11/07/2017 Breakfast


11/07/2017

The latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC's Breakfast team.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 11/07/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:00:00.:00:07.

A review for the government calls for the end of the cash

:00:08.:00:13.

With suggestions for tackling low-paid jobs, zero hours contracts

:00:14.:00:17.

and the gig economy, it says the government should strive

:00:18.:00:19.

Good morning, it's Tuesday the 11th of July.

:00:20.:00:39.

For the first time since 1984 there's a British woman

:00:40.:00:44.

That's right, Johanna Konta will play Simona Halep on centre court at

:00:45.:01:00.

Wimbledon later on this afternoon. Andy Murray is also through. What a

:01:01.:01:05.

match last night, Rafa Nadal knocked out after five hours and five sets.

:01:06.:01:09.

How coffee could be more than just a pick-me-up.

:01:10.:01:12.

Now two major studies say it may help us live longer.

:01:13.:01:18.

We'll find out about the new nursery opening on the same site

:01:19.:01:25.

There's a call for British businesses to do more to boost

:01:26.:01:29.

I'll be finding out why it's so important, and why the UK lags

:01:30.:01:34.

Carol has the weather, good morning. Good morning from Wimbledon, much

:01:35.:01:49.

cooler today than of late, the risk of interruption today. Early

:01:50.:01:53.

afternoon, a dry slot, heavy and persistent rain. We're likely to see

:01:54.:01:57.

significant rain for the first time in a while in southern parts of

:01:58.:02:01.

England and Wales. For the rest of the country, sunshine and showers.

:02:02.:02:05.

We will be back with more details later in the programme. Thank you so

:02:06.:02:07.

much, see you later. An end to cash-in-hand jobs

:02:08.:02:08.

and changing the rules on the gig economy, just two of

:02:09.:02:14.

the recommendations in a major The Matthew Taylor review also says

:02:15.:02:16.

there are too many people who are being treated

:02:17.:02:21.

like cogs in a machine Our economics correspondent

:02:22.:02:23.

Andy Verity reports. In the last ten years the economy's

:02:24.:02:38.

generated record number of jobs and the lowest unemployment rate in

:02:39.:02:41.

nearly half a century. But according to the man who led a government

:02:42.:02:44.

commission review, more jobs hasn't always meant good jobs. In my view,

:02:45.:02:49.

there is too much work, particularly at the bottom end of the labour

:02:50.:02:53.

market, that isn't of high enough quality and there's too many people

:02:54.:02:56.

not having their rights fully respected and there are too many

:02:57.:03:00.

people treated at work like cogs in a machine rather than human beings

:03:01.:03:03.

and there are too many people who don't see a route from their current

:03:04.:03:07.

job to progress and earn more and do better. The review will recommend

:03:08.:03:11.

that if someone is controlled and supervised then there are classified

:03:12.:03:15.

as a worker or dependent contractor rather than self employed. Those

:03:16.:03:24.

workers may be entitled to benefits like holiday plague and employers

:03:25.:03:27.

might have to pay National Insurance at 13.8%. That's broadly in line

:03:28.:03:30.

with a landmark court ruling in a case brought by this former Uber

:03:31.:03:33.

driver. Uber is appealing the ruling. I don't think it helps me as

:03:34.:03:38.

a worker for what I've been fighting for in the tribunal and that's

:03:39.:03:43.

what's concerning because the workers haven't been involved in the

:03:44.:03:47.

process in this report. The review also makes a bigger point that

:03:48.:03:50.

self-employed work from plumbers to painters yields far less tax for the

:03:51.:03:54.

Treasury, especially of the work is cash in hand. For consumers, though,

:03:55.:03:59.

the recommendations are likely to mean inexpensive services will no

:04:00.:04:03.

longer be as cheap. Andy Verity, BBC News.

:04:04.:04:04.

And we'll be talking to Matthew Taylor, the author

:04:05.:04:06.

Theresa May will make her first big speech later this morning

:04:07.:04:12.

since being re-elected as Prime Minister in June.

:04:13.:04:14.

Her party is coming under pressure with no outright majority,

:04:15.:04:17.

and yesterday Conservative MP Anne Marie Morris was suspended

:04:18.:04:19.

of her using a racially-offensive term.

:04:20.:04:22.

Our political correspondent Chris Mason joins us

:04:23.:04:24.

Chris, an important morning for the Prime Minister.

:04:25.:04:36.

But will this fresh controversy affect the tiny majority

:04:37.:04:38.

Yes, good morning. The whole perspective that the Prime Minister

:04:39.:04:46.

hoped to focus on today is exactly what we've been hearing about, this

:04:47.:04:53.

report into working conditions and taxes and National Insurance and all

:04:54.:04:56.

the rest of it as the economy changes. But instead all of the

:04:57.:05:01.

focus was already on the Prime Minister and her future and the

:05:02.:05:04.

extent to which there is still so much gossip going on within

:05:05.:05:07.

Conservative ranks as to how long she can last in Downing Street. Then

:05:08.:05:12.

throw into the mix this emerging yesterday of this recording from a

:05:13.:05:18.

Conservative backbencher making these gratuitously racially

:05:19.:05:21.

insensitive remarks in the context of a debate about Brexit. Lots of

:05:22.:05:26.

other MPs, conservative and otherwise, after that were

:05:27.:05:29.

condemning the language of Anne-Marie Morris. The Prime

:05:30.:05:35.

Minister acted very quickly, to use Westminster's terminology, in

:05:36.:05:38.

removing the whip from her, in other words she's no longer officially a

:05:39.:05:43.

Conservative MP, effectively sitting as an independent. That chips away

:05:44.:05:47.

yet further at the Conservative' non-existent majority, a very small

:05:48.:05:53.

majority, with the help of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist party.

:05:54.:05:57.

In time she may well be restored to the Conservative Party and even if

:05:58.:06:01.

she isn't she may still decide to vote with them, but in authority

:06:02.:06:06.

terms, yet another awkward day for the Prime Minister. You're probably

:06:07.:06:10.

counting them knowing you, Chris! Much, we will speak will speak to

:06:11.:06:12.

you later. A man has been charged over an acid

:06:13.:06:13.

attack on a woman and her cousin John Tomlin, who's 24,

:06:14.:06:17.

is alleged to have thrown acid at Resham Khan and Jameel Muhktar

:06:18.:06:21.

through their car window. Both suffered severe burns

:06:22.:06:23.

to the face and body. An American military aircraft has

:06:24.:06:31.

crashed in the state of Mississippi, killing at least 16 people,

:06:32.:06:34.

according to US media. It crashed about 100

:06:35.:06:36.

miles north of Jackson, The type of aircraft is one

:06:37.:06:39.

of the most extensively used in the military, but they can also

:06:40.:06:42.

be modified to transport cargo A BBC investigation has found nearly

:06:43.:06:46.

500 children aged 12 and under have been questioned by police

:06:47.:06:50.

for sexting since 2013. The practice is when someone uses

:06:51.:06:52.

a mobile phone to send indecent Figures obtained by BBC Newcastle

:06:53.:06:55.

show there's been a steady increase in the number of people

:06:56.:07:00.

being investigated, with a boy aged Clearly the NSPCC don't want

:07:01.:07:18.

children criminalised for this sort of behaviour and it's really

:07:19.:07:22.

important that police are talking to children in a restorative way,

:07:23.:07:25.

looking at the safeguarding issues for that child, making sure that the

:07:26.:07:28.

child isn't criminalised. You know I don't drink coffee? This

:07:29.:08:07.

is coffee number one. How many do you go through in the programme? I

:08:08.:08:11.

only have one otherwise I go slightly over the edge.

:08:12.:08:12.

If you are reaching for your second or even your third cup of coffee

:08:13.:08:16.

Scientists behind two new studies say they've uncovered the clearest

:08:17.:08:22.

evidence yet that the beverage could be beneficial to health.

:08:23.:08:25.

But others have urged caution, saying there's no actual proof

:08:26.:08:27.

It's the news every coffee addict will be delighted to hear. Their

:08:28.:08:48.

daily, or better still thrice daily, brew might be a reason they could

:08:49.:08:52.

live for longer. Previous research has suggested drinking coffee could

:08:53.:08:56.

reduce risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. Now two

:08:57.:09:00.

studies, one American and one European, have both come up with

:09:01.:09:04.

results that seem to show coffee drinkers live longer. The study of

:09:05.:09:09.

more than 500,000 people from ten European countries found men who

:09:10.:09:14.

downed more than three cups of coffee a day were 18% less likely to

:09:15.:09:18.

die from any cause than non- coffee drinkers. Women drinking the same

:09:19.:09:22.

amount benefited less but still experienced an 8% reduction in

:09:23.:09:26.

mortality. What the study doesn't show is what

:09:27.:09:30.

could be causing any apparent benefits. It's thought it could be

:09:31.:09:34.

the antioxidants that coffee contains. What it isn't is caffeine.

:09:35.:09:39.

The results came out the same for people who drank regular or decaf.

:09:40.:09:44.

Word the figures don't prove that ranking coffee will make you live

:09:45.:09:48.

longer, there is no cause and effect shown, just a study of the lifespans

:09:49.:09:54.

of an awful lot of coffee drinkers. Sarah Smith, BBC News.

:09:55.:09:59.

The answer is I'm going to drink a lot more coffee. Can we get her a

:10:00.:10:04.

second one? Plans to almost double

:10:05.:10:05.

the number of Welsh speakers The Welsh government wants one

:10:06.:10:07.

million people to be There will be more teaching

:10:08.:10:11.

at an earlier age, and more Welsh-speaking teachers in primary

:10:12.:10:15.

and secondary schools. My mother is Welsh, she didn't speak

:10:16.:10:30.

in Jewish until she was about 14. -- didn't speak English.

:10:31.:10:32.

For the first time in history, scientists got a close up look

:10:33.:10:35.

of one of the most recognisable features of Jupiter,

:10:36.:10:38.

the centuries-old storm known as the Great Red Spot.

:10:39.:10:40.

We'll see the first images of the storm later this week.

:10:41.:10:43.

The aim is to collect data about the composition of the clouds

:10:44.:10:46.

and find out what lies beneath them.

:10:47.:10:48.

Need to find out some facts on Jupiter for today. We've got some,

:10:49.:10:54.

it is... The storm is twice the size of Earth. That is a good fact. Good

:10:55.:10:58.

one to kick things off with. If you have any others then let us know.

:10:59.:11:03.

What a day at Wimbledon yesterday. Rafa Nadal must be exhausted. That

:11:04.:11:08.

stole the headlines after a great day for Johanna Konta and Andy

:11:09.:11:12.

Murray and five ridiculous hours, if you stayed up to watch it last

:11:13.:11:16.

night, for us it was quite late but for most people it was normal, it

:11:17.:11:22.

finished at 8:45 p.m., Sally is reflecting on all the Wimbledon news

:11:23.:11:26.

and Johanna Konta goes again, Sally? She does, how did that happen? I

:11:27.:11:31.

honestly think for once I'm going to say I hope she's not watching, I

:11:32.:11:35.

hope she is fast asleep in bed and resting, another big day.

:11:36.:11:37.

I have to say apologies to Carol Kirkwood's neighbours, who heard me

:11:38.:11:44.

shouting at the TV until late last night, we stayed up and watched it

:11:45.:11:48.

an my goodness, the Nadal match had us on the edge of our seats, it was

:11:49.:11:55.

a great game! A great day yesterday for Johanna Konta, Andy Murray

:11:56.:11:59.

almost through, they're making history, aren't they? I hesitate to

:12:00.:12:04.

mention this too much about Jo but the way she approaches Wimbledon,

:12:05.:12:09.

her attitude, is changing because in previous years it's been a tricky

:12:10.:12:13.

time for her and she hasn't always had the best time and she hasn't

:12:14.:12:17.

always loved it but I tell you what, something has changed, the crowd is

:12:18.:12:20.

helping her and it's been amazing to see. Great to see. We've spent a lot

:12:21.:12:25.

of time with Jo over the last few weeks so great to see her and Andy

:12:26.:12:30.

Murray having a good run. But to the most important business of the day,

:12:31.:12:34.

I know you want to know who is where in our game said Mike BBC Breakfast

:12:35.:12:38.

challenge? We've asked the great and good of tennis to have a go at

:12:39.:12:43.

getting as many tennis balls they can into a giant BBC Breakfast mug

:12:44.:12:47.

in 30 seconds, let's see how the great three-time grand slam winning

:12:48.:12:49.

champion Kim Kleist is not on. So, Kim Kleist is, welcome to BBC

:12:50.:12:58.

Breakfast. Thank you. You are a former world number one, four

:12:59.:13:02.

grandslam titles under your belt, including three US opens, one

:13:03.:13:05.

Australian Open, but nothing compares to the challenge of facing

:13:06.:13:09.

today. How are you feeling? Pressure, a lot of pressure, a

:13:10.:13:13.

little bit nervous. Huge pressure, are you excited? Are you excited.

:13:14.:13:22.

You know the rules, as many balls into our mug as you can in 30

:13:23.:13:27.

seconds. Have you got the time? I've got the time. Kim, three, two, one,

:13:28.:13:35.

go. Good start, I'm liking the technique, strong technique. It's

:13:36.:13:39.

been successful in the past, one has definitely gone in. Nearly ten

:13:40.:13:44.

seconds down, Kim. To call in now. I think we've got her in her stride.

:13:45.:13:49.

She's not going to change up this technique, definitely working for

:13:50.:13:53.

her, this is going to be a strong performance from the former world

:13:54.:13:57.

number one Kim Clijsters hear. OK, Kim, five seconds left. Four, three,

:13:58.:14:05.

two, one... Just about, well done, I think that was a fantastic

:14:06.:14:09.

performance. How do you feel? Pretty good. Shall we go and check it out?

:14:10.:14:15.

Feeling confident about this? I have no idea how many. One, two, three,

:14:16.:14:21.

four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. Excellent result. You must be

:14:22.:14:26.

pleased with that? I'm happy with that, OK. I didn't beat Andy but

:14:27.:14:32.

I'll give him the win. Well done for having a go at our game, set, mug

:14:33.:14:35.

challenge. Didn't she do brilliantly? Shall we

:14:36.:14:41.

have a look at the leaderboard and see how Kim measures up against

:14:42.:14:51.

everyone else is. -- everyone else. She's done really well and I'm

:14:52.:14:56.

already taking a grandslam title off her, she has 14, not three as I

:14:57.:15:03.

mentioned a moment ago. -- won four. Before we go to Carol, for once we

:15:04.:15:08.

have this gorgeous weight of muffins, not just breakfast for me,

:15:09.:15:13.

there's a reason, every day after she finishes playing, Johanna Konta

:15:14.:15:17.

has been baking muffins for her team -- plate of muffins. She has been

:15:18.:15:22.

relaxing with the baking. I thought I would try my own speciality member

:15:23.:15:26.

here, Carol Kirkwood, do you want one? Not just yet but I want to say

:15:27.:15:32.

these aren't just for me, this is a light snack for you. We must have a

:15:33.:15:36.

word with our team to see if they can do some baking! Not looking too

:15:37.:15:41.

promising! Let's get on with the weather because it could be

:15:42.:15:42.

changing? Were starting to get spots in the

:15:43.:15:54.

error and it is cooler today. The forecast is just that, noticeably

:15:55.:15:57.

cooler with more cloud around, rain in the early afternoon and then a

:15:58.:16:01.

dry slot and then some heavy persistent rain in the late

:16:02.:16:07.

afternoon into the evening. Highs today roundabout 20 Celsius, a drop

:16:08.:16:11.

compared to what we have been used to a bear that in mind if you coming

:16:12.:16:16.

down today. For all of us we have some weight on the forecast either

:16:17.:16:19.

of these showers in the north or persistent rain moving eastwards

:16:20.:16:24.

through the day. If we start in the south at nine a.m. There is a lot of

:16:25.:16:29.

dry weather around but there are splashes of rain that holds through

:16:30.:16:33.

East Anglia into the Midlands. More coherent rain in north England

:16:34.:16:38.

around the Pennines and The Wash and the far north of England into

:16:39.:16:43.

Scotland, again there are dry interludes with Cloud and bright

:16:44.:16:46.

spells, showery outbreaks in Scotland. Northern Ireland has dry

:16:47.:16:51.

in the north, cloud in the south. As the come across Wales and into

:16:52.:16:55.

England and parts of the Midlands, we are again looking at some rain.

:16:56.:16:59.

Not particularly heavy but more persistent. Drifting eastwards again

:17:00.:17:04.

there is a lot of cloud around, and a few splashes of rain here and

:17:05.:17:08.

there. That if the picture at nine o'clock. Through the course of the

:17:09.:17:12.

day, for Scotland and Northern Ireland and northern England there

:17:13.:17:16.

is a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers for Wales in

:17:17.:17:20.

the Southern half of England we have significant rain. More than we have

:17:21.:17:23.

seen for a while for some of us. That moves from the west to the east

:17:24.:17:28.

through the day. That will have an adverse affect on the temperature, a

:17:29.:17:33.

high of 20 in London, fresher elsewhere. Innocent China will not

:17:34.:17:38.

fill too bad further north. Into the evening and overnight the rain

:17:39.:17:42.

drifts eastwards getting into south-east, East Anglia and by the

:17:43.:17:46.

time it gets to us some of us will have 40 millimetres of rain fall,

:17:47.:17:49.

some or more, some a little left. North of that clearing skies and the

:17:50.:17:55.

temperature low enough for a touch of frost in sheltered lend. A fresh

:17:56.:18:00.

night for sleeping in the south where it has been muggy and we start

:18:01.:18:04.

tomorrow on that note with the rain and breathes it quickly clearing

:18:05.:18:07.

away from the south-east and high pressure building in. A lot of

:18:08.:18:13.

settled weather to marvel -- tomorrow. A better day for Wimbledon

:18:14.:18:20.

tomorrow, a high of 23. As we head into Thursday, again a lot of dry

:18:21.:18:24.

weather around. Some showers, particularly in the north and west

:18:25.:18:27.

and lead in the day the weather front shows its hand across the far

:18:28.:18:31.

north-west with temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage

:18:32.:18:36.

in July. We can tell you, we fill a draft here this morning. It has been

:18:37.:18:41.

so muggy and the temperature high for this stage of the day in July.

:18:42.:18:45.

But today it is a different feel. And we can see you, you even had to

:18:46.:18:52.

wear a coat. My goodness. I am interested in the construction of

:18:53.:18:57.

the muffins. The large ones on the base, the mini ones on the top.

:18:58.:19:03.

Quite impressive. Do you know what? There will not be this many muffins

:19:04.:19:07.

the next time you cross to me. I can already see that one has been taken,

:19:08.:19:21.

Carol. Just like you talking about take yesterday.

:19:22.:19:23.

Show we have a look at the papers? The front page of the Guardian

:19:24.:19:32.

talking about the reason may. A lot of the papers have pictures of

:19:33.:19:35.

Joanna Quant the front page and this is an interesting one at the bottom

:19:36.:19:41.

of the Guardian as well. This is an expert in ecology and wildlife, a

:19:42.:19:45.

biological annihilation of wildlife in recent decades means a sixth mass

:19:46.:19:49.

extinction in the cosmic history is well under way. This has been

:19:50.:19:52.

published in a national Academy of sciences. It says it is the tone I

:19:53.:19:58.

am struck by. They say that actually, because of what is

:19:59.:20:02.

happening, the biological annihilation is right to call it

:20:03.:20:08.

that because it is an assault on the foundation of humid civilisation.

:20:09.:20:12.

Front page of the mail this morning has a story about Charlie guard, the

:20:13.:20:17.

judge saying he will not be swayed by tweets. A picture thereof Pippa

:20:18.:20:24.

Middleton on the front page of the Daily Mail. The Daily Mirror, again,

:20:25.:20:31.

talking about Charlie on the front page and a story about Anne-Marie

:20:32.:20:35.

Morris using a quite offensive phrase at a meeting and she has had

:20:36.:20:41.

the whip removed by the Tory party and Theresa May has spoken out about

:20:42.:20:45.

it as well. I love this picture of Johanna Konta. Relief as she throws

:20:46.:20:51.

her racquet enjoyed. This is my favourite story of the day, I am a

:20:52.:20:56.

coffee drinker, drinking coffee for a long life. Look at this. The front

:20:57.:21:02.

page of the express. Your favourite story. And a picture of Andy Murray

:21:03.:21:07.

and Johanna Konta who had a brilliant day to the British

:21:08.:21:11.

yesterday. Johanna Konta is on centre court later and Andy Murray

:21:12.:21:16.

tomorrow. The big story you have been discussing already today is the

:21:17.:21:20.

review about the way that we were. That is in all of the business pages

:21:21.:21:28.

today. The Telegraph here, talking about a jobs supremo defending zero

:21:29.:21:31.

hour deals. Basically the Labour party were hoping that zero hour

:21:32.:21:37.

were contacts would be scrapped. He has not gone that far, saying that

:21:38.:21:42.

they can be useful at times but people need more rights and more pay

:21:43.:21:46.

if they are working in that more vulnerable kind of area. Another

:21:47.:21:50.

quick story is well about craft beer. Here saying that the big

:21:51.:21:57.

distilleries perhaps should not be calling there be a craft beer and it

:21:58.:22:01.

should only be small companies and small distilleries, perhaps

:22:02.:22:09.

companies like Guinness should not be classified as a craft beer.

