14/07/2017 Breakfast


14/07/2017

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with Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty.

:00:00.:00:10.

New measures to tackle a rise in drug-related deaths.

:00:11.:00:13.

The government says it will target so-called legal highs and provide

:00:14.:00:16.

more help for addicts in its first strategy re-think for seven years.

:00:17.:00:31.

Good morning, it's Friday the 14th of July.

:00:32.:00:36.

Five people are attacked with corrosive

:00:37.:00:38.

substances in London in the space of 90 minutes,

:00:39.:00:41.

police say one person has received life-changing injuries.

:00:42.:00:45.

Actor Mark Rylance tells us how he thinks the spirit of Dunkirk

:00:46.:00:49.

depicted in his latest film has been reflected in recent events.

:00:50.:00:57.

These recent disasters in Manchester and London, the two disasters in

:00:58.:01:03.

London, have made us all so much more aware of civilian involvement

:01:04.:01:10.

and the selflessness and bravery of the civilian rescue services.

:01:11.:01:12.

Those controversial ticket re-selling websites.

:01:13.:01:17.

whether gig-goers are getting a raw deal.

:01:18.:01:25.

At Wimbledon the dream is over for Johanna Konta but she remains

:01:26.:01:31.

defiant. The British number one remains confident she can win the

:01:32.:01:34.

women's singles one-day in years to come after she lost her semi-final

:01:35.:01:39.

yesterday to the five-time champion Venus Williams. Venus is rising

:01:40.:01:44.

again and given I'm squinting, so is the son? Today for many after a

:01:45.:01:49.

cloudy start we're looking at a sunny day, sunny intervals, a few

:01:50.:01:53.

showers but later we will see rain coming into the north-west and later

:01:54.:01:57.

Mike and I will be back with more later in the programme.

:01:58.:01:58.

The Home Secretary Amber Rudd has launched a new strategy to tackle

:01:59.:02:03.

illegal drug use after what the Home Office calls

:02:04.:02:05.

a dramatic increase in the number of deaths from drugs in England

:02:06.:02:08.

The strategy focuses on helping addicts to recover

:02:09.:02:12.

and makes clear there'll be no legal changes to decriminalise

:02:13.:02:14.

The entire strategy applies to England,

:02:15.:02:17.

some parts of it also affect the rest of the UK.

:02:18.:02:20.

Our home affairs correspondent, Danny Shaw, reports.

:02:21.:02:28.

Enforcing the law on drugs. Police raids against dealers have been the

:02:29.:02:34.

traditional way of clamping down on the drugs trade. It's estimated to

:02:35.:02:41.

cost the UK ?10.7 billion a year. And the new government drugs

:02:42.:02:44.

strategy says that approach will continue along with renewed efforts

:02:45.:02:49.

to get people off drugs. That's what they do at the Harbour Centre in

:02:50.:02:54.

London. Support people affected by drugs and help them rebuild their

:02:55.:02:58.

lives. The Home Secretary Amber Rudd visited the centre this week. She

:02:59.:03:02.

said her drugs strategy will focus on recovery.

:03:03.:03:06.

People who are recovering from drugs often need help with housing, they

:03:07.:03:10.

need help with employment, they might have mental health

:03:11.:03:13.

difficulties and with this strategy we've acknowledged that, we've

:03:14.:03:17.

embraced that, I set out clear expectations for local authorities

:03:18.:03:20.

about working with recovery to make sure that these additional elements

:03:21.:03:26.

are supplied. The 2017 drug strategy is the first for seven years. It

:03:27.:03:29.

says there should be treatment tailored to the needs of drug users.

:03:30.:03:34.

A new national recovery champion will help to automate services. And

:03:35.:03:39.

there will be measures to deal with new drug threats, including services

:03:40.:03:45.

intended to enhance the experience of having sex. Amber Rudd's

:03:46.:03:50.

involvement in a new cross government drugs strategy board will

:03:51.:03:52.

give the plans political impetus, but she is said to disappoint people

:03:53.:03:56.

who say drug possession should no longer be a crime. Danny Shaw, BBC

:03:57.:03:59.

News. We'll be speaking to the Home Office

:04:00.:03:59.

minister Sarah Newton about this Police in east London

:04:00.:04:04.

are investigating five attacks which involved corrosive substances

:04:05.:04:10.

being thrown in people's faces. One of the victims has what's been

:04:11.:04:15.

described as life changing They all happened within

:04:16.:04:18.

90 minutes in Hackney This was the scene of the most

:04:19.:04:32.

serious attack last night, the victim was delivering takeaway food

:04:33.:04:36.

when a pair of men try to steal his mopeds. Police say a corrosive

:04:37.:04:39.

substance was growing in his face. Lee was taken to hospital with what

:04:40.:04:44.

they described as life changing injuries. In the space of just over

:04:45.:04:50.

an hour police were alerted to five similar attacks, the motive on each

:04:51.:04:53.

occasion seems to be robbery. Police believe they are linked. Acid

:04:54.:04:57.

attacks in England have doubled since 2012. 21-year-old Resham Khan

:04:58.:05:06.

and her cousin Jameel Muhktar were attacked shortly after they had been

:05:07.:05:09.

celebrating her 21st birthday in East Londonderry. Acid was burning

:05:10.:05:13.

through the window of her car -- is London. My face started melting, my

:05:14.:05:17.

clothes started to burn, my clothes started sticking to me and there was

:05:18.:05:21.

smoke coming out of the seats. Mopeds crime is also on the

:05:22.:05:26.

increase, especially in London. Delivery drivers in east London say

:05:27.:05:30.

they've been faced by an escalating crime wave from knife wielding

:05:31.:05:31.

gangs. Andy Moore, BBC News. The Scottish and Welsh governments

:05:32.:05:35.

have threatened to block the key Brexit bill which will convert

:05:36.:05:39.

all existing EU laws into UK law over what they say is a power

:05:40.:05:42.

grab by Westminster. The Repeal Bill is also facing

:05:43.:05:45.

opposition from Labour and other Our political correspondent

:05:46.:05:48.

Chris Mason joins us now Good morning, Chris. This is seeming

:05:49.:06:00.

to be a thing attack from all sides here? 360 degrees of scrutiny for

:06:01.:06:05.

the government on its blueprint for Brexit, outlined yesterday in the

:06:06.:06:09.

European Union withdrawal bill, the repeal bill, the big cut and paste

:06:10.:06:13.

exercise where all of those laws the UK signed up to as part of being a

:06:14.:06:18.

member of the European Union get cut and pasted, so on our first day

:06:19.:06:22.

outside the EU there are still laws covering all the areas the EU up to

:06:23.:06:28.

now has been power to set laws on. But also some controversy about that

:06:29.:06:32.

process. As you were saying, concern from the Scottish and Welsh

:06:33.:06:37.

governments, concern from Labour and some conservatives about exactly how

:06:38.:06:41.

it might work. Concern from others about the lack of opportunity to

:06:42.:06:45.

scrutinise some of the changes because of how much has to happen so

:06:46.:06:50.

quickly. One remark I will bring you from a Labour peer, Lord Adonis,

:06:51.:06:54.

gives you a sense of the heightened language about this. He compares

:06:55.:06:58.

leaving the economic institutions of the EU, the single market and

:06:59.:07:03.

customs union, as being as big a mistake as appeasement in the 1930s.

:07:04.:07:08.

Chris, thanks very much. Chris Mayne send there.

:07:09.:07:10.

Crowds are expected to line the streets for the funeral

:07:11.:07:13.

The six-year-old Sunderland fan won a legion of supporters

:07:14.:07:16.

across the country, including footballer Jermain Defoe who has

:07:17.:07:19.

left training in Spain to be at the funeral.

:07:20.:07:21.

Bradley died last Friday after suffering from a rare cancer.

:07:22.:07:31.

President Trump will be the guest of honour at the Bastille Day

:07:32.:07:34.

He's marking France's National Day at the invitation of the country's

:07:35.:07:38.

The two leaders will watch the traditional military parade

:07:39.:07:41.

which, this year, has French soldiers marching

:07:42.:07:43.

There will be some extraordinary scenes today, we can see some of the

:07:44.:07:57.

buildup behind you? Indeed. I'm on the Champs-Elysee and you can see

:07:58.:08:00.

preparations were under way, they've been under way all-night. As I

:08:01.:08:04.

cycled in half an hour ago there were military police has issued over

:08:05.:08:09.

the city marshalling the tanks, troops, the rest of the kit into

:08:10.:08:15.

bits around the Champs-Elysee and in a couple of hours from now they will

:08:16.:08:20.

stop processing down and you can see a line of APCs and other vehicles,

:08:21.:08:26.

in that direction I can see men in uniform, they look like firefighters

:08:27.:08:30.

and sailors gathering. The big event in the national year will take

:08:31.:08:35.

place, a couple of hours from now, with Donald Trump at the far end at

:08:36.:08:40.

the Place de la Concorde sitting in the place of honour next to Emmanuel

:08:41.:08:45.

Macron. 200 American soldiers leading off the parade, which of

:08:46.:08:48.

course marks 100 years since the entry of America in World War I. For

:08:49.:08:51.

the moment, thank you. Police in the south-west of England

:08:52.:08:57.

have launched the UK's first dedicated drone-unit to help them

:08:58.:09:00.

find missing people, deal with road accidents

:09:01.:09:02.

and tackle major incidents. A helicopter can cost

:09:03.:09:04.

hundreds of pounds per hour but the remote-controlled,

:09:05.:09:07.

miniature alternative, provides an eye-in-the-sky

:09:08.:09:08.

for a fraction of the price. Our home affairs correspondent

:09:09.:09:11.

Daniel Sandford has more. Police drones seemed like a novelty

:09:12.:09:14.

only a few years ago, but Devon and Cornwall

:09:15.:09:17.

Police and Dorset Police have now jointly launched Britain's

:09:18.:09:19.

first dedicated drone unit. Soon they'll have five aerial

:09:20.:09:21.

cameras available 24 hours a day. It can do exactly the

:09:22.:09:28.

same as a helicopter quicker if we are dealing

:09:29.:09:34.

with an incident in Penzance we have one

:09:35.:09:47.

in the back of a car. We can put the drone out as quick

:09:48.:09:49.

as we can and request a helicopter. The unit recorded these incredible

:09:50.:09:53.

pictures of a fire in Exeter last October and are doing more

:09:54.:09:56.

and more jobs which previously could only be done with a police

:09:57.:09:59.

helicopter, which costs Put Simply, a drone

:10:00.:10:02.

is a cost-effective way for police different perspective on an area

:10:03.:10:07.

that's searching for a missing person or in crime scenes

:10:08.:10:10.

or the scene of a disaster And officers are hoping that soon

:10:11.:10:13.

they will be able to download live pictures from drones direct

:10:14.:10:18.

to the force's main control rooms. There's a patent for a mini drone,

:10:19.:10:21.

perched on a police officer's shoulder, which can be voice

:10:22.:10:24.

activated to help gather evidence. In whatever form, these

:10:25.:10:27.

drones with flying cameras are about to become an everyday

:10:28.:10:29.

sight in British policing. A heatwave across southern Europe

:10:30.:10:46.

has forced some of the region's most famous tourist sites to close

:10:47.:10:54.

during peak holiday season. More than twenty fires have started

:10:55.:10:57.

near Naples and Sicily where the temperatures have climbed

:10:58.:11:00.

above 40 degrees celsius this week. The Greek government has ordered

:11:01.:11:03.

that popular archaeological sites close during the hot weather,

:11:04.:11:05.

and in southern Spain, the drought has devastated

:11:06.:11:07.

crops and seven provinces Temperatures will reach 46

:11:08.:11:10.

degrees in Cordoba today. An engaged couple from Bristol

:11:11.:11:14.

landed themselves in hospital after practicing the famous

:11:15.:11:16.

lift from Dirty Dancing Both Andy and Sharon were released

:11:17.:11:18.

a few hours later unharmed. a little less strenuous for the big

:11:19.:11:22.

day. I think they said he was knocked

:11:23.:11:40.

out. It's one of those things you sort of

:11:41.:11:51.

look back on and have a laugh but you don't expect it to happen.

:11:52.:11:55.

Perhaps we're getting a bit too old for it!

:11:56.:11:58.

Sometimes it's almost better when they go wrong than when they go

:11:59.:12:01.

right! Let's go over to Wimbledon, we are

:12:02.:12:10.

in that kind of mood. Who are you playing with? I've made friends with

:12:11.:12:19.

a carp, a fish, it has disappeared, oh, no, there he is. He keeps

:12:20.:12:24.

talking, opening his mouth, do it again, there we are, can you see

:12:25.:12:29.

him? Beautiful. On the top of Henman Hill, Murray Mouth, the water

:12:30.:12:34.

features there, a friendly carp, very calming by the water feature

:12:35.:12:38.

because after the tension of yesterday, Johanna Konta's

:12:39.:12:42.

semi-final, so tense but in the end the dream is over. Disappointment

:12:43.:12:46.

but there's beaming chic and one day go on and win the title -- there's a

:12:47.:12:58.

feeling here one-day. Venus Williams is the oldest finalist since

:12:59.:13:03.

Navratilova in 1994. She was beaten by one of those people that has

:13:04.:13:07.

ruled the courts over these years so no shame. Johanna Konta was roared

:13:08.:13:12.

on by thousands are peer on Henman Hill, Murray Mount, and also those

:13:13.:13:15.

on centre court and we caught up with some of those fans after the

:13:16.:13:17.

match. She played well but obviously not

:13:18.:13:24.

well enough. Disappointing. Gutted. Gutted, but she'll be back.

:13:25.:13:31.

I was a bit sceptical when the draw came out that she would manage to

:13:32.:13:35.

win at all, but she put up a good fight.

:13:36.:13:39.

She was slightly overawed by the occasion. Venus Williams is no

:13:40.:13:45.

slouch. Bit devastating to Seaport Konta lose but Venus is on top form

:13:46.:13:50.

as ever so fair enough for her to be back in the final I guess -- see

:13:51.:13:54.

poor. Venus read the Serbs really well, stepping in and hitting early

:13:55.:13:59.

and Konta didn't have the time to react. Impressed with Venus, sad

:14:00.:14:03.

Konta didn't make it, but good luck to Venus in the final -- serves.

:14:04.:14:06.

Those sentiments reflected in the morning papers, one of the back

:14:07.:14:14.

pages, I will win it one day, Konta's vow after crashing out to

:14:15.:14:18.

Venus. A warning from Greg Rusedski to Andy Murray, who went out in the

:14:19.:14:22.

quarter-finals, he is warning that Murray should take a big rest or

:14:23.:14:26.

perhaps run the gauntlet of never winning again and Greg Rusedski is

:14:27.:14:31.

urging Murray he should miss the US in September. That's to try to

:14:32.:14:36.

recover properly now he's in his thirties. This is interesting in the

:14:37.:14:40.

Guardian, I've featured this before, on the training course I've been for

:14:41.:14:48.

ball boys and Bald Hills, May will have to be trained for the

:14:49.:14:50.

superstitions some players have -- ball girl is -- they will. Rafa

:14:51.:14:58.

Nadal has water bottles all lined up in a certain order -- ball girl is.

:14:59.:15:02.

In the future they will have to train the ball boys and ball girl is

:15:03.:15:06.

to deal with those strippers did in is. Carol has joined me by our pond,

:15:07.:15:14.

it does say deep water, no bathing, you can come and meet Konta the

:15:15.:15:19.

Carp. Not looking to healthy! I think you have put her off!

:15:20.:15:26.

Talking of dazzling, the sunshine will be dazzling. Today is not

:15:27.:15:33.

looking bad. In Wimbledon, it is dry with some cloud around and further

:15:34.:15:37.

cloud through the day, that is the forecast for Wimbledon. There will

:15:38.:15:41.

also be sunny spells as well. Temperatures around 20- 21, maybe

:15:42.:15:46.

more, with a late is. Some of us start with a little cloud this

:15:47.:15:54.

morning. -- late breezes. There will be sunny spells and just a few

:15:55.:15:58.

showers developing. We start across the south of England at 9am. Similar

:15:59.:16:05.

to Wimbledon, blue skies, cloud, one or two showers, by no means is

:16:06.:16:11.

everyone seeing them. Then into northern England, we have breaks in

:16:12.:16:16.

the cloud, sunshine first thing. Not feeling chilly for most of us.

:16:17.:16:20.

Scotland could catch a shallow but the odd one only, with a dry and

:16:21.:16:25.

bright start with sunshine -- shower. The same for Northern

:16:26.:16:28.

Ireland. In the sunshine, temperatures pick up quickly. The

:16:29.:16:32.

odd shower in Wales coming out of the thick cloud but we will see that

:16:33.:16:37.

brighten up through the day. South-west England, heading towards

:16:38.:16:42.

Gloucestershire, Hampshire, we are looking at the mixture of sunny

:16:43.:16:46.

spells, bright spells, meaning you will see a little cloud in the sky.

:16:47.:16:50.

In the sunshine, September to picking up nicely. Through the

:16:51.:16:54.

course of the day for many of us, especially late morning into the

:16:55.:16:58.

afternoon, the sun will come out, the cloud will break and as

:16:59.:17:02.

temperatures rise we are looking at a few showers developing. They will

:17:03.:17:06.

be fairly scattered. And a weather front coming across western Scotland

:17:07.:17:10.

and Northern Ireland. That is going to introduce a range. In the

:17:11.:17:15.

sunshine, highs of up to 20- 22, maybe 23. Through the evening and

:17:16.:17:21.

overnight this front in Scotland and Northern Ireland moves south

:17:22.:17:25.

eastwards, taking rain with it. It won't be as cold in the north as the

:17:26.:17:29.

one just gone. It will be dry further south and it will be cooler

:17:30.:17:34.

than the one just gone. Tomorrow we have to front coming this way, the

:17:35.:17:37.

first continuing into the east, with a lot of cloud and drizzle, as it

:17:38.:17:42.

moves away we see bright spells behind it and then another fund

:17:43.:17:45.

comes in across the north-west, introducing cloud and splashes of

:17:46.:17:51.

rain -- front. In Wales, it will be dry with sunshine and it will start

:17:52.:17:59.

to feel more humid. As we move into Sunday, we have that weather front

:18:00.:18:02.

of sinking southwards, it is a weak creature, so it will produce cloud

:18:03.:18:06.

and drizzle. For northern England it will brighten up with one or two

:18:07.:18:13.

showers -- it is a weak feature. As the weather front sinks south as a

:18:14.:18:17.

weak feature it will introduce cloud and showers. Temperatures climbing.

:18:18.:18:22.

We could hit 27 in the south-east on Sunday. If you like it hot, on

:18:23.:18:27.

Tuesday, somewhere around London area might be back up close to the

:18:28.:18:33.

30 mark, if not 30 mark itself. Then we will see thunderstorms. That is

:18:34.:18:37.

how it is looking at the moment. Thank you very much. See you later

:18:38.:18:42.

on. Don't step backwards, please. I will be joining the fish. Maybe not.

:18:43.:18:44.

Thank you. You're watching

:18:45.:18:46.

Breakfast from BBC News. The main stories this morning:

:18:47.:18:47.

A rise in drug related deaths prompts a new government strategy

:18:48.:18:50.

to provide more help for addicts Five people are attacked

:18:51.:18:53.

with corrosive substances in London in the space of 90 minutes -

:18:54.:18:57.

police say one person has received Good morning. We will take a look at

:18:58.:19:16.

the front pages. The Daily Mail looking at a shakeup of 999 and it

:19:17.:19:22.

says that means that there could be slow response times. It says a major

:19:23.:19:28.

overhaul of the 999 service says that the eight minute response

:19:29.:19:33.

target will be scrapped and people will have to wait 18 minutes and it

:19:34.:19:40.

says those at risk, those at threat with a heart attack. The Times has

:19:41.:19:48.

an image on the Trump visit to Paris, and wrecks it, in relation to

:19:49.:19:52.

the bill on EU laws on the front of the Telegraph, also showing pictures

:19:53.:19:57.

of the Trump visit. At a picture of her on the front of the Daily Mail,

:19:58.:20:01.

and the front of the Guardian, Johanna Konta losing 6-4, 6-2 to

:20:02.:20:06.

Venus Williams, despite the crowd being with her. She has said she had

:20:07.:20:14.

has it in her to win the ladies' final at Wimbledon. The story, the

:20:15.:20:20.

PM's EU Repeal Bill dismissed as a power grab. We will speak to people

:20:21.:20:23.

through the day on how they feel about that. It is hot today. Yes. 46

:20:24.:20:32.

degrees in Spain? Very hot. Just... I thought that was a bit... A bit

:20:33.:20:39.

saucy for a moment. It is OK. It is fine. He has his trunks on. It is

:20:40.:20:46.

absolutely fine. I just had to double take that one. Looking at the

:20:47.:20:51.

business pages today, lots of them focusing on the same story, the

:20:52.:20:55.

warning from the Bank of England yesterday about households going...

