13/07/2017 Breakfast


13/07/2017

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This is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

:00:00.:00:09.

The first step to Brexit becoming law.

:00:10.:00:12.

The bill to convert EU law into British legislation

:00:13.:00:15.

The government calls it a major milestone.

:00:16.:00:19.

Opposition parties threaten to obstruct its progress.

:00:20.:00:35.

The parent's of terminally ill baby, Charlie Gard, put their case

:00:36.:00:47.

to the High Court, arguing that an experimental new treatment

:00:48.:00:49.

All British hopes now lie with Johanna Konta,

:00:50.:01:00.

after Andy Murray was knocked out yesterday.

:01:01.:01:01.

She faces Venus Williams on Centre Court later today bidding

:01:02.:01:04.

to become the first British woman to reach a Wimbledon singles final

:01:05.:01:07.

The financial regulator says more and more people

:01:08.:01:12.

are accessing their pension pot early without taking proper advice.

:01:13.:01:15.

Pension freedoms were introduced two years ago and I'll be speak

:01:16.:01:17.

to the Pensions Minister who made the changes,

:01:18.:01:20.

and asking if people are paying too much tax as a result.

:01:21.:01:23.

We're live at the Natural History Museum, where this is the sight that

:01:24.:01:28.

will be greeting visitors from today.

:01:29.:01:30.

And Carol has the weather form Wimbledon.

:01:31.:01:34.

Good morning. It is a much more mild start to the day here today. We

:01:35.:01:44.

don't have the keen breeze we had yesterday at Wimbledon. The outside

:01:45.:01:49.

chance of a showers. The UK, a mostly dry forecast. Some showers

:01:50.:02:00.

possible. I will have more throughout the programme. Thank you.

:02:01.:02:04.

The government will today publish a long-awaited bill that

:02:05.:02:08.

will convert European Union laws into British legislation.

:02:09.:02:10.

It's been referred to as the Repeal Bill,

:02:11.:02:13.

but its official title is the European Union Withdrawal

:02:14.:02:15.

Its purpose is to replace EU law with UK legislation and smooth

:02:16.:02:20.

The Brexit Secretary David Davis has described it as a "major milestone."

:02:21.:02:24.

However, political opponents have threatened to disrupt

:02:25.:02:26.

Our political correspondent, Ben Wright, is in Westminster.

:02:27.:02:32.

Good morning. Lots of questions about how easy it will be to get

:02:33.:02:39.

this through for the government of Theresa May. Good morning. This is

:02:40.:02:49.

very significant. On the face of it, it is simple. It repeals the 1972

:02:50.:02:56.

act and ends the application of EU law in the UK. Once all of the

:02:57.:03:01.

negotiations are completed and the UK leads the EU in March 2019, it

:03:02.:03:08.

can do it because of this bill being passed. It will do something more

:03:09.:03:11.

significant, transferring thousands of rules and regulations that

:03:12.:03:16.

currently apply to the UK because of membership to the EU, taking all of

:03:17.:03:21.

those laws and regulations, and putting them on a UK Statute book.

:03:22.:03:26.

There will be a huge parliamentary fight over what that should look

:03:27.:03:32.

like and what the oversight will be, what powers ministers will have to

:03:33.:03:36.

change rules over the next few years. The timetable is

:03:37.:03:42.

extraordinarily tight. The Lib Dems and Labour have said clearly they

:03:43.:03:46.

are willing to make the life of the government hell. The government has

:03:47.:03:50.

no majority. There will be many close votes when this comes before

:03:51.:03:55.

Parliament. It will be debated in the Oldham. There has been a lot of

:03:56.:04:02.

criticism of Theresa May's handling of this. David Davis says he was

:04:03.:04:08.

hamstrung by the Prime Minister. Now we're hearing from the head of the

:04:09.:04:12.

National Audit Office. What do you make of this? Strong comments from

:04:13.:04:18.

the head of the National Audit Office, rarely as outspoken as this,

:04:19.:04:21.

especially on something as current and contentious as the Brexit

:04:22.:04:27.

process. She has said there is a lack of leadership putting Brexit at

:04:28.:04:32.

risk. She says there is no clarity from government and direction about

:04:33.:04:36.

the entire process. She said the government could, part like a

:04:37.:04:42.

chocolate orange unless government departments are given more direction

:04:43.:04:47.

quickly over how the process should happen. That is an interesting

:04:48.:04:52.

image, isn't it? Thank you very much, Ben. We will talk to you

:04:53.:04:55.

later. After 7:30 this morning,

:04:56.:04:55.

we'll talk to the Brexit Minister, The parents of Charlie guard will

:04:56.:05:03.

return to the High Court to argue he should be able to be taken to the US

:05:04.:05:08.

for experimental treatment. Doctors say the therapy will not work and

:05:09.:05:13.

his life support systems should be turned off.

:05:14.:05:15.

Charlie guard has been in intensive care at Great Ormond Street Hospital

:05:16.:05:25.

since October last year. He has an extremely rare genetic condition

:05:26.:05:29.

which has left him severely brain-damaged and unable to breathe

:05:30.:05:33.

without the help of a ventilator. Ever since his birth 11 months ago,

:05:34.:05:38.

there have been numerous legal battles escalated to the highest

:05:39.:05:43.

level in the UK and Europe. Doctors have said he is so ill he must be

:05:44.:05:48.

allowed to die, but his parents have persuaded the original judge they

:05:49.:05:52.

should be able to give what they say is new scientific evidence today

:05:53.:05:56.

suggesting experimental treatment could help their son. We have got

:05:57.:06:05.

letters from up to seven doctors and scientists demonstrating there is up

:06:06.:06:08.

to a 10% chance of this groundbreaking treatment working. We

:06:09.:06:12.

will know in a period of 2-8 weeks whether or not baby Charlie is

:06:13.:06:18.

improving. The treatment is non-invasive it is not in operation.

:06:19.:06:26.

They just put it in his food. His parents have received offers of help

:06:27.:06:30.

from the Vatican and the United States. But the judge, Judge

:06:31.:06:36.

Francis, has said any new evidence must given swiftly over concerns of

:06:37.:06:40.

prolonging the suffering of the little boy. Sophie Hutchinson, BBC

:06:41.:06:43.

News. The BBC has learned that at least

:06:44.:06:45.

one person who survived the Grenfell Tower fire has been

:06:46.:06:48.

diagnosed with cyanide poisoning. Luana Gomes, who's 12-years-old,

:06:49.:06:51.

was treated for the effects It isn't known what caused

:06:52.:06:53.

the poisoning, but her parents, who lost their unborn

:06:54.:06:57.

child after the fire, believe it may have been caused

:06:58.:06:59.

by the burning of insulation This was the home of the Gomes

:07:00.:07:11.

family on the 21st floor of Grenfell Tower. They had been living in a

:07:12.:07:18.

hotel since release from hospital. Luana Gomes was having a baby. The

:07:19.:07:27.

family allowed BBC Newsnight to film the hospital discharge papers. The

:07:28.:07:33.

12-year-old's papers detailed cyanide poisoning. She was also

:07:34.:07:37.

treated for the risk of cyanide. This is the first confirmation of a

:07:38.:07:43.

cyanide diagnosis as a result of the fire. The highly toxic gas may have

:07:44.:07:48.

been released by the blaze from the plastics. They have directed their

:07:49.:07:54.

ire at whoever decided to put this cheap material in it. It all could

:07:55.:08:01.

have been avoided. That is where the anger comes from. Yes, it was an

:08:02.:08:06.

accident. Bite it could have been avoided. It should never have

:08:07.:08:14.

happened like this. They never wanted the cladding in the first

:08:15.:08:18.

place. I don't know if it is the right word, but you just killed so

:08:19.:08:24.

many people. You just killed my son. If it was a normal situation, I

:08:25.:08:27.

could have got out. He was seven months. He could have survived.

:08:28.:08:37.

Because of their conditions, he passed away. The family has

:08:38.:08:42.

requested a full postmortem examination on their son to discover

:08:43.:08:47.

what caused his death. They should have been celebrating his birth next

:08:48.:08:51.

month, and they had already decided to call him Logan.

:08:52.:08:54.

The educational gap between poor and rich children is getting wider,

:08:55.:08:57.

A report by the "Commission on Inequality in Education," says

:08:58.:09:01.

pupils in more deprived areas are more likely to be taught

:09:02.:09:04.

The Department for Education disputes the findings,

:09:05.:09:07.

and says it's working towards improving education

:09:08.:09:09.

President Trump will arrive in France this morning

:09:10.:09:15.

He will commemorate the centenary of America's entry

:09:16.:09:18.

Tomorrow, he'll celebrate Bastille Day at the invitation

:09:19.:09:22.

of the French President, Emmanuel Macron.

:09:23.:09:25.

The Chief Minister of Gibraltar has criticised comments made yesterday

:09:26.:09:28.

by King Felipe of Spain during an address to Parliament.

:09:29.:09:31.

The King said he was confident that the UK and Spain would find

:09:32.:09:35.

a solution to the issue of Gibraltar that was acceptable to all involved.

:09:36.:09:38.

At a banquet later at Buckingham Palace,

:09:39.:09:40.

hosted by the Queen and Prince Philip, Her Majesty

:09:41.:09:42.

acknowledged the two countries had not always seen "eye to eye."

:09:43.:09:47.

Yesterday, we were talking about 15-year-old, Eddie,

:09:48.:09:49.

who took over Southern Rail's Twitter account as part

:09:50.:09:52.

Complaints about cancellations and late trains seemed to be

:09:53.:09:55.

forgotten, and followers even used the hashtag "Ask Eddie" to quiz him

:09:56.:09:59.

about duck-sized horses and how to make tea.

:10:00.:10:01.

Eddie was such a hit, that Southern Rail invited him back

:10:02.:10:04.

It has definitely been enjoyable, I will tell you that for a fact. It

:10:05.:10:24.

was a decision I would have a go on the Twitter. Yesterday, I put myself

:10:25.:10:29.

out there and said this is me. A fabulous story. It is quite hard

:10:30.:10:40.

to do. Front pages. The front page of the Times this morning. Many

:10:41.:10:44.

having the images of the royal visit from the Spanish royal couple. This

:10:45.:10:51.

is the Queen of Spain, a former journalist. This is the event at

:10:52.:10:54.

Buckingham Palace yesterday. The main story, Google paid millions of

:10:55.:11:01.

dollars to access academic research to sway public opinion into its

:11:02.:11:04.

policies in favour of the tech giant. Some stories on The Daily

:11:05.:11:10.

Telegraph. This image of Andy Murray grimacing in pain. He still managed

:11:11.:11:16.

a five set quarter-final before being defeated against the American

:11:17.:11:24.

Sam Querrey. Draw up your will in a text message. They say they must

:11:25.:11:29.

catch up with the digital age. And a lack of leadership putting Brexit at

:11:30.:11:35.

risk. We were hearing about that earlier. The head of the National

:11:36.:11:39.

Audit Office has had an unprecedented intervention, not

:11:40.:11:44.

likely to go unnoticed by ministers. They are going through that bill

:11:45.:11:50.

today. Andy Murray out on the Guardian. We will investigate this

:11:51.:11:59.

story more. Good morning. I am looking at pensions today. Big

:12:00.:12:06.

changes in many of the pages about how we can draw down our pensions.

:12:07.:12:12.

Sticking to the Formula 1 theme. A Lamborghini. Can you grab that?

:12:13.:12:17.

Thank you. It is an interesting picture. Many people fear pensioners

:12:18.:12:24.

might splash out on cars... Because people can take out their pension...

:12:25.:12:30.

Yes. But people have been careful about how to spend it. At perhaps

:12:31.:12:34.

they are paying too much tax. It was a quote from a government minister,

:12:35.:12:39.

wasn't it? About spending it on Ferraris and Lamborghinis. Yes. We

:12:40.:12:46.

will speak to him in half an hour. Looking forward to it. Wimbledon! I

:12:47.:12:51.

showed you that picture of Andy Murray limping. It was

:12:52.:12:57.

heartbreaking. Good morning, Sally. Do you see that bottom lip pushed

:12:58.:13:08.

out? That's how I felt yesterday. It wasn't great, but he did well after

:13:09.:13:13.

what we saw one week ago, to get to the quarter-final with the injury he

:13:14.:13:16.

has. Amazing. Can you see what is happening over my shoulder? Oh, you

:13:17.:13:26.

can! Say good morning to Lez, everyone. He is standing on a

:13:27.:13:29.

platform. And you see how high our PE is? He is awfully high cleaning

:13:30.:13:38.

the windows. -- high up he is. This is the cleanest place I have ever

:13:39.:13:42.

been. Every surface is polished. These people are doing their jobs

:13:43.:13:48.

from very early. A dramatic day yesterday for Andy Murray. Pictures

:13:49.:13:53.

of him limping out of Wimbledon, limping away. We don't know when we

:13:54.:13:57.

will see him on a tennis court again. The Times. A comparison

:13:58.:14:01.

between Johanna Konta and Venus Williams. Johanna Konta will play on

:14:02.:14:10.

centre court later on. 26 and 37. Five foot 11 and six foot one. Venus

:14:11.:14:16.

Williams is hugely experienced. Johanna Konta has had messages from

:14:17.:14:20.

all over the world wishing her luck. My favourite is this one from The

:14:21.:14:27.

Mirror. She shared a tweet their sedate from Bono, U2, one of the

:14:28.:14:32.

most exciting things she has said she received. -- she received. Many

:14:33.:14:37.

people are sending her positive vibes.

:14:38.:14:44.

Konta! Konta! Konta! Good luck, Jo, I know you can do it. Good luck, Jo,

:14:45.:14:55.

your number one, know you can do it. Keep playing aggressively and attack

:14:56.:14:59.

more, yeah. When you're serving, toss the ball up really why. I think

:15:00.:15:04.

she's going to win and she's talented. Good luck, Jo, you're the

:15:05.:15:12.

best, I know you can do it. Konta! Konta! Konta!

:15:13.:15:18.

Wasn't that brilliant, thanks to those kids from Raynes Park just

:15:19.:15:24.

near Wimbledon who played along nicely yesterday, all want to see Jo

:15:25.:15:31.

do well today, and so far, I'm not going to try to do the weather

:15:32.:15:34.

forecast because I'm joined by Carol, it looks like the roof might

:15:35.:15:39.

be off, what will it be like? Not too bad and much milder this morning

:15:40.:15:42.

than this time yesterday with that key northerly breeze gone, northerly

:15:43.:15:49.

isn't a good direction for us, only an outside chance of a shower at

:15:50.:15:53.

Wimbledon today and the forecast should stay dry.

:15:54.:15:55.

Again we are off to a sunny start but through the day more cloud will

:15:56.:16:02.

develop and we are looking at highs of 20 or 23 in light breezes. If

:16:03.:16:06.

you're coming down to watch, that will feel fairly pleasant. The

:16:07.:16:10.

forecast for everyone is going to be a largely dry one with sunny

:16:11.:16:15.

intervals, but also a few showers. Not all of us seeing them of course.

:16:16.:16:20.

If we start at 9am in the south, we do have the sunshine but as we go

:16:21.:16:24.

further north, around the Midlands, central and southern England, more

:16:25.:16:27.

cloud around and that could produce a few showers. Moving north into

:16:28.:16:31.

northern England and Scotland, a chilly start for you, overnight some

:16:32.:16:36.

parts have dropped to three or four but in the sunshine this morning the

:16:37.:16:39.

temperatures will pick up and the odd shower, they are the exception

:16:40.:16:49.

rather than the rule. A chilly and fine start in Northern Ireland with

:16:50.:16:52.

sunshine and in Wales we are looking at a sunny start for most but we

:16:53.:16:56.

have areas of cloud here and there that could produce some showers.

:16:57.:16:59.

South-west England seeing a fine start, variable amounts of cloud,

:17:00.:17:03.

you could see the odd shower but you will be unlucky if you do depending

:17:04.:17:06.

on your point of view and further east we have showers in

:17:07.:17:09.

Gloucestershire and Wiltshire, but they are the exception rather than

:17:10.:17:12.

the rule. Through the day what you will find is that the sun will come

:17:13.:17:16.

out, we will see more cloud developing, and then further showers

:17:17.:17:19.

developing in parts of England, Wales and parts of eastern Scotland

:17:20.:17:22.

and Northern Ireland. At the same time a more coherent band of showery

:17:23.:17:27.

rain will move into the west of Northern Ireland and west of

:17:28.:17:30.

Scotland. Through the evening and overnight that will career

:17:31.:17:37.

south-eastwards but it will tend to break up as it makes its final

:17:38.:17:40.

descent towards the south-east. Not going to be a particularly cold

:17:41.:17:44.

night and it won't be as oppressive in the south as it has been. As we

:17:45.:17:48.

start the day tomorrow, not particularly cold for many, but in

:17:49.:17:51.

rural areas it could be a bit nippy and tomorrow almost like today we're

:17:52.:17:55.

starting off on a sunny note. Some cloud building through the day and

:17:56.:17:58.

there will be showers developing as well. For Wimbledon, though, looks

:17:59.:18:04.

like it could stay dry like today. Later in the day the next weather

:18:05.:18:08.

front comes in across the north-west and that will introduce rain into

:18:09.:18:12.

north-west Scotland and the west of Northern Ireland but temperatures in

:18:13.:18:16.

the south starting to climb. Overnight Friday that system comes

:18:17.:18:20.

south, again fragmenting, not much rain from it in the south, then back

:18:21.:18:25.

into a day of bright spells, sunny spells and showers and feeling more

:18:26.:18:29.

due mid from the south, it will do the same thing again on Sunday with

:18:30.:18:33.

temperatures in the higher range of the 20 stash more humid. -- more

:18:34.:18:36.

humid. You're watching

:18:37.:18:40.

Breakfast from BBC News. The main stories this morning:

:18:41.:18:43.

The government will today publish a long-awaited bill that

:18:44.:18:46.

will convert European Union laws Lawyers representing the parents

:18:47.:18:48.

of the terminally-ill baby, Charlie Gard, will return

:18:49.:18:51.

to the High Court in London this morning, to present what they claim

:18:52.:18:54.

is new evidence showing an experimental treatment

:18:55.:18:57.

could help him. In 2015, nearly a million migrants

:18:58.:19:05.

made the dangerous journey by sea More than 10,000 are

:19:06.:19:12.

still in refugee camps, But the island of Tilos

:19:13.:19:16.

believes it has the answer, offering accommodation to migrants

:19:17.:19:26.

who work and integrate, in a trial that could be rolled out

:19:27.:19:28.

across the rest of Greece. Our Europe reporter Gavin Lee

:19:29.:19:31.

is on Till-os for us this morning. Good morning, Gavin. It looks

:19:32.:19:43.

absolutely stunning. What is quite heartwarming about this story is

:19:44.:19:47.

that there's less tension almost, the community has decided to embrace

:19:48.:19:51.

those who so needed the help? Going the other way! I have spoken to you

:19:52.:20:00.

from so many islands, Lesbos, Samos, Kos, we've had hundreds of thousands

:20:01.:20:04.

of migrants coming to the islands but more than 10,000 staying and

:20:05.:20:08.

with pretty basic conditions and they are still stuck there because

:20:09.:20:12.

the migration plan of Europe means they can't continue and at the

:20:13.:20:15.

moment there's big legal action about whether they go back to Turkey

:20:16.:20:21.

or not. This little island of Tilos, very close to Rhodes, about 800

:20:22.:20:25.

people here, the islands or what was happening last year and they decided

:20:26.:20:30.

to invite a small number of refugees to say can this work, can you

:20:31.:20:33.

integrate and bring your families and get jobs, I spoke to locals over

:20:34.:20:38.

the last few days and also refugees to get a sense of how it's working.

:20:39.:20:42.

Tilos island, ten miles from the Turkish coast, population 800. A

:20:43.:20:49.

place where there are more votes than people. A year ago, the local

:20:50.:20:53.

mayor and arms to the islanders wanted to help and received refugees

:20:54.:20:57.

looking for a new life, bucking the trend of the other islands keener to

:20:58.:21:02.

see migrants leave. It's a small but significant show of faith for this

:21:03.:21:06.

tiny island, 50 refugees selected from around Greece who are prepared

:21:07.:21:11.

to work, prepared to integrate and it's mainly families and in exchange

:21:12.:21:14.

they'll get somewhere to stay and residency here. Meet Kusey, the new

:21:15.:21:25.

Baker of Tilos, he escaped from Syria and originally wanted to go to

:21:26.:21:32.

Germany. When I arrived in Tilos my life changed. My wife and my

:21:33.:21:40.

children are lapsed, my children go to school and the people here are

:21:41.:21:46.

very nice, very beautiful. One hotel has taken on three refugees, two as

:21:47.:21:51.

housekeepers, including this woman from Damascus, who talks of one-day

:21:52.:21:52.

buying a house here. In the Tilos refugee centre, the

:21:53.:22:03.

children have been learning Greek songs. They're singing Blow Wind

:22:04.:22:12.