:22:10.:22:12.

Another quick one. Look at these World War Two gadgets going on sale

:22:13.:22:17.

at auction today. They should reach about ?5,000. This is a razor,

:22:18.:22:27.

little spy gadgets, a razor that is an assassination punch that the.

:22:28.:22:31.

This is a pipe with a dagger in it. A matchbox with a secret compass.

:22:32.:22:39.

Quite a lot of daggers. A pen with a dagger in it as well. Essentially

:22:40.:22:42.

daggers concealed in normal household items. Radio in a biscuit

:22:43.:22:49.

tin as well. That is quite clever. They will go on auction today,

:22:50.:22:51.

expected to reach ?5,000. They might be places that you assume

:22:52.:22:53.

are generations apart - but for the first time in the UK,

:22:54.:22:56.

a nursery and a care home It's an idea which has already been

:22:57.:23:00.

adopted by other countries, such as the United States and Japan,

:23:01.:23:04.

but from September, Britain will join them by opening

:23:05.:23:07.

a joint site for youngsters Breakfast's Graham Satchell

:23:08.:23:10.

went to find out more. A large care home in south London

:23:11.:23:30.

and the sound of the nursery rhyme. Young and old singing, playing,

:23:31.:23:36.

interacting together. When it officially opens in September, this

:23:37.:23:40.

will be the first nursery in the country to be placed on the grounds

:23:41.:23:48.

of a care home. Children spend more of their time away from other age

:23:49.:23:52.

groups and the elderly spend time away from everybody. There is

:23:53.:23:55.

something quite natural about bringing them together. A sports day

:23:56.:24:05.

to celebrate the opening and 87-year-old Faye is showing off her

:24:06.:24:10.

egg and spoon skills. Children from a nearby nursery have been coming

:24:11.:24:13.

here on a weekly trip since January and Faye has loved it. Some of them

:24:14.:24:19.

sing and dance and we play games. It is fabulous. So most of the

:24:20.:24:27.

residents, they have a great time. They come alive. Bringing young and

:24:28.:24:33.

old together like this already happens in America, Canada and

:24:34.:24:38.

Japan. Experts say the advantages are clear, particularly for the

:24:39.:24:41.

elderly in tackling isolation and loneliness. There are challenges as

:24:42.:24:47.

well. Finding the right places and making sure both children and adults

:24:48.:24:52.

are safe. The benefits really do our way the disadvantages. This is a

:24:53.:24:58.

model for other care home providers and nurseries across the UK. It

:24:59.:25:02.

certainly works in the rest of the world, there is no reason why would

:25:03.:25:06.

could not see many more of these in the UK. Back inside, 90 Walter is

:25:07.:25:12.

classes out of Play-Doh and passing on years of wisdom. Careful play

:25:13.:25:20.

arranged by grown-ups is teaching them many things they don't know.

:25:21.:25:25.

How to handle things and handle situations. As an old person, I am

:25:26.:25:34.

coming to the end of my life, it is a great joy to see new human being

:25:35.:25:42.

is growing and growing slowly into people, into humanity, into

:25:43.:25:47.

maturity. It's a wonderful thing. I'm very privileged. Irene and

:25:48.:25:56.

Helen... Is this a model for the future? There are certainly hope

:25:57.:25:59.

here that will benefit young and old. I think it is a wonderful idea.

:26:00.:26:08.

Quite clever, isn't it? It seems to be working well. I was going to say

:26:09.:26:16.

its four minutes after half past six... Sorry, no, it is 626, the

:26:17.:26:19.

conventional way of saying things. this year marks a century

:26:20.:26:22.

since the first mass-produced Breakfast's Tim Muffett's taking

:26:23.:26:26.

a look at the machine's history Good morning, Tim. Good morning to

:26:27.:26:39.

you. The great Yorkshire show first staged in 1838 to celebrate

:26:40.:26:45.

agricultural excellence. Ben, a tractor was something

:26:46.:26:47.

science-fiction -based. It was way off in the future. This year they

:26:48.:26:52.

are celebrating 100 years of mass-produced tractors. How have

:26:53.:26:56.

they changed the agricultural industry? We will

:26:57.:30:18.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:30:19.:30:22.

Now, though, it's back to Louise and Dan.

:30:23.:30:24.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:30:25.:30:29.

It's been in use for hundreds of years, but there are concerns

:30:30.:30:39.

about the future of the Welsh language.

:30:40.:30:41.

to double the number of speakers by 2050.

:30:42.:30:44.

In the early hours of this morning, scientists had the very first close

:30:45.:30:48.

up look at Jupiter's 10,000 mile wide storm.

:30:49.:30:50.

We'll speak to one of the team behind the mission.

:30:51.:30:54.

And, she's the former world number one, but Kim Clijsters really felt

:30:55.:30:57.

the pressure when she took on our challenge Game,

:30:58.:31:00.

But now a summary of this morning's main news.

:31:01.:31:07.

An end to cash-in-hand jobs and changing the rules

:31:08.:31:10.

on the minimum wage, just two of the recommendations

:31:11.:31:13.

in a major review into the way we work.

:31:14.:31:15.

The study, led by a former adviser to Tony Blair,

:31:16.:31:18.

Matthew Taylor, recommends that people working in what's known

:31:19.:31:20.

as the gig economy, where workers get paid per task,

:31:21.:31:23.

should receive new legal protections and their employers should make

:31:24.:31:26.

In my view, there's too much work, particularly at the bottom end

:31:27.:31:39.

of the labour market, that isn't of a high enough quality

:31:40.:31:42.

and there's too many people not having their rights fully respected

:31:43.:31:45.

and there are too many people treated at work like cogs

:31:46.:31:48.

in a machine rather than being human beings and there are too many people

:31:49.:31:52.

who don't see a route from their current job to progress

:31:53.:31:55.

I think we can improve all of that if we put our minds to it.

:31:56.:32:03.

And we'll be talking to Matthew Taylor, the author

:32:04.:32:05.

Theresa May will make her first big speech later this morning

:32:06.:32:15.

since being re-elected as Prime Minister in June.

:32:16.:32:17.

Her party is coming under pressure with no outright majority,

:32:18.:32:20.

and just yesterday Conservative MP Anne Marie Morris was suspended,

:32:21.:32:23.

after a recording emerged of her using a racially-offensive

:32:24.:32:25.

term, during a public discussion about Brexit.

:32:26.:32:28.

An American military aircraft has crashed in the state of Mississippi,

:32:29.:32:31.

killing at least 16 people, according to US media.

:32:32.:32:33.

It crashed about 100 miles north of Jackson,

:32:34.:32:35.

The type of aircraft is one of the most extensively used

:32:36.:32:39.

in the military, but they can also be modified to transport cargo

:32:40.:32:42.

A man has been charged over an acid attack on a woman and her cousin

:32:43.:32:51.

John Tomlin, who's 24, is alleged to have thrown acid

:32:52.:32:55.

at Resham Khan and Jameel Muhktar through their car window.

:32:56.:32:58.

Both suffered severe burns to the face and body.

:32:59.:33:07.

President Trump's eldest son is facing further allegations

:33:08.:33:09.

about a meeting he held with a Russian lawyer during last

:33:10.:33:12.

The New York Times says Donald Trump Jr was informed

:33:13.:33:15.

in advance by e-mail that the information offered

:33:16.:33:17.

by the woman was part of a Russian government effort

:33:18.:33:20.

The Senate Intelligence Committee wants to speak to him

:33:21.:33:24.

about the meeting, which in a tweet he's described

:33:25.:33:26.

If you are reaching for your second or even your third cup of coffee

:33:27.:33:37.

Scientists behind two new studies say they've uncovered the clearest

:33:38.:33:45.

evidence yet that the beverage could be beneficial to health.

:33:46.:33:49.

actual proof coffee-drinking is good for you.

:33:50.:33:56.

There are two studies of lots of different European countries. I have

:33:57.:34:06.

genuinely never ever had a sip of coffee. How can you have done that?

:34:07.:34:13.

It is the with, the pong. I'm sorry, I'm not going to change my ways

:34:14.:34:17.

because you don't like the smell -- whiff. Would you like some puppy

:34:18.:34:21.

news? We all know that puppies can be

:34:22.:34:22.

naughty and chew or eat things they shouldn't, but this puppy

:34:23.:34:26.

definitely bit off more He managed to swallow three

:34:27.:34:28.

dog leads while playing Unsurprisingly they didn't go down

:34:29.:34:37.

very well and he was taken Although he had to have emergency

:34:38.:34:42.

surgery, he's made a full recovery. He is also... Absolutely gorgeous,

:34:43.:35:00.

nothing to do with the news story but he is gorgeous. Thank you for

:35:01.:35:06.

that! He is a locker, isn't he? Coffee and Dougie news, what else do

:35:07.:35:13.

you need? -- Lukka. Johanna Konta is back on court today, what a day at

:35:14.:35:17.

Wimbledon, Rafa Nadal to talk about but we need to get to the bottom of

:35:18.:35:23.

the fact that Sal and Carol are living together during Wimbledon.

:35:24.:35:26.

Are they, though? Which is magnificent news in Chez Kirkwood.

:35:27.:35:37.

It's a challenge, it is raucous, the parties, the wild evenings, no,

:35:38.:35:42.

nothing like that! We had a story yesterday about Wayne Rooney and his

:35:43.:35:46.

pyjamas, we were attempted to take a picture of us in matching pyjamas

:35:47.:35:50.

watching the tennis, we didn't do it, we saved the world from that

:35:51.:35:55.

fate! Week two at Wimbledon, dramatic day yesterday. They are

:35:56.:35:59.

just taking the covers down on Court 14 at the moment, just think to get

:36:00.:36:16.

ready for the day ahead, a little bit of rain in the air as Carol has

:36:17.:36:19.

mentioned, and here's something, I wonder if you know this, there's a

:36:20.:36:23.

last eight clubs here, did you know this? I thought it was one of those

:36:24.:36:27.

things we were talking about, Johanna Konta and Andy Murray going

:36:28.:36:31.

for it, round the corner there is a private suite you can only get into

:36:32.:36:34.

and watch the tennis if you have made it to the last eight in the

:36:35.:36:38.

competition so we are looking good, first British man and woman into the

:36:39.:36:42.

quarter-finals in 44 years. A whopping day yesterday. The last

:36:43.:36:45.

woman to make it to the quarter-finals was Virginia Wade in

:36:46.:36:48.

1977, not all of us will remember that, I do, the year of the Queen's

:36:49.:36:54.

Silver Jubilee, Konta takes on Simona Halep this afternoon after a

:36:55.:36:58.

really tough 3-set win yesterday over Carolyn Garcia.

:36:59.:37:02.

It's those positions, those situations that I dream of or

:37:03.:37:08.

dreamed of when I was a little girl and even now to be part of those

:37:09.:37:13.

battles on big stages, so I think that's really what it's about to be

:37:14.:37:15.

a professional athlete. Andy Murray reached

:37:16.:37:16.

the quarter-finals for the 10th year straight-forward win over Benoit

:37:17.:37:19.

Paire. After all the injury worries before

:37:20.:37:22.

the tournament started, Two weeks ago I was resting, so I

:37:23.:37:42.

was also a little bit concerned when you're having issues just a few days

:37:43.:37:45.

before a big event, it's frustrating but I managed it well and I think I

:37:46.:37:51.

played some good stuff. Today, like I said, was the best I've played so

:37:52.:37:57.

far in the tournament and, yeah, I'm doing well, so hopefully I keep it

:37:58.:37:59.

up. Roger Federer is through

:38:00.:38:03.

but Rafael Nadal is out. Gilles Muller beat the two-time

:38:04.:38:05.

champion in an epic five-setter. It was 15-13 in the decider

:38:06.:38:08.

and the pair were on court for nearly five hours,

:38:09.:38:11.

meaning Novak Djokovic's match had There was some criticism

:38:12.:38:14.

of the scheduling of matches yesterday, world number one

:38:15.:38:20.

Angelique Kerber said she was really surprised to find

:38:21.:38:22.

herself on Court Two singles matches were on the show

:38:23.:38:25.

courts. We will be talking about that later

:38:26.:38:37.

in the programme. Away from Wimbledon,

:38:38.:38:42.

Romelu Lukaku has completed his ?75 million

:38:43.:38:47.

move from Everton He trained with his new team-mates

:38:48.:38:48.

for the first time yesterday on United's pre-season

:38:49.:38:52.

tour of the USA. We told you yesterday

:38:53.:38:54.

about Wayne Rooney wearing his

:38:55.:38:56.

Everton pyjamas in secret now he's got his hands

:38:57.:38:57.

on the offical kit after returning He says he wants to win

:38:58.:39:02.

trophies at his boyhood club and force his way back

:39:03.:39:06.

into the national team, so pyjamas might not

:39:07.:39:08.

be appropriate. I'm not going into retirement,

:39:09.:39:10.

I'm ready to play. I want to win and be successful

:39:11.:39:12.

at this football club It will build up in the next few

:39:13.:39:18.

weeks and I'm excited. After a rest day, the Tour de France

:39:19.:39:26.

resumes today with a stage Chris Froome holds the overall lead

:39:27.:39:29.

but he'll have to make do

:39:30.:39:34.

without team-mate Geraint Thomas who crashed out on Sunday

:39:35.:39:37.

with a broken collarbone. Even without Geraint yesterday,

:39:38.:39:47.

he crashed early on, As the rest of the teammates are.

:39:48.:40:02.

Everyone has upped their game to defend the yellow easy.

:40:03.:40:09.

Careful when you're warming up to play in Court 1.

:40:10.:40:13.

As Rafa Nadal found out to his cost because the door frames

:40:14.:40:16.

He and Gilles Muller saw the funny side, and the Spaniard seemed

:40:17.:40:20.

to have no after effects during his epic last 16 match.

:40:21.:40:23.

It's awkward because we know that he knows we are watching, he had to

:40:24.:40:36.

style it out somewhat! I haven't seen that before, Sal, that would

:40:37.:40:41.

have properly hurt! Terrible! You have to grin and get on with it.

:40:42.:40:48.

Really bad. Exactly. Before we go, I've been talking about the muffins,

:40:49.:40:53.

Johanna Konta has been baking muffins, the favourite ones she has

:40:54.:40:56.

made our white chocolate and raspberry, I will try to get hold of

:40:57.:41:01.

some of them. Sounds great, see you later!

:41:02.:41:03.

A BBC investigation's found nearly 500 children under the age of 12

:41:04.:41:07.

have been investigated by police for sexting in England

:41:08.:41:09.

Sexting is when someone uses a mobile phone to send indecent

:41:10.:41:13.

Figures from a BBC Newcastle Freedom of Information Request show there's

:41:14.:41:18.

David Smellie is the Head of Child Protection at Law firm

:41:19.:41:22.

These figures are stark, they are shocking and probably they are the

:41:23.:41:37.

tip of the iceberg in some ways, what do you make of them? I'm not

:41:38.:41:42.

surprised the figures are increasing, but it's important to

:41:43.:41:45.

remember it's not an epidemic that is happening. In an NSPCC survey of

:41:46.:41:52.

last year, they estimate approximately 13% of children have

:41:53.:41:55.

taken images of themselves topless and about 3% have taken images fully

:41:56.:42:00.

naked. That's the scale of the problem but I'm not surprised by the

:42:01.:42:04.

figures you quote. You're saying some of those are sending those

:42:05.:42:10.

images to people they don't know? The survey says about 55% of

:42:11.:42:15.

children who have taken those images have shared them with another

:42:16.:42:19.

person. About 30% have actually shared them with someone they don't

:42:20.:42:22.

know. Again, which is pretty shocking. Very serious. What crime

:42:23.:42:29.

are they committing when they do that? The law of the land was

:42:30.:42:34.

created before anyone thought about the idea of sharing naked images on

:42:35.:42:40.

a phone. The laws which are broken are the taking of an indecent

:42:41.:42:44.

photograph of a child and that law is broken even if the image you're

:42:45.:42:50.

taking is one of yourself. The possession of that image and the

:42:51.:42:57.

sharing and distribution of that image is breaking the law. The

:42:58.:43:01.

police are changing the way they are dealing with it, what is the change

:43:02.:43:05.

and is it helpful? The Home Office and police have done an excellent

:43:06.:43:09.

job. Chief Constable Simon Bailey and his team have been in charge of

:43:10.:43:13.

a change in public policy on this. What they're seeking to do is

:43:14.:43:19.

separate out low-risk cases, for example where the activity is

:43:20.:43:23.

consensual and age-appropriate, and seek not to criminalise those cases,

:43:24.:43:29.

and higher risk cases, where there are adults involved and coercion and

:43:30.:43:35.

blackmail, and there's age inappropriate activity, those are

:43:36.:43:38.

the ones they will seek to take forward. It would be handy to get

:43:39.:43:42.

advice, no doubt many parents watching this morning, what advice

:43:43.:43:47.

would you give? The advice I would give is to talk, tried to Tour de

:43:48.:43:54.

Yorkshire Aldonin about this. -- try to talk to your children. It's

:43:55.:44:00.

futile from preventing technology happening and creeping up. The other

:44:01.:44:04.

day I spoke to my children in the car and I asked them, how common is

:44:05.:44:09.

sexting? You know when you've got your children trapped in the car,

:44:10.:44:12.

that's the perfect time for that discussion so I would say to parents

:44:13.:44:16.

to talk to your children and get it out into a family discussion rather

:44:17.:44:21.

than keeping it under wraps. The important thing about the police

:44:22.:44:25.

change is otherwise you would see possibly hundreds of children with

:44:26.:44:30.

criminal records from this? That's why I think the police changes are

:44:31.:44:35.

so good, because the changes do two things. First they encourage schools

:44:36.:44:40.

and other organisations not to report cases that are low risk, and

:44:41.:44:44.

secondly when they are reported to the police, the police have to deal

:44:45.:44:47.

with them as a crime but now they have something called Outcome 21

:44:48.:44:51.

which enables no further outcome and no criminal record. They take it

:44:52.:44:56.

seriously but don't pursue it. Thanks more. -- tank through much.

:44:57.:45:00.

-- thanks very much. And we've put some advice

:45:01.:45:02.

on our Twitter and Facebook pages on how to talk to your

:45:03.:45:05.

child about 'sexting'. Carol's at Wimbledon with a look

:45:06.:45:09.

at this morning's weather. It is certainly noticeably chilly

:45:10.:45:23.

here. We can also see interruption to play but behind me you can see

:45:24.:45:27.

the court still covered, outside courts, we are likely to have some

:45:28.:45:32.

covers going on for much of today. There will be a dry interlude in the

:45:33.:45:36.

afternoon. If we look at the forecast for Wimbledon today, what

:45:37.:45:41.

we have is a cloudy start. A little spot of drizzle this morning and as

:45:42.:45:45.

we head into the early part of the afternoon we will see rain. A dry

:45:46.:45:51.

interlude again and later some heavy and persistent rain coming our way

:45:52.:45:56.

into the evening as well. More than some parts of seen for a while. That

:45:57.:46:02.

is the forecast for the southern parts, rain drifts eastward for

:46:03.:46:07.

Scotland. Northern England has sunshine and showers. If you start

:46:08.:46:10.

across southern England this morning at nine o'clock, there are bright

:46:11.:46:16.

spells of sunshine and showers. That holds true to East Anglia into the

:46:17.:46:19.

Midlands and then as we drift to northern England that there is a

:46:20.:46:22.

coherent band of rain. Persistent though not heavy. In Scotland, heavy

:46:23.:46:28.

showers and cloudy. Northern Ireland has sunshine in the north, cloud

:46:29.:46:34.

south with not far away. In Wales, heavy outbursts of rain around

:46:35.:46:37.

Cardiff and we also have rain coming in across south-west England. The

:46:38.:46:43.

first band of rain this morning is going to be moving from the west to

:46:44.:46:48.

the east. Currently across counties, for example Gloucestershire to the

:46:49.:46:51.