:20:56.:21:00.

Well, defaulting on credit card debts. That means if you are 90 days

:21:01.:21:05.

late for payment. It seems to be that we are getting to the highest

:21:06.:21:09.

rate since the financial crisis in 2009. Not great news. The Bank of

:21:10.:21:13.

England are concerned more families will get into that situation in the

:21:14.:21:17.

coming months. Have you pick something up on the inside? Do you

:21:18.:21:24.

remember the whole macaque monkey selfie, where the monkey grab the

:21:25.:21:30.

photographer's camera. Well, this photographer is now being taken

:21:31.:21:34.

through the courts by the people for ethical treatment of animals on

:21:35.:21:38.

behalf of the macaque, and they say that it was an abuse of the animal.

:21:39.:21:43.

He is talking about the consequences of that. And that was the selfie

:21:44.:21:47.

which, as people remember, was very good. And that row over who owned

:21:48.:21:54.

the picture. This is it. Did the macaque monkey have the rights? It

:21:55.:22:02.

is a peculiar story. There is a lot of interest in President Trump's

:22:03.:22:07.

visit to Paris. This is a still from the dinner they had halfway up the

:22:08.:22:10.

Eiffel Tower. If you are interested in a meal at the Daily Mail says a

:22:11.:22:16.

five course meal halfway up the Eiffel Tower, ?170 ahead. 170 - I

:22:17.:22:25.

don't know. I would have thought it would be more.

:22:26.:22:29.

Last night, acting royalty mingled with, well, royalty at the premiere

:22:30.:22:32.

of the new World War Two blockbuster Dunkirk.

:22:33.:22:34.

Singer Harry Styles, who is making his acting debut

:22:35.:22:39.

in the film, shaking hands with Prince Harry on the red carpet.

:22:40.:22:42.

The film focuses on the Dunkirk evacuation, when civilian sailors

:22:43.:22:45.

crossed the English Channel to rescue troops trapped

:22:46.:22:48.

I spoke to director Christopher Nolan and actor

:22:49.:22:55.

Sir Mark Rylance, who told me the bravery shown during the recent

:22:56.:22:58.

disasters in London and Manchester was reminiscent of that famous

:22:59.:23:01.

The enemy tanks have stopped. Why? Why waste precious tanks when they

:23:02.:23:18.

can pick us off in the air like fish in a barrel? What was the moment for

:23:19.:23:23.

you as a director, or a human being, the moment when you thought there is

:23:24.:23:28.

a story about Dunkirk, well-known as it is historically, a story that I

:23:29.:23:33.

can tell? For me it was myself and Emma, my producer, we made a trip 20

:23:34.:23:39.

years ago on a friend's small boat. He wanted to make a crossing at the

:23:40.:23:43.

time the evacuation had taken place. It was incredibly rough felt very

:23:44.:23:50.

difficult, very dangerous, and that was without people dropping bombs on

:23:51.:23:54.

us. We were not heading to a war zone, we were going to present-day

:23:55.:23:58.

Dunkirk. A call went out. We have to go to Dunkirk. Ready. What are you

:23:59.:24:05.

doing? Where are we going? Into war, George. These recent disasters in

:24:06.:24:11.

Manchester and London, the two disasters in London, have made us so

:24:12.:24:15.

much more aware of civilian involvement and the selflessness and

:24:16.:24:18.

bravery of the civilian rescue services. Where are we going?

:24:19.:24:28.

Dunkirk. They will come back. There is no hiding from this. I wanted to

:24:29.:24:37.

build a story using three different timelines land, sea and air. You are

:24:38.:24:45.

in a Spitfire, you are on the beach, you are on a boat with Mark Rylance,

:24:46.:24:49.

coming to help with the evacuation. We cross cut between these timelines

:24:50.:24:54.

to try to build up a coherent picture of the bigger events of

:24:55.:24:58.

Dunkirk without jumping out of the intense human experience. It is a

:24:59.:25:04.

film that begs questions of yourself. What would you have done?

:25:05.:25:11.

Yeah, I have a cousin who was among the first rescue services in the

:25:12.:25:18.

Grenfell Tower. And he accounted decision is fine and had to make in

:25:19.:25:21.

that terrible staircase on whether to carry on or rescue people who

:25:22.:25:28.

were there. And the film, for each of the three stories in the film,

:25:29.:25:32.

the characters get to a moment where they have to make a crucial

:25:33.:25:35.

decision, which will affect some people and other people. And someone

:25:36.:25:41.

or a view people will be sacrificed in order to save other people.

:25:42.:25:46.

Terrible, terrible decision. Torpedo! We need to send more ships.

:25:47.:25:56.

You have made some huge films in the past, but making a film about a

:25:57.:26:00.

real-life event, especially this event, brings with it extra

:26:01.:26:05.

responsibilities in terms of what you are depicting and whether it is

:26:06.:26:09.

true and what you are trying to do. How do you handle that? Well, you do

:26:10.:26:15.

a lot of research, you do a lot of reading. You try to get it under

:26:16.:26:19.

your fingers. And then I chose fictional characters to guide us

:26:20.:26:22.

through those events and that freed me up as a filmmaker. I wasn't

:26:23.:26:26.

putting words into people's males who existed. I wasn't speaking for

:26:27.:26:30.

people who couldn't speak for themselves. Last week I did a

:26:31.:26:33.

screening for veterans and people who had been there on the beach and

:26:34.:26:37.

standing in front of that audience about to show the film was one of

:26:38.:26:40.

the most daunting professional experiences I have had. Christopher,

:26:41.:26:41.

thank you very much. It is a film on an extraordinary

:26:42.:26:51.

scale and very interesting Christopher Nolan, the way he told

:26:52.:26:55.

the story through the eyes of two young soldiers. We will hear more

:26:56.:26:59.

from the actors who played those roles, fin whitehead, and Harry

:27:00.:27:05.

Styles, who is acting and there will be more on tomorrow's programme --

:27:06.:27:11.

Finn Whitehead. That story is told through their eyes. Looks like a

:27:12.:27:12.

very big production. Now, though, it's back

:27:13.:30:33.

to Charlie and Naga. with Charlie Stayt and Naga

:30:34.:30:39.

Munchetty. We'll bring you all the latest news

:30:40.:30:44.

and sport in a moment, Jo Konta's Wimbledon dream might be

:30:45.:30:47.

over but there's still plenty of tennis for us

:30:48.:30:52.

to get excited about. We'll be live on Henman Hill

:30:53.:30:54.

and looking ahead to From one great summer

:30:55.:30:57.

tradition to another. The Proms begin tonight

:30:58.:31:08.

and we're behind the scenes at the Royal Albert Hall

:31:09.:31:12.

for the start of the world's And we'll also be

:31:13.:31:15.

speaking to the legendary Sir David Attenborough

:31:16.:31:18.

about his fears for the UK's butterfly population

:31:19.:31:20.

and what you can do to help But now a summary of this

:31:21.:31:23.

morning's main news: The Home Office has launched

:31:24.:31:28.

a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use, with tailored treatment

:31:29.:31:31.

to be given to drug addicts. It follows a rise in

:31:32.:31:34.

drug-related deaths in England and Wales and targets

:31:35.:31:36.

new psychoactive substances. The Home Secretary Amber Rudd said

:31:37.:31:38.

the plan will focus on recovery. Police raids against dealers have

:31:39.:31:54.

been the traditional way of clamping It's estimated to cost the UK

:31:55.:31:59.

?10.7 billion a year. And the new government drug strategy

:32:00.:32:03.

says that approach will continue along with renewed efforts

:32:04.:32:06.

to get people off drugs. That's what they do

:32:07.:32:08.

at the Harbour Centre in London. Support people affected by drugs

:32:09.:32:17.

and help them rebuild their lives. The Home Secretary Amber Rudd

:32:18.:32:19.

visited the centre this week. She said her drugs strategy

:32:20.:32:22.

will focus on recovery. People who are recovering from drugs

:32:23.:32:25.

often need help with housing, they need help with employment,

:32:26.:32:28.

they might have mental health difficulties and in this strategy

:32:29.:32:31.

we've acknowledged that, we've embraced that,

:32:32.:32:33.

I've set out clear expectations for local authorities about working

:32:34.:32:35.

with recovery to make sure that these additional

:32:36.:32:38.

elements are supplied. The 2017 drug strategy

:32:39.:32:49.

is the first for seven years. It says there should be treatment

:32:50.:32:52.

tailored to the needs of drug users. A new national recovery champion

:32:53.:32:55.

will help co-ordinate services. And there will be measures to deal

:32:56.:32:58.

with new drug threats, including substances intended

:32:59.:33:01.

to enhance the experience of having Amber Rudd's involvement

:33:02.:33:03.

in a new cross-government drug strategy board will give

:33:04.:33:19.

the plans political impetus, but she's set to disappoint people

:33:20.:33:21.

who say drug possession should no Police in east London

:33:22.:33:24.

are investigating five attacks which involved corrosive substances

:33:25.:33:34.

being thrown in people's faces. They all happened within

:33:35.:33:36.

90 minutes in Hackney One of the victims has

:33:37.:33:39.

what's been described The Scottish and Welsh governments

:33:40.:33:43.

have threatened to block the key Brexit bill which will convert

:33:44.:33:49.

all existing EU laws into UK law, that's over what they say is a power

:33:50.:33:52.

grab by Westminster. The Repeal Bill is also facing

:33:53.:33:55.

opposition from Labour But Brexit Secretary David Davis has

:33:56.:33:58.

rejected the criticism and described it as one of the most significant

:33:59.:34:03.

pieces of legislation President Trump will be the guest

:34:04.:34:05.

of honour at the Bastille Day He's marking France's National Day

:34:06.:34:13.

at the invitation of the country's The two leaders will watch

:34:14.:34:18.

the traditional military parade which, this year, has French

:34:19.:34:22.

soldiers marching alongside US America's entry into the First World

:34:23.:34:24.

War. Crowds are expected to line

:34:25.:34:29.

the streets for the funeral The six-year-old Sunderland fan won

:34:30.:34:32.

a legion of supporters across the country, including

:34:33.:34:36.

footballer Jermain Defoe who has left training in Spain

:34:37.:34:38.

to be at the funeral. Bradley died last Friday

:34:39.:34:41.

after suffering from a rare cancer. A heatwave across southern Europe

:34:42.:34:50.

has forced some of the region's most famous tourist sites to close

:34:51.:34:54.

during peak holiday season. More than twenty fires have started

:34:55.:34:56.

near Naples and Sicily where the temperatures have climbed

:34:57.:34:59.

above 40 degrees this week. The Greek government has ordered

:35:00.:35:02.

that popular archaeological sites close, and in southern Spain,

:35:03.:35:04.

the drought has devastated crops. Several Spanish cities

:35:05.:35:07.

have experienced record It will reach 46 degrees

:35:08.:35:09.

in Cordoba today. Anyone visiting Stonehenge

:35:10.:35:18.

or Loch Ness earlier this week would have seen a bonus attraction

:35:19.:35:20.

if they'd looked to the skies. The Red Arrows and their

:35:21.:35:26.

American counterparts, the Thunderbirds, have been

:35:27.:35:28.

performing some stunning manoeuvres in a practice display from RAF

:35:29.:35:31.

Fairford in Gloucestershire. They were rehearsing ahead of

:35:32.:35:33.

the Royal International Air Tattoo anniversary of the United States Air

:35:34.:35:36.

Force. Those are the main stories this

:35:37.:35:51.

morning. Leicester and attention now to the sport, Mike is at Wimbledon

:35:52.:35:57.

for us on Henman Hill -- let's turn our attention. All eyes I suppose on

:35:58.:36:03.

the men's semis, Federer particularly, and yesterday was the

:36:04.:36:06.

end of British interest effectively. That's not entirely fair because

:36:07.:36:10.

there is interest in the mixed doubles but in terms of the singles?

:36:11.:36:15.

That's right, Heather Watson and Jamie Murray to cheer on in the

:36:16.:36:21.

doubles. On Henman Hill next to the pond, haven't seen my friendly fish

:36:22.:36:25.

in 20 minutes ever since Carol appeared with her bright dress. He

:36:26.:36:31.

seems to have gone back under for the moment. Reflecting on yesterday,

:36:32.:36:35.

for the second day running, the big British hope, the British number

:36:36.:36:40.

one, went out. Johanna Konta, she says she is not too disappointed,

:36:41.:36:45.

because she remains upbeat and confident she can win the women's

:36:46.:36:49.

singles title in years to come. It was the first a final for her,

:36:50.:36:54.

always seen as a huge match, counter that against the vast experience of

:36:55.:36:58.

Venus Williams, who is now through to her ninth final, incredible, at

:36:59.:37:00.

the age of 37. This time though, her

:37:01.:37:07.

opponent Venus Williams, the five-time champion,

:37:08.:37:09.

looked almost back to her best as she outplayed the

:37:10.:37:11.

British number one. Konta lost in straight sets,

:37:12.:37:13.

losing 6-4, 6-2, much to the disappointment of the home

:37:14.:37:16.

fans here at the All England Club. Afterwards she thanked fans

:37:17.:37:19.

for their love and support and described the fortnight

:37:20.:37:22.

as a memorable experience. I've definitely enjoyed every single

:37:23.:37:28.

moment I've been here these past two weeks. So I don't think I need to

:37:29.:37:35.

much time for that to sink in for me to realise I've made sure that I've

:37:36.:37:39.

been very present with everything I've done to make sure I have

:37:40.:37:43.

enjoyed and taken the most out of every opportunity and experience

:37:44.:37:44.

I've had. Venus Williams will now play

:37:45.:37:46.

Spain's Garbine Muguruza The 14th seed thrashed the unseeded

:37:47.:37:49.

Magdalena Rybarikova in little over an hour to make it to her

:37:50.:37:52.

second Wimbledon final. interest here at Wimbledon,

:37:53.:37:57.

though, Jamie Murray and his partner

:37:58.:38:00.

Martina Hingis are into the mixed doubles semi-finals after beating

:38:01.:38:03.

the all British pairing Murray and Hingis are top seeds

:38:04.:38:06.

and took the match in straight sets to book their place

:38:07.:38:11.

in the last four. And Jamie could be facing a fellow

:38:12.:38:13.

Briton across the net if he makes it to the final because there's

:38:14.:38:17.

a familiar British name in the other Heather Watson

:38:18.:38:20.

is through with her partner They are the defending champions

:38:21.:38:23.

and could make it back to back titles after they won their match

:38:24.:38:26.

in three sets yesterday. The wheelchair tournaments started

:38:27.:38:29.

yesterday here but there was disappointment for defending

:38:30.:38:31.

champion Britain's Gordon Reid. He lost in the singles in straight

:38:32.:38:34.

sets to Sweden's Steffan Olsson, the man he beat to win

:38:35.:38:37.

the title last year. Better news, though,

:38:38.:38:40.

for Alfie Hewett, he won his first singles win

:38:41.:38:41.

on grass. Chris Froome has lost the yellow

:38:42.:38:56.

jersey at the Tour de France. The three-time race winner finished

:38:57.:39:02.

down in seventh on stage 12, handing the overall lead

:39:03.:39:05.

to rival Fabio Aru. He basically said he didn't have the

:39:06.:39:14.

legs when it mattered as the race got into the Pyrenees.

:39:15.:39:21.

To football now and Manchester City have agreed a fee of ?50 million

:39:22.:39:25.

for the Tottenham defender Kyle Walker.

:39:26.:39:26.

It's expected he'll sign in time to join his new team-mates before

:39:27.:39:30.

they leave for their pre-season tour of the United States.

:39:31.:39:32.

an impact at his new club is Wayne Rooney.

:39:33.:39:36.

He only signed for Everton on Sunday but has already scored his first

:39:37.:39:40.

goal, this brilliant long-range effort on his debut

:39:41.:39:42.

during their pre-season tour of Tanzania.

:39:43.:39:50.

Rory Mcllroy is in danger of missing his third cut

:39:51.:39:52.

The world number four is two over par, nine shots off the pace,

:39:53.:39:59.

after the first round of the Scottish Open.

:40:00.:40:01.

The World Para Athletics Championships begins this evening

:40:02.:40:09.

There'll be a minute's silence before competition to mark the death

:40:10.:40:13.

earlier this week of the UAE athlete Abdullah Hayayei,

:40:14.:40:16.

who was killed during a training accident.

:40:17.:40:18.

There's plenty of British names competing at the Championships,

:40:19.:40:20.

This is worlds apart from every other medal you get, this is in

:40:21.:40:40.

London, this is World Championships, on your home turf and I think you

:40:41.:40:44.

want it more. I said to my mum for example last year, she's worried

:40:45.:40:48.

about coming out to Rio, I said don't worry about it, be there in

:40:49.:40:52.

London 27, I want you there because it means something to me. Rio was a

:40:53.:40:58.

job, this is for me, I want this more than I want Rio.

:40:59.:41:01.

England captain Joe Root says it's important the side don't

:41:02.:41:03.

rest on their laurels for the second Test against South Africa,

:41:04.:41:06.

folowing their emphatic victory in the first.

:41:07.:41:08.

England have named an unchanged side for the match which begins today

:41:09.:41:12.

At Wimbledon, as you were saying, Charlie, a huge day, men's

:41:13.:41:28.

semifinals day, so first up on centre court you've got Marian

:41:29.:41:31.

Cilic, who is favourite going into the match against the American who

:41:32.:41:36.

beat Andy Murray in the last round, Sam Querrey. Also Roger Federer

:41:37.:41:40.

against Tomas Berdych. Federer will be the strong favourite there.

:41:41.:41:46.

Coverage starts at 12:30pm on BBC Two and then it continues on Radio 5

:41:47.:41:53.

Live and the BBC Sport website. Hard to see beyond Roger Federer, isn't

:41:54.:41:58.

it? Thanks very much, Mike, see you later on.

:41:59.:42:02.

With its first new strategy for tackling illegal drug use

:42:03.:42:05.

in seven years, the Home Office says its plans will help addicts

:42:06.:42:08.

We can get more details from Sarah Newton,

:42:09.:42:11.

the Minister for Safeguarding and Vulnerability, who joins us

:42:12.:42:14.

Thank you very much bought 14 to us this morning. Pleased to be with

:42:15.:42:23.

you. -- for talking to us. How is this strategy going to cut the

:42:24.:42:28.

number of drug-related deaths? We've learned a lot over the last few

:42:29.:42:31.

years about how to give better treatment to people, you're right to

:42:32.:42:35.

point out there are different groups of people susceptible to different

:42:36.:42:38.

types of drug addiction and to reduce those deaths, we're really

:42:39.:42:42.

talking about people who tend to be older, whose been taking heroin, who

:42:43.:42:48.

are really ill and they need very particular treatment to help them

:42:49.:42:52.

with their recovery -- who's been. Helping the recovery of the most

:42:53.:42:56.

vulnerable people at the heart of our strategy is going to make a real

:42:57.:43:00.

difference. How much will this cost the government and where is the

:43:01.:43:03.

money coming from? It's about joining up lots of budgets, we have

:43:04.:43:08.

the public-health budget, used by local authorities to commission

:43:09.:43:11.

services, but also we've learned over the while that a lot of people

:43:12.:43:16.

that have substance misuse problems have underlying mental health

:43:17.:43:19.

problems, the record amounts we are using for mental health will be used

:43:20.:43:26.

as well. We know some homeless people have substance misuse

:43:27.:43:29.

problems, so the money we are investing in homeless prevention can

:43:30.:43:32.

be brought to bear. It's about pooling across government and

:43:33.:43:36.

agencies in communities so we can smartly use the money available to

:43:37.:43:40.

really make a difference. No extra money? There is investment in parts

:43:41.:43:47.

of the strategy, new money with homeless prevention, mental health

:43:48.:43:51.

services. All so there is various and organised crime -- also.

:43:52.:43:57.

Stopping it coming into the country. We are making a lot of investment

:43:58.:44:00.

there. Investment with young people in schools so young people don't

:44:01.:44:04.

want drugs in the first place because they've had good education.

:44:05.:44:08.

Investment in different pockets coming together brought to bear to

:44:09.:44:13.

make a big difference in an overarching strategy. No new

:44:14.:44:17.

specific money for this new drug strategy, the first new strategy in

:44:18.:44:22.

seven years? There's money in different parts of government which

:44:23.:44:27.

is all being used for this strategy. There are criticisms of this

:44:28.:44:33.

strategy, that you're not moving towards decriminalisation for those

:44:34.:44:36.

who use, and therefore those using are actually fearful of being

:44:37.:44:43.

targeted or called criminals and therefore are locked in to get help.

:44:44.:44:47.

People are saying perhaps you should have considered this more carefully.

:44:48.:44:52.