Blow, take us to distant places. The key to the Tilos plan being a

:22:13.:22:16.

success is how the younger generation of refugees settle here

:22:17.:22:19.

and whether they continue to feel welcome and part of the community

:22:20.:22:21.

over the years to come. The thing that's extraordinary here

:22:22.:22:29.

is how quickly in six months some of the refugees have settled and the

:22:30.:22:32.

dreams they talk about. One says he is desperate to buy a house and

:22:33.:22:36.

start a family here and another said she wants to start a Syrian Greek

:22:37.:22:41.

restaurant, the first on the island, and call it the King Falafel. So

:22:42.:22:46.

it's quite outstanding in one sense. How can it work on a bigger scale?

:22:47.:22:52.

Is it exclusive to this island? I just wonder, given the reluctance of

:22:53.:22:58.

some people on other islands, given how many more people, tens of

:22:59.:23:01.

thousands, are on the other islands, how that will work on a bigger scale

:23:02.:23:08.

than this? What Solidarity Now try to do is establish the wanna model

:23:09.:23:13.

to see how it works in a small-scale society like this island so we try

:23:14.:23:19.

to see how a new incoming population with a different social and cultural

:23:20.:23:25.

background can be a boost factor for the sustainable development of local

:23:26.:23:29.

society. This model can be duplicated in a bigger scale in

:23:30.:23:34.

other islands, of course it depends on the needs and special profiles.

:23:35.:23:39.

What is important to see here is we see not only locals coming again

:23:40.:23:43.

returning to Tilos and finding and opening small businesses but we see

:23:44.:23:47.

refugees working together and interacting together and the bigger

:23:48.:23:52.

vision and the bigger dream is to create what we are trying to do and

:23:53.:23:56.

facilitate, social enterprise, bringing together locals and the

:23:57.:24:02.

whole Syrian community to work together. One of the things you

:24:03.:24:06.

mention was you wanted to take this further, within this enterprise you

:24:07.:24:10.

want to use the goats, there are 10,000 goats and 800 people, Greeks

:24:11.:24:14.

and Syrian rebel Yuji is good start up a dairy farm? Exactly. --

:24:15.:24:21.

refugees. Here there's a tradition of dairy products that has been

:24:22.:24:25.

stopped for quite a while, so what we're trying to do is enhance and

:24:26.:24:30.

encourage this new business on the island so it would be I would say

:24:31.:24:36.

not ambitious but it can be very easily a reality for locals and

:24:37.:24:41.

refugees. This will also help them integrate and coexist. Sophie from

:24:42.:24:46.

SolidarityNow, thanks for talking to me. The one striking thing is with

:24:47.:24:51.

this ambition, it's a small scale, but aid workers are working not just

:24:52.:24:55.

on the islands and the mainland smaller villages to work out if 50

:24:56.:24:59.

or 100 Brit refugees can be an option elsewhere. Gavin Lee on the

:25:00.:25:04.

island of Tilos, thanks very much. Still to come on Breakfast this

:25:05.:25:06.

morning: More people are accessing their pension pots

:25:07.:25:09.

early since the rules were relaxed Colletta will be putting that

:25:10.:25:12.

question to the former government minister who introduced

:25:13.:25:18.

the changes. Time now to get the news,

:25:19.:25:19.

travel and weather where you are. Plenty more on our website

:25:20.:28:41.

at the usual address. Now, though, it's back

:28:42.:28:45.

to Charlie and Naga. This is Breakfast,

:28:46.:28:47.

with Naga Munchetty and Charlie We'll bring you all the latest news

:28:48.:28:53.

and sport in a moment, All eyes will be on Johanna Konta

:28:54.:28:57.

this afternoon as she bids to become the first British woman to reach

:28:58.:29:04.

a Wimbledon final for 40 years. We'll discuss her chances

:29:05.:29:07.

with her former coach, Does where you live dictate

:29:08.:29:09.

the quality of your child's The former Deputy Prime Minister,

:29:10.:29:15.

Nick Clegg, has been look at the issue and we'll

:29:16.:29:18.

talk to him after eight. And we'll be at London's

:29:19.:29:24.

Natural History Museum, to learn all about "Hope,"

:29:25.:29:26.

the 25.2-metre long blue whale skeleton, which is

:29:27.:29:35.

being unveiled today. But now, a summary of this

:29:36.:29:36.

morning's main news. Do you remember the name of the

:29:37.:29:48.

dinosaur? Dippy. I don't remember, sorry. He is gone and the whale is

:29:49.:29:58.

there. The main story is. -- stories.

:29:59.:29:59.

The government will today publish a long-awaited bill that

:30:00.:30:01.

will convert European Union laws into British legislation.

:30:02.:30:03.

The European Union Withdrawal Bill is designed to ensure a smooth

:30:04.:30:06.

transition when the UK leaves the EU.

:30:07.:30:08.

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis, has described it

:30:09.:30:11.

But political opponents have threatened to disrupt

:30:12.:30:18.

After 7:30 this morning, we'll talk to the Brexit Minister,

:30:19.:30:22.

The parents of terminally ill Charlie Gard will return to court to

:30:23.:30:30.

argue that he should be allowed to be taken to the US for speculative

:30:31.:30:35.

treatment. Doctors say the therapy is not likely to work and his

:30:36.:30:38.

life-support system should turned off. Here is more from Sophie

:30:39.:30:40.

Hutchinson. Charlie guard has been in intensive

:30:41.:30:46.

care at Great Ormond Street Hospital He has an extremely

:30:47.:30:49.

rare genetic condition. It's left him severely brain-damaged

:30:50.:30:52.

and unable to breathe Ever since his birth 11 months ago,

:30:53.:30:55.

there have been numerous legal battles escalated to the highest

:30:56.:31:03.

level in the UK and Europe. All the courts have agreed

:31:04.:31:10.

that the baby is so ill he must be allowed to die, but his parents have

:31:11.:31:14.

persuaded the original judge they should be able

:31:15.:31:17.

to give what they say is new scientific evidence today

:31:18.:31:20.

suggesting experimental treatment My understanding is they have got

:31:21.:31:22.

letters from up to seven doctors and scientists demonstrating

:31:23.:31:30.

there is up to a 10% chance of this And they would know

:31:31.:31:33.

in a period of 2-8 weeks whether or not baby

:31:34.:31:38.

Charlie is improving. And the treatment is non-invasive

:31:39.:31:44.

it is not in operation. It is just a food

:31:45.:31:54.

additive into his food. His parents have

:31:55.:31:56.

received offers of help from the Vatican and

:31:57.:31:58.

the United States. But the judge, Judge Francis,

:31:59.:32:00.

has said any new evidence must given swiftly over concerns

:32:01.:32:03.

of prolonging the suffering Applications for university courses

:32:04.:32:05.

in the UK starting this autumn have fallen, with vice-chancellors saying

:32:06.:32:10.

students may have been put off by increases in tuition fees

:32:11.:32:13.

and uncertainty over Brexit. Applications are down by 4%

:32:14.:32:17.

among British students, and 5% for students from elsewhere

:32:18.:32:19.

in the European Union. Wills recorded on voice mail or text

:32:20.:32:24.

message could be deemed legally binding by a judge, thanks

:32:25.:32:27.

to new proposals from the Law It says it is the first step

:32:28.:32:30.

in updating the Victorian law, unchanged since 1839,

:32:31.:32:34.

and could pave the way for the introduction

:32:35.:32:36.

of electronic wills. It wants it to be easier for a court

:32:37.:32:37.

to decide when a person's President Trump will arrive

:32:38.:32:41.

in France this morning He will commemorate

:32:42.:32:49.

the centenary of America's entry Tomorrow, he'll celebrate

:32:50.:32:52.

Bastille Day at the invitation of the French President,

:32:53.:32:56.

Emmanuel Macron. We all know how frustrating it can

:32:57.:33:04.

be when you're on the train and the aisles are

:33:05.:33:08.

blocked with luggage. But two passengers in Australia have

:33:09.:33:10.

taken this to the next level. Do you know that feeling? It is

:33:11.:33:13.

usually my luggage. Queensland Rail has released footage

:33:14.:33:20.

of a man attempting to take a fridge He managed, with some difficulty,

:33:21.:33:25.

to get into the station lift and onto the carriage,

:33:26.:33:28.

before staff saw him and took him Well, another passenger was more

:33:29.:33:31.

successful when he took I am surprised, actually. I don't

:33:32.:33:52.

know how that is easier to move than a fridge.

:33:53.:33:55.

The rail company issued a plea to passengers not to use its trains

:33:56.:33:59.

to move house, suggesting they hire a removal company instead.

:34:00.:34:01.

He was able to take it onto the train, the sofa. Using a shopping

:34:02.:34:10.

trolley. Your thoughts are more than welcome. That is when you have to

:34:11.:34:13.

decide if paying more is worth it. A beautiful morning. I hope that

:34:14.:34:24.

translates into great tennis as well today. Sally is at Wimbledon. Good

:34:25.:34:31.

morning. Good morning. You are right. It is a beautiful, beautiful

:34:32.:34:36.

morning. I wonder if Johanna Konta is awake yet. I hope not, I hope she

:34:37.:34:43.

is resting. There have been many statistics about records being

:34:44.:34:46.

broken and history being made. Today, the first woman from Britain

:34:47.:34:52.

in the semifinals in 40 years. The last was Virginia Wade in 1978. We

:34:53.:34:59.

hope she can go some way to emulating those achievements from

:35:00.:35:00.

four decades ago. After beating the second seed

:35:01.:35:04.

Simona Halep on Tuesday, the five-time Wimbledon champion,

:35:05.:35:06.

Venus Williams, now stands The pair are second on Centre Court

:35:07.:35:08.

today and Konta knows the home It makes it more special because it

:35:09.:35:23.

is home. I do get that home support which I don't get anywhere else. So,

:35:24.:35:29.

in that sense, it makes it, I guess it makes it that much sweeter.

:35:30.:35:36.

We will be hoping for a little bit of better luck for Johanna Konta fan

:35:37.:35:43.

Andy Murray. -- than. His second reign as Wimbledon

:35:44.:35:57.

champion is over. The world number one was expected

:35:58.:35:59.

to beat Sam Querrey in yesterday's quarter-final on Centre Court,

:36:00.:36:02.

but was beaten in a topsy-turvy Murray looked to be struggling

:36:03.:36:05.

with the hip injury that's affected him for several weeks,

:36:06.:36:08.

as Querrey played the match The American came from two sets

:36:09.:36:11.

to one down and is through to his Look, I was obviously in good enough

:36:12.:36:20.

shape to give myself a chance. I almost managed to get through the

:36:21.:36:28.

day. Any slam, I would have taken that compared to how I felt a few

:36:29.:36:30.

weeks ago and how I started. Also hampered by injury

:36:31.:36:33.

was the second seed, His Wimbledon ended with a whimper,

:36:34.:36:36.

he was forced to retire with an elbow injury

:36:37.:36:39.

against Thomas Berdych. The two-time champion said he'd been

:36:40.:36:41.

struggling with the problem for over a year but yesterday

:36:42.:36:44.

was his worst day. It means Berdych will play the seven

:36:45.:36:58.

time Wimbledon champion And with Murray, Djokovic and Nadal

:36:59.:37:01.

all now out of the tournament, Federer is the favourite to win

:37:02.:37:05.

the title this year. He looked impressive in beating last

:37:06.:37:08.

year's finallist Milos Raonic The final of the four names

:37:09.:37:10.

to contest the men's semi finals is Marin Cilic, who'll face Murray's

:37:11.:37:14.

conqueror Sam Querrey. Former US Open champion Cilic came

:37:15.:37:17.

through a five-set epic against Gilles Muller

:37:18.:37:20.

over on Court One. And we still have British

:37:21.:37:21.

interest in the doubles. Heather Watson and partner,

:37:22.:37:24.

Henri Kontinen, continued the defence of their

:37:25.:37:26.

mixed doubles title. They're through to the quarter

:37:27.:37:28.

finals after victory over fourth And the Wheelchair Event gets under

:37:29.:37:30.

way here at the All England Club today, with defending men's champion

:37:31.:37:43.

Britain's Gordon Reid facing Stefan England's cricketers

:37:44.:37:46.

have secured their place in the semi-finals of

:37:47.:37:47.

the Women's World Cup. They beat New Zealand by 75

:37:48.:37:50.

runs yesterday in Derby, They've qualified with a game

:37:51.:37:52.

to spare, that's against Germany's Marcel Kittel

:37:53.:37:57.

won his fifth stage on this year's Tour de France with

:37:58.:38:04.

victory in Stage 11. Chris Froome retains the leaders

:38:05.:38:07.

yellow jersey and will be looking to defend his 18-second overall

:38:08.:38:10.

lead as the race heads And Rory Mcilroy insists he's

:38:11.:38:12.

in positive mood ahead of the Scottish Open which begins

:38:13.:38:18.

this morning in Dundonald. The world number four has yet to win

:38:19.:38:21.

a tournament in a year that's been disrupted by injury,

:38:22.:38:25.

erratic form, and new clubs. Now, one of the things

:38:26.:38:30.

we love about Andy Murray, and we've got to say, his mum, Judy,

:38:31.:38:32.

must take some credit for this, And we saw another example yesterday

:38:33.:38:36.

in his post match press conference when he corrected an American

:38:37.:38:41.

reporter on their statistics. Sam Querrey is the first US player

:38:42.:38:55.

to reach a major US final since 2009... Male player. I beg your

:38:56.:39:10.

pardon? Male player. Yes, male player, for sure.

:39:11.:39:12.

Is in doubt brilliant? The venous sisters have done well as well. --

:39:13.:39:23.

isn't that brilliant? -- Venus. Live coverage starts at 12:15pm

:39:24.:39:28.

on BBC One and from 12:30pm Don't forget, Johanna Konta is

:39:29.:39:40.

second on the court today. I love Andy Murray's comments on that. He

:39:41.:39:46.

was not impressed at all. And it is not the first time he has done that.

:39:47.:39:52.

Not at all. He was brought up by a good woman, I think.

:39:53.:39:53.

Let's return to the story of the terminally ill baby,

:39:54.:39:56.

Charlie Gard, whose parents are trying to convince a High Court

:39:57.:39:59.

judge that he should be allowed to travel

:40:00.:40:01.

Let's talk to Ranan Gillon, a Professor of Medical Ethics

:40:02.:40:07.

A very good morning to you. Thank you for your time this morning. It

:40:08.:40:17.

is a very emotional issue. Everyone has the right opinions. I just want,

:40:18.:40:26.

given your professional expertise, what do you make of the situation?

:40:27.:40:33.

First, I have to say I am speaking personally, not on behalf of any

:40:34.:40:39.

organisation. It is a moral dilemma, several, actually. The real issue as

:40:40.:40:48.

I see it, is, is there sufficient harm to the baby to prevent it being

:40:49.:40:51.

kept alive, that is the first question? I personally feel the

:40:52.:40:56.

answer is no. Secondly, what about its best interests? Who should

:40:57.:41:07.

decide? In my opinion, best interests are differing ideas. One

:41:08.:41:13.

of the things that does not apply is just as in the sense of distribution

:41:14.:41:18.

of scarce resources. They have crowd-funding. No one will be harmed

:41:19.:41:29.

using these resources. A couple of things. Clearly, we are unqualified

:41:30.:41:37.

and unable to comment on the medical side of the story. That is for

:41:38.:41:42.

doctors to talk about. On the ethics of the decision-making process, is

:41:43.:41:47.

at your decision it should never be a court that decides in these

:41:48.:41:54.

circumstances? Of course not. If it is of substantial harm, child abuse,

:41:55.:41:58.

as you might call it, the courts should forbid it. For example,

:41:59.:42:06.

Jehovah's Witnesses' parents sometimes say my child must not be

:42:07.:42:11.

given a blood transfusion. I would expect they should get treatment

:42:12.:42:18.

that is life-saving. I would say that is of substantial harm to the

:42:19.:42:22.

child and should not and is not allowed. Suppose the parents decided

:42:23.:42:28.

they wanted to treat the child by beating it in order to beat out some

:42:29.:42:34.

horrible devil in them. That should not be allowed either. But the

:42:35.:42:38.

treatment here is routine treatment of ventilation and artificial

:42:39.:42:44.

nutrition and hydration and nursing care which is all over the country

:42:45.:42:48.

every day being carried out in order to benefit the child. Now, the

:42:49.:42:52.

question is, who decides what counts as benefit? Now, some religious

:42:53.:43:02.

people will say it is a benefit just to stay alive. The Pope and many

:43:03.:43:05.

Roman Catholics and Orthodox Jews would take that position. I don't

:43:06.:43:10.

think the law should say to them, no, you cannot keep this child

:43:11.:43:15.

alive. In this case, as I understand it, the parents are not pro life in

:43:16.:43:22.

that sense. What they want to do is try very untested experimental

:43:23.:43:28.

treatments that they have read about, they have done a lot of

:43:29.:43:31.

research and have found this treatment available in the United

:43:32.:43:35.

States that might benefit the child. They want to give it a chance. And I

:43:36.:43:41.

think they ought to be able to do that. But the doctors are saying

:43:42.:43:48.

this is so unlikely to benefit them we should not even do minimal sorts

:43:49.:43:54.

of harm to the child by actually keeping it alive. And that is where

:43:55.:43:59.

the dilemma is resting. Thank you for your time this morning. A

:44:00.:44:05.

professor of medical ethics. The time is 60 minutes to seven. -- 16.

:44:06.:44:14.

The main stories. The government will convert European laws to

:44:15.:44:18.

British legislation through a bill today. Lawyers for presenting the

:44:19.:44:22.

parents of terminally ill Charlie Gard are back in the High Court

:44:23.:44:26.

today to give evidence that experimental treatment could help

:44:27.:44:27.

him. We have been talking to Sally at

:44:28.:44:35.

Wimbledon this morning. A glorious morning. Carol is there as well to

:44:36.:44:40.

tell us about the weather. Good morning. Good morning. It is a

:44:41.:44:46.

glorious start to the day at Wimbledon. Yesterday there was a

:44:47.:44:50.

keen northerly breeze. That has faded. The sky is blue. Some cloud

:44:51.:44:56.

is spoiling the view. Behind that, covers are still on. They will be

:44:57.:45:01.

off today a lot. It is a dry forecast for Wimbledon. There is the

:45:02.:45:06.

chance of a shower. But if we catch one, we will be unlucky. Cloud will

:45:07.:45:11.

build a bit more. Sunny intervals. Temperatures getting up to perhaps

:45:12.:45:19.

20 to. Light breezes. If you are a spectator, it will feel pleasant.

:45:20.:45:23.

Dry for most of us. Some showers and the forecast. The south of England.

:45:24.:45:29.

Cloud. Sunshine. Temperatures picking up nicely in the sunshine.

:45:30.:45:34.

The Midlands, central and southern England, a little bit more cloud. It

:45:35.:45:38.

will break up through the morning. The odd showers. Northern England,

:45:39.:45:41.

Scotland, Northern Ireland, clear skies and a chilly started.

:45:42.:45:50.

Temperatures in sheltered, 3-4. Wales, dry. Thick cloud brings

:45:51.:45:56.

showers. The exception rather than the rule. The same set of south-west

:45:57.:46:01.

England. Showers in Gloucestershire and Wiltshire, but they should tends

:46:02.:46:05.

to fade as well. Further east, the Home Counties, again, dry weather

:46:06.:46:11.

and cloud around as well. Through the day, that cloud breaks up in

:46:12.:46:14.

central and southern England and the Midlands. We will see more cloud

:46:15.:46:18.

developing as we go through the afternoon. Not spoiling it. Sunny

:46:19.:46:23.

intervals around. Most of us will stay dry. The risk of showers in

:46:24.:46:28.

England, Wales, the eastern parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland. But

:46:29.:46:32.

they are hit and miss. Rain coming in through the rest of Ireland and

:46:33.:46:39.

Scotland. Temperatures at best up to 22- 23. The evening and overnight, a

:46:40.:46:43.

weather front reducing the rain in Scotland and Northern Ireland goes

:46:44.:46:48.

south, tending to weaken as it goes towards the south-east. --

:46:49.:46:53.

producing. Not call that night. 11- 15, double figures. Tomorrow, a

:46:54.:47:01.

similar story to today in that there will be sunny spells around. Also

:47:02.:47:05.

some showers developing. Most of us will mist them. Temperatures rising.

:47:06.:47:11.

The end of the day, the next weather front coming in through the west of

:47:12.:47:15.

Scotland and Ireland. Overnight, Friday into Saturday, sweeping

:47:16.:47:20.

south. We will not see much rain from it at all in the south. That

:47:21.:47:23.

takes us into Saturday. Cloud around. Sunny spells. Showers as

:47:24.:47:31.

well. You will notice it feels more humid in the south as temperatures

:47:32.:47:35.

start to climb. If you are coming to Wimbledon for the finals this

:47:36.:47:37.

weekend, temperature-wise, we are looking at mid to high 20s. If you

:47:38.:47:46.

finding a fresh at the moment, it will get warmer for some, not all of

:47:47.:47:48.

us. Some will be happy and someone be,

:47:49.:47:57.

but that's just weather, isn't it? Welcome to my world! Thanks very

:47:58.:48:00.

much, see you soon! Two years ago the rules

:48:01.:48:01.

around pensions changed, giving millions of people

:48:02.:48:04.

more choice about how But are they getting

:48:05.:48:06.

the right help and advice? Good morning. Good morning, good

:48:07.:48:10.

morning, everyone. That's right, the financial

:48:11.:48:21.

regulator has been taking a look at what choices people were making

:48:22.:48:24.

with their new pension freedoms. It's found that getting hold

:48:25.:48:27.

of pension pots early, known as drawdown, has

:48:28.:48:29.

become the new norm. But more and more people are doing

:48:30.:48:31.

so without taking financial advice. About a third of consumers now

:48:32.:48:35.

drawdown without getting guidance, that's compared to just

:48:36.:48:37.