Home Counties, it is largely dry. The rain is coming through the

:46:52.:46:55.

course of the morning, getting over into eastern areas. And we have a

:46:56.:47:02.

lull and already worrying coming in across Wales. That will also drift

:47:03.:47:06.

eastwards and that is heavy and persistent rain. Feeling cool in

:47:07.:47:12.

that rain band. As we head into the evening the rain will continue to

:47:13.:47:15.

push over towards East Anglia, the south-east, Kent, and by the end of

:47:16.:47:21.

the day some of us will of had about 40 millimetres of rainfall, some a

:47:22.:47:24.

little more, some a little less. Overnight in the northern half of

:47:25.:47:28.

the country there are clear skies with temperatures falling to single

:47:29.:47:30.

figures. Enough here and there have in sheltered Glenn's great touch of

:47:31.:47:35.

frost. A fresh night whereas it has been muggy lately. Far more

:47:36.:47:42.

comfortable. Tomorrow morning we begin with rain in the south-east

:47:43.:47:45.

that these rapidly and in high-pressure will settle in. Fine

:47:46.:47:49.

with a lot of sunshine. Temperatures up are not compare to what we are

:47:50.:47:55.

looking at. A high of 23. As we head into Thursday, again, a lot of dry

:47:56.:47:59.

weather with a lot of sunshine. Some showers in the north and west and

:48:00.:48:03.

later on in the day a new weather front shows its hand across

:48:04.:48:06.

north-west Scotland. That will be introducing some rain. Temperature

:48:07.:48:09.

white come again, roughly where we should be at this stage in July.

:48:10.:48:15.

Before I go, pollen levels today. They have been high but with all the

:48:16.:48:19.

rain around they will not be quite so high. They will be moderate. That

:48:20.:48:23.

at least as good news for some of us. I love how you always send an

:48:24.:48:30.

good news. Thank you. How interesting to see the workings of

:48:31.:48:32.

Wimbledon behind her. There's a call from business leaders

:48:33.:48:33.

today for companies to do more The group says it could add as much

:48:34.:48:36.

as ?130 billion to the economy. Radio 5 Live Wake Up

:48:37.:48:42.

to Money's Colletta Smith is with us Yes, that's right -

:48:43.:48:46.

the UK's low productivity is a puzzle that politicians

:48:47.:48:51.

and businesses are very keen to solve - but first let's

:48:52.:48:54.

have a look first at how we got Productivity is the measure of how

:48:55.:48:57.

much one person can contribute So it's a glance at how

:48:58.:49:03.

hard we're working - but also how smart -

:49:04.:49:09.

and how much we're investing Since the financial crisis the UK

:49:10.:49:12.

has been falling behind a lot of our neighbours in this-it takes

:49:13.:49:17.

a German worker just four days The UK has very high employment

:49:18.:49:20.

but it's the quality of those jobs that is worrying

:49:21.:49:30.

politicians and businesses. Firms not having the money to invest

:49:31.:49:34.

in new machinery is another factor. It's important because raising

:49:35.:49:37.

productivity should mean getting But since the financial crisis -

:49:38.:49:41.

productivity hasn't really improved and the latest figures for the first

:49:42.:49:49.

three months of this year show Two years ago, the government asked

:49:50.:50:04.

a group of businesses to look at why the UK lags behind and how

:50:05.:50:09.

businesses can be more productive. They were led by Sir Charlie

:50:10.:50:12.

Mayfield, the chairman of the John Lewis partnership and he is joining

:50:13.:50:19.

us now. Good morning. First of all, businesses, chancellors have all

:50:20.:50:22.

been scratching their heads trying to solve this. Are you any closer to

:50:23.:50:28.

finding an answer? What we want to do is move this from being a puzzle

:50:29.:50:32.

to an opportunity. It is an important one, like you say, because

:50:33.:50:36.

although productivity sounds like a word that economists use, it really

:50:37.:50:41.

matters to things like wages and competitiveness and growth and

:50:42.:50:44.

ultimately to employment. So what we have identified is that there are...

:50:45.:50:48.

If we can get many businesses to do a little bit better, we can make a

:50:49.:50:54.

huge difference to the economy and affect all those things. Are you

:50:55.:50:58.

putting emphasis then on the business to do the work rather than,

:50:59.:51:00.

necessarily, calling on the government to improve infrastructure

:51:01.:51:03.

or to spend any more muggy on technology? The government has an

:51:04.:51:08.

important role to play. It needs to put in place those conditions. That

:51:09.:51:12.

most of the problem has to be solved by business. It happens in companies

:51:13.:51:16.

at firm level. That is where action needs to be taken. What we have

:51:17.:51:20.

discovered is that a lot of the opportunity can be grasped not by

:51:21.:51:26.

companies having to go from, sort of, making widgets to winches or

:51:27.:51:29.

something completely new, they just have to do a bit more of what

:51:30.:51:33.

companies are already doing in their sector, and the companies of the

:51:34.:51:37.

same size. Could make an enormous difference to this is about taking

:51:38.:51:41.

thousands of companies are moving up by an inch, rather than by the match

:51:42.:51:46.

I to take a few up by a mile. How do you do that? Have you encourage to

:51:47.:51:50.

be more productive? First of all, business is not good at being told

:51:51.:51:54.

what to do. We want to engage them and today we launch a movement. A

:51:55.:51:59.

movement that we want to engage thousands of businesses across the

:52:00.:52:03.

UK. We will have a small organisation at the centre of this,

:52:04.:52:07.

but of will work with thousands of different employers across the UK.

:52:08.:52:11.

Basically we will provide three things. We have modern tools which

:52:12.:52:15.

companies to figure out how good they are at some of those management

:52:16.:52:18.

practices. Things like colour management, leadership, future

:52:19.:52:22.

planning, some good but basic stuff that people can do things about. We

:52:23.:52:27.

will provide them with data and analytics to help the measure

:52:28.:52:29.

productivity and figure out what best practice looks like. And then

:52:30.:52:34.

we will also help them to get in touch with other people so that they

:52:35.:52:38.

can work out how they can make improvements and encourage

:52:39.:52:40.

communities of businesses across the country to come together and share

:52:41.:52:44.

ideas and figure out how they can make what we hope will be a big

:52:45.:52:47.

improvement. It is interesting that you were saying it is about

:52:48.:52:51.

management and leadership style. At a time when we have seen that

:52:52.:52:57.

workers pay stick at a level and, yet, the bosses and managers at ward

:52:58.:53:01.

level have seen their pay rise. The thing about productivity is that

:53:02.:53:07.

everybody wants to be paid more, and that is a good thing, that wages are

:53:08.:53:11.

rising. The wages can only rise in jobs can only stay at their level of

:53:12.:53:16.

you can dry productivity at the same time. So, you know, the two go very

:53:17.:53:20.

much hand in hand. I also think it is important to think about the

:53:21.:53:24.

workplace and the role of work in a wider context. People go to work for

:53:25.:53:29.

lots of reason that much of it is a sense of the film and. I think

:53:30.:53:32.

Matthew Taylor's report today would discuss the importance of good work.

:53:33.:53:36.

A lot of what we do today in launching this movement is very much

:53:37.:53:47.

is in line with a. -- that. Thank you very much, we will see later.

:53:48.:53:49.

It's 100 years since the first mass-produced tractors came

:53:50.:53:51.

They were sent to help during the First World War,

:53:52.:53:55.

when many farmers were on the frontline.

:53:56.:53:57.

Breakfast's Tim Muffett is at the Great Yorkshire Show

:53:58.:54:00.

where the centenary is being marked.

:54:01.:54:11.

I would be disappointed, Tim, if you were not riding a tractor. I am so

:54:12.:54:19.

selling a boyhood dream. The great Yorkshire show, first held in 1838

:54:20.:54:25.

but this year's showers celebrating 100 years, as you say, of the

:54:26.:54:32.

mass-produced tractor. I'm currently writing a Ford, built in the 1970s.

:54:33.:54:35.

These machines, they transformed agriculture. They transformed the

:54:36.:54:40.

way a farming community worked. I. It now and put the clutch on and

:54:41.:54:47.

pull that. Safety checks, complete. I will jump off and walk down here

:54:48.:54:52.

and we will go and find a man who knows a thing or two about the

:54:53.:54:56.

vintage tractors. This collection is something and it ranges right

:54:57.:55:03.

through the past 100 years. Brines stood proudly by... What is this?

:55:04.:55:10.

This is a 1917 Ford Ministry of Munitions tractor that we brought

:55:11.:55:15.

over in the First World War to help British agriculture, because all of

:55:16.:55:19.

the men and horses had gone off to the First World War. Henry Ford, we

:55:20.:55:24.

know of him as the person who made a model T car and I did not know he

:55:25.:55:28.

was a big deal in the world of tractors. This was this first

:55:29.:55:32.

tractor. Who was raised on a farm and wanted to get rid of the

:55:33.:55:35.

drudgery associated with the horse. He put this mind to building a

:55:36.:55:39.

tractor and this is what happened. And it transformed the world of

:55:40.:55:42.

agriculture, didn't it? Yes, it did. He got rid of veal... Horses were

:55:43.:55:48.

still raw used until the 1940s and 1950s but mechanisation had come to

:55:49.:55:56.

could not be stopped. Thank you. We will talk more later. As we walk

:55:57.:56:00.

along here we can see a chronological display, if you like,

:56:01.:56:03.

of the way that tractors have changed over the years. Of course,

:56:04.:56:07.

when it comes to modern day farming, they are an integral part of the way

:56:08.:56:13.

a farm is run. And you are a farmer, what impact they have on the farm?

:56:14.:56:17.

It is massive. They are used every day and the amount of work that they

:56:18.:56:21.

actually do, the amount of manpower they have taken out over the years

:56:22.:56:25.

is phenomenal, really. One tractor now can do the work of what 50

:56:26.:56:31.

people used to do. And as far as the future goes, what changes are

:56:32.:56:37.

coming? Everything is getting automated now with autos via so you

:56:38.:56:43.

are able to put your wheels within two centimetres of where they were

:56:44.:56:46.

before and it is all about efficiency, really. We will talk

:56:47.:56:50.

later. I am in tractor heaven here. We will talk more to those who run

:56:51.:56:56.

them and whose careers, really, are dependent upon tractors and their

:56:57.:56:57.

success. Thank you very much. Lovely to see

:56:58.:57:01.

them this morning. Up close and personal with a tractor. That was a

:57:02.:57:06.

full frontal at the end that. Time now for news, travel and weather

:57:07.:00:27.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:00:28.:00:28.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:00:29.:00:32.

Now, though, it's back to Louise and Dan.

:00:33.:00:34.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:00:35.:00:38.

A review for the government calls for the end of the cash

:00:39.:00:43.

With suggestions for tackling low-paid jobs, zero hours contracts

:00:44.:00:46.

and the gig economy, it says the government should strive

:00:47.:00:49.

And from paying more wages to providing things like sick pay,

:00:50.:00:53.

I'll be finding out what it could mean for businesses

:00:54.:00:56.

and getting some of their reaction to the proposals.

:00:57.:01:09.

Good morning, it's Tuesday the 11th of July.

:01:10.:01:13.

For the first time since 1984 there's a British woman

:01:14.:01:19.

Yes, that woman is Johanna Konta. She's due to play Simona Halep on

:01:20.:01:36.

centre court later this afternoon. Monza is also through. That means is

:01:37.:01:41.

the first time in 44 years there's been a British man and woman in the

:01:42.:01:46.

quarter-finals. -- Andy Murray. What a night last night for Rafa Nadal,

:01:47.:01:50.

he went out of Wimbledon losing in five sets in just under five hours.

:01:51.:01:56.

Dealing with dementia, how new technology could help people cope

:01:57.:01:58.

with the condition at home. From farmers

:01:59.:02:02.

on the frontline to modern day machinery,

:02:03.:02:08.

we'll find out about 100 years Much cooler today than of late,

:02:09.:02:10.

the risk of interruption today. Heavy rain cracking from the west to

:02:11.:02:26.

the east causing interruptions. A lot of surface water and spray on

:02:27.:02:32.

the roads. In northern England, Northern Ireland and Scotland there

:02:33.:02:35.

will be sunshine and showers. More with that and Sal later in the

:02:36.:02:37.

programme. An end to cash-in-hand jobs

:02:38.:02:40.

and changing the rules on the gig economy, just two of

:02:41.:02:47.

the recommendations in a major The Matthew Taylor review also says

:02:48.:02:50.

there are too many people who are being treated

:02:51.:02:54.

like cogs in a machine Our economics correspondent

:02:55.:02:57.

Andy Verity reports. In the last ten years,

:02:58.:03:05.

the economy's generated record numbers of jobs and the lowest

:03:06.:03:08.

unemployment rate in nearly But according to the man who led

:03:09.:03:11.

a government-commissioned review, more jobs hasn't always

:03:12.:03:14.

meant good jobs. In my view, there's too much work,

:03:15.:03:17.

particularly at the bottom end of the labour market,

:03:18.:03:20.

that isn't of a high enough quality and there's too many people not

:03:21.:03:23.

having their rights fully respected and there are too many people

:03:24.:03:26.

treated at work like cogs in a machine rather than being human

:03:27.:03:29.

beings and there are too many people who don't see a route

:03:30.:03:33.

from their current job to progress The review will recommend that

:03:34.:03:36.

if someone is controlled and supervised then they're

:03:37.:03:42.

classified as a worker, Those workers may be entitled

:03:43.:03:46.

to benefits like holiday pay and employers may have to pay

:03:47.:03:53.

National Insurance at 13.8%. That's broadly in line

:03:54.:03:55.

with a landmark court ruling in a case brought by this former

:03:56.:03:58.

Uber driver Yaseen Aslam. I don't think it helps me

:03:59.:04:01.

as a worker for what I've been fighting for in the tribunal,

:04:02.:04:06.

and that's what's concerning because the workers haven't been

:04:07.:04:08.

involved in the process The review also makes a bigger point

:04:09.:04:11.

that self-employed work from plumbers to painters yields far

:04:12.:04:16.

less tax for the Treasury, especially if the work

:04:17.:04:21.

is cash in hand. For consumers, though,

:04:22.:04:23.

the recommendations are likely to mean inexpensive services

:04:24.:04:25.

will no longer be as cheap. And we'll be talking

:04:26.:04:28.

to Matthew Taylor, the author Theresa May will make her first big

:04:29.:04:38.

speech later this morning since being re-elected

:04:39.:04:44.

as Prime Minister in June. Her party is coming under pressure

:04:45.:04:46.

with no outright majority, and yesterday Conservative MP

:04:47.:04:49.

Anne Marie Morris was suspended of her using a racially-offensive

:04:50.:04:51.

term. Our political correspondent

:04:52.:04:54.

Chris Mason joins us How does this latest controversy

:04:55.:05:10.

affect this tiny majority? Good morning, two things matter in

:05:11.:05:14.

politics, majority and authority. What happened yesterday with the

:05:15.:05:20.

Conservative MP, it arguably chips away at both elements of those

:05:21.:05:25.

things for the Conservatives. Firstly technically because, to use

:05:26.:05:29.

the Westminster jargon, she has had the whip removed, that means she's

:05:30.:05:35.

no longer a Conservative MP. She is an MP, still in the House of

:05:36.:05:38.

Commons, but she isn't a Conservative MP any more but in all

:05:39.:05:42.

likelihood she is still pretty likely to vote with the

:05:43.:05:46.

Conservatives in crucial votes. That may not make any difference in terms

:05:47.:05:50.

of the numbers and the majority. In terms of authority, the Prime

:05:51.:05:54.

Minister wanted to be seen to react very quickly to this yesterday in

:05:55.:05:58.

suspending her membership of the Parliamentary party, but

:05:59.:06:03.

nonetheless, it is very much yet again another headline that Theresa

:06:04.:06:07.

May would have rather not seem. The speech she is giving later this

:06:08.:06:11.

morning, the context of which is what you'd been talking about, this

:06:12.:06:15.

business of working practices, in reality all of the questions are

:06:16.:06:19.

around Theresa May and how long she can last as Prime Minister. Thursday

:06:20.:06:24.

marks her first anniversary in 10 Downing Street, plenty are wondering

:06:25.:06:27.

if she will be around long enough to see a second. Thanks very much,

:06:28.:06:29.

Chris. Britain will have men's and women's

:06:30.:06:32.

quarter-finalists at Wimbledon for the first time since 1973

:06:33.:06:35.

after wins for Johanna Konta Sixth seed Konta beat

:06:36.:06:38.

France's Caroline Garcia on Court 1 yesterday afternoon,

:06:39.:06:41.

she's the first British woman It's those positions,

:06:42.:06:43.

those situations that I dream of, or dreamed of, when I was a little

:06:44.:06:52.

girl and even now to be part of those battles on big stages,

:06:53.:06:56.

so I think that's really what it's Back at Wimbledon later with Sally

:06:57.:07:12.

and Carol Ann Johanna Konta goes again today to try to reach the last

:07:13.:07:16.

four of Wimbledon, takes on Simona Halep to get into the last four. And

:07:17.:07:21.

clearly enjoying it -- Carol and Johanna Konta.

:07:22.:07:23.

A man has been charged over an acid attack on a woman and her cousin

:07:24.:07:27.

John Tomlin, who's 24, is alleged to have thrown acid

:07:28.:07:31.

at Resham Khan and Jameel Muhktar through their car window.

:07:32.:07:33.

Both suffered severe burns to the face and body.

:07:34.:07:40.

An American military aircraft has crashed in the state of Mississippi,

:07:41.:07:43.

killing at least 16 people, according to US media.

:07:44.:07:46.

It crashed about 100 miles north of Jackson,

:07:47.:07:48.

The type of aircraft is one of the most extensively used

:07:49.:07:52.

in the military, but they can also be modified to transport cargo

:07:53.:07:55.

A BBC investigation has found nearly 500 children aged 12 and under have

:07:56.:07:59.

been questioned by police for sexting since 2013.

:08:00.:08:01.

The practice is when someone uses a mobile phone to send indecent

:08:02.:08:05.

Figures obtained by BBC Newcastle show there's been a steady increase

:08:06.:08:09.

in the number of people being investigated, with a boy aged

:08:10.:08:12.

Clearly the NSPCC don't want children criminalised for this sort

:08:13.:08:16.

of behaviour and it's really important that police are talking

:08:17.:08:18.

to children in a restorative way, looking at the safeguarding issues

:08:19.:08:21.

for that child, making sure that the child isn't criminalised.

:08:22.:08:35.

President Trump's eldest son is facing further allegations

:08:36.:08:37.

about a meeting he held with a Russian lawyer during last

:08:38.:08:40.

The New York Times says Donald Trump Jr was informed

:08:41.:08:46.

in advance by e-mail that the information offered

:08:47.:08:48.

by the woman was part of a Russian government effort

:08:49.:08:51.

The Senate Intelligence Committee wants to speak to him

:08:52.:08:55.

about the meeting, which in a tweet he's described

:08:56.:08:57.

This is my favourite news story of the day.

:08:58.:09:09.

If you are reaching for your second or even your third cup of coffee

:09:10.:09:13.

Scientists behind two new studies say they've uncovered the clearest

:09:14.:09:19.

evidence yet that the beverage could be beneficial to health.

:09:20.:09:21.

But others have urged caution, saying there's no actual proof

:09:22.:09:24.

Two studies, across Europe, I'm in! I have to say, you are a different

:09:25.:09:39.

human once you've had one. I don't drink it, never have, probably never

:09:40.:09:45.

will, you try every day to get me to get involved. You are different

:09:46.:09:50.

after you've had one. That's not good, is it? Your quiet!

:09:51.:09:52.

Plans to almost double the number of Welsh speakers

:09:53.:09:55.

The Welsh government wants one million people to be

:09:56.:09:58.

There will be more teaching at an earlier age, and more

:09:59.:10:03.

Welsh-speaking teachers in primary and secondary schools.

:10:04.:10:05.

Our Wales correspondent Sian Lloyd reports.

:10:06.:10:12.

At this school, children's lessons are taught through

:10:13.:10:17.

Leaders from the Welsh government came to spread the word

:10:18.:10:21.

about their Welsh language goal, supported by a guest popular

:10:22.:10:24.

We've laid down the gauntlet if you like.

:10:25.:10:28.

It's a big task, but it's achievable.

:10:29.:10:30.

Expanding Welsh medium education is at the heart of the strategy.

:10:31.:10:36.

It includes creating 150 Welsh language nursery groups over

:10:37.:10:38.

the number of Welsh speaking teachers.

:10:39.:10:48.

They have recognised that there must be opportunities to learn and use

:10:49.:10:51.

There is also a recognition that they need support from parents.

:10:52.:10:56.

For the parents, they need to be encouraged.

:10:57.:10:58.

will all the correspondence be in Welsh?

:10:59.:11:09.

We want to take parents with us. The Welsh language has equal status with

:11:10.:11:23.

