15/07/2017 Breakfast


15/07/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Jon Kay.

:00:00.:00:00.

Calls for a crackdown to tackle acid attacks -

:00:07.:00:09.

a review will be carried out into whether laws

:00:10.:00:12.

After five attacks in London on Thursday night campaigners

:00:13.:00:16.

and the Labour Party say there needs to be a change.

:00:17.:00:35.

Good morning, it's Saturday the 15th of July.

:00:36.:00:37.

A call for a more consistent approach to tower block fires

:00:38.:00:41.

after the Grenfell Tower disaster as one in five fire brigades say

:00:42.:00:44.

they will still not automatically send a high ladder to a blaze.

:00:45.:00:51.

Sir David Frost and his son both died from a genetic undiagnosed

:00:52.:00:56.

heart condition - we'll hear how his family hopes to prevent

:00:57.:00:59.

other people going experiencing the same loss.

:01:00.:01:06.

For your 31-year-old rubber to die suddenly and oblique, nothing can

:01:07.:01:16.

prepare you for that. I will never get over the pain of learning that

:01:17.:01:18.

for the first time. A world record for Hannah Cockroft

:01:19.:01:19.

as Britain takes three medals on the opening night of the World

:01:20.:01:22.

Para-athletics Championships. Good morning here from Wimbledon for

:01:23.:01:34.

women's finals day as 37-year-old Venus Williams aims to become the

:01:35.:01:41.

oldest winner of the open era. Roger Federer is through as well, looking

:01:42.:01:43.

for this eighth title. Today is the Word day of the weekend

:01:44.:01:54.

with most rain to the west. Further south you are, the temperature is on

:01:55.:01:59.

Laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the government

:02:00.:02:06.

following a spate of attacks which took place in London

:02:07.:02:09.

Five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them,

:02:10.:02:12.

including one man who is said to have suffered life-changing

:02:13.:02:15.

Two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion

:02:16.:02:18.

A warning you may find some of the images in Andy Moore's report

:02:19.:02:23.

Where does it hurt? In your eyes? In the aftermath of the first attack,

:02:24.:02:36.

police doused the victim with water. He was protected by his helmet and

:02:37.:02:40.

lucky to escape with only minor injuries. Even so, it was a

:02:41.:02:46.

terrifying experience. Took my helmet off and I was screaming for

:02:47.:02:51.

help. I was crying as much as you could cry. It was burning. I was

:02:52.:02:56.

screaming for water, screaming for help. Knocking on the doors and

:02:57.:03:05.

windows. Another rider attacked at this location was not so lucky. He

:03:06.:03:09.

has a life changing injuries to his face. The Shadow Home Secretary

:03:10.:03:14.

called the attacks horrific and barbaric and she is calling for

:03:15.:03:23.

tighter controls. There are different alternatives from

:03:24.:03:28.

sulphuric acid. No-one should be able to buy sulphuric acid unless

:03:29.:03:33.

they are a builder or a workman who needed in the course of their

:03:34.:03:37.

profession. And they should have a licence. The government says it is

:03:38.:03:40.

working with the police to see what more can be done to combat the

:03:41.:03:42.

growing menace of acid attacks. There are calls for a more

:03:43.:03:44.

consistent response to major incidents from all fire

:03:45.:03:47.

brigades in the UK following A BBC News investigation found that

:03:48.:03:49.

crew levels and equipment vary significantly across the country -

:03:50.:03:55.

leading to what the Fire Brigade Union has described

:03:56.:03:58.

as a postcode lottery. More than one month afterwards,

:03:59.:04:09.

there is now a clear picture of how the London Fire Brigade responded to

:04:10.:04:15.

the blaze. Last week it emerged it took over half an hour for a high

:04:16.:04:19.

ladder to arrive after the first fire engine. Automatically bringing

:04:20.:04:27.

this equipment was not part of its predetermined plan but a BBC News

:04:28.:04:31.

night investigation has found that different from 70% of fire services

:04:32.:04:35.

in the UK with high-rise blocks in their region. The investigation also

:04:36.:04:39.

revealed significant variations in the number of fire engines

:04:40.:04:43.

dispatched across the country. It is Procter calls for the government to

:04:44.:04:46.

implement mandatory minimum requirements for fire services who

:04:47.:04:51.

are attending high-rise fires. We have raised concerns about the sort

:04:52.:04:55.

of issue for over a decade. We used to have national standards of fire

:04:56.:04:59.

cover. We now have local risk management plans. They are budget

:05:00.:05:06.

management plans. We have seen the risk assessments over time, as

:05:07.:05:08.

budgets are squeezed, the response has declined over the past few

:05:09.:05:13.

years. Since grown for power, for services including London and

:05:14.:05:18.

Manchester have changed their attendance plans while nine say they

:05:19.:05:21.

still would not send an aerial ladder in the first instance. They

:05:22.:05:27.

say it is the responsibility of each fire authority to manage their own

:05:28.:05:28.

resources. The former Prime Minister Tony Blair

:05:29.:05:30.

has claimed senior figures in the EU have told him they are prepared

:05:31.:05:33.

to be flexible on freedom of movement in order to accommodate

:05:34.:05:36.

Britain after Brexit. Mr Blair made the claim

:05:37.:05:39.

in an an article written Just last week the EU's chief

:05:40.:05:41.

negotiator Michel Barnier said the freedom of movement of people,

:05:42.:05:45.

goods, services and capital 7000 police officers, soldiers,

:05:46.:06:01.

officials and academics have been sacked in Turkey were a national

:06:02.:06:05.

holiday is being held to mark the first anniversary of a failed

:06:06.:06:08.

attempt to remove President Erdogan. Your authorities have accused them

:06:09.:06:12.

of being members of terrorist at organisations or working against the

:06:13.:06:16.

national interest that it 150,000 people have now been arrested or

:06:17.:06:17.

sacked since the aborted coup. The government says it will consider

:06:18.:06:19.

increasing the sentences of people convicted of offences such

:06:20.:06:22.

as encouraging terrorism, if members of the public think

:06:23.:06:24.

the punishment is too light. The Ministry of Justice has

:06:25.:06:27.

set out plans to extend the "Unduly Lenient Sentence" scheme

:06:28.:06:30.

in England and Wales, which already covers serious terror

:06:31.:06:32.

offences and crimes such Be unduly lenient sentence scheme

:06:33.:06:49.

gives anyone the power to ask the government's most senior law officer

:06:50.:06:53.

to review a criminal sentence. If the attorney general considers it

:06:54.:06:56.

appropriate, the case can be referred to the Court of Appeal to

:06:57.:07:02.

reconsideration. At the moment, the scheme covers crimes such as murder,

:07:03.:07:07.

manslaughter, rape and robbery. In 2015, the attorney general referred

:07:08.:07:11.

136 cases to the Court of Appeal with 102 offenders having their

:07:12.:07:15.

sentence increased. Ministers say they will now extend the scheme to

:07:16.:07:20.

cover 19 offences including supporting an extremist

:07:21.:07:23.

organisation, encouraging acts of terror and failing to disclose

:07:24.:07:26.

information about a terrorist attack. The government says the

:07:27.:07:32.

measure is not an overreaction to recent attacks. We have been looking

:07:33.:07:36.

at this for some time and a lot of work has gone into a. We are making

:07:37.:07:44.

sure there is a system in place for the victims of terror offences, that

:07:45.:07:47.

they are properly checked. Also, making sure that those who wilfully

:07:48.:07:54.

and culpably turn a blind eye to terrorist activity feel the full

:07:55.:07:57.

force of the law. The change will occur on August eight sentences on

:07:58.:08:03.

or after that they will be subject to the scheme but will not applied

:08:04.:08:05.

to previous cases. Wages are increasing

:08:06.:08:06.

at their slowest rate for five years, which is hitting young

:08:07.:08:08.

families particularly hard, The Resolution Foundation -

:08:09.:08:11.

which analyses living standards - says average income growth halved

:08:12.:08:17.

to 0.7% in the 12 months before last month's general

:08:18.:08:20.

election, as our business Went Theresa May became Prime

:08:21.:08:33.

Minister year ago she promised to work hardest for those just about

:08:34.:08:38.

managing. The one year later, that those people have seen the rate at

:08:39.:08:42.

which their incomes grow more than halved. It stood at 1.6% but just

:08:43.:08:48.

before the general election it fell to 0.7%. Before the financial crisis

:08:49.:08:55.

in 2008, incomes had grown an average rate of just over 2%.

:08:56.:08:59.

Incomes for younger families, however, have not risen at all in 15

:09:00.:09:03.

years. Or pensioner incomes have grown by 30% in that time due to

:09:04.:09:10.

soaring property values. The big winners are those with mortgages who

:09:11.:09:13.

have seen the interest rate on their mortgage come down significantly. If

:09:14.:09:21.

they disdain jobs, they may not get the earnings gain they wanted but

:09:22.:09:24.

they have benefited from the interest rates. Young people are

:09:25.:09:29.

still 10% lower than where they were and if they are renting, they say

:09:30.:09:33.

even more pressure on the budget. While average households have seen

:09:34.:09:36.

the ring can stagnate of late the wealthiest 1% of the population are

:09:37.:09:40.

said to have the largest ever share of written is total wealth. --

:09:41.:09:46.

Britain's total wealth. A shortlist of five contenders has

:09:47.:09:49.

been announced in the race to be UK City of Culture 2021,

:09:50.:09:53.

taking over from Hull. Coventry, Paisley, Sunderland,

:09:54.:09:55.

Swansea and Stoke-on-Trent are all still in the running to host

:09:56.:09:56.

the year-long celebration of art and performance, which

:09:57.:10:00.

happens every four years. The winner will be

:10:01.:10:02.

announced in December. New York is well-known

:10:03.:10:08.

for being a ruthless and competitive place - but this could be

:10:09.:10:11.

going a bit too far. It is the city's annual Baby Race -

:10:12.:10:14.

also known as the Diaper Derby. There is only one rule -

:10:15.:10:20.

no walking allowed. From the sidelines parents

:10:21.:10:22.

use whatever it takes to encourage their little

:10:23.:10:29.

ones across the mats. Jangling keys, TV remotes

:10:30.:10:34.

and bottles of milk seem There is no stopwatch,

:10:35.:10:36.

and the time it takes these little sprinters to reach the finish

:10:37.:10:43.

line can vary wildly, No tears, however? There were plenty

:10:44.:10:59.

of tears. It is just the parents. It is just an excuse for cute children

:11:00.:11:03.

on screen, isn't it? Let's have a look at the front pages. This is the

:11:04.:11:07.

story we lead with as well, knife crime laws to halt acid attacks

:11:08.:11:12.

ministers are reacting after we heard that in London five people

:11:13.:11:16.

were attacked on Thursday night in the space of 90 minutes. One person

:11:17.:11:21.

suffered life changing injuries and now new laws to restrict the sale

:11:22.:11:27.

and possession of corrosive substances will be proposed. That is

:11:28.:11:31.

what times they picture there is the king of Spain saying farewell to the

:11:32.:11:38.

Queen after his visit, the first bias that Spanish moniker since

:11:39.:11:43.

1956. The Daily Mail is marking the beginning of the summer holidays, an

:11:44.:11:49.

investigation into what it calls the summer hire car rip-off. It says

:11:50.:11:54.

that British tourist travelling in the EU are facing increases in the

:11:55.:11:58.

access they have to pay if they have an accident. Up to two and a half

:11:59.:12:04.

thousand pounds. Did you watch the game with Roger Federer? It was

:12:05.:12:09.

fabulous. Such a good game. Two brilliant sportsman just battling it

:12:10.:12:16.

out. He has now proceeded to the final. He would be the first, he is

:12:17.:12:22.

one victory away from being the first man to win Wimbledon eight

:12:23.:12:29.

times the massive amount of respect to this man. You remember pictures

:12:30.:12:33.

of them as a young boy winning the singles. And he is still there. A

:12:34.:12:38.

well liked competitor. Tough laws, again, called to stop acid attacks.

:12:39.:12:43.

We will have some highlights from Wimbledon a little bit later and we

:12:44.:12:47.

are looking forward to the ladies final this afternoon. Talking out to

:12:48.:12:51.

J, let's find out what happens with the weather because it will not be

:12:52.:12:55.

amazing to be. Good morning, how are you? Yes, you are right, there is a

:12:56.:13:02.

mixed bag this morning. Some rain this weekend, mostly in the north

:13:03.:13:07.

and west of the UK, not too much in the south and east that will be

:13:08.:13:10.

quite warm and muddy. This is the big picture, weather fronts coming

:13:11.:13:14.

in from the Atlantic and this wedge of warm air will be heading across

:13:15.:13:19.

the UK and fairly humid as well without. Rain on fairly wet in the

:13:20.:13:25.

west of Scotland, Rain through time working its way across much of

:13:26.:13:28.

northern England. Most of the other counties stayed essentially dry is a

:13:29.:13:33.

bit cloudy and breezy. Mid-afternoon, still wet across

:13:34.:13:37.

western Scotland. And drier developing further is but another

:13:38.:13:40.

band of rain working south across Northern Ireland. Northern England

:13:41.:13:45.

dries up to some extent into the afternoon but still a little dull

:13:46.:13:49.

and damp in the west of the Pennines. Low cloud here. A lot of

:13:50.:13:55.

cloud to the afternoon across the south-west of England but not a lot

:13:56.:13:59.

of rain, if any at all, and very little rain makes its way towards

:14:00.:14:02.

the south-east of England. There will be some in East Anglia.

:14:03.:14:05.

Wimbledon this afternoon, the ladies final, a lot of cloud around, maybe

:14:06.:14:12.

a spot of rain but I suspect it will stay dry. Warm for the men's final

:14:13.:14:16.

and quite a lot of cloud around. As we head on into the evening there

:14:17.:14:20.

will be wetter weather sinking slowly south, moving away from

:14:21.:14:22.

Scotland and Northern Ireland, heading down to the western side of

:14:23.:14:27.