5% before the changes. And when people do access

:48:38.:48:40.

their pensions early, most are sticking with their current

:48:41.:48:42.

provider, rather than shopping around, so might be missing

:48:43.:48:45.

out on the best deals. The regulator also found that more

:48:46.:48:54.

than half of those people don't spend the money, but put it

:48:55.:48:57.

into another savings product That means they may be paying more

:48:58.:49:00.

tax than they need to. Let's speak to the man

:49:01.:49:09.

who was Pensions Minister when the new pensions

:49:10.:49:11.

freedoms were introduced, Sir Steve Webb, who is now Director

:49:12.:49:13.

of Policy at Royal London. Welcome to the programme and thanks

:49:14.:49:26.

for joining us. That statistic, almost a third of people getting

:49:27.:49:29.

hold of their pensions money without advice, that wasn't the plan, was

:49:30.:49:33.

it? We need more people to take advice and guidance, the good news

:49:34.:49:38.

is bigger pots, people with serious amounts, are more likely to take

:49:39.:49:42.

advice and that's a good thing but we need to bring that down because

:49:43.:49:46.

we pay an estate agent and an accountant and a solicitor, we are

:49:47.:49:49.

used to paying professionals who are experts to help and when it's your

:49:50.:49:53.

life savings the added value is significant. Financial advice is

:49:54.:49:58.

expensive, though? It looks like a big figure in isolation but it's it

:49:59.:50:02.

-- if it's the amount you save in your life, hundreds of thousands of

:50:03.:50:06.

pounds, an expert can be money well spent. We haven't seen people

:50:07.:50:10.

blowing all their savings, on a Lamborghini or a round the world

:50:11.:50:14.

cruise, but maybe they're not getting as much tax benefit as they

:50:15.:50:19.

could? The risk isn't the riotous living some people talked about,

:50:20.:50:23.

it's the opposite, people who think somehow they have to take their

:50:24.:50:26.

money out of their pension because their ageing, don't know what to do

:50:27.:50:30.

with it and they either put it in a bank account or a cash ISA, earning

:50:31.:50:35.

no interest, inflation eats away at the value of their savings and if

:50:36.:50:39.

people do that for years it will be a real worry. Saying to people leave

:50:40.:50:44.

your money in deposit in cash, good for a rainyday but in the long run

:50:45.:50:48.

not a good idea. The regulator said in this report they are worried

:50:49.:50:51.

there's not enough competition in the industry, shouldn't you have set

:50:52.:50:55.

up a system that made sure people got the best deal if they drew down

:50:56.:50:59.

their pension? The key thing is around and people aren't talking to

:51:00.:51:06.

an adviser, if they can't afford it, then there's pension wise from the

:51:07.:51:09.

government, millions of people have gone to the website that tell them

:51:10.:51:14.

their pension choices, but that needs another push, they have

:51:15.:51:18.

choices and they don't need to stay with one company all their lives. An

:51:19.:51:21.

interesting case yesterday at the Supreme Court, they ruled same-sex

:51:22.:51:28.

married couples should have the same pensions rights as heterosexual

:51:29.:51:31.

married couples. How significant is that case? It's a breakthrough for

:51:32.:51:36.

equality and it could have other effects because there are other

:51:37.:51:39.

groups, with was compared to widows who might get smaller pensions and

:51:40.:51:44.

you could see more cases -- widowers. If people are being

:51:45.:51:48.

treated evenly in pensions that would be a good thing. Thanks for

:51:49.:51:53.

joining us, Sir Steve Webb the former Pensions Minister, thanks for

:51:54.:51:56.

talking us through that one to get our heads around that idea of

:51:57.:52:00.

drawing down your pension is a little bit early. It's tricky, isn't

:52:01.:52:02.

it? It's all change at London's

:52:03.:52:04.

Natural History Museum, its world famous central display,

:52:05.:52:09.

Dippy the Dinosaur, has gone, and its replacement

:52:10.:52:12.

is being unveiled today. I feel like a part of my childhood

:52:13.:52:20.

is going? Really? I remember always seeing Dippy and that was it, that's

:52:21.:52:25.

what you saw at the national history museum but there's something else

:52:26.:52:28.

coming, I wonder what's happening to Dippy. Is this hope, Tim?

:52:29.:52:35.

Good morning. This is indeed hope, 25 metres long, since 1979 Dippy

:52:36.:52:43.

took pride in place -- pride of place at the entrance hall to the

:52:44.:52:48.

national history museum, Dippy is going on a national tour and instead

:52:49.:52:53.

this magnificent skeleton, 25 metres long of a blue whale beached in

:52:54.:52:57.

1891, it is taking pride of place here. Lorraine Cornet is here, head

:52:58.:53:02.

of conservation, and we have the principal curator of mammals. The

:53:03.:53:08.

rain, how does it look -- Cornish? It is great, doesn't it look

:53:09.:53:15.

beautiful? -- Lorraine. She will the great and we are pleased it is up

:53:16.:53:19.

and she will look great for everyone. Higuain the change? She is

:53:20.:53:25.

a real specimen, she can calibrate stories -- why the change? She can

:53:26.:53:33.

tell us about our role in nature -- she can tell great stories. We want

:53:34.:53:37.

people to engage with her. You are the principal curator for mammals,

:53:38.:53:41.

Richard, talk to us about the blue whale, why is the blue whale so

:53:42.:53:46.

fascinating? Fascinating for a number of different reasons, it's

:53:47.:53:49.

the largest animal ever known to have lived on the planet.

:53:50.:53:53.

Evolutionarily speaking, it's an incredible story, 50 years ago -- 50

:53:54.:53:58.

million years ago the ancestors were living on land and 40 million years

:53:59.:54:02.

ago they moved back into the ocean so a wonderful model for the study

:54:03.:54:06.

of evolution and a great model for the hope for the future, something

:54:07.:54:10.

that we as a species decided to do in the 1960s, we got together

:54:11.:54:14.

internationally and brought in a ban on commercial whaling for blue

:54:15.:54:18.

whales because we knew the species was going towards extinction and

:54:19.:54:22.

here we are 50 years later in a position where the animals are

:54:23.:54:27.

recovering. Hence the name Hope, a symbol for humanity's power to shape

:54:28.:54:31.

a sustainable future. The logistics of moving a skeleton of this size,

:54:32.:54:35.

it's been in the possession of the museum for some time, how did you

:54:36.:54:40.

move it? It's taken 3.5 years and she was on display in our mammal

:54:41.:54:45.

Paul, so four tons, several months to bring her down and then to

:54:46.:54:51.

conserve her -- mammal Hall. Then three weeks to put her in place. It

:54:52.:54:56.

took a long time and a huge team of experts but we're really pleased.

:54:57.:55:02.

I've been saying she, it is a chic? It was. A post-mortem examination

:55:03.:55:06.

took place in 1891 that confirmed the sex and ongoing research is due

:55:07.:55:11.

to be published in the next two to three months that will further

:55:12.:55:17.

confirm the gender -- is it a she. Magnificent sight, we will talk to

:55:18.:55:22.

you later. If you want to know more about that story and you can

:55:23.:55:31.

choosing -- if you want to know more about the story you can tune into

:55:32.:55:36.

Horizon on BBC Two. It was beached in 1891 in Wexford in Ireland and

:55:37.:55:41.

now taking pride of place in the Natural History Museum. Tim, I was

:55:42.:55:45.

saying a bit of my childhood was changed because I remember the awe,

:55:46.:55:52.

it was so or inspiring, is this as impressive, it's difficult to see

:55:53.:55:55.

from this angle because you're not singing the angle length? It's very

:55:56.:56:03.

oppressive, 25 metres long, you get a real sense of the scale -- you're

:56:04.:56:09.

not seeing the length. It's as impressive as Dippy. The fact this

:56:10.:56:13.

was an actual skeleton makes a bit of a difference because Dippy was a

:56:14.:56:17.

plaster cast, this is a creature that lived more than 100 years ago

:56:18.:56:22.

and I'm sure will be wowing many visitors. And create many more

:56:23.:56:26.

childhood memories for many more children.

:56:27.:59:45.

This is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

:59:46.:00:15.

The first step to Brexit becoming law.

:00:16.:00:19.

The bill to convert EU law into British legislation

:00:20.:00:21.

The government calls it a major milestone.

:00:22.:00:24.

Opposition parties threaten to obstruct its progress.

:00:25.:00:45.

The parent's of terminally ill baby, Charlie Gard, put their case

:00:46.:00:48.

to the High Court, arguing that an experimental new treatment

:00:49.:00:51.

No Andy Murray left at Wimbledon, so now all British hopes lie

:00:52.:01:05.

She faces Venus Williams on Centre Court later today bidding

:01:06.:01:09.

to become the first British woman to reach a Wimbledon singles final

:01:10.:01:12.

The adverts we see on TV and increasingly on line are part

:01:13.:01:19.

of a growing multi-billion pound industry for the UK.

:01:20.:01:21.

As part of a new series, I'll be talking to the woman

:01:22.:01:24.

in charge of the biggest advertising agency in the UK.

:01:25.:01:27.

We're live on the tiny Greek island of Tilos where they're trying out

:01:28.:01:31.

a new way of welcoming refugees into the community.

:01:32.:01:36.

And we have the weather. Good morning. This is Wimbledon. The sun

:01:37.:01:45.

is shining and it is not as cold as yesterday. It should be dry. Perhaps

:01:46.:01:53.

a shower. The UK as a whole will be mostly dry, sunny spells, some cloud

:01:54.:01:56.

through the day, and well scattered showers. Rainy in the west later.

:01:57.:02:04.

Sally and I will be back with the weather later. Thank you.

:02:05.:02:10.

The government will today publish a long-awaited bill that

:02:11.:02:18.

will convert European Union laws into British legislation.

:02:19.:02:20.

It's been referred to as the Repeal Bill,

:02:21.:02:22.

but its official title is the European Union Withdrawal

:02:23.:02:25.

Its purpose is to replace EU law with UK legislation and smooth

:02:26.:02:28.

The Brexit Secretary David Davis has described it as a "major milestone."

:02:29.:02:32.

However, political opponents have threatened to disrupt

:02:33.:02:34.

Our political correspondent, Ben Wright, is in Westminster.

:02:35.:02:37.

Good morning. In mourning. It is worth reminding people the

:02:38.:02:44.

significance of this transfer of laws. Take us through that. Good

:02:45.:02:50.

morning. It is a hugely important piece of legislation. On the face of

:02:51.:02:58.

it, it is simple, repealing the 1972 European Communities Act, ending

:02:59.:03:03.

European law in the UK from the day we actually leave the EU, which

:03:04.:03:09.

people think will be in March, 2019. It transfers the EU laws to be UK

:03:10.:03:17.

Statute Book. If that did not happen, they would be chaos when we

:03:18.:03:22.

leave the EU. It has to do all of that and decide how it will all be

:03:23.:03:28.

regulated in the future. From the pharmaceutical industry to

:03:29.:03:33.

environmental law, all of it. The government does not have a majority

:03:34.:03:37.

in the House of Commons any more. The Lib Dems and Labour have made it

:03:38.:03:42.

quite clear they will fight the government hard on many aspects of

:03:43.:03:45.

this legislation and cause difficulty. It could be a huge

:03:46.:03:50.

parliamentary battle. It is a really crucial piece of legislation, as I

:03:51.:03:56.

said. On the face of it, it is confusing, because both major

:03:57.:03:59.

parties, for example, are signed up to exert. Why fight about something

:04:00.:04:07.

that has to happen? -- Brexit. . They are looking for reassurance and

:04:08.:04:10.

clarity over many areas. Labour says there needs to be further guarantees

:04:11.:04:17.

over protections for workers. At the moment, workers because rights are

:04:18.:04:24.

enshrined in EU law. The government says they will protect that. They

:04:25.:04:28.

are also looking at executive powers that ministers want to claim over

:04:29.:04:33.

the next few months to get all this through in time. Labour is saying

:04:34.:04:37.

those powers need to be restricted. Labour say they are prepared to vote

:04:38.:04:42.

down this ill unless they get reassurances. -- bill. They have

:04:43.:04:50.

been clear about that. Thank you. We will leave it there for the moment.

:04:51.:04:52.

After 7:30 this morning, we'll talk to the Brexit Minister,

:04:53.:04:55.

The parents of Charlie guard will return to the High Court

:04:56.:04:58.

to argue he should be able to be taken to the US

:04:59.:05:01.

Doctors say the therapy will not work and his life support systems

:05:02.:05:05.

Charlie Gard has been in intensive care at Great Ormond Street Hospital

:05:06.:05:15.

He has an extremely rare genetic condition.

:05:16.:05:21.

It's left him severely brain-damaged and unable to breathe

:05:22.:05:24.

Ever since his birth 11 months ago, there have been numerous legal

:05:25.:05:33.

battles escalated to the highest level in the UK and Europe.

:05:34.:05:36.

All the courts have agreed that the baby is so ill he must be

:05:37.:05:40.

allowed to die, but his parents have persuaded the original judge

:05:41.:05:46.

they should be permitted to present what they say is new scientific

:05:47.:05:50.

evidence today suggesting an experimental treatment

:05:51.:05:52.

My understanding is they've got letters from up to seven doctors

:05:53.:05:59.

and scientists and it demonstrates there is up to a 10% chance of this

:06:00.:06:03.

And they would know within a period of 2-8 weeks whether or not baby

:06:04.:06:10.

And the treatment is non-invasive, it's not an operation.

:06:11.:06:16.

It is actually a food additive into his food.

:06:17.:06:20.

Charlie's parents have received offers of help from the Vatican

:06:21.:06:23.

But the judge, Mr Justice Francis, has made it clear any new evidence

:06:24.:06:36.

must be given swiftly due to concerns of prolonging

:06:37.:06:38.

Applications for university courses in the UK starting this autumn have

:06:39.:06:55.

fallen, with vice-chancellors saying students may have been put off

:06:56.:06:57.

by increases in tuition fees and uncertainty over Brexit.

:06:58.:07:00.

Applications are down by 4% among British students,

:07:01.:07:02.

and 5% for students from elsewhere in the European Union.

:07:03.:07:05.

President Trump is arriving in France this morning

:07:06.:07:07.

He will commemorate the centenary of America's entry

:07:08.:07:10.

Let's talk to our Paris correspondent Hugh Schofield.

:07:11.:07:14.

Good morning. Of course, it might be the anniversary of America's

:07:15.:07:18.

involvement in the war, but France is still under high security levels

:07:19.:07:23.

and very mindful that a year tomorrow it was under attack.

:07:24.:07:29.

Absolutely. Tomorrow it will have been a year since the attack in

:07:30.:07:33.

Nice. There was talk about Donald Trump visiting, but it hasn't

:07:34.:07:37.

happened. Security will be top of the agenda. One of the issues on

:07:38.:07:43.

which the two men see eye to eye, because of course there is a lot

:07:44.:07:48.

they don't, the determined effort on both administrations to emphasise

:07:49.:07:55.

the positive, despite climate, despite differences on protectionism

:07:56.:08:02.

and trade and so on, they have things close together, security, the

:08:03.:08:05.

fight in the Middle East and Africa. Does will be the big issues of

:08:06.:08:11.

discussion. Outside the museum complex is where he will be going

:08:12.:08:17.

first. He will be going for an hour to go to the embassy. Then he will

:08:18.:08:23.

be back here at lunchtime, or shortly after. A meeting in the

:08:24.:08:31.

afternoon with Emmanuel Macron. And then dinner at the Eiffel Tower.

:08:32.:08:38.

Yes. Talking about President Trump's visit to France later today.

:08:39.:08:43.

The Chief Minister of Gibraltar has criticised comments made yesterday

:08:44.:08:45.

by King Felipe of Spain during an address to Parliament.

:08:46.:08:48.

The King said he was confident that the UK and Spain would find

:08:49.:08:52.

a solution to the issue of Gibraltar that was acceptable to all involved.

:08:53.:08:55.

At a banquet later at Buckingham Palace,

:08:56.:08:57.

hosted by the Queen and Prince Philip, Her Majesty

:08:58.:09:00.

acknowledged the two countries had not always seen "eye to eye."

:09:01.:09:03.

Yesterday, we were talking about 15-year-old, Eddie,

:09:04.:09:04.

who took over Southern Rail's Twitter account as part

:09:05.:09:07.

Complaints about cancellations and late trains seemed to be

:09:08.:09:10.

forgotten, and followers even used the hashtag "Ask Eddie" to quiz him

:09:11.:09:14.

about duck-sized horses and how to make tea.

:09:15.:09:16.

Eddie was such a hit, that Southern Rail invited him back

:09:17.:09:19.

It was mainly a collective decision I would have a go on the Twitter. It

:09:20.:09:49.

has been absolutely amazing, such an experience, which I will have with

:09:50.:09:54.

me for the rest of my life. Not many people are that happy after work

:09:55.:09:58.

experience. And not many people have that much of an impact on their

:09:59.:10:00.

first day. It's a big day at Wimbledon today,

:10:01.:10:11.

Britain's on the verge of having its first woman in 40

:10:12.:10:14.

years to reach a final. But Johanna Konta must first

:10:15.:10:18.

overcome five-time champion Venus Williams, Sally's there,

:10:19.:10:20.

and you spent time with Johanna The scale of this task is immense.

:10:21.:10:27.

It is really difficult to know how to put it into words. Did you watch

:10:28.:10:31.

Venus Williams play the other day she is brilliant. She has been here

:10:32.:10:35.

many times before and she knows the score. And of course, Johanna Konta

:10:36.:10:39.

is approaching it in a different way, carrying the hopes of a nation

:10:40.:10:44.

into this final. She is the first British woman in 40 years to get

:10:45.:10:50.

this far, since Virginia Wade in 1978. Yeah, there is the tiny

:10:51.:10:56.

problem of Venus Williams and a final still to play. We are learning

:10:57.:11:02.

more about Johanna Konta. You may not have heard about her previously.

:11:03.:11:07.

She keeps her private life very, very Reidford. If you want to know

:11:08.:11:13.

more, we have had a talk with her. -- private. We met with her in

:11:14.:11:16.

training. It is nice to see you. Welcome to my

:11:17.:11:27.

home from home. For many years, there are dormitories behind there,

:11:28.:11:31.

I used to literally live there. ? Used to live here? Yes. Children,

:11:32.:11:42.

that is how you get good. I used to get up at the crack of dawn to go

:11:43.:11:48.

running. He told me if I wanted to be the best, I needed the best time

:11:49.:11:54.

and I needed to put energy in it. I needed to go train. When my dad

:11:55.:12:00.

realised I was going to wake up at the crack of dawn every morning,

:12:01.:12:03.

initially, he was like, what have I done? I spent my formative years

:12:04.:12:11.

here. I grew up into a tennis player and the person I am today here. You

:12:12.:12:15.

said very clearly you want to be world number one. I do, I do, that

:12:16.:12:20.

has been my dream since I was a young girl to be it continues to be

:12:21.:12:24.

my dream and always will be so long as I play this sport. I want to be

:12:25.:12:27.

the best version of myself. She always wanted to be just the

:12:28.:12:36.

best version of herself. Someone who help her along the way, just a bit,

:12:37.:12:40.

is with me. And with me now is Justin Sherring,

:12:41.:12:41.

Johanna's first tennis coach She says she wants to be the best

:12:42.:12:49.

tennis player in the world, was she always like that? Yes, she was. She

:12:50.:12:55.

had a very obvious passion and enthusiasm, not just for tennis, but

:12:56.:12:59.

to be the best. I can definitely see that. How old was see when you were

:13:00.:13:06.

working with her? 19, just out of juniors. She was in 200- 300. Many

:13:07.:13:14.

players get lost at that stage. She did not. She fought to wear she is

:13:15.:13:19.

today. Could you tell at the time she would be that good? I teach

:13:20.:13:25.

players every day, for many years, and there was something different

:13:26.:13:28.

about her. She was very focused. Every single ball and session. Her

:13:29.:13:34.

game has changed over the last few years. It has changed a little bit.

:13:35.:13:38.

Her mental strength has improved enormously, hasn't it? Yes. We

:13:39.:13:47.

talked a lot about her becoming a warrior on the court, treating every

:13:48.:13:52.

ball like an opponent that needed to be beaten the big she can fight with

:13:53.:13:57.

the best of them. -- beaten. I love that idea. How do you make yourself

:13:58.:14:03.

a warrior on the tennis court? It is you against that yellow fuzzy thing.

:14:04.:14:11.

When she got the quarter-final, she was so cool and calm to be she did

:14:12.:14:15.

not especially celebrate. I know what she is doing. She is treating

:14:16.:14:23.

every game like any game. It might be a semi-final, quarter-final,

:14:24.:14:25.

