10/07/2017 Breakfast


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


10/07/2017

The latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC's Breakfast team.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 10/07/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:00:00.:00:09.

A crucial day for the parents of Charlie Gard as they return

:00:10.:00:12.

to court in the hope he'll be allowed to travel

:00:13.:00:15.

Judges will assess claims of new evidence which suggests

:00:16.:00:19.

the 11-month-old's quality of life could be improved.

:00:20.:00:23.

This morning we'll talk to Charlie's mum Connie Yates.

:00:24.:00:40.

Good morning, it's Monday the 10th of July.

:00:41.:00:44.

Theresa May faces up to her disappointing

:00:45.:00:47.

General Election result with a call to rival parties to work

:00:48.:00:51.

with her on issues like Brexit and social care.

:00:52.:00:59.

75 firefighters have spent the early hours of the morning tackling a fire

:01:00.:01:06.

at London's popular Camden Lock market.

:01:07.:01:08.

Good morning. The English wine industry has grown by nearly 20% in

:01:09.:01:12.

the last year so I'm at this vineyard in Kent looking at what's

:01:13.:01:16.

been behind that sparkling performance.

:01:17.:01:19.

Millions of us already know how beautiful the Lake District is, now

:01:20.:01:24.

the rest of the world does too. We are live there this morning as the

:01:25.:01:28.

United Nations gives it World Heritage data is.

:01:29.:01:29.

I'm at Wimbledon where a place in the quarter-finals is on offer

:01:30.:01:32.

are both in action today and both looking to get

:01:33.:01:37.

into the last eight here at the All England Club.

:01:38.:01:43.

Weather-wise, we're looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers, a

:01:44.:01:49.

30% chance of showers through the afternoon. For the UK as a whole,

:01:50.:01:55.

sunshine and showers but some of the showers will be heavy and thundery

:01:56.:01:58.

in East Anglia and the south-east. More later in the programme.

:01:59.:02:00.

The case of the terminally ill 11-month-old boy,

:02:01.:02:04.

Charlie Gard, returns to the High Court today,

:02:05.:02:06.

as judges consider new evidence relating to potential treatment

:02:07.:02:09.

An earlier ruling supported the view of his doctors that nothing

:02:10.:02:12.

can be done to improve his quality of life and they should be allowed

:02:13.:02:16.

to switch off his life support systems.

:02:17.:02:18.

"He's still fighting, so we're still fighting."

:02:19.:02:30.

A phrase that Charlie Gard's parents have used many times

:02:31.:02:33.

as they battle to keep their son alive.

:02:34.:02:36.

If he was lying there suffering, we would not be here now.

:02:37.:02:50.

It's a story with another twist today.

:02:51.:02:52.

The High Court will look once more at whether

:02:53.:02:55.

or not the 11-month-old born with a serious genetic condition

:02:56.:02:58.

that doctors believe mean he will never

:02:59.:03:00.

see, hear, move nor speak, should go to America

:03:01.:03:02.

So far the courts have agreed with the hospital that Charlie's

:03:03.:03:06.

condition cannot be improved and he should instead be

:03:07.:03:09.

But support has grown for the family from all over

:03:10.:03:19.

the world including from President Trump and the Pope.

:03:20.:03:21.

And a glimmer of hope when seven specialists led by the Vatican's

:03:22.:03:25.

children hospital signed a letter saying that

:03:26.:03:27.

treatment should be reconsidered following success in conditions

:03:28.:03:31.

Chris and Connie handed a petition in to Great Ormond Street yesterday

:03:32.:03:44.

with over 350,000 signatures supporting them.

:03:45.:03:46.

The hospital has made clear that its position has not changed.

:03:47.:03:48.

It will be up to a judge to decide if once again that is true.

:03:49.:03:54.

Mark Lobel is outside Great Ormond Street this morning,

:03:55.:03:57.

how significant could this court hearing be?

:03:58.:04:04.

Definitely. In eight our High Court judges will once again have to

:04:05.:04:12.

decide or start their decisions as to what's in the best interests of

:04:13.:04:17.

11 -month-old Charlie, who as we have said has this rare syndrome

:04:18.:04:21.

which means he needs help even to breathe in the hospital behind me.

:04:22.:04:25.

Great Ormond Street Hospital said this new discovery, potential new

:04:26.:04:29.

discovery, of this oral medication used by just 18 people which could

:04:30.:04:33.

potentially help Charlie, some people said he would stand a one in

:04:34.:04:37.

ten chance of this helping him, would be allowed to be tried and if

:04:38.:04:43.

so Charlie could go to America. But there are strict criteria for

:04:44.:04:46.

allowing that to happen and this has failed in the past. It matters

:04:47.:04:52.

because if that fails then it could mean that they turn off Charlie's

:04:53.:04:57.

ventilator here. If he can go to America, his parents have raised

:04:58.:05:01.

?1.3 million to help him to do so, and there's talk from a congressman

:05:02.:05:05.

of making the parents citizens in America to try to bypass this

:05:06.:05:10.

process. One UK leading paediatrician has said all this

:05:11.:05:13.

outside influence on the congressman to Donald Trump to the Pope is to

:05:14.:05:19.

this process. For Charlie's parents today, what matters and what will be

:05:20.:05:23.

quite agonising for them, is once again the fate of their son is in

:05:24.:05:28.

the hands of others. Mark Lobel, thanks very much indeed. We will be

:05:29.:05:33.

speaking to Gard's month Conservative later on BBC Breakfast.

:05:34.:05:42.

-- mum Connie. Theresa May is to signal a change

:05:43.:05:44.

in her style of government, calling for a cross-party consensus

:05:45.:05:47.

on some policy ideas, in her first major speech since last

:05:48.:05:50.

month's General Election. She'll admit her approach

:05:51.:05:52.

to government will have to change, and is urging her opponents to come

:05:53.:05:55.

forward and contribute. Our political correspondent

:05:56.:05:58.

Iain Watson is in Westminster. Iain, is this an attempt to put

:05:59.:06:00.

the events of the last Is an opportunity for Theresa May to

:06:01.:06:07.

change direction of her leadership? I'm not sure how much direction she

:06:08.:06:12.

will change, she is making a victory of necessity, she doesn't have an

:06:13.:06:16.

overall majority and she is trying to relaunch her leadership since the

:06:17.:06:20.

General Election amid rumours some colleagues wanted her gone by the

:06:21.:06:24.

end of the summer. She is saying to things, in these difficult

:06:25.:06:27.

circumstances you can either be timid or bold, she will be bold and

:06:28.:06:30.

she will renew her commitment she did a year ago on the steps of

:06:31.:06:34.

Downing Street to tackle injustice and vested interests. But there is

:06:35.:06:39.

the interesting development, she had been criticised for perhaps not

:06:40.:06:42.

listening to people inside her own party, she's gone beyond that and

:06:43.:06:47.

she is saying to people to contribute in other parties, don't

:06:48.:06:51.

criticise, and that clashes with this idea of boldness because

:06:52.:06:55.

already some newspapers are saying she is crying out for help and

:06:56.:06:59.

Labour have approached this ungraciously saying that she's run

:07:00.:07:05.

out of ideas and she's begging for help from the opposition. Not sure

:07:06.:07:09.

how well this has gone down. She'll be launching a review of working and

:07:10.:07:13.

employment practices tomorrow so she can do something solid to pack up

:07:14.:07:19.

the rhetoric and to show that she is attempting to move her party beyond

:07:20.:07:24.

its normal range of support and to help ordinary working families as

:07:25.:07:28.

she would put it. Good to talk to you. We will speak to the first

:07:29.:07:32.

Secretary of State Damian Green at 7:10am on Breakfast.

:07:33.:07:33.

Firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight at London's

:07:34.:07:35.

70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke

:07:36.:07:39.

London Fire Brigade says the situation is now under control

:07:40.:07:43.

There are no reports of any casualties.

:07:44.:07:51.

The Iraqi Prime Minister, Haider al-Abadi

:07:52.:07:57.

has congratulated his armed forces on their victory over

:07:58.:07:59.

It's nine months since government forces launched

:08:00.:08:04.

Much of the city has been reduced to rubble,

:08:05.:08:08.

and thousands of people have lost their lives.

:08:09.:08:10.

The BBC understands a government inquiry into the so-called gig

:08:11.:08:13.

economy will call for flexible workers to be paid above

:08:14.:08:15.

The Taylor review, which is due to be published

:08:16.:08:19.

tomorrow, will affect firms like Deliveroo and Uber.

:08:20.:08:21.

It's expected to argue that additional wages will help to offset

:08:22.:08:24.

Counter-terror police have launched a film telling holiday-makers how

:08:25.:08:31.

to react in the event of a terrorist attack in their resort.

:08:32.:08:43.

The four-minute video shows families and hotel staff fleeing the sound

:08:44.:09:00.

of gunshots, barricading themselves into rooms and being treated

:09:01.:09:02.

as potential suspects by armed police.

:09:03.:09:04.

It repeats the advice to run, hide and tell.

:09:05.:09:09.

We will be getting more on this later in the programme. I've watched

:09:10.:09:14.

the video and it's interesting to watch but also alarming in some ways

:09:15.:09:16.

but it tells you what you should do. Wildfires are raging

:09:17.:09:18.

across the US state of California as a record-breaking heat wave sends

:09:19.:09:21.

temperatures above 40 degrees More than 2,000 firefighters

:09:22.:09:24.

are attempting to contain nearly 20 large blazes which have

:09:25.:09:28.

forced hundreds of people Officials are warning

:09:29.:09:30.

that the weather conditions are set Sally has all the sport from

:09:31.:09:46.

Wimbledon but one big story over the weekend was the return of Wayne

:09:47.:09:50.

Rooney to Everton after he spent the last 13 years wearing the red shirt

:09:51.:09:52.

of Manchester United. Now Wayne Rooney has admitted

:09:53.:09:55.

to wearing Everton pyjamas, even during his long spell away

:09:56.:09:57.

from his boyhood club, I don't know why it makes me laugh!

:09:58.:10:07.

It's just the vision, buttoned up to the top!

:10:08.:10:07.

Wayne Rooney, back in blue, back to his boyhood club.

:10:08.:10:12.

One of the finest of his generation, back to where it all began,

:10:13.:10:16.

announcing himself as a teenager in spectacular fashion.

:10:17.:10:19.

But his love for his club has clearly never gone away.

:10:20.:10:22.

I'm ecstatic, I can't wait to be back in.

:10:23.:10:31.

To be honest, I've kept it quiet for the last 13 years,

:10:32.:10:34.

but I've actually been wearing Everton pyjamas.

:10:35.:10:36.

Rooney left Everton for Old Trafford in 2004, and it was there his career

:10:37.:10:40.

At Manchester United, he won almost everything the club

:10:41.:10:47.

game has to offer, becoming their all-time leading scorer.

:10:48.:10:53.

His opportunities on the pitch, though, becoming increasingly

:10:54.:10:55.

limited, so time for a new challenge.

:10:56.:10:57.

I'm absolutely made up he's coming back, yeah.

:10:58.:11:06.

Obviously a lot has gone on over the years when he left,

:11:07.:11:11.

I think it's just fantastic for Everton.

:11:12.:11:14.

Rooney famously once announced, once a blue, always a blue.

:11:15.:11:18.

In football, such allegiances can be hard to shake off.

:11:19.:11:23.

Adam Wild, BBC News, at Goodison Park.

:11:24.:11:26.

I think we need to talk pyjamas today. Do you think? Send us in your

:11:27.:11:35.

pictures of your chilly pyjamas. As long as you're wearing them! That's

:11:36.:11:38.

right, we don't want any of that! It's the start of the final

:11:39.:11:40.

week of Wimbledon today and the competition

:11:41.:11:46.

for Breakfast's Game, Set, Mug Challenge

:11:47.:11:52.

is heating up too. Later on Carol and I will be filling

:11:53.:12:05.

this up with coffee. Our mug challenge is still going on, it is

:12:06.:12:09.

Manic Monday here because the big players are still here, it is

:12:10.:12:13.

starting to get to a really crunch time, fantastic list of games on

:12:14.:12:17.

centre court today if you're lucky enough to be here, one of them is

:12:18.:12:23.

Roger Federer playing Grigor Dimitrov, who over the years has

:12:24.:12:27.

been an incredible player, fantastic game but does he have the skills for

:12:28.:12:35.

Game, Set, Mug? We sent Charlie Stayt to find out.

:12:36.:12:35.

Grigor, welcome, thank you for coming and lovely to see you. Thank

:12:36.:12:45.

you for taking part in the Game, Set, Mug challenge. Are you in the

:12:46.:12:50.

mood? I'm getting their. You know how the rules work, 30 seconds, many

:12:51.:12:55.

balls as you can in the mug. You've been in some type tennis situations

:12:56.:13:00.

in the past, how does this compare? This is one of the toughest tests

:13:01.:13:04.

I've ever been in. I've got the time here so I'm going to get you ready,

:13:05.:13:06.

steady, go! OK, how are we doing so far?

:13:07.:13:15.

Terrible. You're not going to talk and do this at the same time, are

:13:16.:13:19.

you? Fears concentration. Ten seconds so far. He's got the rhythm

:13:20.:13:25.

going now, now he's got the rhythm going. A bit of the mood going here.

:13:26.:13:29.

We've got ten seconds left. I think there's a lot of balls in there.

:13:30.:13:36.

He's gone for an underarm there. Two seconds now. Your time is up. There

:13:37.:13:42.

we go. Let's count them up. I think you got quite a few. I'm going to

:13:43.:13:48.

turn the clock off there. Do you want to count them up from me? How

:13:49.:13:54.

many can you see? One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine.

:13:55.:14:00.

Nine balls. Not too bad. Are you happy? I could have done better but

:14:01.:14:05.

not too bad. Lovely to see you. Thanks for having me.

:14:06.:14:08.

Isn't it interesting, did anyone else spot Charlie's reaction? Nine!

:14:09.:14:17.

Let's look at why he might not have been too delighted why he got nine.

:14:18.:14:22.

Andy Murray still at the top of the leaderboard as you can see. James

:14:23.:14:26.

Ward is behind him in second, he got ten. Grigor Dimitrov, nine balls

:14:27.:14:32.

into the giant mug, which means Charlie Stayt is back in joint

:14:33.:14:37.

fourth place with Kyle Edmund. Charlie did well and got seven but

:14:38.:14:41.

Dimitrov got nine, really good going, this challenge is tough, the

:14:42.:14:44.

toughest challenge at Wimbledon so far! Much more on the tennis

:14:45.:14:49.

throughout the day, coverage on BBC 5 Live and BBC Two starts this

:14:50.:14:54.

morning and if you're a big fan of Carol Kirkwood, you can keep

:14:55.:14:57.

watching her because she is on all day and here she is now!

:14:58.:15:03.

A lovely here this morning? The temperature is 17 Celsius, it feels

:15:04.:15:10.

quite warm, and it will get warmer as we go through the day. The

:15:11.:15:14.

forecast for Wimbledon is one of sunshine and showers. The showers

:15:15.:15:20.

will begin lightly, then we will have a respite, and then we will get

:15:21.:15:24.

more in the late afternoon and into the early evening. There is a 30%

:15:25.:15:28.

chance of a shower today. Temperature-wise up to about 22

:15:29.:15:32.

Celsius. The forecast for the UK as a whole has one also of sunshine and

:15:33.:15:37.

showers, and some of the showers will be happy. If we started the

:15:38.:15:41.

South at 9am, you can see showers coming up from the near continent,

:15:42.:15:48.

and a lot of dry weather around. A warm start to the day, with gentle

:15:49.:15:51.

breezes. Some little beasties out this morning. As we move further

:15:52.:15:55.

north, a similar story until we get to northern England and southern

:15:56.:15:58.

Scotland. Here we have more cloud and splashes of rain, nothing too

:15:59.:16:03.

heavy. Northern Scotland quite cloudy, Northern Ireland a damp

:16:04.:16:07.

start with some rain and drizzle and a slow start, so it will brighten

:16:08.:16:11.

up. As we coming to Wales in south-west England, quite a bit of

:16:12.:16:14.

cloud around first thing, with some spots of rain. Again, nothing too

:16:15.:16:18.

heavy. Drifting eastwards we are back into the bright and sunny skies

:16:19.:16:23.

and a pleasantly warm start. As we head through the course of the day,

:16:24.:16:27.

those showers are mentioned coming in from the near continent will get

:16:28.:16:30.

going, especially so across the south-east and East Anglia where

:16:31.:16:34.

they will be heavy and thundery. You could see some torrential downpours

:16:35.:16:38.

in a short span of time, and a yellow warning from the Met Office

:16:39.:16:43.

until about six p.m.. A mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers

:16:44.:16:48.

and hires up to the mid-20s. Maybe 26, possibly 27 in the south-east.

:16:49.:16:53.

Lower than that as we drift further north. Through the evening and

:16:54.:16:56.

overnight we eventually lose a lot of the showers. There will be a dry

:16:57.:17:00.

interlude at the cloud will be producing rain across England and

:17:01.:17:04.

Wales, and still a few showers in the north. A fresh night for many of

:17:05.:17:08.

us. In the south it will be quite mild. Perhaps not quite as much as

:17:09.:17:12.

the one just gone. Tomorrow we start off with quite a lot of dry weather

:17:13.:17:17.

in northern and eastern areas, but we see showers as we go through the

:17:18.:17:22.

day. Meanwhile, the rain coming in across England and Wales from the

:17:23.:17:25.

west will turn heavier and more persistent as we go through the

:17:26.:17:28.

course of the day, as it continues to journey eastwards across the

:17:29.:17:32.

southern half of England and Wales. If you are under that, it will feel

:17:33.:17:36.

a bit cooler than it has done. That clears early on and on Wednesday

:17:37.:17:40.

morning and a ridge of high pressure builds in, keeping things fine and

:17:41.:17:43.

settled. A lot of dry weather around on Wednesday, but you will notice

:17:44.:17:48.

the temperature is a little bit lower than it has been. That does

:17:49.:17:52.

not mean that summer is over by any stretch. If you like it that bit

:17:53.:17:57.

hotter, he looks like later on this month we might see a return of those

:17:58.:18:03.

higher temperatures. It has been absolutely glorious, and I am happy

:18:04.:18:07.

to say that you and I have noticed the memo about floral dresses. Dan

:18:08.:18:14.

has let us down, not wearing a floral tie. Just to clarify, it is

:18:15.:18:19.

not the same dress, and there wasn't a memo, and we don't have a stylist,

:18:20.:18:26.

do we, Carol? I think most viewers can tell that we don't have one,

:18:27.:18:35.

from my point of view! You both look lovely, and it is not the same

:18:36.:18:39.

dress. Let's have a look at the front pages this morning. Kicking

:18:40.:18:44.

off with the Times, a really wonderful front-page. July's full

:18:45.:18:51.

moon, the buck moon, so named because it is when do you begin to

:18:52.:19:00.

grow their new antlers. Talking about Theresa May, with an

:19:01.:19:05.

extraordinary call for cross-party unity. -- when deer begin to grow

:19:06.:19:19.

their new antlers. The parents of Charlie Gard, and we will be

:19:20.:19:24.

speaking to this mother at 8:10am. At the front page of the Daily

:19:25.:19:31.

Telegraph, Theresa May's cry for help to Jeremy Corbyn, and loads of

:19:32.:19:36.

pictures from Mosul on the front page of many of the papers, where

:19:37.:19:40.

the Iraqi prime minister is celebrating. Ozil is free after

:19:41.:19:49.

three years under Isil's shadow. And Iraq celebrating victory -- Mosul is

:19:50.:20:02.

free. Charlie Gard, they talk about it being this day of destiny and

:20:03.:20:06.

there have been so many of those days in court. Another one to the

:20:07.:20:12.

parents, 350,000 names on a petition to the hospital to ask Charlie Gard

:20:13.:20:16.

to be allowed to fly to America, and we will speak to this mother a

:20:17.:20:20.

little bit later on Breakfast. There is another picture, I am not sure if

:20:21.:20:25.

I should show you, but it is such a graphic image, it is from Mosul. You

:20:26.:20:29.

can see how much the city has been destroyed in the last few years, and

:20:30.:20:33.

this is a picture of a woman carrying a baby, and in this hand

:20:34.:20:37.

she has actually got the trigger for a bomb and a few minutes after this

:20:38.:20:41.

was taken she detonated the bomb. It is a horrible picture, but it shows

:20:42.:20:45.

you the full barbarity of what is taking place in Mosul, and why the

:20:46.:20:48.

Iraqi prime minister, as we were hearing earlier, is celebrating the

:20:49.:20:51.

liberation of the city from the Islamic State.