-- reluctant. What is your response to that? We have consulted carefully

:44:53.:44:57.

on the strategy involving a wide range of stakeholders. It's really

:44:58.:45:02.

important that we send out a very clear message to people, these drugs

:45:03.:45:08.

are very harmful. That's why we make them illegal and that's why we put

:45:09.:45:13.

every effort into reducing demand by educating about the harms, reducing

:45:14.:45:18.

supply, by taking really world leading international effort to

:45:19.:45:21.

prevent the drugs coming into our country and it's quite right we have

:45:22.:45:25.

new powers through the psychoactive substance act which came in last

:45:26.:45:29.

year to crack down on new and emerging drugs, drugs like legal

:45:30.:45:37.

highs or chemsex drugs, the appalling zombie Spice we saw last

:45:38.:45:41.

year, it's really damaging stuff and it's right we try to stop people

:45:42.:45:46.

taking it but I know there are many vulnerable people who do take drugs

:45:47.:45:49.

and that's why we have recovery at the centre of what we are doing so

:45:50.:45:53.

if people do start to take drugs, there are really good services for

:45:54.:45:58.

them to help them break their habit and lead a meaningful and full part

:45:59.:46:00.

in our society. There have been acid attacks in

:46:01.:46:08.

London today, we understand five attacks, and one has suffered life

:46:09.:46:13.

changing injuries. Can you give me an idea what strategy is going to be

:46:14.:46:19.

in place? We have seen a spate of the attacks and corrosive substances

:46:20.:46:23.

have been used as a weapon of choice. How are you going to tackle

:46:24.:46:27.

this as a government? This was a shocking attack last night. Someone

:46:28.:46:32.

is left with life changing injuries. This is something we have been

:46:33.:46:37.

concerned about for some time. We have been working closely with

:46:38.:46:40.

colleagues in law enforcement to get a better picture of what is

:46:41.:46:44.

happening, as you rightly say, in pockets of the country. There has

:46:45.:46:49.

been a state undoubtably in the East End of London recently. Only last

:46:50.:46:55.

week jointly with the national crime lead, most senior police officer, we

:46:56.:47:00.

hosted a conference from retailers to the NHS and law enforcement,

:47:01.:47:04.

people working in communities, community policing, to have a

:47:05.:47:10.

joined-up action plan for what we are working together taking forward

:47:11.:47:15.

to stop young people wanting to use this substance as a weapon,

:47:16.:47:20.

restricting supply and making sure the criminal justice system treats

:47:21.:47:24.

these serious offences with proper sentencing. A proper plan of action.

:47:25.:47:31.

Thank you for talking to us. Where going to have a look at the

:47:32.:47:41.

weather now. Good morning from Wimbledon. It is a

:47:42.:47:47.

mild start and you have been talking about heat in southern Spain.

:47:48.:47:55.

Yesterday in southern Cordoba, it reached 46 degrees, which makes it a

:47:56.:48:03.

whopping 116 Fahrenheit. I am telling you this because today it is

:48:04.:48:08.

going to be more comfortable in the UK with a high of 23. Into the

:48:09.:48:13.

middle of next week we are looking at temperatures in the south of

:48:14.:48:17.

England rising into the high 20s, possibly the 30 degrees mark. That

:48:18.:48:23.

is the same heat across Spain at the moment. Obviously we won't get heat

:48:24.:48:28.

like that. 30 will be roughly the highest temperature we will get.

:48:29.:48:32.

Today at Wimbledon it is a pleasant start to the day. The forecast is

:48:33.:48:38.

fairly cloudy first thing. There will be some sunny breaks coming

:48:39.:48:42.

later on in the day with highs of about 20- 21 in a gentle breeze. The

:48:43.:48:48.

UK as a whole has a cloudy start with showers this morning. We will

:48:49.:48:51.

also see sunny spells develop. And for most it will be dry. In southern

:48:52.:48:57.

England we have variable cloud, sunny spells coming through. We have

:48:58.:49:01.

showers at the moment, with some at nine o'clock as well. Further north

:49:02.:49:08.

into East Anglia, northern England, a combination of more cloud at

:49:09.:49:12.

times, sunny breaks in the cloud, and the same for Scotland. The cloud

:49:13.:49:18.

is thick enough to produce the odd rogue shower. Northern Ireland has a

:49:19.:49:23.

bright start with sunny spells. Wales could catch the odd shower.

:49:24.:49:29.

The same for the Midlands with bright spells of sunshine. The

:49:30.:49:32.

south-west bright spells and sunshine and the odd shower. It will

:49:33.:49:38.

brighten up nicely through the day. Further east, through Dorset into

:49:39.:49:41.

the Home Counties, the same again, bright spells, sunny skies. In the

:49:42.:49:46.

sunshine that are rich will pick up quickly. The cloud will break later

:49:47.:49:55.

into the afternoon. As temperatures rise it could spark some showers.

:49:56.:50:01.

Consider yourself unlike EEC. At the end of the day a weather front

:50:02.:50:05.

coming in across western Scotland and Northern Ireland introducing

:50:06.:50:09.

some rain. As we had on through the evening and overnight period the

:50:10.:50:13.

weather front will move south and swing east and take rain with it. In

:50:14.:50:18.

the north of the country it is going to be a mild night than the one just

:50:19.:50:23.

gone and in the south under clear skies it will be a cooler nights

:50:24.:50:28.

than the one just gone. Tomorrow, two fronts affecting us, the first

:50:29.:50:32.

one swinging east, taking cloud and patchy light showers with it. It

:50:33.:50:36.

will brighten up operated with sunny spells developing and another front

:50:37.:50:41.

across the north-west. In the south, for much of England and Wales, we

:50:42.:50:47.

are looking at a dry picture with a cloudy spite and sunny spells

:50:48.:50:51.

developing. Maybe the odd shower. Starting to turn humid in the south.

:50:52.:50:56.

As we head into Sunday, the weather front coming south is a weak

:50:57.:51:00.

feature. It is going to introduce cloud, spots or drizzle and much

:51:01.:51:05.

brighter for northern England, Scotland with sunshine. After a

:51:06.:51:10.

bright start, as the weak weather front comes south, more cloud and

:51:11.:51:15.

the odd shower. Temperature-wise, look at the temperature, it is

:51:16.:51:19.

zooming up and it will be humid in the south with highs of 27. Much

:51:20.:51:24.

more comfortable in the sunshine. Thank you very much.

:51:25.:51:30.

We are going to talk now about how people get tickets.

:51:31.:51:33.

If you've ever tried to buy tickets for a sold-out gig you might have

:51:34.:51:37.

turned to using a ticket re-selling website.

:51:38.:51:42.

We all know the feeling when you are absolutely gutted to find out it is

:51:43.:51:47.

sold out. If you've ever missed out on getting

:51:48.:51:48.

tickets to a gig or a festival, you might have turned

:51:49.:51:54.

to a re-selling website, where you stand a chance

:51:55.:51:56.

of getting that tickets, but it can often be for much more

:51:57.:51:59.

than the original price. Well, a survey by the market

:52:00.:52:02.

researchers at YouGov out today shows that just under half us thinks

:52:03.:52:05.

re-selling websites should be banned altogether, and slightly more

:52:06.:52:08.

thought the government should intervene to make things fairer

:52:09.:52:10.

for genuine gig-owners So which are the main ticket

:52:11.:52:13.

re-selling websites? Well, there are four big ones,

:52:14.:52:20.

Seatwave and GetMeIn, which are both owned

:52:21.:52:23.

by Ticketmaster, Viagogo They're all operating

:52:24.:52:25.

totally legally in the UK. But secondary ticket websites have

:52:26.:52:33.

been criticised by many in the music industry, notably Adele

:52:34.:52:36.

and Ed Sheeran, for snapping up thousands of gig tickets

:52:37.:52:39.

when they go on sale online Adam Webb is from the FanFair

:52:40.:52:41.

Alliance who campaign against industrial-scale

:52:42.:52:49.

online ticket touting. What do you mean by industrial

:52:50.:53:07.

scale? It literally just means that, we are not talking about one or two

:53:08.:53:11.

tickets, we are talking about before the tickets go on general sale

:53:12.:53:14.

thousands of tickets put onto the resale sites. These are put on by

:53:15.:53:20.

professional ticket touts who use these platforms, which enable their

:53:21.:53:27.

activity. Not me realising I can't get a ticket? No. For a came in I

:53:28.:53:34.

googled the Killers tickets, because they are going online at nine

:53:35.:53:38.

o'clock, and thousands are available on secondary sites. The entry point

:53:39.:53:42.

is often Google. They are at the top of the search engine. That is the

:53:43.:53:47.

main entry point for people. We have contacted the four reselling

:53:48.:53:51.

websites. They haven't got back to us. The defence is, this is totally

:53:52.:53:57.

legal. There is demand for it. People don't have to buy them if

:53:58.:54:01.

they don't want. It is legal to resell a ticket. And four our

:54:02.:54:08.

campaign we believe people should be able to sell their ticket. We

:54:09.:54:11.

believe it should be controlled and regulated and at face value. Not the

:54:12.:54:17.

system which is totally out of whack. And there are rules coming

:54:18.:54:21.

into force. Will they go far enough, what kind of rules are coming in? We

:54:22.:54:29.

have quite a few consumer laws which should protect people but they

:54:30.:54:33.

haven't been enforced. Governments have strengthened the Consumer

:54:34.:54:37.

Rights Act, which is fantastic. We are waiting for that, for the

:54:38.:54:43.

guidelines for that to be published. And we need the laws properly

:54:44.:54:48.

enforced. If the ticket sales or the sites are banned, won't we go back

:54:49.:54:52.

to the days of ticket touts outside the venue? There will always be the

:54:53.:54:56.

demand for people who didn't get the tickets? We are not calling for the

:54:57.:55:01.

sites to be banned. We are calling for them to obey the law and become

:55:02.:55:06.

transparent. It is one of the only markets, the peer-to-peer market,

:55:07.:55:09.

where you do not know who you are buying from. That is the problem.

:55:10.:55:13.

They are marketed as fan platforms. On the whole it is the hard-core

:55:14.:55:18.

ticket touts using them who are bulk buying masses of tickets in primary

:55:19.:55:25.

ticketing websites and are enabled to sell them at inflated prices.

:55:26.:55:31.

Thank you for joining us. So it is interesting. Ed Sheeran has

:55:32.:55:36.

introduced this idea of four forms of IT before you can get into his

:55:37.:55:45.

next coming to. -- ID. We might see some long queues in future? I don't

:55:46.:55:48.

genuinely think that I do. Maybe three. Still to come:, we speak with

:55:49.:55:56.

Sir David Attenborough about his fears for the butterfly population

:55:57.:55:58.

and what people can do to help. Plenty more on our website

:55:59.:59:16.

at the usual address. with Charlie Stayt

:59:17.:59:19.

and Naga Munchetty. Five people are attacked with acid

:59:20.:00:04.

in London in the space One person has suffered

:00:05.:00:07.

life-changing injuries, the government tells this programme

:00:08.:00:09.

it's taking action to tackle Good morning, it's

:00:10.:00:12.

Friday the 14th of July. New measures

:00:13.:00:31.

to tackle a rise in drug related They'll target so-called legal highs

:00:32.:00:35.

and provide more help for addicts. President Trump and President Macron

:00:36.:00:57.

have dinner at the Eiffel Tower. Lloyds banking group,

:00:58.:01:02.

which owns high street banks like Halifax, Bank of Scotland

:01:03.:01:05.

and Lloyds, is scrapping I'll have more on who

:01:06.:01:07.

will be better off. he thinks the spirit of Dunkirk

:01:08.:01:10.

depicted in his latest film has been These recent disasters

:01:11.:01:15.

in Manchester and London, the two disasters in London,

:01:16.:01:19.

have made us all so much more aware of civilian involvement

:01:20.:01:22.

and the selflessness and bravery And we're live in the Royal Albert

:01:23.:01:24.

Hall ahead of the first night The 123rd season gets under way this

:01:25.:01:44.

evening. You're listening to Jessica performing a piece by John Williams.

:01:45.:01:50.

She will make her Proms debut this year, we will talk to her and many

:01:51.:01:56.

other musicians taking part in the world's largest classical music

:01:57.:01:57.

festival. Here at Wimbledon, the dream

:01:58.:01:58.

is over for Johanna Konta The British number one says she can

:01:59.:02:01.

win the women's title in years to come, she lost her

:02:02.:02:08.

semi final yesterday to five-time champion

:02:09.:02:11.

Venus Williams. Carol, it's gone a bit chilly, where

:02:12.:02:20.

is the sun? Still in the sky but the cloud cover has come over and that

:02:21.:02:24.

is making it feel chilly. For many a chilly start and a lot of cloud

:02:25.:02:29.

around, one or two showers but it will brighten up in in sunny showers

:02:30.:02:33.

and if you're coming to Wimbledon it should be dry and getting warmer by

:02:34.:02:39.

the time play starts. See you later on.

:02:40.:02:40.

Police in East London are investigating five attacks

:02:41.:02:45.

which involved corrosive substances being thrown in people's faces.

:02:46.:02:47.

One of the victims has suffered what's been described

:02:48.:02:49.

The incidents all happened within 90 minutes in Hackney

:02:50.:02:53.

Andy Moore's report contains some distressing images.

:02:54.:03:01.

This was the scene of the most serious attack last night,

:03:02.:03:04.

the victim was apparantly delivering takeaway food when a pair of men

:03:05.:03:07.

Police say a corrosive substance was growing in his face.

:03:08.:03:11.

Lee was taken to hospital with what they described

:03:12.:03:13.

In the space of just over an hour police were alerted to five similar

:03:14.:03:23.

attacks, the motive on each occasion seems to be robbery.

:03:24.:03:26.

Acid attacks in England have doubled since 2012.

:03:27.:03:29.

21-year-old Resham Khan and her cousin Jameel Mukhtar

:03:30.:03:32.

were attacked shortly after they had been celebrating her 21st birthday

:03:33.:03:34.

Acid was burning through the window of her car.

:03:35.:03:46.

My face started melting, my clothes started to burn,

:03:47.:03:52.

my shorts started sticking to me and there was smoke coming out

:03:53.:03:55.

Moped crime is also on the increase, especially in London.

:03:56.:03:59.

Delivery drivers in east London say they've been faced by an escalating

:04:00.:04:02.

crime wave from knife-wielding gangs.

:04:03.:04:04.

Earlier on this programme the Home Office Minister Sarah Newton gave us

:04:05.:04:16.

her reaction to that attack. This was a shocking attack last

:04:17.:04:23.

night, someone is left with life changing injuries and this is

:04:24.:04:26.

something we've been concerned about in the Home Office for some time.

:04:27.:04:30.

We've been working very closely with our colleagues in law enforcement to

:04:31.:04:33.

get a better picture of actually what is happening, as you quite

:04:34.:04:37.

rightly say, it's happening in pockets of the country.

:04:38.:04:38.

The Home Secretary Amber Rudd has launched a new strategy to tackle

:04:39.:04:42.

illegal drug use after what the Home Office calls

:04:43.:04:44.

a dramatic increase in the number of deaths from drugs in England

:04:45.:04:48.

The strategy focuses on helping addicts to recover

:04:49.:04:51.

and makes clear there'll be no legal changes to decriminalise

:04:52.:04:53.

The entire strategy applies to England,

:04:54.:04:56.

some parts of it also affect the rest of the UK.

:04:57.:04:59.

Our home affairs correspondent, Danny Shaw, reports.

:05:00.:05:01.

Police raids against dealers have been the traditional way of clamping

:05:02.:05:05.

It's estimated to cost the UK ?10.7 billion a year.

:05:06.:05:09.

And the new government drug strategy says that approach will continue

:05:10.:05:12.

along with renewed efforts to get people off drugs.

:05:13.:05:15.

That's what they do at the Harbour Centre in London.

:05:16.:05:18.

Support people affected by drugs and help them rebuild their lives.

:05:19.:05:21.

The Home Secretary Amber Rudd visited the centre this week.

:05:22.:05:23.

She said her drugs strategy will focus on recovery.

:05:24.:05:31.

People who are recovering from drugs often need help with housing,

:05:32.:05:34.

they need help with employment, they might have mental health

:05:35.:05:36.

difficulties and in this strategy we've acknowledged that,

:05:37.:05:39.

we've embraced that, I've set out clear expectations

:05:40.:05:41.

for local authorities about working with recovery to make sure

:05:42.:05:43.

that these additional elements are supplied.

:05:44.:05:54.

The 2017 drug strategy is the first for seven years.

:05:55.:05:57.

It says there should be treatment tailored to the needs of drug users.

:05:58.:06:00.

A new national recovery champion will help co-ordinate services.

:06:01.:06:02.

And there will be measures to deal with new drug threats,

:06:03.:06:05.

including substances intended to enhance the experience of having

:06:06.:06:08.

Amber Rudd's involvement in a new cross-government drug

:06:09.:06:11.

strategy board will give the plans political impetus,

:06:12.:06:13.

but she's set to disappoint people who say drug possession should no

:06:14.:06:17.

The Scottish and Welsh governments have threatened to block the key

:06:18.:06:32.

Brexit bill which will convert all existing EU laws into UK law

:06:33.:06:35.

over what they say is a power grab by Westminster.

:06:36.:06:38.

The Repeal Bill is also facing opposition from Labour and other

:06:39.:06:41.

Our political correspondent Chris Mason joins us now

:06:42.:06:44.

Good morning, Chris. Some of this stuff is, let's be honest, quite

:06:45.:06:58.

complicated, isn't it? To take us through that phrase, a threat to

:06:59.:07:03.

block, take us through that? Good morning, complicated with a capital

:07:04.:07:08.

C, it definitely is and it will be four months and years to come. What

:07:09.:07:13.

we saw and what we will continue to see is 360 degrees scrutiny of

:07:14.:07:20.

Brexit. On the specifics of that complaint from the first ministers

:07:21.:07:25.

of Scotland and Wales, they say what the government has set out is a

:07:26.:07:29.

power grab from Westminster. The way things will work is all of those

:07:30.:07:33.

laws Brussels was in charge will be cut and paste and put into UK law at

:07:34.:07:37.

Westminster. The government says there will then be a conversation

:07:38.:07:41.

about which bits of law are parcelled up and sent to Edinburgh

:07:42.:07:46.

and Cardiff and Belfast but the mechanics of that are highly

:07:47.:07:49.

controversial. Real concern from the first ministers of Scotland and

:07:50.:07:55.

Wales and a real desire to flex their muscle and cause real anxiety

:07:56.:07:59.

for the British Government. One strand of, as we were saying, a very

:08:00.:08:04.

complicated and convoluted argument to come.

:08:05.:08:04.

Crowds are expected to line the streets for the funeral

:08:05.:08:07.

The six-year-old Sunderland fan won a legion of supporters

:08:08.:08:11.

across the country, including footballer Jermain Defoe who has

:08:12.:08:13.

left training in Spain to be at the funeral.

:08:14.:08:16.

Bradley died last Friday after suffering from a rare cancer.

:08:17.:08:29.

President Trump will be the guest of honour at the Bastille Day

:08:30.:08:32.

He's marking France's National Day at the invitation of the country's

:08:33.:08:37.

The two leaders will watch the traditional military parade

:08:38.:08:40.

which, this year, has French soldiers marching

:08:41.:08:42.

You can see the preparations, but can we start with how this meeting

:08:43.:09:05.

went? There were some interesting nuances and comments that have been

:09:06.:09:11.

picked up. There were, there were. I think the big picture is that it

:09:12.:09:17.

went very well, certainly there was a show of warmth which surprised

:09:18.:09:23.

many, surprised me. The two men have so little in common on the face of

:09:24.:09:28.

it but every effort was made on both sides to show that not only were

:09:29.:09:32.

they getting on but that they were friends. They were specifically

:09:33.:09:36.

asked at the press conference yesterday, how would you

:09:37.:09:39.

characterise the relationship, they both said it was friendly, we're

:09:40.:09:43.

going to dinner at the Eiffel Tower and it will be a dinner of friends.

:09:44.:09:48.

These nuances, as you say, which came out, particularly on climate

:09:49.:09:52.

change, with Donald Trump hinting that he might even revisit his

:09:53.:09:55.

rejection of the Paris climate accord. Hugh, thanks very much, Hugh

:09:56.:10:01.

Schofield in Paris. A heatwave across southern Europe

:10:02.:10:02.

has forced some of the region's most famous tourist sites to close

:10:03.:10:05.

during peak holiday season. More than twenty fires have started

:10:06.:10:08.

near Naples and Sicily where the temperatures have climbed

:10:09.:10:10.

above 40 degrees celsius this week. The Greek government has ordered

:10:11.:10:13.

that popular archaeological sites close during the hot weather,

:10:14.:10:16.

and in southern Spain, the drought has devastated

:10:17.:10:18.

crops and seven provinces Temperatures will reach 46

:10:19.:10:20.

degrees in Cordoba today. Really is too hot! Carol will have

:10:21.:10:39.

the weather in the UK a little later on.

:10:40.:10:40.

The Scottish and Welsh governments have threatened to block the key

:10:41.:10:43.

Brexit bill which will convert all existing EU laws into UK law,

:10:44.:10:46.

claiming it undermines the principles of devolution.