Wimbledon, she is trying to keep that out of it. She will let all of

:14:26.:14:30.

us do the excitement. She is very good at staying in a bubble and

:14:31.:14:37.

staying focused. And I think that if she stays like that, then we have

:14:38.:14:41.

some more magic to look forward to. We will hope so. In the film I just

:14:42.:14:49.

saw, she was saying that for a long time she would sleep in a little,

:14:50.:14:52.

tiny bedroom next to the tennis courts in Roehampton where she

:14:53.:15:00.

learned tennis. What can you tell us about her youth? We used to play

:15:01.:15:07.

outside in the cold in the winter. One day it was minus eight degrees.

:15:08.:15:13.

The court was rockhard. She could only serve because I would not let

:15:14.:15:17.

her out on the courts too much. She was out there for two hours. She

:15:18.:15:24.

told me she had six layers on. It does not get much more dedicated

:15:25.:15:28.

than that. Have you had one of the Johanna Konta Marstons making the

:15:29.:15:36.

rounds? -- muffins. No, I am disappointed. Maybe you should have

:15:37.:15:42.

one live! Will see still be baking before a semi-final? May just to

:15:43.:15:48.

keep her mind off it. Thank you very much. She has been playing since 19.

:15:49.:15:53.

A beautiful date. Will it stay OK for the semifinals?

:15:54.:16:04.

It should, I'm hoping Justin will be baking for us before the end of the

:16:05.:16:08.

day, no mean task! It should stay dry, the outside chance of a shower,

:16:09.:16:13.

not as cold as yesterday this time, we've lost the northerly breeze and

:16:14.:16:17.

things set fair for much of the day and that's the forecast for

:16:18.:16:20.

Wimbledon but for everyone else, largely dry. A few showers around,

:16:21.:16:23.

and a lot of sunshine. In the day we will see rain in

:16:24.:16:29.

north-west Scotland and also the north-west of Northern Ireland. To

:16:30.:16:33.

put some detail on that this morning, dry in southern England to

:16:34.:16:37.

start, some sunshine and a bit of cloud but as we go into central and

:16:38.:16:41.

southern England and around the Midlands, the cloud is thick enough

:16:42.:16:45.

for the odd shower but that cloud will break up and we will see sunny

:16:46.:16:49.

spells developing. Into northern England, Scotland and Northern

:16:50.:16:53.

Ireland, a chilly start with clear spells overnight, temperatures

:16:54.:16:56.

falling as low as three or four. They will start to pick up readily

:16:57.:17:00.

in the morning sunshine and again, the risk of the odd shower through

:17:01.:17:04.

the day but for most it will stay dry for the large part of the day.

:17:05.:17:09.

In Wales, a lot of sunshine first thing and a nippy start but where

:17:10.:17:12.

we've got cloud in south Wales, thick enough for the odd shower and

:17:13.:17:17.

the same in south-west England. Unlucky depending on your point of

:17:18.:17:22.

view weather you see a shower but there's a chance, but in

:17:23.:17:25.

Gloucestershire and Wiltshire, showers but they will fade and in

:17:26.:17:30.

the Home Counties, similar to today, blue skies and cloud building.

:17:31.:17:33.

Through the course of the day a bit more cloud building but we will hang

:17:34.:17:38.

on to sunny intervals and although showers develop in parts of England,

:17:39.:17:43.

Wales, eastern Scotland and Northern Ireland, most will miss them and by

:17:44.:17:47.

the end of the afternoon our weather front in western Scotland and

:17:48.:17:50.

Northern Ireland will introduce some rain. Temperatures today up to 23.

:17:51.:17:55.

Through this evening and overnight, our weather front moves south-east,

:17:56.:18:00.

turning more showery as it does and by the time it gets into the south

:18:01.:18:04.

itself it will be a fairly weak affair. Overnight temperatures

:18:05.:18:08.

roughly around ten to 15, so not feeling as oppressive as it has in

:18:09.:18:12.

parts of the south-east of late. Then tomorrow, almost an action

:18:13.:18:17.

replay of today. A game some sunshine around, some cloud bubbling

:18:18.:18:20.

up as we go through the day. Some showers developing -- again. Then

:18:21.:18:25.

we're looking at another weather front later in the west, introducing

:18:26.:18:29.

more rain. If anything, temperatures picking up a degree or so tomorrow.

:18:30.:18:34.

That weather front in the west will move across the UK during Friday

:18:35.:18:39.

night into Saturday morning, by the time it reaches the south there

:18:40.:18:43.

won't be much rain left on it and on Saturday, more cloud around but we

:18:44.:18:46.

will still see sunny spells and there will also be a few showers.

:18:47.:18:50.

Temperature wise, becoming that this will get hotter and more humid in

:18:51.:18:54.

the south and that process will continue into the weekend. Naga and

:18:55.:18:58.

Charlie, if you remember last week I asked you how many tennis balls it

:18:59.:19:03.

would take to Phil Centre Court with the roof closed, it was 290 million.

:19:04.:19:09.

Today I need to ask you, how many golf umbrellas do you think would

:19:10.:19:14.

cover the same area as the roof does on Centre Court?

:19:15.:19:19.

360 degrees? 1800, it's 1800? You're both way out, 17,500. Opened up

:19:20.:19:36.

fully, golf umbrellas are big? But so is the roof, it is huge! I can't

:19:37.:19:43.

see it! This dispute will carry on. I can't see it, I am going to have

:19:44.:19:48.

to visualise this more. How many did you say, you said 1800? It would

:19:49.:19:55.

take 7500 Wimbledon umbrellas to cover the same area as the roof.

:19:56.:20:00.

Sofar Carol is winning this quiz. It is 2-0 so far. Next time we are

:20:01.:20:06.

going to ask you a question. We're going to ask someone bald and facts

:20:07.:20:08.

for you! In the last few minutes,

:20:09.:20:10.

the government has announced how much they're going to fine

:20:11.:20:13.

the parent company of Southern Rail. This has just come through, we were

:20:14.:20:26.

expecting a decision of some sort? -- fining. The government has put

:20:27.:20:31.

off this decision for some time but today it has announced they are

:20:32.:20:36.

finding the parent company ?13.4 million for all the disputes we've

:20:37.:20:41.

seen over the last year -- fining. It reached its peak last July and

:20:42.:20:45.

then we have had strikes on and off through the year since then.

:20:46.:20:49.

Interestingly the parent company made a profit of ?100 million just

:20:50.:20:56.

last year, so that puts that to a 13 -- that puts the ?30 million into

:20:57.:21:00.

context, no difficulty paying that, but certainly a slap on the wrist --

:21:01.:21:05.

?13 million. Why are they being find? They haven't delivered enough

:21:06.:21:10.

good quality passenger service so this money will have to be spent

:21:11.:21:14.

directly on improving passenger services, and because we've seen so

:21:15.:21:17.

many strikes over the last year, hundreds of thousands of commuters

:21:18.:21:21.

have been impacted and not able to get to work, huge queues, that's the

:21:22.:21:26.

reason, anyone on the south coast will have struggled with that over

:21:27.:21:32.

the past year and that's why the train company are being fined for

:21:33.:21:35.

not delivering that service. One more question, sorry, this figure,

:21:36.:21:40.

?13.4 million, you mentioned the profits, interesting the government

:21:41.:21:43.

said it could have been more but they have set a lot of this is down

:21:44.:21:47.

to strike action? To some extent the government are saying it's difficult

:21:48.:21:51.

when you're dealing with a union and it isn't necessarily the company's

:21:52.:21:55.

fault all the time but the fact they have been fined in the first place

:21:56.:21:59.

means the dispute could have been resolved sooner or quicker. Thanks

:22:00.:22:00.

very much. Dozens of migrants who'd made

:22:01.:22:03.

the perilous sea crossing from Turkey to Greece have been

:22:04.:22:05.

resettled on a Greek island in a trial that could be

:22:06.:22:08.

rolled out across the rest More than 10,000 are in refugee

:22:09.:22:11.

camps across Greece, But the island of Tilos has

:22:12.:22:15.

offered accommodation Our Europe reporter Gavin Lee

:22:16.:22:18.

is on Tilos for us this morning. A rather heartwarming story if the

:22:19.:22:35.

plan works, Gavin? Yeah, you can see it's a picture postcard island and

:22:36.:22:38.

the islanders are doing something that's not been done anywhere else

:22:39.:22:42.

on the Greek islands. We've seen these images of the past couple of

:22:43.:22:47.

years of all the people coming to Lesbos, Samos and Kos, but there are

:22:48.:22:51.

still 10,000 people in pretty basic and bleak conditions but here the

:22:52.:22:55.

officials saw it and the mayor of Tilos sort what was happening and

:22:56.:22:59.

they decided to embrace refugees, a small number, 50 migrants, they said

:23:00.:23:06.

come here, try and integrate, get jobs, we will give you accommodation

:23:07.:23:11.

and residents and I have been speaking to locals and refugees over

:23:12.:23:15.

the last few days to see how it works -- residency.

:23:16.:23:17.

Tilos island, ten miles from the Turkish coast,

:23:18.:23:19.

A place where there are more goats than people.

:23:20.:23:22.

A year ago, the local mayor announced the islanders wanted

:23:23.:23:25.

to help and received refugees looking for a new life,

:23:26.:23:28.

bucking the trend of the other islands keener

:23:29.:23:30.

It's a small but significant show of faith for this tiny island.

:23:31.:23:36.

50 refugees selected from around Greece who are prepared to work,

:23:37.:23:39.

who are prepared to integrate, and it's mainly families,

:23:40.:23:42.

and in exchange they'll get somewhere to stay

:23:43.:23:44.

He escaped from the war in Syria and originally aimed for Germany

:23:45.:23:50.

When I arrived to Tilos all my life changed.

:23:51.:24:01.

My life and my wife is now relaxed and my children go to school

:24:02.:24:05.

and the people here I think are very nice, very beautiful.

:24:06.:24:08.

One hotel has taken on three refugees, two as housekeepers,

:24:09.:24:17.

including Mahar Baraka from Damascus, who talks of one day

:24:18.:24:23.

In the Tilos refugee centre, the children have been learning

:24:24.:24:27.

They're singing, "Blow, wind, blow, take us to distant places."

:24:28.:24:40.

The key to the Tilos plan being a success is how the younger

:24:41.:24:43.

generation of refugees settle here and whether they continue

:24:44.:24:46.

to feel welcome and part of the community over

:24:47.:24:48.

Gavin Lee reporting there from the island of Tilos, where the community

:24:49.:25:05.

is trying hard to integrate refugees and that experiment going on at the

:25:06.:25:09.

moment and it is hoped if it works it will be rolled out to other

:25:10.:25:11.

islands in Greece. Time now to get the news,

:25:12.:25:12.

travel and weather where you are. Plenty more on our website

:25:13.:28:30.

at the usual address. Now, though, it's back

:28:31.:28:34.

to Charlie and Naga. This is Breakfast,

:28:35.:28:36.

with Naga Munchetty and Charlie The government will today publish

:28:37.:28:48.

a long-awaited bill that will convert European Union laws

:28:49.:28:51.

into British legislation. The European Union Withdrawal Bill

:28:52.:28:53.

is designed to ensure a smooth transition when the UK

:28:54.:28:56.

leaves the EU. The Brexit Secretary,

:28:57.:28:58.

David Davis, has described it But political opponents have

:28:59.:29:00.

threatened to disrupt Lawyers representing the parents

:29:01.:29:03.

of the terminally-ill baby, Charlie Gard, will return

:29:04.:29:13.

to the High Court today. They'll argue that he should be able

:29:14.:29:16.

to travel to the United States But doctors at Great Ormond Street

:29:17.:29:19.

Hospital say the therapy is unlikely work, and his life support systems

:29:20.:29:23.

should be turned off. Charlie's family say the treatment

:29:24.:29:26.

is an opportunity to save his life. The parent company of Southern Rail

:29:27.:29:48.

has been given a ?30 million fine. Govia Thameslink Railway will spend

:29:49.:30:08.

the money on improving the service. Southern Rail has been locked

:30:09.:30:11.

in a bitter dispute with unions for more than a year,

:30:12.:30:13.

over plans to introduce driver-only The educational gap between poor

:30:14.:30:16.

and rich children is getting wider, A report by the "Commission

:30:17.:30:23.

on Inequality in Education," says pupils in more deprived areas

:30:24.:30:28.

are more likely to be taught The Department for Education

:30:29.:30:31.

disputes the findings, and says it's working

:30:32.:30:34.

towards improving education Wills recorded on voice mail or text

:30:35.:30:36.

message could be deemed legally binding by a judge, thanks

:30:37.:30:40.

to new proposals from the Law It says it is the first step

:30:41.:30:43.

in updating the Victorian law, unchanged since 1839,

:30:44.:30:47.

and could pave the way for the introduction

:30:48.:30:49.

of electronic wills. It wants it to be easier for a court

:30:50.:30:51.

to decide when a person's President Trump will arrive

:30:52.:30:55.

in France this morning He will commemorate

:30:56.:30:58.

the centenary of America's entry Tomorrow, he'll celebrate

:30:59.:31:01.

Bastille Day at the invitation of the French President,

:31:02.:31:04.

Emmanuel Macron. He is at the airport. Well, he will

:31:05.:31:10.

get there in 15 minutes. You saw him boarding the Air Force One. That is

:31:11.:31:14.

expected to touch down in Paris where he will begin a two-day

:31:15.:31:21.

meeting with a man or marking the US's entrance into World War I. --

:31:22.:31:36.

Emmanuel Macron. I like this story this morning. It has confused me a

:31:37.:31:38.

little bit. We all know how frustrating it can

:31:39.:31:39.

be when you're on the train and the aisles are

:31:40.:31:42.

blocked with luggage. Usually it is me who is blocking the

:31:43.:31:44.

aisles with stuff. But two passengers in Australia have

:31:45.:31:48.

taken this to the next level. Queensland Rail has released footage

:31:49.:31:52.

of a man attempting to take a fridge He managed, with some difficulty,

:31:53.:31:56.

to get into the station lift and onto the carriage,

:31:57.:32:00.

before staff saw him and took him It is quite comic how it is sped up

:32:01.:32:03.

like that. Well, another passenger was more

:32:04.:32:14.

successful when he took He has to flip it and flop it along.

:32:15.:32:32.

And he got it into the train. That is quite an achievement of those a

:32:33.:32:34.

little awkward for other passengers. The rail company issued a plea

:32:35.:32:35.

to passengers not to use its trains to move house, suggesting they hire

:32:36.:32:39.

a removal company instead. That is the rail company talking.

:32:40.:32:48.

Coming up later, we will have the weather from Wimbledon were Carol.

:32:49.:32:57.

Sally is there as well. Good morning. The covers are on. It looks

:32:58.:33:07.

like there are some exciting times ahead. Yes, it will be an exciting

:33:08.:33:13.

day. The covers are still on. I don't think they will be on much

:33:14.:33:20.

longer. Final preparations. The team is there to start working on the

:33:21.:33:31.

court. It looks glorious. The day ahead looks great, as Carol has been

:33:32.:33:34.

saying. All eyes are on Johanna Konta and the semi-final against

:33:35.:33:39.

Venus Williams. We had the disappointment of Andy Murray going

:33:40.:33:44.

out yesterday. All attention turns to Johanna Konta. She will not be

:33:45.:33:50.

paying attention to it. She will be calm and relaxed. Venus Williams is

:33:51.:33:55.

in her way today, the five-time Wimbledon champion. They are second

:33:56.:34:01.

on court today. Johanna Konta says she knows how important home support

:34:02.:34:04.

is. It makes it more special

:34:05.:34:06.

because it is home. I do get that home support

:34:07.:34:08.

which I don't get anywhere else. So, in that sense, it makes it,

:34:09.:34:12.

I guess it makes it And U2 have tweeted her saying good

:34:13.:34:35.

luck! Mick Jagger did the same thing, saying that she has gone

:34:36.:34:39.

further at a grand slam than he ever did. They are just coming out. The

:34:40.:34:47.

cover could come down soon. Johanna Konta is second on court. Andy

:34:48.:34:52.

Murray went out of the tournament yesterday. A big match against Sam

:34:53.:34:57.

Querrey. We thought he would win, but he was clearly injured,

:34:58.:35:01.

struggling with a hip injury. Sam Querrey simply played the match of

:35:02.:35:10.

his life. The American came from two sets to one down. He is through to

:35:11.:35:13.

his first of the Grand Slam semi-final.

:35:14.:35:15.

Look, I was obviously in good enough shape to give myself a chance.

:35:16.:35:19.

I almost managed to get through the day.

:35:20.:35:21.

Any slam, I would have taken that compared to how I felt a few weeks

:35:22.:35:25.

It is a bit like an episode of Casualty.

:35:26.:35:40.

Also hampered by injury was the second seed,

:35:41.:35:42.

His Wimbledon ended with a whimper, he was forced to retire

:35:43.:35:46.

with an elbow injury against Thomas Berdych.

:35:47.:35:48.

The two-time champion said he'd been struggling with the problem for over

:35:49.:35:51.

a year but yesterday was his worst day.

:35:52.:35:54.

It means Berdych will play the seven time Wimbledon champion

:35:55.:35:57.

And with Murray, Djokovic and Nadal all now out of the tournament,

:35:58.:36:01.

Federer is the favourite to win the title this year.

:36:02.:36:04.

He looked impressive in beating last year's finallist Milos Raonic

:36:05.:36:07.

The final of the four names to contest the men's semi finals

:36:08.:36:15.

is Marin Cilic, who'll face Murray's conqueror Sam Querrey.

:36:16.:36:18.

Former US Open champion Cilic came through a five-set epic

:36:19.:36:20.

against Gilles Muller over on Court One.

:36:21.:36:24.

And we still have British interest in the doubles.

:36:25.:36:26.

Heather Watson and partner, Henri Kontinen, continued

:36:27.:36:28.

the defence of their mixed doubles title.

:36:29.:36:30.

They're through to the quarter finals after victory over fourth

:36:31.:36:33.

And we've got four Britons left in the quarter-finals

:36:34.:36:46.

Ken Skupski and Jocelyn Rae are one of the pairs,

:36:47.:36:50.

they earned a thrilling victory against the ninth seeds.

:36:51.:36:53.

It went to three sets, the British duo won the final set 9-7.

:36:54.:36:56.

They'll next face fellow Briton Jamie Murray and his partner

:36:57.:36:59.

Martina Hingis while Heather Watson and Henri Kontinen also

:37:00.:37:01.

And the Wheelchair Event gets under way here at the All England Club

:37:02.:37:06.

today, with defending men's champion Britain's Gordon Reid facing Stefan

:37:07.:37:09.

England's cricketers have secured their place

:37:10.:37:10.

in the semi-finals of the Women's World Cup.

:37:11.:37:13.

They beat New Zealand by 75 runs yesterday in Derby,

:37:14.:37:15.

They've qualified with a game to spare, that's against

:37:16.:37:19.

Germany's Marcel Kittel won his fifth stage on this year's

:37:20.:37:23.

Tour de France with victory in Stage 11.

:37:24.:37:26.

Chris Froome retains the leaders yellow jersey and will be looking

:37:27.:37:29.

to defend his 18-second overall lead as the race heads

:37:30.:37:31.

And Rory Mcilroy insists he's in positive mood ahead

:37:32.:37:35.

of the Scottish Open which begins this morning in Dundonald.

:37:36.:37:38.

The world number four has yet to win a tournament in a year that's been

:37:39.:37:42.

disrupted by injury, erratic form, and new clubs.

:37:43.:37:44.

Now, one of the things we love about Andy Murray,

:37:45.:37:46.

and we've got to say, his mum, Judy, must take some credit for this,

:37:47.:37:50.

And we saw another example yesterday in his post match press conference

:37:51.:37:55.

when he corrected an American reporter on their statistics.

:37:56.:38:01.

Sam Querrey is the first US player to reach a major US

:38:02.:38:05.

Did you like that? Isn't that great? I love the way he goes "Male

:38:06.:38:33.

player... Male player." That is Andy Murray out. All eyes are on Johanna

:38:34.:38:41.

Konta. Superstars are talking to her on Twitter. We have also been to see

:38:42.:38:46.

some junior tennis players just down the road from here to see what they

:38:47.:38:51.

had to say for Johanna Konta. The message was loud and clear, they

:38:52.:38:56.

want to say a very big good luck. Thank you very much. We will be back

:38:57.:39:01.

with you later on in the morning. All eyes are wrong to one Contador.

:39:02.:39:05.

It is an exciting day today. -- Johanna Konta.

:39:06.:39:08.

It's a milestone day for the government, as it begins

:39:09.:39:11.

the process of transferring European law into UK law.

:39:12.:39:14.

But at the same time, it's facing criticism for the way

:39:15.:39:17.

The National Audit Office, which monitors public spending,

:39:18.:39:20.

says a lack of leadership is putting the whole process at risk.

:39:21.:39:23.

Let's talk to the Brexit Minister, Steve Baker, who's in our

:39:24.:39:26.