:20:52.:20:53.

You are watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:20:54.:20:54.

The main stories this morning: The case of terminally ill

:20:55.:20:57.

Charlie Gard returns to the High Court today,

:20:58.:20:59.

as his parents continue their fight to be allowed to take him

:21:00.:21:03.

Theresa May signals a new style of government, as she calls

:21:04.:21:07.

for cross-party support on big issues.

:21:08.:21:11.

The mother of a British backpacker who was stabbed to death

:21:12.:21:14.

in Australia last year has made an emotional journey to the place

:21:15.:21:17.

Mia Ayliffe-Chung was killed at a hostel in Queensland.

:21:18.:21:23.

Another British traveller, Tom Jackson, died trying

:21:24.:21:25.

Mia's mother Rosie wanted to retrace her daughter's steps

:21:26.:21:32.

and learn more about the welfare of backpackers in Australia.

:21:33.:21:35.

Our correspondent Hywel Griffith went with her.

:21:36.:21:41.

This isn't a journey any parent would want to make.

:21:42.:21:45.

10,000 miles from home, Rosie Ayliffe has come to learn

:21:46.:21:48.

20-year-old Mia was working in Queensland to gain a visa.

:21:49.:22:02.

30-year-old Tom Jackson from Cheshire tried to help her.

:22:03.:22:11.

A French national has been charged with their murders.

:22:12.:22:14.

The hostel is still open and, without the cameras following her,

:22:15.:22:18.

Rosie was allowed to enter and see Mia's room, and the place

:22:19.:22:21.

And I sat in a cubicle and I thought about Mia dying in that room.

:22:22.:22:30.

And she's gone, you know, and it's tough.

:22:31.:22:36.

I knew it would be, but I'm so glad I came,

:22:37.:22:42.

But this isn't only about commemoration.

:22:43.:22:47.

Rosie wants to meet other backpackers, and learn exactly

:22:48.:22:49.

what kind of a life her daughter had here.

:22:50.:22:52.

Every year, 200,000 people come to Australia for a working holiday.

:22:53.:22:55.

If they want to stay for a second year, then they have to come

:22:56.:22:59.

Many, like Mia, come to Queensland, where the farmers use

:23:00.:23:03.

the backpackers to pick their fruit and tend their fields.

:23:04.:23:11.

An investigation by Australia's fair work ombudsman has found

:23:12.:23:14.

many backpackers are being exploited.

:23:15.:23:15.

Two thirds say employers take advantage by underpaying them.

:23:16.:23:17.

Some have their passports taken away.

:23:18.:23:19.

Djuro, from Denmark, has just finished the 88 days

:23:20.:23:22.

of rural work needed to gain a second-year visa.

:23:23.:23:26.

It was almost like being in prison, rather than being in Australia.

:23:27.:23:30.

Treatment will be so bad, you're being pushed to your very limit.

:23:31.:23:33.

Now, we're speaking about people working in 40 degrees.

:23:34.:23:38.

And to the amount of capacity that you're working,

:23:39.:23:48.

one or two months, some people collapse, mentally.

:23:49.:23:50.

The Australian government says it recognises migrant workers

:23:51.:23:53.

but while she is in the country, Rosie is anxious to push

:23:54.:24:04.

We are propping up their agricultural industry,

:24:05.:24:07.

People are making huge amounts of money out of our backpackers.

:24:08.:24:11.

And, you know, their days are numbered.

:24:12.:24:21.

But I can feel a fight coming on, I really can.

:24:22.:24:24.

It is one which may bring Rosie back to Australia several times to lobby

:24:25.:24:28.

and campaign, and to give Tom and Mia a legacy.

:24:29.:24:34.

You are watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:24:35.:24:36.

Still to come this morning: Its clear waters and stunning views

:24:37.:24:39.

have earned the Lake District a place on the list

:24:40.:24:42.

It is great news, isn't it? I was actually surprised that it wasn't

:24:43.:24:57.

already. I'm back with the latest

:24:58.:24:58.

from the BBC London newsroom Plenty more on our website

:24:59.:28:24.

at the usual address. Hello, this is Breakfast

:28:25.:28:27.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. We'll bring you all the latest news

:28:28.:28:32.

and sport in a moment. As a fresh court hearing

:28:33.:28:35.

begins to decide the fate of Charlie Gard, we'll speak

:28:36.:28:40.

to his mother about her fight Also this morning, once

:28:41.:28:42.

mocked by its more famous European cousins, now English wine

:28:43.:28:47.

is experiencing a bit of a boom. And after 9am, it's

:28:48.:28:50.

a murder case that hinged on a rare copy of

:28:51.:29:01.

The Wind of the Willows. We'll speak to the BAFTA-award

:29:02.:29:03.

winning film maker behind a new documentary following

:29:04.:29:06.

the investigation into the death But now a summary of this

:29:07.:29:08.

morning's main news. The case of the terminally

:29:09.:29:15.

ill 11-month-old boy, Charlie Gard, is going back

:29:16.:29:17.

to the High Court today. Great Ormond Street Hospital

:29:18.:29:24.

in London has asked judges to consider new evidence relating

:29:25.:29:27.

to potential treatment An earlier ruling supported the view

:29:28.:29:29.

of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality of life

:29:30.:29:33.

and they should be allowed to switch We will speak to Charlie Gard's mum

:29:34.:29:37.

a little bit later. Theresa May is to call on rival

:29:38.:29:47.

political parties to contribute In her first major speech

:29:48.:29:49.

since the General Election, the Prime Minister will say her

:29:50.:29:53.

commitment to change But with the Conservatives

:29:54.:29:56.

losing their overall majority, she'll say the reality

:29:57.:29:58.

she faces means she has Labour said Mrs May's speech

:29:59.:30:01.

proved her party had completely run The Iraqi Prime Minister,

:30:02.:30:05.

Haider al-Abadi, has congratulated his armed forces

:30:06.:30:09.

on their victory over It's nine months since

:30:10.:30:11.

government forces launched Much of the city has

:30:12.:30:14.

been reduced to rubble, and thousands of people

:30:15.:30:18.

have lost their lives. The BBC understands a government

:30:19.:30:23.

inquiry into the so-called gig economy will call for flexible

:30:24.:30:26.

workers to be paid above The Taylor review,

:30:27.:30:29.

which is due to be published tomorrow, will affect firms

:30:30.:30:32.

like Deliveroo and Uber. It's expected to argue that

:30:33.:30:34.

additional wages will help to offset Firefighters have been tackling

:30:35.:30:37.

a blaze overnight at London's popular Camden Lock Market,

:30:38.:30:49.

which attracts 28 million 70 firefighters were sent

:30:50.:30:51.

to the scene after the fire broke London Fire Brigade says

:30:52.:30:55.

the situation is now under control There are no reports

:30:56.:30:59.

of any casualties. Counter-terror police have launched

:31:00.:31:06.

a film telling holiday-makers how to react in the event of a terrorist

:31:07.:31:09.

attack in their resort. WOMAN: We have to get

:31:10.:31:16.

out of here now! The four-minute video shows families

:31:17.:31:18.

and hotel staff fleeing the sound of gunshots, barricading themselves

:31:19.:31:21.

into rooms and being treated as potential suspects

:31:22.:31:23.

by armed police. It repeats the advice

:31:24.:31:25.

to run, hide and tell. And we will be speaking to travel

:31:26.:31:34.

journalist Simon Calder about this Wildfires are raging

:31:35.:31:37.

across the US state of California as a record-breaking heat wave sends

:31:38.:31:52.

temperatures above 40 degrees More than 2,000 firefighters

:31:53.:31:54.

are attempting to contain nearly 20 large blazes which have

:31:55.:31:58.

forced hundreds of people Officials are warning

:31:59.:32:00.

that the weather conditions are set We are over the weekend, maybe the

:32:01.:32:14.

next weekend! Is I have checked and the weekend is over! It is Monday,

:32:15.:32:18.

it is 6:30am -- I have checked. A Coldplay fan who went

:32:19.:32:22.

to the band's recent concert at Croke Park in Dublin became more

:32:23.:32:25.

involved than he expected. Rob had been crowd-surfing

:32:26.:32:28.

in his wheelchair when he was spotted by lead

:32:29.:32:30.

singer, Chris Martin. He was then invited on stage

:32:31.:32:32.

and drew huge cheers from the crowd of more than 70,000 people,

:32:33.:32:36.

when he brought out a harmonica Rob described his

:32:37.:32:39.

experience as amazing. The other story we are talking

:32:40.:32:55.

about, and there are is numerous stories today, pyjamas!

:32:56.:33:03.

Wayne Rooney has revealed that he wore Everton pyjamas

:33:04.:33:06.

during his 13 years at Manchester United.

:33:07.:33:08.

yesterday after leaving United.

:33:09.:33:10.

He grew up supporting the Liverpool club and made his debut

:33:11.:33:13.

To be honest, I've kept it quiet for the last 13 years,

:33:14.:33:26.

but I've actually been wearing Everton pyjamas.

:33:27.:33:29.

At home with my kids. I had to keep that a bit quiet but it's great, it

:33:30.:33:41.

feels... You know, especially as it was 30 years ago.

:33:42.:33:46.

We definitely need some pyjama news today, as long at it is appropriate!

:33:47.:33:56.

He looks so happy, it really does! -- as long as.

:33:57.:33:58.

Andy Murray and Johanna Konta both in action today here at Wimbledon,

:33:59.:34:02.

with a spot in the quarter-finals on offer.

:34:03.:34:08.

Sally's there for us this morning, what else can we expect?

:34:09.:34:13.

Look, I've got a really lovely... Oh, no, nothing in it, completely

:34:14.:34:22.

empty! Hoping I might get a cup of tea in it. I wonder what pyjamas

:34:23.:34:27.

Andy Murray wares, Nabi Hibs pyjamas? I think we need to find

:34:28.:34:34.

that out -- may be kids. It is Manic Monday, Monday of week two, and a

:34:35.:34:40.

busy one -- maybe Hibs. Murray was here practising for his match over

:34:41.:34:45.

the weekend and looking good. He was limping a little bit last week but

:34:46.:34:49.

of course he is playing the Frenchman Benoit Paire later,

:34:50.:34:54.

expected on centre court around 3pm. Konta returns to court number one

:34:55.:34:58.

today after her third round win on Friday. She's against Caroline

:34:59.:35:03.

Garcia, also French. She is first on Court 1 at 1pm. Away from the

:35:04.:35:10.

tennis, Joe Root's reign as England captain started with a brilliant

:35:11.:35:11.

win. England beat South Africa by 211

:35:12.:35:11.

runs with a day to spare at Lords. The second test gets under way

:35:12.:35:15.

in just five days time. In the Women's World Cup,

:35:16.:35:21.

England beat defending champions Australia in a tense

:35:22.:35:23.

match in Bristol. Australia could have won with a six

:35:24.:35:25.

off the final ball but couldn't manage it to give England a fourth

:35:26.:35:28.

straight win at the tournament. Chris Froome still leads the Tour de

:35:29.:35:34.

France but will have to race the rest of it without

:35:35.:35:38.

team-mate Geraint Thomas, who broke his collarbone

:35:39.:35:40.

after a collision with another rider Pre-race favourite Ritchie

:35:41.:35:43.

Porte's Tour is also over. He has a fractured shoulder

:35:44.:35:46.

and pelvis, after crashing at 45mph, but won't need surgery

:35:47.:35:49.

and could be back on his Valtteri Bottas claimed the second

:35:50.:35:52.

win of his Formula 1 career The Finn lead most of the race

:35:53.:36:00.

from pole to take the chequered flag Lewis Hamilton fought back

:36:01.:36:05.

from eighth on the grid to finish fourth and now trails

:36:06.:36:10.

Vettel by twenty points David Weir ended his track

:36:11.:36:12.

career with victory at the London Anniversary Games

:36:13.:36:15.

at the Olympic Stadium. The six time Paralympic

:36:16.:36:17.

gold-medallist will concentrate on road racing in the final

:36:18.:36:19.

stage of his career. He was on the programme recently

:36:20.:36:31.

announcing that, so great to see him victorious yesterday. That's just

:36:32.:36:34.

about it from me but I should tell you, this is one of our favourite

:36:35.:36:38.

days at Wimbledon for Carol and myself because for the rest of this

:36:39.:36:42.

morning we will be talking about food. They're going to let us inside

:36:43.:36:46.

the players' restaurant and they're going to tell us what you need to

:36:47.:36:50.

eat if you want to be a top-notch athlete, how they eat, how often,

:36:51.:36:54.

what's in it and maybe we can convince them to give us some

:36:55.:37:02.

breakfast or at least a tea! That sounds delicious, thanks very much!

:37:03.:37:05.

I'm sorry about the tea, I can't really help from here! You also need

:37:06.:37:10.

a bit of talent, though, to be a top tennis player! If you can't put a

:37:11.:37:14.

ball over the net at 100 mph you've got no chance! You make a very good

:37:15.:37:20.

point. Talent goes a long way. I.e. Very well... Hard work, a bit of

:37:21.:37:24.

talent and the right grub and your there -- I eat very well.

:37:25.:37:26.

When it comes to planning our summer holidays, most of us will be focused

:37:27.:37:30.

But today a campaign has been launched urging us to think

:37:31.:37:35.

about how we would react if there was a terror attack

:37:36.:37:37.

Simon Calder is with us. If you watch the full four-minute video, it

:37:38.:37:52.

is harrowing and trying to get an important message across? Very

:37:53.:37:56.

graphic images in the film and it's very much something that will raise

:37:57.:38:01.

memories of the appalling attack in Tunisia in 2015 just over two years

:38:02.:38:05.

ago in which 30 British holidaymakers died when a lone

:38:06.:38:09.

gunmen went on the rampage through a holiday hotel in Sousse. There was

:38:10.:38:15.

some really worrying stuff but clearly the timing is designed to

:38:16.:38:20.

persuade holidaymakers who have just moved into the peak season, most

:38:21.:38:24.

schools are breaking up in the next couple of weeks, to say look, be

:38:25.:38:30.

aware of what you need to do. Very straightforward, run if you can see

:38:31.:38:34.

a safe escape route, if you can't then find somewhere secure to hide

:38:35.:38:38.

and tell the police when you get the chance. But in terms of the overall

:38:39.:38:44.

risk, terrorism, despite the awful things we have seen in Manchester,

:38:45.:38:51.

London and almost a year ago in Nice, remains a very small risk

:38:52.:38:54.

compared with all the other possibilities that might come to

:38:55.:38:58.

harm you a broad. It's interesting because I have watched the video in

:38:59.:39:03.

full and it gives you more details about what you could do, you might

:39:04.:39:07.

have thought about running but really specific details, if you have

:39:08.:39:11.

to hide, and that's not the first option, they say where you could

:39:12.:39:16.

hide. Certainly. And how to react when the police arrive and that's

:39:17.:39:20.

really interesting, because the police can't tell whether you're

:39:21.:39:23.

actually an attacker or whether you are an innocent victim and they will

:39:24.:39:28.

assume you are an attacker and instruct you accordingly. That's a

:39:29.:39:33.

really important part of the thing. But taking basic steps is clearly

:39:34.:39:39.

important. It's good they've got a public information film out there

:39:40.:39:43.

and it will make people think. I guess I'm worried that people will

:39:44.:39:46.

be so focused on terrorism that they won't think about the far more

:39:47.:39:51.

likely things, road safety, accidents and water. There will be

:39:52.:39:56.

some people watching this morning thinking this is my time to relax, I

:39:57.:40:03.

don't want to go on this one holiday with my family and then think about

:40:04.:40:06.

escape routes from the hotel -- in water. And people shouldn't, as with

:40:07.:40:12.

any hotel, be aware of the fire exits, if something happened, where

:40:13.:40:15.

would you go? It's far more important for people to have a great

:40:16.:40:19.

time and not to be constantly focused on the risk of anything

:40:20.:40:23.

happening. Of course terrorism does happen, it's awful when it does,

:40:24.:40:27.

we've seen terrible tragedies, but if you're a British holidaymaker

:40:28.:40:32.

going abroad I would put it in the same category as plane crashes, they

:40:33.:40:35.

happen, they're awful, but the chances of one happening to me and

:40:36.:40:43.

my family are so low that I'm more focused on not texting when crossing

:40:44.:40:46.

the road, understanding how a rip current works, and the most valuable

:40:47.:40:49.

piece of advice to anyone travelling, don't have a couple of

:40:50.:40:52.

drinks and then ride your scooter around a Greek or Thai island.

:40:53.:40:58.

Extremely good advice. Tell us about the specific travel advice at the

:40:59.:41:02.

moment? We mentioned Tunisia, that is completely off the agenda for

:41:03.:41:05.

British holiday companies, the government still thinks it is too

:41:06.:41:10.

risky a destination and Sharm El-Sheikh, the premier Egyptian

:41:11.:41:14.

resort, still a ban on UK airlines flying there. Not a ban on people

:41:15.:41:18.

going, just a matter of weeping there is still a threat at the

:41:19.:41:22.

airport because a Russian plane two years ago was downed by what appears

:41:23.:41:27.

to be a bomb placed on board at the airport --...

:41:28.:41:39.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:41:40.:41:40.

Charlie Gard returns to the High Court today

:41:41.:41:48.

as his parents continue their fight to be allowed to take him abroad

:41:49.:41:51.

Theresa May signals a new style of government as she calls

:41:52.:41:58.

for cross-party support on big issues.

:41:59.:42:02.

Shall we go to a lovely view? What have you got for us?

:42:03.:42:08.

This is the view of the UK's newest UNESCO World Heritage Site.

:42:09.:42:11.

The Lake District has joined the likes of the Taj Mahal

:42:12.:42:14.

We will be live there a bit later on and Carol is with us in Wimbledon.

:42:15.:42:23.

of missed to be burnt off this morning. Looks gorgeous. -- a bit of

:42:24.:42:33.

missed. What's the weather like this morning? A mixture of sunshine and

:42:34.:42:38.

showers but I'm standing on Henman Hill or Murray mound, depending on

:42:39.:42:43.

the name you want, but it is actually known as Aorangi Tennis,

:42:44.:42:48.

that is still its name, and that goes back to 1967 when the cloud

:42:49.:42:53.

bought the land and leased it to the New Zealand sports and social cloud

:42:54.:43:00.

and Aorangi means cloud in the sky, the Maori name for Mount Cook, it is

:43:01.:43:07.

lovely and warm here, 17, not many clouds in the sky, it won't rise as

:43:08.:43:10.

much as last week, though. The forecast today is a mixture, we

:43:11.:43:17.

start on this beautiful note, the risk of showers early afternoon then

:43:18.:43:21.

it should recede and then we see the risk comeback again late afternoon,

:43:22.:43:27.

early evening. There's a 30% chance of showers today, 70% chance it

:43:28.:43:32.

could stay dry. Highs up to around 23 or 24. Today for most of the UK

:43:33.:43:37.

the forecast is one of sunshine and showers with a few nuances. 9am

:43:38.:43:42.

across the south, there is some thundery showers not too far away,

:43:43.:43:46.

coming up from the near continent but a lot of drier and brighter

:43:47.:43:49.

weather and sunshine. That extends through East Anglia to the Midlands

:43:50.:43:53.

heading north. For Northern England and southern Scotland, some cloud, a

:43:54.:43:59.

weather front and patchy light rain. In Northern Ireland, low cloud this

:44:00.:44:03.

morning, drizzle and rain in the east, that will clear and brighten

:44:04.:44:07.

up for you with a few showers and then in Wales and south-west

:44:08.:44:11.

England, we are back under the influence of a weather front so here

:44:12.:44:15.

too a bit more cloud and also like outbreaks of rain. As we drift

:44:16.:44:20.

further east, again through the south Midlands, south Coast,

:44:21.:44:23.

southern counties generally, back towards the London area, we're back

:44:24.:44:27.

into the warm temperatures and also sunshine. Through the course of the

:44:28.:44:31.

day the thunderstorms that aren't too far away from the south coast

:44:32.:44:35.

will migrate northwards, especially across the south-east and East

:44:36.:44:40.

Anglia. Some of those could be particularly heavy and produce a lot

:44:41.:44:43.

of water in a short amount of time. For the rest of the UK, a mixture of

:44:44.:44:48.

brighter spells, sunshine and showers with temperatures highest in

:44:49.:44:53.

the south-east, 26 or 27. As we head on through the evening and

:44:54.:44:57.

overnight, the thundery showers tend to move away, a drier interlude then

:44:58.:45:01.

thicker cloud will come in across England and Wales, particularly the

:45:02.:45:04.

southern half, and that will introduce some rain. Still quite a

:45:05.:45:08.

warm night in the south, not quite as warm as the one just gone, but

:45:09.:45:12.

fresher conditions for most of us. Tomorrow we start in northern and

:45:13.:45:17.

eastern areas with sunshine and showers. The rain across England and

:45:18.:45:21.