:10:47.:10:48.

It comes after first ministers Nicola Sturgeon

:10:49.:10:53.

and Carwyn Jones met separately with EU chief Brexit negotiator

:10:54.:10:56.

Michel Barnier yesterday to discuss their positions.

:10:57.:10:58.

But Brexit Secretary David Davis has rejected claims ministers

:10:59.:11:00.

were giving themselves sweeping powers.

:11:01.:11:02.

Joining us now from Bangor is the First Minister for Wales,

:11:03.:11:05.

Chris Mason, our political correspondent, said a moment ago

:11:06.:11:09.

that this stuff is complicated. Can you explain in the most punter

:11:10.:11:25.

friendly way what your problem is? It means what is in Brussels now

:11:26.:11:29.

should come back to Cardiff, Edinburgh and Belfast where it

:11:30.:11:33.

affects devolved areas, the areas we are responsible for. We don't think

:11:34.:11:37.

it should stick in London. It means England can do what it once but

:11:38.:11:41.

Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland have new restrictions, we can't

:11:42.:11:46.

accept that. The UK government wouldn't accept that and obviously

:11:47.:11:50.

we can't do the same. The procedure is straightforward, it's been

:11:51.:11:54.

detailed by the government, those EU laws come back to Westminster if you

:11:55.:11:58.

like and then those that are appropriate will be passed out to

:11:59.:12:02.

the devolved nations. Don't you trust the government to do that? No

:12:03.:12:09.

bluntly. At the moment the position is, looking at agriculture and

:12:10.:12:15.

fisheries, Watson Brussels goes to Wales -- what's in fisheries. For us

:12:16.:12:20.

it is a power grab by Whitehall and that's something we can't accept.

:12:21.:12:24.

We've offered a solution, we have said the powers come back to the

:12:25.:12:27.

four different governments, let's agree not to change things until we

:12:28.:12:31.

get an agreement on the way forward. That's the mature thing to do. We're

:12:32.:12:35.

a partnership of four nations and we can't accept a situation where one

:12:36.:12:39.

says to the other three this is the way it's going to be and we're going

:12:40.:12:43.

to place restrictions on new. That's not what people voted for in the

:12:44.:12:46.

referendum, they wanted to bring powers back to themselves Andy McKay

:12:47.:12:50.

is of Wales, to the Welsh. You've made your case clearly that you

:12:51.:12:55.

don't trust Theresa May to do what you think is the right thing. -- and

:12:56.:13:02.

in the case of Wales. You said there is a threat to block this process.

:13:03.:13:06.

Talk us through that, you don't have the power to block it, do you? We

:13:07.:13:13.

have to consider parts of the bill because the UK government needs to

:13:14.:13:17.

get what's called legislative consent, it needs our approval to

:13:18.:13:22.

move forward with parts of the bill and David Davies, the Brexit

:13:23.:13:25.

secretary, has said he's going to look for the consent of the

:13:26.:13:29.

different legislatures and different parliaments across the UK and I

:13:30.:13:34.

welcome that. That consent isn't going to be forthcoming if the bill

:13:35.:13:38.

stays as it is. We have the position in Wales of not trying to block the

:13:39.:13:44.

bill, we want a bill that goes through that delivers a Brexit that

:13:45.:13:47.

is good for all nations in the UK but we're not going to support

:13:48.:13:51.

something that takes power away from Wales. In 2011 we had a referendum

:13:52.:13:55.

where people voted overwhelmingly for new powers to come to Wales, we

:13:56.:14:00.

aren't going to jeopardise that and those powers that would come back to

:14:01.:14:04.

Wales from Brussels, they need to come straight back rather than going

:14:05.:14:08.

through a middleman in London. In the interests of clarity, you used

:14:09.:14:15.

the phrase that they need your consent, but legally speaking,

:14:16.:14:19.

technically, they can go ahead. You're talking about the convention,

:14:20.:14:24.

the convention is they seek your consent and approval but in practice

:14:25.:14:28.

they can carry on regardless, Theresa May and her government can

:14:29.:14:32.

carry on regardless, am I right? If they do that two things would

:14:33.:14:36.

happen, there would be a constitutional crisis because it

:14:37.:14:39.

would go against everything the UK is based on. We don't want that. And

:14:40.:14:43.

it would mean all the words they have used so far are worthless.

:14:44.:14:48.

David Davis himself and Boris Johnson have said the same thing in

:14:49.:14:53.

parliament, the consent of the national parliaments will be needed

:14:54.:14:56.

so in other words their words are worth nothing and they are prepared

:14:57.:15:00.

to override something that's been in place for 18 years. That does

:15:01.:15:04.

nothing to create trust and unity in the UK. We're not going to accept

:15:05.:15:09.

that. We are willing and we have offered to work with the UK

:15:10.:15:13.

government, it's not like we have said we won't talk, we have said

:15:14.:15:16.

let's talk and get to a position where we are all happy and the door

:15:17.:15:21.

has been shut. They can't expect us to support the bill when they aren't

:15:22.:15:25.

prepared to talk to all of us around the table. Some of the mood music

:15:26.:15:29.

coming out of Whitehall now suggests they are looking to work with us to

:15:30.:15:34.

make the bill acceptable, fine, I welcome that but they can't expect

:15:35.:15:38.

us to agree to something they themselves wouldn't touch in a month

:15:39.:15:43.

of Sundays. It's not one rule for London and different rules for

:15:44.:15:46.

everyone else. The UK is a partnership of four nations all what

:15:47.:15:50.

is it? Hugely important we work together to deliver a Brexit that

:15:51.:15:54.

works for everyone and that means showing proper respect to Scotland,

:15:55.:15:57.

Wales and Northern Ireland. Carwyn Jones, thanks for your time, First

:15:58.:16:00.

Minister of Wales. Scorching temperatures

:16:01.:16:02.

across parts of Southern Europe. Many thankful that it is cooler, it

:16:03.:16:14.

is a lot cooler, really, and it is in Wimbledon for the tennis.

:16:15.:16:15.

Where are you? Next to the Rose Arbor. Look at it, it is beautiful.

:16:16.:16:27.

This is where you can come to relax, have a drink, something to eat,

:16:28.:16:32.

surrounded by magnificent flowers. When you think how far into the

:16:33.:16:35.

championships we are, the flowers are in good shape. I have seen

:16:36.:16:39.

people watering them, cleaning up, there are petunias, there is Fearns,

:16:40.:16:46.

roses, and other plants as well, all in Wimbledon colours. 50,000

:16:47.:16:50.

supplied for the championships each year. They have had a watering this

:16:51.:16:55.

morning. There will not be much coming out of the sky for most of

:16:56.:16:59.

the UK. Although we are starting on a cloudy note. As a result it is

:17:00.:17:04.

cool with one or two showers around. The forecast for the Gordon is

:17:05.:17:11.

largely dry. We have areas of cloud, we will see sunny spells and highs

:17:12.:17:18.

of around 20- 21 in the breeze. The forecast for the UK is mainly dry.

:17:19.:17:23.

There are sunny spells. Temperatures rise and some of us will see

:17:24.:17:28.

showers. Nine o'clock this morning in the south we have quite a bit of

:17:29.:17:32.

cloud and some of us have seen some sunshine and there are also some

:17:33.:17:36.

showers dotted around. The same into East Anglia and the Midlands. And

:17:37.:17:40.

then into Northern Ireland, we have bright spells or sunny spells. And

:17:41.:17:47.

here and there the clout is thick enough for the odd shower. Across

:17:48.:17:52.

the Irish Sea into Wales, south-west England, it is not much different.

:17:53.:17:57.

We are looking at bright spells, a bit of cloud like this, sunny spells

:17:58.:18:01.

or indeed cloud thick enough for the odd shower. Parts of Wales and

:18:02.:18:05.

south-west England will brighten up through the day and we will see

:18:06.:18:10.

quite a bit of sunshine. Drifting eastwards to the Home Counties, a

:18:11.:18:14.

similar scenario. The clout is thick enough for the odd shower. They will

:18:15.:18:19.

fade. The cloud will turn over and sunny spells develop. Late afternoon

:18:20.:18:23.

into the early afternoon we will start to see sunny spells develop.

:18:24.:18:27.

And as temperatures rise, showers also develop. We have a weather

:18:28.:18:33.

front moving into western Scotland and Northern Ireland introducing

:18:34.:18:37.

some rain. Through the evening and overnight we have the band of rain

:18:38.:18:41.

swinging south and starting to move eastwards. It will start to weaken

:18:42.:18:46.

as well. Many parts of the north will see some rain from that. It

:18:47.:18:51.

will be a mild night in Scotland, northern England and Northern

:18:52.:18:54.

Ireland. For the rest of England and Wales, it will be a cooler nights

:18:55.:19:00.

than the one that was just gone. Tomorrow, Northern Ireland, England

:19:01.:19:03.

and Scotland, we start with the front drifting eastwards. It will

:19:04.:19:09.

brighten up behind it with some warm sunshine develop. Then another front

:19:10.:19:14.

into the north-west. For the rest of England and Wales we are looking at

:19:15.:19:19.

a cloudy start to the day with some sunshine developing. And it will

:19:20.:19:22.

start to feel a little bit more humid with temperatures rising. As

:19:23.:19:27.

we had into Sunday the second front moves south as a weak feature. For

:19:28.:19:31.

Scotland, northern England and Northern Ireland it will be bright

:19:32.:19:35.

with sunshine. And as the front heads south we are looking at a

:19:36.:19:39.

cloudy afternoon and morning. Still, quite nice with a few showers and

:19:40.:19:44.

feeling much more humid. If you have an allergy to Poland this will not

:19:45.:19:49.

be music to your ears. Today across south-east England and northern

:19:50.:19:52.

Scotland the levels are high. The other places I mentioned are

:19:53.:19:56.

moderate. I had to copper tablet this morning straightaway and it is

:19:57.:20:00.

definitely not pleasant. Thank you. See you later. If you are one of

:20:01.:20:06.

those people checking your watch, the train is weaving at 7:31am some

:20:07.:20:18.

were? Do you trust them? That is the thing. Commuters this morning word

:20:19.:20:20.

need me to tell them. Good morning. Punctuality on the railways

:20:21.:20:22.

is at the worst level in ten years. That's according to research

:20:23.:20:26.

from consumer group Which. They also found that train operators

:20:27.:20:28.

handle passenger complaints and delays almost as badly

:20:29.:20:30.

as they did a decade ago. The number of people defaulting

:20:31.:20:33.

on their credit cards has reached it's highest level since

:20:34.:20:36.

the financial crash. And the bad news is that the Bank

:20:37.:20:43.

of England don't think things They've warned that more households

:20:44.:20:46.

are likely to miss payments over And there's been a big jump

:20:47.:20:51.

in the number of tourists visiting the UK in the first three

:20:52.:20:57.

months of this year, according to official

:20:58.:21:00.

stats out yesterday. The Office for National Statistics

:21:01.:21:02.

found visits to the UK were up by a fifth to a record

:21:03.:21:05.

8.3 million trips. The decline in the value

:21:06.:21:12.

of the pound has made it cheaper for foreign visitors to come

:21:13.:21:15.

to the UK, but more expensive So, yes, the peak tourist

:21:16.:21:25.

attractions in the UK bracing themselves for a bump in summer if

:21:26.:21:30.

those figures are anything to go by. Thank you.

:21:31.:21:32.

It is one of the most inspirational stories of the Second World War,

:21:33.:21:35.

civilian sailors crossing the English Channel to rescue

:21:36.:21:38.

The iconic mission is the subject of a new film by the director

:21:39.:21:42.

I spoke to him and one of the film's stars,

:21:43.:21:45.

Sir Mark Rylance, who says the bravery shown by the emergency

:21:46.:21:48.

services during the recent disasters in London and Manchester shows that

:21:49.:21:51.

famous Dunkirk spirit still exists today.

:21:52.:21:56.

Why waste precious tanks when they can pick us off in the air

:21:57.:22:06.

What was the moment for you as a director,

:22:07.:22:17.

I supposed, more importanlty, or a human being, the moment

:22:18.:22:20.

when you thought, there is a story about Dunkirk,

:22:21.:22:23.

well-known as it is historically, a story that I can tell?

:22:24.:22:26.

For me it was myself and Emma, my producer, we made a trip 20 years

:22:27.:22:30.

He wanted to make a crossing at about the same time

:22:31.:22:36.

It was incredibly rough, felt very difficult,

:22:37.:22:40.

very dangerous, and that was without people dropping bombs on us.

:22:41.:22:44.

We weren't heading to a war zone, we were just going to present-day

:22:45.:22:48.

These recent disasters in Manchester and London,

:22:49.:22:59.

the two disasters in London, have made us all so much more aware

:23:00.:23:04.

of civilian involvement, and the selflessness and bravery

:23:05.:23:06.

What I wanted to do was build a story using three different

:23:07.:23:29.

timelines, you know, land, sea and air.

:23:30.:23:35.

You are in a Spitfire, you are on the beach with the guys

:23:36.:23:38.

there, you are on a boat with Mark Rylance,

:23:39.:23:41.

We cross-cut between these three timelines to try to build up

:23:42.:23:45.

a coherent picture of the bigger events

:23:46.:23:47.

of Dunkirk but without jumping out of the intense human experience.

:23:48.:23:52.

It's a film that begs questions of yourself.

:23:53.:23:54.

Yeah, I have a cousin who was among the first rescue services

:23:55.:24:00.

And he recounted, you know, decisions firefighters had to make

:24:01.:24:19.

in that terrible staircase on whether to carry on or rescue

:24:20.:24:22.

And the film, for each of the three stories in the film,

:24:23.:24:26.

the characters get to a moment where they have to make a crucial

:24:27.:24:29.

decision, which will affect some people and other people.

:24:30.:24:32.

And someone or a few people will be sacrificed in order

:24:33.:24:35.

You have made some huge films in the past, but making a film

:24:36.:24:48.

about a real-life event, particularly this event,

:24:49.:24:51.

brings with it I imagine extra responsibilities in terms

:24:52.:24:56.

of what you are depicting and whether it's true

:24:57.:24:58.

Well, you do a lot of research, you do a lot of reading.

:24:59.:25:06.

You try and get it under your fingers.

:25:07.:25:08.

And then what I did is I chose fictional characters to guide us

:25:09.:25:12.

through those events and that freed me up as a filmmaker.

:25:13.:25:16.

I wasn't putting words into people's mouths who existed.

:25:17.:25:19.

I wasn't speaking for people who couldn't speak for themselves.

:25:20.:25:26.

Last week I did a screening for veterans, you know,

:25:27.:25:29.

people who'd actually been there on the beach and standing

:25:30.:25:32.

in front of that audience about to show the film was one

:25:33.:25:35.

of the most daunting professional experiences I have had.

:25:36.:25:37.

You can get a sense of the scale of the film through the images, it is

:25:38.:25:44.

massive in scale. You can see my interview with two

:25:45.:25:46.

of the younger stars of the film, Fionn Whitehead and singer Harry

:25:47.:25:50.

Styles, on tomorrow morning's show. Dunkirk is out in

:25:51.:25:52.

cinemas next Friday. We will be going behind the scenes

:25:53.:26:02.

of the world's greatest classical music festival.

:26:03.:26:04.

Tim Muffett is at the Royal Albert Hall for us.

:26:05.:26:06.

Good morning. Good morning from the Royal Albert Hall, listening to

:26:07.:26:31.

these fantastic first professional orchestra made up with a majority of

:26:32.:26:36.

musicians from a black or minority background and they are playing a

:26:37.:26:45.

piece on the 130th year of the Proms, and this has posted it for

:26:46.:26:51.

the 48 year. It is the largest classical music festival and we will

:26:52.:26:55.

speak with more of those taking part a little later.

:26:56.:26:56.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:26:57.:30:18.

Now, though, it's back to Charlie and Naga.

:30:19.:30:20.

with Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty.

:30:21.:30:35.

But now a summary of this morning's main news:

:30:36.:30:37.

Police in east London are investigating five attacks

:30:38.:30:40.

which involved corrosive substances being thrown in people's faces.

:30:41.:30:42.

They all happened within 90 minutes in Hackney

:30:43.:30:44.

One of the victims has what's been described

:30:45.:30:49.

Earlier, the government minister Sarah Newton told Breakfast

:30:50.:30:53.

the Home Office is investigating why these type of attacks

:30:54.:30:56.

This was a shocking attack last night. You know, somebody's left

:30:57.:31:05.

with life changing injuries. This is something we've been

:31:06.:31:10.

concerned about in the Home Office We've been working very closely

:31:11.:31:12.

with our colleagues in law enforcement to get a better picture

:31:13.:31:16.

of actually what is happening, as you quite rightly say,

:31:17.:31:19.

it's happening in pockets The Home Office has launched

:31:20.:31:21.

a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use, with tailored treatment

:31:22.:31:26.

to be given to drug addicts. It follows a rise in

:31:27.:31:28.

drug-related deaths in England and Wales and targets

:31:29.:31:31.

new psychoactive substances. The Home Secretary Amber Rudd said

:31:32.:31:33.

the plan will focus on recovery. The Scottish and Welsh governments

:31:34.:31:38.

have threatened to block the key Brexit bill which will convert

:31:39.:31:42.

all existing EU laws into UK law, that's over what they say is a power

:31:43.:31:45.

grab by Westminster. The Repeal Bill is also facing

:31:46.:31:48.

opposition from Labour But Brexit Secretary David Davis has

:31:49.:31:50.

rejected the criticism and described it as one of the most significant

:31:51.:31:55.

pieces of legislation President Trump will be the guest

:31:56.:31:58.

of honour at the Bastille Day He's marking France's National Day

:31:59.:32:03.

at the invitation of the country's The two leaders will watch

:32:04.:32:07.

the traditional military parade which, this year, has French

:32:08.:32:10.

soldiers marching alongside US America's entry into the First World

:32:11.:32:13.

War. A heatwave across southern Europe

:32:14.:32:17.

has forced some of the region's most famous tourist sites to close

:32:18.:32:21.

during peak holiday season. More than twenty fires have started

:32:22.:32:23.

near Naples and Sicily where the temperatures have climbed

:32:24.:32:26.

above 40 degrees this week. The Greek government has ordered

:32:27.:32:28.

that popular archaeological sites close, and in southern Spain,

:32:29.:32:31.

the drought has devastated crops. Several Spanish cities

:32:32.:32:34.

have experienced record It will reach 46 degrees

:32:35.:32:35.

in Cordoba today. Anyone visiting Stonehenge or Loch

:32:36.:32:54.

Ness earlier this week would have seen a bonus attraction if they had

:32:55.:32:56.

looked up. The Red Arrows and their

:32:57.:32:57.

American counterparts, the Thunderbirds, have been

:32:58.:32:59.

performing some stunning manoeuvres in a practice display from RAF

:33:00.:33:01.

Fairford in Gloucestershire. They were rehearsing ahead of

:33:02.:33:04.

the Royal International Air Tattoo anniversary of the United States Air

:33:05.:33:07.

Force. Those are the main stories. Mike is

:33:08.:33:20.

at Wimbledon for us as the ball bounces along and Mike pops up, good

:33:21.:33:25.

morning. You're looking ahead to the men's semis and a lot of eyes on

:33:26.:33:29.

Federer but you're starting with a look back at events yesterday? It's

:33:30.:33:35.

the time of day to draw breath and reflect with the cover is still on

:33:36.:33:39.

on centre court, a bit of a breeze whistling around, not as warm as it

:33:40.:33:43.

has been but hotter later on, as Carol was saying -- covers.

:33:44.:33:49.

Yesterday Johanna Konta, her dream was ended by Venus Williams, the

:33:50.:33:54.

five-time champion, but we're not too downhearted, especially as

:33:55.:33:57.

through this tournament macrojoker has shown her potential and she

:33:58.:34:01.

believes one day she can go all the way and win the women's Engels. It

:34:02.:34:06.

wasn't to be against Venus Williams, who at the age of 37 is the oldest

:34:07.:34:11.

finalist in the women's since Navratilova in 1994 -- singles. She

:34:12.:34:15.

looked every bit the five-time champion, how playing Konta, who

:34:16.:34:21.

lost in straight sets, 6-4, 6-2, much to the disappointment of home

:34:22.:34:23.

fans at the all England club. Afterwards she thanked fans

:34:24.:34:26.

for their love and support and described the fortnight

:34:27.:34:29.

as a memorable experience. I've definitely enjoyed every single

:34:30.:34:31.

moment I've been here these So I don't think I need too much

:34:32.:34:34.

time for that to sink in or me to analyse that, I've made sure that

:34:35.:34:39.

I've been very present with everything I've done to make

:34:40.:34:42.

sure I have enjoyed and taken the most out of every opportunity

:34:43.:34:45.

and experience I've had. Venus Williams will now play

:34:46.:34:48.

Spain's Garbine Muguruza The 14th seed thrashed the unseeded

:34:49.:34:50.