England and Wales. Dry further is to go. Quite warm night, 16, 17 degrees

:14:28.:14:35.

pertaining fresher further north. Of fresh air will work as we ever

:14:36.:14:40.

southwards during the day on Sunday. Behind this band of cloud,

:14:41.:14:42.

increasingly light and patchy rain. Bit of a north south splits in the

:14:43.:14:48.

second half of the weekend, bride of the further north you go with a few

:14:49.:14:52.

showers but further south, a lot of cloud, not a lot of rain that there

:14:53.:14:56.

will be some and still warm and humid with the low cloud across the

:14:57.:15:01.

southern half of the UK. Fairly high humidity and further north, a little

:15:02.:15:03.

fresher at 17 - 19 degrees. Identifying inherited heart

:15:04.:15:11.

conditions can save lives, but many of us don't know that we're

:15:12.:15:13.

carrying the gene that causes Sir David Frost had the condition

:15:14.:15:17.

and while it didn't cause his death he did pass it on to

:15:18.:15:25.

one of his sons Miles. His family have now set up a fund

:15:26.:15:29.

in his name which is paying for genetic testing

:15:30.:15:32.

at centres across the UK. Our correspondent Chris Buckler has

:15:33.:15:35.

been to one of the centres Miles, come here. In every child you

:15:36.:15:50.

can find something of their parents and often inherited alongside looks

:15:51.:15:53.

and characteristics are things that can't be seen. Miles Frost shared

:15:54.:15:59.

with his father David gene responsible for a heart condition

:16:00.:16:03.

that led to his sudden death. For your 31-year-old brother to die

:16:04.:16:07.

suddenly and unexpectedly, nothing can prepare you for it and I'll

:16:08.:16:12.

never get over the pain of learning that for the first time. He loved

:16:13.:16:18.

sport and he seemed extremely healthy, but he died after going

:16:19.:16:25.

out. His brothers have now set up a fund which, along with the British

:16:26.:16:29.

Heart Foundation, is paying for people to be tested for an inherited

:16:30.:16:34.

heart condition. He would have had to adapt his life and stop playing

:16:35.:16:38.

sport, but at least he would be with us. That didn't happen and we can

:16:39.:16:42.

look back and we can complain about that or we can look forward and make

:16:43.:16:46.

sure it doesn't happen again for the people. Sports clubs are starting to

:16:47.:16:50.

get to grips with how to deal with the problem. It's impossible to

:16:51.:16:57.

simply spot who might have an inherited condition on the pitch,

:16:58.:17:00.

but being aware of the disability could save someone's life. We have a

:17:01.:17:07.

couple of southern deaths within our club and it has been shocking and we

:17:08.:17:12.

will go back to looking at just giving advice to people. That

:17:13.:17:17.

doesn't necessarily mean not taking part in sport, it is just changing

:17:18.:17:22.

what they do on the field. Most of the risk with sport is associated

:17:23.:17:27.

with high intensity sprinting back Bell based activities, so we would

:17:28.:17:30.

normally steer people away from those activities. -- sprinting

:17:31.:17:36.

based. Just do things within parameters. This is one of six

:17:37.:17:41.

centres across the country to be given funding. Not just for families

:17:42.:17:45.

who have this gene, which is known as HCM, but also to offer some

:17:46.:17:52.

support to them. When you see it in the book... This woman has been

:17:53.:17:57.

identified with the condition and she has passed it onto her

:17:58.:18:01.

14-year-old son. That means real adjustments for a football and rugby

:18:02.:18:07.

mad teenager. Rugby is a no-no, but he can play in nets, provided

:18:08.:18:12.

there's the lower level of physical exertion. Golf, he loves it, but it

:18:13.:18:18.

will be a huge impact on him. The bottomline is it is better that he

:18:19.:18:22.

knows and that we can make those adjustments in his life and to live

:18:23.:18:28.

with the condition that he has. It's thought tens of thousands of people

:18:29.:18:33.

are carrying the gene in the UK and targeted screening is at the heart

:18:34.:18:38.

of attempts to make sure they live long and active lives.

:18:39.:18:42.

We will talk a bit more about that condition later and about the

:18:43.:18:48.

screening methods that can take place.

:18:49.:18:49.

We'll be back with the headlines at 6:30am.

:18:50.:18:51.

Now on Breakfast it's time to join Jane Hill and Mark Kermode for this

:18:52.:18:55.

Hello and welcome to The Film Review on BBC News.

:18:56.:19:08.

To take us through this week's cinema releases,

:19:09.:19:10.

Hello again Mark. Hello.

:19:11.:19:14.

We have The Beguiled, which is Sofia Coppola's remake

:19:15.:19:19.

We have Cars 3, the animated sequel - more cars.

:19:20.:19:27.

And the War For The Planet Of The Apes, the ongoing saga continues.

:19:28.:19:34.

As I already learnt I have to pronounce.

:19:35.:19:39.

Yes, "Cope-ola", "Cop-pola" let's call the whole thing off!

:19:40.:19:42.

The point is, this is based on a novel by Thomas Cullinan

:19:43.:19:46.

that was filmed before by Don Siegel in 1971,

:19:47.:19:48.

a famous adaptation, a cult movie.

:19:49.:19:51.

During the Civil War a wounded Union soldier is found

:19:52.:19:54.

girl from Miss Farnsworth's Seminary for Young Ladies.

:19:55.:19:59.

He is brought back to the seminary, he is mortally wounded,

:20:00.:20:02.

And his presence immediately starts to cause a kerfuffle,

:20:03.:20:06.

not only because he is an enemy soldier - and how do they feel

:20:07.:20:10.

about brining an enemy soldier into the school - but also

:20:11.:20:13.

You know you're not supposed to go that far.

:20:14.:20:47.

Quick, we need to move him to the porch.

:20:48.:20:58.

So what happens is, due to what Miss Martha

:20:59.:21:00.

calls Christian charity, they bring him into the house.

:21:01.:21:03.

They start to look after him and he starts to get better

:21:04.:21:07.

to get his way into everyone's confidences and he's

:21:08.:21:10.

flirty and he sees what each character wants or needs.

:21:11.:21:13.

The film appears to be one kind of film,

:21:14.:21:15.

but the question is, of course - who is The Beguiled?

:21:16.:21:18.

Sofia Coppola said when she saw the Don Siegel version,

:21:19.:21:21.

this interesting story but from the point of view

:21:22.:21:25.

Although you could say the novel and the film, which have multiple

:21:26.:21:29.

narrators voices, aren't necessarily just from the male

:21:30.:21:31.

What she's really good at, is the relationships

:21:32.:21:35.

They've lived in kind of cloistered existence and in comes

:21:36.:21:41.

And it changes the way in which the dynamic

:21:42.:21:45.

You saw from that sequence just then,

:21:46.:21:48.

It's a really ethereal, almost gauzy look to it.

:21:49.:21:53.

That fairytale quality is partly deliberate but also what it does,

:21:54.:21:58.

This is set in the Civil War but it might as well not be,

:21:59.:22:02.

In the Don Siegel version we have shots of the battlefield

:22:03.:22:07.

and flashbacks but none of that here, it is just in the distance.

:22:08.:22:11.

In the novel and the Siegel version there is a slave character who has

:22:12.:22:14.

not want to trivialise that subject and also

:22:15.:22:20.

because in her mind, that is not what the story is about.

:22:21.:22:23.

I have to confess I have a real fondness of the Don Siegel version,

:22:24.:22:27.

This version takes it in a different direction,

:22:28.:22:38.

That is the question, is it worth remaking something that

:22:39.:22:43.

It is worth it because it is such a different film.

:22:44.:22:48.

prefer the Don Siegel version but I'm happy...

:22:49.:22:53.

The two versions can coexist because they are such different

:22:54.:22:56.

films, and personally, I grew up loving '70s exploitation

:22:57.:22:59.

cinema and I will always have a fondness for the original,

:23:00.:23:02.

Nicole Kidman is very nuanced in her response

:23:03.:23:05.

He has the sly look in his eye, you think he's in control

:23:06.:23:19.

I would encourage people to see this but also the Don Siegel version

:23:20.:23:24.

It strikes me that your next choice could not be more different.

:23:25.:23:29.

The problem with it is, it is very samey, it is Cars 3,

:23:30.:23:32.

and you know Cars 1 and Cars 2, well, it is that.

:23:33.:23:36.

I remember seeing the first one, I loved the designs,

:23:37.:23:43.

I loved the way the landscapes actually looked like cars.

:23:44.:23:45.

I loved the tail fins within the landscapes,

:23:46.:23:47.

the narrative, we have been around this track before,

:23:48.:23:51.

The central character Lightning McQueen has got to go back

:23:52.:24:07.

to school to learn about new ways of winning a race, in the process

:24:08.:24:10.

his trainer has to learn there is more to being a trainer.

:24:11.:24:14.

There are individual set pieces which are good

:24:15.:24:16.

It comes with a short film at the beginning,

:24:17.:24:19.

and the little short film is really sweet and smart, about bullying

:24:20.:24:23.

and how bullying comes from being hurt yourself

:24:24.:24:25.

and it is really short and compact and everything that is smart

:24:26.:24:28.

about that little short film is what is wrong with Cars.

:24:29.:24:31.

Individual scenes are fine but overall it feels heavy baggage.

:24:32.:24:34.

If we start going down that road, we can wipe out most mainstream

:24:35.:24:39.

It is not fair to say that about Cars,

:24:40.:24:42.

as every mainstream franchise has got that.

:24:43.:24:44.

I wouldn't mind that if the film felt more original,

:24:45.:24:47.

but it felt like I had seen that before.

:24:48.:24:52.

Right, now War For The Planet Of The Apes.

:24:53.:24:54.

Sorry, Mark, I know I am an eternal disappointment to you.

:24:55.:25:10.

The original series of the Planet Of The Apes I loved,

:25:11.:25:13.

forget about the Tim Burton remake, but now we have got this

:25:14.:25:17.

Mankind is on the decline, Apekind is on the rise.

:25:18.:25:23.

Caesar is leading the Apes, played by Andy Serkis.

:25:24.:25:25.

Almost human. How did you know I was here?

:25:26.:25:32.

That more soldiers from the North would be joining you here.

:25:33.:25:40.

What I like about this, the performance capture

:25:41.:26:08.

Andy Serkis is starting to specialise in this,

:26:09.:26:12.

His relationship with performance capture goes back to Gollum in Lord

:26:13.:26:21.

of the Rings and working with Peter Jackson on

:26:22.:26:23.

What is extraordinary is this evolution has happened

:26:24.:26:27.

I remember watching the Tim Burton Planet Of The Apes

:26:28.:26:32.

and thinking, oh, they had developed a prosthetic to allow one

:26:33.:26:34.

but now they have computer generated images that are mapped

:26:35.:26:39.

I think the story is good, very dark, and there is a lot

:26:40.:26:43.

of Apocalypse Now in there, which there also was in

:26:44.:26:46.

Kong Skull Island, but I think the way of the performance capture,

:26:47.:26:50.

I think I'm actually watching these characters,

:26:51.:26:56.

and I'm not any longer concentrating on how well

:26:57.:26:58.

I do think Serkis's work is brilliant, and there has been

:26:59.:27:03.

talk about whether he will get an Oscar-nomination and I think

:27:04.:27:06.

What I like about this, as someone who is a die-hard

:27:07.:27:14.

Planet Of The Apes fan, I have always said everything I know

:27:15.:27:17.

about politics I learned from Planet Of The Apes

:27:18.:27:20.

I think this has taken the series on, it is dramatic.

:27:21.:27:25.

The synthesis of performance and technology is really, really well

:27:26.:27:28.

It Comes At Night, I still think is terrific, some people that go

:27:29.:27:39.

thinking this is a slam bang horror movie, as the trailer suggests,

:27:40.:27:42.

have been disappointed, but it's not that.

:27:43.:27:44.

And I asked you to go and see this, but you didn't?

:27:45.:27:47.

You need to go and see this, it is a creepy film,

:27:48.:27:58.

It's not a shriek film, a really creepy horror film,

:27:59.:28:01.

in the woods and there is something out there.

:28:02.:28:05.

I really like it and I think you will admire it.

:28:06.:28:08.

But you know I am a bit chicken about that kind

:28:09.:28:11.

desperate to see what you want to talk about for your DVD.

:28:12.:28:16.

This is a great film, The Levelling, one of the best debut films I've

:28:17.:28:20.

seen in a long time, set in the Somerset

:28:21.:28:22.

Ellie Kendrick and David Troughton are estranged father and daughter,

:28:23.:28:26.

on the farm that he owns, that is failing, they are trying

:28:27.:28:29.

The best way to describe this film is, it is a very tactile film.

:28:30.:28:34.

You can feel the earth, the mud and the history, and all of that

:28:35.:28:38.

I thought it was terrific, great soundtrack, beautiful use

:28:39.:28:42.

She was named as a rising star many years ago,

:28:43.:28:52.

all these newspapers saying this, and it took a long time

:28:53.:28:55.

If you can make a film that good, take as long as you want.

:28:56.:29:02.

Mark, as ever, thanks for joining us.

:29:03.:29:04.

A quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news

:29:05.:29:08.

and reviews from across the BBC online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode.

:29:09.:29:10.

And you can find all our previous programmes on the iplayer.

:29:11.:29:13.

Enjoy your cinema going. Goodbye.

:29:14.:29:55.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Naga Munchetty and Jon Kay.

:29:56.:29:58.

Coming up before seven Jay will have the weekend's weather

:29:59.:30:01.

But first, a summary of this morning's main news.

:30:02.:30:06.

Laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the government

:30:07.:30:10.

following a spate of attacks which took place in London

:30:11.:30:12.

Five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them,

:30:13.:30:15.

including one man who is said to have suffered life-changing

:30:16.:30:18.

Two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion

:30:19.:30:22.

of robbery and grievous bodily harm with intent.

:30:23.:30:29.

20% of fire brigades across the UK still won't automatically send

:30:30.:30:33.

a tall ladder to a fire in a high rise block

:30:34.:30:35.

of flats - despite the Grenfell Tower disaster.

:30:36.:30:38.

Under its policy at the time, the London brigade didn't send

:30:39.:30:41.

an aerial ladder immediately to the blaze.

:30:42.:30:43.

It's thought the equipment might have helped firefighters restrict

:30:44.:30:45.

It's now led to concerns over discrepencies between local fire

:30:46.:30:49.

The former Prime Minister Tony Blair has claimed senior figures in the EU

:30:50.:31:02.

have told him they are prepared to be flexible on freedom

:31:03.:31:05.

of movement in order to accomodate Britain after Brexit.

:31:06.:31:07.

Mr Blair made the claim in an article

:31:08.:31:09.

written for his own charitable institute.

:31:10.:31:11.

Just last week the EU's chief negotiator Michel Barnier said

:31:12.:31:14.

the freedom of movement of people, goods, services

:31:15.:31:16.

There are plans to extend a scheme which allows members of the public

:31:17.:31:32.

to call for harsher sentences in England and Wales.

:31:33.:31:35.

The Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme already covers serious terror

:31:36.:31:37.

offences and crimes such as murder and rape.

:31:38.:31:39.

The Ministry of Justice now wants it to apply to people who have been

:31:40.:31:43.

convicted of offences such as encouraging terrorism.

:31:44.:31:45.

Wages are increasing at their slowest rate for five

:31:46.:31:47.

years, which is hitting young families particularly hard,

:31:48.:31:50.