Thank you for joining us. Thank you. How significant is this piece of

:39:27.:39:38.

legislation? It is basically taking EU laws we abide by and turning it

:39:39.:39:45.

into British legislation. Why is this important? It is the most

:39:46.:39:52.

important piece of legislation since the EU law came to the UK and made

:39:53.:39:56.

it supreme over UK law. This will give certainty and continuity and

:39:57.:40:03.

control to us We want the law on the day after believed to be the same as

:40:04.:40:08.

the one before. That is so individuals know they do not face

:40:09.:40:14.

unexpected changes. This is an important piece of legislation,

:40:15.:40:19.

retaining European law, giving us powers to correct it. When will the

:40:20.:40:25.

laws be changed or be up for change? After we have left or during the

:40:26.:40:32.

process, we will bring forward bills putting specific proposals before

:40:33.:40:36.

Parliament in the usual way. Zabeel we are introducing today, the repeal

:40:37.:40:41.

bill, will not make substantial changes to policy beyond what is

:40:42.:40:47.

necessary to make it work, to be consistent outside the EU. -- The

:40:48.:40:52.

bill. How much support will there be for the bill? Conservatives are

:40:53.:40:59.

holding a tight majority. They say they will oppose the bill, Labour

:41:00.:41:04.

and the Lib Dems, unless there are certain changes. They will consider

:41:05.:41:09.

it. After we look at the bill, we are looking forward to see what they

:41:10.:41:14.

bring forward. It is in the national interest. It is an essential next

:41:15.:41:19.

step as we leave the EU. The manifesto accept of the referendum.

:41:20.:41:23.

I had people come together in the interest of the nation to support

:41:24.:41:28.

the bill to make sure we are able to leave the EU in a way which is

:41:29.:41:32.

smooth and orderly and as I said gives individuals and businesses

:41:33.:41:36.

certainty the law will have some continuity as we leave. What is the

:41:37.:41:42.

plan at the moment for changes to the law? At the moment, the EU has

:41:43.:41:47.

set out something like nine areas, clear areas, it is concerned with.

:41:48.:41:53.

Have the Conservatives set out any? Yes, of course we have. Yes. In the

:41:54.:42:01.

Queen's Speech we set out a legislative programme to make sure

:42:02.:42:06.

we leave the EU with a successful immigration and customs bill and so

:42:07.:42:09.

on. At ten o'clock today we will have papers, three papers, on areas

:42:10.:42:17.

relevant to these. And we will set out the negotiating position to make

:42:18.:42:20.

sure parliament and the government are informed about where we stand at

:42:21.:42:25.

each stage of the negotiations. And as each negotiation cycles through,

:42:26.:42:29.

the secretary will tell us what we have to do. We know what we are

:42:30.:42:34.

doing a big we set it out in the white paper and the Lancaster hill

:42:35.:42:39.

speech. They are all available to the public. Will these talks,

:42:40.:42:45.

negotiations, will they be good-natured? You have got comments

:42:46.:42:50.

from the Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, saying the EU can go

:42:51.:42:55.

whistle if it wants the UK to pay a large exit bill. Is that helpful?

:42:56.:43:02.

The government is approaching these talks in a respectful wait... What

:43:03.:43:06.

about what Boris Johnson said? We are determined we will not pay a

:43:07.:43:11.

penny more than we need to. We are probing the position of the EU right

:43:12.:43:15.

across their claims on the exit bill. And we will see where we

:43:16.:43:21.

arrived through because of the negotiation. He said "Go whistle."

:43:22.:43:28.

Is that constructive? Boris Johnson brings a bit of style to... He is

:43:29.:43:33.

the Foreign Secretary and represents your party abroad. Is this

:43:34.:43:40.

constructive? David Davis and the Prime Minister are leading these

:43:41.:43:42.

negotiations. Boris Johnson has chosen the language he has. What I

:43:43.:43:49.

am looking at is how our department and ministers and Prime Minister are

:43:50.:43:52.

talking directly with the EU and Michel Barnier and their

:43:53.:43:58.

institutions. The head of the National Audit Office has said that

:43:59.:44:02.

Theresa May's of ministration is putting a successful Brexit at risk

:44:03.:44:09.

by showing no leaderships. -- administration. These are strong

:44:10.:44:15.

words. The Daily Telegraph has quoted Mrs Morse saying why

:44:16.:44:21.

departments are struggling to sort this out. My department is involved

:44:22.:44:25.

in co-ordinating all government departments and getting ready to

:44:26.:44:29.

leave the EU. What I have seen since I joined the department not long ago

:44:30.:44:33.

is a really invigorated civil service, with people working with a

:44:34.:44:37.

great deal of intellect and insight and great determination to deliver

:44:38.:44:41.

everything we need by the day we exit. The head of the service,

:44:42.:44:47.

Jeremy Heywood, blocks that, and I am confident we can live what is

:44:48.:44:55.

required, no matter what we face. -- deliver. It is a bit of a slap to

:44:56.:45:00.

hear from the head of the National Audit Office that the government is

:45:01.:45:03.

coming apart like a chocolate orange. It is interesting language,

:45:04.:45:10.

but I don't accept it. What I am seeing from inside the government is

:45:11.:45:13.

active and energetic processes in place and clear direction. I believe

:45:14.:45:19.

we will be able to deliver everything necessary for a clear and

:45:20.:45:24.

orderly exit from the EU. How big is the department for exiting the EU?

:45:25.:45:30.

How many? Hundreds of staff. The department is still growing. It is

:45:31.:45:34.

important to remember this is a whole of government operation. All

:45:35.:45:39.

of government needs to bring forward plans. We run the negotiation and

:45:40.:45:43.

assist other departments in their plans. Remember, it is not a single

:45:44.:45:48.

government department effort, all of it.

:45:49.:45:51.

Steve Baker, Parliamentary Undersecretary of State for the

:45:52.:45:58.

department for exiting the European Union, thank you for your time.

:45:59.:46:02.

Let's catch up with the weather picture with Carol at Wimbledon.

:46:03.:46:09.

Good morning, Carol. Good morning. This morning it is beautiful, the

:46:10.:46:13.

sun is beating down, lovely and warm at the moment and in fact we've been

:46:14.:46:18.

very lucky in terms of rainfall, we had one day of torrential rain but

:46:19.:46:22.

we haven't had a lot of interruptions due to the rain. The

:46:23.:46:26.

wettest year on record forward Maldon was 1997. In the two weeks we

:46:27.:46:34.

had 180 millimetres of rainfall -- for Wimbledon. That's just over 4.5

:46:35.:46:39.

inches. We aren't expecting anything like that today, we're not expecting

:46:40.:46:43.

even any showers today, just the outside chance so the forecast for

:46:44.:46:47.

Wimbledon is mostly dry. Fair bit of sunshine around but through the

:46:48.:46:51.

afternoon there will be more cloud developing but nothing too

:46:52.:46:54.

significant, we will hang on to sunny intervals with highs of 20 or

:46:55.:46:59.

21 or possibly slightly more. For all of us today we are looking at a

:47:00.:47:03.

largely dry day with sunny spells, some showers in the forecast but not

:47:04.:47:09.

all of us will catch one. Starting at 9am across southern England,

:47:10.:47:13.

sunshine and cloud around and as we move further north into the

:47:14.:47:16.

Midlands, central and southern England, a bit more cloud, which

:47:17.:47:19.

could produce the odd shower but that cloud will break up through the

:47:20.:47:23.

morning. In northern England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, under

:47:24.:47:27.

clear skies overnight, a chilly night, temperatures in some

:47:28.:47:30.

sheltered Glens falling to three or four, but starting to pick up quite

:47:31.:47:36.

nicely now, similarly in Northern Ireland, but starting with sunshine.

:47:37.:47:39.

A sunny start to the day in Wales but in south Wales and

:47:40.:47:42.

Gloucestershire, we're looking at Cakir cloud and that could produce

:47:43.:47:46.

the odd shower, similar in Wiltshire -- thicker cloud. In south-west

:47:47.:47:51.

England, at times more cloud but equally some sunshine around. As we

:47:52.:47:57.

drift to the Home Counties, and all points south, still looking at

:47:58.:48:01.

sunshine with some cloud developing. Through the course of the day, what

:48:02.:48:05.

you'll find is we will lose some of that cloud in central and southern

:48:06.:48:09.

England but through the day we see fairweather cloud. And will see more

:48:10.:48:14.

than that, so showers in parts of England, parts of Scotland,

:48:15.:48:17.

especially the east of Northern Ireland and Wales but not everyone

:48:18.:48:21.

will see them. By the end of the afternoon a weather front will

:48:22.:48:24.

produce rain in western Scotland and Northern Ireland. That weather front

:48:25.:48:27.

will continue going south-east as we go through the course of the night,

:48:28.:48:32.

weakening by the time it gets to the far south-east. Temperature wise,

:48:33.:48:37.

ten to 15. Again, not as sticky as it has been in parts of the

:48:38.:48:41.

south-east of late. Tomorrow, very similar conditions to today in that

:48:42.:48:46.

we start off with sunshine, the cloud building through the day and a

:48:47.:48:50.

few of us will see some showers and later in the day, another weather

:48:51.:48:53.

front shows its hand in western Scotland and Northern Ireland.

:48:54.:48:57.

Temperatures up a notch on what we're expecting today. Getting up

:48:58.:49:02.

towards the mid-20s as our maximum height. Then as we move from Friday

:49:03.:49:07.

into Saturday morning, our weather front will have crossed us as a weak

:49:08.:49:11.

feature, hardly any rain in it at all in the south-east. A bit more

:49:12.:49:15.

cloud around on Saturday than in the next couple of days but nonetheless,

:49:16.:49:20.

some sunny spells, a few showers and some rain in the north and west.

:49:21.:49:24.

Turning more humid in southern counties, so if you're coming to

:49:25.:49:28.

Wimbledon on Saturday or Sunday, bear that in mind because we will

:49:29.:49:32.

see our temperatures once again moved from the mid-to-high teens

:49:33.:49:36.

ease in parts of southern England. Sounds lovely.

:49:37.:49:39.

We are going to talk about the advertising industry but focusing in

:49:40.:49:50.

on features we going to do about women in influential business

:49:51.:49:56.

positions. Tell us about your guest. Good morning to you, both, good

:49:57.:50:01.

morning, everyone, this summer we will talk to some of the top women

:50:02.:50:08.

in business that influence all our bar -- all of our lives. We are

:50:09.:50:18.

joined by one of the women that shapes a lot of the advertising we

:50:19.:50:20.

see on our televisions everyday. The UK media industry is huge,

:50:21.:50:23.

the top 100 companies generate about ?90bn in sales MediaCom

:50:24.:50:26.

is the biggest media agency It turned over more than ?1 billion

:50:27.:50:29.

last year and employs more than 1,000 people around

:50:30.:50:35.

the country in five offices. MediaCom plans and buys media

:50:36.:50:38.

space on TV, online, billboards and many other places

:50:39.:50:40.

for big brands like Tesco, Karen Blackett is the

:50:41.:50:43.

chairwoman of MediaCom UK. Hello. Good morning. As we are

:50:44.:50:55.

seeing inflation start to bite, are we actually seen the death of a lot

:50:56.:51:00.

of those big brands? People are prepared to shop around a bit more

:51:01.:51:05.

and go for a cheaper option. We are entering a period of people looking

:51:06.:51:09.

at prioritising. What we are doing with our clients is working to make

:51:10.:51:13.

sure we're at the top of the priority list rather than the

:51:14.:51:17.

consideration list, more so now than ever brand is really important but

:51:18.:51:22.

we are seeing a change in terms of how people are spending their

:51:23.:51:25.

advertising budget based on that uncertainty in terms of what's going

:51:26.:51:29.

on economically. We're seeing more of an increase towards media which

:51:30.:51:33.

can be bought on a shorter term basis, more of a move towards

:51:34.:51:39.

digital media, as opposed to TV media, which is normally associated

:51:40.:51:42.

with brand building. You've been in the industry for 20 years, what

:51:43.:51:46.

changes have you seen, online must be one of the big ones? The main

:51:47.:51:50.

change is Everything is connected now, everything can be media. The

:51:51.:51:57.

smart phone, 77% of all UK adults have one, they have changed the way

:51:58.:52:02.

people interact and use media and how one medium can influence

:52:03.:52:07.

another. Yes, TV advertising's incredibly important but also in

:52:08.:52:11.

conjunction with other media. You watch a TV ad or programme and you

:52:12.:52:15.

can go online or go to social media and engaging conversations about it,

:52:16.:52:20.

you see a TV ad and you can go online and search a website from a

:52:21.:52:24.

client so it's how one media connects with another. Is it easy to

:52:25.:52:27.

keep up with those technology changes that seem to be developing

:52:28.:52:33.

so fast? I'm a digital convert, I wasn't born in a time when the

:52:34.:52:37.

Internet existed, so I'm a convert and we have a number of digital

:52:38.:52:42.

natives employed in the agency but what's really helpful is working for

:52:43.:52:46.

an organisation where you do have scale and insight. Data has allowed

:52:47.:52:53.

us to do our job better. Media is becoming more personal and less

:52:54.:52:57.

public in terms of consumption and we are able to build data to talk in

:52:58.:53:02.

the right way at the right time to consumers. You've campaigned through

:53:03.:53:07.

your career for more diversity in the advertising industry, especially

:53:08.:53:10.

at board level, but have we seen changes in the images that we all

:53:11.:53:16.

see in adverts? Are they now more reflective of society, more

:53:17.:53:20.

inclusive? We've still got a long way to go and that's about future

:53:21.:53:24.

proofing any business to make sure you appeal to the people that live

:53:25.:53:28.

in the UK. The UK's a brilliant fruit salad of people, we have 14%

:53:29.:53:34.

that come from a baying background but in some cities you're seeing the

:53:35.:53:39.

minority becoming the majority so if you want to future proof your

:53:40.:53:42.

business you need people in your organisation that walks on the path

:53:43.:53:46.

of those consumers and know how to build empathy and connections in

:53:47.:53:50.

terms of the brand stories. We still got a long way to go. 30% of the

:53:51.:53:55.

industry is run by women but only 8% run by people from a black, Asian or

:53:56.:54:04.

minority background. You are unique in that sense at the top of the

:54:05.:54:09.

advertising agency. Have you faced discrimination through your career?

:54:10.:54:13.

I'm fortunate I've worked for a company that is about recognising

:54:14.:54:17.

talent and it is about your output rather than what you look like. But

:54:18.:54:22.

to my face, no, I haven't experienced discrimination. Behind

:54:23.:54:27.

my back? Yes I have, absolutely, it's been other people that have

:54:28.:54:34.

told me about it. I have always been taught to celebrate your differences

:54:35.:54:38.

and I have relevance, and my voice, I exist in a small then diagram,

:54:39.:54:43.

part of a Venn diagram, and that makes me relevant, unique and

:54:44.:54:47.

memorable. Thanks very much, Karen Blackett, the chair of MediaCom UK.

:54:48.:54:53.

The first in a series of interviews we will do through this summer

:54:54.:54:57.

talking to high profile on Breakfast.

:54:58.:55:01.

Can I ask a question to Karen, how useful do you think it is for

:55:02.:55:05.

programmes to highlight the fact that women need to be focused on in

:55:06.:55:10.

business? Will we get to a point where we don't need to be talking

:55:11.:55:14.

about it? I would love to get to that point but until we do it's

:55:15.:55:17.

incredibly important to focus on it because I think we need more senior

:55:18.:55:21.

women in business positions to be vocal and visible. Unless you see

:55:22.:55:27.

it, you can't be it, I would love to get to a stage where it's normal and

:55:28.:55:31.

I'm not the only black woman in advertising in a senior role that

:55:32.:55:34.

can speak about this issue. Good to have you with us, Karen

:55:35.:55:39.

Blackett, and thanks very much. Unless you see it, you can't be it,

:55:40.:55:41.

I love that phrase! Hello, this is Breakfast, with

:55:42.:59:35.

Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt. The first step to making Brexit law,

:59:36.:59:37.

the bill to convert EU law into British legislation

:59:38.:59:40.

is put before parliament. The government calls

:59:41.:59:43.

it a major milestone - opposition parties threaten

:59:44.:59:46.

to obstruct its progress. Good morning, it's

:59:47.:00:03.

Thursday 13th July. Also this morning, the parents

:00:04.:00:10.

of terminally-ill baby Charlie Gard take their case to the High Court,

:00:11.:00:13.

arguing that an experimental At Wimbledon, all British hopes now

:00:14.:00:16.

lie with Johanna Konta, after Andy Murray was

:00:17.:00:21.

knocked out yesterday. She faces Venus Williams

:00:22.:00:27.

on Centre Court later today, bidding to become the first British

:00:28.:00:29.

woman to reach a Wimbledon singles The parent company of Southern Rail

:00:30.:00:45.

has been fined ?13 million for a year of strikes and delays. More on

:00:46.:00:47.

that shortly. A new look

:00:48.:00:51.

for a London Landmark. We'll be at the Natural History

:00:52.:00:52.

Museum, where this is the sight that will be greeting

:00:53.:00:55.

visitors from today. And Carol has the weather

:00:56.:00:57.

from Wimbledon. Good morning from centre court where

:00:58.:01:06.

the sun is beating down, the temperature is currently 15 Celsius

:01:07.:01:09.

and that is should stay dry. For the UK as a whole, again mostly dry.

:01:10.:01:15.

Sunny spells, a few showers but later we have some rain coming in

:01:16.:01:18.

across western Scotland and Northern Ireland. We will be back with more

:01:19.:01:20.

later in the programme. The government will today publish

:01:21.:01:22.

a long-awaited bill that will convert European Union laws

:01:23.:01:25.

into British legislation. It's been referred to as the repeal

:01:26.:01:30.

bill, but its official title is the European Union Withdrawal

:01:31.:01:33.

Bill. Its purpose is to replace EU law

:01:34.:01:34.

with UK legislation, The Brexit Secretary David Davis has

:01:35.:01:37.

described it as a "major milestone". However, political opponents have

:01:38.:01:43.

threatened to disrupt its passage Our political correspondent

:01:44.:01:45.

Ben Wright is in Westminster. Good morning. This is very

:01:46.:02:01.

important, we have been told. It may not necessarily go through, it may

:02:02.:02:04.

be blocked, there are threats of that, and all of those very

:02:05.:02:08.

interesting, considering how tight the majority Theresa May holds in

:02:09.:02:13.

this government. Yes, that's right, that last point is absolutely

:02:14.:02:17.

critical. Because of the general election, Theresa May is not have a

:02:18.:02:21.

majority in the House of Commons, which means getting anything through

:02:22.:02:24.

in this parliament will be difficult, and this in particular

:02:25.:02:27.

will be a very contentious piece of legislation. Perhaps the most

:02:28.:02:30.

important bill this parliament will have to deal with. What it does on

:02:31.:02:36.

the face of it is quite simple, it reveals the 1972 European Community

:02:37.:02:40.

's act and ends the application of EU law in the UK, and that will come

:02:41.:02:45.

into effect on the day the European leaves the EU. But all of the law

:02:46.:02:53.

has to be transferred onto the UK Statute book to avoid chaos on

:02:54.:02:59.

Brexit day. Steve Baker, one of the ministers responsible for Brexit,

:03:00.:03:03.

told Breakfast earlier what this bill was actually trying to do. We

:03:04.:03:07.

want to make sure that the law on the day after we leave is the same

:03:08.:03:12.

as the law on the day before, so that individuals and businesses know

:03:13.:03:16.

that they don't face any sudden and unexpected changes. So this is a

:03:17.:03:19.

really important piece of legislation. It reveals the European

:03:20.:03:24.

Communities Act, it retains European law, and it gives us some powers

:03:25.:03:28.

just to correct that law so that the statute book works. So Mr Baker

:03:29.:03:33.

makes it sound quite simple. In fact, it is very complicated, not

:03:34.:03:37.

just because of the volume of the amount of laws that have to be

:03:38.:03:41.

transferred and thought about by Parliament and ministers, but also

:03:42.:03:44.

after we have left, many of the regulatory bodies that govern how

:03:45.:03:47.

these laws work will no longer apply. In particular, the European

:03:48.:03:52.

Court of Justice, which oversees also the thing is relevant here to

:03:53.:03:56.

the UK. So parliament has to decide who is going to regulate all of

:03:57.:04:00.

these things in the future, from pharmaceutical standards to

:04:01.:04:02.

environmental laws, labour laws, all of this has to be thought about and

:04:03.:04:06.

it is clear that opposition parties have big concerns and are going to

:04:07.:04:10.

make Parliamentary trouble. They will scrutinise the government, they

:04:11.:04:14.

are prepared to battle. Labour have said they might even be prepared to

:04:15.:04:19.

vote this down unless they get fresh assurances from the government, so a

:04:20.:04:21.

big parliamentary vote over this. Lawyers representing the parents

:04:22.:04:25.

of the terminally-ill baby, Charlie Gard, will return

:04:26.:04:27.

to the High Court today. They'll argue that he should be able

:04:28.:04:29.

to travel to the United States But doctors at Great Ormond Street

:04:30.:04:32.