Magdalena Rybarikova in little over an hour to make it to her

:34:51.:34:54.

second Wimbledon final. There remains some British

:34:55.:35:00.

interest here at Wimbledon, though, Jamie Murray and his partner

:35:01.:35:02.

Martina Hingis are into the mixed doubles semi-finals after beating

:35:03.:35:06.

the all British pairing Murray and Hingis are top seeds

:35:07.:35:08.

and took the match in straight sets to book their place

:35:09.:35:13.

in the last four. And Jamie could be facing a fellow

:35:14.:35:19.

Briton across the net if he makes it to the final because there's

:35:20.:35:24.

a familiar British name in the other semi final, Heather Watson

:35:25.:35:27.

is through with her partner Henri They are the defending champions

:35:28.:35:29.

and could make it back to back titles after they won their match

:35:30.:35:33.

in three sets yesterday. The wheelchair tournaments started

:35:34.:35:40.

yesterday here but there was disappointment for defending

:35:41.:35:43.

champion Britain's Gordon Reid. He lost in the singles in straight

:35:44.:35:45.

sets to Sweden's Steffan Olsson, the man he beat to win

:35:46.:35:48.

the title last year. Better news, though,

:35:49.:35:51.

for Alfie Hewett, he won his first singles

:35:52.:35:52.

match on grass. Away from Wimbledon,

:35:53.:35:58.

the three-time Tour de France winner Chris Froome has lost the leader's

:35:59.:36:01.

yellow jersey in this year's race after a gruelling day

:36:02.:36:04.

in the mountains on Stage 12. Froome said he just didn't

:36:05.:36:07.

have the legs as the race crossed He finished down in seventh,

:36:08.:36:10.

handing the overall lead to rival To football now and Manchester City

:36:11.:36:14.

have agreed a fee of ?50 million for the Tottenham

:36:15.:36:21.

defender Kyle Walker. It's expected he'll sign in time

:36:22.:36:22.

to join his new team-mates before they leave for their pre-season tour

:36:23.:36:26.

of the United States. an impact at his new club is Wayne

:36:27.:36:28.

Rooney. He only signed for Everton on Sunday

:36:29.:36:33.

but has already scored his first goal, this brilliant

:36:34.:36:36.

long-range effort on his debut during their pre-season

:36:37.:36:38.

tour of Tanzania. Back at Wimbledon, I'm delighted to

:36:39.:36:55.

say to talk about the Johanna Konta match, Pete McCraw, former

:36:56.:36:59.

Australian national women's tennis coach and you discovered her, how

:37:00.:37:05.

was she? 12. Yesterday watching her here, did you have flashbacks to

:37:06.:37:10.

that will be rolled? What was ironic is the first time I saw Jo compete

:37:11.:37:15.

was the clay-court championships in Mildura -- 12-year-old. The irony of

:37:16.:37:20.

grass and grass is a great connection. What emotions did you go

:37:21.:37:25.

through yesterday watching her? She has done so well? She has, she has

:37:26.:37:31.

transformed her game, herself, a competitor, pride is the

:37:32.:37:35.

overwhelming emotion I have from the little girl I first saw at 12 or 13,

:37:36.:37:40.

the girl I took to America for six weeks to play an international

:37:41.:37:44.

junior event and then to see her shine on this stage over the last

:37:45.:37:48.

fortnight has been wonderful. Did you think when you saw her when she

:37:49.:37:53.

was 12 that she could go all the way and win the women's singles at

:37:54.:37:57.

Wimbledon? She definitely had the competitive traits, she definitely

:37:58.:38:01.

brought a sense of purpose and love to compete. While she needed to work

:38:02.:38:07.

on her game and while the transition has been a little longer than most

:38:08.:38:11.

of her peers, I think the process she has been through has really

:38:12.:38:16.

transform her as a competitor to what we see today. Are you convinced

:38:17.:38:20.

even more now that she can bounce back having seen her play this week,

:38:21.:38:23.

especially the mental strength we saw a lot of the time, can she win

:38:24.:38:28.

it one day? No doubt, the best is yet to come. Really? Absolutely.

:38:29.:38:34.

WADA she knew to do to go the extra step to beat the likes of Venus

:38:35.:38:39.

Williams -- what Toshi. When you look at the experience of Venus, a

:38:40.:38:44.

five-time champion, one of Jo's assets is her ability to learn and

:38:45.:38:49.

adapt and she will learn a lot from these championships -- what does

:38:50.:38:53.

she. She will grow as a competitor and develop her game. Standing

:38:54.:38:57.

closer on the baseline and taking the ball earlier will make a big

:38:58.:39:00.

difference against someone like Venus. You can't underestimate the

:39:01.:39:04.

pressure of a first semi-final here and having done its O'Malley times

:39:05.:39:09.

like the nurse makes a difference? For some athletes support is... --

:39:10.:39:19.

so many times -- like Venus. To use the support of the crowd and the

:39:20.:39:23.

backing to get the best out of herself is the way forward. What

:39:24.:39:28.

about the final, Muguruza has been there against Serena, what about

:39:29.:39:32.

Venus? The first semi was a bit difficult to gauge Muguruza's form,

:39:33.:39:39.

given that it was one-sided. Looking at Venus's performance yesterday,

:39:40.:39:44.

you would have to say Venus in straight and Muguruza in three.

:39:45.:39:49.

About the men's, what about Federer, now the other big three have gone?

:39:50.:39:53.

He is the sentimental favourite and he is also the actual favourite. For

:39:54.:40:00.

the benefit of the game it would be a fantastic achievement. They are

:40:01.:40:04.

second up, Federer against Berdych in the second semi-final on Centre

:40:05.:40:08.

Court, you can hear the covers are coming off. Before that it is Cilic

:40:09.:40:14.

against the man who knocked out Andy Murray, Sam Querrey. That's this

:40:15.:40:17.

afternoon, the coverage is on BBC. Also across Radio 5 Live

:40:18.:40:27.

and the BBC Sport website. Will it be as hot as Australia? I

:40:28.:40:36.

don't think so but it depends on where you are. It will be dry when

:40:37.:40:40.

play gets under way today at Wimbledon. What we are looking at is

:40:41.:40:45.

not dissimilar to what we have got, you can see through the roof of

:40:46.:40:48.

Centre Court it is cloudy, remaining cloudy for much of the morning, late

:40:49.:40:52.

morning in the early afternoon it will brighten up and sunshine will

:40:53.:40:56.

be present. The forecast for Wimbledon this afternoon is dry. You

:40:57.:41:01.

will be very unlucky if you see a shower. Temperatures today, up to 20

:41:02.:41:06.

or 21 in light winds, feeling quite pleasant. This morning there's a lot

:41:07.:41:11.

of cloud across the UK, some of us seeing showers and under the cloud

:41:12.:41:15.

it feels cool but the cloud will break and we will see sunny spells

:41:16.:41:18.

developing more less across-the-board and temperature

:41:19.:41:21.

wise showers will develop. This morning at 9am in southern England,

:41:22.:41:26.

cloud around, some will have sunny breaks and there are a few showers.

:41:27.:41:31.

Further north, East Anglia into the Midlands, the same holds true, the

:41:32.:41:35.

mixture of brighter spells, a few sunny spells and showers. Further

:41:36.:41:40.

north into northern England, a drier start, Scotland a drier start with a

:41:41.:41:44.

few showers and in Northern Ireland, a bright start with sunny skies.

:41:45.:41:48.

Into Wales and south-west England, a bit more cloud around, again here

:41:49.:41:52.

and there you could get the odd shower this morning but equally some

:41:53.:41:55.

good brightness through the afternoon with good spells of

:41:56.:41:59.

sunshine developing. Interesting further east through Dorset and into

:42:00.:42:03.

Hampshire and the Home Counties, similar to what we have at

:42:04.:42:06.

Wimbledon, variable amounts of cloud with a few brighter breaks but

:42:07.:42:10.

through the morning, especially late morning into the early afternoon,

:42:11.:42:13.

where we have the cloud at the moment it will turn over, sunny

:42:14.:42:17.

spells will develop and it will be pleasant. As temperatures rise at

:42:18.:42:21.

the top as I mentioned, there will be a few showers but they will be

:42:22.:42:25.

scattered and most won't see them. By the end of the day a new weather

:42:26.:42:28.

front in western Scotland and Northern Ireland will build the

:42:29.:42:33.

abuse rain. Temperatures up to 22 or 23 -- will introduce. Through the

:42:34.:42:37.

evening and overnight the weather front in Scotland and Northern

:42:38.:42:41.

Ireland sinks south and its east, taking the rain with it. Not as cold

:42:42.:42:46.

a night in the north as the one just gone, but under clearer skies as we

:42:47.:42:50.

come across the west of -- rest of England and Wales, a cooler night

:42:51.:42:54.

than the one just gone so if you've been having trouble sleeping in the

:42:55.:42:58.

night, this is good news. Tomorrow we start with the weather front in

:42:59.:43:01.

parts of Scotland and northern England, continuing to drift east,

:43:02.:43:05.

taking its cloud and patchy light rain and drizzle with it. Behind it,

:43:06.:43:10.

brightening up with the sunshine and the next weather front comes to the

:43:11.:43:13.

north-west. In England and Wales away from the north, starting with

:43:14.:43:17.

clear skies and the sun comes out, feeling more humid and the

:43:18.:43:21.

temperature rising. Into Sunday, remember the weather front in

:43:22.:43:25.

Scotland and Northern Ireland? It moves south as a weak feature, so

:43:26.:43:29.

for Scotland, England and Northern Ireland, more sunshine, the chance

:43:30.:43:33.

of a shower, a bright and right start in southern England and Wales

:43:34.:43:37.

but as the front goes south as a weak feature it will introduce more

:43:38.:43:40.

cloud and maybe the odd shower. Temperatures around London, 27. If

:43:41.:43:46.

you're coming to Wimbledon for the men's finals, bear that in mind,

:43:47.:43:50.

feeling humid. If you like it hot, as we head into the middle of next

:43:51.:43:55.

week, parts of southern England, especially the south-east, will be

:43:56.:43:59.

back in the high 20s, maybe even 30, once again, but it does mean we will

:44:00.:44:05.

see thunderstorms again. Always liked reliever or some relief after

:44:06.:44:09.

a spell of hot weather. Lots of comments about the subjectivity of

:44:10.:44:22.

weather, what is hot -- always light relief. In meteorological terms we

:44:23.:44:27.

have standards by which we will say this is considered hot in the summer

:44:28.:44:31.

or this is considered hot in the winter. But personally, I like it

:44:32.:44:36.

about 28 in the summer, dry, sunny, rain at night to water the plants.

:44:37.:44:43.

I'm a 23 girl I think, better for golf! Carol, thanks very much!

:44:44.:44:45.

Now many of us will have been hit with a charge

:44:46.:44:49.

for going over our overdraft limit unexpectedly but for 20 million bank

:44:50.:44:53.

This is all about going over an agreed overdraft limit,

:44:54.:45:08.

so we're talking about unplanned overdrafts.

:45:09.:45:10.

Lloyds Banking Group, which owns Lloyds, Halifax and Bank

:45:11.:45:13.

of Scotland, has announced it's scrapping its fees

:45:14.:45:15.

At the moment, Lloyds customers pay a daily charge if they go

:45:16.:45:19.

over their overdraft limit unexpectedly.

:45:20.:45:21.

If you go above your overdraft limit by between ?10 and ?25,

:45:22.:45:25.

And if you blow your overdraft limit by more than that,

:45:26.:45:30.

From November, those charges will be scrapped.

:45:31.:45:37.

Sue Hayward is a personal finance expert and she is with us.

:45:38.:45:49.

My first question is whether this will encourage people into

:45:50.:45:56.

overspending. If there isn't a limit, if there isn't a threat of

:45:57.:46:00.

charge, will people spend too much? I don't think they will at all. What

:46:01.:46:05.

the banks are doing, with the Lloyds group, the amount you can go over,

:46:06.:46:12.

they will cut the fees free buffer rather drastically, which means

:46:13.:46:16.

people won't have the option and in some cases they might have to clear

:46:17.:46:19.

the overdraft before they can spend more money. It is not an open bank

:46:20.:46:24.

account to spend as much as you like. And of course, don't forget, a

:46:25.:46:31.

lot of people have a fee free buffer zone. We might see people switching

:46:32.:46:37.

banks to go to a different bank that offers more for their money. Will

:46:38.:46:41.

the banks be able to make the money back somehow? They are charging a

:46:42.:46:45.

little more in interest rates for some overdrafts? They are. The banks

:46:46.:46:50.

are not that generous, they are not charities. They are there to make

:46:51.:46:53.

money. If they are going to lose money, in the sense they will not

:46:54.:46:57.

charge as much, we could see overcharges in credit cards. Over

:46:58.:47:01.

the last couple of years we have seen the Bank of England base rate

:47:02.:47:04.

go down. Savings rates have been particular shabby. What has happened

:47:05.:47:09.

is interest rates on credit cards have been creeping up to over 20%.

:47:10.:47:13.

There might be little charges that they sneak in and we don't notice in

:47:14.:47:17.

the small print all the terms and conditions where we might get hit.

:47:18.:47:21.

We heard from the Bank of England more concerns about people's

:47:22.:47:25.

personal debt, household debt. People seem to be using credit cards

:47:26.:47:29.

to pay other credit cards are today off other debts. That is a concern.

:47:30.:47:35.

It is, yes. The number of credit cards, these 0% deals, is being cut.

:47:36.:47:40.

There are some at the moment where you can get three and a half years

:47:41.:47:45.

of interest-free credit. Those deals are not available to everybody. It

:47:46.:47:49.

depends on your financial circumstances. The banks are cutting

:47:50.:47:53.

back on those as well. We might see less of those in future. Are we

:47:54.:47:57.

likely to see the other banks follow suit? This is Lloyds, will others be

:47:58.:48:03.

pressured into the same thing? The financial conduct authority is on

:48:04.:48:06.

their case and they say you have to do something about this. More will

:48:07.:48:10.

follow. Thank you very much for joining us. Good news for banking

:48:11.:48:14.

customers, especially those who may occasionally drift into the

:48:15.:48:17.

overdraft without necessarily planning to. Thank you very much. We

:48:18.:48:25.

are very lucky on Breakfast to go behind-the-scenes in places and here

:48:26.:48:29.

we are, this low shot this morning inside the hallowed surroundings of

:48:30.:48:33.

the Royal Albert Hall. Of course, the Proms about to start, returning

:48:34.:48:36.

for the 123rd year. And for the first time

:48:37.:48:38.

ever, Breakfast is live inside the Royal Albert Hall,

:48:39.:48:41.

home to the musical extravaganza So, there is history there. As well

:48:42.:48:51.

as of course passion for music. That is Nicola Benedetti, I think.

:48:52.:48:54.

Indeed, performing Shostakovich's violin Concerto number one, one of

:48:55.:49:08.

the most successful violinist. It will be her sixth time at the Proms.

:49:09.:49:16.

The 120 30 of the world's largest classical music festival. Eight

:49:17.:49:20.

weeks of music ahead. Very exciting. Katie is one of the presenters, and

:49:21.:49:26.

also Anushka, performing for the third time at the Proms on the

:49:27.:49:31.

sitar. What are the highlights? Welcome to our summer home. It is

:49:32.:49:34.

really rather nice. It will be a fabulous season. Highlights from all

:49:35.:49:40.

sorts of young performers, world-class names you will have

:49:41.:49:43.

heard of, the best classical musicians in the world come here.

:49:44.:49:46.

Eight weeks this summer with over 90 concerts. What is wonderful is there

:49:47.:49:52.

is music for everyone. Of course it is classical music, there is jazz,

:49:53.:49:57.

soul, pop, world music. You are going to hear more about that as

:49:58.:50:01.

well. And although most of the concerts are here, we go out and

:50:02.:50:06.

about, the Proms on the road, and it is going out of London to Hull.

:50:07.:50:12.

There are the attempts to make classical music more relevant to

:50:13.:50:15.

more people. What has happened this year specifically? I love this

:50:16.:50:21.

question. The Proms started 123 years ago with the sole intent of

:50:22.:50:27.

making classical music as outwardly diverse and accessible as possible.

:50:28.:50:30.

You can come here any night and get a ticket for just a couple of quid

:50:31.:50:34.

and stand here in the arena. There is never a sold-out concert because

:50:35.:50:38.

you can always have tickets in the day. That was the idea, get as many

:50:39.:50:42.

people to great music as possible. Yes, a lot of youth appearing this

:50:43.:50:46.

year. We have the first black and Asian and ethnic minority orchestra,

:50:47.:50:50.

we have wonderful diversity from around the world. The whole idea is

:50:51.:50:56.

you can come along to the Proms and have a great time for not free much

:50:57.:51:00.

money and just... Get on to listen to a lot of great music. It had been

:51:01.:51:05.

accusations that it is only test, although it has clearly changed, and

:51:06.:51:09.

has a change for ever? The Proms have mashed up classical and pop

:51:10.:51:14.

music. It is different to what it was when it first began in 1895.

:51:15.:51:20.

Well, of course it is, a lot has changed, Tim, we can all agree since

:51:21.:51:26.

then. If you want to come and see tributes to Ella Fitzgerald. The

:51:27.:51:33.

late-night Proms are amazing. One of the best nights I had was the Ibetha

:51:34.:51:42.

from. You can't assume it is just a whole load of stuff, you know, the

:51:43.:51:46.

old-fashioned view that it is stuffy musicians. It really is not at all.

:51:47.:51:50.

It is great music. That is what you have to remember. Whatever you music

:51:51.:51:54.

you come to watch, it is the best in the world. Lovely. Thank you very

:51:55.:52:01.

much. Now, Anushka, pass sister Norah Jones, you will perform on the

:52:02.:52:05.

sitar for the third time at the Proms. What is it like? I have

:52:06.:52:10.

played a couple of times outside the Proms as well and it is incredible.

:52:11.:52:17.

Just in and of itself. And the Proms are something special. It is the

:52:18.:52:21.

most iconic classical musical festival in the world. To play it

:52:22.:52:26.

there is a special feeling and I think it is something that feels

:52:27.:52:30.

accessible. You can see the standing seats, it is a diverse group of

:52:31.:52:36.

people. Not the same as other classical audiences. It feels a lot

:52:37.:52:40.

more diverse. That is exciting. Your instrument, in India, is seen as a

:52:41.:52:45.

male instrument. That has changed more recently. He performed with

:52:46.:52:51.

your late father as well. When you perform, does it feel special to

:52:52.:52:55.

perform an instrument, non-traditional classical

:52:56.:52:57.

instrument, in the British sense in such an historic venue? I appreciate

:52:58.:53:03.

getting to present Indian music in something like the Proms. It is an

:53:04.:53:07.

important symbol of diversity to have that. This will be a special

:53:08.:53:11.

night, premiering music never performed live before. It is an

:53:12.:53:16.

album called Passages with my father and Philip Glass. Outside of that I

:53:17.:53:20.

am one of the few female instrumentalist outplay sitar but

:53:21.:53:24.

they do not have gender, so, you know, I just play this instrument. I

:53:25.:53:29.

will tell you what we should do, let's listen to the players as we

:53:30.:53:33.

chat a little longer, because, as you were saying, tell us about these

:53:34.:53:37.

musicians, they are very special in many ways. They are tremendous. You

:53:38.:53:42.

will have seen the base earlier, this was set up a couple of years

:53:43.:53:49.

ago. Fantastic musicians. So much work has been done to try to get

:53:50.:53:53.

away from the idea that classical music is for white old men. It

:53:54.:53:56.

really isn't. We all know that. There are a lot of amazing musicians

:53:57.:54:00.

from all sorts of backgrounds. Traditionally they were not many

:54:01.:54:05.

visible on stage in European orchestras. This was something that

:54:06.:54:09.

I know was strongly felt about, to provide a place where it was normal

:54:10.:54:13.

to be from an ethnic minority playing traditional classical music

:54:14.:54:17.

on a stage like this. It has been the most tremendous success of. It

:54:18.:54:24.

is absolutely fantastic. And the key thing is more people, the more who

:54:25.:54:28.

engage with classical music, the better, and that is a done deal in

:54:29.:54:32.

many ways, isn't it, that is happening at the moment? I would

:54:33.:54:36.

like to think so, yes, and I bank my drum for this every year. I have

:54:37.:54:40.

played classical music since I was a kid. But I always say is it is part

:54:41.:54:48.

of the music around us all the time, whether it is film music, like John

:54:49.:54:52.

Williams, it is therefore stop it is just wonder. White -- it is just

:54:53.:54:58.

there. If we can get one more from the players as we headed back, that

:54:59.:55:02.

would be lovely. It all kicks off this evening. There are eight weeks

:55:03.:55:05.

of classical music. This evening it begins and it goes on until

:55:06.:55:10.

September. The Proms has, long way in the last 123 years.

:55:11.:55:16.

-- the Proms has come a long way in the last 123 years.

:55:17.:55:33.