Wales turning that bit more heavy and more persistent through the day

:45:22.:45:25.

and it's going to be drifting steadily eastwards. Temperatures

:45:26.:45:29.

tomorrow down a touch on today and certainly we're looking at highs of

:45:30.:45:33.

up to probably the low 20s. That leads into a fresh start for

:45:34.:45:37.

Wednesday, so more culpable for sleeping. The rain we have in the

:45:38.:45:42.

south-east clears, a ridge of high pressure builds in and that means

:45:43.:45:47.

we're looking at a fresher day with more sunshine and again temperatures

:45:48.:45:51.

at a more comfortable level. As for the pollen, today's levels are high

:45:52.:45:56.

or very high across eastern and central and some southern parts of

:45:57.:46:01.

England. For western England and Wales, northern England, Northern

:46:02.:46:04.

Ireland and most of Scotland, they are moderate, and in the far north

:46:05.:46:08.

of Scotland that they are low. If you're heading out and you have an

:46:09.:46:12.

allergy to pollen, bear that in mind. Handy advice!

:46:13.:46:16.

We will see you a little bit later, thank you very much. It has been

:46:17.:46:25.

just glorious at Wimbledon. This is very strange, it doesn't normally

:46:26.:46:31.

happen. I love it, it is so gorgeous. One extra slice of

:46:32.:46:35.

Wimbledon news. Someone getting very excited. Michelle from Nottingham

:46:36.:46:40.

has sent us this gorgeous picture of her dog Flossie, who has amassed

:46:41.:46:52.

quite a lot of tennis balls. It is all about the angled head to add to

:46:53.:46:58.

the cuteness. We are also talking about wine.

:46:59.:47:01.

English wine used to be a bit of a joke among connoisseurs,

:47:02.:47:04.

but the industry could be about to have the last laugh.

:47:05.:47:07.

It was the fastest-growing sector in the UK's food and drinks

:47:08.:47:10.

Sean is at a vineyard for us in Kent this morning,

:47:11.:47:14.

to see what has put the fizz into sales.

:47:15.:47:19.

Good morning, they are bubbling with confidence, it is a sparkling

:47:20.:47:29.

performance. We will get that out of the way early on.

:47:30.:47:35.

Figures out this morning show that the amount of money taken

:47:36.:47:38.

by English wine producers was up nearly 20% last year,

:47:39.:47:41.

There are now around 500 commercial vineyards in England and Wales,

:47:42.:47:46.

Annually they are producing over five million bottles,

:47:47.:47:48.

But, although there is more wine being produced,

:47:49.:47:52.

the market for English wine is still tiny, making up less

:47:53.:47:55.

than 1% of the wine consumed in the UK.

:47:56.:47:58.

So still plenty to play for. Simon, you run this place. Why the growth?

:47:59.:48:04.

I think what we are seeing is more and more people getting to actually

:48:05.:48:07.

taste our wine. They are realising it is as good as anywhere that we

:48:08.:48:11.

taste wine from in the world. So we are seeing more and more people

:48:12.:48:14.

coming to the Vineyard, more and more people tasting the wine and

:48:15.:48:18.

realising it is good stuff and they need to drink more of it. What has

:48:19.:48:22.

taken the industry so long, then? Because it looks like a standard

:48:23.:48:25.

Vineyard in the south of England, shouldn't we have been doing that

:48:26.:48:29.

for decades? Yes, and in fact they have been growing grapes here since

:48:30.:48:32.

Roman times. It is just taking the industry from what we have in the

:48:33.:48:36.

past and turning it into a proper commercial industry. We have got a

:48:37.:48:40.

few hurdles to get through. How economies of scale are not the same

:48:41.:48:44.

as the rest of the world. But across the rest of Europe you will see that

:48:45.:48:49.

we are starting to perform much better than we have done before. But

:48:50.:48:54.

it is expensive, isn't it? Relative to a bottle of wine people might be

:48:55.:48:58.

used to buying on a Friday night, you are paying a bit more. What puts

:48:59.:49:03.

the prices up? There are three things. One is we are a cool climate

:49:04.:49:11.

so we have much more volatility in the weather. The second thing is

:49:12.:49:14.

that economy of scale I talked about. The average size of a

:49:15.:49:18.

Vineyard in the UK is much smaller than the rest of the world, and

:49:19.:49:21.

thirdly the duty prices in England, and especially for producers, they

:49:22.:49:25.

are so much higher than the rest of the world. We pay at least ?2.60 a

:49:26.:49:29.

bottle on each bottle of wine we drink in the UK, and in France it is

:49:30.:49:35.

a few cents. We will talk later about how that tough frost might

:49:36.:49:38.

have made things a bit difficult. Some industries would kill for 20%

:49:39.:49:43.

growth in the year. The English wine industry clearly doing well, but

:49:44.:49:47.

let's speak to ten. A beautiful place here. Not industry can have

:49:48.:49:56.

something like this to show people -- Tim. What can other industries

:49:57.:50:00.

learn from them? What you have seen all around this morning typifies the

:50:01.:50:05.

British manufacturing industry. It is all about quality and innovation

:50:06.:50:09.

and is really focused on delivering what the consumer wants. Consumers

:50:10.:50:13.

see that and that is why they are responding not only to English wine,

:50:14.:50:18.

at British food, in terms of cheese, fish, these are things that British

:50:19.:50:24.

customers want to buy and the world wants to buy. You say it is what

:50:25.:50:28.

consumers want, but what consumers really want is low prices. The

:50:29.:50:32.

former boss of Sainsbury is worth saying that Brexit will mean higher

:50:33.:50:37.

prices, lower quality and less choice. Would you agree with him? I

:50:38.:50:43.

think he is only right if we don't get that free trade deal which

:50:44.:50:46.

everyone says is very important. We know that tariffs are very, very

:50:47.:50:51.

high on meat, fish and dairy. If you look at what happened since the

:50:52.:50:55.

referendum, when the value of the pound has gone down, food prices

:50:56.:50:59.

have risen only relatively modestly. We think that will continue, but

:51:00.:51:02.

both the retailers in manufacturers are trying really hard to make sure

:51:03.:51:06.

that those food price increases do not feed through to consumers. He

:51:07.:51:11.

thinks consumers are not aware of how much food prices could be going

:51:12.:51:16.

up. Have consumers got used to that? I think consumers are noticing price

:51:17.:51:21.

rises after they have been falling for several years. There is an

:51:22.:51:25.

awareness of that and they don't know how far that will go, but they

:51:26.:51:29.

are hoping like us that they will quickly work out what the final

:51:30.:51:32.

trade deal looks like and what the transition to that trade deal looks

:51:33.:51:36.

like. We will return to you later in the morning, and also looking at the

:51:37.:51:40.

reason why some of these plants have not grown as well as they have in

:51:41.:51:44.

recent years. I will learn how frost affects the venue here. And

:51:45.:51:46.

education for you, Sean. Underworld is one of the most

:51:47.:51:56.

successful electronic acts of the last 25 years, so much so,

:51:57.:51:59.

Danny Boyle chose them to look after all the music for the opening

:52:00.:52:02.

of the 2012 Olympics. Their new work for the Manchester

:52:03.:52:05.

International Festival Manchester Street Poem turns

:52:06.:52:08.

interviews with people who have been homeless into a piece of music,

:52:09.:52:11.

and as audiences listen, they can watch Karl Hyde

:52:12.:52:14.

from the group paint what was said. Our entertainment correspondent

:52:15.:52:17.

Colin Paterson went to see Nobody wants to see people

:52:18.:52:19.

on the street, and if they do, they're not going to

:52:20.:52:25.

ask them their story. In paint and in music,

:52:26.:52:27.

the words of people who have been homeless, given a whole

:52:28.:52:31.

new audience by Underworld. I was just curious about why people

:52:32.:52:37.

were sleeping in doorways. And, you know, my kids

:52:38.:52:42.

were asking me what's going on,

:52:43.:52:48.

and I couldn't - I've come close to being lost enough

:52:49.:52:49.

to have lost everything, and I don't

:52:50.:52:57.

see any difference between the people who are living

:52:58.:52:59.

on the streets and me, And it was when Underworld

:53:00.:53:02.

were at their most popular that Karl thought he might end

:53:03.:53:08.

up on the streets. How close did you come

:53:09.:53:10.

to being homeless? Close, because I was

:53:11.:53:12.

losing everything. It came to pieces

:53:13.:53:14.

quite a lot of times. It was in the most successful

:53:15.:53:16.

of those times that I was at my And I came very close,

:53:17.:53:21.

and it looked like a really good The dance duo worked

:53:22.:53:24.

with the charity Mustard Tree to record the stories of 35

:53:25.:53:29.

former rough sleepers. You're vulnerable,

:53:30.:53:33.

and you're scared, and your dignity is

:53:34.:53:39.

stripped away from you. The aim - to make people think

:53:40.:53:41.

about the homeless not as a group She is now housed,

:53:42.:53:45.

but shared her story with us. It was worse when I had

:53:46.:53:51.

addiction problems. A couple of years ago,

:53:52.:53:53.

ended up losing some jobs, ended up committing

:53:54.:53:57.

crimes over Christmas. Went to prison,

:53:58.:53:59.

came out or prison How do you look back

:54:00.:54:01.

at that period now? It's scary, it's frightening

:54:02.:54:07.

to be out on the streets, especially in a big

:54:08.:54:10.

city like Manchester. And if it's a weekend, as well,

:54:11.:54:12.

people coming past drunk, and I know people get

:54:13.:54:17.

abused, and I know people that have been urinated

:54:18.:54:21.

on, and thrown food Underworld have taken over

:54:22.:54:23.

a shop in the centre Anyone can pop in for a listen,

:54:24.:54:27.

and watch Karl in action. Mooch been off the streets

:54:28.:54:31.

for three years. He is one of the voices

:54:32.:54:35.

on the soundtrack, and thinks that

:54:36.:54:38.

Manchester Street Poem really This gives people the

:54:39.:54:40.

opportunity to know what - people out on the streets,

:54:41.:54:44.

they've all have a story to tell. And at the end, I want someone

:54:45.:54:47.

to have come off the streets, turned their life around

:54:48.:54:52.

by the help of all this. Which will happen, and I know

:54:53.:54:54.

it's happening now. What does it mean to you,

:54:55.:54:57.

to have your story now It's great to be a part of something

:54:58.:55:01.

like this, you know. It's good to see that

:55:02.:55:09.

people can see that, You're not just something

:55:10.:55:12.

that's sat on the street, And, if you can't make it

:55:13.:55:21.

to the shop to see and hear Manchester Street Poem,

:55:22.:55:26.

you can hear it on BBC 6 Music this One thing we are talking about his

:55:27.:55:33.

pyjamas. Some people have asking about our pyjamas, but we are not.

:55:34.:55:41.

It would be difficult, wouldn't it? The reason we are talking about are

:55:42.:55:47.

charmers is that Wayne Rooney has been talking about the fact that he

:55:48.:55:51.

wears Everton pyjamas. There was no picture available, but we made this

:55:52.:55:55.

one. So obviously we imagine that some of you might possibly, given it

:55:56.:56:00.

is breakfasttime and just before 7am, be watching in your pyjamas,

:56:01.:56:05.

and it would cheer us up immensely if you would send us pictures of

:56:06.:56:10.

your pyjamas. The e-mail addresses are on the screen. Fire away if you

:56:11.:56:15.

feel you are able to. I'm back with the latest

:56:16.:59:35.

from the BBC London newsroom Plenty more on our website

:59:36.:59:38.

at the usual address. Hello, this is Breakfast

:59:39.:59:41.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. A crucial day for the parents

:59:42.:00:06.

of Charlie Gard as they return to court in the hope he'll

:00:07.:00:09.

be allowed to travel Judges will assess claims

:00:10.:00:12.

of new evidence which suggests the 11-month-old's quality

:00:13.:00:16.

of life could be improved. This morning we'll talk

:00:17.:00:18.

to Charlie's mum Connie Yates. Good morning, it's

:00:19.:00:37.

Monday the 10th of July. Also this morning: Theresa May faces

:00:38.:00:41.

up to her disappointing General Election result with a call

:00:42.:00:44.

to rival parties to work with her on issues like

:00:45.:00:47.

Brexit and social care. 75 firefighters have spent the early

:00:48.:00:54.

hours of the morning tackling a fire at London's popular

:00:55.:00:58.

Camden Lock Market. The English wine industry has grown

:00:59.:01:04.

by nearly 20% in the last year so I'm at this vineyard in Kent

:01:05.:01:09.

looking at what's been behind Millions of us already know how

:01:10.:01:13.

beautiful the Lake District is, We are live there this morning

:01:14.:01:18.

as the United Nations gives it I'm at Wimbledon where a place

:01:19.:01:25.

in the quarter-finals is on offer Andy Murray and Johanna Konta

:01:26.:01:31.

are both in action today and both looking to get into the last eight

:01:32.:01:38.

here at the All England Club. Weather-wise, we're looking

:01:39.:01:45.

at a mixture of sunshine and showers, a 30% chance of showers

:01:46.:01:49.

through the afternoon. For the UK as a whole,

:01:50.:01:54.

sunshine and showers but some of the showers will be heavy

:01:55.:01:56.

and thundery in East Anglia The case of the terminally

:01:57.:02:00.

ill 11-month-old boy, Charlie Gard, returns

:02:01.:02:17.

to the High Court today as judges consider new evidence

:02:18.:02:20.

relating to potential treatment An earlier ruling supported the view

:02:21.:02:22.

of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality

:02:23.:02:27.

of life and they should be allowed to switch off his life

:02:28.:02:30.

support systems. Mark Lobel is outside

:02:31.:02:37.

Great Ormond Street this morning, how significant could

:02:38.:02:39.

this court hearing be? That's right. After much pushing

:02:40.:02:49.

from Charlie's parents and some members of the medical community, in

:02:50.:02:53.

seven hours High Court judges will once again have to work out what's

:02:54.:02:57.

in the best interests of 11 -month-old Charlie Murphy is behind

:02:58.:03:02.

me, but being kept alive because he has a rare syndrome, being helped to

:03:03.:03:06.

breathe by the hospital. Great Ormond Street Hospital says new

:03:07.:03:11.

evidence have come to light that all medication, which has only been

:03:12.:03:16.

taken by 18 people in the world at the moment, but something that would

:03:17.:03:21.

give Charlie a one in ten chance of getting better, whether that should

:03:22.:03:24.

be taken and if so whether he's allowed to travel to America to have

:03:25.:03:29.

it. But there are strict criteria here as to whether treatments for

:03:30.:03:32.

children are allowed and they've already tried to get permission for

:03:33.:03:36.

Charlie to fly to America from the High Court before and that's failed.

:03:37.:03:41.

There's a high hurdle for the parents to overcome and it matters

:03:42.:03:47.

because if Charlie can't go then it's possible they might turn off

:03:48.:03:51.

his ventilator here. The parents are ready and hoping that he would be

:03:52.:03:57.

able to travel, they've raised ?1.3 million to go to America and there's

:03:58.:04:02.

even a congressman that's preparing to make the parents citizens to

:04:03.:04:07.

bypass the system but that's led to criticism from a leading British

:04:08.:04:10.

paediatrician who says all this outside involvement from Donald

:04:11.:04:13.

Trump to the Pope to the congressman isn't helping. For Charlie's

:04:14.:04:18.

parents, what matters today and what they will go through, is another

:04:19.:04:23.

agonising wait as to what happens to their son and that power is once

:04:24.:04:28.

again in the hands of others. Thank you very much, Mark. We will be

:04:29.:04:34.

speaking to Charlie Gard's mother at around 8am in the continued fight

:04:35.:04:37.

for her son's life. We'll be speaking to Charlie Gard's

:04:38.:04:38.

mother just after eight about the continued fight

:04:39.:04:41.

for her son's life. Theresa May is to signal a change

:04:42.:04:43.

in her style of government, calling for a cross-party consensus

:04:44.:04:46.

on some policy ideas, in her first major speech since last

:04:47.:04:48.

month's General Election. She'll admit her approach

:04:49.:04:51.

to government will have to change, and is urging her opponents to come

:04:52.:04:54.

forward and contribute. Our political correspondent

:04:55.:04:57.

Iain Watson is in Westminster. Iain, is this an attempt to put

:04:58.:04:59.

the events of the last It is unusual, but she has to make a

:05:00.:05:08.

victory of necessity. She is recognising she'll know longer has

:05:09.:05:13.

an overall majority and it's very read to be in that position -- she

:05:14.:05:19.

no longer. The last time was in the coalition -- very rare. To some

:05:20.:05:26.

extent she has to ask if other people have ideas and can they get

:05:27.:05:30.

involved but equally they are facing other challenges with Brexit and she

:05:31.:05:33.

may need the help of labour's front bench to get the legislation through

:05:34.:05:38.

against some of her own rebels and some of Labour's of levels. To some

:05:39.:05:43.

extent it's natural she would say this but we could be getting a mixed

:05:44.:05:47.

message from Theresa May, in these difficult times she is saying she

:05:48.:05:51.

can either be timid or bold, she is saying she is being bowled, but then

:05:52.:05:58.

she is saying to come and help and not criticise, that is seen as a

:05:59.:06:03.

sign of weakness from Conservative criticising newspapers. Labour

:06:04.:06:06.

aren't joining in the spirit of this, they are saying Theresa May

:06:07.:06:10.

has run out of ideas and she is begging for help. If she is hoping

:06:11.:06:15.

to create this new consensus then that will be difficult. The key

:06:16.:06:19.

challenge for her is to put policies behind some of her rhetoric and to

:06:20.:06:23.

see if she can get some cross-party support, that could be possible when

:06:24.:06:27.

she launches a review of employment practices, something that should

:06:28.:06:30.

appeal to people on the Labour benches tomorrow.

:06:31.:06:33.

More on that from Damian Green in a few moments so stay with us for that

:06:34.:06:37.

on the programme. The Iraqi Prime Minister,

:06:38.:06:39.

Haider al-Abadi, The Iraqi Prime Minister has visited

:06:40.:06:40.

Mosul to congratulate his armed forces on their victory over

:06:41.:06:43.

the Islamic State group, nine months after they launched

:06:44.:06:46.

the offensive to liberate the city. In the capital, Baghdad,

:06:47.:06:49.

people sang and danced Many areas of Mosul have been

:06:50.:06:51.

reduced to rubble in the fight, Fireworks over Baghdad last night.

:06:52.:07:06.

Iraq is celebrating the defeat of so-called Islamic State in Mosul.

:07:07.:07:12.

But it's come at a cost. This is Iraq's second biggest city. Homes,

:07:13.:07:17.

streets, shops. Reduced to ruins and dust. It's brought thousands have

:07:18.:07:24.

been killed, some will have been part of IS, others were civilians.

:07:25.:07:28.

Search and rescue teams continue to pull bodies from the rubble. These

:07:29.:07:34.

families have survived three years under IS.

:07:35.:07:35.

Now they're able to leave following nearly a million people who've

:07:36.:07:41.

already left their homes here. It may be a while until they can

:07:42.:07:46.

return. The fighting is ending but the humanitarian crisis is not. It

:07:47.:07:50.

will take months, maybe even years, for the people who have fled from

:07:51.:07:54.

their homes, they have lost everything, it will take months for

:07:55.:07:58.

them to go back to the damaged neighbourhoods.

:07:59.:08:02.

The UN estimates it will cost at least ?770 million to restore the

:08:03.:08:07.

city's basic infrastructure, such as clean water and electricity. IS

:08:08.:08:11.

still hold territory to the west and south of Mosul, as well as elsewhere

:08:12.:08:18.

in Iraq. Some experts have warned if games are not secured properly, IS

:08:19.:08:23.

could retake cities again -- gains. Although this city is liberated, for

:08:24.:08:28.

these families it came at a price. Caroline Davies, BBC News.

:08:29.:08:36.

The BBC understands a government inquiry into the so-called gig

:08:37.:08:39.

economy will call for flexible workers to be paid above

:08:40.:08:42.

The Taylor review, which is due to be published

:08:43.:08:45.

tomorrow, will affect firms like Deliveroo and Uber.

:08:46.:08:47.

It's expected to argue that additional wages will help to offset

:08:48.:08:50.

Firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight at London's

:08:51.:08:59.

70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke

:09:00.:09:03.

London Fire Brigade says the situation is now under control

:09:04.:09:07.

