen today, four days

:31:14.:31:18.

after an 11-year-girl died after falling from a ride.

:31:19.:31:22.

Evha Jannath, from Leicester, fell from a boat on the

:31:23.:31:24.

The park's owners say the ride will remain shut,

:31:25.:31:34.

along with ones that overlook it, as a mark of respect to her family.

:31:35.:31:37.

Pope Francis will canonise two Portuguese children at a mass today

:31:38.:31:39.

on the spot where they reported seeing the Virgin Mary

:31:40.:31:42.

Tens of thousands of pilgrims gathered in Fatima to welcome

:31:43.:31:51.

the Pontiff last night and today's mass is expected to attract

:31:52.:31:53.

Francis is the fourth Pope to visit the shrine.

:31:54.:32:02.

Have you ever been to Paris and seen many padlocks with messages on a

:32:03.:32:06.

bridge? Yes, I have. A selection of padlocks -

:32:07.:32:13.

or so called love-locks that are famously attached to a bridge

:32:14.:32:15.

in Paris are being put up Many of them were removed because

:32:16.:32:32.

the Parisian council did delight -- decided to remove many of them.

:32:33.:32:34.

The padlocks, engraved with couples' initials,

:32:35.:32:36.

were attached in an act of romance, before the keys were

:32:37.:32:39.

But they had to be removed two years ago after a part of the bridge

:32:40.:32:43.

Today clusters of the locks will be sold as pieces of street art,

:32:44.:32:47.

Does that feel right? I feel they are beautiful. I would like one. You

:32:48.:32:52.

can get a whole section. It has featured in many films, sequences

:32:53.:32:57.

where they throw the keys. Maybe a good idea for Chelsea fans at the

:32:58.:33:03.

gates of Stamford Bridge. That is a good link.

:33:04.:33:08.

They certainly love Antonio Conte eight, as they were in a bit of

:33:09.:33:14.

disarray after Jose Mourinho started. It is all about the

:33:15.:33:21.

attention to detail, changing the diets of the players even before

:33:22.:33:26.

pre-season friendly matches and giving every staff member with a

:33:27.:33:31.

bottle of Prosecco with the words, we will either find a way. -- we

:33:32.:33:39.

will find a way. So Chelsea have done it -

:33:40.:33:45.

a 1-0 win at West Brom made them Premier League champions with two

:33:46.:33:48.

games to spare. Our sports editor Dan Roan

:33:49.:33:50.

looks at Antonio Conte's, Chelsea's stroll to

:33:51.:33:52.

the title almost complete. West Brom have also enjoyed

:33:53.:33:56.

their season, however, and victory here at the Hawthorns

:33:57.:33:58.

would have to be earned. The visitors enjoying more chances,

:33:59.:34:01.

but failing to break down a stubborn Added urgency after the restart,

:34:02.:34:04.

Victor Moses denied by Ben Foster. Chelsea's frustration

:34:05.:34:11.

beginning to show. Then, in the final ten

:34:12.:34:17.

minutes and with the game seemingly headed for a draw,

:34:18.:34:22.

the pressure finally showed. Michy Batshuayi with

:34:23.:34:24.

the crucial touch. The substitute barely

:34:25.:34:28.

played this season. Now he scored the goal that

:34:29.:34:30.

would seal the title. We started the season

:34:31.:34:32.

with a lot of problems. But I think in the problems,

:34:33.:34:37.

we found the right way And now I think that they deserved

:34:38.:34:40.

to win the league. From the moment he arrived

:34:41.:34:53.

in England last year, the Italian has been a passionate

:34:54.:34:57.

and animated presence But his team's march

:34:58.:35:00.

towards the title has When Chelsea play Watford here at

:35:01.:35:04.

Stamford Bridge on Monday evening, they and their fans will be able

:35:05.:35:12.

to celebrate a second Premier League triumph in just three seasons -

:35:13.:35:15.

re-establishing this club as the dominant force

:35:16.:35:17.

in the English game. When you consider what went

:35:18.:35:20.

on here last season, it's an achievement that should

:35:21.:35:22.

not be underestimated. Jose Mourinho was sacked

:35:23.:35:26.

after a chaotic defence of the title, the club finishing

:35:27.:35:28.

10th and failing to Chelsea hired Conte but had to wait

:35:29.:35:31.

until the end of the Euros before the Italy manager

:35:32.:35:37.

was free to join them. There were one or two big signings,

:35:38.:35:46.

like midfielder N'Golo Kante, but the new coach has

:35:47.:35:49.

largely transformed We worked very hard and I think

:35:50.:35:51.

we have been a very good team. Conte has also guided Chelsea

:35:52.:35:56.

to the FA Cup final. Other managers may have

:35:57.:36:00.

grabbed more headlines and created more controversy,

:36:01.:36:02.

but the Italian has What a great achievement.

:36:03.:36:04.

Congratulations to Chelsea. There was one other game last night

:36:05.:36:13.

- Everton beat Watford, Dan is here with his

:36:14.:36:15.

Football Focus head on. We will concentrate on Chelsea

:36:16.:36:30.

winning the title once again. You paid tribute to Antonio Conte and

:36:31.:36:33.

remember when they lost against Arsenal, and they switched to a back

:36:34.:36:40.

three. After that game he said they are only a good team on paper, it is

:36:41.:36:44.

time to be a good team on the pitch, and after that they went on to a

:36:45.:36:50.

great run. In a pre-season match against rapid Vienna, they thought

:36:51.:36:55.

they had gone into a different room, because there were lots and dried

:36:56.:37:02.

fruit and they realise this was the new diet. I always have porridge.

:37:03.:37:15.

What about the bottom, things are still to be settled? This will be

:37:16.:37:22.

fascinating. We know Sunderland and Middlesbrough have been relegated,

:37:23.:37:25.

and we have Hull and Swansea in a perilous position and Crystal Palace

:37:26.:37:29.

need one more point to be safe. Crystal Palace take on Hull this

:37:30.:37:35.

weekend. You can feel the nervous already. We have been speaking to

:37:36.:37:41.

Sam Allardyce and we asked him whether he will be in the dressing

:37:42.:37:44.

room ranting and raving before the game. I won't be there. Most of the

:37:45.:37:52.

staff won't be there. We will have done our work before we get there,

:37:53.:37:57.

and I don't like screaming and shouting in the dressing room, I

:37:58.:38:00.

never liked it as a player. We don't need it. Do the warm up as normal

:38:01.:38:12.

and then a -- then we will be ready. Maybe a future trips to the toilet.

:38:13.:38:21.

-- a few trips. He is saying is all about the build-up, and then you let

:38:22.:38:27.

the players do the rest. We have the women's FA Cup final? Manchester

:38:28.:38:33.

City against Birmingham. Manchester City are the overwhelming

:38:34.:38:36.

favourites. That should be a cracking game. Tom Cairney at

:38:37.:38:46.

Fulham. Yes, I went into a cryo chamber with him earlier in the

:38:47.:38:52.

season and I could see the difference it was making. Can you do

:38:53.:38:58.

the face? LAUGHTER We have Huddersfield against

:38:59.:39:03.

Sheffield Wednesday in the play-off semifinal. We have Martin Keown on

:39:04.:39:09.

the programme. And we have predictions from Sir Andy Murray.

:39:10.:39:15.

And Tottenham's last game this weekend at White Hart Lane and we

:39:16.:39:19.

are with Garth crooks, who takes a trip down memory lane. That will be

:39:20.:39:29.

some of his goals? No doubt. We are on at midday.

:39:30.:39:35.

Celtic are two matches away, from completing an unbeaten season,

:39:36.:39:40.

in the Scottish Premiership, after winning 3-1 at

:39:41.:39:42.

All the goals came in a frantic first 12 minutes -

:39:43.:39:47.

Lee Griffiths with Celtic's third - and that took their league

:39:48.:39:49.

Celtic will be going for the league and Cup double -

:39:50.:39:53.

and a domestic treble - in two weeks' time,

:39:54.:39:55.

when they take on Aberdeen, again, in the Scottish Cup final.

:39:56.:39:57.

Have you seen these pictures? Carrying the bike? Yes.

:39:58.:40:04.

What a dramatic day it's been for Jonny Brownlee,

:40:05.:40:10.

in the World Triathlon Series race in Japan.

:40:11.:40:13.

In treacherous conditions in Yokohama,

:40:14.:40:14.

he was caught up in a crash, on the last lap of the bike

:40:15.:40:17.

leg and was sent flying over the railings -

:40:18.:40:19.

but he refused to give up, carrying his damaged bike,

:40:20.:40:22.

to the transition point, to get his running shoes on

:40:23.:40:25.

before eventually finishing down in 42nd place -

:40:26.:40:27.

You can see highlights tomorrow at one o'clock on BBC Two.

:40:28.:40:30.

Worth watching. That is proper determination.

:40:31.:40:41.

Gloucester, lost to Stade Francais, in rugby union's Challenge Cup

:40:42.:40:54.

final, at a rainy Murrayfield, going down, 25-17.

:40:55.:40:56.

An interception from Gloucester and England man, Johnny May,

:40:57.:40:59.

gave the English side, a 10-0 lead and they

:41:00.:41:01.

were racing towards, this trophy for a third time.

:41:02.:41:03.

But Stade, are fed up being runners up -

:41:04.:41:05.

as in four previous finals - and they scored 3 tries

:41:06.:41:08.

Try telling them, this, is European club rugby's

:41:09.:41:11.

Today, it's the turn of Saracens, who'll be hoping, to retain

:41:12.:41:14.

their European Champions Cup title when they take on French

:41:15.:41:17.

In rugby league, Salford Red Devils were given a scare by

:41:18.:41:21.