Well, wasn't that lovely? And how did they know that we had to come

:55:34.:55:40.

out of that moment? That was exquisite timing. Time to

:55:41.:55:41.

perfection. We'll talk to Sir David

:55:42.:55:47.

Attenborough about his fears for the UK's butterfly population

:55:48.:55:49.

and what you can do to help sent in of butterflies in your

:55:50.:55:52.

sent in of butterflies in your Hello, this is Breakfast, with

:55:53.:59:15.

Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty. Five people are attacked

:59:16.:59:56.

with acid in London One person has suffered

:59:57.:59:58.

life-changing injuries. The Government tells this

:59:59.:00:03.

programme it's taking action This was a shocking attack last

:00:04.:00:16.

night, one person has a life changing injuries, and this is

:00:17.:00:18.

something we have been concerned about in the Home Office for some

:00:19.:00:19.

time. Good morning, it's

:00:20.:00:29.

Friday, 14th July. New measures to tackle

:00:30.:00:30.

a rise in drug-related deaths are announced -

:00:31.:00:35.

they'll target so-called legal highs After dinner together

:00:36.:00:37.

in the Eiffel Tower, President Trump joins

:00:38.:00:46.

President Macron of France for the country's

:00:47.:00:47.

Bastille Day celebrations. Actor Mark Rylance tells us how

:00:48.:00:49.

he thinks the spirit of Dunkirk depicted in his latest film has been

:00:50.:00:52.

reflected in recent events. These recent disasters in Manchester

:00:53.:01:06.

and London, the two disasters in London, have made us all so much

:01:07.:01:11.

more aware of civilian involvement and the selflessness and bravery of

:01:12.:01:13.

the civilian rescue services. The 123rd prom season begins this

:01:14.:01:33.

evening, you are listening to a piece by hollyhocks. We will be

:01:34.:01:37.

speaking to the musicians taking part in the world's largest

:01:38.:01:39.

classical music festival. Here at Wimbledon, the dream

:01:40.:01:42.

is over for Johanna Konta, She says she can win the women's

:01:43.:01:44.

title in years to come. She lost her semi-final

:01:45.:01:52.

yesterday to five-time Talking of Venus, there is that

:01:53.:02:03.

song, she's got it, she's still got it.

:02:04.:02:11.

Good morning, it is a chilly start at Wimbledon, also quite a cloudy

:02:12.:02:14.

one but it should brighten up and stay dry. For the UK as a whole,

:02:15.:02:19.

cloudy with a few showers, sunny spells developing and further

:02:20.:02:23.

showers this afternoon in the north-west later. More detail on all

:02:24.:02:27.

of that later in the programme. Thank you, see you later on.

:02:28.:02:28.

Police in East London are investigating five attacks

:02:29.:02:33.

which involved corrosive substances being thrown in people's faces.

:02:34.:02:35.

One of the victims has suffered what's been described

:02:36.:02:38.

The incidents all happened within 90 minutes in Hackney

:02:39.:02:42.

One teenager has been arrested on suspicion of grievous

:02:43.:02:45.

Andy Moore's report contains some distressing images.

:02:46.:02:53.

This was the scene of the most serious attack last night,

:02:54.:02:59.

the victim was apparently delivering takeaway food when a pair of men

:03:00.:03:02.

Police say a corrosive substance was thrown in his face.

:03:03.:03:10.

He was taken to hospital with what they described

:03:11.:03:12.

In the space of just over an hour, police were alerted

:03:13.:03:18.

to five very similar attacks, the motive on each occasion

:03:19.:03:20.

The Government says it is keen to crack down on this type of crime.

:03:21.:03:31.

This was a shocking attack last night. Somebody is left with life

:03:32.:03:34.

changing injuries and this is something that we've been concerned

:03:35.:03:38.

about in the Home Office for some time. We've been working very

:03:39.:03:42.

closely with our colleagues in law enforcement to get a better picture

:03:43.:03:46.

of actually what is happening, as you quite rightly say it is

:03:47.:03:47.

happening in pockets of the country. Acid attacks in England

:03:48.:03:52.

have doubled since 2012. 21-year-old Resham Khan

:03:53.:03:54.

and her cousin Jameel Mukhtar were attacked shortly after they had

:03:55.:03:56.

been celebrating her 21st Acid was thrown through

:03:57.:03:58.

the window of their car. My face started melting,

:03:59.:04:06.

my clothes started to burn, my shorts started sticking

:04:07.:04:11.

to me, there was smoke Moped crime is also on the increase,

:04:12.:04:13.

especially in London. Delivery drivers in east London

:04:14.:04:17.

say they've been faced by an escalating crime wave

:04:18.:04:20.

from knife-wielding gangs. The Home Office has launched

:04:21.:04:22.

a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use, with tailored treatment

:04:23.:04:38.

to be given to drug addicts. It follows a rise in

:04:39.:04:41.

drug-related deaths in England and Wales and targets

:04:42.:04:43.

new psychoactive substances. The Home Secretary Amber Rudd said

:04:44.:04:45.

the plan will focus on recovery. The Scottish and Welsh governments

:04:46.:04:47.

have threatened to block the key Brexit bill which will convert

:04:48.:04:50.

all existing EU laws into UK law, over what they say is a "power

:04:51.:04:53.

grab" by Westminster. The Repeal Bill is also facing

:04:54.:04:55.

opposition from Labour and other Our political correspondent

:04:56.:04:58.

Chris Mason joins us now You can always make things clear and

:04:59.:05:07.

no-one is under any illusions, this is complicated, isn't it grows by

:05:08.:05:11.

pro-1 of those examples, the EU bill, there is already a row over

:05:12.:05:15.

this one? Yes, there is, it is mighty

:05:16.:05:18.

complicated, this, and pretty difficult to explain but let me have

:05:19.:05:23.

a crack. What the Government was doing and is doing with the

:05:24.:05:27.

blueprint for Brexit is setting out how it goes about untying the UK

:05:28.:05:32.

from 40 odd years of association with the EU, in

:05:33.:05:43.

terms cutting and pasting all of the laws that Brussels has made on our

:05:44.:05:47.

behalf and turning them into British law on day one after Brexit so there

:05:48.:05:50.

are no black holes in terms of laws and regulations. But exactly how

:05:51.:05:53.

that works is causing 360 degrees of scrutiny, Labour asking awkward

:05:54.:05:55.

questions, some Conservatives asking awkward questions, and crucially

:05:56.:06:00.

awkward questions from Scotland and Wales, the devolved administrations.

:06:01.:06:03.

Powers that will come back from Brussels that could eventually end

:06:04.:06:08.

up in Belfast, Edinburgh and Cardiff are coming via Westminster and that

:06:09.:06:12.

is causing real anxiety. Listen to the concern of the First Minister of

:06:13.:06:18.

Wales, for instance. It is not one rule for London and then different

:06:19.:06:22.

rules for everybody else, the UK is a partnership of four nations, or

:06:23.:06:27.

what is it? It is hugely important we work together to deliver a Brexit

:06:28.:06:30.

that works for everybody and that means showing proper respect to

:06:31.:06:34.

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The first ministers outside

:06:35.:06:38.

of London can't stop Brexit happening altogether but they can

:06:39.:06:43.

cause no end of grief to the process and Downing Street is well aware of

:06:44.:06:47.

that and well aware of where else the criticism could come from as

:06:48.:06:51.

well. This is going to be a rocky couple of years the Theresa May, if

:06:52.:06:55.

she lasts that long. Chris, thank you.

:06:56.:06:56.

Crowds are expected to line the streets for the funeral

:06:57.:06:59.

The six-year-old Sunderland fan won a legion of supporters

:07:00.:07:06.

across the country, including footballer Jermain Defoe, who has

:07:07.:07:09.

left training in Spain to be at the funeral.

:07:10.:07:11.

Bradley died last Friday after suffering from a rare cancer.

:07:12.:07:18.

Two police forces have become the first in the UK to set up

:07:19.:07:21.

A helicopter can cost hundreds of pounds per hour

:07:22.:07:30.

but the remote-controlled miniature alternative

:07:31.:07:31.

provides an eye-in-the-sky for a fraction of the price to help

:07:32.:07:33.

with searches for missing people, responding to road crashes

:07:34.:07:35.

President Donald Trump is in Paris to discuss US relations with French

:07:36.:07:41.

He has been the guest of honour at many of

:07:42.:07:47.

the city's famous landmarks - including the Eiffel Tower,

:07:48.:07:49.

You looked that up, ?170 per head is what you would pay?

:07:50.:08:03.

Normally, it is probably more expensive on this occasion!

:08:04.:08:05.

Maybe they got a special deal. They'll meet again at the Bastille

:08:06.:08:08.

Day celebrations in Paris. Our reporter Hugh

:08:09.:08:10.

Schofield is there. We can see people lining the

:08:11.:08:16.

streets, very much very keen to welcome President Trump?

:08:17.:08:23.

They are, and in an hour or so the parade will start down the

:08:24.:08:28.

Champs-Elysees where I am standing and the final preparations are

:08:29.:08:32.

underway, watching soldiers, beautifully turned out, putting on

:08:33.:08:36.

the final changes and joking in their bright red cravat and helping

:08:37.:08:40.

each other to looks big and span and in an hour the first troop. Marching

:08:41.:08:47.

down. Americans, by the way, this year, because this year marks 100

:08:48.:08:51.

years since the United States joined the First World War and that is why

:08:52.:08:56.

Donald Trump is here, the invitation was to come and represent America

:08:57.:09:01.

for this very important anniversary, coincidentally, but of course it

:09:02.:09:07.

comes also with diplomatic baggage around it, Emmanuel Macron and

:09:08.:09:14.

Donald Trump seem to have forged a friendship or at least a

:09:15.:09:17.

relationship that is functioning and which, from the French point of

:09:18.:09:21.

view, will serve the purpose of keeping Donald Trump and America

:09:22.:09:25.

within the camp, stopping the isolation of Trump, which the French

:09:26.:09:28.

beard is what was happening. It is interesting as you talk about

:09:29.:09:33.

that relationship being built upon and how, I don't know, how people in

:09:34.:09:40.

the press are perceiving Trump with other leaders, there are still

:09:41.:09:43.

comments being picked up on about what Donald Trump did or did not say

:09:44.:09:47.

to Emmanuel Macron's wife and in relation to the general political

:09:48.:09:59.

sense of unease at the moment? Yes, there were remarks that Donald

:10:00.:10:03.

Trump made yesterday, basically complimenting Emmanuel Macron's

:10:04.:10:09.

wife, a much older woman of course, which had been reported and spun and

:10:10.:10:14.

indicating that his crudeness has not gone away, shall we say, but

:10:15.:10:19.

that is not being made much of here in France. One aspect of this which

:10:20.:10:22.

I heard you referred to in the earlier discussion is why are there

:10:23.:10:32.

no protest here? The French are not big fans of Donald Trump at all but

:10:33.:10:36.

they are not protesting, largely because it is holiday time here,

:10:37.:10:41.

summer is coming, the French really switch off politics now and will

:10:42.:10:45.

give him a good welcome. Always good to talk to you, thank

:10:46.:10:50.

you very much. Apologies for a bit of a break-up, the technical

:10:51.:10:52.

gremlins tackling us again, but we got the gist of what he was saying,

:10:53.:10:57.

President Trump expected to arrive for the parade in about an hour.

:10:58.:11:01.

Sunshine in Paris, but further south the temperatures are getting warm

:11:02.:11:02.

across southern Europe. It has forced some

:11:03.:11:10.

of the region's most famous tourist sites to close

:11:11.:11:12.

during peak holiday season. More than 20 fires have started

:11:13.:11:15.

near Naples and Sicily, where the temperatures have climbed

:11:16.:11:17.

above 40 degrees celsius this week. The Greek government has

:11:18.:11:20.

ordered that popular In southern Spain,

:11:21.:11:21.

the drought has devastated crops. Several Spanish cities

:11:22.:11:25.

have experienced record It will reach a record 47

:11:26.:11:27.

degrees in Cordoba today. We will get a full weather update

:11:28.:11:40.

for over year with Carol in every moment.

:11:41.:11:47.

Fewer people are taking illegal drugs than in recent years but

:11:48.:11:51.

according to the Home Office there has been a dramatic increase in

:11:52.:11:59.

deaths from drugs in England and Wales.

:12:00.:12:06.

The first new strategy for seven years aims to target

:12:07.:12:09.

what are described as "new threats" such as former legal highs

:12:10.:12:11.

There will be more monitoring of those who use drugs to better target

:12:12.:12:15.

the help available. With us now is Eve Christian,

:12:16.:12:19.

a former drugs user who now helps support others with addiction

:12:20.:12:22.

problems, and in our Westminster studio is Ed Morrow,

:12:23.:12:24.

from the Royal Society Ed, let me begin with you. Your

:12:25.:12:35.

reaction to this programme, there is no new money, no decriminalisation

:12:36.:12:40.

when it comes to the use of drugs or for drug users, those are some

:12:41.:12:47.

criticisms levied at it. What are some positives? This is a small step

:12:48.:12:52.

in the right direction, there is an increased emphasis on recovery, on

:12:53.:12:55.

harm reduction, on getting people into treatment, but really without

:12:56.:12:59.

the new money to facilitate that we are still facing a problem where

:13:00.:13:03.

huge numbers of people are suffering harm from drug use because they are

:13:04.:13:07.

not accessing the services that they need, the majority of deaths we have

:13:08.:13:11.

seen recently, those people have never been in contact with

:13:12.:13:22.

treatment, so if we don't remove the barrier of criminalisation and put

:13:23.:13:24.

more money into treatment services, we are not going to get those people

:13:25.:13:26.

into contact with treatment services. Eve, we will talk about

:13:27.:13:29.

what you think works in a moment but it is worth establishing, for people

:13:30.:13:31.

who don't know your story, how bad things were bored you, and I'm

:13:32.:13:35.

looking at a quote here, you said yourself, a drugs worker you first

:13:36.:13:40.

came into contact with said, I really don't know how you are not

:13:41.:13:44.

dead? You were five stone, a combination of drink and drugs? It

:13:45.:13:51.

was, yes. I started out a heavy drinker, turned to drugs, the last

:13:52.:13:56.

two years of my addiction were the worst, I would climb into a cupboard

:13:57.:14:01.

because I couldn't stand the sound of my own breath because I had

:14:02.:14:04.

turned to crack cocaine as well and I didn't know where to go to help. I

:14:05.:14:09.

had been to my doctor several times, there was no literature anywhere, no

:14:10.:14:13.

one pointing me in the right direction, and it was actually

:14:14.:14:15.

social services that gave me the number to my local community

:14:16.:14:21.

drugs... And they were in touch, you had young children at the time? Yes,

:14:22.:14:27.

two of my children had been removed at that time, there was no social

:14:28.:14:32.

service involvement, I became homeless so they had to go and stay

:14:33.:14:37.

with their dad and luckily enough he was such a fantastic father social

:14:38.:14:41.

services never had to get involved, but when I got clean they never came

:14:42.:14:45.

back to me, they stayed with their dad. They are now adults and we have

:14:46.:14:50.

a healthy, strong relationship, but I had had another child later on and

:14:51.:14:54.

she remained with me, she was two when I decided to get help. We spoke

:14:55.:14:58.

earlier to a Government minister about this new idea, no new money,

:14:59.:15:03.

as we have heard. From your experience, what are the things that

:15:04.:15:05.

really work that can help people and genuinely make a

:15:06.:15:26.

difference? I work for a charity called Action On Addiction and we

:15:27.:15:28.

have lots of services available and their people helped me, I went into

:15:29.:15:31.

the 12-step treatment programme with them, which is now slightly adapted,

:15:32.:15:33.

we offer two routes to recovery, centred around an interpersonal

:15:34.:15:35.

approach, your relationships, and that is what worked for me. I

:15:36.:15:37.

currently get people ready to move into abstinence for recovery. The

:15:38.:15:40.

problem is how many of those programmes are available and how

:15:41.:15:44.

people find out about it? That is the issue, yes, we try to get out

:15:45.:15:48.

there as much as we can and I'm sure people have heard of The Brink, a

:15:49.:15:54.

bar in Liverpool, and my services are based in there, we have drugs

:15:55.:16:00.

and alcohol counsellor, and a family programme because it is not just

:16:01.:16:03.

addiction, the addict, it is a family illness and the family must

:16:04.:16:07.

recover from it as well. I brought great shame on my own family and it

:16:08.:16:11.

took time to rebuild those relationships and I think that is

:16:12.:16:15.

what has worked best for me. When I went for help I was met with

:16:16.:16:19.

understanding and compassion, and grace.

:16:20.:16:24.

Ed, you are listening to leave and the focus on... What did you call

:16:25.:16:32.

it, the step towards abstinence or preparation for abstinence? Is that

:16:33.:16:37.

when you think the resources should be focused? There are different

:16:38.:16:41.

forms of treatment. There is the issue of abstinence -based treatment

:16:42.:16:45.

which works for some people but perhaps not so well for others. We

:16:46.:16:50.

need to be flexible in the treatment we are delivering. One of the things

:16:51.:16:54.

we think is good with this new strategy is the appointment of a new

:16:55.:17:00.

champion, which has more of a focus on looking at the fundamental

:17:01.:17:05.

deterrents to people/ use. -- determinants to people/ use. Things

:17:06.:17:10.

like unemployment, homelessness, mental health problems. We need to

:17:11.:17:12.

address those issues when people have come out of recovery. To be

:17:13.:17:18.

fair, that is what the minister said, those are the resources being

:17:19.:17:22.

tied together. They say that is how you tackle something like this. It

:17:23.:17:27.

is hugely important, another positive movement is moving the

:17:28.:17:33.

measure of success about successful treatment completion from six to 12

:17:34.:17:37.

months after completion so we are not putting people out as a

:17:38.:17:41.

successful completion and seeing them falling back into dependency

:17:42.:17:45.

and coming back to the system. But it remains to be seen whether the

:17:46.:17:50.

recovery champion is a gimmick or if resources will improve those factors

:17:51.:17:53.

and support people back into a normal life which gives them a

:17:54.:17:58.

platform to avoid dependency in the future. Tomorrow, and even, thank

:17:59.:18:04.

you both very much. We met your 11-year-old daughter

:18:05.:18:07.

this morning, possibly the best evidence of your story and recovery.

:18:08.:18:13.

She certainly is. She is very confident. She is. Thank you.

:18:14.:18:18.

Shall we find out what is happening in the weather? We had some really

:18:19.:18:26.

scorching and pleasant temperatures across the European mainland,

:18:27.:18:30.

luckily we will not experience any thing so horrible -- scorching and

:18:31.:18:35.

unpleasant. Yesterday in southern Spain the

:18:36.:18:41.

temperature hit 46.6 Celsius. We would round that up to 47, a

:18:42.:18:46.

whopping and very uncomfortable 116.6 Fahrenheit. That heat is

:18:47.:18:52.

coming our way, but not to that extent. Into next week, parts of

:18:53.:19:00.

southern England could hit 28, 29 or even 30. But when we see those kinds

:19:01.:19:06.

of levels, it all breaks down in a thundery maths. That is likely to

:19:07.:19:13.

happen next week. If you are out and about this morning, it is a chilly

:19:14.:19:17.

start. It is bright with quite a lot of cloud here at Wimbledon this

:19:18.:19:21.

morning, some showers as a result. The forecast the Wimbledon, when

:19:22.:19:27.

play gets under way, is try. Variable shallots, sunny spells,

:19:28.:19:34.

highs of 20 or 21 and light breezes. When the cloud cover comes over it

:19:35.:19:39.

feels chilly. When we lose this cloud, for many we are looking at

:19:40.:19:44.

sunny spells and showers. We have showers in the forecast this

:19:45.:19:47.

morning. At 9am across southern England we have guys like this with

:19:48.:19:53.

cloud, some breaks in it, so some blue sky, but also some showers

:19:54.:19:58.

continuing to East Anglia. Northern England, Scotland and

:19:59.:20:01.

Northern Ireland, a similar story, bright and sunny spells and the

:20:02.:20:04.

cloud thick enough for the odd shower.

:20:05.:20:08.

Across the Irish Sea into Wales, a similar story. The same for the

:20:09.:20:12.

Midlands. Some bright spells but quite a bit of cloud around. That is

:20:13.:20:18.

producing the odd shower. Even the south-west of England is not immune

:20:19.:20:22.

through the morning but it will brighten up very nicely for you. As

:20:23.:20:27.

we drift from Gloucestershire into Dorset, Hampshire, the Home

:20:28.:20:34.

Counties, a similar story. Some clouds, some breaks, some sunshine

:20:35.:20:37.

and the odd shower. Many of the showers will fade through the

:20:38.:20:41.

morning, the cloud will break out by late morning/ early afternoon, lots

:20:42.:20:46.

of us will be dry with sunny spells. Through the afternoon we could see

:20:47.:20:49.

some scattered showers develop. By no means will we all see them. By

:20:50.:20:53.

the end of the afternoon, the weather front will produce rain

:20:54.:20:57.

across western Scotland and Northern Ireland. This evening and overnight,

:20:58.:21:03.

that will move south and east, taking the cloud and rain with it.