There are no reports of any casualties.

:09:08.:09:17.

Counter-terror police have launched a film telling holiday-makers how

:09:18.:09:20.

to react in the event of a terrorist attack in their resort.

:09:21.:09:23.

WOMAN: We have to get out of here now!

:09:24.:09:26.

The four-minute video shows families and hotel staff fleeing the sound

:09:27.:09:31.

of gunshots, barricading themselves into rooms and being treated

:09:32.:09:34.

as potential suspects by armed police.

:09:35.:09:35.

It repeats the advice to run, hide and tell.

:09:36.:09:42.

Wildfires are raging across the US state of California

:09:43.:09:44.

as a record-breaking heat wave sends temperatures above 40 degrees

:09:45.:09:47.

More than 2,000 firefighters are attempting to contain nearly 20

:09:48.:09:51.

large blazes which have forced hundreds of people

:09:52.:09:53.

Officials are warning that the weather conditions are set

:09:54.:09:57.

He has spent the last 13 years wearing the red shirt of Manchester

:09:58.:10:17.

United Thaiday only we think. Now Wayne Rooney has admitted to wearing

:10:18.:10:21.

evident pyjamas even during his long spell away from his boyhood club,

:10:22.:10:27.

which he has now rejoined of course, Adam Wilde has more.

:10:28.:10:34.

Wayne Rooney, back in blue, back to his boyhood club.

:10:35.:10:37.

One of the finest of his generation, back to where it all began,

:10:38.:10:40.

announcing himself as a teenager in spectacular fashion.

:10:41.:10:42.

But his love for his club has clearly never gone away.

:10:43.:10:45.

I'm ecstatic, I can't wait to get back playing.

:10:46.:10:48.

To be honest, I've kept it quiet for the last 13 years,

:10:49.:10:51.

but I've actually been wearing Everton pyjamas.

:10:52.:10:53.

Rooney left Everton for Old Trafford in 2004, and it was there his career

:10:54.:10:57.

At Manchester United, he won almost everything the club

:10:58.:11:02.

game has to offer, becoming their all-time leading scorer.

:11:03.:11:04.

His opportunities on the pitch, though, becoming increasingly

:11:05.:11:07.

limited, so time for a new challenge.

:11:08.:11:08.

I'm absolutely made up he's coming back, yeah.

:11:09.:11:20.

Obviously a lot has gone on over the years when he left,

:11:21.:11:24.

I think it's just fantastic for Everton.

:11:25.:11:27.

Rooney famously once announced, once a blue, always a blue.

:11:28.:11:31.

In football, such allegiances can be hard to shake off.

:11:32.:11:34.

Adam Wild, BBC News, at Goodison Park.

:11:35.:11:41.

Clearly there's other more important news around but it has made us...

:11:42.:11:48.

You don't have to defend it. It made us chuckle, though!

:11:49.:11:49.

This is something we mocked up earlier.

:11:50.:11:52.

This is what we think Wayne Rooney might look

:11:53.:11:54.

like in his Everton PJs, very fetching.

:11:55.:11:56.

Mike has sent this one in. Maybe this is the evident pyjamas that he

:11:57.:12:11.

is wearing. Mary sent this picture of five-month-old Bethany in her

:12:12.:12:16.

beautiful pyjamas. Very sweet, thanks very much indeed!

:12:17.:12:19.

It's been a turbulent month for the Prime Minister

:12:20.:12:21.

following the shock election result in June.

:12:22.:12:23.

Since then she has had to apologise to her own MPs

:12:24.:12:26.

for the campaign, agree a billion-pound deal with the DUP

:12:27.:12:29.

and now, in the week which marks her first anniversary

:12:30.:12:32.

in Downing Street, she faces criticism from the European

:12:33.:12:34.

Parliament over her offer to EU citizens post Brexit.

:12:35.:12:36.

So will a speech tomorrow mark a reboot of her premiership?

:12:37.:12:39.

Joining us this morning from Westminster is First Secretary

:12:40.:12:42.

Good morning to you, Mr Green. Thanks for your time on this. A

:12:43.:12:58.

rebrand, a reboot, it doesn't feel like a year into the job there's

:12:59.:13:03.

much to celebrate for May. There's a lot to do, that's one of the points

:13:04.:13:07.

the Prime Minister will make tomorrow, her ambition for this

:13:08.:13:11.

country is the same as it was a year ago when she stood on the steps of

:13:12.:13:15.

Downing Street and said she wanted to make this a country that works

:13:16.:13:18.

for everyone and tomorrow for example she's launching Matthew

:13:19.:13:23.

Taylor's report on working practices. We all know the world of

:13:24.:13:27.

work has changed, he's been looking at what we call the gig economy,

:13:28.:13:32.

people working for companies like Uber and deliver a row and making

:13:33.:13:37.

suggestions about how we can benefit from the flexible world of work we

:13:38.:13:42.

have and make sure that people get good work and feel satisfied in

:13:43.:13:46.

their jobs. That's the kind of big issue where politicians should

:13:47.:13:50.

address things and the Prime Minister is determined to do so.

:13:51.:13:55.

Only 12 weeks ago she called this snap General Election to remove some

:13:56.:13:59.

of the noise holding her back from her plans in parliament, now she's

:14:00.:14:03.

reaching out to the other parties, it's easy to see how people will say

:14:04.:14:07.

she is begging and she is desperate and some have said she even can't

:14:08.:14:12.

survive as Prime Minister? That's all nonsense. Why is that nonsense,

:14:13.:14:17.

why is she not begging for help and isn't desperate? She's not begging

:14:18.:14:21.

for help. There are big issues facing this country, not just

:14:22.:14:26.

Brexit, obviously the one that will dominate politics for the next few

:14:27.:14:30.

years, but counterterrorism, improving the world of work for

:14:31.:14:34.

millions of people, the issue of social care, I'm sure most of the

:14:35.:14:39.

people watching this programme will save you know what, it's possible no

:14:40.:14:44.

political party has the complete monopoly of wisdom, we want to see

:14:45.:14:47.

our politicians working together and that's the point the Prime Minister

:14:48.:14:51.

is making and that's one of the lessons you can draw from the

:14:52.:14:55.

General Election result. It wasn't as good as we Conservatives would

:14:56.:14:58.

have wanted, that's perfectly clear, but the message I take from it is

:14:59.:15:04.

people want politicians to address the big issues and if they can do it

:15:05.:15:13.

across the divide of parties then so be it. There must be things we can

:15:14.:15:17.

agree on in terms of fighting terrorism and dealing with social

:15:18.:15:20.

care and getting the best Brexit deal for Britain. As we look at this

:15:21.:15:24.

reboot or revamp, whatever you want to call it, the Prime Minister was

:15:25.:15:28.

accused of being a bit robotic and looking remote and inaccessible in

:15:29.:15:32.

the election. You've known her for an awfully long time, can she do

:15:33.:15:40.

warm and I she need to? She is a perfectly warm and compassionate

:15:41.:15:44.

human being -- does she need to. But that hasn't necessarily come across

:15:45.:15:49.

to some? The campaign had a number of problems, which we all know, and

:15:50.:15:55.

I think people see... They have seen already in her year as Prime

:15:56.:15:58.

Minister, and they will see in the years to come, that she is not only

:15:59.:16:04.

resilient and determined and hard-working and conscientious, all

:16:05.:16:08.

the things people accept about her, but of course she is a warm and

:16:09.:16:14.

sympathetic woman as well and I think that is something... She is

:16:15.:16:20.

the right person in difficult times. We have a complicated Brexit deal to

:16:21.:16:25.

negotiate, we have trade deals around the world we need to

:16:26.:16:28.

negotiate as well, it's her combination of qualities we need for

:16:29.:16:30.

the years to come. There is plenty of speculation about

:16:31.:16:38.

David Davies being moved into position to being the next leader.

:16:39.:16:43.

It is all speculation which adds to the issues she is facing. I have

:16:44.:16:48.

been around Westminster for long enough to know that July is the time

:16:49.:16:53.

when everyone... It is warm press echo again, is it? It is the warm

:16:54.:17:05.

prosecco problem, and after that all of it gets forgotten. Just on the

:17:06.:17:11.

Charlie Gard situation, Donald Trump has commented, and we have heard

:17:12.:17:15.

from the Pope in recent days, what is the government's edition on the

:17:16.:17:20.

case of Charlie Gard, which is going back to the courts? Our position is

:17:21.:17:24.

precisely that this is a matter for... Obviously it is hugely

:17:25.:17:29.

emotional, and none of us can imagine what Charlie Gard's parents

:17:30.:17:34.

must be going through, and the right place for this to be decided is

:17:35.:17:39.

between the medical experts, and there can be few, if any, hospitals

:17:40.:17:43.

and the world better at dealing with children, and the courts, to look at

:17:44.:17:49.

all the evidence, if there is new evidence from other parts of the

:17:50.:17:53.

world, than that should be looked at as well, to see if the clinicians at

:17:54.:18:02.

the hospital might change their position. It is important to let the

:18:03.:18:06.

medical experts and the parents, in a court of law, decide what best to

:18:07.:18:13.

do next. Thank you for your time this morning. Good to talk to you.

:18:14.:18:18.

And we will be speaking to Charlie Gard's mother in about one hour.

:18:19.:18:22.

Carol is at Wimbledon this morning with the weather.

:18:23.:18:25.

Some people say we look like twins this morning. We are not wearing

:18:26.:18:32.

exactly the same dress, but it is the floral theme. A beautiful dress.

:18:33.:18:38.

I wouldn't mind being your twin at all. We are at Wimbledon, of course,

:18:39.:18:43.

and we are in the dining area. This is where some of the players and

:18:44.:18:47.

their family come to enjoy a snack while looking out over the course.

:18:48.:18:53.

They are enjoying a very tasty lunch, and Wimbledon is the largest

:18:54.:18:57.

single annual sporting catering operation carried out in Europe.

:18:58.:19:01.

Around 2000 staff are required to operate the outlets during Wimbledon

:19:02.:19:06.

fortnight and about 16,000 portions of fish and chips are served. There

:19:07.:19:10.

is none of that this morning. What we are looking at is the covers on

:19:11.:19:15.

the courts, they have just come off court number three, and they might

:19:16.:19:19.

be on again later on today, because the forecast for Wimbledon is a more

:19:20.:19:23.

unsettled one. What we have is the risk of some showers as we go into

:19:24.:19:27.

the early part of the afternoon. That risk will then fade, but it

:19:28.:19:31.

will come back in the late afternoon and early evening. Having said that,

:19:32.:19:36.

it is only a 30% risk, so there is a 70% chance we could mist it

:19:37.:19:40.

altogether. The forecast across the UK generally as one of sunshine and

:19:41.:19:45.

some heavy showers. If we start in southern England, this morning at

:19:46.:19:49.

9am there is a lot of sunshine around. We have blue skies which

:19:50.:19:53.

continues as we drift further north through East Anglia, into the

:19:54.:19:56.

Midlands, and for northern England and southern Scotland there is more

:19:57.:20:00.

cloud and a weather front producing spots of rain. A chilly start in

:20:01.:20:04.

northern Scotland. Here there is some sunshine. The temperature will

:20:05.:20:06.

pick up quite quickly and for Northern Ireland you have a lot of

:20:07.:20:11.

low cloud, some rain in the east but it will brighten up and you will see

:20:12.:20:15.

some sunshine. For Wales in south-west England there is again

:20:16.:20:18.

some showery outbreaks of rain, but as we push across the South

:20:19.:20:21.

Midlands, across southern counties of England generally, in the

:20:22.:20:25.

direction of London, we are back in the dry conditions with some

:20:26.:20:29.

sunshine. We are importing some thunderstorms from the near

:20:30.:20:31.

continent which will likely move from south-east England and East

:20:32.:20:35.

Anglia in particular, where some of them could be heavy, and we could

:20:36.:20:38.

see some torrential downpours, but they are showers, so not all of us

:20:39.:20:45.

will see them. Highs up to around 25 or 26, possibly a little bit more

:20:46.:20:49.

than that in the south-east. Now, through this evening and overnight,

:20:50.:20:53.

we lose most of those showers, the thundery ones. There is a dry

:20:54.:20:57.

interlude. Still some showers in the north, and by the end of the night

:20:58.:21:01.

we do have another weather front coming in from the west, introducing

:21:02.:21:04.

thicker cloud and some rain. The rain at this stage will not be

:21:05.:21:08.

particularly heavy. A fresh night for the UK, temperatures down a

:21:09.:21:14.

touch in the south-east, but it will still not be a cool night in the

:21:15.:21:18.

south-east. So tomorrow we start off on a largely dry note, with some

:21:19.:21:21.

showers across Northern Ireland, Scotland, northern England, eastern

:21:22.:21:23.

England, and southern England. Meanwhile, rain across the South

:21:24.:21:29.

moves heavier and more persistent as a drift east over the course of the

:21:30.:21:33.

day. That could cause some disruption to Wimbledon through the

:21:34.:21:35.

course of tomorrow, and temperatures will be down a little bit on today.

:21:36.:21:41.

That leads us into a cool night further south-east compared with

:21:42.:21:45.

what we have had. We lose the rain quite early on from the south-east

:21:46.:21:49.

as well. A ridge of high pressure builds in and for most of the UK it

:21:50.:21:54.

will be a dry and sunny day, but feeling more pleasant if you don't

:21:55.:21:58.

like it so hot. Just before I go, the pollen levels. Well, across much

:21:59.:22:02.

of England, through the stone, Central and southern areas today, it

:22:03.:22:08.

is high or very high. The rest of England, Wales, Northern Ireland and

:22:09.:22:11.

most of Scotland it is moderate, and across the far north of Scotland it

:22:12.:22:16.

is low. And I don't know if you have been seeing in the papers all the

:22:17.:22:20.

news about how it is going to turn hot again, the trend looks like we

:22:21.:22:23.

will see a return, especially across England and Wales, to those higher

:22:24.:22:28.

temperatures. It has been absolutely glorious. Not good for the gardens,

:22:29.:22:33.

but glorious. We will see you a little later. Now, look at this

:22:34.:22:41.

beautiful scene behind us this morning.

:22:42.:22:43.

The Lake District, famed for its stunning scenery,

:22:44.:22:45.

has been awarded World Heritage status.

:22:46.:22:46.

It puts it alongside the likes of the Taj Mahal,

:22:47.:22:49.

the Great Wall of China, and the Grand Canyon.

:22:50.:22:52.

Our reporter Linsey Smith is in one of the Lake District's popular

:22:53.:22:55.

Good morning to you. Good morning, welcome to Lake Windermere. This is

:22:56.:23:10.

the largest natural lake in the UK and it is at the heart of the new

:23:11.:23:16.

UNESCO heritage site. 100 delegates agreed that this was a worthy winner

:23:17.:23:20.

of the title. It joins a prestigious list of iconic landmarks including

:23:21.:23:25.

the Taj Mahal, the Grand Canyon and the Great Barrier Reef, and one

:23:26.:23:28.

person who helped to bring this title to the area is Richard. Thank

:23:29.:23:33.

you for joining us. You are from the Lake District National Park. How

:23:34.:23:37.

long have you been working on bringing the title to the area? We

:23:38.:23:42.

have been working on this bid since 1986, so 31 years it has taken us to

:23:43.:23:47.

get here, and it is fantastic to receive global recognition of the

:23:48.:23:53.

Lake District National Park is a World Heritage site. I think we will

:23:54.:23:57.

be partying all week. One of the things the UN committee spoke about

:23:58.:24:00.

was the need to monitor tourism in the area. How will you do that? We

:24:01.:24:06.

check our visitor numbers annually, and we know we have had 18 million

:24:07.:24:11.

this year, so it is already a really well visited National Park, but we

:24:12.:24:15.

hope that with World Heritage status we will be able to compete in

:24:16.:24:20.

international markets as well and we would like to encourage our visitors

:24:21.:24:24.

to get a little bit more under the skin of the place. Really understand

:24:25.:24:27.

what makes it globally significant. Stay a little longer and spend a

:24:28.:24:31.

little more money in our local economy. Thank you very much for

:24:32.:24:35.

joining us. One of the reasons it was awarded the status was because

:24:36.:24:38.

of the stunning natural beauty. You can see a little bit of that today.

:24:39.:24:42.

It is also home to the UK's tallest mountain, and another one of the

:24:43.:24:48.

reasons it was so successful was because of the inspiration it has

:24:49.:24:51.

provided over centuries. To name some of the most famous artists who

:24:52.:24:54.

have been inspired, William Wordsworth and Beatrix Potter. I am

:24:55.:25:01.

joined now by another guest, Amanda Shaw from the local hotel. Your

:25:02.:25:06.

family have lived here for many years, haven't they? Tell us a

:25:07.:25:10.

little bit about that, and how proud you are. We know that from church

:25:11.:25:15.

records we go back to about the 1700s. Very, very proud of this

:25:16.:25:23.

area. It is such a beautiful place. We have a farming background, and

:25:24.:25:27.

that has played a huge part in the cultural landscape, shaping this

:25:28.:25:31.

landscape that we see today. And so you must be keen that the area is

:25:32.:25:37.

preserved. Yes, absolutely. It is one of the major attractions. World

:25:38.:25:43.

Heritage status puts the Lake District on the global platform and

:25:44.:25:47.

hopefully it will bring more visitors to the area. As you heard

:25:48.:25:52.

Richard Seah, there are 18 million visitors annually to the area, none

:25:53.:25:59.

of them have joined us yet this morning. They are probably having a

:26:00.:26:01.

sleep in -- Richard say. English wine used to be mocked

:26:02.:26:09.

by its more famous European cousins, but that has started

:26:10.:26:12.

to change recently. Sean is in a vineyard in Kent

:26:13.:26:14.

to find out what is behind You can see why a potentially we can

:26:15.:26:32.

grow a lot of grapes in the UK. A very similar climate to the

:26:33.:26:36.

Champagne region in France. It has not in this gorgeous all year

:26:37.:26:44.

around. This frost has affected a lot of it, and could affect the

:26:45.:26:47.

harvest. But don't worry, these grapes will be harvested later in

:26:48.:26:51.

the year. We will be looking more at how this industry has been growing

:26:52.:26:53.

so much, 20% growth Plenty more on our website

:26:54.:30:13.

at the usual address. Hello, this is Breakfast

:30:14.:30:17.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. The case of the terminally

:30:18.:30:29.

ill 11-month-old boy, Charlie Gard, is going back

:30:30.:30:31.

to the High Court today. Great Ormond Street Hospital

:30:32.:30:34.

in London has asked judges to consider new evidence relating

:30:35.:30:37.

to potential treatment An earlier ruling supported the view

:30:38.:30:39.

of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality of life

:30:40.:30:46.

and they should be allowed to switch Theresa May is to call on rival

:30:47.:30:50.

political parties to contribute In her first major speech

:30:51.:30:59.

since the General Election, the Prime Minister will say her

:31:00.:31:03.

commitment to change But with the Conservatives

:31:04.:31:05.

losing their overall majority, she'll say the reality

:31:06.:31:08.

she faces means she has Labour said Mrs May's speech

:31:09.:31:10.

proved her party had completely run The Iraqi Prime Minister,

:31:11.:31:15.

Haider al-Abadi, has congratulated his armed forces

:31:16.:31:25.

on their victory over It's nine months since

:31:26.:31:27.

government forces launched Much of the city has

:31:28.:31:30.

been reduced to rubble, and thousands of people

:31:31.:31:33.

have lost their lives. The BBC understands a government

:31:34.:31:41.

inquiry into the so-called gig economy will call for flexible

:31:42.:31:44.

workers to be paid above The Taylor review,

:31:45.:31:46.

which is due to be published tomorrow, will affect firms

:31:47.:31:50.

like Deliveroo and Uber. It's expected to argue that

:31:51.:31:52.

additional wages will help to offset Firefighters have been tackling

:31:53.:31:55.

a blaze overnight at London's popular Camden Lock Market,

:31:56.:32:05.

which attracts 28 million 70 firefighters were sent

:32:06.:32:06.

to the scene after the fire broke London Fire Brigade says

:32:07.:32:10.

the situation is now under control There are no reports

:32:11.:32:14.

of any casualties. A Coldplay fan who went

:32:15.:32:26.

to the band's recent concert at Croke Park in Dublin became more

:32:27.:32:28.

involved than he expected. Rob had been crowd-surfing

:32:29.:32:32.

in his wheelchair when he was spotted by lead

:32:33.:32:34.

singer, Chris Martin. He was then invited on stage

:32:35.:32:36.

and drew huge cheers from the crowd of more than 70,000 people,

:32:37.:32:40.

when he brought out a harmonica Rob described his

:32:41.:32:43.

experience as amazing. If you can play a harmonica, then

:32:44.:33:05.

take it just in case! Wonderful! Brilliant!