Hull Kingston Rovers, but they came from behind,

:41:22.:41:23.

to make it into the quarter-finals, of the Challenge Cup.

:41:24.:41:25.

They were losing at half time, but Salford scored 18 unanswered

:41:26.:41:28.

This try from Ben Murdoch Masila, ensured Salford advance to the last

:41:29.:41:32.

eight, along with last night's other winners,

:41:33.:41:35.

we have Castleford against saints live today on the BBC. Tomorrow it

:41:36.:41:49.

is the British basketball finals at the O2 Arena in London, live on the

:41:50.:41:54.

BBC red button and through the website. Nottingham against

:41:55.:42:00.

Sevenoaks in the women's. There is also this match which I will be

:42:01.:42:08.

playing in. Who is your money on? You. We have got players like

:42:09.:42:14.

Lauderdale. Great player, legend of the basketball game. I can go

:42:15.:42:21.

through players legs, I have looked it up. He is seven feet four inches.

:42:22.:42:31.

It is a competition? No, it is a match. There are players including

:42:32.:42:37.

David James, former England goalkeeper. Take plenty of pictures,

:42:38.:42:43.

Mike. LAUGHTER See you later.

:42:44.:42:45.

Medical services across England and Scotland will be disrupted today

:42:46.:42:51.

as work to restore NHS computer systems continues.

:42:52.:42:55.

Planned operations and appointments at around 40 Trusts have been

:42:56.:42:57.

cancelled after a cyber attack struck the health service

:42:58.:42:59.

We've been hearing some patients' experiences,

:43:00.:43:02.

including this man who had major heart surgery cancelled.

:43:03.:43:05.

I've been waiting for it for many many months now. They only do it on

:43:06.:43:12.

a Friday. Morning, lunchtime, afternoon. So, yeah. You expected to

:43:13.:43:22.

have it today? Yes, indeed. I was ready, and I've been shaped down the

:43:23.:43:25.

front because they are going to open me up. I was already to go, nil by

:43:26.:43:31.

mouth, and then at 130 the surgeon turned up and said we've been hacked

:43:32.:43:36.

and there's nothing we can do, we can't operate full stop not the only

:43:37.:43:44.

one for the operation. It is inconvenient and very frustrating

:43:45.:43:47.

for my fellow patients. The nurses are fabulous and the doctors, but

:43:48.:43:52.

also it is a heinous crime, this hacking, because they are putting

:43:53.:43:56.

people's lives at risk. They were very good and they kept with it

:43:57.:44:00.

well. We had to wait a bit longer and it is a dreadful situation. Some

:44:01.:44:04.

of the patients caught up in this. Let's talk to the Home

:44:05.:44:07.

Secretary, Amber Rudd. This is the sharp end of this

:44:08.:44:13.

problem. These people would have had their operations by now. Yes, as

:44:14.:44:20.

they said, it is very inconvenient, a disruption to individual lives and

:44:21.:44:24.

it is a heinous crime as the lady said. We are working very hard to

:44:25.:44:28.

make sure that we help the NHS but their systems back in order and so

:44:29.:44:34.

far we have had reassuring trombone, no patient data has been

:44:35.:44:39.

compromised. The National cyber security centre is working with them

:44:40.:44:42.

to end and contain the disruption and to make sure we learn lessons.

:44:43.:44:49.

Hammond hospitals and trusts were affected? -- how many. We understand

:44:50.:44:56.

45 have been affected out of several hundred and most of them are being

:44:57.:45:01.

very cautious. Some of them are making changes and some of them

:45:02.:45:04.

aren't. Some of them are carrying on with their daily work. Can I point

:45:05.:45:09.

out that this particular attack, this cyber attack, hasn't been

:45:10.:45:14.

especially focused on the NHS, it has been a worldwide attack,

:45:15.:45:18.

affecting a hundred countries and different organisations, but in the

:45:19.:45:24.

UK it has impacted on the NHS. What do you know about who is

:45:25.:45:29.

responsible? We don't know the answer to that, but I've spoken to

:45:30.:45:33.

the National Crime Agency to find out who might be, but it will take a

:45:34.:45:38.

few days. We have to make sure we are very clear about what

:45:39.:45:41.

information we have and we tracked it down. We are talking to

:45:42.:45:47.

international partners because this is an international attack, so we

:45:48.:45:50.

have good relationships with different countries who have been

:45:51.:45:54.

impacted and we are sharing information to find how best to

:45:55.:45:57.

address this and how to find out who has done it and how to make sure we

:45:58.:46:00.

have the right defences going forward. They -- there are some

:46:01.:46:09.

straight questions people want answered. The NHS backed up? They

:46:10.:46:16.

are supposed to be backed up, that is partly to defend against this

:46:17.:46:22.

kind of incident, and this ransomware is about getting money

:46:23.:46:26.

off people to access data. If those files are backed up that attack is

:46:27.:46:31.

worthless, because people can download the backed up information

:46:32.:46:34.

and work from that, so I hope the answer is yes was the those of the

:46:35.:46:39.

instructions everyone has received in the past and that is good cyber

:46:40.:46:43.

defence. But I expect and we will find out in the next few days if

:46:44.:46:49.

there are any holes in that. People would be hoping for reassurance from

:46:50.:46:51.

the Home Secretary regarding the question. The information you are

:46:52.:47:00.

seething at the moment is that it may be that some of these hospital

:47:01.:47:05.

trusts do not have the details of patients backed up, is that my

:47:06.:47:11.

understanding? I don't have that information, but what I can say, all

:47:12.:47:16.

of the NHS trusts have been asked to review their data overnight. Jeremy

:47:17.:47:20.

Hunt is in touch with them and they are working with the national cyber

:47:21.:47:24.

security centre. There may be lessons to learn. The important

:47:25.:47:29.

thing is to disrupt the attack, and we will come back afterwards as to

:47:30.:47:32.

whether there are lessons to be learned. The threat is that these

:47:33.:47:43.

details will be lost and destroyed within the space of a week, so if

:47:44.:47:49.

these aren't backed up, this is potentially a very difficult

:47:50.:47:52.

situation? We don't underestimate the difficulty, this is a dangerous

:47:53.:47:58.

cyber attack. The kind that we have been expecting in a way because that

:47:59.:48:04.

is why we have invested ?1.9 billion in a national cyber security centre.

:48:05.:48:08.

That is why we have high levels of expertise in the area and why we

:48:09.:48:12.

have been training police and investing inside the skills but in

:48:13.:48:15.

terms of the outcome of this attack, we will have to wait for the dust to

:48:16.:48:19.

settle to see what the impact has been, but most hospitals are not

:48:20.:48:23.

affected and most are getting on with their daily work. An American

:48:24.:48:30.

hospital that was affected by similar ransomware recently paid a

:48:31.:48:35.

ransom of some $17,000, in order to get the material back. They made the

:48:36.:48:41.

decision and we understand some commercial organisations will make

:48:42.:48:49.

that decision. What... Is there a government policy in relation to

:48:50.:48:51.

advertising NHS trusts in this situation? Because one option is to

:48:52.:48:58.

play. Not surprisingly, our clear advice is not to play. We don't

:48:59.:49:03.

believe we should be paying ransoms, and the advice we give is about

:49:04.:49:07.

protecting your data and there are ways, very effectively, of doing

:49:08.:49:12.

that and having very up-to-date antivirus software. And making sure

:49:13.:49:17.

you don't fall into the trap of pressing on certain links. That is

:49:18.:49:24.

your advice. Are you telling NHS trusts not to play? That is what

:49:25.:49:28.

they have been told officially? -- pay. Yes, that is the advice, they

:49:29.:49:38.

should not be plain, that is government advice, yes. -- paying.

:49:39.:49:45.

Regarding advice given out by Microsoft, and this is a fast

:49:46.:49:50.

developing situation, I got quotes from the professor of security at

:49:51.:49:59.

Cambridge, he says Microsoft issued critical notices in connection with

:50:00.:50:05.

security a couple of months ago. The suggestion is NHS organisations

:50:06.:50:11.

might not even have known this. Or ignored advice to update what was

:50:12.:50:16.

relatively old computer systems. I'm not sure if you have heard these

:50:17.:50:22.

stories, but many people will think that is not acceptable. We know how

:50:23.:50:27.

important this information is, everybody is aware, anyone who works

:50:28.:50:34.

in the NHS, especially at the senior level, is aware of how important it

:50:35.:50:39.

is to have cyber defences which is why the CQC inspection makes cyber

:50:40.:50:43.

part of the regular inspection. They have been given, and most NHS trusts

:50:44.:50:49.

work within those guidelines to make sure that they do have up-to-date

:50:50.:50:53.

software and they do have the bright platforms and they back up

:50:54.:50:58.

appropriately. -- right platforms. We have been ready to this kind of

:50:59.:51:02.

attack and we have been giving advice and assistance to

:51:03.:51:04.

organisations like the NHS for many years to make sure we are ready for

:51:05.:51:09.

that. Our focus is making sure that we end the disruption of being

:51:10.:51:14.

caused by this particular attack. Afterwards we won't hesitate to

:51:15.:51:17.

learn lessons and see where we can improve. Thanks for joining us.

:51:18.:51:23.

Amber Rudd, the Home Secretary. We will talk about this in further

:51:24.:51:29.

detail. We have new information coming out from Microsoft and their

:51:30.:51:35.

suggested updates. We have got a technology expert in the studio in

:51:36.:51:37.

the next hour. Here's Helen with a look

:51:38.:51:39.

at this morning's weather. Good morning, this is a lovely shot

:51:40.:51:47.

that has been sent in from Plymouth. Blue skies. We don't have blue skies

:51:48.:51:53.

by everyone, we have quite a bit of cloud around and it is likely to

:51:54.:51:56.

stick around in eastern Scotland. This is the view from Aberdeen.