The Resolution Foundation - which analyses living standards -

:31:51.:31:53.

says average income growth halved to 0.7% in the 12 months before last

:31:54.:31:57.

A shortlist of five contenders has been announced in the race to be UK

:31:58.:32:11.

City of Culture 2021, taking over from Hull.

:32:12.:32:13.

Coventry, Paisley, Sunderland, Swansea and Stoke-on-Trent

:32:14.:32:15.

are all still in the running to host the year-long celebration of art

:32:16.:32:18.

and performance, which happens every four years.

:32:19.:32:20.

The winner will be announced in December.

:32:21.:32:26.

A 20-year old pilot from West Sussex has become the youngest ever woman

:32:27.:32:30.

to fly alongside the US Air Force Thunderbirds display team.

:32:31.:32:33.

Beth Moran only took up flying last year because she wanted to do

:32:34.:32:36.

something positive following the Shoreham air disaster.

:32:37.:32:38.

She took to the skies over RAF Fairford in Gloucestershire

:32:39.:32:41.

in an F-16 combat jet that is in the UK as part of 70th

:32:42.:32:45.

I am dizzy just looking at that. You can fill your stomach flipping while

:32:46.:33:04.

you watch it. Well done to her, however. Those are our main stories

:33:05.:33:10.

this morning. We promised you we would head to Wimbledon and we are

:33:11.:33:15.

going there now. Good morning, Mike. Good morning. Can you see what we

:33:16.:33:21.

are doing here? I have a mug of tea behind me. I would find it difficult

:33:22.:33:27.

to pick it up and drink it. It is our mug for our challenge. Later we

:33:28.:33:33.

will see how the former world heavyweight champion of the world,

:33:34.:33:39.

David Hay, got an. Here we are, on women's final day. A history making

:33:40.:33:42.

weekend this could be. If Venus Williams at the age of 37 can do

:33:43.:33:48.

defeat Babinda Muguruza this afternoon she will be the oldest

:33:49.:33:56.

winner in the open era, the oldest since 1908, some achievement. We

:33:57.:34:00.

have waited a long time 337-year-old to win a ran slam like this. In the

:34:01.:34:05.

men's final tomorrow, another veteran of Centre Court, Roger

:34:06.:34:09.

Federer is through looking to make history as well. He defeated his

:34:10.:34:16.

opponent in straight sets as he looks freeze record 19th grand slam

:34:17.:34:17.

title. I feel privileged to be in another

:34:18.:34:25.

final. I know how much a means to so many players to be able to go out on

:34:26.:34:29.

centre court at Wimbledon at any time in their career and I have had

:34:30.:34:34.

the pleasure to do it so many times. This time in another final, it is so

:34:35.:34:38.

good. I can not believe it is true again.

:34:39.:34:40.

Looking to spoil Federer's party on centre court tomorrow is Marin

:34:41.:34:43.

The seventh seed came through a tough four set semi-final

:34:44.:34:46.

Cilic is into his second major final after winning the 2014 US Open.

:34:47.:34:51.

Jamie Murray and Martina Hingis are through to the mixed doubles

:34:52.:34:56.

final after beating Marcelo Demoliner and Maria Jose

:34:57.:34:59.

Martinez-Sanchez in straights sets on centre court.

:35:00.:35:06.

And waiting for them are Heather Watson and Henri

:35:07.:35:08.

They beat Bruno Soares and Elena Vesnina two sets to one.

:35:09.:35:11.

So that means Britain is guaranteed success one way or another

:35:12.:35:14.

Gordon Reid and Alfie Hewett are back in the hunt for another

:35:15.:35:21.

Wimbledon title after Britain's star wheelchair tennis double act

:35:22.:35:23.

After early defeats in the singles for the British pair,

:35:24.:35:29.

they rebounded as a team with victory over Argentinian

:35:30.:35:31.

Gustavo Fernandez and Japan's Shingo Kunieda.

:35:32.:35:40.

Away from the tennis, Hannah Cockcroft set a new world

:35:41.:35:42.

record at the World Para-athletics Championships in London last

:35:43.:35:45.

Cockroft won the 100 metre T34 gold in 17.18 seconds.

:35:46.:35:48.

And it was a British one-two as as sixteen-year-old Kare Adenegan

:35:49.:35:51.

Immense. Amazing. I was getting a little emotional. The noise is so

:35:52.:36:13.

loud, we have not had that since the London 2012. To be able to go in and

:36:14.:36:19.

put in such a good performance, it means so much and hopefully that's a

:36:20.:36:21.

sign of And Gemma Prescott won GB's third

:36:22.:36:21.

medal of the tournament with bronze in the F32 club final for seated

:36:22.:36:26.

athletes with cerebral palsy. Prescott's best throw

:36:27.:36:29.

was 19.97 metres. South Africa are 309 for six

:36:30.:36:34.

after day one of the second test Hashim Amla top scored

:36:35.:36:37.

for the tourists with 78, but England picked up four wickets,

:36:38.:36:41.

including his, in the last session . The last time that we played here

:36:42.:36:53.

and older we bowled rather well. I think was important that whatever we

:36:54.:37:00.

did, we kept at it and we did that. They applied themselves well, credit

:37:01.:37:06.

to them. As I say, they were in front.

:37:07.:37:08.

There's eight stages to go at the Tour de France

:37:09.:37:11.

and Chris Froome will start this morning in white,

:37:12.:37:14.

rather than yellow, for a second day -

:37:15.:37:16.

he's still six seconds behind Fabio Aru.

:37:17.:37:18.

But he says he's enjoying racing to try and take the yellow jersey

:37:19.:37:21.

It was actually quite a great feeling to have to go out there and

:37:22.:37:36.

try to race for a win today, as opposed to racing defensively and

:37:37.:37:40.

having the pressure of defending the Jersey. It was nice to have the shoe

:37:41.:37:43.

on the other foot. It's been a difficult few

:37:44.:37:44.

weeks for Rory McIlroy, he's been struggling for form

:37:45.:37:46.

and he's now missed the cut It means he misses the weekend's

:37:47.:37:49.

play, for the third time in the last Celtic have beaten Northern Irish

:37:50.:37:54.

side Linfield two nil in a Champions League

:37:55.:37:59.

qualifier in Belfast. Scott Sinclair and Tom Rogic scoring

:38:00.:38:01.

the goals for Brendan Rodgers' Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor

:38:02.:38:04.

were in London last night, promoting their much anticipated

:38:05.:38:09.

boxing match at the end of August. Like the three events before it,

:38:10.:38:12.

it was a highly charged affair but challenger Conor McGregor say's

:38:13.:38:16.

he can't wait to prove You are all going to air your words

:38:17.:38:33.

and I will be so happy. It is all being documented. Everyone stared

:38:34.:38:37.

into a camera and gave the prediction that I would not touch

:38:38.:38:41.

on, and that there was no chance. I am sitting here laughing. They doubt

:38:42.:38:46.

me but it is a different world, a whole new wave. I look forward to

:38:47.:38:49.

watching all the post match footage. He may be the former

:38:50.:38:55.

heavyweight world champion, but can David Haye put Andy Murray

:38:56.:38:58.

on the ropes to go top of the leaderboard in our Game,

:38:59.:39:01.

Set, Mug challenge? We are in a privileged place this

:39:02.:39:21.

morning. We are inside the gym owned by the one and only Mr David Hay,

:39:22.:39:24.

former world heavyweight champion. He will have a go against the

:39:25.:39:32.

market. I am feeling that you are ready for this. I am. I have been

:39:33.:39:37.

waiting a long time for this. OK. 30 seconds to get as many balls into

:39:38.:39:45.

that mug. Andy Murray has 14. Here's a Wimbledon champion, though... Yes.

:39:46.:39:50.

I think double figures is good. OK. I am going for the double figures.

:39:51.:39:58.

Good technique. Overarm, yes, kept going. Oh, my goodness. This is

:39:59.:40:03.

going to be a good one. Here we go. Interesting. Of power in these risks

:40:04.:40:10.

is translating into a good result here. You are halfway there, 15

:40:11.:40:15.

seconds left. I feel like I am in your corner. This is brilliant.

:40:16.:40:20.

Should I offer you some coaching? I am better at punching people. And

:40:21.:40:29.

now stocked. Had you think you did? Not that great. I think I got around

:40:30.:40:35.

three or four, hopefully. Follow me. Let's have a look. Let's have a

:40:36.:40:40.

look. Ready look inside the mug? I am. Oh, that is brilliant! Nine!

:40:41.:40:53.

Nine! I did not trust your counting. I am happy with that. David Hay,

:40:54.:41:03.

nine. Who have second place? I think you may have been beaten by Kim

:41:04.:41:08.

Clijsters, I'm not sure. But for a boxer, that is very good, better

:41:09.:41:15.

than me. Thank you. I will come back and I will beat Andy. I will get

:41:16.:41:23.

you, Andy. Well done. David Hayes certainly did well there. Let's see

:41:24.:41:26.

where it leaves him now on the leaderboard. This is our leaderboard

:41:27.:41:29.

on the ultimate day of Wimbledon. David Hay, joins Grigor Dimitrov on

:41:30.:41:54.

nine just behind James Ward and Clinton cries that and Andy Murray,

:41:55.:41:58.

still there on 14. Looking as though he may take the title. So on ladies

:41:59.:42:05.

final day, do not forget the coverage starts on BBC Two at 11

:42:06.:42:10.

o'clock and then it is across the BBC on Radio 5 live on the sport

:42:11.:42:14.

website at two o'clock this afternoon. The fund should be

:42:15.:42:18.

shining. I don't will see this on Centre Court this afternoon. Misses

:42:19.:42:21.

from yesterday, I think you'll enjoy this moment. Kim Clijsters is asking

:42:22.:42:29.

the crowd how she should serve? One serve as a madman said do a body so.

:42:30.:42:36.

Well, Kim wanted to know if he could do the walk as well is talk the talk

:42:37.:42:42.

she also went and got him one of her skirts and shirts and tries to

:42:43.:42:47.

squeeze the fan into its. So that he can indeed face one of her first.

:42:48.:42:53.

And he does. Actually, he manages to return it. Well done, Sir. Imagine

:42:54.:42:58.

trying to do that with all the pressure of the crowd looking at

:42:59.:43:01.

you, having squeezed into the type of stock skirts. There were. One

:43:02.:43:09.

brave man, isn't he? He had some real walls to do that and he did

:43:10.:43:13.

quite well. How do you think you would have done that? I don't think

:43:14.:43:20.

I would have returned as well as he did. Maybe you would have looked

:43:21.:43:28.

better in this go. I might have squeezed in bath... It does make it

:43:29.:43:32.

hard to move. I have never won a skirt, I don't know. Trident. It is

:43:33.:43:38.

not hard. A whole new you. Will try later. Not today. Only on Sundays.

:43:39.:43:45.

Let's bring you up today now with the news from BBC. Laws to be

:43:46.:43:51.

reviewed on buying and carrying acid and corrosive materials after the

:43:52.:43:55.

attacks in London on Thursday night. And there are demands for the Fire

:43:56.:44:00.

Brigades to adopt a more consistent response to major incidents after

:44:01.:44:07.

the grand full power disaster. -- Grenfell Tower.

:44:08.:44:13.

I enjoyed this so much. I feel very grateful to do the things that I

:44:14.:44:19.

like so much. He stars alongside Tom Hardy

:44:20.:44:20.

and Mark Rylance in one of the summer's biggest

:44:21.:44:22.

blockbusters, Dunkirk. Here's Jay with a look

:44:23.:44:27.

at this morning's weather. A dramatic sky behind you! Yes, we

:44:28.:44:40.

can expect at least some rain this weekend. Most of that will be in

:44:41.:44:44.

northern parts of the UK, but for most of us it's a warm day and

:44:45.:44:48.

fairly humid as well. This warm air is coming in from the south and

:44:49.:44:52.

west, bringing the weather fronts with them. It is bring the rain into

:44:53.:44:56.

the north and west. There are highs bars on the chart, so it be breezy.

:44:57.:45:01.

Lots of cloud first thing. The rain is moving from west to east. Further

:45:02.:45:07.

south it's a largely dry day, if rather cloudy and breezy. Wettest

:45:08.:45:13.

all the while in the western side of Scotland. Further east, some drier

:45:14.:45:18.

and brighter interludes, but there will be another band of rain working

:45:19.:45:21.

south through the afternoon. In northern England most of the rain

:45:22.:45:24.

will be through the morning. Still some left over in the west in

:45:25.:45:32.

particular, quite grey as well. Again, the rain works through here

:45:33.:45:36.

through the morning. There will be some drier and brighter conditions

:45:37.:45:40.

in the southern counties. Temperatures about 21- 22 degrees in

:45:41.:45:44.

the south and east. Not a great deal of sunshine through the afternoon.

:45:45.:45:50.

Largely dry for the ladies' final today. Tomorrow a lot of cloud

:45:51.:45:58.

around again. In evening the weather front moves away from Scotland and

:45:59.:46:01.

Northern Ireland and pushes into the north of England, maybe some wet

:46:02.:46:05.

weather to the south and west of the UK as well with lots of low cloud.

:46:06.:46:09.

But quite a warm night, 16- 17 degrees. Fresher further north. That

:46:10.:46:15.

fresh air will eventually win out and push in behind this weakening

:46:16.:46:19.

band of cloud and a little bit of rain as well through the day on

:46:20.:46:23.

Sunday. As you see this is working south. Fresh air coming in behind it

:46:24.:46:27.

and brighter conditions as well. Maybe the odd shower in Scotland.

:46:28.:46:31.

Dry and bright weather across the northern half of the UK. Maybe some

:46:32.:46:36.

rain, but nothing too significant and still pretty warm and humid.

:46:37.:46:41.

Further north it is fresh, 17- 19. A changeable weekend. Back to you.

:46:42.:46:45.

We'll be back with the headlines at 7am.

:46:46.:46:49.

Now on Breakfast, it's time for Click.

:46:50.:47:16.

This is Adam Jensen, star of the video game

:47:17.:47:18.

Set in 2027, the poor chap has to undergo extensive

:47:19.:47:28.

cybernetic modifications after being severely injured.

:47:29.:47:32.

Well, just ten years before those events might occur,

:47:33.:47:34.

that plot line doesn't seem that far off.

:47:35.:47:41.

For years now people have been body hacking,

:47:42.:47:43.

giving themselves extra abilities and, as our understanding

:47:44.:47:45.

of robotics has advanced, so has our creativity.

:47:46.:47:55.

Like the cyborg in the video game, he too has a bionic eye.

:47:56.:48:01.

It doesn't have Terminator vision like this, yet,

:48:02.:48:04.