English. If you're living in Wales then it's voluntary. It makes sense,

:11:24.:11:27.

doesn't it, to keep the language alive. Brought up and have family in

:11:28.:11:33.

Wales but don't speak Welsh, wasn't forced on me so I don't want to do

:11:34.:11:35.

it. The Welsh language is celebrated

:11:36.:11:38.

every year at a cultural festival, which welcomes both those who do

:11:39.:11:41.

and do not speak Welsh. The Welsh government wants more

:11:42.:11:50.

people to be able to communicate in Welsh. But the public's appetite for

:11:51.:11:55.

change remains to be seen. Sian Lloyd, BBC News, Cardiff.

:11:56.:12:04.

For the first time in history, scientists got a close up look

:12:05.:12:08.

of one of the most recognisable features of Jupiter,

:12:09.:12:10.

the centuries-old storm known as the Great Red Spot.

:12:11.:12:12.

Doesn't sound grand enough, does it? Should have a better name.

:12:13.:12:15.

We'll see the first images of the storm later this week.

:12:16.:12:18.

The aim is to collect data about the composition of the clouds

:12:19.:12:22.

and find out what lies beneath them.

:12:23.:12:24.

Thank you for all your Jupiter based facts this morning. It takes 12

:12:25.:12:29.

Earth years to orbit the sun and a day on Jupiter is ten hours long.

:12:30.:12:34.

Just ten hours! Imagine how much you would be missing out on. It means a

:12:35.:12:39.

shift would be quite short, a ten hour day. Up I'm up for that! -- I'm

:12:40.:12:43.

up for that. Workers should be treated like human

:12:44.:12:45.

beings and not like cogs in a machine, that's

:12:46.:12:48.

the conclusion of a review in to the state of

:12:49.:12:50.

the British workplace. The report also called for an end

:12:51.:12:53.

to the cash-in-hand economy, which is worth about

:12:54.:12:56.

?6 billion a year. He joins us now

:12:57.:12:58.

from central London. Matthew, good morning, lovely to

:12:59.:13:06.

speak to you on Breakfast this morning. An end to the cash in hand

:13:07.:13:10.

economy, how would that work and what with that look like? This

:13:11.:13:13.

morning as people are hearing this I'm sure they're thinking about

:13:14.:13:19.

handymen, window cleaners, cleaners, childminders, people like that, how

:13:20.:13:22.

do you end an economy like that? This is a small part of a report

:13:23.:13:26.

which is about how we improve the quality of work in the British

:13:27.:13:35.

economy, but one of the points we make is when we talk about

:13:36.:13:38.

technology in jobs, we're often pessimistic about the impact of

:13:39.:13:41.

technology in terms of losing jobs but technology can make things

:13:42.:13:44.

easier for people at work and one of the suggestions we make is over time

:13:45.:13:48.

we can move to a situation where when we pay for Labour,

:13:49.:13:50.

self-employed labour, a window cleaner, we can do it without cash

:13:51.:13:54.

and that will allow that person to pay their tax as they are and, as we

:13:55.:13:58.

do as employees so they don't have to fill in the own risk tax returns

:13:59.:14:03.

and it means at the same time they can save money for a pension or

:14:04.:14:11.

insure them against sickness and one of moving to a system like that it

:14:12.:14:15.

means for those that want to make sure when we pay for those services

:14:16.:14:19.

the person we are paying is paying their taxes, that system would make

:14:20.:14:23.

that more likely. You say it's a small part of a bigger study, let's

:14:24.:14:26.

talk about the study, you have spoken to hundreds of workers, what

:14:27.:14:30.

are the main messages they say they want from the people that employ

:14:31.:14:33.

them? We're really good as a country in creating jobs. Were seeing more

:14:34.:14:38.

people in work than ever before, low unemployment, lots of flexible work

:14:39.:14:41.

and those inflexible work like it but there's a problem about quality

:14:42.:14:45.

of work especially among lower paid lower skilled workers. We have to

:14:46.:14:51.

tackle exploitation. There are too many people who suffer one-sided

:14:52.:14:55.

flexibility, the employers have lots of flexibility but that isn't how it

:14:56.:14:59.

feels to them. They are insecure and they don't feel like they have a

:15:00.:15:03.

voice at work. Secondly our system is a bit out of date. We need more

:15:04.:15:09.

clarity about four example who is self-employed and who is a worker,

:15:10.:15:12.

who should pay National Insurance and who shouldn't. Thirdly there are

:15:13.:15:17.

some bigger underlying things we need to do if we want a good work

:15:18.:15:21.

economy, things like improving people's employability and working

:15:22.:15:26.

in sectors, because certain sectors like social care, hospitality has a

:15:27.:15:30.

proponent saw people in lower paid, lower skilled work so we need to

:15:31.:15:34.

work in those sectors to make sure those people have good jobs and have

:15:35.:15:37.

the possibility to progress to better paid jobs. You say in terms

:15:38.:15:43.

of bringing about that change you say that's required, it's not about

:15:44.:15:47.

national regulation but responsible corporate governance. How do you

:15:48.:15:52.

make sure these companies solve a regular? How do you promote that,

:15:53.:15:56.

how can that change take place -- self-regulatory? -- self regulate.

:15:57.:16:03.

What we say in the report is the most important thing is the way

:16:04.:16:07.

people are treated by their managers and their company but we're not

:16:08.:16:10.

saying we can rely on salt regulation, there are a number of

:16:11.:16:15.

things that will protect people, especially people working in these

:16:16.:16:19.

flexible ways, zero hours workers, agency workers, people who don't

:16:20.:16:24.

have the security and certainty of people who are full employees so

:16:25.:16:28.

there are a range of measures we suggest to improve the way we

:16:29.:16:33.

protect those people to make sure they understand their rights and

:16:34.:16:37.

they can exorcise those rights. Can I bring forward a point the TUC

:16:38.:16:44.

said, the balance of power will shift under your recommendations and

:16:45.:16:47.

the Unite union have compare them to a dog that is all bark and no bite,

:16:48.:16:52.

are you confident your review can bring about change? I think my

:16:53.:16:57.

review if it was fully implemented would be the biggest reset of the

:16:58.:17:02.

way we think about work and regulate work for a generation. We're talking

:17:03.:17:07.

about fundamental shifts. Media view a couple of examples. At the moment

:17:08.:17:12.

the threshold for independent representation at work, someone who

:17:13.:17:16.

represents you, for rights to consultation is 10% of employees

:17:17.:17:19.

have to vote for that, we want that at 2% so it is easy for people to

:17:20.:17:25.

get independent representation. We are talking about the idea of a

:17:26.:17:28.

higher minimum wage for people on lower hours contracts for the extra

:17:29.:17:34.

hours they get, so in a sense we are saying if you are only guaranteed no

:17:35.:17:38.

hours or two or three hours and you are asked to work more then you

:17:39.:17:41.

should get paid more, that's partly to persuade organisations to think

:17:42.:17:44.

harder about how they can give people more certainty. We're talking

:17:45.:17:48.

about a range of measures to make it easier for people to enforce their

:17:49.:17:52.

rights and to ensure that everybody understands they have holiday pay

:17:53.:17:56.

and statutory sick pay and they can exercise those rights. It's up to

:17:57.:18:01.

the trade unions to determine their position, but there's no question

:18:02.:18:04.

worthy report to be fully implemented it would be a major step

:18:05.:18:07.

forward for workers and vulnerable workers.

:18:08.:18:12.

Fascinating to talk to you this morning and interesting to see what

:18:13.:18:17.

the economy will look like in the future.

:18:18.:18:19.

Carol is at Wimbledon again for us this morning. Quite chilly this

:18:20.:18:24.

morning, she is wearing her coat. Certainly is. Good morning and

:18:25.:18:28.

welcome. Not just a little bit chilly but we expect some rain.

:18:29.:18:32.

Currently they are taking the covers of some of the outside courts but

:18:33.:18:37.

they will probably be in use as we go through the course of today.

:18:38.:18:40.

Especially later on. Centre court was the first court to have the

:18:41.:18:46.

cover on, way back in 1922 but all courts that covers since 1971. Of

:18:47.:18:50.

course, the roof on Centre Court was first used in 2009, ensuring the

:18:51.:18:55.

play continued. You can see behind me the roof being built across court

:18:56.:18:59.

number one. That will be completed in 2019. The forecast for Wimbledon

:19:00.:19:06.

today is a varied one. We begin with a dry weather, a bit of cloud

:19:07.:19:10.

around. We see some rain early afternoon and then another dry slot

:19:11.:19:15.

and then later in the afternoon and into the evening we will return to

:19:16.:19:19.

heavy and persistent rain is feeling notably cooler than it was

:19:20.:19:23.

yesterday. Today we have got that rain, it will also affect us moving

:19:24.:19:28.

from west to east across parts of Wales in southern England were as

:19:29.:19:32.

the Scotland and Northern Ireland had sunshine and showers. This

:19:33.:19:34.

morning at nine across southern England we have bright spells, sunny

:19:35.:19:42.

spells and we have showers that is the same to East Anglia and

:19:43.:19:45.

Midlands. To the far north of northern England into Scotland, a

:19:46.:19:50.

lot of cloud, a couple of bright breaks and some showers in Scotland.

:19:51.:19:53.

For Northern Ireland, the northern half has sunshine this thing, the

:19:54.:19:58.

south Seas more cloud. Rain not too far away. For Wales, a lot of cloud

:19:59.:20:03.

and persistent rain, not particularly heavy for most of Wales

:20:04.:20:07.

although in the south it is. For south-west England, a similar story,

:20:08.:20:10.

there is a lot of cloud around and we also have some rain moving in.

:20:11.:20:14.

That band of rain will continue to journey eastwards, so to start the

:20:15.:20:18.

day across Gloucestershire and into Dorset, Hampshire, the Home

:20:19.:20:21.

Counties, the forecast is similar to what we have here. Bright spells

:20:22.:20:25.

with showers. Will not be long before the rain moves over from the

:20:26.:20:29.

west towards the east. There will be a dry load and then rain across

:20:30.:20:33.

Wales and the south-west. Heavy and more persistent rain and zooms

:20:34.:20:39.

across as well. North of that, Scotland and Northern Ireland,

:20:40.:20:41.

northern England, sunshine and showers. As we have through the

:20:42.:20:45.

evening in overnight with the heavy rain continuing to move eastwards.

:20:46.:20:48.

Some into the North Sea. By the time it does some parts of the south will

:20:49.:20:52.

add 40 millimetres of rain, possibly more, some a little less. North of

:20:53.:20:56.

that again, from northern England and Northern Ireland, Scotland,

:20:57.:21:00.

there will be some clear skies, temperatures dipping in Scotland

:21:01.:21:03.

into single figures. A touch of frost in some short of Glen stick in

:21:04.:21:07.

the south, a much more comfortable night for sleeping where it has been

:21:08.:21:11.

so muggy oblate. Tomorrow we begin with rain in the south-east first

:21:12.:21:14.

thing. That will clear, high pressure builds in and then we all

:21:15.:21:18.

have a dry day with sunny spells. Temperatures are responding

:21:19.:21:24.

accordingly. We are at a high of 22 or 23 deep as we head into Thursday,

:21:25.:21:28.

again, a lot of dry weather. Sunshine around, some showers,

:21:29.:21:31.

particularly in the north and the west and then later in the day,

:21:32.:21:35.

again, a new weather front shows its hand, coming in across north-west

:21:36.:21:38.

Scotland. Temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage in

:21:39.:21:43.

July. Just before I go, one more thing, if you have an allergy to

:21:44.:21:48.

pollen today, the levels across the UK today are low or moderate. Music

:21:49.:21:52.

to my ears. Look at that, ending with some good news. I am looking at

:21:53.:21:58.

the flowers, so wonderful to have you their. I was watching Wimbledon

:21:59.:22:02.

yesterday, Carol, I know you extend on through the day and you got told

:22:03.:22:07.

off by sue for mentioning the R word. She was not happy when you

:22:08.:22:14.

mentioned rain. She is lovely but it will rain today. Don't you worry,

:22:15.:22:21.

Carol, now that you have said it is well. It is 722, we will be back

:22:22.:22:27.

Wimbledon in about ten minutes time. This morning

:22:28.:22:29.

we are looking at the way dementia patients can stay at home for longer

:22:30.:22:33.

than using new technology. The idea is being trialled in the UK

:22:34.:22:34.

and means people with the condition will be monitored remotely by a team

:22:35.:22:38.

that can track physical activity, Breakfast's John Maguire's

:22:39.:22:41.

been to take a look. Fulfil in June Bell, for whom the

:22:42.:22:54.

home they have lived end four years is where their hearts are. They are

:22:55.:22:57.

trialling technology that should help June to stay here as long as

:22:58.:23:01.

possible. She was diagnosed with dementia one year ago. One of our

:23:02.:23:07.

aims has always been to stay as long as we can within the home. Our home.

:23:08.:23:13.

And what the technology has done has enabled us to do that. Because we

:23:14.:23:19.

intend to die in our beds, so to speak. It makes you feel safer,

:23:20.:23:25.

doesn't it? It does. It does to think that somebody is out there,

:23:26.:23:33.

concerned about me. I think that is, you know, it is quite touching,

:23:34.:23:38.

really. That people are so kind. This is how the system works.

:23:39.:23:44.

Various sensors in the house monitor the movements of June and also

:23:45.:23:52.

readily check the hills cloud pressure, to a cloud oxygen levels

:23:53.:23:55.

for example. That information is immediately sent to this clinical

:23:56.:24:00.

monitoring team and staff here can combine gin's medical and

:24:01.:24:03.

environment or data to build up a fuller picture of her hills. If you

:24:04.:24:08.

look at some of the motion data here with you can see she is moving in

:24:09.:24:13.

the living room, hallway, you also see how often she was in bed. You

:24:14.:24:17.

can look at some body temperature and all this data could suggest

:24:18.:24:22.

comic issue being agitated? Is there infection? Putting everything

:24:23.:24:27.

together could give us a good picture about how well she is. There

:24:28.:24:32.

are currently 200 patients with mild or moderate dementia on the trial,

:24:33.:24:36.

based in the Surrey in North East Hampshire NHS area. They're looking

:24:37.:24:40.

for more volunteers. The red stethoscope and an on-screen alert

:24:41.:24:45.

warms the team of potential problems. They may then called the

:24:46.:24:51.

household, from medical teams or ask staff on the outside the society to

:24:52.:24:55.

pay a visit. Another so sleepout has been going off a lot. The technology

:24:56.:24:59.

is also useful for GPs and hospital staff. This contained in June's

:25:00.:25:07.

recent readings, a day by day patient record with a better insight

:25:08.:25:12.

into her health. It has been an important aspect of this project

:25:13.:25:16.

that people on the trial have been able to take their data to their GP

:25:17.:25:20.

or consultant so that they have that set of data to make clinical

:25:21.:25:25.

judgement in a much more effective way. The results of the trial, the

:25:26.:25:30.

first of its kind in the UK, will not be known until next year. But

:25:31.:25:35.

early indicators are positive. These gadgets are helping people stay

:25:36.:25:39.

longer in their homes, safe and secure in the knowledge that helped,

:25:40.:25:44.

if needed, is just a phone call or a mouse click away. We will be looking

:25:45.:25:52.

at that, if you have questions for later on, get in contact with us via

:25:53.:25:56.

the usual numbers and social media is well. 25 minutes past seven, and

:25:57.:26:03.

Marks Spencer have just relieved their latest profits. Best of the

:26:04.:26:12.

big it is slowly turning around Marks Spencer. They released their

:26:13.:26:16.

results last three months and they seem overall an increase of 2.7% in

:26:17.:26:20.

profit. Most of that is thanks to their strong food sale, but the big

:26:21.:26:25.

four we had previously seen in their clothes has improved a little. The

:26:26.:26:31.

boss says they have not needed to fail the season, so they sell more

:26:32.:26:36.

things at full price. That positive news seems to be reflected more

:26:37.:26:39.

widely as well with figures from the British retail Consortium showing

:26:40.:26:43.

that retail sales were up by 2% last month which is one of the warmest

:26:44.:26:46.

June is on record. The weather is believed to have led to more people

:26:47.:26:50.

spending on summer clothing, health and beauty products. There is a call

:26:51.:26:54.

from business leaders this morning for companies to do more to make

:26:55.:26:57.

workers more productive. They say it could add up to ?130 billion to the

:26:58.:27:07.

economy. The group, led by the John Lewis chairman was set up by the

:27:08.:27:11.

government in nine years ago to look at how to boost the UK's

:27:12.:27:14.

productivity which lags behind many other countries. Thank you very

:27:15.:27:22.

much. Title is fine by this morning. It is nearly half past seven. Time

:27:23.:27:25.

for news, travel and Hello, this is Breakfast,

:27:26.:30:51.

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. I miss time that! No time to drink

:30:52.:30:58.

that! -- miss timed. Let's tell you about the latest

:30:59.:31:08.

news: An end to cash-in-hand jobs

:31:09.:31:10.

and changing the rules on the minimum wage,

:31:11.:31:12.

just two of the recommendations in a major review

:31:13.:31:14.

into the way we work. The study, led by a former

:31:15.:31:17.

adviser to Tony Blair, Matthew Taylor, recommends that

:31:18.:31:20.

people working in what's known as the gig economy,

:31:21.:31:22.

where workers get paid per task, should receive new legal protections

:31:23.:31:25.

and their employers should make Speaking earlier on Breakfast,

:31:26.:31:27.

the report author Matthew Taylor told us he hopes to stop

:31:28.:31:31.

employers taking advantage There's a problem about quality

:31:32.:31:33.

of work especially among lower paid There are too many people who suffer

:31:34.:31:58.

one-sided flexibility, the employers have lots

:31:59.:32:03.

of flexibility but that isn't how it They are insecure and they don't

:32:04.:32:06.

feel like they have a voice at work. Theresa May will make her first big

:32:07.:32:11.

speech later this morning since being re-elected

:32:12.:32:14.

as Prime Minister in June. Her party is coming under pressure

:32:15.:32:16.

with no outright majority, and just yesterday Conservative MP

:32:17.:32:19.

Anne Marie Morris was suspended, after a recording emerged

:32:20.:32:21.

of her using a racially-offensive term, during a public

:32:22.:32:24.

discussion about Brexit. An American military aircraft has

:32:25.:32:26.

crashed in the state of Mississippi, killing at least 16 people,

:32:27.:32:29.

according to US media. It crashed about 100

:32:30.:32:31.

miles north of Jackson, The type of aircraft is one

:32:32.:32:33.

of the most extensively used in the military, but they can also

:32:34.:32:37.

be modified to transport cargo A man has been charged over an acid

:32:38.:32:41.

attack on a woman and her cousin John Tomlin, who's 24,

:32:42.:32:45.

is alleged to have thrown acid at Resham Khan and Jameel Muhktar

:32:46.:32:49.

through their car window. Both suffered severe burns

:32:50.:32:52.

to the face and body. A BBC investigation has found nearly

:32:53.:33:10.

500 children aged 12 and under have been questioned by police

:33:11.:33:13.

for sexting since 2013. The practice is when someone uses

:33:14.:33:16.

a mobile phone to send indecent Figures obtained by BBC Newcastle

:33:17.:33:19.

show there's been a steady increase in the number of people

:33:20.:33:23.

being investigated, with a boy aged President Trump's eldest son

:33:24.:33:26.

is facing further allegations about a meeting he held

:33:27.:33:35.

with a Russian lawyer during last The New York Times says

:33:36.:33:38.

Donald Trump Jr was informed in advance by e-mail

:33:39.:33:42.

that the information offered by the woman was part

:33:43.:33:44.

of a Russian government effort The Senate Intelligence Committee

:33:45.:33:47.

wants to speak to him about the meeting,

:33:48.:33:50.

which in a tweet he's described We all know that puppies can be

:33:51.:33:53.

naughty and chew or eat things they shouldn't, but this puppy

:33:54.:34:04.

definitely bit off more He managed to swallow three

:34:05.:34:07.

dog leads while playing Unsurprisingly they didn't go down

:34:08.:34:11.

very well and he was taken Although he had to have emergency

:34:12.:34:16.

surgery, he's made a full recovery. Coming up on the programme: Carol's

:34:17.:34:30.

at Wimbledon with the weather. She is wearing a coat so there are

:34:31.:34:38.

warnings about rain on the way. There will be a roof on centre court

:34:39.:34:43.

and also there will eventually be won on Court 1. Johanna Konta will

:34:44.:34:48.

play today, mother plays tomorrow, an amazing match for Rafa Nadal.

:34:49.:34:51.

Sally has that and the rest of the sport for us -- Andy Murray.

:34:52.:34:58.