:21:04.:21:08.

Across Scotland, northern England and Northern Ireland, a milder

:21:09.:21:13.

nights. And a clear skies, further south, for the rest of England and

:21:14.:21:17.

Wales, a night than the one just gone -- under more clear further

:21:18.:21:25.

south. Some patchy light rain and showers

:21:26.:21:29.

on Saturday, behind that it brightens up nicely with sunshine,

:21:30.:21:32.

but later a new weather front will come into the north-west,

:21:33.:21:35.

introducing more rain. For southern areas, for the rest of England away

:21:36.:21:39.

from the North and Wales, we are looking at variable cloud with some

:21:40.:21:43.

sunny spells, with a temperature continuing to climb. In this Sunday,

:21:44.:21:49.

the weather front across Scotland and Northern Ireland sinks

:21:50.:21:52.

southwards. For Scotland, northern England and Northern Ireland on

:21:53.:21:56.

Sunday we will see some sunshine and one or two showers. After a bright

:21:57.:22:00.

and sunny start in the south of England and South Wales, the weather

:22:01.:22:04.

front comes south, introducing more cloud, we will also see the odd

:22:05.:22:08.

shower from bad. It will feel more humid, highs of 27.

:22:09.:22:17.

Thank you, Carol The weather is closely related to the next story,

:22:18.:22:21.

featuring British butterflies. It's a critical summer

:22:22.:22:23.

for the UK's butterflies, with even the most common of species

:22:24.:22:25.

experiencing a significant But it's hoped that this year's warm

:22:26.:22:27.

weather could see populations bounce back and the Big Butterfly Count

:22:28.:22:31.

launches today to see Sir David Attenborough is President

:22:32.:22:34.

of the Butterfly Conservation charity and joins us now

:22:35.:22:37.

from the London Wetland Centre. I am very pleased to say he can join

:22:38.:22:42.

us. Good morning. Thank you very much for talking to us. Good

:22:43.:22:48.

morning. How can people help? How do you count and record butterflies and

:22:49.:22:55.

how will that help? Initially the Big Butterfly Count is to discover

:22:56.:22:59.

what is happening. Last year was the fourth worst year on record in terms

:23:00.:23:04.

of butterflies. What we want to know is what is happening this year. It

:23:05.:23:10.

looks pretty promising at the moment, but what people can do is go

:23:11.:23:17.

into a garden or an open place, some sunny place, and start looking

:23:18.:23:22.

around for 15 minutes and tell us how many butterflies they saw and

:23:23.:23:26.

what kinds they were. Even if they don't see any at all, that is an

:23:27.:23:31.

important piece of information. Having done that for 15 minutes, how

:23:32.:23:36.

many they are, you can get a chart from the Internet to tell you what

:23:37.:23:40.

they were, then tell us on the Internet. That will give us lots of

:23:41.:23:44.

valuable statistics. I should apologise for calling you Sir

:23:45.:23:48.

Richard, said David, a slip of the tongue. What are the most common --

:23:49.:23:57.

why are the most common butterfly species like the common White

:23:58.:24:02.

declining? That is exactly what we want to know. Can you hear me now? I

:24:03.:24:09.

can hear you. The most common ones as opposed to the more rare ones?

:24:10.:24:16.

Yes. In the past, the thing about butterflies, all those are fairly

:24:17.:24:26.

common. What were once common, the populations are going up and going

:24:27.:24:31.

down. Last year was very bad. This year is beginning to look good,

:24:32.:24:35.

partly because we have the good weather. Butterflies can bounce

:24:36.:24:39.

back. Female butterflies lay so many eggs that if only a tiny proportion

:24:40.:24:44.

of them survive they are doing quite well, but if conditions are good

:24:45.:24:48.

then you will get a lot of butterflies of different kinds. And

:24:49.:24:53.

we hope you will. That is what we want to discover. Which species do

:24:54.:24:56.

you miss seeing the most at the moment? There are four common ones,

:24:57.:25:06.

the peacock is very beautiful, one of the most. Happily it is one of

:25:07.:25:12.

the more common ones. Bread and rolls are very exciting but not

:25:13.:25:17.

doing quite as well as peacocks -- red Admirals are very exciting.

:25:18.:25:22.

There is the ringlets, the meadow brown, the clouded white. You will

:25:23.:25:26.

find a chart of 18 of the most common plus two of the day flying

:25:27.:25:30.

moths on the Internet which will help you to identify them. It is

:25:31.:25:35.

interesting talking about the smaller creatures in life, we have

:25:36.:25:39.

often spoken about how the humble bee is threatened and how important

:25:40.:25:44.

the bumblebee is to conservation, and the Butterfly. How should we

:25:45.:25:48.

link this all and that this ecosystem together? How do we put

:25:49.:25:55.

them all together? We don't have too. But the more you know about

:25:56.:25:59.

these things the more you can put them together and get around eight

:26:00.:26:05.

-- get a rounded picture. Once you start looking at butterflies, as you

:26:06.:26:10.

say, you suddenly see bumblebees. And there might be more bumblebees

:26:11.:26:14.

than we thought. There are societies you can join that will specialise in

:26:15.:26:19.

bumblebees. But what we are talking about butterflies. Have you seen any

:26:20.:26:25.

this morning? Have I seen any? No, it is a bit early, not warm enough

:26:26.:26:30.

yet. Butterflies like the warm weather. And when they come up they

:26:31.:26:34.

are very important because they fertilise plants. They pollinate

:26:35.:26:40.

them. Sir David Attenborough, it is a joy talking to you. Thank you very

:26:41.:26:41.

much. It looks so tranquil, then you hear

:26:42.:26:44.

the noise of the aeroplanes! We're behind the scenes of the Proms

:26:45.:26:50.

ahead of the start of the world's Tim Muffett is at the Royal

:26:51.:26:54.

Albert Hall for us. the website. Or tune in to BBC Radio

:26:55.:30:18.

London. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:30:19.:30:28.

with Charlie Stayt Police in east London

:30:29.:30:30.

are investigating five attacks which involved corrosive substances

:30:31.:30:38.

being thrown in people's faces. They all happened within

:30:39.:30:40.

90 minutes in Hackney One teenager has been arrested

:30:41.:30:42.

on suspicion of grievous One of the victims has what's

:30:43.:30:45.

been described as "life Earlier, the government minister

:30:46.:30:49.

Sarah Newton told Breakfast the Home Office is investigating why

:30:50.:30:52.

these type of attacks This was a shocking attack last

:30:53.:30:54.

night, someone is left with life This was a shocking attack last

:30:55.:31:11.

night, someone is left This is something we've been

:31:12.:31:13.

concerned about in the Home We've been working very closely

:31:14.:31:16.

with our colleagues in law enforcement to get a better picture

:31:17.:31:20.

of actually what is happening, as you quite rightly say,

:31:21.:31:23.

it's happening in pockets The Home Office has launched

:31:24.:31:25.

a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use, with tailored treatment

:31:26.:31:28.

to be given to drug addicts. It follows a rise in

:31:29.:31:31.

drug-related deaths in England and Wales and targets

:31:32.:31:33.

new psychoactive substances. The Home Secretary Amber Rudd said

:31:34.:31:35.

the plan will focus on recovery. The Scottish and Welsh governments

:31:36.:31:38.

have threatened to block the key Brexit bill which will convert

:31:39.:31:40.

all existing EU laws into UK law. The Brexit Secretary David Davis has

:31:41.:31:44.

described it as one of the most significant pieces of legislation

:31:45.:31:47.

to pass through Parliament. But the leaders of the two devolved

:31:48.:31:48.

governments say it represents President Trump will be the guest

:31:49.:31:51.

of honour at the Bastille Day He was invited to mark

:31:52.:31:59.

France's National Day by the country's President,

:32:00.:32:02.

Emmanuel Macron. The two leaders will watch

:32:03.:32:03.

the traditional military parade which, this year,

:32:04.:32:06.

has French soldiers marching alongside US troops,

:32:07.:32:08.

to mark the centenary of America's A heatwave across southern Europe

:32:09.:32:10.

has forced some of the region's most famous tourist sites to close

:32:11.:32:21.

during peak holiday season. More than 20 fires have started

:32:22.:32:24.

near Naples and Sicily where the temperatures have climbed

:32:25.:32:26.

above 40 degrees celsius this week. The Greek government has

:32:27.:32:29.

ordered that popular archaeological sites close,

:32:30.:32:30.

and in southern Spain, Several Spanish cities

:32:31.:32:32.

have experienced record It will reach 47 degrees

:32:33.:32:37.

in Cordoba today. Anyone visiting Stonehenge

:32:38.:32:47.

or Loch Ness earlier this week would have seen a bonus attraction

:32:48.:32:49.

if they'd looked to the skies. The Red Arrows and their American

:32:50.:32:53.

counterparts, the Thunderbirds, have been performing some stunning

:32:54.:32:57.

manoeuvres in a practice display from RAF Fairford

:32:58.:32:59.

in Gloucestershire. They were rehearsing ahead of

:33:00.:33:02.

the Royal International Air Tattoo this weekend which marks the 70th

:33:03.:33:04.

anniversary of the creation Coming up here on Breakfast

:33:05.:33:07.

this morning... Jo Konta's Wimbledon dream

:33:08.:33:13.

might be over but there's still plenty of tennis for us

:33:14.:33:16.

to get excited about. We'll be live on Centre Court

:33:17.:33:18.

and looking ahead to We'll hear from the Oscar winning

:33:19.:33:20.

actor Sir Mark Rylance on his latest film "Dunkirk",

:33:21.:33:27.

and how he believes the spirit of that famous Second World War

:33:28.:33:30.

evacuation still exists today. And is reality TV changing

:33:31.:33:37.

the way we speak? We'll discuss how the language

:33:38.:33:42.

of Love Island is travelling Only a few days left, with this

:33:43.:33:57.

giant bouncing ball behind us... You love it, you love the ball! And it

:33:58.:34:04.

means that Mike turns up there! We have a day ahead of ourselves, men's

:34:05.:34:09.

semifinals day, Roger Federer with a lot of excitement to come? Yes, I

:34:10.:34:14.

pop out of my box at this time when the bouncing ball comes across! We

:34:15.:34:18.

must not be downhearted about the likes of Andy Murray and Johanna

:34:19.:34:23.

Konta leaving, a lock to look forward to, the men's semifinals, on

:34:24.:34:27.

Centre Court, Rick is mowing the lawn, there's a lot of interest with

:34:28.:34:31.

Jamie Murray and Heather Watson still involved in mixed doubles, and

:34:32.:34:36.

Andy Hewitt is doing well in the next wheelchair doubles. Let's

:34:37.:34:38.

reflect on Johanna Konta. So there was huge disappointment

:34:39.:34:41.

here yesterday as for the second day running, the big British hope

:34:42.:34:43.

was knocked out of the tournament. She remains defiant that her showing

:34:44.:34:51.

here at Wimbledon means that she can one day go on and win the women's

:34:52.:34:55.

title. She takes confidence, in spite of her defeat, to the

:34:56.:35:00.

five-time champion Venus Williams, who looked imperious. The oldest

:35:01.:35:08.

women's since Martina Navratilova in 1984, the five-time champion going

:35:09.:35:13.

back to her best. Johanna Konta lost in straight sets, 6-4, 6-2,

:35:14.:35:17.

admittedly to the disappointment of the home fans here at the

:35:18.:35:18.

All-England Club. Afterwards she thanked fans

:35:19.:35:22.

for their "love and support" and described the fortnight

:35:23.:35:24.

as a memorable experience. Venus Williams will now play

:35:25.:35:26.

Spain's Garbine Muguruza The 14th seed thrashed the unseeded

:35:27.:35:28.

Magdalena Rybarikova in little over an hour to make it to her second

:35:29.:35:33.

Wimbledon final. There remains some British interest

:35:34.:35:36.

here at Wimbledon though - Jamie Murray and his partner

:35:37.:35:40.

Martina Hingis are into the mixed doubles semi finals after beating

:35:41.:35:47.

the all-British pairing Murray and Hingis are top seeds

:35:48.:35:49.

and took the match in straight sets. Heather Watson and her

:35:50.:35:53.

partner Henri Kontinen - who are the defending champions -

:35:54.:35:55.

also made it to the semi finals. The wheelchair tournaments started

:35:56.:36:01.

yesterday here but there was disappointment for defending

:36:02.:36:05.

champion Britain's Gordon Reid. He lost in the singles in straight

:36:06.:36:09.

sets to Sweden's Stefan Olsson - the man he beat to win

:36:10.:36:13.

the title last year. There's no British women left

:36:14.:36:15.

in the singles draw etiher but better news for Alfie Hewett

:36:16.:36:17.

he achieved his first Away from Wimbledon,

:36:18.:36:20.

the three-time Tour de France winner Chris Froome has lost the leader's

:36:21.:36:29.

yellow jersey in this year's race after a gruelling day

:36:30.:36:32.

in the mountains on Stage 12. Froome said he just didn't

:36:33.:36:34.

have the legs as the race He finished down in seventh,

:36:35.:36:37.

handing the overall lead to rival Wayne Rooney is already

:36:38.:36:44.

making an impact back He only signed for them

:36:45.:36:46.

on Sunday but has already scored his first goal -

:36:47.:36:51.

this brilliant long range effort on his debut

:36:52.:36:53.

during their preseason tour Back here on Centre Court, a

:36:54.:37:07.

champion is in our midst! The one and only Marion Bartoli. I will give

:37:08.:37:14.

you a proper hug this time! We love hugs! Is lovely to see you again,

:37:15.:37:19.

dressed for tennis! Yes, I'm ready to play! The invitation doubles.

:37:20.:37:24.

Great for the spectators to watch. I don't know, I will try my best! At

:37:25.:37:30.

Centre Court, the city of your triumph in 2013, you were one of the

:37:31.:37:34.

few before yesterday he said that you doubted Johanna Konta's ability

:37:35.:37:39.

to go all the way this time, why? I think the matchplay with Venus

:37:40.:37:44.

Williams was not good for her, especially as she plays with a slow

:37:45.:37:51.

ball, Johanna can play with that but when someone is playing fast with

:37:52.:37:56.

her, she has difficulty. The matchup with Venus, who has triumphed here

:37:57.:38:00.

are five times before, it is a stepping stone forward. Playing in

:38:01.:38:10.

her home country, with Andy Murray, carrying the flag for Britain, it

:38:11.:38:14.

was a bit too much. Plus that amount of pressure. I definitely think

:38:15.:38:17.

she's got the ability to win in future but I think she needs to

:38:18.:38:22.

adjust a few things in her game. An experience you know all about, is it

:38:23.:38:27.

sometimes harder to get to the final after the semifinals, rather than

:38:28.:38:32.

playing the final like you did in 2013?

:38:33.:38:38.

I won two in 2007 and 2013 but every round, you get further in a grand

:38:39.:38:41.

slam and you feel the pressure. It is difficult to win a semifinal but

:38:42.:38:48.

the final is even tougher! You have two be ready for each round, and I

:38:49.:38:51.

think also, having someone in your camp whose been able to go through

:38:52.:39:03.

that is a massive help. Venus knows that, and obviously, with Garbine

:39:04.:39:08.

Muguruza, she has the experience, but after 2013, that helped me to

:39:09.:39:12.

deal with the final pressure. Those moments are so particular that if

:39:13.:39:16.

you haven't gone through it yourself, it's very difficult as a

:39:17.:39:18.

coach to really know how it feels to be on the court. It was only four

:39:19.:39:23.

years ago... Looking back down there... I know, I can't believe it

:39:24.:39:28.

is only four years ago, looking at my game now! I go, really? How do

:39:29.:39:34.

you feel when you look down there, now, some pictures of how you did

:39:35.:39:38.

it. Yes, we were on that side serving for the match point. I got

:39:39.:39:43.

an ace out wide, I have all of those memories coming back to me. The best

:39:44.:39:50.

thing in the world, having a badge and being a member, I feel like a

:39:51.:39:57.

kid in a candy store every morning! It is brilliant to hear. What about

:39:58.:40:01.

Venus Williams, the five-time champion against Garbine Muguruza,

:40:02.:40:05.

who played the other Williams in the final, can she do it this time

:40:06.:40:09.

against a Williams sister? I think it's going to be very tricky for

:40:10.:40:16.

her. And very good friends with her, she was so sweet yesterday. I

:40:17.:40:20.

brought her lucky notes before the tournament and she kept them in her

:40:21.:40:24.

bag. In the locker room she said to me yesterday, look, they are a lucky

:40:25.:40:31.

charm! I think she knows how to win, obviously, she just has to win this

:40:32.:40:36.

one. It was fine for her, losing against Serena, but she knows that

:40:37.:40:44.

number one in the world when Serena isn't there, I think she will be

:40:45.:40:49.

tough to beat. And talking of specialists on grass, Roger Federer

:40:50.:40:52.

in the semifinals today, if he goes on to win, and Serena Williams, it

:40:53.:40:56.

will be like 2007 when they were both champions ten years ago! I

:40:57.:41:01.

don't see how Roger can lose the championship, with how he has been

:41:02.:41:05.

playing and could beat Milos Raonic, who beat him last year. He did not

:41:06.:41:11.

give him a single charts. I cannot see anyone challenging Roger if he

:41:12.:41:14.

plays at the same level. He is against Tomas Berdych, and then the

:41:15.:41:22.

Sam Querrey in the other end. Yes, they have one of the longest

:41:23.:41:29.

matches, against Nicholas Mahut, this is going to be very close.

:41:30.:41:36.

Winning the US open, he has an edge mentally, but even if it is Marin

:41:37.:41:39.

Cilic against Roger Federer, I do not see how Roger can lose this one!

:41:40.:41:45.

We sent him a lucky note as well? No, I don't think you need is one!

:41:46.:41:50.

You won Wimbledon in 2013, and how have you got on since with our Game

:41:51.:41:56.

Set Mug challenge? We are going to see! You might have got 15!

:41:57.:42:03.

Afterwards, I thought yes, I've done better! Holly Hamilton is here doing

:42:04.:42:07.

the officiating. Let's have a look...

:42:08.:42:13.

Marion Bartoli, welcome to BBC Breakfast and our challenge today,

:42:14.:42:17.

how do you feel? Very nervous, actually! Nothing to worry about!

:42:18.:42:23.

You are a former Wimbledon champion back in 2013, eight WTA singles

:42:24.:42:27.

titles, nothing for you to worry about! There is! The racket is a

:42:28.:42:32.

little long... I don't know about my technique! It in your excuses and! I

:42:33.:42:36.

will try and beat Johanna Konta, that's my goal! 30 seconds to get as

:42:37.:42:44.

many balls into our Game Set Mug as possible. Are you ready? Ready.

:42:45.:42:53.

Marion, three, two, one... Go! Her technique is working... Keep your

:42:54.:42:57.

speed up! A much faster technique. They are coming back... Just missing

:42:58.:43:02.

with that one. Ten seconds... We are back into a stride again. It is warm

:43:03.:43:10.

out here today. Just to the left slightly... You keep hitting the

:43:11.:43:18.

rim, ever so close. Everything you've got... Three, two, one...

:43:19.:43:22.

Bob's! We couldn't have allowed it anyway! She is feeling confident! I

:43:23.:43:30.

have five! I have more than Johanna Konta! It's a good result! I feel so

:43:31.:43:36.

happy about it. And how does it compare to Wimbledon? That is much

:43:37.:43:41.

tougher! We've been hearing that a lot! Congratulations, very

:43:42.:43:43.

successful... It was tough to get the ball Law in! That's what was

:43:44.:43:51.

missing... A good result, well done! Game Set Mug.

:43:52.:43:58.

Tougher than Wimbledon? Winning Wimbledon? Really? Amazing! There,

:43:59.:44:07.

you do not know if you go like that all like this, I was moving to pick

:44:08.:44:13.

up the ball from the basket, but afterwards, Kim and I, we were

:44:14.:44:18.

practising! Did you get a lot in? Yeah, is the pressure! We said we

:44:19.:44:23.

had to come back! It is those 30 seconds when it matters. On the

:44:24.:44:29.

leaderboard... Starting at seven... We have Johanna Konta. Mo Farah got

:44:30.:44:37.

four. Look, you are in fifth place with five! In Clearwater, just

:44:38.:44:40.

behind Kyle Edmund and Charlie Stayt! Andy Murray had 14 which is

:44:41.:44:46.

ridiculous! Can post as did well. Andy Murray on 14. I had to beat

:44:47.:44:55.