:33:06.:33:07.

Wayne Rooney has revealed that he wore Everton pyjamas

:33:08.:33:10.

during his 13 years at Manchester United.

:33:11.:33:14.

The striker re-joined Everton yesterday after leaving United.

:33:15.:33:16.

He grew up supporting the Merseyside club and made his debut

:33:17.:33:19.

To be honest, I've kept it quiet for the last 13 years,

:33:20.:33:28.

but I've actually been wearing Everton pyjamasa at home

:33:29.:33:30.

So I had to keep that a bit quiet but it's

:33:31.:33:34.

You know, as special it did 13 years ago.

:33:35.:33:48.

I love the way he smiles as he reveals the big secret! He knows

:33:49.:33:55.

it's interesting! We have been talking pyjamas this morning amongst

:33:56.:33:58.

other things. We thought what we would do is seeing there's no

:33:59.:34:03.

picture of wine in Everton pyjamas, we have mocked one up for you. --

:34:04.:34:13.

Wayne. Mike has sent in this picture of him wearing evident PJs, maybe

:34:14.:34:19.

Wayne has the same ones? And sent in this picture of her and her

:34:20.:34:24.

nine-month-old son, Ben -- Anna. Clearly woken up in a good mood in

:34:25.:34:29.

his pyjamas! What a lovely big smile, Ben, lovely to see you! Send

:34:30.:34:34.

us your pictures, we love seeing them!

:34:35.:34:36.

Second week of Wimbledon, always a big day, Manic Monday. The first

:34:37.:34:43.

week didn't disappoint, loads of British excess in the first week, we

:34:44.:34:47.

still have Johanna Konta and mother. That British success. -- British

:34:48.:34:54.

success. Is this their canteen? Hard-boiled egg please! Well

:34:55.:35:01.

spotted! Do you know what, Walker, you could have 20 boiled eggs, they

:35:02.:35:07.

are looking fantastic! Isn't this marvellous? We are in the players'

:35:08.:35:11.

canteen, signs saying only players after midday so thankfully no

:35:12.:35:15.

players at the moment so we can have a good nose around. You might think

:35:16.:35:21.

this is what I expect from a tennis players' canteen, leaves, salad,

:35:22.:35:27.

spinach, isn't it all very, very healthy? Some seeds and dressing.

:35:28.:35:32.

Thankfully over here it gets a bit more exciting. Scramble date being

:35:33.:35:37.

made, smoked salmon, really important what the players it, I

:35:38.:35:41.

interviewed Johanna Konta recently in Birmingham when she was playing

:35:42.:35:45.

and before she talked to us she had to have a huge meal after she came

:35:46.:35:52.

off court -- players eat. There's a new trend of really carb loading and

:35:53.:35:56.

eating lots and lots of healthy, delicious food which they can do

:35:57.:36:01.

here, as Dan said, we have Johanna Konta and Mars are both on Manic

:36:02.:36:08.

Monday or Magic Monday, Andy Murray was here on Saturday practising on

:36:09.:36:13.

one of the outside courts preparing for his clash with Benoit Paire from

:36:14.:36:17.

France -- Johanna Konta and Andy Murray. He is expected at around 3pm

:36:18.:36:23.

on Court 1. Johanna Konta is playing Caroline Garcia after her win on

:36:24.:36:27.

Friday against French opponent at 1pm.

:36:28.:36:30.

Joe Root's reign as England captain has started with a win.

:36:31.:36:33.

England beat South Africa by 211 runs with a day to spare at Lord's.

:36:34.:36:37.

The second test gets under way in just five days time.

:36:38.:36:40.

We know they're going to come back hard at Trent bridge and we're going

:36:41.:36:46.

to have to play really well but to be 1-0 up, it's the first time we've

:36:47.:36:50.

beaten them here for a long time. Everything I've asked from the lads

:36:51.:36:54.

this week they've dived straight into and they've gone about it in a

:36:55.:36:59.

very, very, just a brilliant way really and made my life a lot

:37:00.:37:01.

easier. In the Women's World Cup,

:37:02.:37:01.

England beat defending champions Australia in a tense

:37:02.:37:03.

match in Bristol. Australia could have won with a six

:37:04.:37:05.

off the final ball but couldn't manage it to give England a fourth

:37:06.:37:09.

straight win at the tournament. Valtteri Bottas claimed the second

:37:10.:37:26.

win of his Formula 1 career The Finn lead most of the race

:37:27.:37:29.

from pole to take the chequered flag Lewis Hamilton fought back

:37:30.:37:34.

from eighth on the grid to finish fourth and now trails

:37:35.:37:39.

Vettel by twenty points In the beginning I could control the

:37:40.:37:45.

pace, the backmarkers raided really tricky, the second win in my career

:37:46.:37:49.

so thank you, guys, for the support and thanks to the team to make it

:37:50.:37:51.

possible. Let's get back to the food, my

:37:52.:37:55.

favourite subject, this is lunch getting prepared. Wimbledon is

:37:56.:37:59.

Siksika the chef is with us to explain why this is so important for

:38:00.:38:04.

the players -- Wimbledon's Centre Court the chef. They are a fussy

:38:05.:38:11.

bunch so it's a tough job? -- Wimbledon executive chef. They can

:38:12.:38:17.

create their own dishes, there is no set menu, they can pretty much have

:38:18.:38:21.

what they want. What do most people have? On trend at the moment is the

:38:22.:38:26.

Queen hour with all the veg and the proteins and that. -- quinoa. We've

:38:27.:38:35.

had one request for quinoa with cinnamon, a bizarre combination. But

:38:36.:38:41.

they can have anything they want. Are they coming in before their

:38:42.:38:45.

match and eating a big meal? I was talking about Johanna Konta having a

:38:46.:38:50.

big meal after she played? They are eating an hour and a half or two

:38:51.:38:55.

hours before they are on court and that gives them the time for their

:38:56.:39:00.

bodies to absorb the goodness. We all love a smoothie bar, let's have

:39:01.:39:07.

a look, what have we got here? We have a range of fruits and we have

:39:08.:39:12.

set menus but players can create their own smoothies. We have

:39:13.:39:16.

wheatgrass as well to add to it. What does that do? It is a health

:39:17.:39:23.

thing. What else are they putting in, yoghurt? Protein? Yoghurt,

:39:24.:39:32.

fruit, coconut water, everything. Who is the fussiest person you have

:39:33.:39:39.

fed? They are all special! Special? Has anyone ever come in and said I

:39:40.:39:46.

want bacon, eggs and a sausage? No, no, they are all healthy. That is

:39:47.:39:50.

why they are all winning tennis tournament is perhaps! Thanks, Gary!

:39:51.:39:57.

I want to show you this overhear, it isn't all super healthy, a lovely

:39:58.:40:02.

breakfast pop, scones, strawberries -- breakfast pots. -- over here. But

:40:03.:40:11.

keep coming, down here, some cakes, and who is this? Carol Kirkwood! Do

:40:12.:40:17.

you know what, I thought if we going to find Steph McGovern then it will

:40:18.:40:22.

be here! Where is she? I don't know, you might want to check out the

:40:23.:40:27.

strawberrynet orangs, the chocolate, look at the size of the croissants,

:40:28.:40:37.

they are enormous! -- strawberry orangs. The temperature will rise

:40:38.:40:41.

through this morning and the afternoon and the forecast today,

:40:42.:40:45.

the temperature getting up to 23, but there's the risk of a shower.

:40:46.:40:49.

That risk is into the afternoon, then there is a bit of respite and

:40:50.:40:54.

then we see the risk return late afternoon, early evening. A 30% risk

:40:55.:40:59.

so there's a 70% chance that it will stay dry. The forecast for the UK is

:41:00.:41:03.

one of sunshine and showers and some of those showers will be heavy and

:41:04.:41:08.

thundery. If we start the forecast at 9am in southern England, a lot of

:41:09.:41:13.

sunshine around and in the sunshine temperatures pick up really quickly.

:41:14.:41:16.

That holds true for East Anglia and the Midlands but for Northern

:41:17.:41:19.

England and southern Scotland we have a weather front so here a bit

:41:20.:41:24.

more cloud around and light and patchy rain. Northern Scotland,

:41:25.:41:27.

chilly start for you but sunshine from the word goes over temperatures

:41:28.:41:31.

will pick up rapidly. In Northern Ireland this morning, a cloudy

:41:32.:41:35.

start, drizzle and rain in the east -- from the word go so temperatures.

:41:36.:41:47.

In through the south Midlands, southern counties, the home

:41:48.:41:51.

counties, a lot of dry weather, sunshine and the temperature is

:41:52.:41:55.

responding accordingly. As we go through the day, thundery showers

:41:56.:41:59.

will come through from the near continent. Through East Anglia and

:42:00.:42:03.

the south-east in particular. Some of those will be torrential and some

:42:04.:42:08.

will miss them altogether. The forecast for the UK as a whole will

:42:09.:42:12.

be sunshine and showers. Temperatures in the high teens and

:42:13.:42:17.

low to mid 20s but a bit higher in the south-east. As we head through

:42:18.:42:22.

the course of this evening and overnight, thundery showers push

:42:23.:42:27.

away into the North Sea, a drier interlude, still showers in Scotland

:42:28.:42:29.

and Northern Ireland and thicker cloud brings in rain. Not heavy at

:42:30.:42:34.

this time in Wales and southern England. That's how we start

:42:35.:42:38.

tomorrow. With that rain coming in across Wales and southern England.

:42:39.:42:43.

It will pep up through the day and it will be drifting eastwards. Ahead

:42:44.:42:47.

of it in eastern and northern parts of the country, there will be

:42:48.:42:51.

showers and one or two of those could be heavy. Again not all of us

:42:52.:42:55.

will catch them. Fresher, especially if you're stuck under that band of

:42:56.:43:00.

rain, noticeably in the south-east where it's been so hot and muggy

:43:01.:43:04.

recently but that rain could well in the Wimbledon. A fresher night for

:43:05.:43:08.

sleeping on Tuesday into Wednesday in the south-east, the rain clearing

:43:09.:43:13.

early on and as the ridge of high pressure moves in things settle down

:43:14.:43:21.

and lots of sunshine. Temperatures down a touch compared to what we've

:43:22.:43:25.

been used to but still not too bad for this time in July. If you think

:43:26.:43:29.

that's it, is that some? It's not, it looks like as we head into the

:43:30.:43:33.

latter part of next week, temperatures across England and

:43:34.:43:36.

Wales are set to rise rapidly once again. Hang on, hang on, hang on...

:43:37.:43:43.

Look at that! We have been sent over with a little surprise for Carol

:43:44.:43:49.

from Ian. Look at that, how good does that look? Thank you, Ian,

:43:50.:43:51.

thank you very much! Get a slice of cake on the side of

:43:52.:43:59.

that, perfect! That is the perfect breakfast. You would just have cake,

:44:00.:44:05.

wouldn't you? I would be rifling through that in the morning. Look at

:44:06.:44:10.

that! I was staring at the cake through the entire report. He wasn't

:44:11.:44:15.

just staring at it, he was talking about eating the whole thing!

:44:16.:44:20.

Soap Murray and Konta on court, and the men's doubles. They are on court

:44:21.:44:35.

14 at 11:30 a.m.. There is a lot of television watching to be done. Sort

:44:36.:44:42.

yourself out, find a pew. If you are at work, find a radio.

:44:43.:44:46.

You are watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:44:47.:44:47.

The main stories this morning: The case of terminally ill

:44:48.:44:50.

Charlie Gard returns to the High Court today,

:44:51.:44:52.

as his parents continue their fight to be allowed to take him

:44:53.:44:56.

Theresa May signals a new style of government, as she calls

:44:57.:45:00.

for cross-party support on big issues.

:45:01.:45:11.

It seems that everybody on this programme apart from us is out and

:45:12.:45:15.

about. The English wine industry grew

:45:16.:45:15.

nearly 20% last year, making it one of the fastest-growing

:45:16.:45:18.

sectors in the UK's food Sean is at a vineyard

:45:19.:45:20.

for us in Kent. I am in Kent, the M25, would you

:45:21.:45:39.

believe, is only a few miles that way. Lots of commuters travelling

:45:40.:45:44.

into London at the minute, but it is a pretty good region for making

:45:45.:45:49.

wine. You can see the soil, this kind of Stone is the same as they

:45:50.:45:52.

have in the Champagne region in France. They only get four days lest

:45:53.:45:58.

sunlight than that area as well. There has been 20% growth over the

:45:59.:46:00.

last year. There are now around 500 commercial

:46:01.:46:03.

vineyards in England and Wales, Annually, they are producing over

:46:04.:46:07.

five million bottles, You keep track of these things for a

:46:08.:46:19.

magazine. It looks like they have everything in place, why is it only

:46:20.:46:25.

20%? It is great, a lot of people just don't know it is here. 25 years

:46:26.:46:28.

ago there were no commercial Vineyards in the UK. It is something

:46:29.:46:32.

people are still getting to know. That is changing with the amount of

:46:33.:46:36.

competition is that English sparkling wine is winning. It is the

:46:37.:46:39.

case of being aware of it, and people do want to support local

:46:40.:46:45.

producers, and I think the sparkling industry, their success in general

:46:46.:46:50.

is helping people to come across from Prosecco, so that tells you how

:46:51.:46:59.

much Brits love sparkling. . There isn't that bottle of English wine

:47:00.:47:04.

for five or ?6 you can get from every supermarket, that you can see

:47:05.:47:08.

with a lot of winds around the world. At I think with English

:47:09.:47:12.

sparkling wine there is no entry level. You are not going to see much

:47:13.:47:19.

change from ?25 for a bottle of English sparkling, and the challenge

:47:20.:47:24.

is to get people to move on from Prosecco and trade up. We know

:47:25.:47:29.

people want to explore. The premium shift is having an influence, people

:47:30.:47:32.

want to explore outside their comfort zone, but people need to be

:47:33.:47:37.

convinced to trade up outside of Prosecco's price racket, not the

:47:38.:47:41.

Champagne but the English sparkling wine. It is not just the wine, as

:47:42.:47:48.

well, you can get a train from anywhere around the country and you

:47:49.:47:52.

are here in half an hour. Is there more of the tourism industry around

:47:53.:47:55.

English wine? Absolutely, people want an excuse to come out to the

:47:56.:47:59.

country, and all this beautiful greenery is here. I think, you know,

:48:00.:48:04.

we don't really have a huge manufacturing industry any more, so

:48:05.:48:08.

it is really encouraging and exciting, the fact that we have a

:48:09.:48:12.

new agricultural industry, really, and that is a lot of potential

:48:13.:48:17.

worldwide. Brand Britain has a lot of capital around the world. Thank

:48:18.:48:22.

you very much for that. A lot of parts of the industry would love 20%

:48:23.:48:27.

growth. It is not quite happening everywhere. You are from the Food

:48:28.:48:30.

and Drink Federation. What has English wine had in the last few

:48:31.:48:33.

years which other factors haven't been able to match, 20% growth?

:48:34.:48:42.

English food and drink is a boom industry, it is our biggest

:48:43.:48:46.

manufacturing sector, contributes hugely to the economy and employs 4

:48:47.:48:51.

million people. Its success is driven by innovation, quality and

:48:52.:48:55.

Consumer Focus. You say that success, but we import a lot of food

:48:56.:49:01.

and with Brexit we are expecting higher prices, lower quality, less

:49:02.:49:05.

choice. So is it as much of a powerhouse as we needed to be? Well,

:49:06.:49:09.

about half of the food in supermarkets is imported. There is a

:49:10.:49:13.

huge amount at stake in the Brexit negotiations. We have to get a

:49:14.:49:18.

conference of free trade deal. We need frictionless trade. If not they

:49:19.:49:22.

will be serious consequences for food Andrecht and beyond. There you

:49:23.:49:26.

go. The Sun has gone down a little bit, but it is glorious this

:49:27.:49:31.

morning. Hope you are enjoying yourselves on the sofa. We have been

:49:32.:49:36.

appreciating everyone else's views, especially Carol's. Hopefully you

:49:37.:49:42.

could hear him very clearly, we have a little bit of trouble with the

:49:43.:49:46.

microphone but hopefully you got the message. When it comes to planning a

:49:47.:49:54.

summer holidays, most of us focus on Sun, sea and sightseeing. But a

:49:55.:49:58.

public information campaign has been launched urging us to think about

:49:59.:50:02.

how we would react if there was a terrorist attack on the resort where

:50:03.:50:06.

we were staying. A look at that film.

:50:07.:50:14.

If you hear a gunshot, if there is a safe route, run. This is the best

:50:15.:50:26.

option. Lock yourself in and move away from the door. Barricade

:50:27.:50:36.

yourself thin if you can. Turn your mobile phone to silent and switch

:50:37.:50:45.

off vibrate. When the police arrived, they will be armed. They

:50:46.:50:50.

will deal with the immediate threat first, to prevent further

:50:51.:50:54.

casualties. These kinds of attacks are rare, but having a plan, knowing

:50:55.:50:59.

how to respond, and being prepared will help you stay safe, and could

:51:00.:51:02.

save your life. So run, Hyde, tell. Scott Wilson is

:51:03.:51:16.

the National counterterrorism co-ordinator of the Protect and

:51:17.:51:23.

Prepare a strategy. And people got a feel of the film there. In some ways

:51:24.:51:27.

it is quite frightening. Do you think people need this information?

:51:28.:51:32.

We really do think that people do need this information. If you look

:51:33.:51:36.

in the same context as when you have an aeroplane you watch the safety

:51:37.:51:39.

briefing. It is giving people the knowledge of what to do or what not

:51:40.:51:45.

to do. It does give you more details about, for example, hiding. What are

:51:46.:51:49.

the standout bits of information people should take away? What we are

:51:50.:51:55.

trying to say to people, there is no point trying to surrender or

:51:56.:51:57.

negotiate. You have to get yourself out of the danger zone first of all,

:51:58.:52:02.

and if you can get out, what we are asking people as the barricade

:52:03.:52:05.

yourself into a room and then notify authorities of the location of the

:52:06.:52:09.

offenders, how many offenders, and where you actually are. So in the

:52:10.:52:14.

first instance, you are concerned, you hear noises, you run. You get

:52:15.:52:19.

yourself out of there. These people are not here to steal a phone or a

:52:20.:52:26.

watch, they are here to kill you, so get yourself out of that danger

:52:27.:52:29.

zone. And what about for the elderly and infirm? Well, within hotel

:52:30.:52:36.

complex as we have trained 20,000 representatives, within the hotels

:52:37.:52:40.

themselves, training has been taking place, and they can assist others.

:52:41.:52:46.

And how many people have you trained, and where are they? There

:52:47.:52:51.

are 23,000 representatives from the major holiday companies, who have

:52:52.:52:55.

received not just this training but also in how to identify suspicious

:52:56.:52:58.

behaviour, how to identify suspicious items. They have received

:52:59.:53:02.

the training and are working in resorts all over the world. And one

:53:03.:53:07.

of the messages in the film is, when the authorities arrived, people

:53:08.:53:11.

might be treated as suspects. And that is also... Can be quite

:53:12.:53:15.

frightening. It can, but what we don't want you to do is become a

:53:16.:53:19.

victim. We want you to stay calm and listen to what the authorities are

:53:20.:53:23.

telling you to do, so you don't become a victim. Just tell us a

:53:24.:53:28.

little bit about the public appetite for this, as well. Do you think

:53:29.:53:31.

there is a public appetite for this kind of information? Well, as we

:53:32.:53:36.

have seen in the atrocities in 2015, and more recently in London, we feel

:53:37.:53:40.

it is only right that we make people aware and give them that knowledge

:53:41.:53:44.

of what they should and shouldn't do it caught up in such an act. And

:53:45.:53:49.

tell us, because you put out this kind of information, and people will

:53:50.:53:54.

be scared going on holiday, but what is the actual reality? How likely is

:53:55.:53:59.

it that people will be involved in this kind of situation? It is very

:54:00.:54:04.

unlikely, but as I said it is like the safety briefing you get on an

:54:05.:54:08.

aeroplane before you take off. It is unlikely you are going to crash but

:54:09.:54:12.

it is important you argument that knowledge of what you should and

:54:13.:54:16.

shouldn't do. And talk about a little bit of if you are with your

:54:17.:54:21.

children? What would you say to parents, for example, with young

:54:22.:54:25.

children? I would say to all parents, before you go on holiday,

:54:26.:54:30.

look at the travel advice for the location and look at this video, it

:54:31.:54:34.

will only take four minutes before you go to make you and your family

:54:35.:54:37.

safe. Thank you for your time. We have been out and about this

:54:38.:54:51.

morning, in Kent, with Sean, at Wimbledon with Carol, the Lake

:54:52.:54:56.