:51:57.:52:06.

There is some sunshine. Plenty of cloud further west. Coming into

:52:07.:52:11.

Northern Ireland, north-west England and northern Wales and south-west

:52:12.:52:15.

Scotland, this is all close to the area of low pressure. The low

:52:16.:52:21.

pressure is just moving north. The rain will clear away from Northern

:52:22.:52:25.

Ireland in the afternoon but at the moment it is just across the South

:52:26.:52:30.

West areas. It will be turning damp, Northern Ireland. As you can see

:52:31.:52:38.

from the pictures, we have sunshine elsewhere, waiting in the wings, and

:52:39.:52:43.

temperatures are starting at 13-14 and they will respond to the strong

:52:44.:52:53.

sunshine. They should be more of it today, especially in eastern areas.

:52:54.:53:00.

-- there should. The next rain man coming in during tea time. -- rain

:53:01.:53:07.

band. Heavy downpours in Scotland, even in the North West, where B

:53:08.:53:11.

could see 19-20 but also some intense downpours that we could see.

:53:12.:53:18.

As we go through the evening and overnight, we might see some rain

:53:19.:53:21.

across the London area and eastern areas. Good news for farmers and

:53:22.:53:28.

growers, enough rain to dampen the ground and that brings the low

:53:29.:53:30.

pressure further away tomorrow. Feeding in showers. Across many

:53:31.:53:38.

areas. A large part of the day will be dry, but some areas will have a

:53:39.:53:43.

shower after shower. And other areas will escape scot-free. There will be

:53:44.:53:52.

an abundance of sunshine and also some big showers in the north and

:53:53.:53:58.

west. Moving into Monday, it goes downhill with wet and windy weather

:53:59.:54:03.

sweeping back. Good news where we need the rain but not a good start

:54:04.:54:07.

to the week and it is debatable how much rain we will see in the south

:54:08.:54:08.

and east of the UK. More than 80,000 people go missing

:54:09.:54:27.

and the anxiety of those they leave behind is made worse by strict rules

:54:28.:54:32.

which mean their financial arrangements cannot be altered.

:54:33.:54:34.

Now a new law will help their loved ones to take

:54:35.:54:36.

control of things like mortgage payments and standing orders.

:54:37.:54:39.

Paul Lewis from Radio 4's Money Box programme has been

:54:40.:54:41.

I knew nothing about this until this week, but if somebody goes missing,

:54:42.:54:48.

even their closest relatives are not allowed to manage their finances. I

:54:49.:54:50.

spoke to Peter Lawrence, his daughter went missing eight years

:54:51.:54:53.

ago and he spoke to me about some of the problems caused by this for the

:54:54.:54:56.

relatives of people who have gone missing. Any adult who goes missing

:54:57.:55:02.

will almost certainly have a bank account and insurance policies and

:55:03.:55:06.

maybe a mortgage. And the relatives very soon find within a few weeks of

:55:07.:55:12.

their loved one going missing, when they are feeling very low, that they

:55:13.:55:15.

cannot deal with any of these financial matters. I've met one lady

:55:16.:55:22.

who would have lost the house if her family had not gathered round and

:55:23.:55:26.

help her out financially. Many stories like that. This law will

:55:27.:55:34.

apply in England and Wales and it will allow a close relative to be

:55:35.:55:38.

appointed by the court to manage the missing person's financial affairs,

:55:39.:55:45.

always in their best interest, so if they return their financial affairs

:55:46.:55:47.

will be in order. When might this happen? Eight years has been

:55:48.:55:53.

campaigned for, and it was thought it might be lost when Parliament was

:55:54.:55:57.

dissolved before the election but it sneaked through in time. The

:55:58.:56:01.

government said as it was going through Parliament that it would

:56:02.:56:04.

probably be another 12 months to sort out the fiddly bits so it will

:56:05.:56:10.

be in place, and it will be a little while before it is enforced but 2500

:56:11.:56:17.

people, are likely to be helped by this, according to one charity, so

:56:18.:56:20.

this is very good news indeed. Thanks for joining us.

:56:21.:56:37.

Tonight it's the Eurovision song Contest and, after failing to make

:56:38.:56:39.

it into the top 10 for the past seven years, could this be the year

:56:40.:56:43.

I don't think Brexit is going to help. I do feel a bit sorry for our

:56:44.:56:51.

entrance. It is always political -- entrant.

:56:52.:56:54.

Our Moscow Correspondent, Steve Rosenberg, is in Kiev,

:56:55.:56:56.

and has been to meet some of the contestants ahead

:56:57.:56:58.

It's Eurovision 2017, and it's all rather confusing.

:56:59.:57:12.

A horse head on a ladder. Why?

:57:13.:57:19.

The audience is not understanding it.

:57:20.:57:21.

I am leaving the whole meaning to them.

:57:22.:57:23.

And what is going on with one of the favourites,

:57:24.:57:31.

Why the monkey? Why the ape?

:57:32.:57:38.

"The monkey," Francesco Gabbani tells me, "is a symbol that

:57:39.:57:40.

at the end of the day we are all naked apes."

:57:41.:57:45.

Among the frontrunners are Bulgaria and Portugal.

:57:46.:57:49.

You know, there was a time when the UK was always a contender

:57:50.:57:57.

We always seemed to be in with a shot at the top spot.

:57:58.:58:01.

More recently we have been propping up the table.

:58:02.:58:03.

But could this be the year that Britain is back?

:58:04.:58:10.

At rehearsals, Lucie Jones has been impressing

:58:11.:58:14.

everybody with her power ballad, Never Give Up On You.

:58:15.:58:20.

I am hoping that I will go home with the respect

:58:21.:58:23.

of the nation that watched the show at home.

:58:24.:58:25.

I work in theatre. It will be nice to greet people at stage door and

:58:26.:58:34.

for them to say, you have done us proud. She has got the fans excited.

:58:35.:58:48.

This is our best chance for many years.

:58:49.:58:51.

If the UK wants success in Eurovision, this could be

:58:52.:58:54.

Maybe there is a message in the title of the song? Never Give Up On

:58:55.:59:12.

You? Maybe. Winning Masterchef is also a big TV moment. We have got

:59:13.:59:17.

the winner in the last hour of the programme. Stay with us. The

:59:18.:59:20.

headlines are coming up. Hello this is Breakfast,

:59:21.:00:21.

with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent. The NHS faces a weekend of

:00:22.:00:23.

disruption following a large-scale cyber attack which has caused

:00:24.:00:26.

hospitals to delay treatments Around 40 NHS Trusts and some

:00:27.:00:28.

GP surgeries were hit, but there's no sign that patient

:00:29.:00:31.

data has been compromised. I'm at Barts, the largest NHS Trust

:00:32.:00:46.

in the country, running five hospitals in London and all of them

:00:47.:00:48.

cancelling routine outpatient appointments.

:00:49.:00:51.

Organisations around the world have been affected by the malicious

:00:52.:00:53.

software known as "ransomware", with reports of infections

:00:54.:00:55.

Good morning, it's Saturday the 13th of May.

:00:56.:01:12.

Labour's deputy leader Tom Watson warns his party faces

:01:13.:01:15.

a "Margaret Thatcher style" landslide defeat, if it doesn't

:01:16.:01:17.

They can finally celebrate after a late winner at West Brom

:01:18.:01:25.

secured the Premier League title in Antonio Conte's

:01:26.:01:27.

Jonny refuses to give up in the World Series triathlon -

:01:28.:01:36.

after a nasty crash, he picks up his bike

:01:37.:01:38.

From horse heads to monkeys, it can only be Eurovision.

:01:39.:01:44.

But will the UK feel the Brexit backlash?

:01:45.:01:46.

The winner of this year's MasterChef competition was crowned last night,

:01:47.:02:01.

Good morning, despite low pressure across the UK,

:02:02.:02:10.

I will have more in about 15 minutes.

:02:11.:02:15.

The Home Secretary has said it is not yet known who was behind the

:02:16.:02:28.

global cyber attacks that hit NHS computer systems. 45 health service

:02:29.:02:33.

organisations in England and Scotland were affected by malicious

:02:34.:02:37.

software that locks computers and demands a ransom payment to restore

:02:38.:02:39.

access. There's no evidence that patient

:02:40.:02:42.

data has been stolen. The first indication

:02:43.:02:44.

that something was wrong was mid-afternoon yesterday,

:02:45.:02:46.

when some hospital trusts and GP surgeries reported being locked out

:02:47.:02:48.

of their computers. Vital information such as patient

:02:49.:02:50.

records and appointment It meant operations were cancelled,

:02:51.:02:52.

patients were sent home surgeries in England and Scotland

:02:53.:02:55.

had been affected. an attack on the NHS,

:02:56.:03:09.

said the incident was not Work to restore NHS computer

:03:10.:03:22.

systems will continue Earlier we spoke to the Home

:03:23.:03:26.

Secretary Amber Rudd. They are supposed to be backed up

:03:27.:03:34.

and the purpose of backing up is partly to defend against this

:03:35.:03:38.

particular type of incident. This ransomware is not about stealing

:03:39.:03:42.

data, it is about getting money from people to access data. If the files

:03:43.:03:47.

are backed up that attack is worthless, because people can

:03:48.:03:50.

download the backed up information and work from that. I hope the

:03:51.:03:55.

answer is yes, that is the instructions everybody has received

:03:56.:04:00.

in the past, that is good cyber defence. I expect and we will find

:04:01.:04:03.

out if there are any holes in that. The Home Secretary there talking

:04:04.:04:05.

to us in the last half hour. Let's get up to date

:04:06.:04:11.

on the very latest. St Bartholemew's Hospital in east

:04:12.:04:14.