Milos Raonic, actually! Tomorrow, boxer David Haye is taking on the

:44:56.:45:01.

challenge. We will see how he got on then. Time to bring in Carol. Look

:45:02.:45:07.

at your fingernails! And they amazing? They are, actually. Yes, I

:45:08.:45:13.

have a bit of colour and they said that it was not wise. They have to

:45:14.:45:20.

be all white, I have a little bit of a problem. I've never seen that,

:45:21.:45:23.

fingers in different colours... Or is that just me? Maybe you haven't

:45:24.:45:29.

met the right people, but they are gorgeous. Unlike the weather, it is

:45:30.:45:32.

a little chilly this morning with all of this cloud around... It's a

:45:33.:45:37.

forecast for Wimbledon today... It's actually a dry one. When play gets

:45:38.:45:41.

underway, cloudy to start with, cloud will break and then we have

:45:42.:45:49.

sunshine coming through, highs of 20-21d with a gentle breeze. Not bad

:45:50.:45:52.

if you are coming down as a spectator but I would imagine the

:45:53.:45:55.

players wouldn't find it too shabby either. Chilly under the cloud

:45:56.:45:58.

cover, a couple of showers around. The cloud will break early morning

:45:59.:46:02.

and in the afternoon, the sun will come out. Temperatures rising, could

:46:03.:46:06.

see a couple of showers but by no means will we see them all. -- all

:46:07.:46:12.

see them. Similar conditions here at Wimbledon, bright with sunshine,

:46:13.:46:16.

quite a lot of cloud and the chance of a shower. It holds true as we

:46:17.:46:20.

move through the Midlands and East Anglia, and into Scotland and

:46:21.:46:24.

Northern Ireland. A similar scenario, sunny spells with cloud

:46:25.:46:28.

and the odd shower. In Wales this morning, you could see a shower but

:46:29.:46:32.

most will stay dry, varied amounts of cloud, and as we sink into the

:46:33.:46:37.

south-west of England, although it is cloudy at the moment it will

:46:38.:46:40.

brighten beautifully if you like it sunny. As we move from

:46:41.:46:43.

Gloucestershire, again, across Dorset. Across Hampshire and the

:46:44.:46:50.

Home Counties, we are looking at a similar scenario. Some cloud around

:46:51.:46:54.

this morning, sunshine and risks of showers. They tend to fade, and the

:46:55.:46:59.

cloud will break up, so spells developed through the late morning

:47:00.:47:02.

and afternoon, for most it will be dry, aside from the odd shower. By

:47:03.:47:07.

the afternoon, this weather front from western Scotland and Northern

:47:08.:47:10.

Ireland will introduce rain. If we pick up that weather front, through

:47:11.:47:15.

the evening and overnight, it will sink southwards and eastwards,

:47:16.:47:20.

taking cloud and rain with it. It would be as cold a night in Scotland

:47:21.:47:23.

and northern England and Northern Ireland as the one just gone. For

:47:24.:47:27.

the rest of England and Wales, clear skies, it will be cooler than the

:47:28.:47:31.

night just gone. Good news for some of us, it will be much easier to

:47:32.:47:35.

sleep in those kinds of temperatures. Tomorrow, we start off

:47:36.:47:38.

with a weather front, the first heading into eastern England, taking

:47:39.:47:43.

cloud and patches are bring with it. Behind, it brightens beautifully

:47:44.:47:47.

with sunny spells developing. Later in the day, another weather front

:47:48.:47:52.

comes in across western Scotland and Northern Ireland, introducing rain.

:47:53.:47:54.

Moving away from that weather front, away from the north and from Wales,

:47:55.:48:00.

it begins cloudy but sunny breaks develop and it increasingly turns

:48:01.:48:03.

more humid, especially in the south-east. On Sunday, this weather

:48:04.:48:09.

friend coming in across north-west Scotland six southwards, several

:48:10.:48:12.

northern England, Scotland and Northern Ireland on Sunday, we are

:48:13.:48:16.

looking at sunshine, a couple of showers possible, and further south,

:48:17.:48:21.

it's beginning on a sunny note but then it will feel humid on Sunday.

:48:22.:48:27.

Highs of about 27 in the south-east. Something to bear in mind if you are

:48:28.:48:31.

watching the men's finals here at Wimbledon. Pollen levels today, I

:48:32.:48:37.

know that you won't like this, Naga, high across-the-board, and in North

:48:38.:48:44.

Scotland, where they are moderate. Sorry about that, Naga! Charlie, you

:48:45.:48:45.

aren't too bothered? No, I don't suffer, so I am lucky.

:48:46.:48:57.

Carroll, lovely to see you there. Thank you for this morning. Centre

:48:58.:49:01.

Court, we get the access to the best thing is, don't we?

:49:02.:49:06.

We are so lucky. Centre court and now to be centre of one of the most

:49:07.:49:13.

amazing performance halls ever. We are at the Royal Albert Hall today.

:49:14.:49:18.

It's a festival like no other and tonight the Proms return

:49:19.:49:21.

for their 123rd season, bringing us eight weeks of classical

:49:22.:49:23.

music from some of the world's most renowned musicians.

:49:24.:49:25.

We can just listen in for a moment whilst some early morning rehearsals

:49:26.:49:30.

are underway. Nicola Benedetti, one of the most

:49:31.:49:58.

successful violinist and a former youth violinist -- youth musician of

:49:59.:50:05.

the year. What's it like a performing at the Proms? Like

:50:06.:50:11.

nothing else. I remember the first time I performed lark ascending and

:50:12.:50:18.

having all those people standing around you. All musicians say, there

:50:19.:50:25.

is nothing like this. 123 years now, it's been going. Do you think the

:50:26.:50:28.

change has been extraordinary in the last few years in particular in

:50:29.:50:31.

terms of reaching out to new audiences? I think all classical

:50:32.:50:37.

musicians and promoters and organisers want as many people to

:50:38.:50:40.

enjoy this music as possible but I think they would have wanted that.

:50:41.:50:44.

It was part of the origins and premise of the Proms and of course

:50:45.:50:49.

that something that needs to be re-addressed and redefined and a

:50:50.:50:52.

continuous kind of challenge of how to reach out to people. I think the

:50:53.:50:57.

Proms has always done an amazing job at that. Tell us what you will be

:50:58.:51:02.

performing this year. I will be performing the Shostakovich first

:51:03.:51:07.

violin Concerto which is a harrowing but unbelievable piece. Thanks ever

:51:08.:51:10.

so much. We will have a listen to some other violinists -- musicians

:51:11.:51:19.

who will be performing this year. This lady will be performing on her

:51:20.:51:24.

cello and was inspired by her grandmother who made her a string

:51:25.:51:27.

quartet out of cereal boxes when she was two years old.

:51:28.:51:44.

We heard you performing earlier with your orchestra. Tell us about them

:51:45.:51:53.

and the idea behind them. It has been founded to try to go some way

:51:54.:51:59.

to help to redress the balance of artists that we see and hear playing

:52:00.:52:05.

classical music and I think one of the ways that the Proms and the BBC

:52:06.:52:10.

had reached out to bring in the wider audience, because I know

:52:11.:52:15.

that's what's on the agenda, I think by inviting us to have our Proms

:52:16.:52:20.

debut, I think the BBC is really showing that its leading the way in

:52:21.:52:27.

the sort of diversity issues. Taking part in this event, there are eight

:52:28.:52:31.

weeks, aren't there? Not just events here in the Albert Hall either. They

:52:32.:52:34.

are elsewhere as well. How important is it that the Proms do that and

:52:35.:52:39.

reach out to more people? It's very important, because venues have a big

:52:40.:52:43.

impact on people coming into them. So the further you can go to

:52:44.:52:50.

different areas, different size halls, venues, of course there will

:52:51.:52:55.

be a different demographic. This place has such an iconic impact that

:52:56.:53:00.

we've watched it for so many years. I've been playing him for 35 years

:53:01.:53:04.

but this is the best time to play here with my orchestra. And amongst

:53:05.:53:11.

the other highlights this year, performances in Hull, the city of

:53:12.:53:14.

culture, and on top of a multistorey car park in Peckham. I know that's

:53:15.:53:20.

an important place to play. I've seen performances there myself.

:53:21.:53:25.

Where do you see the Proms playing? I've played with the multistorey

:53:26.:53:29.

orchestra and I love it. I think music for all is top of the agenda.

:53:30.:53:36.

Of course, what is being presented as an immediate impact on who is

:53:37.:53:43.

reached by the P audience and not just that, the music that we play.

:53:44.:53:48.

He won the composers? Fantastic. Thanks so much for coming along this

:53:49.:53:53.

morning. Let's listen to a bit of a performance from Jess Gillen. She is

:53:54.:53:55.

19. Performing a piece by John Williams,

:53:56.:54:14.

one of the many companies is who is being celebrated at this year 's

:54:15.:54:21.

Proms. It really is a very eclectic mix of performances, an eclectic mix

:54:22.:54:26.

of composers being celebrated. It has been an extraordinary history

:54:27.:54:33.

over 123 years. It started out as an attempt to bring classical music to

:54:34.:54:38.

everyone. Back in 19 -- in 1895, it cost one shilling to attend the

:54:39.:54:46.

concerts. Before 19 41, they weren't held here at the Royal Albert Hall.

:54:47.:54:49.

They were moved here during the Second World War and they have been

:54:50.:54:53.

here ever since. I will leave you with a little bit more of Jess.

:54:54.:55:26.

It's a wonderful scene there at the Royal Albert Hall and a big thank

:55:27.:55:32.

you to all those artists because I would imagine playing at this time

:55:33.:55:36.

of day... They are in early. I did give you a

:55:37.:55:38.

real sense of atmosphere there. Last night, acting royalty mingled

:55:39.:55:44.

with, well, royalty at the premiere of the new World War Two blockbuster

:55:45.:55:46.

Dunkirk. Singer Harry Styles -

:55:47.:55:48.

who is making his acting debut in the film -

:55:49.:55:52.

shaking hands with Prince Harry The film focuses on the Dunkirk

:55:53.:55:54.

evacuation, when civilian sailors crossed the English Channel

:55:55.:56:01.

to rescue troops trapped I spoke to director Christopher

:56:02.:56:02.

Nolan, and actor Sir Mark Rylance, who told me the famous

:56:03.:56:07.

Dunkirk Spirit still exists today. Why waste precious tanks

:56:08.:56:16.

when they can pick us off What was the moment

:56:17.:56:25.

for you as a director, I supposed, more importanlty,

:56:26.:56:39.

or a human being, the moment when you thought, there

:56:40.:56:41.

is a story about Dunkirk, well-known as it is historically,

:56:42.:56:44.

a story that I can tell? For me it was myself and Emma,

:56:45.:56:50.

my producer, we made a trip about 20 He wanted to make a crossing

:56:51.:56:54.

at about the same time of year We made the crossing

:56:55.:57:02.

to Dunkirk, and the Channel It was incredibly rough,

:57:03.:57:05.

felt very difficult, very dangerous, and that was without people dropping

:57:06.:57:10.

bombs on us. We weren't heading to a war zone,

:57:11.:57:14.

we were just going to So I came away from that feeling

:57:15.:57:17.

like, what would it have been like to step off the dock,

:57:18.:57:24.

and step into the boat, knowing that you were heading

:57:25.:57:27.

towards a burning war zone? On a day, ordinary people,

:57:28.:57:32.

if you can use that word, like the character you play, they just

:57:33.:57:50.

did what was necessary. They just made that decision

:57:51.:57:53.

that they had to do something at that moment in time,

:57:54.:57:55.

and it is very emotional, that is, How did you try and tune

:57:56.:57:58.

into that thought process? I think it's even more emotional

:57:59.:58:01.

because these recent the two disasters in London,

:58:02.:58:05.

have made us all so much more aware of civilian involvement,

:58:06.:58:12.

and the selflessness and bravery Just the instinct to help other

:58:13.:58:14.

people, which is a very natural part It's very interesting,

:58:15.:58:26.

that you make that analogy, if you I thought at the time we made

:58:27.:58:29.

the movie, that this would be something to do with Brexit,

:58:30.:58:37.

and us leaving Europe, and all that. Really, it's more to do

:58:38.:58:41.

with civilian bravery in violent and perilous situations,

:58:42.:58:44.

and that there is an instinct for togetherness

:58:45.:58:49.

People have remarked on the fact that there

:58:50.:59:12.

are, effectively, no Germans in this film.

:59:13.:59:14.

That there is no Churchill in this film.

:59:15.:59:17.

What was the thinking around what you were try to

:59:18.:59:19.

I wanted to create a story, an experience for the audience

:59:20.:59:23.

that stays true to the human perspective of the people involved.

:59:24.:59:26.

What I wanted to do was build the story using three different

:59:27.:59:28.

timelines, you know, land, sea and air.

:59:29.:59:33.

You are in a Spitfire with Tom Hardy, the pilot.

:59:34.:59:36.

with the guys there, you are on a boat with Mark Rylance,

:59:37.:59:51.

We cross-cut between these three timelines to try to build up

:59:52.:59:57.

a coherent picture of the bigger events of Dunkirk but

:59:58.:59:59.

without jumping out of the intense human experience.

:00:00.:00:15.

You could practically see it from here.

:00:16.:00:17.

One of the things I was struck by watching it, is

:00:18.:00:25.

I don't mean you, but what would one have done?

:00:26.:00:42.

It does beg those questions, doesn't it?

:00:43.:00:43.

Yeah, I have a cousin who was among the first rescue services

:00:44.:00:46.

And he recounted, you know, decisions firefighters had to make

:00:47.:00:51.

in that terrible staircase on whether to carry on or rescue

:00:52.:00:55.

people who were there in the stairwell.

:00:56.:01:00.

And the film, for each of the three stories in the film,

:01:01.:01:08.

the characters get to a moment - Tom Hardy and my character

:01:09.:01:11.

and those on the beach, Ken Branagh's character,

:01:12.:01:13.

decision, which will affect some people and other people.

:01:14.:01:17.

And someone or a few people will be sacrificed in order

:01:18.:01:20.

Decisions you don't have a lot of time to make.

:01:21.:01:28.

I felt very strongly, viscerally and emotionally,

:01:29.:01:31.

what it would be like to have to make those kinds of

:01:32.:01:34.

You have made some huge films in the past, but making a film

:01:35.:01:52.

about a real-life event, particularly this event,

:01:53.:01:54.

brings with it I imagine extra responsibilities in terms

:01:55.:01:59.

of what you are depicting and whether it's true

:02:00.:02:01.

Well, you do a lot of research, you do a lot of reading.

:02:02.:02:10.

You try and get it under your fingers.

:02:11.:02:12.

And then what I did is I chose fictional characters to guide us

:02:13.:02:16.

through those events and that freed me up as a filmmaker.

:02:17.:02:19.

I wasn't putting words into people's mouths who existed.

:02:20.:02:21.

I wasn't speaking for people who couldn't speak for themselves.

:02:22.:02:24.

I wanted to use fictional characters to give you the

:02:25.:02:26.

But the sense of responsibility, you put it to one

:02:27.:02:32.

You shoot a film, and it comes back powerfully to finish.

:02:33.:02:37.

Last week I did a screening for veterans, you know,

:02:38.:02:39.

people who'd actually been there on the beach and standing

:02:40.:02:42.

in front of that audience about to show the film was one

:02:43.:02:44.

of the most daunting professional experiences I have had.

:02:45.:02:47.

I felt very relieved when it was over,

:02:48.:02:49.

that, you know, they felt that we had done justice to their

:02:50.:02:52.

Really interesting, hearing how the end of that interview he said they

:02:53.:03:07.

show the film to veterans who have seen it hand is Maka kill hand

:03:08.:03:09.

show the film to veterans who have seen it hand is Maka kill

:03:10.:03:13.

You can see my interview with two of the younger stars of the film,

:03:14.:03:19.

Fionn Whitehead and singer Harry Styles, on tomorrow

:03:20.:03:21.

It's worth saying, we will cross over to Paris. Along the lines we

:03:22.:03:28.

were talking about World War II, you can see these extraordinary pictures

:03:29.:03:33.

from Paris this morning. Indeed, these are commemorations of Bastille

:03:34.:03:38.

Day in Paris today. Donald Trump is visiting, he has been invited by

:03:39.:03:42.

President Emmanuel Macron to visit Paris today. There are crowds lining

:03:43.:03:49.

the streets, and army parades throughout, marking the centenary of

:03:50.:03:52.

the American involvement in the First World War. Many anniversaries

:03:53.:03:59.

being marked, as well as a lot of thought about it being one year on

:04:00.:04:06.

from the attack in Nice. Emmanuel Macron on the Champs-Elysees there,

:04:07.:04:14.

we will expect another meeting between Donald Trump and President

:04:15.:04:21.

Macron later on, they will be taking part in this traditional military

:04:22.:04:27.

parade. Coverage continuing on the BBC News Channel, very dramatic

:04:28.:04:31.

Bye bye. A brief last

:04:32.:06:15.

It is a new word time! We like this, I think!

:06:16.:06:19.

Do people think you're snakey because you've been

:06:20.:06:21.

Or have you been pied off because someone thinks

:06:22.:06:25.

I thought a pie off was something else entirely! But we will make

:06:26.:06:33.

sense of all of this... These are the kinds of words

:06:34.:06:34.

you might have heard if you've been watching the ITV reality dating

:06:35.:06:37.

show, Love Island. Here are some of those taking part

:06:38.:06:43.

in the programme explaining what they are talking about...

:06:44.:06:46.

Like, if you're chatting to a girl and she's not that into you,

:06:47.:06:53.

You've got to keep grafting and grafting and grafting

:06:54.:06:59.

When you've got the icky feeling with a boy or a girl

:07:00.:07:09.

You need to be less melty in the future.

:07:10.:07:20.

So, the word melt means like when someone is going to do

:07:21.:07:23.

something in a situation and they literally just crumble.

:07:24.:07:25.

Because sometimes you can use it in terms of like,

:07:26.:07:29.

if someone in a group is being annoying and is trying too

:07:30.:07:32.

hard, trying to be the funny guy, you're also a melt.

:07:33.:07:35.

We did not get you to dress appropriately! Well, no... I was

:07:36.:07:50.

going to! He's not allowed! Mike Kidd said not to! Rob Drummond, a

:07:51.:07:57.

language expert, is with us. What about this language? It's good, they

:07:58.:08:02.

aren't always knew, it is just new to this generation, people watching

:08:03.:08:05.

it now. The words themselves, quite a lot of them have been around a

:08:06.:08:10.

while. The programme gets so much attention and so much on social

:08:11.:08:14.

media, people share these words so they become in common usage. But how

:08:15.:08:20.

long until they transfer from a programme on ITV to common parlance,

:08:21.:08:25.

so to speak? For young people, they will be using them anyway. What we

:08:26.:08:30.

see, we get a glimpse into how people communicate. I am not the

:08:31.:08:36.

target audience, let's be honest, I'm a little older, but we do not

:08:37.:08:39.

get to see. We hear young people speaking that this is a real insight

:08:40.:08:44.

into some of the language. But they are not new, light craft? If you do

:08:45.:08:56.

that, you work extra. -- like graft. And the word extra, we used to say

:08:57.:09:01.

that. "You are so extra". You are down with the kids! And what does

:09:02.:09:10.

extra mean? It means that you are a bit over the top. If you were going

:09:11.:09:17.

on about something, it's paying too much attention to it. It is, you are

:09:18.:09:23.

being so extra. It can be extra any thing. A little bit over the top...

:09:24.:09:27.

These words come round again and again. What may have happened in the

:09:28.:09:32.

past generations come back quickly, words are spread more quickly. They

:09:33.:09:36.

come round again and again. It is a slight change in meaning, this

:09:37.:09:41.

functional shift in changing from a verb to a noun or an adjective. It's

:09:42.:09:49.

quite easy to be snooty but you look at change, change in language

:09:50.:09:54.

happens for all kinds of reasons. It is easy to be snooty about Love

:09:55.:09:57.

Island, I watched it last night to make sure I knew what was going

:09:58.:10:02.

out... Who is going out with who? It was a little bit complicated! I

:10:03.:10:07.

didn't quite understand everything going on. But with language, it is

:10:08.:10:11.

fascinating. It is easy to be snooty, it's a huge thing. People

:10:12.:10:16.

have been talking about it, this is language change happening. If it is

:10:17.:10:20.

happening, it is of interest to linguists. To get a bit personal,

:10:21.:10:25.

are you ever melt with your partner? No, sometimes, I can be a bit of a

:10:26.:10:31.

melt! Do you know what we are talking about? I feel like I am

:10:32.:10:33.

completely outside of the conversation! If you are melt, you

:10:34.:10:40.

would not be pied off. I might be a little bit muddy, but right now? My

:10:41.:10:47.

kids are cringing, that we are using these words! -- muggy. As long as

:10:48.:10:56.

you are not salty! That's all this morning, thank you. A completely

:10:57.:10:57.

different change now! We're going back to

:10:58.:10:59.

the Royal Albert Hall now where the National Youth Orchestra

:11:00.:11:02.

of Great Britain can play us out We'll be back tomorrow

:11:03.:11:05.

morning at six o'clock.

:11:06.:11:09.