Hospital say the therapy is unlikely to work,

:04:33.:04:35.

and his life support systems Charlie's family say the treatment

:04:36.:04:38.

is an opportunity to save his life. The BBC has learned that at least

:04:39.:04:44.

one person who survived the Grenfell Tower fire has been

:04:45.:04:47.

diagnosed with cyanide poisoning. Luana Gomes, who's 12-years-old,

:04:48.:04:50.

was treated for the effects It isn't known what caused

:04:51.:04:52.

the poisoning, but her parents, who lost their unborn child

:04:53.:04:58.

after the fire, believe it may have been caused by the burning

:04:59.:05:00.

of insulation or plastics This was the home of

:05:01.:05:03.

the Gomes family on the 21st They have been living in a hotel

:05:04.:05:11.

since their release from hospital. Andreia Gomes was seven months

:05:12.:05:17.

pregnant and the baby was stillborn by caesarean section,

:05:18.:05:21.

while she and her daughters The family allowed BBC

:05:22.:05:23.

Newsnight to film their Their 12-year-old's diagnosis

:05:24.:05:27.

details cyanide poisoning. Her mother and sister were also

:05:28.:05:33.

treated for the risk of cyanide. This is the first confirmation

:05:34.:05:36.

of a cyanide poisoning diagnosis The highly toxic gas may have been

:05:37.:05:39.

released by the burning of insulation or plastics

:05:40.:05:45.

during the blaze. The Gomes family direct their ire

:05:46.:05:51.

at whoever made the decision to place cheaper fire retardant

:05:52.:05:53.

cladding on the tower. Very angry with them, because it

:05:54.:05:57.

could have all been avoided. And that is where the anger

:05:58.:06:00.

really stems from. It should never have

:06:01.:06:02.

happened like this. The residents never wanted

:06:03.:06:10.

the cladding in the first place. I don't know if it's the right word,

:06:11.:06:14.

but you just killed so many people and you just killed my son,

:06:15.:06:22.

because if we were in a normal situation, I could have gone out,

:06:23.:06:26.

and he was seven months, Because of the conditions,

:06:27.:06:29.

he passed away. The family has requested a full

:06:30.:06:40.

postmortem examination on their son They should have been

:06:41.:06:43.

celebrating his birth next month and they had already decided

:06:44.:06:48.

to name him Logan. The educational gap between poor

:06:49.:06:57.

and rich children is getting wider, A report by the "Commission

:06:58.:07:00.

on Inequality in Education", says pupils in more deprived areas

:07:01.:07:03.

are more likely to be taught The Department for Education

:07:04.:07:06.

disputes the findings, and says it's working

:07:07.:07:11.

towards improving education In the next 20 minutes we will talk

:07:12.:07:20.

to the former Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg, who has been working on

:07:21.:07:22.

that report. President Trump has landed in Paris

:07:23.:07:32.

ahead of a two-day visit to France. He landed in the last 20 minutes or

:07:33.:07:37.

so. He will be commemorating the centenary of America buys Mac entry

:07:38.:07:41.

in the First World War. Major security in place more generally at

:07:42.:07:45.

the moment, but specifically around Mr Trump is Mac visit. A little wave

:07:46.:07:53.

as he comes down the steps. We can speak to our Paris correspondent,

:07:54.:07:57.

Hugh Schofield. We have seen President Trump arriving, it is an

:07:58.:08:01.

important visit, and two relatively new world leaders. Yes, but they

:08:02.:08:07.

have met, don't forget, and there was the famous handshake a few weeks

:08:08.:08:12.

ago at the G-7. This was Macron who refuse to let go of the Trump and in

:08:13.:08:17.

a very, very deliberate show of force and the session on the part of

:08:18.:08:22.

the French leader. A gesture, which apparently Trump did not take too

:08:23.:08:27.

kindly to afterwards, according to the American media, but which you

:08:28.:08:29.

suspect it did work, in the sense that it was intended to show that

:08:30.:08:34.

France was back, we're not going to be a pushover, and maybe created a

:08:35.:08:38.

kind of mutual respect between the two men, because contrary to all

:08:39.:08:42.

likelihood and expectation, there do seem to be a relationship building

:08:43.:08:45.

up between Macron and Trump. Everything you would think about

:08:46.:08:50.

them. Their age, Trump is twice as old practically as Emmanuel Macron,

:08:51.:08:54.

they have no interest in common, no political views in common, but they

:08:55.:08:58.

do seem to be building up a relationship, built out of mutual

:08:59.:09:01.

interest and perhaps out of this shared sense of respect, with Trump

:09:02.:09:06.

admiring perhaps the chips but others new young leader. -- admiring

:09:07.:09:19.

the chutzpah. Particularly of course the fight against terrorism, and the

:09:20.:09:24.

possible cooperation in poor example a postwar Syria. We believe that

:09:25.:09:32.

now, thank you. -- we will leave it there. Thank you very much.

:09:33.:09:34.

The Chief Minister of Gibraltar has criticised comments made yesterday

:09:35.:09:36.

by King Felipe of Spain, during an address to parliament.

:09:37.:09:39.

The King said he was confident that the UK and Spain would find

:09:40.:09:42.

a solution to the issue of Gibraltar that was acceptable to all involved.

:09:43.:09:45.

At a banquet later at Buckingham Palace, hosted

:09:46.:09:47.

by the Queen and Prince Philip, Her Majesty acknowledged

:09:48.:09:49.

the two countries had not always seen "eye to eye".

:09:50.:09:52.

Nasa has released new images of a raging storm on Jupiter,

:09:53.:09:54.

which were taken earlier this week by the unmanned Juno spacecraft.

:09:55.:09:57.

The pictures are the most detailed insight scientists have ever had

:09:58.:10:00.

to the phenomenon known as the Great Red Spot, revealing

:10:01.:10:02.

Juno launched in 2011 and has been orbiting the solar system's largest

:10:03.:10:08.

All of the sport and weather coming up later on.

:10:09.:10:25.

The desperate campaign of baby Charlie Gard's parents has made

:10:26.:10:27.

His case is back in front of a judge at the High Court today.

:10:28.:10:32.

The 11-month-old has an extremely rare genetic condition,

:10:33.:10:34.

and his family want him to travel to the United States

:10:35.:10:36.

But his doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital say he is so ill,

:10:37.:10:41.

The family is arguing that the treatment offers an opportunity to

:10:42.:10:52.

save Charlie's life. They have got letters from up to seven doctors and

:10:53.:10:55.

scientists, and it demonstrates there is up to a 10% chance of this

:10:56.:11:00.

ground-breaking treatment working, and they would know within a period

:11:01.:11:05.

of two to eight weeks whether or not baby Charlie is improving. And the

:11:06.:11:12.

treatment is noninvasive, it is not an operation, it is actually a food

:11:13.:11:13.

additive into his food. We're

:11:14.:11:17.

joined now by Iain Brassington, Medical Ethics lecturer

:11:18.:11:19.

at the University of Manchester. Good morning. When you hear that, it

:11:20.:11:29.

seems as if there is a treatment out there, and the parents and Charlie

:11:30.:11:31.

Gard are being denied this treatment. We obviously know it is

:11:32.:11:37.

not as simple as that. Yep. We are not in any way accusing medical

:11:38.:11:44.

staff of anything, but which way do you lie on this tussle? Where do

:11:45.:11:48.

your sympathies lie the most? Where my sympathies lie and who I think

:11:49.:11:53.

right is not the same thing. On a very human level, no one would want

:11:54.:11:56.

to be in that kind of situation, if you or I were Charlie's parents, I

:11:57.:12:03.

suspect we would be making exactly the same case. So on an emotional

:12:04.:12:07.

level, clearly a lot of our sympathies will be there, but when

:12:08.:12:10.

it comes down to the details of this case, what has been proposed in this

:12:11.:12:15.

latest development is not a treatment, but an experimental

:12:16.:12:17.

treatment, so it is not as though we have something we know will work and

:12:18.:12:20.

will be straightforward and more make him better, it is something

:12:21.:12:23.

that has a small chance of possibly making a small difference. So once

:12:24.:12:28.

you take that kind of thing into account, the Dr's assessment of

:12:29.:12:31.

whether it is a chance worth taking or whether the burdens it will

:12:32.:12:34.

accrue to Charlie will be too great, that becomes much more of a live

:12:35.:12:37.

issue, notwithstanding the emotional side of it. If we look at the

:12:38.:12:42.

ethical side of this, how does it work, in percentage terms? Is it

:12:43.:12:46.

that cold, when it comes down to making these decisions, because as a

:12:47.:12:49.

parent obviously we understand that you have the promise or the hope of

:12:50.:12:55.

something. But whether doctors lie, and obviously the medical well-being

:12:56.:13:00.

of Charlie is at the centre of their concern, how do they make that

:13:01.:13:04.

decision as to whether or not it is worth trying? It is a very, very

:13:05.:13:09.

tough one, and there is no hard and fast rule, there is no chart where

:13:10.:13:13.

we can say we have crossed the threshold. As I understand, this

:13:14.:13:17.

particular treatment, what is proposed has at most a 10% chance of

:13:18.:13:21.

working a very small evidence base, so on that basis, we know that

:13:22.:13:26.

Charlie still being in intensive care is not without burdens of its

:13:27.:13:29.

own, so it will be a matter of the judgment of the doctors, based on

:13:30.:13:33.

the experience of other severely ill children, based on the prospects

:13:34.:13:37.

that this treatment is likely to bring, they have reached some kind

:13:38.:13:41.

of judgment about where the line is crossed. But as you say it is a very

:13:42.:13:46.

difficult one to call precisely. We have the system we have, and the

:13:47.:13:51.

system dictates ultimately it is a court, a judge, who makes that

:13:52.:13:54.

determination, and that in itself is a problem for a lot of people,

:13:55.:13:58.

because a lot of them say surely it should be doctors and all the

:13:59.:14:00.

parents who make that final decision. But the system we have

:14:01.:14:05.

means it is a legal person, a judge, not a medical professional, looking

:14:06.:14:12.

at all the evidence, but he or she is clearly faced by evidence on

:14:13.:14:15.

either side. So ultimately you have someone who is not medically

:14:16.:14:19.

trained, nor a parent, making the call. And these are very hard thing

:14:20.:14:24.

to balance out. Yes, and again that is one of the interesting things

:14:25.:14:29.

about this kind of case, all three players, the parents, the medical

:14:30.:14:32.

staff and the judge, there is a good reason to go with all of them. So as

:14:33.:14:36.

I said, the parents, it is their child may have a very direct bond

:14:37.:14:41.

with the child, the doctors have the medical knowledge, the judges

:14:42.:14:44.

advantage is that they are disinterested, they are above that,

:14:45.:14:51.

so for each of the triangle you can make a case for who should have the

:14:52.:14:55.

final decision. In practice, in reality, I think what is likely to

:14:56.:14:58.

be the case is that the medical evidence is likely to be

:14:59.:15:02.

overwhelming, so the judges have to be disinterested, they will step

:15:03.:15:05.

back and say who has the best argument? The judge has the ability

:15:06.:15:09.

to step back and do that, and so that is why I think overall it does

:15:10.:15:14.

make sense that it be in judicial hands. And of course the law itself

:15:15.:15:18.

has a position that it takes. The law says that treatment can only be

:15:19.:15:21.

provided if it is the best of the child. And so the judge is therefore

:15:22.:15:26.

the best person who can decide, is this actually serving Charlie's best

:15:27.:15:31.

interests? If yes, then provided, if it is not, then not only is there no

:15:32.:15:34.

reason to provided but there might be a reason not to.

:15:35.:15:40.

From an ethical point of view, the amount of time this has taken,

:15:41.:15:46.

dragged out, it is unsympathetic term, but is there an ethical issue

:15:47.:15:53.

there that it has not been resolved sooner to cause less pain? Yeah,

:15:54.:16:00.

absolutely. With all of these things, the point can be made that

:16:01.:16:03.

we should not be starting from here, but this is where we are. It is true

:16:04.:16:08.

it has gone through the courts four times, I think, and it has dragged

:16:09.:16:13.

on over months. That is obviously not something anyone would want but

:16:14.:16:19.

this is where we are. That makes it more urgent now. Thank you so much

:16:20.:16:27.

for your time this morning. Let us take some time ourselves to look at

:16:28.:16:35.

the weather. Good morning. It is a very pleasant start the day. 16

:16:36.:16:41.

degrees here and it will only get warmer and so many British players

:16:42.:16:45.

playing today, I would imagine Henman hill, Murray Mount, it will

:16:46.:16:52.

be packed. Yesterday 38,000 people attended Wimbledon. The capacity is

:16:53.:16:57.

39,000, roughly 2000 more than on the same day last year were here

:16:58.:17:03.

yesterday. Last year, four days were interrupted by rain for. This year,

:17:04.:17:08.

we're not expecting that many and none today. It is largely dry today

:17:09.:17:13.

with sunny spells with more cloud building this afternoon but

:17:14.:17:17.

nonetheless, sunny intervals prevailing. Only a very outside

:17:18.:17:24.

chance of a shower. Mostly dry. 20, 21, maybe a little bit more in the

:17:25.:17:30.

sunshine. The forecast for the UK, dry, but there are showers, although

:17:31.:17:37.

by no means will we all see them. My name, southern England, sunshine,

:17:38.:17:42.

some cloud, thicker cloud in the Midlands, central, southern England,

:17:43.:17:45.

producing the odd shower but it will break up through the morning.

:17:46.:17:49.

Northern England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, chilly. Temperatures will

:17:50.:18:01.

pick up readily. Northern Ireland, beautiful start, chilly. The same

:18:02.:18:06.

for Wales. Although parts of south Wales, more cloud around and you

:18:07.:18:10.

could catch the odd shower. South-west England, bright spells or

:18:11.:18:16.

sunny spells. Bright spells, a bit more cloud, but with the sunny

:18:17.:18:20.

spells, you will see the sun. The home Counties, a mixture of bright

:18:21.:18:22.

spells and sunny skies. Further sunny spells developing through the

:18:23.:18:30.

day and some of the cloud will be thick enough to produce showers in

:18:31.:18:35.

England, Wales, eastern Scotland and Northern Ireland. By the end of the

:18:36.:18:39.

afternoon, and other weather front coming in in western Scotland and

:18:40.:18:45.

Northern Ireland introducing rain. Maximum temperature is likely to be

:18:46.:18:49.

23 in the south-east. Overnight, the weather front in the West continues

:18:50.:18:54.

to move Southeast and will do so overnight, weakening by the time it

:18:55.:19:00.

gets to the south-east. Temperatures 10-15, not as sultry as it has been

:19:01.:19:07.

in the south-east. Tomorrow the front clears away and it will be

:19:08.:19:10.

more or less at the same as today, sunshine, cloud developing and

:19:11.:19:15.

further showers developing. We will also have a weather front coming

:19:16.:19:20.

back in across the West of Scotland and Northern Ireland later.

:19:21.:19:24.

Temperatures up a notch on the day. Overnight, Friday into Saturday, the

:19:25.:19:29.

weather front comes south, weakens, not much rain in the south.

:19:30.:19:34.

Saturday, more cloud than we have been used to. Nonetheless, still

:19:35.:19:38.

sunny spells, a few showers, and outbreaks of rain in parts of the

:19:39.:19:42.

north and west. By then, temperatures rising in southern

:19:43.:19:46.

areas and we will start to feel more humid. By Sunday, in the south, it

:19:47.:19:53.

will be that scenario, hotter and humid with temperatures somewhere

:19:54.:19:55.

between 25 and 28 degrees. That is hot! See you later. So much

:19:56.:20:10.

has been talked about the problems with Southern Rail.

:20:11.:20:14.

They financed? The Government has been making a decision on this for

:20:15.:20:18.

quite awhile. The parent company of Southern Rail has been fined more

:20:19.:20:23.

?13 million by the Government. They will have to spend it on

:20:24.:20:27.

improvements for passengers. More than a year since the dispute with

:20:28.:20:32.

unions saw a string of strikes affecting commuters. The row has not

:20:33.:20:34.

been resolved with more strikes possible over the summer. Property

:20:35.:20:40.

surveyors say that the housing market is operating at a sluggish

:20:41.:20:46.

pace. The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors say the market

:20:47.:20:49.

might continue flat-lining for a while after 16 months of falling

:20:50.:20:52.

numbers of home surveys being commissioned. The flip-flop maker

:20:53.:21:00.

Havianas has been sold for more than $1 million.

:21:01.:21:04.

The Brazilian label has become one of the most popular global brands

:21:05.:21:07.

and they sell about 200 million pairs of their brightly coloured

:21:08.:21:09.

I think it is officially more flip-flops than I would get through

:21:10.:21:16.

in a summer even though I managed to break a fair few!

:21:17.:21:18.

I am not a flip-flop flan. Or fan! As we've been hearing,

:21:19.:21:31.

new research has suggested that the educational gap

:21:32.:21:33.

between poor and rich The report is by the Commission

:21:34.:21:34.

on Inequality in Education, which includes politicians

:21:35.:21:38.

from across the main parties. It has found that pupils

:21:39.:21:40.

in disadvantaged areas are more likely to be taught by younger

:21:41.:21:42.

teachers who lack a degree. The former Deputy Prime Minister,

:21:43.:21:45.

Nick Clegg, is the chair of the commission and is in our

:21:46.:21:47.

Westminster studio. Thank you for your time. Take us

:21:48.:21:52.

through the significant findings, if you would? The most significant one

:21:53.:21:54.

is that even though the attainment, how well pupils do in the classroom,

:21:55.:22:00.

has improved over the years by the benchmarks governments apply, five

:22:01.:22:07.

GCSEs and so on, the gap between the performance of children from the

:22:08.:22:10.

more advantaged backgrounds and the most disadvantaged has remained

:22:11.:22:16.

stubbornly consistent over the last 30 years and a new trend is

:22:17.:22:22.

emerging, we have always known about the link between parental income and

:22:23.:22:25.

how well a child does at school but now were a child lives, the

:22:26.:22:31.

geography of the inequality in our school systems, it has become more

:22:32.:22:34.

pronounced over time and that was something that we found as we did

:22:35.:22:39.

our research and as you have rightly suggested it was a cross-party

:22:40.:22:43.

endeavour. It is a commission hosted by the Social Market Foundation

:22:44.:22:48.

think tank. Research showed it is associated with the fact that a lot

:22:49.:22:52.

of schools in disadvantaged areas have less qualified teachers who

:22:53.:22:57.

stay for a shorter period of time at those schools, a higher turnover of

:22:58.:23:00.

less qualified, less experienced teachers in the schools where you

:23:01.:23:06.

want the most qualified and experienced teachers. The scenario

:23:07.:23:13.

you have, in a deprived area, a school, the talent they are able to

:23:14.:23:17.

attract, for whatever reason, is not as good? Not as much experience.

:23:18.:23:23.

Where does the blame lies? Resume believe they put an advertisement

:23:24.:23:27.

out and they ask for the best possible candidates -- presumably

:23:28.:23:34.

they put an advertisement out. Is the school not choosing the right

:23:35.:23:40.

teachers? Plot it through for me. What we found speaking to teachers

:23:41.:23:44.

who are obviously the most important people to speak to, lots of

:23:45.:23:47.

particularly younger teachers who might be great teachers but they do

:23:48.:23:52.

not have the experience or the pedigree of their more experienced

:23:53.:23:57.

peers, they want to go to the schools which are in the most

:23:58.:24:01.

challenging areas, they go to them and then for some reason they get

:24:02.:24:05.

demoralised and often leave after a few months. What we try to

:24:06.:24:09.

understand is, why was that the case? It was not about page,

:24:10.:24:13.

interestingly. Often they will be paid more if they go to a school in

:24:14.:24:19.

a disadvantaged area and teachers in more advantageous areas. It seems to

:24:20.:24:23.

be more about the fact they felt their efforts were not necessarily

:24:24.:24:27.

well recognised by the way in which the school is judged in the rankings

:24:28.:24:33.

that are published about schools and often also teachers, inexperienced

:24:34.:24:36.

teachers, they said they would value to have more support from mentors in

:24:37.:24:45.

the school. One of our recommendations is firstly that if a

:24:46.:24:48.

teacher wants to later in their career become a headteacher and get

:24:49.:24:52.

a headship qualification, they first must have shown they have done a

:24:53.:24:56.

serious dent in the disadvantaged school. Secondly, to make sure the

:24:57.:25:02.

relationships between more experienced and less experienced

:25:03.:25:04.

teachers are duplicated across the country. Does that mean a

:25:05.:25:12.

headteacher is obliged to take on a variety of experience of teaching?

:25:13.:25:16.

How do you possibly enforce that? Surely a headteacher would take on

:25:17.:25:20.

whoever they think is best for the job? You cannot tell them who to

:25:21.:25:26.

employ. Sorry, if you want to become a headteacher yourself, our

:25:27.:25:30.

recommendation is, and there is a thing called a headship

:25:31.:25:33.

qualification, we are saying you can only get that qualification if you

:25:34.:25:38.

yourself, in your earlier teaching career, have done a serious stint in

:25:39.:25:47.

a school in a disadvantaged area, creating an incentive for future

:25:48.:25:51.

leaders in our schools to have accumulated serious experience

:25:52.:25:53.

teaching in those schools where we need the best teachers. Are you

:25:54.:25:59.

really frustrated? You have been in politics a long time, I am sure I

:26:00.:26:02.

have interviewed you and other politicians in the past about what

:26:03.:26:07.

is going on in education and it is always the same people, in deprived

:26:08.:26:13.

areas, nothing ever seems to change. To be fair, it is not quite as

:26:14.:26:17.

simple. As I said, the good news is the attainment of all pupils is

:26:18.:26:22.

actually increasing, it is just the gap between the rich and the poor is

:26:23.:26:27.

not. Secondly, behind that sense of nothing changing, quite a lot is

:26:28.:26:31.

shifting. There are certain parts of the country, I am right now in

:26:32.:26:35.