Inside a prosthetic eye, which is an odd shape,

:48:05.:48:10.

they're not a sphere, a prosthetic eye, they're actually

:48:11.:48:13.

Inside that is a battery, a video camera and a video

:48:14.:48:23.

transmitter all attached to a circuit board so they can

:48:24.:48:26.

The camera is turned on and off with a magnet.

:48:27.:48:31.

It doesn't look at all comfortable, is it in anyway comfortable?

:48:32.:48:34.

The first configuration that looks the most uncomfortable,

:48:35.:48:44.

it looks like a '90s iMac, you can see all the goods inside.

:48:45.:48:49.

Like the battery and the wires, but that's covered by smooth

:48:50.:48:56.

I don't have open wires and batteries, you know.

:48:57.:49:02.

That kind of made my stomach drop a little bit when I saw that.

:49:03.:49:06.

Rob damaged his eye when he was nine and in 2009 began exploring

:49:07.:49:10.

As a film-maker himself, he was fascinated with the idea

:49:11.:49:15.

It's like an absurd toy for a one-eyed film-maker.

:49:16.:49:20.

I used to watch the Bionic Man when I was a kid, the $6 Million

:49:21.:49:25.

I had the action figure, you looked through the back of his head,

:49:26.:49:29.

I was looking at my Nokia flip phone at the time I was like -

:49:30.:49:34.

That's in fact who I called, I called Nokia.

:49:35.:49:41.

They said - well, we'll call the camera module people in China.

:49:42.:49:48.

It's very small, it's very challenging.

:49:49.:49:52.

It does visual dropouts, which is the visual language

:49:53.:49:56.

of all video from the future, including Princess Leia

:49:57.:49:58.

Since the initial prototype, Rob and his engineers have gone

:49:59.:50:08.

He now has one eye that glows red when it films and another camera eye

:50:09.:50:16.

I get calls from and emails from moms whose kid has just lost

:50:17.:50:26.

an eye, because it's some sort of fun thing to show a kid this

:50:27.:50:29.

maniac running around on videos and glowing

:50:30.:50:40.

red eye cameras and stuff. It's fun for them to look at that.

:50:41.:50:43.

They're now looking working on ways to transfer the technology to other

:50:44.:50:47.

We're doing 3D scans of those now and then that creates a space that

:50:48.:50:51.

you can take into software to map on the technology that we're

:50:52.:50:54.

Some people golf, I like to make fake eye cameras and, you know,

:50:55.:50:59.

Welcome to the weekend tech. It was the week a group of disgruntled

:51:00.:51:20.

Twitter users began suing President Donald Trump for blocking them on

:51:21.:51:26.

Twitter! Facebook announced it is trialling embedded advertising in

:51:27.:51:31.

its messenger app. Yay, that will go down well with users.

:51:32.:51:32.

Step aside, PSY, here is Wiz Khalifa, taking the coveted

:51:33.:51:35.

It has been viewed a staggering 2.9 billion times.

:51:36.:51:49.

Billionaire Elon Musk launched the new all-electric Tesla Model

:51:50.:51:51.

At a pricetag of $35,000, it's supposed to be more affordable

:51:52.:52:01.

than Tesla's previous efforts which cost 100 grand.

:52:02.:52:03.

Rival automobile company Faraday Future has scrapped

:52:04.:52:05.

its plans to build a billion-dollar factory in the US state of Nevada.

:52:06.:52:09.

This leaves a big question mark over the launch next year

:52:10.:52:12.

No, this is not a digital version of the Ministry of Silly Walks

:52:13.:52:20.

but this is Google's Deep Mind attempting to learn how to walk.

:52:21.:52:27.

So far the research is being conducted in virtual environments,

:52:28.:52:32.

but it could one day help robots learn how to navigate

:52:33.:52:35.

And, finally, a former Nasa scientist has built a super sized

:52:36.:52:44.

It's so big, at least you will see him coming.

:52:45.:52:56.

Almost everyone in the world who works pays tax on the money

:52:57.:52:59.

But at this restaurant in San Francisco there

:53:00.:53:02.

are no waiting staff and robots plate the food.

:53:03.:53:04.

That work is currently not taxable and politician Jane Kim is now

:53:05.:53:08.

looking into how this is changing the city's economy.

:53:09.:53:10.

So what we're seeing is after automation that you can

:53:11.:53:13.

hire less people in order to deliver products maybe quicker

:53:14.:53:15.

But it's one of the questions that we have, it's true this

:53:16.:53:23.

is really convenient, but at what cost?

:53:24.:53:25.

It's not just restaurants, this picture is now seen across the city,

:53:26.:53:28.

from hotels and hospitals to the latest addition

:53:29.:53:30.

to the autonomous family, self-driving cars.

:53:31.:53:35.

Policy makers have noticed, every time a robot takes a human

:53:36.:53:39.

job, potential tax revenue is being lost.

:53:40.:53:44.

The research is showing us that jobs are going to get lost over the next

:53:45.:53:48.

ten years and if before the Great Depression

:53:49.:53:50.

we could have predicted what would come afterwards,

:53:51.:53:52.

if government could have prepared for the job loss that occurred,

:53:53.:53:55.

That is the level at which we are looking at potentially

:53:56.:54:04.

over the next ten years, in terms of job loss

:54:05.:54:06.

Estimations of how many jobs will be wiped out vary widely

:54:07.:54:10.

from study to study, but a recent report especially has

:54:11.:54:13.

It's estimated that robots will replace 37% of jobs

:54:14.:54:16.

in the United States by the early 2030s.

:54:17.:54:24.

So the biggest concern is mass job displacement,

:54:25.:54:26.

lack of true, meaningful, high wage work.

:54:27.:54:28.

We are already seeing a decrease of that in San Francisco

:54:29.:54:31.

where we have the fastest growing income gap in the country

:54:32.:54:34.

and a wealth gap that is akin to the country of Rwanda,

:54:35.:54:37.

accord to our own human services agency data

:54:38.:54:39.

and so we have a shrinking middle-class and we have this

:54:40.:54:42.

growing imminent threat that many of our meaningful,

:54:43.:54:45.

working-class and even middle-class jobs may go away

:54:46.:54:47.

At Cafe X, again a human worker has been replaced by a robot.

:54:48.:54:55.

An Americano with milk, served by a robot.

:54:56.:54:57.

Now, the human has a different role, advising on coffee beans and showing

:54:58.:55:01.

customers how to use the tablet to operate the robot.

:55:02.:55:03.

The owner is not sure about the idea of a tax on the replacement.

:55:04.:55:10.

I guess I find it a little odd because what robots are supposed

:55:11.:55:14.

That means it allows a shift in labour from doing highly

:55:15.:55:20.

repetitive, low productivity tasks to more useful things.

:55:21.:55:26.

So in order to have this machine operate, there has to be a lot

:55:27.:55:33.

of engineers on software, hardware and manufacturing to build

:55:34.:55:36.

Jobs like this require training and that's what Supervisor Kim wants

:55:37.:55:43.

If you're a childcare worker or you're an in home

:55:44.:55:48.

support services worker, working with a senior

:55:49.:55:50.

or individual with disability, you often work three or four hours

:55:51.:55:53.

So one of the ideas was, why not tax robots and invest

:55:54.:56:01.

in these poverty jobs and make them truly living wage

:56:02.:56:04.

This would mean a robot tax potentially subsidising low paying,

:56:05.:56:08.

but essential jobs, so that the human employees

:56:09.:56:11.

Currently, many people are working but not earning enough to live,

:56:12.:56:17.

leading several politicians around the world to float the idea

:56:18.:56:20.

This would be expensive for governments and Supervisor Kim

:56:21.:56:25.

is suggesting an automation tax could be a solution.

:56:26.:56:28.

If there's one thing that San Francisco is known for,

:56:29.:56:31.

it's leading the conversation on technology and innovation,

:56:32.:56:33.

but as harder and harder questions are asked about automation

:56:34.:56:35.

and what this really means for people's jobs it seems

:56:36.:56:54.

appropriate that this city, which has added so much

:56:55.:56:57.

to the problem, is also grappling with what could be the solution.

:56:58.:57:00.

But the rise of robotic workers is playing out on a global scale

:57:01.:57:04.

and San Francisco is not the only place trying to lead

:57:05.:57:06.

In the EU, a proposal to tax robots was voted down earlier in the year

:57:07.:57:11.

and one of the Commissioners who did so says robots will create more

:57:12.:57:15.

They are worried because they say robots they will take their jobs,

:57:16.:57:22.

Progress always created more jobs than progress used to destroy.

:57:23.:57:26.

The train is moving and speed is high and now it's up to us to be

:57:27.:57:31.

on that train or to stay and to wave to the leaving train.

:57:32.:57:34.

Concerns about automation replacing human jobs has been felt

:57:35.:57:37.

since the Industrial Revolution and more

:57:38.:57:39.

the manufacturing industry have seen jobs disappear

:57:40.:57:42.

As the issue of a robot tax begins to spread further,

:57:43.:57:54.

a fundamental question still needs to be answered -

:57:55.:57:57.

In the context of robots of course automation is much broader

:57:58.:58:01.

They gave this definition more than 100 years ago.

:58:02.:58:05.

Politicians can no longer ignore the robots creeping

:58:06.:58:08.

into the workplace and while many of the big questions

:58:09.:58:11.

are still being thrashed out, it's clear that the issue of robot

:58:12.:58:22.

workers is becoming more and more of a political one.

:58:23.:58:25.

You can watch the full version on iPlayer.

:58:26.:58:28.

And you can follow us on Twitter @BBC Click throughout

:58:29.:58:31.

the week and like us on Facebook, too.

:58:32.:58:33.

Thanks for watching and we will see you soon.

:58:34.:00:02.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Jon Kay.

:00:03.:00:04.

Demands for a crackdown to tackle acid attacks.

:00:05.:00:06.

A review will be carried out into whether laws

:00:07.:00:09.

After five attacks in London on Thursday night, campaigners

:00:10.:00:12.

and the Labour Party say there needs to be change.

:00:13.:00:28.

Good morning, it is Saturday 15 July.

:00:29.:00:33.

A call for a more consistent approach to Tower fires.

:00:34.:00:46.

Tony Blair says some EU leaders tell him

:00:47.:00:49.

that they are willing to consider changing rules on the free movement

:00:50.:00:52.

A world record for Hannah Cockroft, as Britain takes three medals

:00:53.:00:59.

on the opening night of the World Para Athletics

:01:00.:01:01.

While here at Wimbledon, it is women's final day,

:01:02.:01:06.

as 37-year-old Venus Williams looks to become the oldest winner

:01:07.:01:08.

And another veteran of centre court, Roger Federer, has made it

:01:09.:01:16.

He will be looking for his eighth title here.

:01:17.:01:20.

Today will be the wetter of the two days of the weekend,

:01:21.:01:36.

The further south you are, the temperature is on the rise,

:01:37.:01:41.

First, our main story: Laws on buying and carrying acid

:01:42.:01:45.

are to be reviewed by the Government following a spate of attacks

:01:46.:01:48.

which took place in London on Thursday night.

:01:49.:01:51.

Five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them,

:01:52.:01:53.

including one man who is said to have suffered life-changing

:01:54.:01:55.

Two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion

:01:56.:02:00.

of robbery and grievous bodily harm with intent.

:02:01.:02:02.

A warning - you may find some of the flashing images

:02:03.:02:05.

In the aftermath of the first attack, police doused

:02:06.:02:16.

He was protected by his helmet, and lucky to escape

:02:17.:02:20.

But even so, it was a terrifying experience.

:02:21.:02:29.

Took off my helmet, and I was just screaming for help,

:02:30.:02:38.

because it was getting dry, and as much as it was getting dry,

:02:39.:02:42.

I was screaming for water, screaming for help.

:02:43.:02:45.

Another rider attacked at this location was not so lucky.

:02:46.:02:50.

He has life-changing injuries to his face.

:02:51.:02:52.

The Shadow Home Secretary called the attacks horrific and barbaric.

:02:53.:02:55.

Nobody in their own home needs pure sulphuric acid.

:02:56.:03:10.

There are different alternatives for cleaning your drains.

:03:11.:03:12.

No-one should be able to buy sulphuric acid

:03:13.:03:18.

unless they're a builder or a workman who needs

:03:19.:03:24.

it in the course of their profession,

:03:25.:03:26.

The Government says it is working with the police to see what more can

:03:27.:03:31.

be done to combat the growing menace of acid attacks.

:03:32.:03:34.

There are calls for a more consistent response to major

:03:35.:03:37.

incidents from all fire brigades in the UK,

:03:38.:03:39.

following the Grenfell Tower disaster.

:03:40.:03:40.

A BBC News investigation found that crew levels and equipment vary

:03:41.:03:43.

significantly across the country, leading to what the Fire Brigade

:03:44.:03:46.

Union has described as a postcode lottery.

:03:47.:03:48.

More than a month on, there is now a clear picture of how

:03:49.:03:52.

the London Fire Brigade responded to the blaze.

:03:53.:03:56.

Last week, it emerged it took more than 30 minutes for a high ladder

:03:57.:04:00.

to arrive after the first fire engine.

:04:01.:04:04.

Until Grenfell, automatically bringing this piece of equipment

:04:05.:04:08.

was not part of its predetermined plan.

:04:09.:04:10.

But a BBC Newsnight investigation has found

:04:11.:04:16.

that is different from 70% of fire services in the UK with high-rise

:04:17.:04:20.

The investigation also revealed significant variations in the number

:04:21.:04:23.

of fire engines dispatched across the country.

:04:24.:04:25.

It has prompted calls for the Government to implement

:04:26.:04:28.

mandatory minimum requirements for fire services who are

:04:29.:04:30.

We have raised concerns about this sort of issue for over a decade.

:04:31.:04:36.

We used to have national standards of fire cover.

:04:37.:04:39.

What they are in reality is budget management plans.

:04:40.:04:46.

We have seen the risk assessments over time,

:04:47.:04:48.

as budgets are squeezed, the response has declined over

:04:49.:04:51.

Since Grenfell Tower, four services, including London

:04:52.:04:57.

and Manchester, have changed their attendance plans,

:04:58.:04:58.

while nine say they still would not

:04:59.:05:00.

send an aerial ladder in the first instance.

:05:01.:05:06.

The Home Office says it is the responsibility of each

:05:07.:05:09.

fire authority to manage their own resources.

:05:10.:05:11.

The former Prime Minister Tony Blair has that claimed senior figures

:05:12.:05:14.

in the EU have told him they are prepared to be flexible

:05:15.:05:17.

on freedom of movement in order to accommodate Britain after Brexit.

:05:18.:05:20.

Mr Blair made the claim in an article written

:05:21.:05:22.