Carol has been telling me because she knows a lot about this stuff,

:34:59.:35:04.

this is a tent cover, they have different types, I suggested this is

:35:05.:35:08.

because players camp out overnight under it, apparently not. The covers

:35:09.:35:13.

are coming off quite soon, people arriving all around, all around the

:35:14.:35:17.

whole place the covers are coming off. They will leave this on a bit

:35:18.:35:21.

longer, though. What a match last night for a fun at all, I was

:35:22.:35:28.

shouting at the TV. Incredible to see him go out. A little bit sad to

:35:29.:35:34.

see him go out but fantastic performance from Gilles Simon last

:35:35.:35:38.

night, finishing quite late, a knock on effect to date. -- Giles Miller.

:35:39.:35:44.

And the last woman to win Wimbledon was Virginia Wade

:35:45.:35:51.

in the year of the Queen's silver jubilee back in 1977.

:35:52.:35:54.

She takes on Simona Halep this afternoon, after a really tough

:35:55.:35:59.

It's those positions, those situations that I dream of,

:36:00.:36:03.

or dreamed of, when I was a little girl and even now to be part

:36:04.:36:07.

of those battles on big stages, so I think that's really what it's

:36:08.:36:10.

Andy Murray reached the quarter-finals for the 10th year

:36:11.:36:15.

straight-forward win over Benoit Paire.

:36:16.:36:19.

After all the injury worries before the tournament started,

:36:20.:36:23.

so I was also a little bit concerned.

:36:24.:36:34.

When you're having issues just a few days before a big event,

:36:35.:36:37.

it's frustrating but I managed it well and I think I played

:36:38.:36:42.

Today, like I said, was the best I've played so far in the tournament

:36:43.:36:47.

and, yeah, I'm doing well, so hopefully I keep it up.

:36:48.:36:52.

Roger Federer is through but Rafael Nadal is out.

:36:53.:36:54.

Gilles Muller beat the two-time champion in an epic five-setter.

:36:55.:36:57.

It was 15-13 in the decider and the pair were on court

:36:58.:37:00.

for nearly five hours, meaning Novak Djokovic's match had

:37:01.:37:03.

There was some criticism of the scheduling of matches

:37:04.:37:13.

yesterday, world number one Angelique Kerber said

:37:14.:37:15.

she was really surprised to find herself on Court Two

:37:16.:37:18.

singles matches were on the show courts.

:37:19.:37:25.

Away from Wimbledon, Romelu Lukaku has completed his ?75

:37:26.:37:28.

million move from Everton to Manchester United.

:37:29.:37:30.

He trained with his new team-mates for the first time yesterday

:37:31.:37:33.

on United's pre-season tour of the USA.

:37:34.:37:42.

We told you yesterday about Wayne Rooney wearing his

:37:43.:37:44.

Everton pyjamas in secret for the last 13 years,

:37:45.:37:47.

now he's got his hands on the offical kit after returning

:37:48.:37:50.

He says he wants to win trophies at his boyhood club

:37:51.:37:54.

and force his way back into the national team,

:37:55.:37:56.

so pyjamas might not be appropriate.

:37:57.:38:04.

I'm not coming into a retirement home.

:38:05.:38:06.

I wanna win, I wanna be successful at this football club and that's

:38:07.:38:10.

Well, not fit at the minute, but that'll build up in the next few

:38:11.:38:16.

After a rest day, the Tour de France resumes today with a stage

:38:17.:38:24.

Chris Froome holds the overall lead but he'll have to make do

:38:25.:38:28.

without team-mate Geraint Thomas who crashed out on Sunday

:38:29.:38:31.

Careful when you're warming up to play in Court 1.

:38:32.:38:49.

As Rafa Nadal found out to his cost because the door frames

:38:50.:38:52.

He and Gilles Muller saw the funny side, and the Spaniard seemed

:38:53.:38:56.

to have no after effects during his epic last 16 match.

:38:57.:38:59.

It could have been a sign it wasn't going to be his day yesterday. I'm

:39:00.:39:09.

sure he's woken up with sore legs, a sore knee, a saw everything and a

:39:10.:39:14.

sore head this morning! We're on Centre Court this morning

:39:15.:39:18.

and as you can hear, they're starting to work on removing the

:39:19.:39:22.

covers, gets a bit noisy but we love it at this time of day and I'm

:39:23.:39:26.

joined by Chris Clary from the New York Times, tennis writer. Good

:39:27.:39:31.

morning. I love this, they know we are here, they know we are live on

:39:32.:39:36.

TV and they have a competition to be as noisy as possible. That's what it

:39:37.:39:41.

sounds like. You were here late last night, Rafa Nadal, sad to see him go

:39:42.:39:44.

but incredible performance from both players? It was a lifetime match for

:39:45.:39:50.

Gilles Muller, I saw him play a lot, his mid- 30s, he will tell his

:39:51.:39:55.

grandchildren about that, incredible performance. Zen master in the way

:39:56.:40:00.

he handled the pressure and kept sending of the breakpoints, he could

:40:01.:40:04.

sense the hunger of Nadal but it wasn't enough, could have been the

:40:05.:40:09.

blow on the head! You're coming from an American perspective, but we get

:40:10.:40:13.

very excited about the British players at Wimbledon and maybe this

:40:14.:40:17.

year for the first time in a long time we have even more reason, a

:40:18.:40:20.

British man and woman through to this stage for the first time in 44

:40:21.:40:25.

years, incredibly exciting! It's the same at all the slams, look at the

:40:26.:40:31.

scheduling for the main courts in Australia, the French Open, America,

:40:32.:40:35.

and as it should be. It's nice for Andy for it not to be just about

:40:36.:40:40.

him, adding Johanna Konta. We had Andy Murray, we are blase about a

:40:41.:40:46.

successful British man, but in terms of Jo Konta, in previous years she

:40:47.:40:50.

has struggled with the pressure, not always looked particularly happy at

:40:51.:40:53.

Wimbledon but something has changed this year. Have you noticed that?

:40:54.:40:58.

It's been changing for a while with Jo, I can't see any weaknesses in

:40:59.:41:03.

her game, it's a big game, you don't know until she has done it, and he

:41:04.:41:08.

has done it in many venues including here but with Konta it's a mystery.

:41:09.:41:16.

I've covered tennis for a long time and you see people who look great

:41:17.:41:20.

and then something happens when the moment is in front of them. What

:41:21.:41:23.

about against Halep, will she do OK? Jo won't change her game, she takes

:41:24.:41:27.

the ball aggressively off both sides, it's about what Simone will

:41:28.:41:33.

do to defend against that. What does and the have to look out for against

:41:34.:41:38.

Sam Querrey, you know him well? A lot of big serves, he's a big

:41:39.:41:41.

favourite even though he isn't in great form right now. Sam loves

:41:42.:41:47.

Wimbledon but he has a back and you can exploit. You heard it here

:41:48.:41:51.

first, I wonder if they're watching! --. If you want to know more about

:41:52.:41:57.

Wimbledon you can listen to the coverage live on Radio 5 Live

:41:58.:42:02.

through the day -- backhand. Much more from here in the next hour.

:42:03.:42:06.

Carol will have the weather in about ten minutes. But at that, the tent

:42:07.:42:10.

is removed from behind you! Thanks very much, Sal!

:42:11.:42:12.

It's a language that's been in use for hundreds of years,

:42:13.:42:15.

but the number of people speaking Welsh has fallen over time.

:42:16.:42:18.

The latest statistics from the census in 2011 show just

:42:19.:42:21.

under a fifth of people can speak the language.

:42:22.:42:23.

But now the government in Wales has put forward its plans on how it

:42:24.:42:27.

will double the number of people who use the language by 2050.

:42:28.:42:32.

Joining us now is the Chair of the Welsh Language Society.

:42:33.:42:38.

Bore da! From your point of view, why is it important more people

:42:39.:42:49.

speak Welsh? The Welsh language isn't only a minority language, it's

:42:50.:42:53.

a language that has been minor retires in its own country,

:42:54.:42:57.

purposeful steps were taken by the English establishment since Wales

:42:58.:43:02.

came under English rule in 1566 to raise the language. This is like

:43:03.:43:08.

people weren't allowed their administrative jobs, names were

:43:09.:43:15.

taken from David to Davis. There are lots of other examples. These

:43:16.:43:20.

purposeful steps to raise the Welsh language. The Welsh language, which

:43:21.:43:24.

we have to justify again this morning, we should not have to

:43:25.:43:29.

justify it, but it is our identity, it is our culture, we have

:43:30.:43:33.

literature, it's the way we look at the world, it's our window into the

:43:34.:43:37.

world and it's very important. To overturn all of this that I've just

:43:38.:43:44.

said needs radical steps, huge steps to overturn this, because it is a

:43:45.:43:50.

symptom of a, colonised nation is we don't pass the language our children

:43:51.:43:56.

-- a colonised nation. The language of the oppressor is bought more

:43:57.:43:59.

important than our language. We need this confidence to make sure we know

:44:00.:44:05.

we have a right to exist -- is thought.

:44:06.:44:08.

What happens at the moment in primary schools and secondary

:44:09.:44:11.

schools, what would you like to see changed?

:44:12.:44:14.

One of the things the government needs to address in the announcement

:44:15.:44:18.

this morning is education. It's a big thing. Baby viewers don't know

:44:19.:44:26.

that education is devolved to Wales -- may be viewers. The situation in

:44:27.:44:32.

Wales at the moment is different in different areas. For example in

:44:33.:44:40.

areas that are more populous, in the East, there aren't enough Welsh

:44:41.:44:43.

schools. There's a demand but people are being turned away, which means

:44:44.:44:47.

the children leaving school at or 18 maybe Mono got or bilingual children

:44:48.:44:53.

with their own language so the schools need to be on a continuing.

:44:54.:45:00.

We have Welsh schools with four categories depending on the amount

:45:01.:45:05.

of Welsh. They need to move to aim to become Welsh schools. Another

:45:06.:45:09.

problem is more in the West where some children leave school at 11

:45:10.:45:16.

able to speak Welsh but at 16 not able because they have lost the

:45:17.:45:19.

skill because they went to an English school. This shouldn't

:45:20.:45:23.

happen. Children should be going on one part and not losing the scale.

:45:24.:45:28.

You are passionate about this and you have three children yourself,

:45:29.:45:35.

they speak Welsh and English? They speak Welsh at home and in the

:45:36.:45:42.

community. But then once they are seven years old they are being

:45:43.:45:46.

taught English in schools. Of course, the English language will

:45:47.:45:54.

never be under this threat. We are a language that has been turned into a

:45:55.:45:58.

minority. Certain steps must be taken to help the language. That is

:45:59.:46:03.

one thing. We are also glad to see that the government is addressing

:46:04.:46:06.

this by getting rid of Welsh as a second language, as a subject,

:46:07.:46:12.

because at moment if you do Welsh as a first language or second language

:46:13.:46:15.

which is more like French, but not even that. Most children who studies

:46:16.:46:22.

second language come out unable to speak Welsh. So we're glad that they

:46:23.:46:31.

are addressing that. Also, of course, we need to normalise the

:46:32.:46:34.

language in all aspects of life. We need to change attitudes. To do

:46:35.:46:39.

that, we need to change their behaviour. And to do that we need to

:46:40.:46:45.

legislate. Some legislation is in at the moment which covers the

:46:46.:46:50.

standards. For example, our councils, under these standards.

:46:51.:46:54.

They need to provide a certain number of services in Welsh. We have

:46:55.:46:58.

the right to access those through Welsh. These need to be extended,

:46:59.:47:05.

they need to be done quickly, they need to be extended. You mentioned

:47:06.:47:09.

the economy, there is a direct link between our economy and our

:47:10.:47:17.

language. In Welsh, there is a huge number of people leaving Wales every

:47:18.:47:23.

year and this has an effect on our community. It leaves a vacuum for

:47:24.:47:32.

English immigrants to move in. So many immigrants are moving in

:47:33.:47:36.

because of all of those moving out. We look forward to seeing more

:47:37.:47:40.

detail on that as well. I love your passion. I don't know how to say

:47:41.:47:42.

thank you. Diolch. Carolynn has been a -- Carol has

:47:43.:48:03.

been at Wimbledon and she would tell us how it will be. It will be wed in

:48:04.:48:11.

Wales and at Wimbledon. Good morning to you both. If you look behind me,

:48:12.:48:16.

the cover is now off on Centre Court. They have been inspecting the

:48:17.:48:23.

court, and they seem quite happy with what they have seen so far. We

:48:24.:48:28.

have been lucky this year in terms of interruptions to play because of

:48:29.:48:33.

the rain. In fact there have been very few Wimbledon Championships

:48:34.:48:36.

without rain since 1922. Only seven. The last one in 2010. The highest

:48:37.:48:42.

temperature we have ever recorded during the fortnight of Wimbledon

:48:43.:48:50.

was 35.7 degrees, in 2015. Of course, play is guaranteed on Centre

:48:51.:48:54.

Court which is a good thing because there is rain on the forecast for

:48:55.:48:57.

Wimbledon. What we have a syllable more cloud around. We will also see

:48:58.:49:04.

some rain in the early afternoon, then a dry interlude and somewhat

:49:05.:49:08.

heavy and persistent rain will arrive late into the afternoon and

:49:09.:49:11.

in the evening. Temperature wires, clearer than it has been. A maximum

:49:12.:49:20.

of 20. That same rain affecting Wales and eastern England's drifts

:49:21.:49:22.

eastwards as a mixture of sunshine and showers. Starting at nine

:49:23.:49:26.

o'clock across southern England there is a lot of dry weather, a

:49:27.:49:30.

fair bit of cloud and also the odd shower. Bennett extends to East

:49:31.:49:33.

Anglia and the Midlands. Northern England has a more coherent band of

:49:34.:49:39.

rain. Not heavy but persistent. Clouds are foremost in Scotland with

:49:40.:49:43.

showers around. In Northern Ireland in the Norcia have sunshine and in

:49:44.:49:47.

the south more out. The rain not too far away. For Wales, a bitter cloud

:49:48.:49:50.

this morning with showery outbreaks of rain. A little heavier across

:49:51.:49:55.

south Wales. For south-west England, a similar story in that it is a

:49:56.:49:59.

cloudy star with rain and as we drift further east it is dry but

:50:00.:50:03.

there are some showers and a bit of cloud. The rain that we have in the

:50:04.:50:07.

west at the moment will be pushing eastwards through the course of the

:50:08.:50:12.

day. Behind it we have a dry and cloudy interlude and then we have

:50:13.:50:15.

already got heavy rain across south-west England and Wales which

:50:16.:50:18.

will be following in hot pursuit eastwards and that will be the heavy

:50:19.:50:23.

and persistent rain. For Scotland and Northern Ireland in any sunshine

:50:24.:50:26.

will fill pleasant with rising into the high teens. As we come further

:50:27.:50:30.

south will be cooler than it has been and feeling so if you are stuck

:50:31.:50:34.

under the band of rain. The rain will be heavy, particularly south

:50:35.:50:38.

Wales and some of us seeing a good 40 millimetres at of rainfall.

:50:39.:50:43.

Through the evening an overnight it stays heavy as rain drifts across

:50:44.:50:46.

the south towards the North Sea. Behind it, clear skies and in parts

:50:47.:50:52.

of Scotland in particular it will be cool enough for a touch of frost in

:50:53.:50:55.

sheltered Glenn's. We start tomorrow with the remnants of the rain in the

:50:56.:50:59.

south-eastern corner. That will clear quickly. High pressure builds

:51:00.:51:04.

in and for most of the UK it will be a dry day with sunny intervals.

:51:05.:51:08.

Temperature as a result will pick up, looking at highs up to 22 or 23

:51:09.:51:14.

degrees. As we head on into Thursday, still a lot of dry worth

:51:15.:51:18.

around, a lot of sunshine as well. There will be some showers

:51:19.:51:21.

especially in the north and the west and then later with the new weather

:51:22.:51:26.

front showing its hand, introducing rain across the north-west of

:51:27.:51:28.

Scotland and temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage

:51:29.:51:30.

in July. Thank you very much, Carol. See when

:51:31.:51:39.

30 minutes to it does look promising there are Wimbledon. This morning we

:51:40.:51:44.

are also talking about this... I am ready for it, a big review into how

:51:45.:51:53.

workers in the so-called gig economy are treated more rights and better

:51:54.:51:58.

conditions. Collator is with us today speaking with the author of a

:51:59.:52:00.

report. We are looking at how businesses are

:52:01.:52:05.

responding. Good morning, everyone. The government has asked Matthew

:52:06.:52:09.

Taylor, the head of the Royal Society of arts and a former adviser

:52:10.:52:13.

to Tony Blair to look at modern working practices. Nine months ago.

:52:14.:52:16.

He will make this recommendations later this morning. It is all to do

:52:17.:52:22.

with the rise in people working as things like couriers and drivers or

:52:23.:52:26.

offering services on an ad hoc basis. Often for big companies.

:52:27.:52:31.

Jennifer O'Donnell runs a cleaning firm did she contributed to the

:52:32.:52:35.

report and I'm pleased to say she is with us this morning. All of the

:52:36.:52:40.

cleaners who work for you are technically employees so you pay

:52:41.:52:43.

them a little more. Is a more difficult to compete with other

:52:44.:52:46.

countries are companies that don't. I began this business four years ago

:52:47.:52:50.

and when I began I felt quite strongly that all of my should be

:52:51.:52:54.

employed. I think if you go to work every day you need to make sure that

:52:55.:52:58.

you are protected and you have employment rights, the right to

:52:59.:53:01.

thick pay and holiday pay but also that you have the race to make right

:53:02.:53:05.

to grievance and hills and safety training. It was important to me

:53:06.:53:09.

that all of those factors were part of their working life.

:53:10.:53:14.

Unfortunately, what it means, particularly in the domestic side of

:53:15.:53:18.

the business, there is a huge black market economy where there are many

:53:19.:53:23.

cash transactions, workers going into people's homes on

:53:24.:53:28.

recommendation. We are also up against the new gig economy, digital

:53:29.:53:33.

platforms that link customers to consumer. And also agencies which I

:53:34.:53:39.

call greymarket because they often subcontract an unregulated

:53:40.:53:45.

workforce. Both can keep their costs down because they do not have these

:53:46.:53:51.

additional employment costs. Even those difficulties, you contributed

:53:52.:53:55.

to this report. Are you happy with it? Did it go far enough? It is good

:53:56.:54:03.

to see that it is a positive step, that cash transactions will be

:54:04.:54:06.

looked at. My concern is that culturally and certain set as it is

:54:07.:54:11.

so acceptable to do a cash transaction and we think it is OK to

:54:12.:54:15.

do. How that will be enforced will be interesting. I am also very

:54:16.:54:19.

interested in the point about dependent contractors and creating a

:54:20.:54:23.

new category. That is interesting for me because it seems as though

:54:24.:54:29.

there is a category there that are going to be able to operate and

:54:30.:54:34.

still keep some cost out of their business, but because they offer

:54:35.:54:37.

flexibility to their workers they are going to be able to still kind

:54:38.:54:44.

of work in a self complete we. Lots and lots of issues to work through.

:54:45.:54:48.

Thank you very much for joining us this morning to talk about that

:54:49.:54:52.

thorny issue of zero hours contract is and how we work in the future.

:54:53.:54:56.

Very interesting to discuss a change of culture as well. It is 100 years

:54:57.:55:02.

since the first mass-produced tractor came to the UK. Looker that

:55:03.:55:08.

blue ones are behind us. They were sent to help during the First World

:55:09.:55:12.

War when men and farmers were on the frontline. Teens at the great

:55:13.:55:16.

Yorkshire show, driving about whether Centenary will be marked.

:55:17.:55:22.

Good morning. The show first happened in 1838, designed to

:55:23.:55:27.

celebrate agricultural excellence. This year they are celebrating 100

:55:28.:55:33.

years of the mass-produced tractor. Sweep along this way and you will

:55:34.:55:37.

see some of the finest vintage tractors you will ever see. It all

:55:38.:55:44.

started in 1917 when there had been petrol driven tractors before but

:55:45.:55:47.

they were large and cumbersome things. Henry Ford changed things,

:55:48.:55:55.

didn't he? He was fed up with the drudgery that was commonplace on

:55:56.:55:58.

farms and he wanted to make life easier for the farm. City set to a

:55:59.:56:03.

daughter tractor. What impact did it have on agriculture? Well, he

:56:04.:56:10.

mechanise the whole thing. From early beginnings right now when we

:56:11.:56:13.

cannot do anything without a tractor. Look at this one here. This

:56:14.:56:17.

is a 100-year-old tractor. Before this and they were far bigger, they

:56:18.:56:23.

were far more cumbersome. This is merely the first lightweight tractor

:56:24.:56:29.

that many of the older tractors that we have, they were like steam

:56:30.:56:34.

engines, big heavy things unsuitable to the small fields of England. It

:56:35.:56:44.

is fascinating stuff. Let's swing the camera around and have a look at

:56:45.:56:49.

the century of tractors and they are quite something. As we walk along

:56:50.:56:54.

here, the images you get... This one here is something extraordinary. It

:56:55.:57:00.

makes you think of the prairies of America and that sort of thing. We

:57:01.:57:02.

will talk more Now, though, it's back

:57:03.:00:22.

to Louise and Dan. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:00:23.:00:24.