London. What is the situation like for

:04:15.:04:25.

patients? The situation in this large NHS Trust is routine

:04:26.:04:31.

outpatient appointments have been cancelled today. The disruption here

:04:32.:04:35.

continues. Other NHS trusts will probably have similar problems where

:04:36.:04:40.

they have been affected by this attack. It has to be said large

:04:41.:04:45.

parts of the NHS have not been hit, and Northern Ireland and Wales have

:04:46.:04:49.

not been hit, even parts of England and Scotland have not. The message

:04:50.:04:53.

from the NHS is generally the system is up and running and you should use

:04:54.:04:58.

it normally unless you have been told otherwise. The Home Secretary

:04:59.:05:04.

Amber Rudd said lessons would have to be learned. We will have to wait

:05:05.:05:09.

and see whether these hospitals have backed up data, or whether some of

:05:10.:05:13.

them might even have to pay that ransom. We heard from a hospital in

:05:14.:05:18.

the states that was hit by a similar ransom attack last year. In the end,

:05:19.:05:24.

it paid something like ?13,000, because it was the only way to get

:05:25.:05:29.

systems back-up and that took ten days before the IT was back up and

:05:30.:05:33.

running fully. Thanks. Labour's deputy leader,

:05:34.:05:38.

Tom Watson, has urged voters to support their local

:05:39.:05:40.

Labour MP to prevent the Conservatives winning a

:05:41.:05:41.

"Margaret Thatcher-style landslide". Speaking to the Guardian,

:05:42.:05:46.

Mr Watson admitted that it would be very difficult to turn the poll

:05:47.:05:49.

numbers around, and that Labour had Our political correspondent

:05:50.:05:52.

Leila Nathoo joins us now Take us through what Tom Watson, a

:05:53.:06:07.

significant figure in the Labour Party, has been saying. He is

:06:08.:06:12.

Labour's deputy leader and has a morose assessment of Labour's specs.

:06:13.:06:20.

This is a candid admission -- Labour's prospects. Labour trailing

:06:21.:06:26.

by more than 20 points according to some polls, which we must take with

:06:27.:06:32.

a pinch of salt these days, but Tom Watson acknowledging Labour has a

:06:33.:06:35.

tricky task ahead. He says if Labour supporters do not back Labour

:06:36.:06:42.

candidates, Theresa May is on course to have a majority of Conservative

:06:43.:06:46.

MPs in the Commons of over 100 which he says will allow her to push

:06:47.:06:51.

through policies without having any Parliamentary opposition. He says

:06:52.:06:57.

their manifesto is full of exciting ideas. Plenty will have heard them

:06:58.:07:02.

after the leak of the draft. He urges voters to get out there and

:07:03.:07:08.

vote. This is a morose assessment of Labour's prospects but it could be

:07:09.:07:12.

seen as a rallying cry to get out there and vote, or it could be seen

:07:13.:07:17.

as a resignation Labour will not form the next government, and the

:07:18.:07:22.

best they can hope for is not to be a diminished opposition. Jeremy

:07:23.:07:26.

Corbyn going into the election saying it is not a foregone

:07:27.:07:29.

conclusion and he is campaigning like he is going to be in power.

:07:30.:07:31.

Thank you. Drayton Manor Theme Park

:07:32.:07:35.

will reopen today, four days after an 11-year-girl died

:07:36.:07:37.

after falling from a ride. Evha Jannath, from Leicester,

:07:38.:07:40.

fell from a boat on the The park's owners say

:07:41.:07:43.

the ride will remain shut, along with ones that overlook it,

:07:44.:07:47.

as a mark respect to her family. Ofsted inspectors have revealed

:07:48.:07:53.

they were jostled and pelted with food by pupils during a two-day

:07:54.:07:57.

visit to a secondary school The five-strong team rated

:07:58.:08:00.

the Willenhall Academy, near Walsall as 'inadequate'

:08:01.:08:04.

for leadership, learning, The Ofsted report also found that

:08:05.:08:05.

Year 11 students failed to reach their potential over

:08:06.:08:11.

a three year period. Pope Francis will canonise two

:08:12.:08:14.

Portuguese children at a mass today on the spot where they reported

:08:15.:08:18.

seeing the Virgin Mary Tens of thousands of pilgrims

:08:19.:08:20.

gathered in Fatima to welcome the Pontiff last night and today's

:08:21.:08:26.

mass is expected to attract Francis is the fourth Pope

:08:27.:08:29.

to visit the shrine. Europe's best wine waiters have been

:08:30.:08:38.

going head to head - in an unusual contest,

:08:39.:08:41.

to find the most Contestants at the European

:08:42.:08:43.

Sommelier Championship in Vienna had to face challenges such as pouring

:08:44.:08:53.

18 glasses of champagne with exactly the same amount in each,

:08:54.:08:56.

and impressing the judges with their knowledge

:08:57.:08:59.

of different fine wines. The eventual winner

:09:00.:09:00.

was from a country you wouldn't necessarily associate with wine -

:09:01.:09:02.

Latvia. There is a competition for

:09:03.:09:15.

everything. Congratulations. A good thing to be

:09:16.:09:20.

good at. The sport and weather coming up later. Let's go back to

:09:21.:09:25.

the main story. The hacking of NHS systems.

:09:26.:09:29.

in some parts of the UK after yesterday's cyber

:09:30.:09:32.

We heard from Amber Rudd the Home Secretary saying 45 NHS trusts have

:09:33.:09:42.

been affected, saying no information at this stage about who is

:09:43.:09:44.

responsible. Joining us is cyber security analyst

:09:45.:09:46.

Emily Orton. Dr Aisha Awan, whose

:09:47.:09:48.

GP surgery was advised to shut its system down

:09:49.:09:52.

and work from paper. Let's get first-hand experience of

:09:53.:10:06.

yours. You work in an A department. When was the first time

:10:07.:10:10.

you were aware something was happening? Around 2pm, we got a

:10:11.:10:17.

message that we have to close the computer system down completely.

:10:18.:10:24.

That was upsetting. Why is that? They told us it was because of the

:10:25.:10:29.

cyber attack. We were not sure of the extent, how big the scale was

:10:30.:10:35.

and thought maybe it was our department. We close the computers

:10:36.:10:40.

down and had a briefing for a few minutes that we have to wait until

:10:41.:10:44.

we get further instructions and later we discovered it was

:10:45.:10:50.

nationwide. We had to go back to a paper-based system. We were worried,

:10:51.:10:54.

to be honest, I thought they were going to close the A and send us

:10:55.:10:59.

home, but I was surprised they manage to overcome the situation. In

:11:00.:11:04.

practical terms, what do you rely on, working in A, what do you need

:11:05.:11:10.

computers for? From when the patient comes in till when they go home.

:11:11.:11:15.

When they are being admitted. For example, I saw a patient yesterday

:11:16.:11:22.

and they had a severe stomach pain for ten days and we needed to find

:11:23.:11:26.

out why he was in pain and could not find out because we could not get

:11:27.:11:31.

the blood results. We manage to get x-rays. I had to go physically to

:11:32.:11:36.

the x-ray department and CB x-rays while they were scanned and if I

:11:37.:11:44.

missed this term, that is it. You are a GP. How did it affect you?

:11:45.:11:49.

There have been practices who are not affected and their systems have

:11:50.:11:53.

slowed down. We are told to get paper details about appointments we

:11:54.:12:00.

had and then close the system down. You do not want this worm to go and

:12:01.:12:06.

affect other systems. We have it much easier than the secondary care

:12:07.:12:10.

colleagues and A doctors may not have met the patient before. We

:12:11.:12:14.

often have someone at the practice who know the patient and we can deal

:12:15.:12:20.

with it. I emphasise to any patients who are worried, in particular those

:12:21.:12:24.

with complex issues, you will be seen. If you are worried or there is

:12:25.:12:31.

a serious problem, you will be seen. General practices will be open to

:12:32.:12:33.

deal with your concerns. That is important. If you are worried, still

:12:34.:12:44.

go to your GP. We are on extra duty for the weekend, I am not working

:12:45.:12:49.

but I am available in case they need an extra hand. Emily, cyber security

:12:50.:12:57.

expert. We know from talking to our correspondent in America, this has

:12:58.:13:00.

happened before and affected a hospital there that paid a ransom,

:13:01.:13:05.

faced with the prospect of data being deleted, they paid a ransom.

:13:06.:13:11.

If you do not pay the ransom, can you cure it? Can you make your way

:13:12.:13:18.

through it? It is difficult, you are right. We have had many cases where

:13:19.:13:24.

organisations have paid the ransom. Why? If they cannot back up the

:13:25.:13:29.

files and it is a question of risk, what is the risk of me not being

:13:30.:13:35.

able to access the files for the next week, against the risk of

:13:36.:13:40.

trying to ride out the storm. Ransomware is not new. We have had

:13:41.:13:44.

it over ten years now. These are escalating attacks that have reached

:13:45.:13:51.

a scale that is difficult to come back from. How difficult is it? We

:13:52.:13:58.

heard from Microsoft saying some customers who are running older

:13:59.:14:01.

versions of Windows XP will not have known they needed to update the

:14:02.:14:05.

system. Some will have heard they needed to update it and maybe those

:14:06.:14:09.

updates of happened, but some people might not know they were vulnerable.

:14:10.:14:17.

It is difficult. People in the health care sector, security is not

:14:18.:14:22.

their main job, they are delivering patient care, organising the

:14:23.:14:26.

hospitals. You cannot expect everybody to be a security expert.