District, and on Windermere, the Lake District has been named as a

:54:57.:55:01.

World Heritage site. They have been waiting for 30 odd years. Thank you

:55:02.:55:06.

for all the photos that you have sent us over the weekend. What a

:55:07.:55:12.

lovely weekend it was. These are pictures taken by Paul Hewitt. It

:55:13.:55:17.

was actually a while ago. They are from a vineyard in Hampshire where

:55:18.:55:22.

he works. They ran out of candles on the third night and had to resort to

:55:23.:55:29.

straw bales. Just to keep the temperature above freezing. This is

:55:30.:55:32.

a beautiful picture taking on the Brecon Beacons by David Pearce. We

:55:33.:55:40.

will get to it in a moment, there was a great one of sunrise. Here it

:55:41.:55:46.

is. Look at that. Ten firefighters completing the first of three Welsh

:55:47.:55:53.

peaks in the day. If you remember Band of Brothers, it looks like

:55:54.:55:57.

that. Always impressed by the wonderful talent of our Breakfast

:55:58.:56:03.

viewers when it comes to taking those pictures.

:56:04.:56:05.

You are watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:56:06.:56:07.

Still to come this morning: Grigor Dimitrov will be hoping

:56:08.:56:10.

it is game, set and match when he takes on Roger Federer later

:56:11.:56:13.

today, but how will he get on with our mug challenge?

:56:14.:56:16.

We will find out if he can knock Andy Murray off the top spot

:56:17.:56:20.

He didn't even watch anyone else's technique, just smashed it.

:56:21.:56:35.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:56:36.:59:57.

Now, though, it is back to Louise and Dan.

:59:58.:00:00.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:00:01.:00:14.

A crucial day for the parents of Charlie Gard, as they return

:00:15.:00:16.

to court in the hope he'll be allowed to travel to

:00:17.:00:19.

Judges will assess claims of new evidence which suggests

:00:20.:00:22.

the 11-month-old's quality of life could be improved.

:00:23.:00:24.

This morning, we'll talk to Charlie's mum, Connie Yates.

:00:25.:00:36.

Theresa May faces up to her disappointing general

:00:37.:00:45.

election result with a call to rival parties to work with her on issues

:00:46.:00:48.

70 firefighters have spent the early hours of the morning tackling a fire

:00:49.:00:55.

at London's popular Camden Lock Market.

:00:56.:01:03.

The English wine industry grew nearly 20% last year, making it one

:01:04.:01:06.

of the fastest growing sectors in the UK's food

:01:07.:01:08.

Millions of you already know how beautiful the Lake District

:01:09.:01:15.

is, and now the rest of the world does too.

:01:16.:01:17.

We're live there this morning as the United Nations gives it

:01:18.:01:20.

I'm at Wimbledon, where a place in the quarter-finals is on offer

:01:21.:01:30.

Andy Murray and Johanna Konta are both in action today -

:01:31.:01:35.

into the last eight here at the All England Club.

:01:36.:01:46.

Weather-wise, there is the risk of a shower today. Early afternoon and

:01:47.:01:52.

late afternoon into the early evening. But it is only a 30% risk.

:01:53.:01:57.

For the UK, the forecast is for sunshine and showers, but some of

:01:58.:02:00.

the showers will be heavy and thundery, particularly across the

:02:01.:02:03.

south-east and East Anglia. More details later.

:02:04.:02:05.

The case of the terminally ill 11-month-old boy, Charlie Gard,

:02:06.:02:11.

returns to the High Court today, as judges consider new evidence

:02:12.:02:14.

relating to potential treatment for his condition.

:02:15.:02:16.

An earlier ruling supported the view of his doctors that nothing can be

:02:17.:02:20.

done to improve his quality of life, and they should be allowed to switch

:02:21.:02:23.

"He's still fighting, so we're still fighting."

:02:24.:02:29.

A phrase that Chris and Connie Gard have used many times as they battle

:02:30.:02:32.

to keep their baby son Charlie alive.

:02:33.:02:40.

We are just two normal, everyday people.

:02:41.:02:43.

What is strong is the love we have for our boy.

:02:44.:02:47.

If he was lying there suffering, we wouldn't be here now.

:02:48.:02:53.

It's a story with another twist today.

:02:54.:02:55.

The High Court will look once more at whether or not the 11-month-old

:02:56.:03:03.

whowas born with a serious genetic condition that doctors believe mean

:03:04.:03:06.

he will never see, hear, move or speak, should go to America

:03:07.:03:09.

So far, the courts have agreed with the hospital that Charlie's

:03:10.:03:14.

condition cannot be improved and he should instead be

:03:15.:03:17.

But support has grown for the family from all over the world,

:03:18.:03:20.

including from President Trump and the Pope.

:03:21.:03:25.

And a glimmer of hope when seven specialists

:03:26.:03:28.

led by the Vatican Children Hospital signed a letter saying that

:03:29.:03:30.

treatment should be reconsidered following success in conditions

:03:31.:03:32.

Chris and Connie handed a petition in to Great Ormond Street yesterday

:03:33.:03:41.

with over 350,000 signatures backing them.

:03:42.:03:43.

But the hospital has made clear that its position has not changed.

:03:44.:03:50.

It will be up to a judge to decide if once again that is true.

:03:51.:03:56.

And we will be speaking to Charlie Gard's mother

:03:57.:03:59.

Theresa May is to signal a change in her style of government,

:04:00.:04:03.

calling for a cross-party consensus on some policy ideas

:04:04.:04:07.

in her first major speech since last month's general election.

:04:08.:04:11.

She'll admit her approach to government will have to change,

:04:12.:04:13.

and is urging her opponents to come forward and contribute.

:04:14.:04:17.

Our political correspondent Iain Watson is in Westminster.

:04:18.:04:27.

This is an interesting change, asking other parties to help. Is it

:04:28.:04:35.

significant? It is unusual, but these are unusual circumstances. She

:04:36.:04:38.

has a very slim majority even with the help of the DUP and the ?1

:04:39.:04:42.

billion she gave them. Even then, they will only give her limited

:04:43.:04:46.

support. She is not in the same position David Cameron was in in

:04:47.:04:50.

2010 with a formal coalition with the Liberal Democrats, so she's

:04:51.:04:54.

making a victory of necessity. She's changing her leadership style, which

:04:55.:04:57.

had been criticised as being too remote.

:04:58.:05:01.

She is now say to others, contribute and don't criticise. But some are

:05:02.:05:07.

saying she needs to relaunch her leadership because at the moment,

:05:08.:05:11.

there is talk at Westminster of whether she will last the summer or

:05:12.:05:15.

whether the Brexit secretary David Davis might succeed her. One Cabinet

:05:16.:05:21.

minister said that all this talk was down to some of his colleagues

:05:22.:05:24.

perhaps having too much sun and too much one prosecco. Interestingly,

:05:25.:05:30.

Damian Green, on this programme, Theresa May's deputy, also blend

:05:31.:05:38.

that talk on the bubbly. I have been in Westminster long enough to know

:05:39.:05:42.

that July is the time of summer parties. So it is one prosecco? It

:05:43.:05:47.

is the prosecco problem, yes. By the time everyone goes on holiday, all

:05:48.:05:53.

this July gossip gets forgotten. So apparently when we are back here in

:05:54.:05:57.

the autumn, Theresa May will still be in place according to Damian

:05:58.:06:02.

Green. But there has been a sober reaction to her offer to work with

:06:03.:06:05.

other parties today. Labour said she was running out of ideas and

:06:06.:06:10.

suggested that she was begging for help but even some usually

:06:11.:06:13.

Conservative supporting newspapers are using similar language, a plea

:06:14.:06:18.

for help. She says she wants to be bold and has a vision for the

:06:19.:06:24.

country that goes beyond Brexit. Her critics say this demonstrates

:06:25.:06:25.

weakness instead. The Iraqi prime minister,

:06:26.:06:27.

Haider al-Abadi, has congratulated his armed forces

:06:28.:06:30.

on their victory over It's nine months since government

:06:31.:06:32.

forces launched an attack Much of the city has

:06:33.:06:36.

been reduced to rubble, and thousands of people have

:06:37.:06:42.

lost their lives. The BBC understands a Government

:06:43.:06:45.

inquiry into the so-called gig economy will call for flexible

:06:46.:06:49.

workers to be paid The Taylor review,

:06:50.:06:51.

which is due to be published tomorrow, will affect firms

:06:52.:06:58.

like Deliveroo and Uber. Our economics editor Kamal Ahmed

:06:59.:07:01.

is in London to tell us more. Kamal, what's the background

:07:02.:07:04.

to the Taylor review Theresa May set this report up last

:07:05.:07:18.

November, before the election. It was to look at this big new economy

:07:19.:07:26.

we work in, which is companies like Uber and Deliveroo, the OnDemand

:07:27.:07:31.

economy, people who deliver food and drive our taxes. Another big area is

:07:32.:07:36.

zero hours contracts, people who are not guaranteed any hours of work.

:07:37.:07:40.

She asked Matthew Taylor, the head of the Royal Society of arts, to

:07:41.:07:45.

look at this issue. That was before the election. His report comes out

:07:46.:07:49.

tomorrow and it will have some pretty radical reforms recommended

:07:50.:07:57.

in there. One will be that many of these riders and drivers are not

:07:58.:08:00.

guaranteed the minimum wage at the moment because they are described as

:08:01.:08:05.

self-employed. He will say that that categorisation should be changed to

:08:06.:08:12.

what he describes as a dependent contractor. That will mean that

:08:13.:08:15.

person will get some rights to the minimum wage and rights to sickness

:08:16.:08:21.

benefit and holiday pay, for example. That has been the

:08:22.:08:25.

controversy, that people who work in this very flexible way, delivering

:08:26.:08:31.

food and driving taxis, seem to have to sacrifice the benefits we get as

:08:32.:08:34.

full-time employees for working flexibly. I think Mr Taylor will

:08:35.:08:41.

suggest that that should be changed. Thank you for that.

:08:42.:08:43.

Firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight at London's

:08:44.:08:45.

popular Camden Lock Market, which attracts 28 million

:08:46.:08:47.

70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke

:08:48.:08:54.

London Fire Brigade says the situation is now under control

:08:55.:08:57.

There are no reports of any casualties.

:08:58.:09:04.

Wildfires are raging across the US state of California

:09:05.:09:07.

as a record-breaking heatwave sends temperatures above 40 degrees

:09:08.:09:10.

More than 2,000 firefighters are attempting to contain nearly 20

:09:11.:09:18.

large blazes which have forced hundreds of people to

:09:19.:09:20.

Officials are warning that the weather conditions

:09:21.:09:23.

In just over six hours, the case of terminally ill baby

:09:24.:09:39.

Charlie Gard will return once more to the High Court.

:09:40.:09:41.

Doctors treating the 11-month-old have applied for a fresh hearing

:09:42.:09:44.

in the light of what it calls the "claims of new evidence"

:09:45.:09:47.

Let's talk to Charlie's mum Connie Yates, who's in a radio car

:09:48.:09:51.

outside Great Ormond Street Hospital.

:09:52.:09:59.

What do you hope will happen today? I hope the judge will take into

:10:00.:10:11.

account the new evidence. He previously said that this is futile

:10:12.:10:19.

and that there is no chance. Now that chance has been put up to 10%.

:10:20.:10:23.

We have seven doctors supporting us from all over the world. Two from

:10:24.:10:28.

America, two from Italy, one from England and two from Spain. They are

:10:29.:10:33.

all experts in Charlie's particular condition. So I hope they realise

:10:34.:10:38.

that this does have a chance. I have always known it has a chance, but

:10:39.:10:42.

now that chance is slightly higher, I hope my son gets that chance. This

:10:43.:10:47.

is of course not the first time you have been to court. You fought so

:10:48.:10:53.

hard on behalf of Charlie. What have been the toughest moments for you?

:10:54.:10:58.

It has been a living hell, to be honest. I couldn't watch him in pain

:10:59.:11:04.

or suffer. I promise you that I wouldn't. I think parents know when

:11:05.:11:13.

their children are the two go and when they have given up, and Charlie

:11:14.:11:18.

is still fighting -- parents know when their children are ready to go.

:11:19.:11:23.

It is not just about Busnari best, it is about having other hospitals

:11:24.:11:27.

and other doctors saying, we think it is the best thing to do to

:11:28.:11:34.

Charlie. I have been fighting this since November. It is now July.

:11:35.:11:45.

We are not slating Great Ormond Street Hospital. They do amazing

:11:46.:11:51.

things there, but the children in their are all on treatment and our

:11:52.:11:56.

son is not. He deserves that chance. You have had so much support. You

:11:57.:12:01.

have had people raising money and signing petitions. You have had

:12:02.:12:03.

Donald Trump on the Pope talking about it. How does that impact on

:12:04.:12:09.

you? We are just so grateful for all the support we have got. It is

:12:10.:12:14.

astounding how much money we have raised to allow Charlie to have this

:12:15.:12:18.

treatment. Every person that has signed the petition and everyone

:12:19.:12:24.

that followed us, there are lots of vigils and protests going on. There

:12:25.:12:30.

are people outside court. There are people that are so touched by this

:12:31.:12:35.

story. Someone even said to me, I have never met your son, but I love

:12:36.:12:39.

your son so much that it shows that I can adopt. I can love another

:12:40.:12:44.

child that is not biologically mine. People have so much love for

:12:45.:12:49.

Charlie, and they support us. The scary thing is that this could

:12:50.:12:55.

happen to anyone. We are just two normal people, and parents do know

:12:56.:13:03.

their children best sometimes. There was the story of Ashya King, whose

:13:04.:13:08.

parents wanted to take their child to proper treatment that was not

:13:09.:13:12.

available on the NHS. NHS doctors did not think it was best for him,

:13:13.:13:16.

and they ended up getting arrested, but that boy is now at school and

:13:17.:13:20.

doing well. And that treatment is coming to the NHS this year. So if

:13:21.:13:24.

there are doctors who think they can help, it is not just about parents

:13:25.:13:28.

knowing best. We have now got seven experts agreeing with us. So we

:13:29.:13:32.

should be able to do so as long as it is not causing him harm. It is

:13:33.:13:37.

only oral medication. It will just go in his ilk. The only known side

:13:38.:13:40.

effect is dose-related diarrhoea. That does not mean he will get that.

:13:41.:13:47.

-- it would go in his milk. As a mum listening to you, you have taken

:13:48.:13:53.

this to the High Court and the European court. At the same time,

:13:54.:13:56.

you are trying to look after your little boy. What has that been like?

:13:57.:14:02.

It is a living hell. We are living on a knife edge. I can't put it into

:14:03.:14:07.

words. It is a nightmare. We have to stay strong. Our love for Charlie

:14:08.:14:12.

keeps us strong. I don't know what we would be like if we lose him. We

:14:13.:14:18.

can't think about that. We have to be very close to losing Charlie

:14:19.:14:24.

recently on a couple of occasions. We have been saying goodbye to him.

:14:25.:14:28.

But at the last minute, something happens. I just hope we get our

:14:29.:14:33.

miracle and we are allowed to take our son to another hospital that

:14:34.:14:39.

want to help him. We know this goes to the High Court today. If you were

:14:40.:14:43.

given permission for him to have this treatment, is it your hope that

:14:44.:14:48.

he would go abroad for it and have you got plans for that to happen? We

:14:49.:14:54.

have been speaking to air ambulance companies. They would pick him up at

:14:55.:14:58.

the bedside and take care of him. There would be doctors and nurses on

:14:59.:15:02.

board. It would be just for Charlie. There is all the medical equipment

:15:03.:15:06.

you need. Charlie just needs a ventilator. He doesn't have any

:15:07.:15:10.

intravenous lines are any needles. He is not even on oxygen. He's just

:15:11.:15:16.

on room air. And he has a feeding tube. So he is fit to fly. So they

:15:17.:15:23.

would take him bed to bed from one hospital to the other. We have two

:15:24.:15:27.

hospitals offering us treatment in Italy and America. Connie Yates, I

:15:28.:15:34.

appreciate your time. Thank you for talking to us.

:15:35.:15:41.

We're joined now by Dr Peter-Marc Fortune,

:15:42.:15:43.

head of the Paediatric Intensive Care Society, which represents

:15:44.:15:47.

those involved in caring for children in intensive care.

:15:48.:15:52.

Thank you so much for being with us, I know you were listening to what

:15:53.:15:57.

Connie Yates was saying, I'm sure you have had to advise families in

:15:58.:16:00.

similar circumstances in the past. What do you say? Sadly this is

:16:01.:16:06.

becoming very common, some people would say it is being convicted of

:16:07.:16:10.

our own success but medical technology has moved on to a point

:16:11.:16:14.

worth doing the medicine, giving the treatment, is probably the easiest

:16:15.:16:17.

part of what we do. The ethical decisions where we start to think we

:16:18.:16:21.

may be crossing boundaries between doing good and doing harm is the

:16:22.:16:24.

most complicated, the most difficult part. It is unusual that it should

:16:25.:16:30.

go to the High Court, the European Court. How do you... Parents

:16:31.:16:36.

obviously feel very strongly, you must be having some very difficult

:16:37.:16:41.

conversations? Of course parents feel stronger. It feels to me that

:16:42.:16:46.

sometimes what is being missed here is that everybody involved feels

:16:47.:16:49.

strongly, we are all on the same side in that everybody want the best

:16:50.:16:53.

for Charlie at the end of the day, and what is clearly different,

:16:54.:16:57.

everybody must understand this, is what the best thing for him is. It

:16:58.:17:01.

is a difficult process to work through and we try to do that and

:17:02.:17:05.

usually succeed in finding a commonplace with families at the

:17:06.:17:09.

bedside in the hospital involved, but where necessary we fortunately

:17:10.:17:14.

have a structure through the Royal College of paediatrics and Child

:17:15.:17:17.

health which allows us to follow guidelines about how we make these

:17:18.:17:20.

decisions and then we have a judiciary if it really comes to that

:17:21.:17:24.

point who take an objective external overview of all of the evidence and

:17:25.:17:29.

try to draw up the best evidence for the right thing to do. You mention

:17:30.:17:34.

those advances in medicine, part of the reason for cases like this. Do

:17:35.:17:38.

you think we are almost at a stage where people are unwilling to accept

:17:39.:17:41.

there is no further treatment available because medicine has moved

:17:42.:17:46.

on so far? We are definitely at that stage, we have moved a huge distance

:17:47.:17:50.

in the last ten years and there really is an expectation of QR on

:17:51.:17:54.

every occasion, and I only wish that was true but sadly it isn't. -- an

:17:55.:18:02.

expectation of cure. It is a story that I'm sure people are talking

:18:03.:18:05.

about this morning and giving their opinion on what it means. Thank you

:18:06.:18:08.

for coming in this morning and giving us your view.

:18:09.:18:11.

been out and about all morning, Carol have had lovely views today,

:18:12.:18:17.

as usual. A beautiful view at Wimbledon, the

:18:18.:18:20.

weather has been gorgeous throughout the first weekend into the second

:18:21.:18:23.

now, Carol is there with the weather. They have let her inside

:18:24.:18:27.

the courts again. Good morning, Carol.

:18:28.:18:32.

Good morning to you, it is beautiful here, 19 Celsius at the moment, they

:18:33.:18:36.

are the electric lawn mower, the roof is open but today it may be

:18:37.:18:41.

employed because there is a risk of showers. Let's start by taking a

:18:42.:18:44.

look at the forecast for Wimbledon today, risk of showers early

:18:45.:18:49.

afternoon, then it fades and it comes back late afternoon early

:18:50.:18:53.

evening, but the risk is 30% which means there is a 70% chance it could

:18:54.:19:01.

dry. Temperature is about 23 Celsius at Wimbledon, just light breezes.

:19:02.:19:05.

The forecast for us all today is a mixture of sunshine and showers,

:19:06.:19:08.

some of the showers will be heavy and sundry, we have some just off

:19:09.:19:11.

the south coast of England at the moment, they will come up and will

:19:12.:19:15.

be heavy and sundry later on but just now it is dry, bright, sunny

:19:16.:19:19.

and temperatures are picking up nicely. That can be said across East

:19:20.:19:23.

Anglia, the Midlands, heading to northern England. But for Northern

:19:24.:19:27.

England and southern Scotland, more cloud and also some spots of rain.

:19:28.:19:32.