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. Plans to change the way we work -

:00:25.:00:38.

a review for the Government calls for the end of

:00:39.:00:41.

the cash-in-hand economy. With suggestions for tackling

:00:42.:00:43.

low-paid jobs, zero-hours contracts and the gig economy,

:00:44.:00:45.

it says the Government should strive Good morning, it's

:00:46.:00:48.

Tuesday, 11th July. Thank you for being with us on

:00:49.:01:05.

Breakfast. For the first time since 1984,

:01:06.:01:10.

there's a British woman She plays Simona Halep

:01:11.:01:13.

on centre later. She's joined in the quarterfinals

:01:14.:01:20.

by Andy Murray - the first time in 44 years a British man and woman

:01:21.:01:23.

have made it this far. Rafa Nadal was knocked out

:01:24.:01:27.

of Wimbledon after five sets Dealing with dementia -

:01:28.:01:31.

how new technology could help people Profits at Marks Spencer went up

:01:32.:01:51.

in the last three months, does that show a change in fortunes for the

:01:52.:01:55.

high street giant? I will be finally look. -- I will be finding out.

:01:56.:02:03.

We'll find out about 100 years of mass produced tractors,

:02:04.:02:06.

from farmers on the frontline to modern day machinery.

:02:07.:02:08.

And we will be joined by two actors after nine.

:02:09.:02:16.

We are expecting rain so there is likely to be interruption to play.

:02:17.:02:26.

Heavy radius movies over the southern half of England and Wales

:02:27.:02:41.

during the day -- heavy rain is moving. More details later.

:02:42.:02:46.

First, our main story.An end to cash-in-hand jobs,

:02:47.:02:49.

and changing the rules on the gig economy, where workers

:02:50.:02:51.

get paid per task - just two of the recommendations

:02:52.:02:54.

in a major report into the way we work.

:02:55.:02:56.

The Matthew Taylor review also says there are too many people

:02:57.:02:59.

who are being treated like cogs in a machine, rather

:03:00.:03:01.

Our economics correspondent, Andy Verity, reports.

:03:02.:03:04.

In the last ten years, the economy's generated record

:03:05.:03:06.

numbers of jobs and the lowest unemployment rate in nearly

:03:07.:03:08.

But according to the man who led a government-commissioned review,

:03:09.:03:12.

more jobs hasn't always meant more good jobs.

:03:13.:03:15.

In my view, there's too much work, particularly at the bottom end

:03:16.:03:17.

of the labour market, that isn't of a high enough quality

:03:18.:03:20.

and there's too many people not having their rights fully respected

:03:21.:03:23.

and there are too many people treated at work like cogs

:03:24.:03:26.

in a machine rather than being human beings and there are too many people

:03:27.:03:29.

who don't see a route from their current job to progress

:03:30.:03:32.

The review will recommend that if someone is controlled

:03:33.:03:39.

and supervised, then they're classified as a worker,

:03:40.:03:41.

or dependent contractor, rather than self-employed.

:03:42.:03:43.

Those workers may be entitled to benefits like holiday pay

:03:44.:03:47.

and employers may have to pay national insurance at 13.8%.

:03:48.:03:50.

That's broadly in line with a landmark court ruling

:03:51.:03:57.

in a case brought by this former Uber driver, Yaseen Aslam.

:03:58.:03:59.

I don't think it helps me as a worker for what I've been

:04:00.:04:06.

fighting for in tribunal, and that's what's concerning

:04:07.:04:09.

because the workers have not been involved in the process

:04:10.:04:11.

The review also makes a bigger point that self-employed work,

:04:12.:04:15.

from plumbers to painters, yields far less tax for the Treasury,

:04:16.:04:18.

especially if the work is cash in hand.

:04:19.:04:21.

For consumers, though, the recommendations are likely

:04:22.:04:23.

to mean inexpensive services will no longer be as cheap.

:04:24.:04:26.

Theresa May will make her first big speech later this morning,

:04:27.:04:36.

since being re-elected as Prime Minister in June.

:04:37.:04:38.

Her party is coming under pressure with no outright majority,

:04:39.:04:41.

and yesterday, Conservative MP Anne Marie Morris was suspended,

:04:42.:04:47.

after a recording emerged of her using a racially offensive term.

:04:48.:04:49.

Our political correspondent, Chris Mason, joins us

:04:50.:04:51.

Chris, an important morning for the Prime Minister.

:04:52.:05:00.

A chance to set the agenda again. It absolutely is. There are two rhyming

:05:01.:05:10.

words that matter in politics, majority and authority. The row

:05:11.:05:15.

yesterday over the Conservative MP chips away technically at the wafer

:05:16.:05:19.

thin majority the Prime Minister has, although in all likelihood,

:05:20.:05:26.

even though Anne Marie Morris is no longer a Conservative MP, she is

:05:27.:05:30.

still an MP, she is likely to vote, I suspect, with what was her party

:05:31.:05:34.

when votes come up in the House of Commons. In terms of authority, the

:05:35.:05:38.

Prime Minister tried to react very quickly to what happened when the

:05:39.:05:44.

recording emerged, doing what is known in Westminster is removing the

:05:45.:05:47.

whip, meaning Anne Marie Morris sits as an independent MP effectively

:05:48.:05:54.

now. It is yet another incident that the May has had to deal with when

:05:55.:05:59.

there are all of these swirling questions about her credibility as

:06:00.:06:03.

Prime Minister and how long she can cling on for. This speech really

:06:04.:06:07.

does matter for her. She wanted it to focus on the issue of employment

:06:08.:06:12.

rights you were talking about a moment ago. But there are far bigger

:06:13.:06:16.

question is at stake for her, not least how long she will be Prime

:06:17.:06:21.

Minister for. Coverage of that speech throughout the day on the BBC

:06:22.:06:22.

News Channel. Britain will have men's and women's

:06:23.:06:26.

quarterfinalists at Wimbledon for the first time since 1973

:06:27.:06:28.

after wins for Johanna Sixth seed Konta beat

:06:29.:06:31.

France's Caroline Garcia She's the first British woman

:06:32.:06:34.

to reach the last eight since 1984. It's those positions,

:06:35.:06:46.

those situations that I dream of, or dreamed of, when I was a little

:06:47.:06:49.

girl and even now to be part of those battles on big stages,

:06:50.:06:53.

so I think that's really what it's You can follow that across the BBC

:06:54.:06:56.

today as well. A man has been charged over an acid

:06:57.:07:12.

attack on a woman and her cousin John Tomlin, who's 24,

:07:13.:07:16.

is alleged to have thrown acid at Resham Khan and Jameel Muhktar

:07:17.:07:19.

through their car window. Both suffered severe burns

:07:20.:07:22.

to the face and body. An American military aircraft has

:07:23.:07:24.

crashed in the state of Mississippi, killing at least 16 people,

:07:25.:07:27.

according to US media. It crashed about 100 miles north

:07:28.:07:29.

of Jackson, the state capital. The type of aircraft is one

:07:30.:07:34.

of the most extensively used in the military,

:07:35.:07:36.

but they can also be modified A BBC investigation has found nearly

:07:37.:07:41.

500 children aged 12 and under have been questioned by police

:07:42.:07:48.

for sexting since 2013. The practice is when someone uses

:07:49.:07:52.

a mobile phone to send indecent The guidance around the law changed

:07:53.:07:55.

last year in England and Wales to say if it's a young person

:07:56.:08:02.

creating the images, the police can choose

:08:03.:08:06.

to record that as a crime, but that taking formal action isn't

:08:07.:08:09.

in the public interest. President Trump's eldest son

:08:10.:08:15.

is facing further allegations about a meeting he held

:08:16.:08:16.

with a Russian lawyer The New York Times says that

:08:17.:08:19.

Donald Trump Junior was told before the meeting that the lawyer

:08:20.:08:24.

who was offering damaging information about Hillary Clinton

:08:25.:08:28.

was acting Donald Trump Junior has insisted

:08:29.:08:30.

that the lawyer provided no meaningful information

:08:31.:08:33.

on his father's rival Plans to almost double

:08:34.:08:35.

the number of Welsh speakers The Welsh Government wants

:08:36.:08:42.

1 million people to be We had a very passionate guest on

:08:43.:08:45.

the sofa a few minutes ago. There will be more teaching

:08:46.:08:57.

at an earlier age and more Welsh-speaking teachers in primary

:08:58.:09:00.

and secondary schools as our Wales At Ysgol Glan Morfa, children's

:09:01.:09:02.

lessons are taught through Welsh. Members of the Welsh Government came

:09:03.:09:06.

here to spread the word about their new goal

:09:07.:09:09.

for the language, supported We've laid down the gauntlet,

:09:10.:09:11.

if you like, it's a big task, If we really want to do it

:09:12.:09:19.

and we believe we can do it, then Expanding Welsh medium education

:09:20.:09:30.

is at the heart of the strategy. It includes creating 150 Welsh

:09:31.:09:33.

language nursery groups over the next decade and increasing

:09:34.:09:35.

the number of Welsh speaking primary But it's recognised that there must

:09:36.:09:38.

be opportunities to learn and use There's also a recognition

:09:39.:09:42.

that they need support from parents. Some parents will say, you know,

:09:43.:09:48.

if my kids go to a Welsh medium school, can I help them

:09:49.:09:59.

with their homework? Will all the correspondence be

:10:00.:10:01.

in Welsh from the school? So of course we want

:10:02.:10:04.

to take parents with us. The Welsh language is

:10:05.:10:11.

celebrated every year at the National Eisteddfod,

:10:12.:10:12.

a cultural festival which welcomes The Welsh Government wants more

:10:13.:10:15.

people to be able to communicate in Welsh, but the public's appetite

:10:16.:10:18.

for change remains to be seen. I have managed to...

:10:19.:10:29.

What have you done? I cannot hear the director.

:10:30.:10:34.

I have pulled out my earpiece. You are in charge!

:10:35.:10:40.

This is fun, I am in charge! I can do what I like. I am going to

:10:41.:10:44.

Wimbledon because they are telling me too! I am not in control. All

:10:45.:10:52.

eyes on Jo Konta this afternoon. She will be in the quarterfinal with

:10:53.:10:57.

Simona Halep. Andy Murray place tomorrow. Sally is

:10:58.:11:02.

at Wimbledon, she can tell us all about it.

:11:03.:11:05.

She can't hear you, Sally. Can anyone hear me? Good morning. We

:11:06.:11:11.

are on centre court, they are getting ready for the matches to

:11:12.:11:15.

start later. They are out with the mower. We are talking a lot this

:11:16.:11:20.

morning about Jo Konta because she has made history, the match she

:11:21.:11:24.

played, she played with heart and passion and it was so brilliant to

:11:25.:11:28.

see her play so confidently. Over the last couple of years, if you

:11:29.:11:35.

have been watching her play, there is a shift, she has always had a

:11:36.:11:40.

great game, the talent and the skill, but something mentally may

:11:41.:11:44.

have shifted this time. Let us hear from Clare Balding who looks back at

:11:45.:11:48.

what Jo Konta has been up to during this Wimbledon. On court, she rarely

:11:49.:11:55.

lets the mask slip. We hardly get to peer beyond the professional veneer.

:11:56.:12:02.

What a battle! What resilience! But there is another side to her. To

:12:03.:12:09.

take a break, she bakes cakes. She has been handing out muffins to the

:12:10.:12:13.

coaching team, the best on tour, she claims. Maybe it is useful

:12:14.:12:19.

preparation because Wimbledon is all about rising at the right time. The

:12:20.:12:28.

last woman to reach this stage was the lovely Jo Durie in 1984. Good

:12:29.:12:37.

morning. Thank you for coming in. You are quite happy that Jo Konta

:12:38.:12:41.

has equalled your record. Of course I am because we have got a

:12:42.:12:44.

successful British player who was playing in the second week,

:12:45.:12:48.

quarterfinals of Wimbledon. It brings back the memories for me.

:12:49.:12:52.

People keep talking about it and I keep remembering when I was playing

:12:53.:12:56.

and I just think it is fantastic. You never watched your much back, is

:12:57.:13:02.

that true? How do you know that? I haven't. Why is that? In those days,

:13:03.:13:08.

you did not have the facilities. You played your match. If you are lucky,

:13:09.:13:14.

you sometimes got a VHS video. I have not got one. A few years ago, I

:13:15.:13:18.

saw my match from Roland Garros which I had never seen, the

:13:19.:13:22.

semifinal. You were quite good! I played quite well! She has the game,

:13:23.:13:30.

talent, skills, Jo Konta, but something has changed this year for

:13:31.:13:35.

her? It really hurts. She is comfortable now with the top

:13:36.:13:40.

players, being in the mix, the top ten -- it really has. She is not

:13:41.:13:44.

thinking, just doing. Her preparation for the grass courts was

:13:45.:13:49.

superb because losing first round of Roland Garros, a lot of grass court

:13:50.:13:55.

practice. What do you think she has been doing differently? I do not

:13:56.:13:59.

know if it is differently, I think if you do things time and time again

:14:00.:14:03.

and you do it in a certain way and you put the work in, eventually, it

:14:04.:14:07.

becomes a habit and you do not think, you are just doing it, she

:14:08.:14:12.

has the mindset which is very strong and she goes on court. At the

:14:13.:14:17.

moment, she is not blinking, getting to the crunch moments and going

:14:18.:14:21.

through them. How is she managing to not let nerves get to her? In the

:14:22.:14:27.

past, they did get to her. She has a process no of overcoming it. If she

:14:28.:14:32.

keeps rigidly to that process and does not look forward to much, it is

:14:33.:14:36.

working. When it pops up occasionally come you think, I am

:14:37.:14:40.

merely there. Too much thinking, it all goes wrong. Of all the places

:14:41.:14:45.

for her to do well and played, Wimbledon will be the toughest

:14:46.:14:50.

because it is the home crowd. Exactly. What are the expectations

:14:51.:14:59.

like? Huge but also you are a big quarterfinal, the crowd want you to

:15:00.:15:02.

do well and that is what you feel and it really lifts you up. Has the

:15:03.:15:07.

back of your neck stand up, they really do. Fabulous feeling. What

:15:08.:15:11.

can she learn from the way Andy Murray has handled the pressure the

:15:12.:15:17.

years? I think he is still there, we are not talking about Andy, it is

:15:18.:15:22.

amazing, also in the quarterfinals. To have someone else there who has

:15:23.:15:26.

studied. He said she should let go a little bit. I do not think she is

:15:27.:15:33.

quite like Andy. She needs to keep everything close to her and do her

:15:34.:15:38.

thing. That is something he has successfully done, he has learned to

:15:39.:15:42.

let go. He has. Sometimes he is a bit moany. But he is a great tennis

:15:43.:15:56.

player! Lovely to see you, thanks for joining us. We will go now to

:15:57.:16:01.

someone who has never been moany, Carol.

:16:02.:16:03.

Unless you eat all the muffins! It's cloudy above Centre Court but

:16:04.:16:17.

it's bright. The forecast for Wimbledon, we'll see some rain

:16:18.:16:22.

towards the afternoon. Then we'll have a drier slot of weather. We see

:16:23.:16:29.

heavy and persistent rain return again later into the evening. It

:16:30.:16:32.

will feel much cooler than it has done. Maximum temperature today, 20

:16:33.:16:38.

Celsius. That rain affecting Wimbledon is also affecting parts of

:16:39.:16:42.

England and Wales. Moving towards the east for Scotland and Northern

:16:43.:16:47.

Ireland and you have a day of sunshine and showers, some of those

:16:48.:16:51.

heavy. East Anglia and the Midlands, a lot of dry weather around and a

:16:52.:16:57.

few showers. Quite a bit of cloud around with brighter breaks. For

:16:58.:17:01.

northern England, a more coherent band of rain.

:17:02.:17:06.

For Northern Ireland, some sunshine for you first thing. In the south,

:17:07.:17:10.

more cloud with rain not too far away. For Wales, a bit of cloud with

:17:11.:17:15.

some rain. Now, some heavier bursts across South Wales. As we transfer

:17:16.:17:19.

into south-west England again, quite a bit of cloud with some outbreaks

:17:20.:17:22.

of rain, not particularly heavy at this stage. Drifting further east, a

:17:23.:17:27.

lot of dry weather and a few showers. Through the course of the

:17:28.:17:32.

day, the rain we currently have will quite quickly move to the east at

:17:33.:17:37.

the same time there's another band of heavier rain in the south-west of

:17:38.:17:41.

England and Wales. That is moving east too. North of that for the far

:17:42.:17:46.

north of northern England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, sunshine and

:17:47.:17:50.

showers. Here in the sunshine it will feel pleasant enough. It will

:17:51.:17:53.

feel cooler if you are stuck under the band of rain. The rain will

:17:54.:17:59.

still be with us this evening, continuing it journey, eventually

:18:00.:18:01.

clearing from Wales in the south-west. For the north, some

:18:02.:18:07.

breaks in that cloud and in some sheltered glens in Scotland, the

:18:08.:18:10.

breaks will be cool enough for a touch of frost. More comfortable

:18:11.:18:15.

night in the south for sleeping than those we have had recently. Tomorrow

:18:16.:18:19.

we start off with the rain in the far south-east and East Anglia. It

:18:20.:18:22.

clears quickly. High pressure builds in and most of us will have a dry

:18:23.:18:28.

sunny day. Temperatures tomorrow up on today because the sun will be

:18:29.:18:33.

out, with highs up to 22, maybe 23. Then for Thursday, once again a lot

:18:34.:18:37.

of dry and sunny weather. Some showers in the north and west. Many

:18:38.:18:41.

of us will miss them. Later in the day, we see a new weather front

:18:42.:18:45.

returning to north-west Scotland. That will introduce some more rain.

:18:46.:18:49.

Temperature-wise, roughly where we should be in July again with highs

:18:50.:18:53.

of up to the low 20s in terms of Celsius. Before I go, if you have an

:18:54.:18:59.

allergy to pollen, today with all the weather going around, you will

:19:00.:19:03.

be pleased to hear the levels are moderate or low. I want a bit more

:19:04.:19:08.

information about what is happening tonight. Is Sal staying around yours

:19:09.:19:12.

again, what is on the menu, are you cooking something for the pair of

:19:13.:19:17.

you? I think Sal said enough of my cooking, we had very basic cooking

:19:18.:19:21.

last night, chicken, broccoli and new potatoes. You didn't answer the

:19:22.:19:26.

other question though. Did she? ! You can't skirt around the question.

:19:27.:19:33.

I don't want the political answer. Oh yes I can, Dan, oh, yes, I can.

:19:34.:19:46.

A major review into the way we work recommends rules for the Gig

:19:47.:19:53.

economy. Konta makes history at Wimbledon today as she becomes the

:19:54.:19:57.

first player for over 30 years to represent Great Britain in the

:19:58.:19:59.

ladies quarter-finals. Marks Spencers has been struggling

:20:00.:20:15.

in the last few years. Here are the business stories.

:20:16.:20:19.

Good news for Marks Spencers at last. Just over an hour ago they

:20:20.:20:24.

revealed that takings were up 2.7% in the last three months. Most of

:20:25.:20:29.

that is down to strong food sales. The big fall that we had been

:20:30.:20:33.

previously seeing in the clothing department has improved a little.

:20:34.:20:37.

The boss says they've not needed a sale this season and they've sold

:20:38.:20:41.

more at full price. That positive news seems to be reflected more

:20:42.:20:45.

widely with figures from the British Retail Consortium showing that

:20:46.:20:50.

retail sales were up 2% last month, one of the warmest Junes on record.

:20:51.:20:54.