Just last week the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier,

:05:23.:05:26.

said the freedom of movement of people, goods, services

:05:27.:05:29.

Our political correspondent Emma Vardy joins us now

:05:30.:05:32.

You have been looking through this article Mr Blair has risen. What is

:05:33.:05:51.

he saying, exactly? -- written. The key claim that he makes is that the

:05:52.:05:55.

EU is now prepared to make concessions on freedom of movement

:05:56.:05:59.

to accommodate Britain, essentially saying that while Britain could gain

:06:00.:06:03.

greater control of its borders and bring immigration down while still

:06:04.:06:08.

remaining within a reformed EU. Some might say this sounds rather like

:06:09.:06:12.

having your cake and eating it. Where is the evidence that the EU is

:06:13.:06:17.

prepared to make these concessions? Because, as the rules currently

:06:18.:06:21.

stand, opting out of freedom of movement means leaving the single

:06:22.:06:24.

market. But what Tony Blair is saying is, hang on, there could be

:06:25.:06:30.

another way it here. He is a former prime minister, he doesn't have any

:06:31.:06:33.

real political power any more. We knew that he was pro- remain. Does

:06:34.:06:39.

it matter? Is this a serious intervention by him? Well, for some

:06:40.:06:43.

people Tony Blair is still a big player in politics and his argument

:06:44.:06:47.

could carry some weight. He can be persuasive, he knows how to make

:06:48.:06:51.

headlines, and he wants to be seen to be steering the country in a

:06:52.:06:55.

different way on Brexit. For others, Tony Blair may seem a rather

:06:56.:07:00.

irrelevant voice in the Brexit debate. He may want to lead the

:07:01.:07:04.

anti- Brexit fightback and persuade the UK that it is better off in the

:07:05.:07:09.

EU but he will always face the argument that he is ignoring the

:07:10.:07:12.

referendum result and ignoring that democratic ballot.

:07:13.:07:13.

7,000 police officers, soldiers, officials and academics have been

:07:14.:07:16.

sacked in Turkey, where a national holiday is being held to mark

:07:17.:07:19.

the first anniversary of a failed attempt to remove President Erdogan.

:07:20.:07:22.

The authorities have accused them of being members of terrorist

:07:23.:07:25.

organisations or of groups working against the national interest.

:07:26.:07:27.

150,000 people have now been arrested or sacked

:07:28.:07:29.

There are plans to extend a scheme which allows members of the public

:07:30.:07:41.

to call for harsher sentences in England and Wales.

:07:42.:07:43.

The unduly lenient sentence scheme already covers serious terror

:07:44.:07:46.

offences and crimes such as murder and rape.

:07:47.:07:48.

The Ministry of Justice now wants it to apply to people who have been

:07:49.:07:52.

convicted of offences such as encouraging terrorism.

:07:53.:07:54.

We've been looking at this for some time.

:07:55.:08:14.

A lot of work has gone into it.

:08:15.:08:16.

We are making sure there is a system in place for the victims of terror

:08:17.:08:20.

offences, that they are properly checked.

:08:21.:08:22.

Also, making sure that those who wilfully and culpably turn

:08:23.:08:25.

a blind eye to terrorist activity feel the full force of the law.

:08:26.:08:30.

A man has died after being attacked by a man on mopeds. He was

:08:31.:08:37.

pronounced dead at the scene. His family have been informed and no

:08:38.:08:39.

arrests have been made. Wages are increasing

:08:40.:08:40.

at their slowest rate for five years, which is hitting young

:08:41.:08:42.

families in particular, The Resolution Foundation,

:08:43.:08:44.

which analyses living standards, says average income growth halved

:08:45.:08:47.

to 0.7% in the year before the general election,

:08:48.:08:50.

as our business correspondent When Theresa May became

:08:51.:08:53.

Prime Minister a year ago, she promised

:08:54.:09:02.

to work hardest for those But a year later, those so-called

:09:03.:09:03.

JAMs have seen the rate at which their incomes

:09:04.:09:15.

grow more than halved. It stood at 1.6% but just before

:09:16.:09:17.

the general election it Before the financial crisis in 2008,

:09:18.:09:20.

incomes had grown an average rate Incomes for younger families,

:09:21.:09:26.

though, have not risen While pensioner incomes have grown

:09:27.:09:29.

by 30% in that time due The big winners are those

:09:30.:09:37.

with mortgages, who have seen the interest rate on their mortgage

:09:38.:09:42.

come down significantly. And if they've stayed in their jobs,

:09:43.:09:49.

yes, they may not get the earnings gain they wanted,

:09:50.:09:53.

but they have benefited Young people are still 10% lower

:09:54.:09:55.

than where they were and if they are renting, there is even more

:09:56.:10:00.

pressure on the budget. While average households have

:10:01.:10:03.

seen their income stagnate of late, the wealthiest 1% of the population

:10:04.:10:07.

are said to have the largest-ever A shortlist of five contenders has

:10:08.:10:10.

been announced in the race to be UK City of Culture 2021,

:10:11.:10:16.

taking over from Hull. Coventry, Paisley, Sunderland,

:10:17.:10:18.

Swansea and Stoke-on-Trent are all still in the running to host

:10:19.:10:20.

the yearlong celebration of art and performance, which

:10:21.:10:23.

happens every four years. The winner will be

:10:24.:10:25.

announced in December. New York is well-known

:10:26.:10:30.

for being a ruthless and competitive place, but this could be

:10:31.:10:33.

going a bit too far. It is the city's annual Baby Race,

:10:34.:10:36.

also known as the Diaper Derby. There is only one rule -

:10:37.:10:39.

no walking allowed. From the sidelines, parents

:10:40.:10:42.

use whatever it takes to encourage their little

:10:43.:10:44.

ones across the mats. Jangling keys, TV remotes

:10:45.:10:46.

and bottles of milk seem Cameras, favourite toys. Rusk would

:10:47.:10:49.

have got me over the line. There is no stopwatch,

:10:50.:11:14.

and the time it takes these little sprinters to reach the finish

:11:15.:11:17.

line can vary wildly, He is just chill. We assume that is

:11:18.:11:32.

a he. You never know. We will be talking to Mike at Wimbledon and

:11:33.:11:36.

getting the latest on the weather a little later on.

:11:37.:11:37.

The hunt for treatments to halt Alzheimer's disease has so far been

:11:38.:11:40.

largely unsuccessful, with most clinical trials

:11:41.:11:42.

But a group of scientists say they may be close to doing

:11:43.:11:46.

for Alzheimer's what statins have done for heart disease,

:11:47.:11:49.

through researching people with an unusually high genetic risk

:11:50.:11:51.

We will find out a bit more in just a moment,

:11:52.:11:55.

but first, let's hear from one of the people taking part

:11:56.:11:58.

I am so he, and my family has a very rare genetic form of Alzheimer's

:11:59.:12:10.

which means that I can develop Alzheimer's in the next couple of

:12:11.:12:15.

years -- Sophie. As of this I am very much involved in Alzheimer's

:12:16.:12:18.

research and passionate about finding a cure. My mum started

:12:19.:12:22.

showing signs of Alzheimer's in her 40s, and because her sister had had

:12:23.:12:27.

it as well and a really young age, we found out that there was a

:12:28.:12:31.

genetic link. And that meant that we had a chance, all of the children of

:12:32.:12:35.

that generation had a 50- 50 chance of getting it. I decided not to find

:12:36.:12:41.

out. I need that hope that I might not have it, and I am not ready to

:12:42.:12:46.

potentially have that taken away from me at the moment, and they know

:12:47.:12:50.

for certain what the indications are for my daughter. So for now I have

:12:51.:12:54.

chosen not to be tested. I started the drugs trial almost three years

:12:55.:13:00.

ago now. They are testing experimental drugs. I go down to

:13:01.:13:05.

London every four weeks. I love what I am doing. I feel in a really...

:13:06.:13:10.

What could be a very dark thing, there is this hope. And I do believe

:13:11.:13:14.

that me and that families like mine that get involved in research are

:13:15.:13:16.

going to be part of finding a cure. Let's speak now to Dr Randy Bateman,

:13:17.:13:19.

who is professor of neurology at Washington University School

:13:20.:13:22.

of Medicine, in St Louis. Thank you very much for talking to

:13:23.:13:34.

us this morning. Sophie made it very clear that that the problem now with

:13:35.:13:38.

identifying Alzheimer's and preventing Alzheimer's is the

:13:39.:13:43.

diagnosis before and treatment before the disease takes hold.

:13:44.:13:47.

That's exactly right. And so these families potentially hold the cure,

:13:48.:13:52.

for a wafer us to identify those who are at certain risk for getting the

:13:53.:13:57.

disease, and being able to test drugs and therapies to see if we can

:13:58.:14:01.

prevent the disease from coming on in the first place -- way for us. If

:14:02.:14:07.

that is successful, it could lead to a prevention effort that can be used

:14:08.:14:11.

by everybody. What I suppose is discouraging about this research is

:14:12.:14:15.

that there is a very small number of people who can be identified for

:14:16.:14:18.

inheriting the disease, and still those who develop it without family

:14:19.:14:22.

history, the treatment is still very lacking. That's right, and so those

:14:23.:14:30.

who have these mutations are spread geographically around the world and

:14:31.:14:33.

at this year's Alzheimer 's meeting here in London, they are gathering

:14:34.:14:39.

over 150 family participants. So although these families are quite

:14:40.:14:42.

rare, it is important to remember that they have a genetic

:14:43.:14:45.

predisposition which causes them to have the certainty of getting the

:14:46.:14:50.

disease. And that certainty allows us to treat people years or even

:14:51.:14:54.

decades before their symptoms began. And in so doing, we think we have

:14:55.:14:58.

the opportunity to stop the Alzheimer 's pathology from taking

:14:59.:15:06.

hold and damaging the brain. It is quite difficult to conceive this

:15:07.:15:09.

idea of treating something that hasn't begun yet. How do you prove

:15:10.:15:14.

the success of that treatment? It is commonly done in medicine, where we

:15:15.:15:17.

treat diseases long before they take all and cause damage. For example,

:15:18.:15:24.

high blood pressure of cholesterol. We screened the general population,

:15:25.:15:29.

looking for people who have these as risk factors for heart attacks and

:15:30.:15:36.

strokes. And so we now have the ability to see their signatures of

:15:37.:15:41.

Alzheimer's disease before they get sick and before significant brain

:15:42.:15:45.

damage occurs. So if we are able to use that combination of bio markers

:15:46.:15:50.

with a genetic predisposition that these families hold, it can lead to

:15:51.:15:53.

a prevention effort where we can screen everyone with the bio markers

:15:54.:16:00.

for Alzheimer's disease, treat them for -- with the medication and

:16:01.:16:04.

prevent them from getting the disease. It is a very frustrating

:16:05.:16:09.

field of research, in the sense that those with the disease now are still

:16:10.:16:13.

seeing sales treatments or unsuccessful treatments so far. How

:16:14.:16:19.

confident are you that this could perhaps lead to treating those who

:16:20.:16:22.

are currently dealing with the disease? There are multiple avenues

:16:23.:16:28.

being taken to treat the disease, both for those before they had

:16:29.:16:33.

symptoms, as well as those who already had symptoms and those

:16:34.:16:36.

individuals are included in these trials as well. What we don't know

:16:37.:16:41.

yet is when is the optimal time to intervene and with what drug and on

:16:42.:16:44.

which way? Although it is frustrating that over the past ten

:16:45.:16:48.

years there have been failures in clinical trials, the trials continue

:16:49.:16:52.

to point to us that we are making progress, we can now intervene in

:16:53.:16:58.

the Alzheimer's pathology in the brain itself and there are signs

:16:59.:17:02.

that this is helping people's cognition in thinking that in later

:17:03.:17:06.

stage trials we may be able to demonstrate significant benefits. So

:17:07.:17:10.

I would say there's a great amount of hope among researchers and

:17:11.:17:15.

families that we have a shot to change the course of this disease.

:17:16.:17:20.

Thank you very much for your time and for giving us a clear

:17:21.:17:24.

explanation of going on in this area of research.

:17:25.:17:25.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:17:26.:17:29.

The main stories this morning: There's to be a review of the laws

:17:30.:17:34.

on buying and carrying acid, following Thursday night's

:17:35.:17:36.

There are demands for the Uk's Fire Brigades to adopt

:17:37.:17:42.

a more consistent response to major incidents after

:17:43.:17:44.

Also coming up in the programme: Look at this for a selfie!

:17:45.:17:51.

We've been to meet the youngest ever woman to fly with the Thunderbirds

:17:52.:17:55.

and she only had her first flying lesson a year ago.

:17:56.:18:05.

Not only is she the youngest woman to fly with them, she takes a selfie

:18:06.:18:13.

when she is how high up in the air? So confident!

:18:14.:18:17.

Incredible. I saw some lovely blue sky. I wonder

:18:18.:18:22.

what it will be like today. Good morning. Good morning. A lot of

:18:23.:18:27.

cloud in the UK this morning and we will have rain working from east to

:18:28.:18:31.

west. Today looks like the wetter day. It is warm and muggy, which

:18:32.:18:36.

this warm air coming in from the Atlantic, but it is also coming in

:18:37.:18:40.

with a breeze and some cloud and outbreaks of rain. It will always be

:18:41.:18:44.

wettest across the western side of Scotland. Northern England will be

:18:45.:18:49.

wettest through this morning and by the afternoon things are turning a

:18:50.:18:53.

little bit drier. A little bit of rain possible towards the south-east

:18:54.:18:56.

of England. Many southern counties should be fine. It stays pretty dry

:18:57.:19:02.

in the central and western parts of Scotland. The eastern side of

:19:03.:19:05.

Scotland has something drier developing. More rain working ever

:19:06.:19:09.

southwards through the afternoon. Northern England, the wettest

:19:10.:19:12.

through this morning. Some drier spells through the afternoon, at

:19:13.:19:17.

still grey and stamp on the western side of the Pennines and western

:19:18.:19:22.

Wales. Light rain, drizzle and low cloud into the afternoon. Southern

:19:23.:19:25.

counties staying dry. The spot of light rain in the south-east of

:19:26.:19:29.

England, but largely wet weather in east The potential for rain early

:19:30.:19:36.

this afternoon, but it should be drier later at Wimbledon. And a bit

:19:37.:19:41.

warmer. Fairly humid into tomorrow. Through this evening we have this

:19:42.:19:44.

weather front sweeping south, bringing rain away from Northern

:19:45.:19:49.

Ireland and Scotland and into parts of Wales and the south-west. Tony

:19:50.:19:56.

little bit more fresh further north, at 12- 13 degrees. The fresh air

:19:57.:20:00.

will slowly sink south through the day. That's behind this cloud and

:20:01.:20:06.

increasingly patchy rain, which will be there in the southern half of the

:20:07.:20:11.