Northern Scotland get a cold start, the temperature picking up quickly

:19:33.:19:35.

in the sunshine and for Northern Ireland it is quite cloudy with

:19:36.:19:38.

drizzle and rain in the east but it will brighten. For Wales and

:19:39.:19:41.

south-west England, fair bit of cloud this morning with some patchy

:19:42.:19:46.

outbreaks of brain. As we drift further east, Gloucestershire to the

:19:47.:19:50.

Home Counties and seven counties generally, we are back into the dry,

:19:51.:19:53.

sunny and warm weather. Through the course of the day the thunderstorms

:19:54.:20:09.

will come up across south-east England and East Anglia, they will

:20:10.:20:12.

be heavy and thundery, not all of us will see a shower but you could see

:20:13.:20:16.

a lot of water coming out of the skies in a short amount of time. For

:20:17.:20:19.

the rest of the UK it is a mixture of sunshine and showers,

:20:20.:20:21.

temperatures up to the south-east around maybe 26, 20 seven. Fresher

:20:22.:20:24.

than that as we push across the rest of the country. Through this evening

:20:25.:20:26.

and overnight we eventually lose the risk of thunder showers, they push

:20:27.:20:29.

their way into the North Sea, behind it a drier interlude but then we

:20:30.:20:31.

also have thicker cloud and rain across Wales and southern parts of

:20:32.:20:34.

England, not particularly heavy at this stage, also showers across

:20:35.:20:37.

Northern Ireland and Scotland, temperatures down the touch in the

:20:38.:20:40.

south-east compared to last night but still quite a warm night. For

:20:41.:20:44.

the rest of us, quite fresh. Tomorrow we start up again on that

:20:45.:20:49.

note, looking at some showers around, but as we go through the

:20:50.:20:53.

course of the day what you find is the rain will move from the West,

:20:54.:20:57.

drifting eastward and ahead of it there will be showers in the east

:20:58.:21:00.

and sunshine and showers as we push further north. As a result it means

:21:01.:21:03.

it will not feel as oppressive as it has done where we had the muddy

:21:04.:21:08.

field. On Wednesday morning a fresh start of the day in the south-east,

:21:09.:21:12.

much more comfortable for sleeping in overnight, the rain clears

:21:13.:21:15.

happily, high pressure behind and a settled day for most with a fair bit

:21:16.:21:19.

of sunshine and temperatures closer to where they should be at this

:21:20.:21:23.

stage in July. If you are thinking, is batted for the high temperatures?

:21:24.:21:27.

It doesn't look like it is because towards the end of next week it

:21:28.:21:31.

looks like England and Wales in particular will

:21:32.:21:42.

see a high temperatures, into the high 20s and possibly even the low

:21:43.:21:46.

30s, so I will keep you posted on that.

:21:47.:21:48.

Who needs to go on holiday?! We have got it all here, Carol!

:21:49.:21:50.

Absolutely! I don't like it so muddy, though.

:21:51.:21:53.

I agree, you just have to have a cold shower!

:21:54.:21:57.

It will be all right! We look like twins this morning, I'm happy with

:21:58.:22:02.

looking like your twin, to honest! Just for clarity, it is not the same

:22:03.:22:08.

dressed, the light makes it look the same!

:22:09.:22:18.

The Lake District, famed for its stunning scenery,

:22:19.:22:20.

has been awarded World Heritage status.

:22:21.:22:21.

It puts it alongside the likes of the Taj Mahal,

:22:22.:22:24.

the Great Wall of China and the Grand Canyon.

:22:25.:22:26.

Our reporter Linsey Smith is in one of the Lake District's

:22:27.:22:28.

popular tourist spots, Bowness-on-Windermere.

:22:29.:22:29.

It is a little bit misty, to be honest!

:22:30.:22:36.

Good morning, it is misty and reigning! But welcome to Windermere,

:22:37.:22:42.

the largest natural Mir in the UK, a stunning natural site whatever the

:22:43.:22:45.

weather and it is one of the reasons why the Lake District was awarded

:22:46.:22:52.

world Heritage site status. Another is the Pike, the tallest mountain in

:22:53.:22:56.

England. These sites bring millions of visitors to the Lake District

:22:57.:23:00.

every year and it is expected now that they will bring many, many

:23:01.:23:05.

more. One of the people who will meet those visitors is Tom McCann, a

:23:06.:23:10.

tourist guide. You were brought up in the area but worked as a diplomat

:23:11.:23:14.

aboard the 37 years. How important is it to be able to tell foreign

:23:15.:23:18.

visitors about World Heritage Site status? It is very important

:23:19.:23:34.

and we hope the World Heritage Site will bring a lot more of them. You

:23:35.:23:38.

have to set it in a different context for foreign visitors, they

:23:39.:23:40.

are not familiar with the history and geography in the way British

:23:41.:23:43.

visitors would be. We get a lot of British visitors as well but I think

:23:44.:23:46.

our skill is to be able to set that context to explain how we are links

:23:47.:23:49.

to the Norse folk of Scandinavia and links to the Romantic poets and that

:23:50.:23:52.

sort of thing, coming right up to date with things like Donald

:23:53.:23:55.

Campbell's attempt on the world speed record, that is important to

:23:56.:23:59.

Australians because he did a lot in Australia as well. That is great,

:24:00.:24:04.

thank you for joining us. You said that this now joins a list of

:24:05.:24:11.

prestigious, iconic landmarks across the world, that visitors will now

:24:12.:24:15.

want to come and see on their bucket list, I'm told. One person who will

:24:16.:24:20.

be working to keep them safe is Richard, from the Lake District

:24:21.:24:23.

Mountain search and rescue. You will have many more visitors, many not

:24:24.:24:27.

from the UK and not familiar with the landscapes. Does that pose a

:24:28.:24:31.

worry to you? I think it is great that we have put the Heritage award,

:24:32.:24:36.

more people coming into the county, but there is a potential downside.

:24:37.:24:44.

More people coming in will mean more people on the mountains and that

:24:45.:24:46.

means potentially more injuries and people getting lost. Viewers will

:24:47.:24:52.

know that mountain rescuers are all unpaid volunteers, there are 450 in

:24:53.:24:57.

the Lake District. We are approaching 300 call-outs this year

:24:58.:25:02.

so far, 29 in the last few weeks, so what we don't want is people coming

:25:03.:25:06.

and not being aware, so preparedness is essential for preventing

:25:07.:25:10.

accidents. That is great, thank you. Lots of

:25:11.:25:14.

celebrations here in the area because of this new state parked the

:25:15.:25:19.

message is clearly come prepared and be careful, because although the

:25:20.:25:23.

landscapes here are very beautiful, they can dangerous.

:25:24.:25:27.

It does look lovely there this morning, it doesn't matter that it

:25:28.:25:30.

is raining. No, you want to go and be out on one

:25:31.:25:34.

of the rowing boats, I want to be out for a swim, water is water.

:25:35.:25:38.

You are planning a dip for next year.

:25:39.:25:42.

Yes, they have a fantastic race there.

:25:43.:25:45.

If you have just switched on, we are in the Lake District this morning

:25:46.:25:48.

because it has been given World Heritage status, the likes of the

:25:49.:25:52.

Taj Mahal and all of that. Sally will have all of the sport for

:25:53.:25:55.

us in about ten minutes time, talking about the fact that Andy

:25:56.:25:59.

Murray is playing today, Jo Konta is playing today.

:26:00.:26:01.

They are playing at the same time. Yes, at 1pm.

:26:02.:26:07.

What are you going to do, flicking channels?

:26:08.:26:11.

Double screen. One on the TV, while on the...

:26:12.:26:15.

On the tablet or something? I am so glad we have cleared this

:26:16.:26:21.

up! Also Marcus Ellis and Jade Bridge may be in action at the same

:26:22.:26:25.

time in the men's doubles, so plenty to watch.

:26:26.:26:27.

I am really sorry if you are at work, we clearly will not be at work

:26:28.:26:32.

by then! And John Ryan, the Spaniard, won the

:26:33.:26:39.

open, what a sporting summer, I cannot wait, I love it!

:26:40.:26:44.

Coming up in a moment on the BBC News Channel is Business Live, but

:26:45.:26:47.

here on Breakfast... Underworld were one of the most

:26:48.:26:51.

successful electronic acts in the last 25 years but then new work is a

:26:52.:26:55.

bit different. We will be hearing how they turned interviews with

:26:56.:26:59.

people who have been homeless into a brand-new piece of music.

:27:00.:27:02.

That is coming up later, first the news, travel and

:27:03.:30:29.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:30:30.:30:38.

It takes 30 AM. Let's bring you up-to-date with some of the main

:30:39.:30:42.

news around today. The case of the terminally

:30:43.:30:45.

ill 11-month-old boy, Charlie Gard, is going back

:30:46.:30:47.

to the High Court today. Great Ormond Street Hospital

:30:48.:30:50.

in London has asked judges to consider new evidence relating

:30:51.:30:52.

to potential treatment An earlier ruling supported the view

:30:53.:30:54.

of his doctors that nothing can be done to improve his quality of life

:30:55.:30:58.

and they should be allowed to switch Earlier his mother Connie Yates told

:30:59.:31:10.

us that new evidence would be given the right considerations.

:31:11.:31:14.

I hope the judge will take into account the new evidence. He

:31:15.:31:20.

previously said this is futile and has close to zero chance of working

:31:21.:31:26.

for Charlie. Now that chance has been put up to 10%, we now have

:31:27.:31:31.

seven doctors supporting us from all over the world. Two from America,

:31:32.:31:37.

two from Italy, one from England and two from Spain. They are all experts

:31:38.:31:42.

on Charlie's syndrome. I hope they realise this has a chance. I've

:31:43.:31:47.

always known it has a chance but now that higher I hope my son gets a

:31:48.:31:48.

chance. Theresa May is to call on rival

:31:49.:31:52.

political parties to "contribute In her first major speech

:31:53.:31:55.

since the General Election, the Prime Minister will say her

:31:56.:31:58.

commitment to change Labour said Mrs May's speech

:31:59.:32:00.

proved her party had But with the Conservatives

:32:01.:32:06.

losing their overall majority, she'll say the reality she faces

:32:07.:32:09.

means she has to approach Damian Green told this programme

:32:10.:32:20.

that the Prime Minister was the right person for the job.

:32:21.:32:24.

I think that's one of the points the Prime Minister will make

:32:25.:32:28.

tomorrow, that her ambition for this country is the same as it was a year

:32:29.:32:32.

ago when she stood on the steps of Downing Street and said

:32:33.:32:35.

she wanted to make this a country that works for everyone.

:32:36.:32:38.

And tomorrow, for example, she's launching Matthew Taylor's

:32:39.:32:39.

We all know that the world of work has changed.

:32:40.:32:45.

The Iraqi Prime Minister, Haider al-Abadi, has

:32:46.:32:47.

congratulated his Armed Forces on their victory over

:32:48.:32:49.

It's nine months since government forces launched

:32:50.:32:54.

Much of the city has been reduced to rubble,

:32:55.:32:59.

and thousands of people have lost their lives.

:33:00.:33:03.

The BBC understands a government inquiry into the so-called gig

:33:04.:33:06.

economy will call for flexible workers to be paid

:33:07.:33:08.

The Taylor review, which is due to be published tomorrow,

:33:09.:33:12.

will affect firms like Deliveroo and Uber.

:33:13.:33:15.

It's expected to argue that additional wages will help to offset

:33:16.:33:18.

Firefighters have been tackling a blaze overnight at London's

:33:19.:33:26.

popular Camden Lock Market, which attracts 28 million

:33:27.:33:28.

70 firefighters were sent to the scene after the fire broke

:33:29.:33:32.

London Fire Brigade says the situation is now under control

:33:33.:33:37.

There are no reports of any casualties.

:33:38.:33:43.

Counter-terror police have launched a film telling holiday-makers how

:33:44.:33:45.

to react in the event of a terrorist attack in their resort.

:33:46.:33:56.

If there is a safe route, Ron. We have to get out of here now!

:33:57.:34:04.

The four-minute video shows families and hotel staff fleeing

:34:05.:34:06.

the sound of gunshots, barricading themselves into rooms

:34:07.:34:08.

and being treated as potential suspects by armed police.

:34:09.:34:10.

It repeats the advice to run, hide and tell.

:34:11.:34:15.

A Coldplay fan who went to the band's recent concert

:34:16.:34:17.

at Croke Park in Dublin became more involved than he expected.

:34:18.:34:23.

Rob had been crowd-surfing in his wheelchair when he was

:34:24.:34:25.

spotted by lead singer, Chris Martin.

:34:26.:34:30.

He was then invited on stage and drew huge cheers from the crowd

:34:31.:34:33.

of more than 70,000 people, when he brought out

:34:34.:34:35.

Rob described his experience as "amazing".

:34:36.:34:49.

He's clearly helping him with the microphone as well, brilliant.

:34:50.:34:57.

Wayne Rooney has revealed that he wore Everton pyjamas

:34:58.:34:59.

The striker re-joined Everton yesterday after leaving United.

:35:00.:35:05.

He grew up supporting the Merseyside club and made his debut

:35:06.:35:08.

for the first team at the age of 16.

:35:09.:35:17.

To be honest, I've kept it quiet for the last 13 years,

:35:18.:35:19.

but I've actually been wearing Everton pyjamasa at home

:35:20.:35:22.

So I had to keep that a bit quiet but it's

:35:23.:35:27.

You know, as special it did 13 years ago.

:35:28.:35:38.

You've been sending in some pictures of you in your pyjamas. Thank you

:35:39.:35:45.

for those! This is what Wayne Rooney might look like in bed with Everton

:35:46.:35:51.

pyjamas. He hasn't actually posted a picture. He's probably unlikely to!

:35:52.:35:58.

Claire has sent us a lovely picture. Look at that. Thank you very much.

:35:59.:36:04.

That's ten-year-old Grace in her PJ 's. This is Alexander from Bishops

:36:05.:36:09.

Crawford with his great bed head hair and gold pyjamas. -- skull

:36:10.:36:22.

pyjamas. Thank you for getting in touch. Coming up, English wine used

:36:23.:36:34.

to be Europe's's poor relation but now it's gone from sad to sparkling.

:36:35.:36:39.

We find out what's behind its flourishing sales. Are you filming

:36:40.:36:47.

me? I told you I was. Why didn't you tell me so I could look my best? Tom

:36:48.:36:53.

was diagnosed with dementia three years ago. We talk to his grandson

:36:54.:36:58.

about his film documenting his struggle to come to terms with the

:36:59.:37:01.

condition and its affect on the family. The murder case that hinged

:37:02.:37:07.

on a rare copy of The Wind in the Willows. A Bafta award-winning

:37:08.:37:11.

film-maker will be here to tell us about the investigation into the

:37:12.:37:13.

death of Adrian Greenwood. It's time to talk about Wimbledon. I

:37:14.:37:29.

got an error earlier on. I think I might have called J Clark J Bridge.

:37:30.:37:37.

So who is playing. Andy Murray is playing, Jo Konta, Marcus Willis and

:37:38.:37:44.

J Clark are playing. Sally is there for us.

:37:45.:37:55.

It's a busy day. There are too many British tennis players doing too

:37:56.:38:01.

well so no wonder we are getting them all confused. It's glorious on

:38:02.:38:08.

Centre Court, absolutely beautiful. Forgive us if it gets a bit noisy.

:38:09.:38:13.

I've got a tennis bulletin to bring you but I'm not going to make this

:38:14.:38:18.

man wait. This is John Lloyd Hughes joined us this morning. Good

:38:19.:38:23.

morning. Can't keep you waiting. Let's chat a bit, it's quite a

:38:24.:38:29.

momentous day. We've got Andy Murray playing, Jo Konta playing at the

:38:30.:38:34.

same time. Let's talk about and the first of all. I know he was here at

:38:35.:38:40.

the weekend. Beckett is looking OK. How is he doing? On the first week

:38:41.:38:46.

you might have given him 7.5 out of ten. Between points... You think

:38:47.:38:54.

what is he doing but when he starts the point he's like a greyhound.

:38:55.:38:59.

Every player in the draw has probably got niggles. Here is

:39:00.:39:03.

probably worse than most. Is anybody going on to the court thinking he's

:39:04.:39:08.

going to struggle, then he runs and hits a passing shot. I don't think

:39:09.:39:13.

he's 100% but a lot of players in the draw probably aren't. What is

:39:14.:39:22.

the player like he's playing today? When he's on he's dangerous. If he

:39:23.:39:31.

said I'd be playing Paire in the last 16, I can't see him losing this

:39:32.:39:37.

one. Jo Konta has got Caroline Garcia today. I think Jo is

:39:38.:39:42.

embracing being the big hope. I think before Wimbledon she had been

:39:43.:39:47.

a bit tired. Then she had an epic match where she came through and now

:39:48.:39:52.

she believes she can win. If you look at the women's 16 it so

:39:53.:39:56.

exciting because you could go, she could win, she could win... They

:39:57.:40:00.

could all when it. Venus Williams could win it, Jo certainly could win

:40:01.:40:06.

it. Did you manage to catch any of the doubles with Marcus Willis? A

:40:07.:40:13.

couple of points. I was sneaking a look on the monitor. What a

:40:14.:40:16.

performance. They haven't actually been playing together that long. It

:40:17.:40:22.

would be a fantastic romantic Wimbledon story if Marcus Willis and

:40:23.:40:27.

Jay Clarke progressed a bit here. They've already been a number to

:40:28.:40:33.

seeds. In the men's doubles you think, why not. The men's doubles as

:40:34.:40:38.

unpredictable these days. Marcus Willis last year hit the headlines

:40:39.:40:41.

and now he's trying to hit them again. We love Marcus Willis on

:40:42.:40:49.

Breakfast. We know you're a busy man, who are your predictions for

:40:50.:40:53.

men's and ladies singles winners? In the men's I went with Federer. In

:40:54.:40:57.

the women's bike my predictions have already gone! -- both of my

:40:58.:41:03.

predictions have already gone! I'm going to go for Venus Williams. OK.

:41:04.:41:11.

Enjoy the rest of the tournament. Let's talk about the cricket. Joe

:41:12.:41:16.

Root's reign as England captain has been going really well. England beat

:41:17.:41:21.

South Africa with a dead to spare at Lord's -- with a day to spare. David

:41:22.:41:28.

Weir ended his track career with a victory at the London anniversary

:41:29.:41:31.

games at the Olympic Stadium. He will concentrate on road racing in

:41:32.:41:37.

the final stage of his career. Jon Rahm overcame a scare to win his

:41:38.:41:44.

first European tour victory. It was a closing round of 65 winning him

:41:45.:41:49.

the Irish open by six shots. There was a bit of controversy about his

:41:50.:41:54.

ball marking but he got away, no in penalty was imposed, and he went on

:41:55.:41:59.

to win the tournament. The reason John is busy is because Wimbledon

:42:00.:42:04.

coverage is all over the BBC today. We have it on BBC Two to start with.

:42:05.:42:19.

Carol Kirkwood also be with the BBC sport team for the rest of the day.

:42:20.:42:26.

STUDIO: Thank you very much, what an exciting day! Some of it is

:42:27.:42:35.

happening simultaneously. It is. What are we going to do? I don't

:42:36.:42:39.

know whether to run between the two courts and see how they are going.

:42:40.:42:42.

Lucky you! Very privileged! Dementia can be a cruel disease

:42:43.:42:51.

that makes families feel that they are losing

:42:52.:42:57.

the person they love. When film-maker Dominic Sivyer heard

:42:58.:42:59.

his grandfather had the condition, it seemed natural to pick

:43:00.:43:01.

up his camera in the hope that it would help him make sense

:43:02.:43:04.

of what was happening. The result is an emotional

:43:05.:43:07.

film shot over two years that captures the attempts

:43:08.:43:10.

of his family to care for a once Throughout my childhood,

:43:11.:43:13.