The weather's believed to have led more people to spend on summer

:20:55.:20:59.

clothes, health and beauty products. There's a call from business leaders

:21:00.:21:03.

this morning for companies to do more to make workers more

:21:04.:21:08.

productive. They say it could add up to ?130 billion to the economy. The

:21:09.:21:12.

group which was led by the John Lewis chairman Sir Charlie Mayfield

:21:13.:21:15.

was set up by the Government two years ago to look at how to boost

:21:16.:21:20.

the UK's productivity which lags behind many other countries at the

:21:21.:21:22.

moment. Thank you very much. They might be places that you assume

:21:23.:21:34.

are generations apart but for the first time in the UK,

:21:35.:21:37.

a nursery and a care home are closing the age gap by spending

:21:38.:21:40.

time together every day as part It's an idea which has already been

:21:41.:21:43.

adopted by other countries, such as the United States and Japan,

:21:44.:21:47.

but from September, Breakfast's Graham Satchell

:21:48.:21:49.

went to find out more. A large care home in south London

:21:50.:21:52.

and the sound of a nursery rhyme. Young and old singing, playing,

:21:53.:21:57.

interacting together. When it officially opens

:21:58.:21:59.

in September, this will be the first nursery in the country to be sited

:22:00.:22:04.

on the grounds of a care home. Children spend more of their time

:22:05.:22:07.

away from other age groups and the elderly spend time

:22:08.:22:11.

away from everybody. There is something quite natural

:22:12.:22:17.

about bringing them together. A Sportsday to celebrate the opening

:22:18.:22:29.

and 87-year-old Fay is showing Children from a nearby nursery have

:22:30.:22:34.

been coming here on a weekly trip Some of them sing and dance

:22:35.:22:41.

and we play games. So most of the residents,

:22:42.:22:48.

they have a great time. Bringing young and old together

:22:49.:22:54.

like this already happens Experts say the advantages

:22:55.:23:01.

are clear, particularly for the elderly, in tackling

:23:02.:23:07.

isolation and loneliness. Finding the right places

:23:08.:23:09.

and making sure both children The benefits really do

:23:10.:23:15.

outweigh the disadvantages. This is a model for other

:23:16.:23:23.

care home providers It certainly works in the rest

:23:24.:23:27.

of the world, there is no reason why we could not see many more of these

:23:28.:23:33.

in the UK. Back inside, Walter is making

:23:34.:23:35.

glasses out of Play-Doh Careful play arranged by grown-ups

:23:36.:23:39.

is teaching them many How to handle things

:23:40.:23:47.

and handle situations. As an old person, I am coming

:23:48.:23:57.

to the end of my life, it is a great joy to see new human

:23:58.:24:00.

being is growing and growing slowly into people,

:24:01.:24:04.

into humanity, into maturity. There are certainly hopes here

:24:05.:24:11.

that it will benefit young and old. You can email us at

:24:12.:24:34.

bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk or share your thoughts with other

:24:35.:24:36.

viewers on our Facebook page. Kim Clijsters felt under pressure

:24:37.:24:59.

when she took on our challenge. We have Andy Murray right at the top of

:25:00.:25:03.

the leaderboard. Jo Konta despite being in the quarter-finals only got

:25:04.:25:07.

two. This game might not be the most important one ever. I think I've got

:25:08.:25:12.

a tactic. If I was to do it, I would go for the Clijsters technique. That

:25:13.:25:17.

is how Andy Murray did it. She gets three balls in her hand at once and

:25:18.:25:21.

then bang, bang, bang. Speed and accuracy. Just like that! When can

:25:22.:25:31.

we have a go? ! Do you think they're saving us from ourselves. For the

:25:32.:25:32.

final. We could team up. Tim Muffet is at Harrogate at the

:25:33.:25:51.

Yorkshire Show. The idea of a tractor was something which was a

:25:52.:25:57.

distant futuristic dream. It wasn't until 1917 that tractors, as we know

:25:58.:26:02.

them today, first came about, the first mass produced tractor was

:26:03.:26:07.

created then. Henry Ford, best known to many for creating the model T car

:26:08.:26:14.

and popularising cars, he did the same for tractors because before

:26:15.:26:19.

then they were huge machines. He made them accessible and affordable

:26:20.:26:27.

for farmers and it transformed the ago cultural industry. --

:26:28.:26:37.

agricultural industry. The show jumping is also here, the sheep

:26:38.:26:41.

shearing competition is later on, and the various other displays. You

:26:42.:26:46.

don't often see these. They are celebrating 100 years of tractors.

:26:47.:26:51.

Mighty fine they are too if I say so myself. We'll talk to the person

:26:52.:26:55.

that owns and runs these fine vintage machines. Now here is the

:26:56.:26:59.

news, weather and travel where you are.

:27:00.:30:18.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:30:19.:30:28.

An end to cash-in-hand jobs, and changing the rules

:30:29.:30:32.

on the minimum wage - just two of the recommendations in

:30:33.:30:35.

The study - led by a former adviser to Tony Blair, Matthew Taylor -

:30:36.:30:43.

recommends that people working in what's known

:30:44.:30:44.

where workers get paid per task, should receive

:30:45.:30:48.

new legal protections, and their employers should make

:30:49.:30:49.

In the last ten years, the economy's generated record

:30:50.:31:01.

numbers of jobs and the lowest unemployment rate

:31:02.:31:03.

But according to the man who led a government-commissioned review,

:31:04.:31:07.

more jobs hasn't always meant more good jobs.

:31:08.:31:09.

In my view, there's too much work, particularly at the bottom end

:31:10.:31:12.

of the labour market, that isn't of a high enough quality

:31:13.:31:14.

and there's too many people not having their rights fully respected

:31:15.:31:17.

and there are too many people treated at work like cogs

:31:18.:31:19.

in a machine rather than being human beings and there are too many people

:31:20.:31:23.

who don't see a route from their current job to progress

:31:24.:31:25.

The review will recommend that if someone is controlled

:31:26.:31:29.

and supervised, then they're classified as a worker,

:31:30.:31:31.

or dependent contractor - rather than self-employed.

:31:32.:31:33.

Those workers may be entitled to benefits like holiday pay

:31:34.:31:36.

and employers may have to pay national insurance at 13.8%.

:31:37.:31:41.

That's broadly in line with a landmark court ruling

:31:42.:31:48.

in a case brought by this former Uber driver, Yaseen Aslam.

:31:49.:31:51.

I don't think it helps me as a worker for what I've been

:31:52.:31:55.

fighting for in the tribunal, and that's what's concerning,

:31:56.:31:57.

because the workers have not been involved in the process

:31:58.:31:59.

The review also makes a bigger point that self-employed work,

:32:00.:32:05.

from plumbers to painters, yields far less tax for the Treasury,

:32:06.:32:08.

especially if the work is cash in hand.

:32:09.:32:11.

For consumers, though, the recommendations are likely

:32:12.:32:15.

to mean inexpensive services will no longer be as cheap.

:32:16.:32:18.

Theresa May will make her first big speech later this morning

:32:19.:32:24.

since being re-elected as Prime Minister in June.

:32:25.:32:27.

Her party is coming under pressure, with no outright majority,

:32:28.:32:32.

and just yesterday Conservative MP Anne Marie Morris was suspended,

:32:33.:32:34.

after a recording emerged of her using a racially-offensive term

:32:35.:32:38.

during a public discussion about Brexit.

:32:39.:32:44.

An American military aircraft has crashed in the state of Mississippi,

:32:45.:32:47.

killing at least 16 people, according to US media.

:32:48.:32:55.

The US Marines said the headless transport aircraft had experienced a

:32:56.:32:58.

mishap. It crashed about 100 miles north

:32:59.:32:58.

of Jackson, the state capital. A man has been charged over an acid

:32:59.:33:01.

attack on a woman and her cousin John Tomlin, who's 24,

:33:02.:33:04.

is alleged to have thrown acid at Resham Khan and Jameel Muhktar

:33:05.:33:08.

through their car window. Both suffered severe burns

:33:09.:33:10.

to the face and body. A BBC investigation has found nearly

:33:11.:33:18.

500 children aged 12 and under have been questioned by police

:33:19.:33:21.

for sexting since 2013. The practice is when someone

:33:22.:33:23.

uses a mobile phone to send indecent pictures

:33:24.:33:26.

of themselves to others. The guidance around the law changed

:33:27.:33:30.

last year in England and Wales to say if it's a young person

:33:31.:33:33.

creating the images, the police can choose

:33:34.:33:35.

to record that as a crime, but that taking formal action

:33:36.:33:38.

isn't in the public interest. Clearly, the NSPCC don't want

:33:39.:33:44.

children criminalised for this sort of behaviour, and it's really

:33:45.:33:46.

important that police are talking to children in a restorative way,

:33:47.:33:49.

looking at the safeguarding issues for that child, making sure

:33:50.:33:51.

that the child isn't criminalised. President Trump's eldest son

:33:52.:34:00.

is facing further allegations about a meeting he held

:34:01.:34:02.

with a Russian lawyer The New York Times says that

:34:03.:34:05.

Donald Trump Junior was told before the meeting that the lawyer,

:34:06.:34:15.

who was offering damaging was acting for the government

:34:16.:34:17.

in Moscow. Donald Trump Junior has insisted

:34:18.:34:20.

that the lawyer provided on his father's rival

:34:21.:34:22.

for the presidency. You hold onto that! Seriously, it is

:34:23.:34:38.

a heavier pen than normal. It is drawing my calibration out!

:34:39.:34:41.

Plans to almost double the number of Welsh speakers

:34:42.:34:44.

The Welsh Government wants one million people to be

:34:45.:34:49.

There will be more teaching at an earlier age

:34:50.:34:54.

and more Welsh-speaking teachers in primary and secondary schools.

:34:55.:34:58.

You would think you have been drinking coffee!

:34:59.:35:02.

You are reaching for your second or even your third cup

:35:03.:35:05.

of coffee this morning, there's good news.

:35:06.:35:07.

I am convinced this is one of these surveys... It is two important

:35:08.:35:13.

studies that have loved that thousands of people!

:35:14.:35:15.

Scientists behind two new studies say they've uncovered

:35:16.:35:17.

the clearest evidence yet that the beverage

:35:18.:35:18.

But others, like Dan, are saying there's no actual proof

:35:19.:35:24.

I will read you the study later! Saying that coffee makes you live

:35:25.:35:38.

longer... It certainly wakes me up.

:35:39.:35:42.

If you didn't have your coffee just before six, I do not know where we

:35:43.:35:46.

would be! Puppy news for you now! We all know that puppies can be

:35:47.:35:48.

naughty and chew or eat but this puppy definitely bit off

:35:49.:35:51.

more than it could chew. He managed to swallow

:35:52.:35:55.

three dog leads while playing Unsurprisingly, they didn't go

:35:56.:35:58.

down very well, and he Although he had to have emergency

:35:59.:36:01.

surgery, he's made a full recovery. Look at him, gorgeous, he has made a

:36:02.:36:08.

full recovery. Victoria Derbyshire is on BBC Two

:36:09.:36:19.

later, she can tell us what is on the programme. We are talking to one

:36:20.:36:23.

of the richest women in the world, Melinda gates, about a multi-million

:36:24.:36:27.

pound efforts to get contraception to women in the poorest parts of the

:36:28.:36:31.

planet. When you travel the world, you meet so many women that will

:36:32.:36:36.

tell you that if they can space the births of their children, they can

:36:37.:36:40.

feed and educate them, and that is what they want to do. The It's

:36:41.:36:46.

Foundation is calling on leaders around the world to do more to help.

:36:47.:36:47.

-- Gates Foundation. Coming up on Breakfast this morning,

:36:48.:36:52.

we'll take a look at the history of the mass-produced tractor

:36:53.:36:57.

on its 100th birthday, and what the future

:36:58.:36:59.

is for the machine. In the early hours of this morning,

:37:00.:37:03.

scientists had the very first close-up look at Jupiter's

:37:04.:37:05.

10,000 mile wide storm. We'll speak to one of the team

:37:06.:37:08.

behind the mission. It is known as the giant red spot.

:37:09.:37:24.

I had one of those on my forehead this morning, thankfully it has been

:37:25.:37:25.

removed! And after nine, we'll be joined

:37:26.:37:26.

by Downton Abbey's Laura Carmichael who are about to star

:37:27.:37:29.

in a new play together. That would be just after nine,

:37:30.:37:39.

someone is messing with our times, a Time Lord has fiddled with it!

:37:40.:37:46.

Downton Abbey and Doctor Who, that has got to be a great combination.

:37:47.:37:51.

Also, really exciting things going on at Wimbledon, Sally has the

:37:52.:37:52.

details. You are on! Morning, yeah, two British players

:37:53.:38:01.

through to the singles quarterfinals for the first time in 44 years, Andy

:38:02.:38:06.

Murray is through, we are used to that, but Jo Konta made it through

:38:07.:38:09.

as well, and what is his secret weapon? What is his secret weapon?

:38:10.:38:16.

These! Get off! Honestly, I have been fighting the crew all morning,

:38:17.:38:23.

I want to show you at home what Jo Konta has been using to keep her

:38:24.:38:28.

going. She has been baking every day after her matches and bringing

:38:29.:38:31.

muffins in for the rest of her team, it is obviously doing the trick. Can

:38:32.:38:35.

she go all the way? The last woman to do that was back in 1977, of

:38:36.:38:41.

course it was Virginia Wade in the year of the Queen's Silver Jubilee.

:38:42.:38:46.

Could Konta be next? She takes on Simona Halep this afternoon after a

:38:47.:38:50.

really tough win over Caroline Garcia.

:38:51.:38:53.

It's those positions, those situations that I dream of,

:38:54.:38:55.

or dreamed of, when I was a little girl, and even now to be part

:38:56.:38:59.

of those battles on big stages, so I think that's really what it's

:39:00.:39:02.

Murray reached the quarterfinals for the tenth year in a row,

:39:03.:39:11.

thanks to a relatively straightforward win

:39:12.:39:13.

After all the injury worries before the tournament started,

:39:14.:39:17.

so I was also a little bit concerned.

:39:18.:39:23.

When you're having issues just a few days before a big event,

:39:24.:39:27.

it's frustrating, but I managed it well,

:39:28.:39:29.

and I think I played some good stuff.

:39:30.:39:32.

Today, like I said, was the best I've played so far in the tournament

:39:33.:39:35.

and, yeah, I'm doing well, so hopefully I keep it up.

:39:36.:39:43.

Roger Federer is through, but Rafael Nadal is out.

:39:44.:39:49.

Gilles Muller beat the two-time champion in an epic five-setter.

:39:50.:39:53.

It was 15-13 in the decider, and the pair were on court

:39:54.:39:56.

for nearly five hours, meaning Novak Djokovic's match

:39:57.:40:00.

of the scheduling of matches yesterday.

:40:01.:40:07.

World number one Angelique Kerber said she was really surprised

:40:08.:40:09.

to find herself on Court Two after she lost to Garbine Mugaruza.

:40:10.:40:14.

Only two of the eight women's singles matches

:40:15.:40:16.

Away from Wimbledon, Romelu Lukaku has completed his ?75 million move

:40:17.:40:25.

He trained with his new team-mates for the first time yesterday

:40:26.:40:33.

on United's pre-season tour of the USA.

:40:34.:40:36.

We told you yesterday about Wayne Rooney wearing

:40:37.:40:38.

his Everton pyjamas in secret for the last 13 years.

:40:39.:40:43.

Now he's got his hands on the offical kit after

:40:44.:40:45.

He says he wants to win trophies at his boyhood club

:40:46.:40:50.

and force his way back into the national team,

:40:51.:40:52.

I'm not coming into a retirement home.

:40:53.:40:55.

I want to win, I want to be successful at this football club,

:40:56.:41:00.

but that'll build up in the next few weeks, and I'm excited.

:41:01.:41:13.

After a rest day, the Tour de France resumes today

:41:14.:41:15.

with a stage to favour the sprinters.

:41:16.:41:17.

but he'll have to make do without team-mate Geraint Thomas,

:41:18.:41:21.

who crashed on Sunday and broke his collarbone.

:41:22.:41:27.

Even without Geraint yesterday, he crashed fairly early on,

:41:28.:41:30.

and I think risen to the occassion of defending the yellow jersey.

:41:31.:41:50.

Back to Wimbledon, what not to do when you are warming up for a crunch

:41:51.:41:55.

match on court number one, look at these incredible pictures of Rafa

:41:56.:42:00.

Nadal about to go out yesterday. He wallops it said on the ceiling, we

:42:01.:42:04.

have all done it, haven't we? You try to laugh, but I bet that really

:42:05.:42:10.

hurt! Thankfully, he saw the funny side, but probably an accurate

:42:11.:42:13.

indication that it was not going to be his day. This morning he has

:42:14.:42:18.

probably woken up with aching arms and legs and quite a sore head too.

:42:19.:42:23.

You have seen some of the greatest tennis players in the world have a

:42:24.:42:31.

go at our Breakfast moped challenge, how many tennis balls they can get

:42:32.:42:35.

into our giant mug in the space of 30 seconds. It looks like it will be

:42:36.:42:39.

really easy and that you will be able to do a - it is not, it is very

:42:40.:42:45.

challenging, Andy Murray is top of the leaderboard, and we asked or

:42:46.:42:48.

time Grand Slam when I came Clijsters to have a go, and here is

:42:49.:42:51.

how she got on. So, Kim Clijsters,

:42:52.:42:52.

welcome to BBC Breakfast. So you are a former world number

:42:53.:42:53.

one, four Grand Slam titles under your belt, including three

:42:54.:42:58.

US Opens, one Australian Open, but nothing compares

:42:59.:43:00.

to the challenge Pressure, a lot of pressure,

:43:01.:43:01.

a little bit nervous. You understand the rules,

:43:02.:43:08.

as many balls as you can get OK, good start, I'm liking

:43:09.:43:16.

the technique, strong technique. It's been successful in the past,

:43:17.:43:31.

one has definitely gone in. That is now nearly ten

:43:32.:43:36.

seconds down, Kim. She's not going to change up this

:43:37.:43:39.

technique, it's definitely working for her, this is going to be

:43:40.:43:48.

a strong performance from former OK, Kim, we've got

:43:49.:43:51.

five seconds left. Just about, well done, I think

:43:52.:43:55.

that was a fantastic performance. Are you feeling

:43:56.:44:03.

confident about this? I don't know.

:44:04.:44:09.

I have no idea how many. One, two, three, four, five, six,

:44:10.:44:11.

seven, eight, nine, ten. I didn't beat Andy, but you know,

:44:12.:44:17.

I'll give him the win. Really well done for having a go

:44:18.:44:26.

at our Game, Set, Mug Challenge. That is Kim Clijsters with Holly

:44:27.:44:44.

Hamilton, let's see where she is on the leaderboard, because she did

:44:45.:44:50.

brilliantly. Andy right at the top with 14, a whopping 14, will anyone

:44:51.:44:55.

beat that by the end of week? In second place, jointly James and Kim

:44:56.:44:56.

Clijsters. In fourth place, Charlie Stayt, who

:44:57.:45:10.

managed to get seven balls into the BBC Breakfast mug! There will be

:45:11.:45:16.

more stars playing over the coming days, we have got some really good

:45:17.:45:20.

ones coming up. If you want to watch more Wimbledon today, listen to the

:45:21.:45:27.

tennis, keep in touch, all afternoon on BBC Radio 5 live and BBC Two from

:45:28.:45:28.

12 o'clock. We are just having a few technical

:45:29.:45:41.

issues, Louise has called on something and broken a microphone.

:45:42.:45:44.

I think I have genuinely broken it! We shall carry on, I am sure we will

:45:45.:45:47.

hear you at some stage! It's a storm twice the size

:45:48.:45:49.

of earth, raging over Jupiter's Great Red Spot has

:45:50.:45:51.

intrigued scientists since its discovery almost 200 years

:45:52.:45:54.

ago, and in the early hours of this morning,

:45:55.:45:56.

the spacecraft Juno flew the closest The aim is to discover more

:45:57.:45:59.

about Jupiter and its famous storm, but it'll take a few days before

:46:00.:46:03.

we get to see those first pictures. In the meantime, here's what we know

:46:04.:46:06.

about the great gas giant Very peaceful! But not if you are

:46:07.:46:10.

close! Behind us you can see the first set

:46:11.:47:20.

of images that the space craft Juno sent back to Earth from Jupiter

:47:21.:47:23.

earlier this year. We won't see the pictures from this

:47:24.:47:25.

morning's close up fly-by Joining us now is Dr Jonathan

:47:26.:47:28.

Nichols, a Juno mission scientist. I love stories like this, you must

:47:29.:47:40.

be extremely excited? I can't wait. The images will come on Friday. The

:47:41.:47:47.

scientists have to work on them to get them looking nice, but I can't

:47:48.:47:54.

wait. Louise is not happy with the name Great Red Spot. What do we know

:47:55.:48:09.

about it, and what will we know about it? The storm is bigger than

:48:10.:48:15.

the Earth, you could fit the Earth inside the Great Red Spot. It is

:48:16.:48:20.

similar to a Harry Kane on the Earth, but Harry Kane 's need an

:48:21.:48:24.

ocean, they need to be over an ocean to survive. Jupiter is different

:48:25.:48:27.

from the earth because there is no solid surface, so we don't actually

:48:28.:48:32.

understand how he Great Red Spot can survive for so long. I understand

:48:33.:48:37.

the storm has been raging for many years, but it has been changing over

:48:38.:48:44.

time? Yes, it has been observed as long as we have been looking at

:48:45.:48:47.