London, London was in the middle of the tables, the rankings, some years

:26:36.:26:40.

ago, and it is now towards the top. London is an area of great diversity

:26:41.:26:46.

socially, ethnically and so on. There has also been huge changes in

:26:47.:26:50.

the performance of girls against boys. And the performance of

:26:51.:26:55.

different ethnic groups. All pupils from Asian community is 30 years ago

:26:56.:26:59.

were not doing very well and now, for instance, kids from Chinese and

:27:00.:27:04.

Indian families in Britain are doing considerably better than the

:27:05.:27:09.

average. I agree with you that the overall picture can feel pretty

:27:10.:27:12.

dismal and static, but behind that, there are a lot of changes. What we

:27:13.:27:17.

try and do in the report is picked out where the changes have been in

:27:18.:27:21.

the right direction, how can we spread that as best practice? One of

:27:22.:27:26.

the observations, you will not be surprised to hear, is that not only

:27:27.:27:30.

does a child do well in the classroom if they are taught by

:27:31.:27:38.

well-qualified teachers, but also if they have parents supportive at

:27:39.:27:40.

home. Again, it is tricky when politicians try and help parents how

:27:41.:27:43.

to be parents, but there are examples around the country of

:27:44.:27:46.

schools who enter into a contract, if you like, between teachers and

:27:47.:27:50.

parents to encourage parents to be more supportive of their daughters

:27:51.:27:54.

and sons in doing homework and so on and it is again something in our

:27:55.:28:00.

recommendations we believe should happen on a more widespread basis.

:28:01.:28:09.

Thank you for your time, chair of the Commission

:28:10.:31:26.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty

:31:27.:31:34.

The Government will today publish a long-awaited bill that

:31:35.:31:42.

will convert European Union laws into British legislation.

:31:43.:31:45.

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis, has described it

:31:46.:31:49.

It comes as the head of the National Audit Office,

:31:50.:31:55.

Sir Amyas Morse, warned government could "fall apart like a chocolate

:31:56.:31:58.

orange" in the Brexit process unless departments got more support.

:31:59.:32:09.

Earlier on Breakfast, Brexit Minister Steve Baker

:32:10.:32:11.

A very vivid choice of language, but I don't accept

:32:12.:32:14.

What I'm seeing from the inside of Government,

:32:15.:32:17.

it is a very active and energetic process in place.

:32:18.:32:20.

I'm seeing very clear political direction,

:32:21.:32:21.

and I believe that we will be able to deliver all that is necessary

:32:22.:32:24.

across Government to ensure a smooth and orderly exit

:32:25.:32:27.

Lawyers representing the parents of the terminally-ill baby

:32:28.:32:29.

Charlie Gard will return to the high court today.

:32:30.:32:32.

They'll argue that he should be able to travel to the United States

:32:33.:32:35.

Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital say

:32:36.:32:39.

the therapy is unlikely work, and his life support systems

:32:40.:32:42.

Charlie's family say the treatment is an opportunity to save his life.

:32:43.:32:50.

The educational gap between poor and rich children is getting wider,

:32:51.:32:52.

The Department for Education disputes the findings,

:32:53.:32:55.

and says it's working towards improving education

:32:56.:32:56.

But the report by the Commission on Inequality in Education says

:32:57.:33:05.

pupils in more deprived areas are more likely to be taught

:33:06.:33:08.

President Trump has landed at Paris for the start of a two-day visit to

:33:09.:33:18.

France. He will commemorate

:33:19.:33:19.

the centenary of America's entry Tomorrow, he'll celebrate

:33:20.:33:21.

Bastille Day at the invitation of the French President,

:33:22.:33:24.

Emmanuel Macron. Wills recorded on voice mail or text

:33:25.:33:27.

message could be deemed legally-binding by a judge,

:33:28.:33:30.

thanks to new proposals It says it's the first step

:33:31.:33:32.

in updating the Victorian law, unchanged since 1839,

:33:33.:33:39.

and could pave the way for the introduction

:33:40.:33:41.

of electronic wills. It wants it to be easier for a court

:33:42.:33:43.

to decide when a person's Dozens of migrants who'd made

:33:44.:33:46.

the perilous sea crossing from Turkey to Greece have been

:33:47.:33:54.

resettled on a Greek island in a trial that could be

:33:55.:33:57.

rolled out across the rest More than 10,000 are in refugee

:33:58.:33:59.

camps across Greece, But the island of Tilos has offered

:34:00.:34:03.

accommodation to those Our Europe reporter Gavin Lee

:34:04.:34:06.

is on Tilos for us this morning. It is a beautiful view, the Perfect

:34:07.:34:20.

Day, it seems. But for many, many still rebuilding their lives, and an

:34:21.:34:24.

interesting story we are hearing that the community is embracing

:34:25.:34:27.

this, there are fewer tensions than we have seen in other parts of the

:34:28.:34:32.

Mediterranean? Yes, it is a picture postcard

:34:33.:34:36.

island, and the locals here, 800 of them, are doing something very

:34:37.:34:42.

different elsewhere we have been to places like Lesbos Thunderbirds have

:34:43.:34:46.

come in, more than a million people last year, people here watched on,

:34:47.:34:53.

invited a small group of refugees, people who were prepared to work and

:34:54.:34:58.

integrate, and they would be given accommodation here, and most now

:34:59.:35:01.

have presidency as well. It is a product they want to spread

:35:02.:35:05.

elsewhere. Let's bring in one of those who got involved and decided

:35:06.:35:09.

to employ three refugees at your hotel. Tell me about whether you

:35:10.:35:16.

think this idea that you are doing can work elsewhere? Yes, I wish, and

:35:17.:35:24.

actually this is not happening for the first time on Tilos, I think

:35:25.:35:30.

Tilos is the last 25 years is doing things for the first time in Greece,

:35:31.:35:33.

that is why I believe that this came very naturally for us. I know for

:35:34.:35:39.

example Tilos had the first gay civil partnership you, the first to

:35:40.:35:46.

have clean energy, the first to also say no to the partying lifestyle...

:35:47.:35:59.

The first with the medicine and the doctors. How have your refugee

:36:00.:36:04.

workers integrated here? They are very well, very naturally, we didn't

:36:05.:36:09.

have any second thoughts, we didn't have second thoughts when we picked

:36:10.:36:15.

them up because they needed help, now they need work, this is the

:36:16.:36:18.

second step, and very naturally we give them work. That is what we do,

:36:19.:36:24.

we do that for the last 25 years and we do that again now. I think we

:36:25.:36:29.

will continue that. Thank you for talking to us. Briefly, it is

:36:30.:36:33.

extraordinary, there are people here working in restaurants and bars, I

:36:34.:36:37.

have spoken to people who want to buy houses here, Syrian families who

:36:38.:36:42.

want to set up a life in Tilos, somebody who wants to set up the

:36:43.:36:45.

first bakery, they want to cool it Mr Falafel.

:36:46.:36:52.

That is quite a nice thought to end on. A positive tale to come out of

:36:53.:36:54.

this. Thank you very much. Victoria Derbyshire is on at 9am

:36:55.:37:01.

this morning on BBC 2. Good morning, on the programme,

:37:02.:37:09.

White are there so few black and minority ethnic teachers, how do you

:37:10.:37:14.

attract new trainees? And as Charlie Gard's parents prepare for another

:37:15.:37:18.

hearing about the care of their son, we will hear from another father of

:37:19.:37:21.

a child with the same rare genetic condition as Charlie.

:37:22.:37:25.

Join us after Breakfast on BBC Two, the BBC News Channel and online.

:37:26.:37:28.

And coming up here on Breakfast this morning...

:37:29.:37:30.

You want to be pointing in a diagonal direction of whichever side

:37:31.:37:33.

you want to play the shot. We'll hear from Britain's Gordon

:37:34.:37:36.

Reid, as he begins his defence of his wheelchair singles

:37:37.:37:38.

title at Wimbledon. Award-winning author David Mitchell

:37:39.:37:40.

will be here to tell us how his latest work with a Japanese

:37:41.:37:42.

author who has autism helped him to understand his

:37:43.:37:45.

own son's condition. # I feel it in my fingers, I feel it

:37:46.:37:51.

in my toes... And we'll talk to Joe McElderry

:37:52.:38:02.

about his new album Saturday Night At The Movies,

:38:03.:38:07.

and his lead role in Joseph And His Before we do those things, let's go

:38:08.:38:16.

to Sally at Wimbledon... Don't you feel like you are on a big

:38:17.:38:20.

ten is good? With the balls bouncing behind us?

:38:21.:38:24.

It has that effect, that is the idea!

:38:25.:38:29.

I really am in a Big ten has got here, the real thing! We are inside

:38:30.:38:36.

centre court, the covers are off, the Royal box is having a lot of

:38:37.:38:40.

fuss at the moment, very much focusing on cleaning it and tidying

:38:41.:38:44.

up, I wonder who they are expecting today? I reckon it might be quite

:38:45.:38:47.

poll today because it is a big day year, the women's semifinals day we

:38:48.:38:52.

have got Jo Konta hoping to become the first British woman to get into

:38:53.:38:56.

the final for 40 years, Virginia Wade was the last one, she won 40

:38:57.:39:03.

years ago. Jo beat Simona Halep on Tuesday, she is now facing five-time

:39:04.:39:06.

champion been as Williams, they are second on centre.

:39:07.:39:09.

The pair are second on Centre Court today and Konta knows the home

:39:10.:39:12.

It makes it more special because it is home, and I do

:39:13.:39:16.

get that home support, which I don't get anywhere else.

:39:17.:39:19.

So, in that sense it makes it, I guess it makes

:39:20.:39:21.

And it won't just be the Wimbledon crowd rooting for Konta -

:39:22.:39:31.

U2 are among those who've tweeted their support,

:39:32.:39:33.

sending congratulations and good luck.

:39:34.:39:37.

And Sir Mick Jagger did the same, saying she's gone further

:39:38.:39:40.

Many of you will have seen Andy Murray limp off centre court

:39:41.:39:56.

yesterday, he was beaten by Sam Querrey, and much you would have

:39:57.:39:59.

expected him to win but he has been struggling with a hip injury that

:40:00.:40:02.

has affected impossible weeks, and Sam Querrey played the match of his

:40:03.:40:06.

life. He came from two sets to one down and his through to his first

:40:07.:40:08.

ever grand slam semifinal. Murray wasn't the only player

:40:09.:40:14.

affected by injury - also hampered was the second seed

:40:15.:40:17.

Novak Djokovic. His Wimbledon ended

:40:18.:40:19.

with after he was forced to retire with an elbow injury against Thomas

:40:20.:40:21.

Berdych. The two-time champion said he'd been

:40:22.:40:23.

struggling with the problem for over a year but yesterday

:40:24.:40:25.

was his worst day. So, Berdych will play

:40:26.:40:29.

the seven-time Wimbledon And with Murray, Djokovic and Nadal

:40:30.:40:31.

all now out of the tournament, He looked impressive,

:40:32.:40:38.

beating last year's finallist And we've got four Britons left

:40:39.:40:47.

in the quarter finals Ken Skupski and Jocelyn Rae

:40:48.:40:51.

are one of the pairs, they earned a thrilling victory

:40:52.:40:54.

against the ninth seeds. It went to three sets, the British

:40:55.:40:57.

duo won the final set 9-7. They'll next face Jamie

:40:58.:40:59.

Murray and his partner Martina Hingis, while Heather Watson

:41:00.:41:01.

and Henri Kontinen There are four players in the

:41:02.:41:12.

wheelchair event as well, Mike has a special piece on that coming up in a

:41:13.:41:14.

few minutes. Elsewhere, England's cricketers have

:41:15.:41:14.

secured their place in the semi They beat New Zealand by 75 runs

:41:15.:41:17.

yesterday in Derby - They've qualified with a game

:41:18.:41:21.

to spare, that's against Germany's Marcel Kittel

:41:22.:41:25.

won his fifth stage on this year's Tour de France with victory

:41:26.:41:28.

in Stage 11. Chris Froome retains the leader's

:41:29.:41:31.

yellow jersey and will be looking to defend his 18 second overall lead

:41:32.:41:34.

as the race heads into In just a few hours,

:41:35.:41:37.

Jo Konta will be the first British woman in years to play

:41:38.:42:01.

a Wimbledon semifinal. She's been a favourite since early

:42:02.:42:03.

on, and no doubt has been training exceptionally hard to get

:42:04.:42:06.

to this point. I caught up with her back in April

:42:07.:42:08.

where she told me she's no stranger I actually, for many, many years,

:42:09.:42:11.

there's dormitories behind there, and I used to sleep there,

:42:12.:42:15.

so I literally used to live here. I actually, physically lived pretty

:42:16.:42:18.

much on the tennis court. When I started actually

:42:19.:42:21.

waking my dad up at the crack Yes, he told me that

:42:22.:42:27.

if I wanted to be the best, I needed to invest time

:42:28.:42:33.

and energy into it. He was like, you know,

:42:34.:42:35.

"We need to get up in the mornings Once my dad realised that

:42:36.:42:38.

I was really going to be waking him up at the crack of dawn every

:42:39.:42:42.

morning, initially he was a bit like, "Oh no, what have

:42:43.:42:46.

I got myself into?! Dedication. Someone who knows about

:42:47.:42:50.

that is two-time grand slam winner and former world number three Mary

:42:51.:42:52.

Pierce. We heard from Jo talking about how she actually lived on the

:42:53.:42:55.

court, she had a little bedroom next to the court where she stayed all of

:42:56.:42:58.

the time. You know what it takes to get to the top in this game, how

:42:59.:43:03.

hard is the road that gets you here? It is extremely hard, I am laughing

:43:04.:43:06.

because it reminds me of where I lived when I was 15 or 16 in France,

:43:07.:43:08.

I lived actually at the club, above

:43:09.:43:36.

the clubhouse was apartment so my bedroom was pretty much looking over

:43:37.:43:39.

the tennis court, I would wake up, there is the tennis court, go to

:43:40.:43:42.

sleep, there is the tennis court, so it is dedication 24/7, everything

:43:43.:43:45.

you do, not just the time you on the practice court but the time you go

:43:46.:43:47.

to sleep, what you eat, your training of the court, it is

:43:48.:43:49.

everything, sacrifices, discipline. It is not easy but the reward is

:43:50.:43:52.

great. What has Joe sacrificed to get this far, what will she have

:43:53.:43:55.

missed out on? Simple things, even as a young girl you cannot go and

:43:56.:43:57.

walk around in the shopping more for hours because it makes your legs

:43:58.:44:00.

tired, there are certain things you cannot eat because it is not good

:44:01.:44:03.

for you, you cannot have too much sugar, lots of things like that, it

:44:04.:44:06.

is just really your whole life and time is given to that, so there is

:44:07.:44:09.

not a lot of free time. She plays Venus Williams today, it is a match

:44:10.:44:12.

she would look at, I watched Venus play a few days ago and she was in

:44:13.:44:16.

fantastic form but we were talking to one of Jo's coaches from when she

:44:17.:44:20.

was a kid earlier today and he said quite simply, she will win this

:44:21.:44:24.

match. He has got the belief in her and so does the whole country,

:44:25.:44:28.

everyone will be behind Jo Konta today in this match against Venus

:44:29.:44:32.

Williams. They have played five times, Jo has won three, so the

:44:33.:44:36.

head-to-head is in her favour. When you play an

:44:37.:44:55.

opponent you have beaten before you think, I have done this before, I

:44:56.:44:59.

can do it again, I know what I need to do, so in her mind Jo knows what

:45:00.:45:02.

she needs to do tactically to beat Venus Williams. She has improved as

:45:03.:45:05.

a tennis player, her game is so much better now, she is mentally so much

:45:06.:45:08.

stronger, she seems to stay in the moment so well and in the zone, so I

:45:09.:45:11.

have a peonage if she continues to play like she has since the

:45:12.:45:13.

beginning of the tournament she has a very good chance to win. You say

:45:14.:45:16.

her game has improved, how? Her serve, she has a bigger serve, a lot

:45:17.:45:19.

closer to the baseline, playing more aggressive and coming to the net,

:45:20.:45:22.

those are the big things I have noticed, and she is moving really

:45:23.:45:24.

well. Is there a chink in the Williams' Aamer? Is there a

:45:25.:45:27.

weakness? There is, she is a human being like all of the girls on the

:45:28.:45:32.

tour out there, and Venus is a fierce competitor, she has the most

:45:33.:45:35.

experience out of all of the players, she has won the tournament

:45:36.:45:39.

before so she will not be fazed by going on centre court for a

:45:40.:45:44.

semifinal against Jo Konta with the crowd behind Jo but it could be one

:45:45.:45:47.

of those days where some time she is a little bit off, she does have a

:45:48.:45:53.

tendency to lose on her forehand side in important moments. San Jose

:45:54.:46:01.

women's tennis is in as good as the men's might want to watch this

:46:02.:46:04.

afternoon. Two of the most competitive women on the tour

:46:05.:46:08.

playing each other right here. I think it could be quite some match.

:46:09.:46:13.

Definitely. Thank you very much indeed, Mary.

:46:14.:46:15.

Live coverage starts at 12:30pm on BBC Two,

:46:16.:46:16.

and at the same time over on BBC Radio 5 Live.

:46:17.:46:19.

Plenty to look forward to. Sadly, I haven't asked your morning,

:46:20.:46:29.

who is going to win? This match, today? Today? Konte. This time

:46:30.:46:36.

yesterday I would have said Venus, but after we came off air with her

:46:37.:46:42.

coach, I said how is she going to do this and he said, Jo's has got it,

:46:43.:46:46.

she's got the legs, Venus has. She's got a job on her side, power on her

:46:47.:46:52.

side. Actually you haven't seen anything yet from Jo and said she

:46:53.:46:58.

has the most phenomenal, mental belief. Her mental strength is so

:46:59.:47:02.

strong. I'm going with that. Looks like both of you agree with that!

:47:03.:47:05.

Sets up nicely for this afternoon. Autism affects one in every 100

:47:06.:47:08.

people, and it is a condition Author David Mitchell's son

:47:09.:47:10.

was diagnosed when he was four. While trying to learn more

:47:11.:47:19.

about the condition, David discovered that teenage

:47:20.:47:23.

Japanese author Naoki Higashida was writing about how autism

:47:24.:47:25.

affected his schooling, friendships David found Naoki's books

:47:26.:47:28.

so helpful, he translated two Good morning. Good morning. It must

:47:29.:47:42.

have really moved EU, for you to translate into English. Did it offer

:47:43.:47:47.

you something? I imagine you looked into many books about autism, how to

:47:48.:47:52.

deal with children and help children with autism and you weren't finding

:47:53.:47:56.

anything, is that a correct assumption to make? That is pretty

:47:57.:48:01.

much it in a nutshell. Books by specialists and parents of kids with

:48:02.:48:05.

autism have a role, but there was nothing else that was from kids who

:48:06.:48:17.

have nonverbal autism by someone that young, were so close in age to

:48:18.:48:23.

my son. He was just teenager, 13, when the book was published, when he

:48:24.:48:29.

wrote it in Japan. So for these reasons, it was a lot closer to

:48:30.:48:34.

where my son was. The advice in it was often a lot more applicable. It

:48:35.:48:39.

is worth pointing out that what Naoki is doing is what a lot of

:48:40.:48:44.

people thought people with autism cannot do, that notion of reflecting

:48:45.:48:48.

on your own self and talking about it. Just writing the book in itself

:48:49.:48:54.

is an incredible achievement. Yes, he can't speak, he's never had a

:48:55.:48:57.

conversation like this in his life. What you can do, however, is right

:48:58.:49:01.

via what he calls an hour for that great. It's kind of eight cardboard

:49:02.:49:08.

qwerty keyboard. He points to individual letters, vocalises them

:49:09.:49:12.

and that is how he communicate. Is this you meeting him? That's right,

:49:13.:49:18.

we met at my home in Ireland. How did this process work? You've found

:49:19.:49:21.

the book and translated it? My wife, I better not leave her out of the

:49:22.:49:26.

equation or I will be in trouble when I get home expert she found the

:49:27.:49:31.

book in Japan. It looks promising and when it arrived she began

:49:32.:49:35.

reading it at the kitchen table and began verbally translating large

:49:36.:49:40.

sections and saying, hey, this is just like our Sun, this could be

:49:41.:49:45.

what's going on with our Sun hitting his head against the floor or why he

:49:46.:49:49.

has inexplicable mood shifts so quickly. -- our son. This is one

:49:50.:49:58.

person with autism, that's true, but often there is an overlap, perhaps

:49:59.:50:04.

with nonverbal autism, where people cannot speak for themselves. You are

:50:05.:50:08.

holding the book. You are going to read a passage, which may be touched

:50:09.:50:13.

you in particular but might affect other people. What is it being

:50:14.:50:18.

described? It is called Mother's Day 2013. At the beginning of the book

:50:19.:50:24.

there is Mother's Day 2011, when he expresses... He just wishes his

:50:25.:50:28.

autism would let him buy a flower at the supermarket, to thank his mum

:50:29.:50:33.

for everything she does for him. Two years later, this happens.