UK. A lot of low cloud as well in associations with that, so a pretty

:20:12.:20:15.

dull day and damper. Behind that we have good spells of sunshine coming

:20:16.:20:19.

through. Breezy in the north of Scotland, but many places will be

:20:20.:20:23.

dry and fine. Temperatures in the other teams and feeling fresher, but

:20:24.:20:30.

further south it is warm and humid. So a changeable weekend. The best of

:20:31.:20:35.

the sunshine in the northern half of the UK through tomorrow.

:20:36.:20:40.

What do you make of these temperatures in Europe, Spain in

:20:41.:20:43.

particular? 47 degrees! Good you cope with that? Near

:20:44.:20:48.

record-breaking heat. It could be record-breaking in Spain. Dangerous

:20:49.:20:53.

levels, at 47 Celsius. Extraordinary. I'm sure we won't see

:20:54.:20:56.

anything like that here. A heatwave across southern

:20:57.:20:58.

Europe is fuelling fires, exacerbating droughts and forcing

:20:59.:21:00.

the closure of tourist sites Several Spanish cities have

:21:01.:21:02.

experienced record temperatures for July, with Montoro in Cordoba

:21:03.:21:05.

reaching more than 47 degrees At the Acropolis in Athens

:21:06.:21:08.

the mercury hit 39 degrees While in Italy and Sicily,

:21:09.:21:17.

temperatures have topped 40 degrees. The combination of heat and strong

:21:18.:21:25.

winds has fuelled large wildfires including on the slopes

:21:26.:21:28.

of Mount Vesuvius near Naples We're joined now on Skype

:21:29.:21:30.

by Miguel-Ancho Murado, Good morning and thanks for joining

:21:31.:21:47.

us. I bet early in the morning is the best time, before it gets too

:21:48.:21:55.

hot? Yes. In fact we have now 23 Celsius and that is the coolest we

:21:56.:21:59.

can expect today. Today is not going to be the hottest day at all. The

:22:00.:22:05.

maximum will be 32 degrees Celsius. We had 40 yesterday. And this is in

:22:06.:22:10.

Madrid, in the south of Spain they are having over 40 Celsius everyday.

:22:11.:22:19.

As you said, even 47.3! What sort of impact is that having on life? Life

:22:20.:22:23.

can't go on as normal in those sorts of temperatures, can they? What can

:22:24.:22:29.

you do? Yes, of course everything slows down considerably. You can't

:22:30.:22:39.

walk in the middle hours of the day. You can't sleep, it is very

:22:40.:22:43.

difficult to sleep, and those of us not blessed with air-conditioning,

:22:44.:22:46.

we really struggled to get some sleep at night. And of course you

:22:47.:22:51.

have to carry a bottle of water with you everywhere you go because the

:22:52.:22:55.

heat retention is a real danger. Here in the chilly, wet UK, we are

:22:56.:23:01.

not blessed with great summers much of the time, but we tend to think

:23:02.:23:06.

that Spain always has hot summers come but this is unusually hot,

:23:07.:23:12.

isn't it? It is. Spain has a very diverse climate. The north of Spain

:23:13.:23:19.

is actually as cool in some parts as Britain itself. Where I come from,

:23:20.:23:25.

the north-west, has basically the same weather as England. But, yes,

:23:26.:23:29.

generally Spain is hot. Heatwaves are not unusual. They are a feature

:23:30.:23:36.

of our climate. They happen almost every year. But what we see is that

:23:37.:23:42.

in the last decade they are longer and this one is the most intense on

:23:43.:23:48.

record, at least since there is a consistent record of heatwaves,

:23:49.:23:54.

since 1976. I believe you to get a wet flannel and yourself off! Thank

:23:55.:23:58.

you very much for joining us for now. Let's go to what must be the

:23:59.:24:06.

best backdrop of the day! Our correspondent in Athens. A lovely

:24:07.:24:09.

shot. What's the weather like in Athens? Earlier this month we got to

:24:10.:24:17.

43. On Wednesday it was 39. Given this is the most popular landmark in

:24:18.:24:24.

the whole of Greece behind me, the Acropolis, that's the problem with

:24:25.:24:29.

it as well. It is effectively on the rocks, so if you are exposed in the

:24:30.:24:33.

afternoon there are problems. It closed for the whole of Wednesday

:24:34.:24:37.

afternoon. For the locals in Greece, they get a sense that you don't

:24:38.:24:41.

generally go to the Acropolis in the afternoon, but it is for tourists.

:24:42.:24:46.

It's not just here, there are other sites as well. The big famous

:24:47.:24:52.

tracking site, again shut down. The issue is there are so many famous

:24:53.:24:56.

well-known sites in Greece, on the island as well. In Lesbos the

:24:57.:25:02.

archaeological sites had to be shut down. It is relatively infrequent.

:25:03.:25:07.

These temperatures have been on the upper 40s. Today, like in Spain, I

:25:08.:25:12.

can wear a jacket, it is cooler, and it is expected to be like that for

:25:13.:25:16.

the week ahead. What we are heading into August. These are slightly

:25:17.:25:21.

unprecedented for the past couple of years. A bit of relief today. What

:25:22.:25:25.

sort of advice for people heading on holidays to places like Greece? AB

:25:26.:25:30.

the islands, rather than the cities. What are we being told to do, apart

:25:31.:25:37.

from just 80 more bottles of water? I think both here and in Italy as

:25:38.:25:41.

well. In Italy we have similar temperatures as Spain, where they

:25:42.:25:49.

have above 40. There were fires and 700 tourists were evacuated from a

:25:50.:25:55.

beach resort. The mountain close to Naples, the fire at the foot of the

:25:56.:25:58.

mountains... Italian authorities say it may have been set alight

:25:59.:26:03.

purposefully. I think the basic advice you would think everyone

:26:04.:26:08.

would do, people don't. People get dehydrated, they forget to drink

:26:09.:26:12.

water. A lot of people come here to this famous sites, 2 million people

:26:13.:26:16.

come to see the Acropolis every year, bring water, keeping the

:26:17.:26:19.

shade. If you walk in exposed areas, don't wear a jacket. Be loose and

:26:20.:26:25.

cool. We don't have such concerns over here! At thank you for the

:26:26.:26:27.

advice. It's not that hard this week.

:26:28.:26:33.

But not that good either. Which would you choose? I would much

:26:34.:26:37.

prefer here. It is dangerous for a lot of people.

:26:38.:26:42.

The US Air Force Thunderbirds team is mostly made up

:26:43.:26:53.

Now 20-year-old Beth Moran has become the youngest ever woman

:26:54.:26:57.

to fly alongside them and she only had her first flying

:26:58.:26:59.

She took up flying last year because she wanted to do something

:27:00.:27:04.

positive following the Shoreham air disaster, as Ben Moore reports.

:27:05.:27:10.

Coping with a force nearly ten times that of gravity is not bad for a

:27:11.:27:18.

novice pilot. Beth Moran is the youngest ever woman to fly with the

:27:19.:27:24.

Thunderbirds, despite having had her first flying lesson just over a year

:27:25.:27:32.

ago. Now she is in an F-16 belonging to the top American aerial display

:27:33.:27:34.

team. All right. Up over the top... Beth wanted to do something to lift

:27:35.:27:49.

spirits after the Shorham air disaster, she learned to fly. She

:27:50.:27:57.

had contact with the Thunderbirds on social media, asking if they would

:27:58.:28:02.

take up. She was unsurprisingly impressed. It still feels surreal

:28:03.:28:11.

that I went up in an air -- an F-16 and pulled 9.2 G. It is an

:28:12.:28:17.

experience I will never forget. For being part of such a select team,

:28:18.:28:22.

she got her name on the plane. Around of applause and a friend

:28:23.:28:26.

photo. But this just has to be the best selfie ever!

:28:27.:28:30.

Thumbs up. She spent just a year learning. She got her name on a

:28:31.:28:39.

plane, the certificate and she got to fly with the Thunderbirds.

:28:40.:28:46.

Williams! Well done. Now, could Mike top that? He has done some pretty

:28:47.:28:50.

amazing things. I don't think it could topic today.

:28:51.:28:54.

He is looking ahead to the action today on for the ladies' final.

:28:55.:29:03.

I have done everything, but never again. My stomach was left behind in

:29:04.:29:08.

the skies above London. Hats off to them. It is an incredible skill to

:29:09.:29:13.

cope with all of those G-force is. It is the final day for the ladies

:29:14.:29:18.

and the penultimate day for our challenge. Look at that! Despite the

:29:19.:29:22.

pressure, see how David Haye got on when he took on the challenge. We

:29:23.:29:29.

are mainly focusing on the women's final. Ken Venus Williams at the age

:29:30.:29:34.

of 37 we come the oldest winner of the title? In fact the oldest winner

:29:35.:29:41.

since 1908, when a woman won at the age of 37. Are we different times of

:29:42.:29:45.

course. Talking of veterans on centre court, Roger Federer will be

:29:46.:29:50.

there tomorrow trying to win the title for the eighth time against

:29:51.:29:53.

marriage village and later on Breakfast I will tell you we are

:29:54.:29:59.

guaranteed a winner! See what I have to put up with? We are guaranteed a

:30:00.:30:02.

British winner in the mixed doubles tomorrow. That's all to come

:30:03.:30:04.

tomorrow. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:30:05.:30:28.

with Naga Munchetty and Jon Kay. Coming up before 8:00am: Jay

:30:29.:30:31.

will have the weather. But first, at 7:30am,

:30:32.:30:33.

a summary of this morning's main Laws on buying and carrying

:30:34.:30:36.

acid are to be reviewed by the Government, following attacks

:30:37.:30:42.

which took place in London Five people had corrosive

:30:43.:30:44.

liquid thrown at them, including one man who is said

:30:45.:30:52.

to have suffered life-changing Two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16,

:30:53.:30:55.

remain in custody on suspicion of robbery and grievous

:30:56.:31:04.

bodily harm with intent. 20% of fire brigades across the UK

:31:05.:31:06.

still won't automatically send a tall ladder to a fire

:31:07.:31:09.

in a high-rise block of flats, Under its policy at the time,

:31:10.:31:12.

the London brigade didn't send an aerial ladder

:31:13.:31:17.

immediately to the blaze. It is thought the equipment might

:31:18.:31:19.

have helped crews restrict It has now led to concerns

:31:20.:31:21.

about discrepancies between local The former Prime Minister Tony Blair

:31:22.:31:25.

has that claimed senior figures in the EU have told him

:31:26.:31:32.

they are prepared to be flexible on freedom of movement in order

:31:33.:31:35.

to accommodate Britain after Brexit. Mr Blair made the claim

:31:36.:31:38.

in an article written Just last week the EU's chief

:31:39.:31:41.

negotiator, Michel Barnier, said the freedom of movement

:31:42.:31:45.

of people, goods, services There are plans to extend a scheme

:31:46.:31:47.

which allows members of the public to call for harsher sentences

:31:48.:31:57.

in England and Wales. The unduly lenient sentence scheme

:31:58.:31:59.

already covers serious terror offences and crimes such

:32:00.:32:02.

as murder and rape. The Ministry of Justice now wants it

:32:03.:32:04.

to apply to people who have been convicted of offences such

:32:05.:32:08.

as encouraging terrorism. Wages are increasing

:32:09.:32:14.

at their slowest rate for five years, which is hitting young

:32:15.:32:17.

families in particular, The Resolution Foundation,

:32:18.:32:19.

which analyses living standards, says average income growth halved

:32:20.:32:22.

to 0.7% in the 12 months before last A shortlist of five contenders has

:32:23.:32:26.

been announced in the race to be UK City of Culture 2021,

:32:27.:32:39.

taking over from Hull. Coventry, Paisley, Sunderland,

:32:40.:32:41.

Swansea and Stoke-on-Trent are all still in the running to host

:32:42.:32:43.

the yearlong celebration of art and performance, which

:32:44.:32:46.

happens every four years. The winner will be

:32:47.:32:48.

announced in December. Those are the main stories, so we

:32:49.:33:12.

have to talk to Mike at Wimbledon. He is having a bit of fun at

:33:13.:33:16.

Wimbledon. I cannot lend him. Where are you, Mike? You are joining me

:33:17.:33:24.

live in the undergrowth, the beautiful reeds, the bushes, the

:33:25.:33:29.

magnificent flowers, I have gone all Sir David Attenborough. He was here

:33:30.:33:33.

yesterday on centre court and we are looking for something so rat, which

:33:34.:33:38.

hasn't been seen since 1908, a 37-year-old winner of the ladies'

:33:39.:33:47.

title. That is what Venus Williams is trying to do today. Also, talking

:33:48.:33:57.

of veterans on centre court, we must also focus on Roger Federer. He is

:33:58.:33:59.

into the men's final tomorrow. He beat Tomas Berdych in straight

:34:00.:34:04.

sets to book his 11th Wimbledon final, as he looks for a record

:34:05.:34:07.

19th Grand Slam title. I feel privileged to

:34:08.:34:10.

be in another final. I know how much it means to so many

:34:11.:34:13.

players to be able to go out on centre court at Wimbledon at any

:34:14.:34:17.

time in their career and I have had This time in another

:34:18.:34:21.

final, it is so good. Looking to spoil Federer's party

:34:22.:34:26.

on centre court tomorrow is Marin The seventh seed came

:34:27.:34:36.

through a tough four-set semi-final Cilic is into his second major final

:34:37.:34:42.

after winning the 2014 US Open. Jamie Murray and Martina Hingis

:34:43.:34:51.

are through to the mixed doubles final, after beating

:34:52.:34:54.

Marcelo Demoliner and Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez in straights

:34:55.:34:56.

sets on centre court. And waiting for them

:34:57.:34:58.

are Heather Watson and Henri They beat Bruno Soares

:34:59.:35:06.

and Elena Vesnina 2-1. So that means Britain

:35:07.:35:09.

is guaranteed success, Gordon Reid and Alfie Hewett

:35:10.:35:11.

are back in the hunt for another Wimbledon title, after Britain's

:35:12.:35:19.

star wheelchair tennis double act After early defeats in the singles

:35:20.:35:22.

for the British pair, they rebounded as a team

:35:23.:35:33.

with victory over Argentinian Gustavo Fernandez and

:35:34.:35:36.

Japan's Shingo Kunieda. Away from the tennis,

:35:37.:35:37.

Hannah Cockcroft set a new world record at the World Para Athletics

:35:38.:35:40.