Jupiter with telescopes, for centuries. It changes, and it has

:48:48.:48:54.

halved in size since the Voyager spacecraft flew by in the 70s. It

:48:55.:49:01.

changes over time, it is about half the size, but it is still bigger

:49:02.:49:07.

than the Earth. Where does Juno go after this? Friday will be a big

:49:08.:49:12.

day, you will be glued to a screen as the images come in, but what is

:49:13.:49:17.

next? Juno has been orbiting Jupiter for the last year, and it is making

:49:18.:49:23.

orbits where it comes in, died is close, within 9000 kilometres,

:49:24.:49:27.

closer to Jupiter than the size of the Great Red Spot, and comes out on

:49:28.:49:32.

a long orbit. It has done that for about a year, it will carry on for

:49:33.:49:38.

at least another year. The thing about Juno, it is limited by the

:49:39.:49:42.

radiation around Jupiter. Jupiter is a radioactive planet, nasty for the

:49:43.:49:48.

electronics, and when Juno guides through, it takes a dose of

:49:49.:49:52.

radiation, and that will damage the electronics. How important is this

:49:53.:50:03.

information, for science? When Juno is flying over the Great Red Spot,

:50:04.:50:06.

we will find out how deep the sport is. We can see it on the surface but

:50:07.:50:11.

we do not understand how far down it goes, so it will tell us the 3-D

:50:12.:50:15.

structure of the Great Red Spot and what it is made of and why it is so

:50:16.:50:19.

red. Juno will tell us about the formation of Jupiter, the interior

:50:20.:50:24.

structure, what it is made of, and that tells us where Jupiter formed,

:50:25.:50:29.

and then that tells us about how the Earth formed. Would you have a

:50:30.:50:34.

scientific get-together on Friday? A big gang? Who will be looking at the

:50:35.:50:41.

images and we will have a party! I can't wait, I am sitting forward on

:50:42.:50:46.

my seat, waiting for it. You collaborate with the Americans is

:50:47.:50:53.

that unusual? In science, it is an international discipline, especially

:50:54.:50:59.

space. It is very expensive to send spacecraft to Jupiter, we need to

:51:00.:51:03.

work across international borders to make a successful mission, and Juno

:51:04.:51:07.

has been a spectacularly successful mission. There will be covering it

:51:08.:51:11.

on Friday. Really looking forward to seeing the

:51:12.:51:17.

images. Can we call it a bit different from Great Red Spot? Bill?

:51:18.:51:22.

I think the great big spot could catch on!

:51:23.:51:25.

Bill the spot! Carol's at Wimbledon with a look

:51:26.:51:27.

at this morning's weather. You don't have to do the weather on

:51:28.:51:35.

Jupiter! That's a relief! You will notice a

:51:36.:51:47.

change today, especially across southern counties, it will feel much

:51:48.:51:51.

colder than it has. We are looking at significant rain for the first

:51:52.:51:56.

time in a while. Our gardens are crying out for it. If you are coming

:51:57.:52:01.

to Wimbledon, the forecast is more unsubtle, more cloud, we are not

:52:02.:52:10.

immune to rain. Later on, we will see the heavier and more persistent

:52:11.:52:14.

rain, especially later in the afternoon and into the early

:52:15.:52:21.

evening. Feeling cooler. The rain that is affecting Wimbledon later is

:52:22.:52:24.

already affecting parts of the South West and Wales, and it will drift

:52:25.:52:30.

east through the day. For Scotland and Northern Ireland, you have

:52:31.:52:34.

sunshine and showers. There is a lot of cloud around, we have seen

:52:35.:52:37.

showers, and we will see further showers. For northern England, more

:52:38.:52:46.

coherent rain. Some of it is heavy as it drifts east. For Scotland, one

:52:47.:52:52.

or two showers, and for Northern Ireland, but some bright spells. As

:52:53.:52:57.

we come back into Wales, rain. The heaviest is across the South. For

:52:58.:53:01.

south-west England, quite a bit of cloud, with showery rain. As we

:53:02.:53:06.

drift further east, through Gloucestershire, into the South

:53:07.:53:13.

Midlands, also doubles the Home Counties, a few showers, but a lot

:53:14.:53:17.

of dry and bright weather as well. The rain we have in the West is

:53:18.:53:23.

moving east quite smartly. A drier interlude, possibly with one or two

:53:24.:53:28.

showers, then the heavy rain moves in and moves across to eastern

:53:29.:53:32.

areas. North of that, a mixture of sunshine, bright spells and showers.

:53:33.:53:39.

The link all if you are in the showers or the rain. The rain

:53:40.:53:43.

continues to push towards the North Sea as we head through the evening

:53:44.:53:47.

and overnight. By the time we finished with it, we could have at

:53:48.:53:53.

least 40 millimetres. North of that, across Scotland, northern England

:53:54.:53:57.

and Northern Ireland, variable cloud, clear skies, and the

:53:58.:54:01.

temperatures could be low enough for a touch of frost in sheltered glens.

:54:02.:54:07.

More comfortable to sleep in in the south-east. Tomorrow, we lose the

:54:08.:54:12.

rain, and high-pressure built-in, hitting us a day of sunny spells.

:54:13.:54:20.

Thursday, again a lot of dry weather around. A fair bit of sunshine. A

:54:21.:54:25.

few showers in the north and west. A new weather front coming in across

:54:26.:54:29.

north-west Scotland, introducing grain. Temperatures roughly where

:54:30.:54:35.

they should be at this stage in July. Pollen levels will be low or

:54:36.:54:43.

moderate today. That is good news for me, I don't know about you!

:54:44.:54:51.

I have got a confession to make. I know we had 45 muffins earlier, we

:54:52.:54:55.

only have one left! Wedded you put them? We might have eaten them all!

:54:56.:55:03.

I saved this one for you, though! These muffins have been working for

:55:04.:55:09.

Johanna Konta, she has been baking muffins, bringing them in, they have

:55:10.:55:13.

dubbed white chocolate and raspberry, banana and chocolate

:55:14.:55:16.

chip, somebody is asking for peanut butter and banana, that sounds like

:55:17.:55:21.

my favourite. If we keep eating muffins, when we have a go at the

:55:22.:55:29.

game, we might be brilliant. We will test the theory! See you later!

:55:30.:55:33.

Enjoyed your mini muffin! I am looking forward to you playing

:55:34.:55:44.

Game Set Mug! You never brought any food in from

:55:45.:55:47.

MasterChef. I have brought it for other people.

:55:48.:55:51.

OK! I will bring you some jam. Home-made

:55:52.:55:56.

jam? Not really, I want some sort of

:55:57.:55:58.

cake. It's 100 years since

:55:59.:55:59.

the first mass-produced They were sent to help

:56:00.:56:01.

during the First World War, when many farmers were

:56:02.:56:04.

on the front line. Breakfast's Tim Muffett

:56:05.:56:06.

is at the Great Yorkshire Show, The show started in 1838, this year

:56:07.:56:23.

it is all about the tractor, as well as many other attractions. 1917 is

:56:24.:56:29.

when it first started, and tractors have transformed agriculture. What a

:56:30.:56:33.

collection of crackers we have here this morning, dating back to 1917.

:56:34.:56:40.

Brian, you are from the Vintage tractor... The National Vintage

:56:41.:56:49.

tractor and engine club. This is a 1917 models for sport over to help

:56:50.:56:54.

with the war effort. It was one of the first that Henry Ford built.

:56:55.:57:01.

They send them over because all of the men and horses had gone off to

:57:02.:57:05.

the war, and they were short of manpower. He transformed the way

:57:06.:57:11.

agriculture worked. We think of him as changing the car industry, and

:57:12.:57:17.

tractors as well. He made more impact on agriculture, because he

:57:18.:57:23.

introduced a lightweight tractor that the small farmer could afford.

:57:24.:57:30.

He wanted to get rid of the drudgery associated with the horse, because

:57:31.:57:33.

he was fed up of it. Fascinating stuff. You wrote one of these when

:57:34.:57:44.

you were ten. We bought it in 1936 for ?60 second-hand. Today, you turn

:57:45.:57:51.

a key and it starts immediately, but then it could be two or three hours,

:57:52.:57:57.

especially in winter. What is it like, seeing it today? It is

:57:58.:58:10.

marvellous. Give us a spin later! I would like to crank it up! It merely

:58:11.:58:18.

fetched my thumb off. We don't want to do that. A fantastic load of

:58:19.:58:25.

events. A lot of people admiring the tractors. As they have changed,

:58:26.:58:31.

agriculture has changed. And the way in which the machines operate is

:58:32.:58:36.

transformed's has transformed the way farmers work. What is it like,

:58:37.:58:42.

driving a tractor? Extremely important, they help us with

:58:43.:58:46.

everything that we do everyday, feeding cattle, general feeding. You

:58:47.:58:53.

are both young farmers, but even in the time you have been working, how

:58:54.:58:58.

have tractors changed? At the latest has just got cheap DRS, so you

:58:59.:59:03.

barely even have to drive it, it tells you where to go, where you

:59:04.:59:09.

have been, it is brilliant. What could happen to tractors in the

:59:10.:59:13.

future? Have they got as advanced as they can ever be? Definitely not.

:59:14.:59:18.

Think what will happen in the next 20, 30, 50 years. To see the old

:59:19.:59:24.

ones as well, alongside the new ones, it is quite something. A

:59:25.:59:28.

hundred years ago that is when it started.

:59:29.:59:34.

They have moved semantically quickly, and it shows what can be

:59:35.:59:39.

done in a short period of time. Thanks very much indeed, the show

:59:40.:59:49.

goes on, there will be sheep shearing, horses from Poldark, and

:59:50.:59:54.

one joke sent from a couple people on social media this morning - what

:59:55.:59:57.

to call someone who used to like tractors but doesn't anymore? An

:59:58.:00:04.

ex-tractor fan! Those Poldark horses are very much

:00:05.:00:11.

worth seeing! The joke was so bad the cameraman

:00:12.:00:16.

just moved away from him towards the ex-tractor fan!

:00:17.:00:18.

You've been sending in your tractor pictures.

:00:19.:00:20.

Jen has sent in a photo of her great-uncle

:00:21.:00:23.

with motoring mogul Henry Ford, who was his friend.

:00:24.:00:26.

If you look closely, you can just about make out

:00:27.:00:29.

Henry Ford's signature at the very bottom of the photo.

:00:30.:00:39.

being able to continue living in their own home is so important.

:00:40.:00:43.

Now, doctors are trialling new technology which it hopes

:00:44.:00:45.

It works by tracking a person's physical activity,

:00:46.:00:49.

information people with dementia can't always remember.

:00:50.:00:52.

It's hoped carers will feel more confident to leave a relative alone

:00:53.:00:55.

for short amounts of time, and help patients feel like they're

:00:56.:00:57.

Breakfast's John Maguire has been to take a look.

:00:58.:01:09.

For Phil and June Bell, the home they have lived

:01:10.:01:12.

in for 30 years is definitely where their hearts are.

:01:13.:01:14.

And they are trialling technology which should help June stay

:01:15.:01:17.

She was diagnosed with dementia a year ago.

:01:18.:01:24.

One of our aims is to stay as long as we can within our home,

:01:25.:01:29.

and what the technology has done is enable us to do that.

:01:30.:01:36.

It does, yes, to think somebody is out there,

:01:37.:01:49.

concerned about me, I think it's quite touching.

:01:50.:01:55.

Various sensors monitor June's movements and activity,

:01:56.:02:02.

and it regularly checks health, blood pressure,

:02:03.:02:08.

Information is sent to this clinical monitoring team,

:02:09.:02:16.

and staff here can combine June's medical and environmental data

:02:17.:02:20.

to build up a fuller picture of her health.

:02:21.:02:24.

If we look at this data, she is moving in the living room hallway

:02:25.:02:28.

All those data can suggest if she is becoming agitated or not,

:02:29.:02:44.

is there an infection, so putting everything together

:02:45.:02:46.

could give us a picture of how well she is.

:02:47.:02:48.

There are currently 200 patients with mild or moderate dementia

:02:49.:02:51.

on the trial, based in the Surrey

:02:52.:02:55.

and North East Hampshire NHS area, and they are looking

:02:56.:02:57.

A red stethoscope and an on-screen alert warn the team

:02:58.:03:02.

They may then call the household, enlist help from medical

:03:03.:03:08.

teams or ask staff from the Alzheimer's Society

:03:09.:03:11.

The technology is also proving useful for GPs and hospital staff.

:03:12.:03:19.

This handset contains June's recent readings,

:03:20.:03:22.

that again offers a better insight into her health.

:03:23.:03:30.

It's been an important aspect of this project

:03:31.:03:33.

that people on the trial have been able to take their data to their GP

:03:34.:03:37.

or consultant so they have that set of data to make clinical judgments

:03:38.:03:41.

The results of the trial, the first of its kind in the UK,

:03:42.:03:48.

will not be known until next year, but early indicators are positive.

:03:49.:03:54.

These gadgets are helping people stay longer in their homes,

:03:55.:03:59.

safe and secure in the knowledge that help, if needed,

:04:00.:04:01.

is just a phone call or a mouse click away.

:04:02.:04:08.

We'll be joined by actors Laura Carmichael and Freema

:04:09.:04:18.

Downton Abbey meets Doctor Who, not quite that, but stay with us! I love

:04:19.:04:28.

that idea! Hello, welcome back, everybody. I

:04:29.:06:18.

don't know what is the matter with wee two this morning! You speak now!

:06:19.:06:21.

Our next guests are two of the UK's most-exciting young actors.

:06:22.:06:24.

Laura Carmichael's best known for her role in Downton Abbey,

:06:25.:06:26.

and Freema Agyeman's big break was playing Martha in

:06:27.:06:28.

Now they're both going to take centre stage

:06:29.:06:31.

Say it for me, ladies, apologies! Lovely to see you! First up,

:06:32.:06:48.

fantastic actresses, who wants to tell me what it is about, the play?

:06:49.:06:54.

Come on, one of you! Well, it is about a multitude of things, but I

:06:55.:06:59.

like to think of it as a black comedy about secrets and family

:07:00.:07:05.

truths. It happens around this dinner table, and it is a brilliant

:07:06.:07:13.

observation of group dynamics, and I think the audience will recognise

:07:14.:07:17.

the social rituals that polite society have to adhered to around

:07:18.:07:20.

the table, and you can maybe recognise what role you play in

:07:21.:07:26.

group gatherings, there is always somebody who is the firestarter, the

:07:27.:07:32.

truth tell, the tap dancer in the group. So it is interesting to see

:07:33.:07:37.

how the people start the evening, doing what they are supposed to do,

:07:38.:07:44.

then it unravels. Stockard Channing is our mother-in-law, so we play the

:07:45.:07:50.

girlfriends of her sons, and it is her birthday, and we have all come

:07:51.:07:53.

for dinner, and it all kind of goes wrong! She plays this amazing woman,

:07:54.:08:00.

an art historian and feminist activist, and so it is a sort of

:08:01.:08:07.

reflection of the sacrifices she made and what happens to her sons as

:08:08.:08:13.

she pursued her causes, I guess, when they were kids. What has it

:08:14.:08:21.

been like, working a huge star of film and television? What has she

:08:22.:08:25.

been like to work with? She is so warm, isn't she? And as into it as

:08:26.:08:32.

we are. She wants to go through it in detail and talk about every

:08:33.:08:40.

aspect, and she is there to be a group player. She really is. It is

:08:41.:08:47.

amazing when you get to walk -- work with legends and she turns up and

:08:48.:08:51.

she is normal, so down-to-earth, but yet perfect for this part, who is

:08:52.:08:59.

fiercely intelligent and funny and cutting its us in our place. Yeah,

:09:00.:09:05.

that is such a good point, because all the characters start with having

:09:06.:09:10.

a strong belief in something at the beginning, and it is slowly

:09:11.:09:14.

dissected - beaver sexted, each person starting to question their

:09:15.:09:20.

beliefs, and usually it is coming from her, get into people and

:09:21.:09:26.

unravel them sounds like a good dinner party!

:09:27.:09:32.

I know I feel that very awkward! You have both been involved in hugely

:09:33.:09:36.

successful television as well, shall we talk about the Downton effect

:09:37.:09:42.

first of all? When you first started, presumably nobody had any

:09:43.:09:47.

idea how immense it was going to be. True, no idea, and it was my first

:09:48.:09:54.

TV job ever, and I had no clue that it would take off like it did, and

:09:55.:09:59.

everyday of my life it is a gift, you get jobs off the back of it, so

:10:00.:10:04.

it has been amazing. There you are, and you work in a small programme

:10:05.:10:09.

called Doctor Who! I am not sure many people will have heard it.

:10:10.:10:17.

Quite niche! It never leaves you, does it? No, I was at a convention

:10:18.:10:21.

this weekend, and it has been ten years since I did it. Has it

:10:22.:10:26.

really?! It was the job I did for the shortest amount of time in my

:10:27.:10:31.

professional career, and it is a gift, because the association, you

:10:32.:10:35.

do not want to disassociate yourself, because it is such a

:10:36.:10:39.

wonderful, happy product, and the opportunities that it ought you are

:10:40.:10:49.

incredible. And the fans are very loyal. They are so loyal, whatever

:10:50.:10:52.

job you go on to do, they will always support you, and you cannot

:10:53.:10:58.

ask for more than that. Would you ever go back? You can never say

:10:59.:11:02.

never, especially with Doctor Who! Is this where you tell us you are

:11:03.:11:09.

the new Doctor?! You just never know! I think I played, you know, my

:11:10.:11:15.

own character, my own cousin in season two of the show, so anything

:11:16.:11:21.

can happen, you know. Talk about the Doctor Who convention, people come

:11:22.:11:26.

dressed as all sorts, is there a Downton equivalent? Well, there is

:11:27.:11:32.

not a sci-fi thing, but there are events, and people do dress up. Do

:11:33.:11:38.

you get invited? Yeah, well, signing things, or when we have done trips

:11:39.:11:42.

to America, they are very enthusiastic! And it is funny,

:11:43.:11:49.

because it is period costumes, it is really inventive, just lovely. Did

:11:50.:11:57.

you know there was a crossover between Doctor Who and Downton Abbey

:11:58.:12:02.

fans? You are both really busy, so, Laura, tell us what else you have

:12:03.:12:12.

got going on. Yes, Man In An Orange Shirt is coming on the BBC this

:12:13.:12:17.

week, a story of two men who fall in love in the Second World War, the

:12:18.:12:20.

fallout of that, the marriages that they go on to have. I play the

:12:21.:12:26.

sister to one of their wives, and how it is a secret that tears them

:12:27.:12:31.

apart, and that is the first part, said in the 1940s, then the second

:12:32.:12:36.

part is modern-day and follows the wife character, played by Vanessa

:12:37.:12:42.

Redgrave. So it is seeing how that changes, impacts. You have had huge

:12:43.:12:47.

success with Doctor Who, which I still, to quite believe was ten

:12:48.:12:58.

years ago, and Sense8 has been massive on Netflix. Yes, we have got

:12:59.:13:03.

a Sense8 special that will be filmed for it. I mean, season to just came

:13:04.:13:10.

out, and it was axed by Netflix, and there was such a backlash from the

:13:11.:13:18.

Van Dam! Because it is such an important show with the message is

:13:19.:13:22.

that it is giving across, love and unity in these dark times of

:13:23.:13:26.

divisiveness, what seems to be happening at the moment, so they

:13:27.:13:31.

film in 14 countries around the world, so it is very expensive. It

:13:32.:13:35.

was not coming from a place of Netflix not supporting it, it was a

:13:36.:13:40.

business decision, but the fans kicked right off, and we have now

:13:41.:13:45.

got a special coming up! You can't take away our TV show!

:13:46.:13:47.

Apologia will be performed from the 29th July to 18th November

:13:48.:13:50.

Did you get it right that I'm?! Go and enjoy it, it is great.

:13:51.:13:56.

Jon and Lou will be here tomorrow morning from six o'clock.

:13:57.:14:02.

You are back tomorrow, I have been sacked!

:14:03.:14:04.

But now it's time for Right On The Money

:14:05.:14:06.

with Dominic Littlewood and Denise Lewis.

:14:07.:14:10.

we could all do with knowing how to make the most of our cash.

:14:11.:14:16.

So, we've found simple advice for you to do just that,

:14:17.:14:19.

and taken it to people right across the UK.

:14:20.:14:23.

Whatever help you need with your finances, we are right on the money.

:14:24.:14:30.

Hello, and welcome to Right On The Money,

:14:31.:14:33.