:50:34.:50:39.

"Sometimes I go out with my special needs help to a local supermarket.

:50:40.:50:44.

Today in the food section I saw they were selling bunches of red

:50:45.:50:46.

carnations the Mother's Day. I thought, I'll would like to buy some

:50:47.:50:52.

for but I wasn't simple simply able to vocalise this thought because it

:50:53.:50:55.

is so hard for me to tell others what I want by speech or gestures.

:50:56.:50:59.

On this occasion, however, I managed to produce this two word line,

:51:00.:51:09.

Carnation, buy. First I played a memory clip of carnations in my

:51:10.:51:12.

head, by playing this clip I was able to say the word Carnation.

:51:13.:51:18.

Next, I access the verb I needed to go with the flour with my thoughts

:51:19.:51:23.

at the time, words like walk, see and think went through my mind, but

:51:24.:51:27.

the fact we were in a supermarket unveiled the word buy. Then I was

:51:28.:51:31.

free to think, that's what I need to say it, and finally I said it.

:51:32.:51:35.

Giving flowers to my mum Mother's Day was a dream I had been

:51:36.:51:41.

harbouring for years and today, one red carnations in a room at home did

:51:42.:51:46.

all my talking for me." . This is what is so interesting about that

:51:47.:51:51.

book, in a sense. It breaks down how people are thinking. It is very easy

:51:52.:51:54.

to meet someone with autism and think they are shut off and not

:51:55.:51:58.

aware of what's going on, or completely blocked from that. This

:51:59.:52:05.

breaks down various ways, what they see, a nonverbal person with autism

:52:06.:52:10.

seas, and finding possible to communicate. We constantly, and

:52:11.:52:16.

perhaps naturally, a communicative disability with a cognitive

:52:17.:52:20.

disability. We judge the value, the intelligence of someone on how they

:52:21.:52:24.

can or cannot articulate themselves. If someone can't speak, then we tend

:52:25.:52:30.

to assume there's not much going on there. But you can see from this

:52:31.:52:33.

book, he has the same emotional range as we do, something which the

:52:34.:52:39.

stereotypical idea of people with autism says they don't, they are

:52:40.:52:43.

unfeeling robots. At the same time, they know what's going on, they have

:52:44.:52:49.

a theory of mind. They get the idea other people minds, looking at and

:52:50.:52:53.

thinking about them. Behind the eat ology of the word autism is the idea

:52:54.:52:57.

there is just one person in the universe and that's you never

:52:58.:53:00.

announces a hatstand. This book tells that on its head. Your son's

:53:01.:53:07.

name? OK, I know you want to keep something that the public domain.

:53:08.:53:13.

How is he, how is he now? He is 11, is doing well. He's not totally

:53:14.:53:18.

nonverbal. It's always hard to say if he is nonverbal or not. He has a

:53:19.:53:22.

vocabulary in English and Japanese are probably a few thousand, but

:53:23.:53:27.

like Naoki, he's never spoken, he's never had a conversation like this.

:53:28.:53:31.

Did this change your relationship with your son? It did them a lot.

:53:32.:53:37.

Specific in some pieces of advice Naoki gives that I do have time to

:53:38.:53:40.

go through now but generally it gives you hope. It was way too there

:53:41.:53:51.

is a lot more behind the speechlessness of autism.

:53:52.:53:53.

Really good to talk to you, David. Thank you very much and good luck.

:53:54.:53:55.

Very nicely read, by the way. There was a bit of pressure put on

:53:56.:53:58.

you before you did that by Charlie, so well done!

:53:59.:53:59.

David's latest translation of Naoki Higashida's book is called

:54:00.:54:01.

Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight.

:54:02.:54:04.

Carol's at Wimbledon with a look at this morning's weather.

:54:05.:54:08.

Good morning. This morning at Wimbledon it is gorgeous, 16 Celsius

:54:09.:54:17.

at the moment. If you take a look through the roof you can see lovely

:54:18.:54:22.

blue skies. Some cloud will develop in the day but it should stay dry.

:54:23.:54:27.

The roof is half closed and we think that is to protect the grass from

:54:28.:54:31.

the direct sunlight but we haven't got a definitive answer on that one.

:54:32.:54:36.

The forecast the Wimbledon today, it should stay dry. Looking at sunshine

:54:37.:54:39.

this morning, a little more cloud building as we go through the course

:54:40.:54:43.

of the day but still sunny spells. Just the outside chance of a shower,

:54:44.:54:52.

so that basically means you will be very unlucky. More than likely going

:54:53.:54:55.

to stay dry with highs into the low 20s. For many parts of the UK today,

:54:56.:54:58.

staying dry. Some showers in the forecast, a few this morning. This

:54:59.:55:02.

morning across the south-east, we have the sunshine. A bit of fair

:55:03.:55:06.

weather cloud. Cloud across the Midlands starting to break up, we

:55:07.:55:09.

have had some showers here this morning. In northern England and

:55:10.:55:13.

Scotland and Northern Ireland, under the clear skies it has been a chilly

:55:14.:55:18.

start. In some parts temperatures overnight fell to three or four. Is

:55:19.:55:24.

now picking up. Moving across the Irish Sea into a fair bit of

:55:25.:55:30.

sunshine around. Here and there pockets of cloud, which could

:55:31.:55:32.

produce just the odd shower. South-west England, a similar story,

:55:33.:55:36.

variable amounts of cloud, some sunny skies, outside chance of a

:55:37.:55:39.

shower. We have had some showers this morning across Gloucestershire

:55:40.:55:43.

and Wiltshire. They will tend to fade and as we drift further east in

:55:44.:55:47.

the home Counties and southern counties, some sunshine and that

:55:48.:55:51.

cloud, which will break up. Through this morning, a lot of sunshine

:55:52.:55:55.

around. As we head into the afternoon, seeing more cloud

:55:56.:55:59.

building, more showers in Wales, England, eastern Scotland and

:56:00.:56:03.

Northern Ireland. Not all of us will be seeing these showers by any

:56:04.:56:06.

stretch. Most of us will stay dry. By the end of the afternoon we will

:56:07.:56:11.

be looking at another weather front coming in in Northern Ireland and

:56:12.:56:14.

western Scotland introducing some rain. That rain will continue to

:56:15.:56:19.

drift south-eastwards overnight, weakening as it does so,

:56:20.:56:22.

particularly as it gets to the south of England. Temperatures around

:56:23.:56:25.

10-15. Not such a sticky night as we have had in the

:56:26.:56:43.

south-east. Tomorrow, very similar weather to today. Starting with some

:56:44.:56:45.

sunshine, some cloud building through the day. Some of us seeing

:56:46.:56:48.

some showers and by the end of the day a new weather front coming into

:56:49.:56:50.

Scotland and Northern Ireland, introducing some rain. Temperatures

:56:51.:56:52.

if anything tomorrow, up a little on what we're seeing today. The rain in

:56:53.:56:55.

the north-west of the UK Friday and Saturday will move quite swiftly

:56:56.:56:57.

southward, weakening as it does. Not much rain in the South at all.

:56:58.:57:01.

Saturday, looking like a cloudy day then we have been used to. Still

:57:02.:57:05.

some sunny spells around. 12-macro showers, but some rain in the north

:57:06.:57:10.

and west. One thing you will notice, decree of your coming to Wimbledon

:57:11.:57:14.

on Saturday and Sunday, in the south of the country it will turn a bit

:57:15.:57:18.

hotter and more humid. Temperatures back in the range of 25-28. I think

:57:19.:57:24.

that kind of level is where Sally likes it. You don't like it chilly

:57:25.:57:30.

at 23. I still have my coat on! It is getting warmer. We've been

:57:31.:57:34.

talking a lot this money about Jo Konte and not the only British

:57:35.:57:39.

player in action today, in the doubles and the wheelchair

:57:40.:57:42.

tournament starts today. Gordon Reid, the defending champion, starts

:57:43.:57:47.

the defence of his title today and we sent Mike to have a go and see if

:57:48.:57:50.

he could beat the raining champion. What chance do think he's got?

:57:51.:57:56.

Gliding on grass, one of the quickest men on wheels,

:57:57.:57:59.

His name is the only one, so far, on the men's Wimbledon singles

:58:00.:58:05.

trophy in wheelchair tennis, after the singles event

:58:06.:58:10.

To be the first-ever winner, and be the first name on the trophy

:58:11.:58:16.

So you've got to make sure it's on there again, then, this year?

:58:17.:58:20.

Yeah, I was saying to my dad the other day and he was like,

:58:21.:58:24.

no one else's name will be on there if you go and win

:58:25.:58:27.

I think if you ask any British player, playing at Wimbledon,

:58:28.:58:32.

For me, last year, we had the outside courts we played on,

:58:33.:58:38.

They make it look so effortless, which is why Gordon has

:58:39.:58:44.

challenged me to sit in a tennis chair, just to see how difficult

:58:45.:58:47.

And, of course, you have your tennis racket in hand as well.

:58:48.:58:52.

When you're on the grass court, it's much thicker and your tyres,

:58:53.:59:05.

so you lose all momentum, a metre in front of you,

:59:06.:59:07.

so you're always having to generate the power and always

:59:08.:59:10.

push your own body weight around, which just makes it a lot more

:59:11.:59:13.

demanding on your arms and your shoulders.

:59:14.:59:15.

They say the first pushes the hardest push, because just

:59:16.:59:17.

a small area of grass, it seems to take the most monumental

:59:18.:59:20.

First tip, yeah, you want to be pointing in the sort of diagonal

:59:21.:59:27.

direction of which ever side you want to play the shot.

:59:28.:59:34.

You are allowed two bounces, though, in wheelchair tennis.

:59:35.:59:37.

That's straight down his throat, it's coming back at me.

:59:38.:59:39.

Positioning, how you carry your racket when you're

:59:40.:59:46.

moving your wheels, the immense strength it takes.

:59:47.:59:49.

Crikey, no wonder this is seen as one of the greatest

:59:50.:59:52.

And this is why Britain's other Wimbledon wheelchair champion,

:59:53.:59:58.

Jordanne Whiley, faces a challenge to be at the peak of her fitness

:59:59.:00:01.

after eight months out with illness and injury.

:00:02.:00:04.

Normally I would train Monday to Friday, around three

:00:05.:00:07.

or four hours a day, including gym as well.

:00:08.:00:09.

And I haven't really been doing that.

:00:10.:00:13.

I've been trying to do as much as I can, without injuring myself

:00:14.:00:16.

before the grass season, because the grass

:00:17.:00:18.

I haven't been doing the hours on court that I would have liked,

:00:19.:00:23.

Jordanne feels her dream of being singles champion

:00:24.:00:29.

at Wimbledon this year may be just out of reach.

:00:30.:00:32.

As were most shots for me, as I got stuck on the grass,

:00:33.:00:35.

Well done for having a go and good luck to everybody, all the British

:00:36.:00:52.

players and everybody else on this big day today. I should point out,

:00:53.:00:58.

Carol, one thing I have noticed, the grass on centre court is looking a

:00:59.:01:02.

little bit tired in places already. It has taken a pasting with the

:01:03.:01:05.

weather as well. A technical term, it has taken a

:01:06.:01:08.

pasting! And the other place it has is Henman

:01:09.:01:13.

Hill, all Murray Mount, depending which you want to call it, and with

:01:14.:01:27.

all the British player today it will be heaving but yesterday the

:01:28.:01:29.

tendency at Wimbledon was 38,348 people, roughly 2000 more than this

:01:30.:01:32.

time on the same day last year. It was definitely very busy on Bay

:01:33.:01:34.

Hill, you could not move. Once you had your spot, you literally could

:01:35.:01:40.

not leave it. Somebody told me they had been asked

:01:41.:01:43.

to move their shoes, which they had taken off, and once they had lifted

:01:44.:01:47.

their shoes the person sat down in the same spot.

:01:48.:01:50.

You would need big shoes to sit down in the same spot!

:01:51.:02:02.

I would need big shoes, not you, Sally!

:02:03.:02:07.

You are digging a big hole! I was going to give you a compliment

:02:08.:02:11.

and say Sally is the most appropriately dressed because I do

:02:12.:02:13.

believe it is chilly in the morning so well done for having the jacket.

:02:14.:02:18.

Carol is the best dressed in terms of matching her surroundings,

:02:19.:02:20.

because you are pure Wimbledon today, Carol.

:02:21.:02:25.

Wimbledon colours! But I've been a little bit hurt by

:02:26.:02:30.

not getting anything right so I'm throwing a fact back at you today,

:02:31.:02:38.

38,348 people attended yesterday, up 2000, I was listening to you. How

:02:39.:02:45.

many strawberries did they eat? I think it was probably...

:02:46.:02:54.

100,000. 105,037.5.

:02:55.:02:59.

I believe you, I don't know the answer either!

:03:00.:03:04.

Oh, we don't have the answer? No, I just wanted to see if they

:03:05.:03:07.

would answer! That was a terrible question, Naga!

:03:08.:03:13.

It's all change at London's Natural History Museum.

:03:14.:03:15.

Its world-famous central display, Dippy the dinosaur, has gone,

:03:16.:03:20.

That there is a replacement and it is also very big.

:03:21.:03:23.

Breakfast's Tim Muffett is there, with something equally spectacular?

:03:24.:03:28.

Yes, look at this, the staff of the Natural History Museum, many getting

:03:29.:03:39.

their first glimpse of Drippy, the 23 metre blue whale skeleton which

:03:40.:03:45.

replaces Dippy the dinosaur which has been here since 1979. A

:03:46.:03:51.

magnificent sight. Let's chat to the director of science and head of

:03:52.:03:55.

conservation. Why did you move dippy and bring in Hope? DP was wonderful

:03:56.:04:05.

but a plaster cast, where as Hope is a real skeleton so we can really

:04:06.:04:14.

educate people. Hope is our largest and most wonderful specimen. The

:04:15.:04:19.

logistics of moving her must have been fantastic, she was beached in

:04:20.:04:24.

Wexford in Ireland in 1981, how did you move her? In many cranes, she

:04:25.:04:28.

came to the museum, she was too big to go in any galleries, we built the

:04:29.:04:35.

mammal Hall in 1934, we put her in with a model underneath, visitors

:04:36.:04:38.

come and see the model but don't really see her so we wanted to bring

:04:39.:04:44.

her down and put her in a new space, a new pose, diving, lunge feeding,

:04:45.:04:49.

dynamic, she is our largest specimen and our most magnificent specimen in

:04:50.:04:53.

here today and she tells the story of hope for us, which is the message

:04:54.:04:58.

we want to bring. Ian, you are the director of science, why is the blue

:04:59.:05:01.

whale such an important species to focus on and showcase? We think it

:05:02.:05:06.

sends a hopeful message about the future, we wanted a specimen that

:05:07.:05:10.

talks about the past, the present and the future, and the blue whale

:05:11.:05:15.

of course, when this creature was alive there were perhaps 250,000 in

:05:16.:05:19.

the world's oceans, hunted down to perhaps a few hundred, and now,

:05:20.:05:24.

through humans saving them, up to around 25,000, so we hope that the

:05:25.:05:28.

message is that if you make the right decisions and act on them you

:05:29.:05:32.

can make a difference to the world. They are such magnificent creatures,

:05:33.:05:36.

the largest animals on earth, and even bigger in scale than the

:05:37.:05:40.

dinosaurs, I was surprised to know? That is right, the blue whale is the

:05:41.:05:45.

largest animal ever to have lived by mass, and amazing animal, and that

:05:46.:05:49.

is part of having the wow factor, we don't want people to feel they come

:05:50.:05:52.

here and are being lectured, we want them to come here, be excited, just

:05:53.:05:57.

like they were by Dippy, but then ask a series of questions about the

:05:58.:06:01.

natural world, their role in the natural world, and so on. Lorraine,

:06:02.:06:09.

do you think when people come in here, Dippy was so synonymous with

:06:10.:06:12.

the Natural History Museum, wasn't she, do you think Hope will have the

:06:13.:06:18.

same impact? I think Hope will have a greater impact, we still have

:06:19.:06:21.

dinosaurs on display, original dinosaurs, one on display in this

:06:22.:06:26.

gallery, but I think Hope will have a great impact because she has this

:06:27.:06:30.

amazing message as well about us as a species saving other species. We

:06:31.:06:33.

have caused a lot of harm in the world and she is a great message for

:06:34.:06:35.

us to say it within our power to do great

:06:36.:07:04.

things. Lorraine, Ian, thank you both very much. Lovely to see the

:07:05.:07:06.

star Pierre, some of them have not been able to see the skeleton in

:07:07.:07:09.

situ until now. If you want to know more about the story of the skeleton

:07:10.:07:12.

and Dippy has, there is a special Horizon

:07:13.:08:54.

Joe McElderry has been performing to sell-out audiences

:08:55.:09:01.

in the lead role in Joseph And His Amazing

:09:02.:09:03.

Technicolour Dreamcoat, while at the same time putting

:09:04.:09:05.

The former X Factor winner has compiled songs from the movies,

:09:06.:09:09.

# I feel it in my fingers, I feel it in my toes

:09:10.:09:17.

# And love is all around me, and so the feeling grows

:09:18.:09:30.

# It's written in the wind, it's everywhere I go

:09:31.:09:38.

# So if you really love me, come on and let it show...

:09:39.:09:50.

Welcome, Joe, how are you? Very well. Why this album now, because

:09:51.:10:01.

you are very busy in Joseph, how have you find the time to do this? I

:10:02.:10:04.

was working with the wonderful Bill Kenwright giving Joseph and we

:10:05.:10:07.

wanted to go to the studio and acknowledge what a wonderful time we

:10:08.:10:11.

have had working together so we all compiled our favourite movie songs

:10:12.:10:14.

and show tunes and went into the studio on a Sunday and Monday in a

:10:15.:10:20.

break between shows of Joseph, we do ten shows a week without, and

:10:21.:10:24.

recorded the album, January, February and March I did it. And

:10:25.:10:28.

they are all linked to films, that is the thread running through. That

:10:29.:10:34.

is a big plating, you look at the great movie soundtracks, songs in

:10:35.:10:38.

the movies, how on earth do you combine the ones that you want to

:10:39.:10:44.

do? We all sat down with huge lists, I Don't Want To Miss A Thing is one

:10:45.:10:50.

of my favourite songs, and Love Is All Around is one of the first songs

:10:51.:10:55.

are used to think when I started performing, I think the only karaoke

:10:56.:10:58.

backing track I could get off the Internet! So I learned it had a very

:10:59.:11:03.

young age, about 14, and we whittled down the list, went into the studio

:11:04.:11:07.

and tried to do the songs. It is interesting that you used to sing at

:11:08.:11:12.

karaoke because the danger of putting out albums like this with

:11:13.:11:15.

such popular songs that people know the boys is already is that it

:11:16.:11:20.

sounds like an imitation and not quite the real thing, so how much do

:11:21.:11:25.

you make it your own and how much are you very true to the original

:11:26.:11:30.

Soundtrack? Well, a few years ago I did a classical crossover with the

:11:31.:11:37.

same vibe, which took on huge famous arias and very well-known songs, and

:11:38.:11:42.

I think the key to making it sound you own is also not taking it too

:11:43.:11:48.

far away from the original, and obviously I came off a TV show on X

:11:49.:11:51.

Factor, we sang huge covers every week so people know me for that as

:11:52.:11:55.

well, I have done my own material as well but it is about finding a

:11:56.:11:58.

balance between modernising it but keeping in touch with the original.

:11:59.:12:03.

It is a while ago now, 2009? Eight years ago! Does it feel like a long

:12:04.:12:09.

time ago, like another life? It does, in some ways it feels like

:12:10.:12:13.

yesterday but I feel like such a lot has happened in a short space of

:12:14.:12:17.

time and I also feel so much older! I feel like I have been around ages

:12:18.:12:22.

but it is not that long ago! Are you sensitive about your age? No, I'm

:12:23.:12:28.

26. Only 26?! You don't need to be sensitive about

:12:29.:12:34.

your age at 26! That question was more for us, really! What next,

:12:35.:12:39.

then? Is this just a little tangent...

:12:40.:12:45.

? The album comes out soon and then we are going across the country

:12:46.:12:48.

throughout the summer, pretty much everywhere, Manchester, Edinburgh,

:12:49.:12:54.

Southampton, Brighton, everywhere, so you can find out...

:12:55.:12:59.

Do you know what song I would sing in the unlikely event of me bringing

:13:00.:13:02.

out songs of the movies with me thinking...

:13:03.:13:04.

We have been trying to guess this all morning will stop have a guest?

:13:05.:13:12.

All we got was that the first word begins with B.

:13:13.:13:16.

I will tell you because we don't have much time, Born Free. Do you

:13:17.:13:24.

know that song? I think I do... Job doesn't even know it! That would be

:13:25.:13:26.

my song, anyway! we could all do with knowing

:13:27.:13:31.

how to make the most of our cash. So we've found simple advice for you

:13:32.:13:42.

to do just that and taken it to

:13:43.:13:48.