Championships in London last night. Cockroft won the 100 metre T34

:35:41.:35:43.

gold in 17.18 seconds. And it was a British one-two,

:35:44.:35:46.

as 16-year-old Kare Adenegan came The noise is so loud,

:35:47.:35:49.

we have not had that To be able to go in and put

:35:50.:36:03.

in such a good performance, it means so much and hopefully

:36:04.:36:08.

that's a sign of a good And Gemma Prescott won GB's third

:36:09.:36:11.

medal of the tournament, with bronze in the F32 club

:36:12.:36:17.

final for seated athletes Prescott's best throw

:36:18.:36:20.

was 19.97 metres. South Africa are 309-6 after day one

:36:21.:36:30.

of the second Test at Trent Bridge. Hashim Amla top-scored

:36:31.:36:33.

for the tourists, with 78. But England picked up four wickets,

:36:34.:36:36.

including his, in the last session The last time that we played here

:36:37.:36:39.

and older we bowled rather well. So I think was important

:36:40.:36:47.

that whatever we did, They applied themselves

:36:48.:36:50.

well, credit to them. 170 odd for two, as I say, they were

:36:51.:37:00.

excellent. There are eight stages to go

:37:01.:37:04.

at the Tour de France, and Chris Froome will start

:37:05.:37:07.

this morning in white, rather than yellow,

:37:08.:37:09.

for a second day. He is still six seconds behind

:37:10.:37:11.

Fabio Aru, but he says he is enjoying racing to try

:37:12.:37:14.

and take the yellow jersey back. It was actually quite a great

:37:15.:37:18.

feeling to have to go out there and try to race for a win

:37:19.:37:21.

today, as opposed to racing defensively and having the pressure

:37:22.:37:24.

of defending the jersey. It was nice to have the shoe

:37:25.:37:27.

on the other foot. It has been a difficult few

:37:28.:37:30.

weeks for Rory McIlroy. He has been struggling for form,

:37:31.:37:33.

and he has now missed the cut It means he misses the weekend's

:37:34.:37:36.

play for the third time England's Callum Shinkwin

:37:37.:37:40.

is in a three-way tie for the lead, on nine-under-par,

:37:41.:37:45.

with Ian Poulter a shot back. Celtic have beaten Northern Irish

:37:46.:37:53.

side Linfield 2-0 in a Champions League qualifier

:37:54.:37:55.

in Belfast, Scott Sinclair and Tom Rogic scoring the goals

:37:56.:37:57.

for Brendan Rodgers's side. Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor

:37:58.:38:04.

were in London last night promoting their much-anticipated

:38:05.:38:06.

boxing match at the end of August. Like the three events before it,

:38:07.:38:09.

it was a highly charged affair, but challenger Conor Mcgregor

:38:10.:38:12.

says he can't wait to He could have rode off into the

:38:13.:38:34.

sunset 45- zero. Instead, this is my first time in the ring and in six

:38:35.:38:36.

weeks I will run boxing. And, of course, it is the ladies'

:38:37.:38:45.

final here at Wimbledon. There is coverage across the BBC,

:38:46.:38:48.

starting at 11:00am on BBC Two, from 2:00pm on BBC Radio 5 Live

:38:49.:38:51.

and on the BBC Sport website. As I was saying earlier, I don't

:38:52.:39:01.

think this will happen on centre court today. Kim Clijsters was

:39:02.:39:12.

asking the crowd how she should serve. So the crowd said do serve.

:39:13.:39:20.

She gets a skirt out of her bag, and a T-shirt, and it takes a little

:39:21.:39:23.

time but he manages just about to squeeze into this outfits, which

:39:24.:39:30.

apparently I have been told is a skort. He still manages to return

:39:31.:39:38.

the Kim Clijsters body serve, so he goes really well. I did not know

:39:39.:39:44.

that that was a skort, I had never heard of that before. Do you know

:39:45.:39:49.

why it is colder skort? Women wear them for golf, and maybe some men

:39:50.:39:54.

wear them. It is because you have shorts inside the skirt, because

:39:55.:39:58.

they are often quite short, the skirt, so you have shorts inside to

:39:59.:40:02.

protect your dignity, but they are also very comfortable. Very

:40:03.:40:11.

practical, by the sound of it. I like the sound of a skort. I will

:40:12.:40:18.

have a bit of a shop around. Lovely seeing you in amongst the foliage,

:40:19.:40:25.

you did a very good impression. He was here yesterday, he was really

:40:26.:40:30.

enjoying the tennis. It always takes your breath away, the perfection

:40:31.:40:33.

that they achieved with everything that they do here at Wimbledon,

:40:34.:40:37.

including the flowers. Almost symmetry, isn't it? The way they

:40:38.:40:40.

match and blend together, it is beautiful. And the Wimbledon

:40:41.:40:42.

colours. Goes nicely with his tie. Identifying inherited heart

:40:43.:40:49.

conditions can save lives, but many of us don't know

:40:50.:40:51.

that we are carrying the gene that Sir David Frost had the condition,

:40:52.:40:54.

and while it didn't cause his death he did pass it on to one of his sons

:40:55.:41:00.

Miles who died at the age Now, his family are trying to help

:41:01.:41:04.

other people find out Our correspondent

:41:05.:41:10.

Chris Buckler reports. In every child, you can find

:41:11.:41:13.

something of their parents, and often

:41:14.:41:22.

inherited alongside looks and characteristics are things that

:41:23.:41:29.

can't be seen. Miles Frost shared with his father

:41:30.:41:33.

David a gene responsible for a heart condition that led

:41:34.:41:36.

to his sudden death. For your 31-year-old brother to die,

:41:37.:41:39.

suddenly and unexpectedly, And I'll never get over the pain

:41:40.:41:41.

of learning that for the first time. Miles loved sport, and he seemed

:41:42.:41:56.

extremely healthy, but he died His brothers have now

:41:57.:42:00.

set up a fund which, along with the British Heart

:42:01.:42:04.

Foundation, is paying for people to be tested for an inherited

:42:05.:42:07.

heart condition. Miles would have had

:42:08.:42:10.

to adapt his life and stop playing sport,

:42:11.:42:13.

but at least he would be with us. Now, that didn't happen,

:42:14.:42:15.

and we can look back and we can complain about that,

:42:16.:42:18.

or we can look forward and make sure it doesn't happen again

:42:19.:42:21.

for the people. Sports clubs are starting to get

:42:22.:42:25.

to grips with how to deal It is impossible to simply spot

:42:26.:42:30.

who might have an inherited condition on the pitch,

:42:31.:42:37.

but the Gaelic Athletic Association says being aware of the disability

:42:38.:42:39.

could save someone's life. We've a couple of sudden deaths

:42:40.:42:47.

within our own club, and it has been shocking,

:42:48.:42:50.

and we will go back to looking at just giving

:42:51.:42:52.

advice to people. That doesn't necessarily mean not

:42:53.:42:55.

taking part in sport. It is just changing

:42:56.:42:57.

what they do on the field. Most of the risk is thought to be

:42:58.:43:04.

associated with high-intensity So we would normally

:43:05.:43:08.

steer people away This is one of six centres across

:43:09.:43:12.

the country to be given funding. They will employ staff not just

:43:13.:43:22.

for families who have this gene, which is known as HCM,

:43:23.:43:25.

but also to offer Moira has been identified

:43:26.:43:27.

with the condition, and she has That means real adjustments for

:43:28.:43:33.

a football and rugby-mad teenager. Rugby is a no-no, but he can play

:43:34.:43:39.

in nets, provided there's the lower Golf he can't continue with,

:43:40.:43:47.

which he also loves. The bottomline is it is better

:43:48.:43:59.

that he knows and that we can make those adjustments in his life,

:44:00.:44:06.

and to live with the condition It is thought tens of thousands

:44:07.:44:09.

of people are carrying the gene in the UK, and targeted screening

:44:10.:44:13.

is at the heart of attempts to make sure they live long

:44:14.:44:17.

and active lives. In one hour we will talk to adopt

:44:18.:44:26.

about that condition and about diagnosing and detecting it.

:44:27.:44:31.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:44:32.:44:32.

The main stories this morning: There's to be a review of the laws

:44:33.:44:36.

on buying and carrying acid, following Thursday night's

:44:37.:44:38.

There are demands for the Uk's fire brigades to adopt a more consistent

:44:39.:44:44.

response to major incidents after the Grenfell Tower disaster.

:44:45.:44:49.

Here's Jay with a look at this morning's weather.

:44:50.:44:54.

That's a lovely picture. What does that signify? It is a bit of a mixed

:44:55.:45:03.

bag this weekend. Expect some rain. Most of it will be today. It will be

:45:04.:45:09.

warm and fairly muddy. We have this wedge of warm air coming in from the

:45:10.:45:14.

athletic, but that comes in with some weather fronts and a bit of a

:45:15.:45:20.

breeze. It will always be a dull and damp day in Scotland. In northern

:45:21.:45:25.

England as the rain will be most noticeable through the morning.

:45:26.:45:30.

Patchy rain in the Midlands, but most will clear in the afternoon. It

:45:31.:45:33.

stays windy and wet across the western side of Scotland well into

:45:34.:45:37.

the afternoon. The eastern side of Scotland should have some brighter

:45:38.:45:40.

spells developing into the afternoon. Staying cloudy in

:45:41.:45:44.

Northern Ireland. Rain working south. In northern England it tends

:45:45.:45:51.

to dry up, but we will also have low cloud on the western side of the

:45:52.:45:56.

Pennines. The western side of Wales as drizzle into the afternoon.

:45:57.:46:01.

Largely dry. Cos, maybe the odd spot of rain in the London and the early

:46:02.:46:06.

afternoon, but a lot of dry weather in and around the Wimbledon area.

:46:07.:46:13.

Dry but what rather cloudy and warmer tomorrow, still humid.

:46:14.:46:16.

Through this evening and overnight the rain eventually clears from

:46:17.:46:19.

Scotland and Northern Ireland, moving south. Low cloud in the

:46:20.:46:25.

western parts of England and Wales, with light rain and drizzle. The

:46:26.:46:29.

warm night in the south of the UK. Temperatures dropping away.

:46:30.:46:34.

Something fresher in the north of Scotland. It is that fresher air in

:46:35.:46:38.

the north of the UK which will eventually win out. It is coming in

:46:39.:46:42.

behind this band of cloud and increasingly patchy rain. Behind it,

:46:43.:46:48.

much brighter skies. Still breezy in northern Scotland. The odd spot of

:46:49.:46:53.

rain along this weather front, which continues south. It remains humid in

:46:54.:47:00.

the south of the UK into tomorrow. It is fresh, 17- 19 the further

:47:01.:47:05.

north you happen to be. Thanks very much.

:47:06.:47:09.

The headlines in a few minutes' time.

:47:10.:47:15.

Now it's time for Samira Ahmed to round up your comments on BBC

:47:16.:47:18.

Wimbledon fans have been glued to television screens this past

:47:19.:47:23.

fortnight but should tennis take priority over the news?

:47:24.:47:28.

And would a male politician have been asked if he had shed

:47:29.:47:31.

We are coming to the end of the Wimbledon fortnight,

:47:32.:47:43.

the annual treat for tennis fans, but the source of

:47:44.:47:47.

Never mind the many hours of live action on BBC One and BBC Two,

:47:48.:47:53.

the tournament has featured strongly over the past two weeks

:47:54.:47:56.

on Breakfast, the News Channel and news bulletins.

:47:57.:47:58.

There have been features on the famously long queue

:47:59.:48:05.

for spectators to get into Wimbledon, the condition

:48:06.:48:07.

of Andy Murray's dodgy hip and discussion of the baby his wife

:48:08.:48:10.

A number of injuries sustained by other players in matches,

:48:11.:48:22.

the state of the grass on court and of course the progress

:48:23.:48:25.

of our great British singles hopes, all lapped up by the aficionados.

:48:26.:48:41.

On Tuesday night it wasn't a question of tennis

:48:42.:48:44.

featuring in the news, as instead of the news, specifically

:48:45.:48:46.

some local news bulletins, as it came up to six o'clock

:48:47.:48:50.

the British number one woman Johanna Konta was battling it out

:48:51.:48:52.

And it was decided to keep showing that match on BBC One instead

:48:53.:49:01.

And on BBC Two they had abandoned their planned Wimbledon

:49:02.:49:05.

coverage for unscheduled repeats, as rain meant no other

:49:06.:49:08.

John Wilson did not understand the logic.

:49:09.:49:23.

Another viewer Pat Brown was also annoyed by this and recorded this

:49:24.:49:26.

We have been subscribers of the Radio Times for many years

:49:27.:49:35.

but when it comes to Wimbledon the scheduling might as well

:49:36.:49:38.

A prime example of this was on Tuesday, when at six o'clock

:49:39.:49:52.

the news was turned over onto BBC Two - can't Wimbledon

:49:53.:49:55.

And no London news at all that night.

:49:56.:49:59.

The London news was in fact shown that evening later than scheduled

:50:00.:50:07.

but in other parts of the UK such as Scotland and Northern Ireland

:50:08.:50:12.

the early evening regional bulletin was dropped altogether.

:50:13.:50:17.

We hoped to discuss the reasoning behind this with someone from BBC

:50:18.:50:21.

Instead, they gave us this statement.

:50:22.:50:58.

It has been a month since the fire at Grenfell Tower in London

:50:59.:51:01.

And on Wednesday morning our reporter reported on the impact

:51:02.:51:09.

the disaster has had on the local community, especially children.

:51:10.:51:12.

All the children who have witnessed unimaginable horror,

:51:13.:51:15.

we asked for a show of hands of those who knew

:51:16.:51:17.

This is just the beginning of the healing process.

:51:18.:51:24.

But we know that the healing is going to take years,

:51:25.:51:27.

Having watched that, Jan had this to say.

:51:28.:51:33.

Justin contacted us with more general thoughts on coverage

:51:34.:51:35.

of the Grenfell Tower, one month on.

:51:36.:52:03.

Justin contacted us with more general thoughts on coverage

:52:04.:52:05.

of the Grenfell Tower, one month on.

:52:06.:52:39.

And Graham Satchell's report on the aftermath of the tragedy came

:52:40.:52:42.

on the News at Ten - it began like this.

:52:43.:52:46.

A black nail, hammered into London's conscience.

:52:47.:52:50.

Grenfell Tower demands your attention.

:52:51.:52:58.

In its shadow the faces of the missing are everywhere.

:52:59.:53:01.

On trees and walls and bus shelters, unblinking, it is hard

:53:02.:53:04.

Adrian made the same point on camera.

:53:05.:53:37.

Come on, BBC, this is a serious news item, why did we have to have

:53:38.:53:41.

dramatic build-up music, more akin to a drama

:53:42.:53:44.

like Silent Witness or a Hollywood movie?

:53:45.:53:53.

This was unnecessary, trivialising a serious news item.

:53:54.:54:06.