:14:27.:14:31.

On that point, I will ask this question and appreciate if you say

:14:32.:14:35.

what I do is look after patients, I am not in charge of back-up of data,

:14:36.:14:38.

you must have asked this question yourself. Do you know, is the

:14:39.:14:44.

material you work from, is it backed up? Can I emphasise one thing. We

:14:45.:14:51.

are not security experts but I was at a three-day course just on

:14:52.:14:57.

Tuesday this week, making IT systems better. Do you have any idea how

:14:58.:15:05.

hard NHS IT people were? This is not a problem with the IT system but a

:15:06.:15:10.

problem with underfunding. Allah Home Secretary was Theresa May and

:15:11.:15:14.

she knew there were cyber issues. Where is Jeremy Hunt? This is a

:15:15.:15:19.

major incident in the NHS and I have not heard a peep out of him in 24

:15:20.:15:25.

hours. This is not just IT services, it is to do with underfunding and we

:15:26.:15:30.

cannot just go, what is going on here? This is in no way a criticism

:15:31.:15:35.

of you, I am curious. We were talking to Amber Rudd and by way of

:15:36.:15:40.

reassurance, the best she could come up with, they are supposed to be

:15:41.:15:45.

backed up. What do you know? What I know from my experience, every day

:15:46.:15:50.

the data is backed up, every 24 hours. There is a potential we could

:15:51.:15:57.

get back all the files but that will take time for the IT people to look

:15:58.:16:03.

into. Yesterday, they were fantastic how they were working. I was really

:16:04.:16:11.

amazed. If you were filming it, you would have seen it in action. Within

:16:12.:16:16.

an hour, our and a half, they manage to get a back-up system running

:16:17.:16:21.

which we used for patient data and at the same time we used paper

:16:22.:16:24.

versions, putting it on the screen is literally. One other question. We

:16:25.:16:30.

have not had much time, but looking ahead. It is the weekend, people get

:16:31.:16:35.

ill. Monday, people will go into hospital expecting operations. We

:16:36.:16:40.

will see them. It will take a little bit longer. Be patient and please

:16:41.:16:47.

come to A if it is an accident or emergency. Expect delays but if you

:16:48.:16:51.

are elderly, have complex medical problems, you will be seen. Thank

:16:52.:16:58.

you both very much. We will keep you up-to-date over the next 45 minutes.

:16:59.:17:08.

Helen has the weather. Good morning. This is how the weather looks at the

:17:09.:17:14.

moment with the cloud and rainfall picture. There is a lot to take in

:17:15.:17:18.

but good spells of sunshine in the east and south west and north east

:17:19.:17:23.

of Northern Ireland. This is moving northwards and tending to break up

:17:24.:17:29.

and become showery. There will be still a lot of dry weather,

:17:30.:17:32.

particularly away from the north and west of the UK. This scene in

:17:33.:17:39.

Plymouth, in contrast, as well as the cloud and rain in the west, we

:17:40.:17:46.

have sea fog in north-east Scotland and North East England, but today we

:17:47.:17:50.

are changing the wind direction, pulling in a south-westerly, which

:17:51.:17:56.

will blow the mist and away over the next 24 hours.

:17:57.:18:04.

Very little change in eastern Scotland. Most of England and Wales,

:18:05.:18:13.

when the weather system moves north, it is a case of dry, bright, sunny

:18:14.:18:19.

spells and just the odd shower. Mostly light. Not as heavy as recent

:18:20.:18:27.

days. We should see a window of dry weather across southern island and

:18:28.:18:32.

furthered all. The rain reaches the north west of Scotland, combined

:18:33.:18:35.

with the humidity there, it will break down into showers and there

:18:36.:18:41.

could be torrential downpours across the Grampian region to the

:18:42.:18:43.

north-west Highlands but in the sunshine, up to 19. It should be

:18:44.:18:49.

lovely weather for the women's FA Cup final. I am hoping the showers

:18:50.:18:55.

will stay clear. There will be rain through the night. The next band of

:18:56.:19:00.

rain in the south-west by air and played today. There will be a

:19:01.:19:03.

dampening of the ground across eastern parts of the UK but it

:19:04.:19:09.

should clear. More straightforward, sunny spells and showery day

:19:10.:19:16.

tomorrow. Not completely dry again. Some areas will have showers, others

:19:17.:19:21.

will escape. The coast could do well in the south and west but heavy

:19:22.:19:24.

showers across the north-west of the country. Not bad on Sunday. As we

:19:25.:19:30.

head into Sunday night and Monday, more rain. A southerly wind, heat

:19:31.:19:35.

building in the east and so debate as to how quickly the rain will

:19:36.:19:39.

reach the South East. The bulk of it north and west. It could get warm in

:19:40.:19:43.

southern and eastern areas early next week.

:19:44.:19:49.

He's the man who set himself the mission of running 44 marathons,

:19:50.:19:52.

in 44 countries, in 44 days, to raise awareness of mental health.

:19:53.:20:00.

With just two more runs to go, Peter Thompson from Bournemouth

:20:01.:20:03.

So before we talk to him, let's look at his journey so far.

:20:04.:20:13.

It all kicked off in St Petersburg, Russia, on April the 1st,

:20:14.:20:16.

18 races later he arrived in Slovakia where he braved the snow

:20:17.:20:21.

But the weather was much nicer on day 24, which saw Peter

:20:22.:20:28.

And he was still smiling when he arrived in France

:20:29.:20:32.

Four days later, and Peter was in Italy, Vatican City.

:20:33.:20:41.

And on day 33, he raced in the Greek capital Athens.

:20:42.:20:50.

His 35th marathon in Switzerland, and now he's

:20:51.:20:55.

about to run his penultimate race in Reykjavik.

:20:56.:20:57.

Peter, good morning. I will say one thing, before I ask a question, I

:20:58.:21:08.

can see how much weight you have lost over the last few weeks. How

:21:09.:21:15.

are you feeling? Yes, I am just feeling tired, excited. A mixture of

:21:16.:21:22.

loads of different feelings, to be honest. Are you mid marathon right

:21:23.:21:36.

now? Are we holding you up? I got up at 5am. I have been out into

:21:37.:21:43.

Iceland. I have run about 11 miles. Some amazing scenery. After this I

:21:44.:21:48.

have 15 and a bit more miles to go and then fly off to Dublin to get

:21:49.:21:53.

the 44th done. Peter, what is your motivation? The motivation is trying

:21:54.:22:05.

to raise awareness and support for mental health charities, two

:22:06.:22:10.

charities, Mind, and another which runs a project. There is a massive

:22:11.:22:15.

focus on Mental Health Act the London Marathon with what the royal

:22:16.:22:21.

family did. That was incredible. It means a lot to me and my friends and

:22:22.:22:27.

family. That is the reason, my motivation for running in the snow

:22:28.:22:31.

and rain, and yes, getting the suntan lotion out in Athens. That is

:22:32.:22:38.

what keeps me going. You are midway through the Barras in Iceland. I bet

:22:39.:22:43.

you are looking forward to Dublin? Yes. I have tried not to think about

:22:44.:22:48.

it loads on the course of this journey because there have been so

:22:49.:22:52.

many ups and downs of things I cannot control. Until my feet land

:22:53.:23:03.

in Dublin, I tried not to get too carried away. It is exciting. It has

:23:04.:23:07.

been the best thing and hardest thing I have done and I want to try

:23:08.:23:12.

to get to the finishing line. Peter, we are sending you loads and loads

:23:13.:23:16.

of luck. When you finish in Dublin, go and have a pint of Guinness and a

:23:17.:23:22.

giant pie. I think you have earned it. Amazing achievement. We will

:23:23.:23:28.

look at the papers now. They click look through the front

:23:29.:23:44.

pages. One story today. The huge hack attack hitting hospitals. In

:23:45.:23:51.

the Telegraph. Same in the Daily Mail. And on the front page of the

:23:52.:23:55.

Sun newspaper. And we heard from Amber Rudd this morning about the

:23:56.:23:58.

scale of the attack. And what will happen next. Where will you start?

:23:59.:24:04.

Away from the hacking, I've looked for different stories and one that

:24:05.:24:10.

took my eye, a familiar story of discipline in schools. This is a

:24:11.:24:16.

headteacher called Louise McGowan, who has been working for 25 years as

:24:17.:24:24.

a teacher and is at a girls' school in Chatham in Kent and she is

:24:25.:24:28.

blaming parents for a crisis in discipline, saying there has been a

:24:29.:24:32.

huge increase in those who protest when their children are punished for

:24:33.:24:36.

bad behaviour at her school. I think she recently expelled five girls and

:24:37.:24:42.

she says when a child does something wrong, the first thing they do is

:24:43.:24:47.

text mum and dad to say, I am in trouble. Then mum and dad get onto

:24:48.:24:51.

the school. This teacher has obviously cracked down on things

:24:52.:24:56.

like mobile phones and tablets in school, which a lot of parents have

:24:57.:25:00.

issues about. It seems from the story she has tried to maintain

:25:01.:25:04.

discipline standards and is undermined by parents. That is a big

:25:05.:25:08.

change from the generation ago. Why is that? Why parents are backing

:25:09.:25:16.

their children? I think it is part of the breakdown of discipline, not

:25:17.:25:24.

just... In society in general. Children now would use these devices

:25:25.:25:28.

they take to school to quickly get in first. If you tell mum and dad I

:25:29.:25:33.

have done this, I did not really do it, I am being blamed for it. The

:25:34.:25:40.

teacher is saying she is not having it. And this is important to people

:25:41.:25:49.

in the avocado business! We have the shortage of lettuces, the courgette

:25:50.:25:54.

crisis, now the avocado disaster. Shortage as prices increase. It

:25:55.:25:57.

looks like supplies are drying up because of a late harvest in Mexico,

:25:58.:26:03.

flooding in Peru, a drought in California. Also, the Chinese

:26:04.:26:07.

apparently love avocados and are buying up all the stop will stop it

:26:08.:26:11.

seems like everybody loves avocado. It is supposed to be a super food.