Nan and Grandad were there for each I think you look very

:43:14.:43:27.

nice for your interview. But everything changed three years

:43:28.:43:36.

ago when a brain scan revealed that I wanted to capture the strange

:43:37.:43:42.

turn his life was about to take. And maybe I was trying to hold

:43:43.:43:54.

onto him before he disappeared. As time went on, I began to worry

:43:55.:44:01.

if Nan and Grandad's love was strong I have watched the film and it is

:44:02.:44:29.

very emotional. Some of it is hard to watch and I am not even a member

:44:30.:44:32.

of your family but it does give an insight. You start with the first

:44:33.:44:36.

diagnosis. How soon did it become clear that he was quite ill with

:44:37.:44:42.

this I think it took place over a long period of time. My grandma is

:44:43.:44:45.

closest to him and she noticed that he wasn't quite right and she

:44:46.:44:50.

noticed a change in behaviour over a period of time and the family

:44:51.:44:54.

noticed after my grandmother spoke out. It starts at a really difficult

:44:55.:44:58.

time and they have been on holiday together, and you felt as a family

:44:59.:45:03.

that you needed to separate them for safety reasons. Exactly. I had been

:45:04.:45:07.

away on holiday with them for a couple of weeks and my grandad was

:45:08.:45:15.

in a bad state. He was very angry and his moods were up and down. I

:45:16.:45:18.

decided to go back and he came back as well and that's when I started

:45:19.:45:21.

looking after him at home. How hard has it been? You have been filming

:45:22.:45:25.

over two years. How hard hadn't been to see the change, in character and

:45:26.:45:29.

in the man you spend a lot of time with over the years? I think it has

:45:30.:45:32.

been the hardest thing I have ever done, to see my grandad go through

:45:33.:45:36.

that. He is someone who is incredibly important to me. To see

:45:37.:45:41.

someone you love lose control, in a sense, and feel powerless in a

:45:42.:45:45.

situation, it is incredibly difficult. It is an insight into

:45:46.:45:51.

something so many families are going through, increasingly. When I meet

:45:52.:45:56.

people, they have usually been affected, they have someone in their

:45:57.:46:00.

family affected. It is incredible. For people who have not had

:46:01.:46:05.

relatives with dementia, it gives a clear indication. You talk to him

:46:06.:46:08.

one moment and he has forgotten what you said moments later. There is

:46:09.:46:12.

that repetitive behaviour from his point of view. Exactly. I think when

:46:13.:46:18.

he was in hospital and in the care home, he felt quite insecure. It

:46:19.:46:21.

exacerbated a lot of the symptoms that he was displaying. The more he

:46:22.:46:26.

felt unsafe, the more his dementia came out. You say it was tough for

:46:27.:46:32.

you to film and to work on. Let me show you more from the film. This is

:46:33.:46:35.

you talking to your grandad in hospital.

:46:36.:46:42.

What is the matter? I just feel sorry for you, grandad. Why? Come

:46:43.:46:54.

on, why? Answer me! Stop that! It must be really horrible. You think

:46:55.:46:59.

I'm going to die? No, I don't think you're going to die. You think I'm

:47:00.:47:05.

going to be an invalid? No. I'm not allowed to move. Is that right? Why

:47:06.:47:11.

did we come to this hotel? Did they directors here? You're not in a

:47:12.:47:18.

hotel. You're in a hospital. It is a brutally honest conversation to

:47:19.:47:20.

have. It is clearly something you found really difficult at times. You

:47:21.:47:25.

have said how hard you found it. I wonder what the rest of the family

:47:26.:47:29.

thought, having watched it back. I think now my family have seen it,

:47:30.:47:33.

everyone has been positive actually. Your microphone has fallen. Let me

:47:34.:47:42.

drive that backed up. -- let me drag that back-up. It was hard for my

:47:43.:47:45.

family while I was filming to grasp what I was doing because it was in

:47:46.:47:49.

tangible. Now they have seen what I have doing. When you can't

:47:50.:47:54.

understand what somebody is doing, it is confusing. Looking back now,

:47:55.:48:00.

being able to see it, what has happened, does it make you more

:48:01.:48:06.

optimistic than you were in the film sometimes? Definitely. The beauty of

:48:07.:48:10.

the film is that it was all shot in the present day. Every emotion that

:48:11.:48:14.

he was feeling and that I was feeling was captured at the time. If

:48:15.:48:17.

I doubt it retrospectively, I would be able to reflect on it more. -- if

:48:18.:48:25.

I did it retrospectively. Now I feel optimistic because I can see what

:48:26.:48:27.

went wrong and what should have happened. It is easy to generalise,

:48:28.:48:34.

but is there anything that you have learned that could help other

:48:35.:48:38.

people? I think just sticking in there and being supportive as you

:48:39.:48:42.

can and not constantly reminding somebody that they have got

:48:43.:48:46.

dementia. I did that and it upset him. Being as supportive as you can

:48:47.:48:51.

be. How are your grandparents now? Really good. They have moved into a

:48:52.:48:54.

new retirement centre and they have been there for the last year and I

:48:55.:48:57.

think the change of environment and a new set of friends and a newly

:48:58.:49:02.

self life has really helped them. And a supportive community around

:49:03.:49:06.

them. Yes. It is an amazing film. Thank you very much.

:49:07.:49:12.

Granddad, Dementia and Me is on BBC One tomorrow night at 10:45pm.

:49:13.:49:15.

And you can watch it on iPlayer as well. We have been in the studio but

:49:16.:49:21.

Sean has been in Kent and in the Lake District, which has been

:49:22.:49:25.

awarded world heritage status. It was raining earlier that now it is

:49:26.:49:29.

picking up. The cloud is lifting and we have got the weather, not just

:49:30.:49:33.

for the Lake District but Wimbledon and the rest of the UK, in a

:49:34.:49:39.

glorious sunshine morning. Good morning, both. Quite right. It

:49:40.:49:44.

is glorious. The temperature at Wimbledon is 19 at the moment. We

:49:45.:49:48.

have blue skies, the sunshine is beating down. If you are allergic to

:49:49.:49:53.

pollen, the pollen levels are very high or high across a large chunk of

:49:54.:49:57.

England and Wales. Away from the north and the west, where it is

:49:58.:50:01.

moderate. Moderate in Northern Ireland and most of Scotland except

:50:02.:50:04.

for the far north of Scotland where it is low. Bear that in mind. If you

:50:05.:50:08.

are coming to Wimbledon today, as well as the pollen, the forecast is

:50:09.:50:15.

mixed. There is a risk of showers in the early afternoon. And then late

:50:16.:50:19.

afternoon and early evening. That risk is at 30%. The 70% chance of it

:50:20.:50:24.

staying dry but be prepared for a shower just in case. Maximum

:50:25.:50:30.

temperatures here about 23. For all of us today, we are looking at a

:50:31.:50:33.

mixture of sunshine and showers, some of the shower is heavy,

:50:34.:50:37.

especially in the south-east and in East Anglia. That is not the case

:50:38.:50:40.

this morning. Showers coming across the English Channel but at the

:50:41.:50:43.

moment across southern counties it is dry and sunny and warm.

:50:44.:50:47.

Temperature is picking up quite quickly. The same can be said for

:50:48.:50:52.

East Anglia and the Midlands. A lot of bright weather in the Midlands

:50:53.:50:57.

but in the far north of England and southern Scotland, more cloud and

:50:58.:50:59.

outbreaks of rain. Again nothing too heavy. Quite chilly across northern

:51:00.:51:04.

Scotland to start but in the sunshine temperatures will pick up

:51:05.:51:09.

quickly. In Northern Ireland, cloudy start, low cloud and drizzle and

:51:10.:51:13.

rain in the east, but improving. More sunshine and also just a few

:51:14.:51:17.

showers through the day. In Wales and south-west England, cloudy and

:51:18.:51:21.

we have got some showers here, but drifting eastwards, from

:51:22.:51:25.

Gloucestershire to the Home Counties, we are back into the

:51:26.:51:29.

sunshine and the temperatures will continue to climb. Through the day,

:51:30.:51:33.

we will import thunderstorms from near continent across the south-east

:51:34.:51:37.

and East Anglia. Some of them will be torrential. A lot of water coming

:51:38.:51:41.

out of the sky in a short amount of time but not all of us will catch

:51:42.:51:45.

one because they are showers. For the rest of the UK, that is

:51:46.:51:50.

forecast. Sunshine and showers, and at worst bright spells, with more

:51:51.:51:54.

cloud at times. Temperatures are quite high in the south-east but not

:51:55.:51:58.

as high as they have been. For the rest of us, fresher. Overnight we

:51:59.:52:02.

lose the thundery showers. There is a brief respite and then they could

:52:03.:52:07.

cloud and rain coming into England and Wales. Showers continuing across

:52:08.:52:10.

Scotland and Northern Ireland. Quite warm overnight in the south-east but

:52:11.:52:15.

fresh elsewhere. Tomorrow we start off with the rain in Wales and

:52:16.:52:19.

southern England. It will be light, but not too long before it becomes

:52:20.:52:23.

heavier and more persistent and it moves east. Ahead of it in northern

:52:24.:52:27.

and eastern parts of the UK, sunshine and showers, but eventually

:52:28.:52:30.

the rain will get into the south-east and affect Wimbledon. It

:52:31.:52:35.

will bring down the temperature. Overnight, Tuesday into Wednesday,

:52:36.:52:37.

and much more comfortable night for sleeping where it has been

:52:38.:52:42.

oppressive of late. We lose the rain from the south-east and a ridge of

:52:43.:52:47.

high pressure moves in and we are looking at settled conditions,

:52:48.:52:49.

sunshine, and temperatures closer to where they should be at this stage

:52:50.:52:55.

in July. That is not the end of the high temperatures. We think at the

:52:56.:52:58.

moment as we head towards the end of next week, temperatures for England

:52:59.:53:01.

and Wales in particular will start to rise again into the high 20s,

:53:02.:53:06.

perhaps even into the 30s. I know Sally is in the wings. Do you like

:53:07.:53:11.

it that hot? You know I love it when it is that hot. Even when it is

:53:12.:53:16.

Maggie? Yes, even hot is good. I don't like it humid. I know, but I

:53:17.:53:21.

am the one in the coat and jacket. You always think it is warm and I

:53:22.:53:27.

should just move somewhere else! They are getting everything ready.

:53:28.:53:31.

The linesmen are getting that little bit of finishing touches just

:53:32.:53:37.

perfect. An important day on Centre Court. Later on, a busy afternoon,

:53:38.:53:41.

we have Grigor Dimitrov playing Roger Federer right here later this

:53:42.:53:46.

afternoon. That is going to be one to stay for, one to watch. Grigor

:53:47.:53:52.

Dimitrov, fantastic player, but we challenged him as well to our

:53:53.:53:58.

challenge this year. The Breakfast challenge, the Game, Set, Mug

:53:59.:54:01.

Challenge. I have had a go at it. Have you had a go? Not yet! Let's

:54:02.:54:04.

see how Grigor Dimitrov got on. Thank you for taking part

:54:05.:54:10.

in the Game, Set, Mug Challenge. Are you in the right spirit,

:54:11.:54:19.

are you in the right You've got 30 seconds,

:54:20.:54:21.

as many balls as you can in the mug. You've been in some tight tennis

:54:22.:54:31.

situations in the past, This is definitely one

:54:32.:54:36.

of the toughest tests You're able to talk and do this

:54:37.:54:40.

at the same time, are you? I think there's quite

:54:41.:54:50.

a lot of balls in there. Slightly slacking now

:54:51.:55:03.

the concentration is waning. I'm going to turn

:55:04.:55:05.

the clock off there. Do you want to count

:55:06.:55:18.

them up from me? One, two, three, four, five,

:55:19.:55:21.

six, seven, eight, nine. I could have done better

:55:22.:55:28.

but I'm happy with that. Charlie says not too bad. That was

:55:29.:55:48.

brilliant! This is the leaderboard. At the top of it, as ever, guess

:55:49.:55:56.

who? Andy Murray with 14. James Ward got ten and Grigor Dimitrov got

:55:57.:56:00.

nine. I wonder if Charlie was not so excited because he got seven. He was

:56:01.:56:05.

second on the leaderboard last week. And now Grigor Dimitrov has booted

:56:06.:56:13.

him off. Quite good! We have many more challenges to come over the

:56:14.:56:16.

next few days. You never know who might be next. Really! Andy Murray

:56:17.:56:24.

is shaking in his shoes! Have you tried it? Not yet. Why don't you try

:56:25.:56:31.

together in the hopes of getting to where Andy Murray is? Would that

:56:32.:56:36.

make a difference? Good idea. She is right. Let's do it! That could be

:56:37.:56:43.

bending the rules but we make the rules! A quick reminder of why you

:56:44.:56:51.

can watch tennis today. Caught 14, 11:30am, Jay Clarke and Marcus

:56:52.:56:55.

Willis, the men's doubles. Johanna Konta is first up on court number

:56:56.:57:00.

one. At one o'clock. And Andy Murray second up on Centre Court. It could

:57:01.:57:06.

be that you could spend the whole afternoon watching them

:57:07.:57:09.

back-to-back! I will probably do that. Enjoy it.

:57:10.:57:13.

Underworld is one of the most successful electronic acts

:57:14.:57:15.

So much so that Danny Boyle chose them to look after all the music

:57:16.:57:19.

for the opening of the 2012 Olympics.

:57:20.:57:21.

Their new work for the Manchester International Festival

:57:22.:57:23.

Manchester Street Poem turns interviews with people who have been

:57:24.:57:26.

As audiences listen, they can watch Karl Hyde

:57:27.:57:30.

Our entertainment correspondent Colin Paterson went to see

:57:31.:57:34.

Nobody wants to see people on the street, and if they do,

:57:35.:57:43.

they're not going to ask them their story.

:57:44.:57:45.

In paint and in music, the words of people who have been

:57:46.:57:48.

homeless, given a whole new audience by Underworld.

:57:49.:57:51.

I was just curious about why people were sleeping in doorways.

:57:52.:57:56.

And, you know, my kids were asking me what's going on?

:57:57.:57:59.

I've come close to being lost enough to have lost everything,

:58:00.:58:04.

and I don't see any difference between the people who are living

:58:05.:58:08.

on the streets and me just because I've got a job.

:58:09.:58:10.

# MUSIC: "Born Slippy" by Underworld.

:58:11.:58:15.

And it was when Underworld were at their most popular that Karl

:58:16.:58:18.

thought he might end up on the streets.

:58:19.:58:20.

How close did you come to being homeless?

:58:21.:58:22.

Close, because I was losing everything.

:58:23.:58:25.

It came to pieces quite a lot of times.

:58:26.:58:27.

It was in the most successful of those times that I was at my lowest.

:58:28.:58:34.

It looked like a really good option to throw in the towel.

:58:35.:58:40.

The dance duo worked with the charity Mustard Tree

:58:41.:58:43.

to record the stories of 35 former rough sleepers.

:58:44.:58:47.

As soon as you hit the streets, you're vulnerable and you're scared,

:58:48.:58:50.

and your dignity is stripped away from you.

:58:51.:58:54.

The aim - to make people think about the homeless not

:58:55.:58:57.

She is now housed, but shared her story with us.

:58:58.:59:03.

I always worked while I had addiction problems.

:59:04.:59:07.

A couple of years ago, I ended up losing some jobs,

:59:08.:59:10.

ended up committing crimes over Christmas.

:59:11.:59:11.

Went to prison, came out or prison with nowhere to live.

:59:12.:59:14.

How do you look back on that period now?

:59:15.:59:16.

It's frightening to be out on the streets, especially in a big

:59:17.:59:20.

And if it's a weekend as well, people coming past drunk,

:59:21.:59:25.

and I know people get abused, and I know people that

:59:26.:59:28.

have been urinated on, and thrown food at,

:59:29.:59:30.

Underworld have taken over a shop in the centre

:59:31.:59:35.

Anyone can pop in for a listen and watch Karl in action.

:59:36.:59:40.

I want them to read it and go on a journey.

:59:41.:59:43.

Mooch been off the streets for three years.

:59:44.:59:45.

He's one of the voices on the soundtrack, and thinks that

:59:46.:59:48.

Manchester Street Poem really can bring about change.

:59:49.:59:51.

This gives people the opportunity to know what...

:59:52.:59:55.

People out on the streets, they've all got a story to tell.

:59:56.:59:57.

And at the end, I want someone to have come off the streets,

:59:58.:00:02.

turn their life around by the help of all this.

:00:03.:00:05.

Which will happen, and I know it's happening now.

:00:06.:00:08.

What does it mean to you to have your story now

:00:09.:00:13.

It's great to be a part of something like this, you know.

:00:14.:00:18.

It's good to see that people can see that,

:00:19.:00:20.

You're not just something that's sat on the street that they walk past.

:00:21.:00:26.

Colin Paterson, BBC News, Manchester.

:00:27.:00:32.

And if you can't make it to the shop to see and hear

:00:33.:00:35.

"Manchester Street Poem" a 20 version will be played on BBC 6Music

:00:36.:00:39.

You can also search for that on the BBC radio iPlayer.

:00:40.:00:53.

English wine used to be a bit of a joke among connoisseurs,

:00:54.:00:56.

but the industry could be about to have the last laugh.

:00:57.:00:58.

It was the fastest growing sector in the UK's food

:00:59.:01:01.

Sean's at a vineyard for us in Kent this morning to see what's put

:01:02.:01:05.

He's got some with him. Good morning. I've finally found the end

:01:06.:01:18.

produce. To be specific I'm in a boutique vineyards on the chalky

:01:19.:01:23.

slopes in Sevenoaks in Kent. The M25 is a couple of miles away, lots of

:01:24.:01:29.

commuters going in on the train. Glorious weather here, like the

:01:30.:01:33.

Champagne region. There's a lot of tourism tasting and we'll join them

:01:34.:01:42.

for a bit of tasting. If you could crack open a bottle! Less than 1%

:01:43.:01:47.

this English wine market is of the wine market in the UK, why so low?

:01:48.:01:53.

It's still a new industry, it's still got a long way to go. I think

:01:54.:01:58.

people just need to know about English wine as well. There's a lot

:01:59.:02:07.

of issues with branding. People know Cru and Tattinger but they don't

:02:08.:02:11.

know the English brands so much. That's going to have to be bolstered

:02:12.:02:16.

going forward. What have we got here and what is your bestseller? This is

:02:17.:02:22.

an English sparkling wine made in the same way as champagne.

:02:23.:02:30.

Predominantly Pinot Noir. Perfect for Wimbledon fortnight with

:02:31.:02:38.

strawberries and cream. Easily compatible to top quality champagne

:02:39.:02:45.

and slightly cheaper. But still not quite that entry level, you can't

:02:46.:02:48.

get a bottle of English wine for less than a tenner. That's correct

:02:49.:02:52.

and it goes back to the earlier points about economies of scale and

:02:53.:02:56.

higher duty. I think the quality is getting better ask for the premiums

:02:57.:03:00.

we are getting and it's about the entire experience, not just about

:03:01.:03:04.

what's in the bottle. It's a complex one, would that be fair to say?

:03:05.:03:13.

That's wonderful. Could be that the food and drink industry look at how

:03:14.:03:19.

we get to that produce that we see on the shelves? I think there's a

:03:20.:03:23.

really valuable lesson here. It's not just about price but it's about

:03:24.:03:28.

quality and experience. Consumers love great British food and drink

:03:29.:03:31.

and be could be doing more to market it. What is the best seller

:03:32.:03:35.

generally, what is the go to think that people are drinking? In general

:03:36.:03:42.

sparkling is a huge category at the moment. Ten years ago it would be

:03:43.:03:46.

unheard of to go to the pub and ask for a sparkling wine. Now that the

:03:47.:03:51.

growth of Prosecco that is becoming more commonplace and the category is

:03:52.:03:56.

growing. Do you find more and more people are coming here for

:03:57.:04:03.

sparkling? Absolutely. Once they've come here, they come back again.

:04:04.:04:09.

It's not just about what's in the bottles, it's about the entire

:04:10.:04:13.

location we are at. Thank you very much, enjoy. The one thing I've

:04:14.:04:19.

learnt, if you haven't got a corkscrew, always have one of these

:04:20.:04:24.

in your back pocket. We didn't risk doing it this morning and it's a bit

:04:25.:04:29.

early! That's a back-up for you! STUDIO: Not to be recommended after

:04:30.:04:40.

a couple of glasses of Prosecco! Enjoy yourselves! Unbelievable! I've

:04:41.:04:49.

got my watered-down here! -- my water down here.

:04:50.:04:52.

We'll be speaking to Bafta award-winning film maker

:04:53.:04:54.

Jezza Neumann about his new documentary charting

:04:55.:04:56.

the investigation into the murder of book-seller Adrian Greenwood

:04:57.:04:58.

and what happened to his ?50,000 rare edition

:04:59.:05:00.

First a last brief look at the headlines where

:05:01.:05:04.

What that meant was actually in many ways Adrian Greenwood retains the

:05:05.:13:12.

ownership of the film, it's very much about him. It also allows us to

:13:13.:13:17.

look at the other side of things because there are thousands of

:13:18.:13:20.

children across Britain who have a parent in prison. It's something

:13:21.:13:24.

that lives with them for ever. It's a fascinating watch.

:13:25.:13:26.

Catching A Killer: The Wind In The Willows Murder

:13:27.:13:33.

Now it's time for Right On The Money with Dominic Littlewood

:13:34.:13:36.