:26:12.:26:17.

And how to avoid avocado hand, apparently people chopping their

:26:18.:26:19.

fingers off when they are slicing avocados. Four a week in hospital

:26:20.:26:28.

A departments. It tells you helpfully in the Guardian how to

:26:29.:26:33.

slice it. From the thin end to the fat end.

:26:34.:26:36.

To keep the prices down, if there is one that is misshapen, they are

:26:37.:26:40.

selling them more cheaply. Instead of ?1 five for a perfect one, you

:26:41.:26:49.

pay 39p. And you mash it up anyway. Unless you take a picture of it and

:26:50.:26:55.

post it on Instagram, which is what people do with avocado on toes. This

:26:56.:27:00.

is from the Orkneys. A woman who discovered her husband's missing

:27:01.:27:04.

wedding ring in a million to one chance, in the Daily Telegraph. He

:27:05.:27:09.

lost it on the beach and two months later... He did not declare it. Paul

:27:10.:27:14.

Hickson, living in the Orkneys. It took him two months to confess he

:27:15.:27:18.

had lost the wedding ring stop my goodness. His wife was walking the

:27:19.:27:25.

dogs and saw something sparkling on the beach. I think it is called

:27:26.:27:30.

Shingle Beach, and there was the missing wedding ring. What are the

:27:31.:27:35.

chances? Tonight, he and she will do the lottery. Destined to come back

:27:36.:27:43.

to them, clearly. And he is out of trouble, which is good. Lovely to

:27:44.:27:44.

see you. We're on BBC One until ten

:27:45.:27:47.

o'clock this morning, when Angela Hartnett takes over

:27:48.:27:50.

in the Saturday kitchen. Good morning. Our special guest is

:27:51.:27:58.

Rebecca Adlington. What do you love eating? My heaven is sticky toffee

:27:59.:28:07.

pudding. Amazing. What about your food hell? Game, venison, wings like

:28:08.:28:16.

that. Well, I'm afraid I might have twists on that you. I have Tom

:28:17.:28:20.

Aikins and Stephen Terry today. We were talking about avocados.

:28:21.:28:28.

Deep-fried avocado with crispy chicken and chorizo. Roe scallops --

:28:29.:28:38.

raced scallops. And you cook recipes at home. And match the wines. It is

:28:39.:28:44.

a hard life. Wait till you see the ingredients Tom Howes. We look

:28:45.:28:48.

forward to seeing you at 10am today. Brilliant, we will see you then. We

:28:49.:28:56.

are staying on the cooking theme. Do we need to warn people? Do you think

:28:57.:28:57.

everybody knows? MasterChef Champion 2017...

:28:58.:29:10.

That is where we will stop. We have the winner coming in. We are being

:29:11.:29:15.

careful, in case you have not seen it. You are warned that whatever

:29:16.:29:20.

happens, we cannot hide it once the weather is with us. MasterChef

:29:21.:29:23.

winner will be here a little bit later.

:29:24.:29:28.

Do stay with us, you have been warned. The headlines are coming up.

:29:29.:30:16.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Sally Nugent.

:30:17.:30:19.

Coming up Helen will have the weather.

:30:20.:30:21.

But first a summary of this morning's main news.

:30:22.:30:26.

The Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, has said it's not yet known

:30:27.:30:29.

who was behind yesterday's global cyber attack which hit

:30:30.:30:31.

About 45 health service organisations in England

:30:32.:30:34.

and Scotland were affected by malicious software which locks

:30:35.:30:36.

computers and demands a ransom payment to restore access.

:30:37.:30:38.

There's no evidence that patient data has been stolen.

:30:39.:30:40.

Earlier the Home Secretary told us she hoped NHS trusts had

:30:41.:30:43.

They are supposed to be backed up. The purpose of backing up is of

:30:44.:30:57.

course partly to defend against this kind of incident. This ransomware is

:30:58.:31:03.

not about stealing data but about getting money off people to access

:31:04.:31:08.

data. If those files are backed up that attack is absolutely worthless

:31:09.:31:12.

because people can just download the back up information and work from

:31:13.:31:17.

that. So I hope the answer is yes, those are the instructions everyone

:31:18.:31:20.

has received in the past, that is good cyber defence. But I expect and

:31:21.:31:25.

we will find out if there are any holes in that.

:31:26.:31:28.

Labour's deputy leader, Tom Watson, has warned of the Conservatives

:31:29.:31:30.

winning a "Margaret Thatcher-style landslide" if they maintain their

:31:31.:31:32.

Mr Watson told the Guardian that it would be "very,

:31:33.:31:40.

very difficult" to turn the poll numbers around, and Labour had

:31:41.:31:44.

Mrs Thatcher won majorities of 144 in 1983 and 101 in 1987.

:31:45.:31:51.

The Conservatives want to give people the power to demand that

:31:52.:31:54.

social media companies delete any embarrassing content they posted

:31:55.:31:56.

Labour has questioned whether the legislation

:31:57.:32:00.

would be enforceable, given that most of the largest

:32:01.:32:02.

Drayton Manor Theme Park will reopen today, four days

:32:03.:32:11.

after an 11-year-girl died after falling from a ride.

:32:12.:32:13.

Evha Jannath, from Leicester, fell from a boat on the

:32:14.:32:15.

The park's owners say the ride will remain shut,

:32:16.:32:18.

along with ones that overlook it, as a mark of respect to her family.

:32:19.:32:28.

Pope Francis will canonise two Portuguese children at a mass today

:32:29.:32:31.

on the spot where they reported seeing the Virgin Mary

:32:32.:32:36.

Tens of thousands of pilgrims gathered in Fatima to welcome

:32:37.:32:42.

the Pontiff last night and today's mass is expected to attract

:32:43.:32:44.

Francis is the fourth Pope to visit the shrine.

:32:45.:32:58.

A selection of padlocks - or so called love-locks that

:32:59.:33:02.

are famously attached to a bridge in Paris are being put up

:33:03.:33:05.

The padlocks, engraved with couples' initials,

:33:06.:33:15.

were attached in an act of romance, before the keys were

:33:16.:33:18.

But they had to be removed two years ago after a part of the bridge

:33:19.:33:22.

Today clusters of the locks will be sold as pieces of street art,

:33:23.:33:27.

I suppose that works. Although me feels that is insensitive. It is a

:33:28.:33:32.

special thing, but it is being sold. Yes, but it is going to charity, and

:33:33.:33:38.

I think they are beautiful. Chelsea fans, take the lead, maybe put them

:33:39.:33:42.

on Stamford Bridge. They love Antonio Conte. These are the

:33:43.:33:51.

pictures of him celebrating. Who is the guy peeping at the back? Yes,

:33:52.:33:56.

they should have the small ones at the front, really. Antonio Conte

:33:57.:34:07.

really is the special one. Because of where Chelsea were a year ago,

:34:08.:34:09.

they were in tenth place. It is his attention to detail.

:34:10.:34:20.

Making certain everyone is feeling loved at the club, everyone got a

:34:21.:34:24.

bottle of Prosecco, with a little message, which says, we will find a

:34:25.:34:33.

way or we will make one. It was a written statement. Making sure

:34:34.:34:38.

everyone feels loved, the attention to detail has made him stand out.

:34:39.:34:42.

So Chelsea have done it - a 1-0 win at West Brom gave them

:34:43.:34:46.

the Premier League title with two games to spare.

:34:47.:34:48.

They had to wait until the last 10 minutes of the match, though -

:34:49.:34:51.

substitute Michy Batshuayi the unlikely hero, after a season

:34:52.:34:54.

Manager Antonio Conte can now set his sights on the double -

:34:55.:35:00.

Chelsea have an FA Cup final against Arsenal to look forward to.

:35:01.:35:05.

We're joined now by ex-Chelsea player Pat Nevin.

:35:06.:35:11.

You have met the man. What was your first impression? What you see is

:35:12.:35:20.

what you get, he's very passionate. You spoke about attention to detail

:35:21.:35:24.

and professionalism, but there is also honesty about him. He has got

:35:25.:35:30.

the Chelsea fans behind him. If you listen, they are singing Antonio,

:35:31.:35:36.

Antonio, all night long. He went there and he got them going. It is

:35:37.:35:41.

easy to do that, but people see through it if that is just a fake,

:35:42.:35:46.

but there is nothing fake, he is the real Dale Steve -- the real deal. He

:35:47.:35:55.

has been against top players, Jose Mourinho, Pep Guardiola. -- top

:35:56.:36:01.

managers. The players have really done it for him. They adore him and

:36:02.:36:05.

they have massive respect for him and also affection. Even the players

:36:06.:36:12.

who are not playing every week, like Fabregas, they have been brilliant

:36:13.:36:17.

and professional. It was a big job which had to be done, after tenth

:36:18.:36:21.

place last year, but boy, he has done it very well. When he started

:36:22.:36:26.

to change things, like the pre-match meals last season, did you sense

:36:27.:36:32.

that he have might what it takes to restore Chelsea as champions? I'm

:36:33.:36:36.

not sure it was the diet that changed my mind about him, but in

:36:37.:36:41.

preseason he had a system he wanted to play. Everyone talks about the

:36:42.:36:46.

system and we sometimes over intellectualise it, but he had the

:36:47.:36:53.

system. And it wasn't working. When he saw it wasn't working, he changed

:36:54.:37:06.

it. It was well used last night. To get that important goal. If that

:37:07.:37:10.

adaptability and willingness to change his mind through games and

:37:11.:37:14.

through the season, that has made him special, he has been tactically

:37:15.:37:19.

brilliant and that is saying a lot considering the other managers that

:37:20.:37:24.

are around at the moment. As a former player. Players can be quite

:37:25.:37:30.

sensitive, so how much difference does it make to feel loved and to

:37:31.:37:36.

really love the manager? You have to balance it really well. Arsene

:37:37.:37:42.

Wenger, or even a Sir Alex Ferguson, there is love and fear, but the fear

:37:43.:37:47.

is way up there. Antonio Conte is well-balanced. The players want to

:37:48.:37:52.

respect him and they feel as if they can be his friend to some degree.

:37:53.:37:56.

But they know where to draw the line. I was watching training a

:37:57.:38:03.

while back and Diego Costa rang with a big bucket of water behind the

:38:04.:38:07.

manager as if to throw it over his head, and in the last minute he

:38:08.:38:10.

stopped and walked away and he knew where the line was. That is a

:38:11.:38:15.

lesson, everyone knew, he is a very likeable man, but he's in charge.

:38:16.:38:21.

That is wonderful. We could talk all day about the great man, Antonio

:38:22.:38:27.

Conte. That is Pat Nevin, talking about the achievements of Chelsea.

:38:28.:38:32.

They can do the double in a couple of weeks' time, if they can win the

:38:33.:38:33.

FA Cup. This There was one other game last night

:38:34.:38:37.

- Everton beat Watford, Everton beat Watford,

:38:38.:38:41.

1-0 thanks to Ross Barkley's goal. Celtic are two matches away,

:38:42.:38:43.

from completing an unbeaten season, in the Scottish Premiership,

:38:44.:38:49.

after winning 3-1 at Aberdeen. All the goals came in

:38:50.:38:51.

a frantic first 12 minutes - Leigh Griffiths with Celtic's third

:38:52.:38:58.

- and that took their league Celtic will be going

:38:59.:39:00.

for the league and Cup double - and a domestic treble -

:39:01.:39:04.

in two weeks' time, when they take on Aberdeen, again,

:39:05.:39:06.

in the Scottish Cup final. And Dundee United will face Falkirk

:39:07.:39:09.

in the Scottish Premiership promotion play-off semi-final

:39:10.:39:11.

after beating Greenock Morton 3-0 Birmingham City Ladies say

:39:12.:39:13.

they will not fear Manchester City in today's Women's FA

:39:14.:39:23.

Cup final at Wembley. Birmingham will have

:39:24.:39:25.

to overcome a side aiming This is the third year

:39:26.:39:29.

that the women's FA Cup final We want to put on a

:39:30.:39:34.

great performance. We're not just going there to be

:39:35.:39:37.

another team that has been We want to do better,

:39:38.:39:40.

we want to win, we want We're a footballing team and we show

:39:41.:39:44.

grit and determination. We can't wait to go

:39:45.:39:48.

and play at Wembley. You always dream of playing

:39:49.:39:51.

at Wembley, and you always dream Ever since I have joined this club

:39:52.:39:54.

it's about trying to win the FA Cup and we're one step closer

:39:55.:40:00.

to doing that. Definitely up there with the stuff

:40:01.:40:03.

I have achieved so far. Jonny Brownlee's return

:40:04.:40:07.

to the World Triathlon Series was almost as dramatic

:40:08.:40:17.

as his collapse at In treacherous conditions

:40:18.:40:19.

in Yokohama, he was caught up in a crash, on the last lap

:40:20.:40:24.

of the bike leg and was sent flying over the railings -

:40:25.:40:28.

but he refused to give up, carrying his damaged bike,

:40:29.:40:30.

to the transition point, to get his running shoes on before

:40:31.:40:32.

eventually finishing down in 42nd place -

:40:33.:40:34.

but what determination. You can see highlights tomorrow

:40:35.:40:37.

at one o'clock on BBC Two. they have got guts. Amazing. It

:40:38.:40:41.

looked nasty. Gloucester lost to Stade Francais

:40:42.:40:50.

in rugby union's Challenge Cup final, at a rainy Murrayfield,

:40:51.:40:53.

going down, 25-17. An interception from Gloucester

:40:54.:40:55.

and England man, Johnny May, gave the English side,

:40:56.:40:57.

a 10-0 lead and they were racing towards this

:40:58.:41:00.

trophy for a third time. But Stade are fed up

:41:01.:41:03.

being runners up - as in four previous finals -

:41:04.:41:06.

and they scored 3 tries Today, it's the turn of Saracens,

:41:07.:41:08.

who'll be hoping to retain their European Champions Cup title

:41:09.:41:16.

when they take on French In rugby league, Salford Red Devils

:41:17.:41:18.

were given a scare by Hull Kingston Rovers,

:41:19.:41:23.

but they came from behind, to make it into the quarter-finals,

:41:24.:41:25.

of the Challenge Cup. They were losing at half time,

:41:26.:41:27.

but Salford scored 18 unanswered This try from Ben Murdoch Masila,

:41:28.:41:30.

ensured Salford advance to the last eight along with last night's other

:41:31.:41:36.

winners Wakefield and holders Hull. Rugby league is one of the most

:41:37.:41:46.

physical sports of all, but now there's a way of playing

:41:47.:41:50.

into your 70s or even 80s and it's Ahead of the weekend's challenge

:41:51.:41:53.

cup matches on the BBC, I've been to Castleford to see why

:41:54.:41:57.

Masters rugby league is breaking Playing rugby league

:41:58.:42:00.

again at the age of 82. Jimmy Airnes is taking on players

:42:01.:42:03.

nearly 50 years younger, I get the ball, I get

:42:04.:42:06.

plenty of running. And I've got these

:42:07.:42:16.

great mates again. It's a great spirit,

:42:17.:42:18.

it's the comradeship after the game. Rugby league is one of the most

:42:19.:42:20.

brutal and physical contact But in Masters, there's a way

:42:21.:42:28.

of reducing impact on ageing limbs. Well, Masters begins at the age

:42:29.:42:34.

of 35, when you can wear It does mean full contact,

:42:35.:42:43.

doesn't it, Chris? I hope this will be

:42:44.:42:47.

slightly less contact. Luckily, I'm over 50,

:42:48.:42:52.

so I get the red shorts. Then when you get to 60, look,

:42:53.:42:56.

you wear the gold shorts, If you tackle a player in green

:42:57.:43:06.

shorts you know they're over 70, so you treat them with even more

:43:07.:43:16.

respect as you remove their tags. Jimmy was the only player

:43:17.:43:19.

over 80, able to wear Admittedly, even in the blue shorts,

:43:20.:43:27.

you do get some accidental contact. But Jimmy got straight

:43:28.:43:35.

back onto his feet. And the older players in Masters

:43:36.:43:41.

also get an advantage when it comes to tackling, as they only have

:43:42.:43:44.

to tag their opponents, Lots of people have never

:43:45.:43:46.

played rugby before It's just the camaraderie

:43:47.:43:51.

that gets them. If you retire from sport at 27, 28,

:43:52.:43:56.

30, 35, you've got 50 years It has the same thrills and spills

:43:57.:44:00.

as the professional game, Since coming to the UK

:44:01.:44:05.

from New Zealand, the sport has boomed, with 50 clubs

:44:06.:44:13.

and 1,000 players now wearing I was so busy looking

:44:14.:44:15.

at the shorts, I forgot Whatever their physical condition

:44:16.:44:21.

they can come and play and have fun. That really impacts on the community

:44:22.:44:26.

clubs, the amateur clubs as we used to call them, and the professional

:44:27.:44:29.

clubs as well, because people It has kick-started many

:44:30.:44:32.

sporting ambitions. Nothing to do with me,

:44:33.:44:34.

but a turn of pace from a man That was Dave Woods. He will be

:44:35.:44:56.

commentating on the rugby league match later. If you are wearing blue

:44:57.:45:03.

shorts, you are not meant to get flattened. Even with me in the red

:45:04.:45:07.

shorts, you can only be tackled waist up. Thanks.

:45:08.:45:22.

Games, gunge and celebrity guests used to be the staple ingredients

:45:23.:45:24.

of children's television at the weekend.

:45:25.:45:26.

Now the BBC has announced plans for a return to a live show

:45:27.:45:29.

It'll be broadcast on CBBC from the autumn and has a working

:45:30.:45:33.

But can it live up to the classics that

:45:34.:45:36.

dominated the 1970s, 80s and 90s?

:45:37.:45:37.

I dare you to wear a pair of shorts on one of your programmes.

:45:38.:45:51.

And it's time for Saturday Superstore!

:45:52.:45:59.

It sounds like a Scottish meal, doesn't it?

:46:00.:46:23.

That takes you right back. Many people have been writing in.

:46:24.:46:51.

On Facebook Judith says "Saturday Children's TV

:46:52.:46:52.

was literally what the weekend was all about.

:46:53.:46:56.

My older brother insisted on Tiswas and he would make me change

:46:57.:46:59.

the channel to Swap Shop during the adverts."

:47:00.:47:08.

Tiswas was slightly more anarchic and dangerous, as I remember.

:47:09.:47:14.

Ian says: "Going Live was my all time favourite

:47:15.:47:16.

Saturday morning TV program, with Trevor and Simon

:47:17.:47:18.

Helen says: "the memory of Gordon the Gopher getting attacked

:47:19.:47:26.

by a shih tzu puppy, and Sarah Greene having hysterics

:47:27.:47:28.

My favourite one. SMTV, remember that? Ant and Dec. Yes, of course.

:47:29.:47:48.

Helen has got the weather for us. You have changed location in the

:47:49.:47:50.

imaginary world that you live in. This is up in Scotland. I remember

:47:51.:48:00.

SMTV, as well, Sally. What lovely memories. This is St Andrews in

:48:01.:48:07.

Scotland, and it is not much nicer in Aberdeen. I'm fairly confident we

:48:08.:48:12.

are going to lose the bad weather through the day, though. We have

:48:13.:48:18.

cloud further west. Not plain sailing but there is a lot of dry

:48:19.:48:21.

weather, especially for England and Wales. The rain is making its way

:48:22.:48:26.

across Northern Ireland and we will have dry whether, as well. -- dry

:48:27.:48:33.

weather. This is moving north. It will turn into lots of showers on

:48:34.:48:39.

the high ground, including Hale and thunder and real downpours. Further

:48:40.:48:50.

south we have a mixture of bright and dry conditions, and that sums up

:48:51.:48:53.

the day, the showers should not be as nasty as they have been in recent

:48:54.:48:58.

days. We get to enjoy some more of that strong sunshine which will come

:48:59.:49:04.

back to Northern Ireland. Through the course of the afternoon and into

:49:05.:49:08.

the evening, but for Scotland we have the showers further north and

:49:09.:49:13.

west. It won't be raining all the time, some sunshine, we could have

:49:14.:49:19.

19-20 in the Highlands between the showers. It should stay dry for the

:49:20.:49:28.

women's FA Cup final, as well. We will have some showers around

:49:29.:49:31.

England and Wales, but few and far between. Most of the rain comes

:49:32.:49:37.

overnight. Not a great deal of rain in eastern areas, but just enough to

:49:38.:49:40.

dampen the ground for farmers and growers, so better than nothing. A

:49:41.:49:45.

touch of ground frost first thing in the morning and then it is more

:49:46.:49:50.

straightforward, sunny spells and showers, and so some areas could

:49:51.:49:53.

have recurring showers, but other areas will be scot-free. Always the

:49:54.:49:58.

heaviest of the showers further north and west across Scotland.

:49:59.:50:06.

15-20 is across the board, and it could get even warmer in the south

:50:07.:50:10.

and east through the coming week, but not elsewhere, with wind and

:50:11.:50:13.

rain arriving on the scene. Have a good day.

:50:14.:50:22.

It is the Eurovision Song Contest tonight, in case you didn't know.

:50:23.:50:40.

After failing to make it into the top 10 for the past seven

:50:41.:50:43.

years, could this be the year Britain bounces back?

:50:44.:50:45.

Our Moscow Correspondent, Steve Rosenberg, is in Kiev,

:50:46.:50:48.

Have you taken a selfie? Of course. This is the place to come today for

:50:49.:50:54.

the Eurovision souvenir selfies. People have been coming here all

:50:55.:50:57.

week to have their photos taken. -- taken. It is a great atmosphere,

:50:58.:51:03.

local residents and foreign tourists. Everyone is excited about

:51:04.:51:08.

the Grand Final of the Eurovision Song Contest. Central Kiev has been

:51:09.:51:13.

transformed into a Eurovision village. The Main Street has been

:51:14.:51:19.

cut off and large video screens have been set up at the other end. If

:51:20.:51:23.

people don't have a ticket for the Grand Final tonight, they can go to

:51:24.:51:28.

the big screen and watch there. There is a real buzz in the area and

:51:29.:51:35.

I'm very confident that the UK entry is going to do quite well this year.

:51:36.:51:42.

I appreciate that you are confident, because the song is amazing and

:51:43.:51:46.

Lucie Jones looks incredible and her voice is fantastic. But it might be

:51:47.:51:51.

a bit political this time around, yet again? There is talk about

:51:52.:52:00.

politics and Brexit, but I think that this year the UK has a good

:52:01.:52:04.

song and a great singer and a great staging. The whole package. There

:52:05.:52:11.

has been a buzz about her song all week. I was speaking to German

:52:12.:52:21.

television's Eurovision commentator, the German version of Graham Norton,

:52:22.:52:25.

and he was full of praise for Lucie Jones and he said it was the best UK

:52:26.:52:28.

singer that he has seen in many years, so that must be a good sign.

:52:29.:52:34.

Having said that, 26 countries and 26 songs, public voting and jury

:52:35.:52:40.

voting, it is unpredictable, so we have got to wait and see, but I

:52:41.:52:45.

think we could be in the top ten. Steve, we will quote this back to

:52:46.:52:50.

you tomorrow. I wish you could see Charlie's face Vatican -- face! You

:52:51.:53:03.

are not convinced. We are going to go to another competition now.

:53:04.:53:07.

As you can see it's time for a spoiler alert.

:53:08.:53:09.

If you haven't yet watched last night's MasterChef

:53:10.:53:11.

We're about to speak to the winner of this year's competition.

:53:12.:53:15.

I can remember when used to read the football results on ten o'clock

:53:16.:53:18.

news, I had to say this. You could not get a bigger spoiler

:53:19.:53:23.

alert! Before we meet them,

:53:24.:53:28.

let's take a quick look at the highlights from last

:53:29.:53:30.

night's final episode. Now only the three

:53:31.:53:34.

most talented remain. Steve has not ceased to amaze me,

:53:35.:53:40.

from the moment he walked in. Through round after

:53:41.:53:43.

round after round. What a time, I think,

:53:44.:53:47.

to present the best dish you've done in the competition,

:53:48.:53:55.

by a country mile. I think the whole thing

:53:56.:53:57.

is absolutely delicious. There is the familiar

:53:58.:54:08.

and the unusual. And it comes together, for me,

:54:09.:54:12.

in quite a thrilling way. I'm really really

:54:13.:54:15.

blown away by this. Our Masterchef Champion

:54:16.:54:17.

2017 is Saliha. Here she is, Saliha,

:54:18.:54:30.

welcome to Breakfast. Congratulations. Thank you. It is

:54:31.:54:49.

unbelievable. It feels like a surreal dream. That is yours now.

:54:50.:54:58.

Indeed. Thank you. Your food was spectacular, they braved about it

:54:59.:55:03.

consistently. Very much influenced by your family and upbringing, you

:55:04.:55:08.

brought that with you. I did. I'm from a very foody background, and my

:55:09.:55:17.

mother and my mother-in-law and grandmother, they have taught me to

:55:18.:55:23.

cook loads and loads. I wanted to represent them in the final and I

:55:24.:55:27.

felt I did that. People watching will know about your background. But

:55:28.:55:33.

some watching this won't know. Your day job, you read up to? Yes, and a

:55:34.:55:43.

wife and mother to a son -- you are a doctor? My parents came from

:55:44.:55:51.

Pakistan, so I'm British Pakistani. You read doctor and a mother, so

:55:52.:55:56.

every moment is taken up, so how did you find the time? It was very

:55:57.:56:05.

difficult. Balancing many different things, I was very well supported by

:56:06.:56:08.

my husband, but it was hard, childcare, cooking, many late nights

:56:09.:56:13.

and early starts and a lack of sleep, but it was worth it. Totally

:56:14.:56:19.

worth it. Certainly was this morning, sitting here with your

:56:20.:56:23.

trophy. Master chef had been on your mind for a while? I have loved the

:56:24.:56:28.

show, I watched it when Lloyd Grossman was on it and I watched it

:56:29.:56:33.

when I was ten. That is how much I loved it. I always thought it was

:56:34.:56:37.

something I would love to do at some point in life. But with working and

:56:38.:56:43.

having a child it went into the background, and it was only when my

:56:44.:56:47.

husband filled out the form for me, that this actually became reality. I

:56:48.:56:53.

was pushed into it by him but it was a good push. These are some of the

:56:54.:56:59.

dishes. It is one thing loving cooking and loving food and pleasing

:57:00.:57:05.

your family and friends, but it is different when you start being

:57:06.:57:08.

filmed. And you have people judging what you are doing. Was that

:57:09.:57:13.

difficult? Yes, I'm not a professional chef. I'm an amateur so

:57:14.:57:20.

there is a big learning curve. I might try to cook nice things at

:57:21.:57:23.

home but I'd never been judged by it and no one has ever given me

:57:24.:57:28.

feedback. Apart from my family who always love me no matter what I give

:57:29.:57:33.

them. That is a big learning curve. You go to these Michelin star

:57:34.:57:36.

restaurants and you learn from these incredible chefs. How you start and

:57:37.:57:42.

how you end is so different. You are a tummy doctor. Gastroenterology.

:57:43.:57:55.

Has that influenced your cooking? Much of the food I have made is

:57:56.:57:58.

festive food so it has not been totally healthy, but on a day to day

:57:59.:58:06.

basis I try to cook healthy food. It is very difficult, but being healthy

:58:07.:58:12.

is hard. In the future I would love to work towards developing healthy

:58:13.:58:14.

diets for people, especially those who suffer from coeliac disease or

:58:15.:58:20.

irritable bowel syndrome, so many things I can do with my medical

:58:21.:58:24.

background in the future. What are you going to be cooking tonight?

:58:25.:58:27.

LAUGHTER Are you going out? I have not

:58:28.:58:32.

planned that far, I'm just living in the moment. We can always rely on my

:58:33.:58:38.

mother for dinner tonight. Congratulations. And I liked the

:58:39.:58:46.

cuddle at the game, the camaraderie. Yes, they are friends for life, they

:58:47.:58:50.

are wonderful. Thanks for joining us.

:58:51.:58:52.

Breakfast will be back tomorrow from six.

:58:53.:58:56.