On Wednesday MPs debated the abuse and intimidation of parliamentary

:54:07.:54:09.

candidates after a cross-party report said misogyny,

:54:10.:54:11.

Politicians like Diane Abbott and Stella Creasy had described

:54:12.:54:20.

the repeated online abuse they have been subjected to and

:54:21.:54:23.

Theresa May has now ordered an inquiry into the subject.

:54:24.:54:26.

William McNulty gave us his thoughts after considering the interviews

:54:27.:54:29.

If you look at the way the Prime Minister is addressed

:54:30.:54:38.

or Jeremy Corbyn is addressed, certainly by members of Newsnight

:54:39.:54:40.

and the media in general, think the aggressive tones that

:54:41.:54:43.

And this unfortunately translates to members of the public.

:54:44.:55:03.

And I think the media, certainly the BBC,

:55:04.:55:05.

and they are not alone in it - they have contributed to the levels

:55:06.:55:09.

of abuse that politicians have to put up with today.

:55:10.:55:16.

On Wednesday's Daily Politics the Labour MP Jack Dromey came

:55:17.:55:18.

to discuss the scale of personal abuse directed at politicians.

:55:19.:55:24.

It has been getting worse for some years.

:55:25.:55:30.

I personally don't get that much BLEEP, if you will

:55:31.:55:32.

It comes overwhelmingly from the right, but that doesn't

:55:33.:55:36.

matter where it comes from, it is not acceptable

:55:37.:55:38.

and anyone who practices that is completely wrong.

:55:39.:55:43.

When we're talking about abuse it would be best if we did not

:55:44.:55:46.

use abusive language on daytime television.

:55:47.:55:48.

The Daily Politics team were not able to bleep out the term

:55:49.:55:53.

as we have done and that led to this response.

:55:54.:56:09.

I don't want to sit and hear people coming out with disgusting language

:56:10.:56:13.

like that, I'm amazed you allow people like that to

:56:14.:56:16.

come on the television and speak like that.

:56:17.:56:18.

When there are little children around.

:56:19.:56:23.

Another political interview caused more controversy this week,

:56:24.:56:26.

one conducted on Thursday by Emma Barnett for Radio five.

:56:27.:56:33.

She asked the Prime Minister how she reacted on election night

:56:34.:56:36.

Did you have a cry, how did you feel?

:56:37.:56:40.

That admission was headlined on television news bulletins

:56:41.:56:55.

It is worth bearing in mind that interviews like this are arranged

:56:56.:57:04.

between the Prime Minister's office and a programme, and maybe the line

:57:05.:57:07.

But some viewers felt the prominence given to it and the line

:57:08.:57:11.

of questioning played into gender stereotypes.

:57:12.:57:46.

Finally back to tennis, and the defeats of Britain's great

:57:47.:57:49.

These are the headlines from the News at Six

:57:50.:57:56.

And Andy Murray crashes out of the quarterfinals at Wimbledon

:57:57.:58:05.

And the end of a dream for Britain's Johanna Konta

:58:06.:58:12.

as she crashes out of the Wimbledon semifinals.

:58:13.:58:16.

Thank you for your comments this week.

:58:17.:58:43.

If you want to share your opinions on BBC mews and current affairs

:58:44.:58:47.

and even appear on the programme, you can call us or e-mail Newswatch.

:58:48.:59:01.

You can find us on Twitter and have a look at our website.

:59:02.:59:05.

We will be back to hear your thoughts about BBC news

:59:06.:59:09.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Jon Kay.

:59:10.:00:01.

Demands for a crackdown to tackle acid attacks.

:00:02.:00:03.

A review will be carried out into whether laws

:00:04.:00:05.

After five attacks in London on Thursday night, campaigners

:00:06.:00:08.

and the Labour Party say there needs to be change.

:00:09.:00:25.

Good morning, it's Saturday the 15th of July.

:00:26.:00:31.

A call for a more consistent approach to tower-block fires

:00:32.:00:35.

after the Grenfell disaster, as one in five Fire Brigades say

:00:36.:00:38.

they still won't automatically send a high ladder to a blaze.

:00:39.:00:41.

Tony Blair says some EU leaders are willing to consider changing

:00:42.:00:44.

rules on the free movement of people to accommodate Britain after Brexit.

:00:45.:00:50.

A world record for Hannah Cockroft, as Britain takes three medals

:00:51.:00:52.

on the opening night of the World Para-Athletics

:00:53.:00:54.

While here at Wimbledon, it's women's finals day,

:00:55.:01:06.

as 37-year-old Venus Williams looks to become the oldest

:01:07.:01:08.

She takes on Garbine Muguruza, live on the BBC on centre court.

:01:09.:01:19.

Today will be the wetter of the two days of the weekend. Most of the

:01:20.:01:28.

rain will be in the North and west of the UK. The further south you

:01:29.:01:31.

are, temperatures are on the rise, as is the humidity.

:01:32.:01:33.

Laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the Government

:01:34.:01:39.

following a spate of attacks which took place in London

:01:40.:01:41.

Five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them,

:01:42.:01:44.

including one man who is said to have suffered

:01:45.:01:46.

Two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion

:01:47.:01:51.

of robbery and grievous bodily harm with intent.

:01:52.:01:54.

Andy Moore's report contains flashing images and some scenes

:01:55.:01:56.

We need to try and get water in your eyes...

:01:57.:02:10.

In the aftermath of the first attack, police doused

:02:11.:02:12.

He was protected by his helmet, and lucky to escape

:02:13.:02:16.

But even so, it was a terrifying experience.

:02:17.:02:22.

I took off my helmet, and I was just screaming for help,

:02:23.:02:25.

because it was getting dry, and as much as it was getting

:02:26.:02:28.

So I was just screaming for water, screaming for help, knocking

:02:29.:02:39.

Another moped rider attacked at this location was not so lucky.

:02:40.:02:48.

He has life-changing injuries to his face.

:02:49.:02:49.

The Shadow Home Secretary called the attacks horrific and barbaric.

:02:50.:02:52.

Nobody in their own home needs pure sulphuric acid.

:02:53.:02:55.

There are different alternatives for cleaning your drains.

:02:56.:02:58.

No-one should be able to buy sulphuric acid unless they're

:02:59.:03:01.

a builder or a workman who needs it in the course of their profession,

:03:02.:03:06.

The Government says it is working with the police to see what more can

:03:07.:03:13.

be done to combat the growing menace of acid attacks.

:03:14.:03:19.

There are calls for a more consistent response to major

:03:20.:03:24.

incidents from all Fire Brigades in the UK following

:03:25.:03:26.

the Grenfell Tower disaster. A BBC News investigation found that

:03:27.:03:28.

crew levels and equipment vary significantly across the country,

:03:29.:03:31.

leading to what the Fire Brigades Union has described

:03:32.:03:33.

More than a month on, there is now a clear picture of how

:03:34.:03:42.

the London Fire Brigade responded to the blaze.

:03:43.:03:45.

Last week, it emerged it took more than 30 minutes

:03:46.:03:48.

for a high ladder to arrive after the first fire engine.

:03:49.:03:51.

Until Grenfell, automatically bringing this piece

:03:52.:04:01.

of equipment to a tower block was not part

:04:02.:04:06.

But a BBC Newsnight investigation has found that is different from 70%

:04:07.:04:10.

of Fire Services in the UK with high-rise blocks

:04:11.:04:12.

The investigation also revealed significant variations in the number

:04:13.:04:15.

of fire engines dispatched across the country.

:04:16.:04:17.

It has prompted calls for the Government to implement

:04:18.:04:20.

mandatory minimum requirements for Fire Services who are

:04:21.:04:22.

We have raised concerns about this sort of issue

:04:23.:04:26.

We used to have national standards of fire cover.

:04:27.:04:35.

We now have local so-called risk management plans.

:04:36.:04:37.

What they are in reality is budget management plans.

:04:38.:04:40.

We have seen the risk assessments over time,

:04:41.:04:41.

as budgets are squeezed, the response has declined

:04:42.:04:43.

Since Grenfell Tower, four services, including London and Manchester,

:04:44.:04:49.

have changed their attendance plans, while nine say they still would not

:04:50.:04:52.

send an aerial ladder in the first instance.

:04:53.:04:56.

The Home Office says it is the responsibility

:04:57.:05:03.

of each fire and rescue authority to manage their own resources.

:05:04.:05:06.

The former Prime Minister Tony Blair has claimed that senior figures

:05:07.:05:11.

in the EU have told him they are prepared to be flexible

:05:12.:05:14.

on freedom of movement in order to accommodate Britain after Brexit.

:05:15.:05:16.

Mr Blair made the claim in an article written

:05:17.:05:18.

Just last week, the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier,

:05:19.:05:22.

said the freedom of movement of people, goods, services

:05:23.:05:24.

Our Political Correspondent, Emma Vardy, joins us now

:05:25.:05:35.

Hello, and. Let's get down to what Mr Blair has said. What's in this

:05:36.:05:44.

article? This is his latest intervention, an attempt to

:05:45.:05:47.

influence the Brexit debate. The key claim that he is making is that EU

:05:48.:05:51.

leaders are now prepared to change the rules on freedom of movement to

:05:52.:05:55.

accommodate Britain. So essentially saying that Britain could gain

:05:56.:05:59.

greater control of its borders and bring down emigration, whilst still

:06:00.:06:04.

staying within a reformed EU. Now, this may sound a little bit like,

:06:05.:06:08.

well, having your cake and eating it. Up until now, we understand that

:06:09.:06:12.

opting out of the rules for freedom of movement does mean leaving the

:06:13.:06:17.

Single Market. But Tony Blair says, no, Hang on, there could be a

:06:18.:06:21.

compromise, there could be another way, don't discount it. In the media

:06:22.:06:24.

account this morning, some people are saying, what does it matter what

:06:25.:06:28.

Tony Blair says? He is a former Prime Minister, but he is irrelevant

:06:29.:06:33.

now. Is this significant? For some, he is still a big player in politics

:06:34.:06:37.

and his argument may carry some weight. He has put himself forward

:06:38.:06:42.

on a mission to lead the anti-Brexit fight back. Some people will see him

:06:43.:06:49.

as a rather irrelevant voice in this debate. And of course at the moment

:06:50.:06:52.

it does appear that we are not releasing the evidence to back up

:06:53.:06:57.

the argument -- we are not really seeing the evidence. Michel Barnier

:06:58.:06:59.

was saying that movement of goods and services and people was

:07:00.:07:04.

indivisible. People have tried in the past to reform the EU, and have

:07:05.:07:11.

failed. It does seem like a rather big ask. But Tony Blair knows how to

:07:12.:07:18.

be persuasive and make headlines. He is using his old Tony Blair touch to

:07:19.:07:21.

try and steer the country in a different direction on Brexit.

:07:22.:07:24.

7,000 police officers, soldiers, officials and academics have

:07:25.:07:26.

been sacked in Turkey, where a national holiday

:07:27.:07:28.

is being held to mark the first anniversary of a failed attempt

:07:29.:07:31.

to remove President Erdogan. The authorities have accused them

:07:32.:07:33.

of being members of terrorist organisations or of groups working

:07:34.:07:35.

150,000 people have now been arrested or sacked

:07:36.:07:42.

Here, there are plans to extend a scheme which allows members

:07:43.:07:52.

of the public to call for harsher sentences in England and Wales.

:07:53.:07:55.

The Unduly Lenient Sentence Scheme already covers serious terror

:07:56.:07:57.

offences and crimes such as murder and rape.

:07:58.:07:59.

The Ministry of Justice now wants it to apply to people who have been

:08:00.:08:02.

convicted of offences such as encouraging terrorism.

:08:03.:08:07.

We've been looking at this for some time.

:08:08.:08:08.

What we are making sure is that there is a system in place

:08:09.:08:22.

for the victims of terror offences, that they are properly checked.

:08:23.:08:25.

Also, making sure that those who wilfully and culpably turn

:08:26.:08:27.

a blind eye to terrorist activity feel the full force of the law.

:08:28.:08:32.

Wages are increasing at their slowest rate for five

:08:33.:08:34.

years, which is hitting young families in particular,

:08:35.:08:36.

according to new research. The Resolution Foundation,

:08:37.:08:38.

which analyses living standards, says average income growth halved

:08:39.:08:41.

to 0.7% in the year before the general election,

:08:42.:08:45.

as our Business Correspondent, Joe Lynam, reports.

:08:46.:08:50.

When Theresa May became Prime Minister a year ago,

:08:51.:08:53.

she promised to work hardest for those "just about managing."

:08:54.:08:57.

But a year later, those so-called JAMs have seen the rate

:08:58.:08:59.

at which their incomes grow more than halved.

:09:00.:09:09.

In 2016, it stood at 1.6%, but just before the general

:09:10.:09:12.

Before the financial crisis in 2008, incomes had grown an average

:09:13.:09:16.

Incomes for younger families, though, have not risen

:09:17.:09:19.

While pensioner incomes have grown by 30% in that time,

:09:20.:09:24.

The big winners have been those with mortgages, who have seen

:09:25.:09:36.

the interest rate on their mortgage come down significantly.

:09:37.:09:38.

And if they've stayed in their jobs, yes, they may not get

:09:39.:09:42.

the earnings growth they wanted, but they have benefited

:09:43.:09:45.

The big losers have been the young people.

:09:46.:09:51.

Young people are still 10% lower than where they were today.

:09:52.:09:54.

And if they're renting, there is even more pressure on the budget.

:09:55.:09:57.

While average households have seen their income stagnate of late,

:09:58.:09:59.

the wealthiest 1% of the population are said to have the largest-ever

:10:00.:10:02.

A shortlist of five contenders has been announced in the race to be UK

:10:03.:10:10.

City of Culture 2021, taking over from Hull.

:10:11.:10:14.

Coventry, Paisley, Sunderland, Swansea and Stoke-on-Trent

:10:15.:10:19.

are all still in the running to host the year-long celebration

:10:20.:10:22.

of art and performance, which happens every four years.

:10:23.:10:24.

The winner will be announced in December.

:10:25.:10:29.

So, we've got to keep rolling the drums until then! Yeah, it wasn't

:10:30.:10:37.

great! Some of the world is largest carnivores are being squeezed out of

:10:38.:10:42.

their natural habitat due to farming and human settlements. Six species,

:10:43.:10:46.

including tigers and lions, have lost at least 90% of the areas that

:10:47.:10:51.

they have his territory occupied. Researchers say the reintroduction

:10:52.:10:54.

into these landscapes would mean human beings more willing to share

:10:55.:11:01.

habitats with animals like Wolves. The time is 8:10am. Jay Wynne will

:11:02.:11:06.

have the weather little later, and Michael have the latest from

:11:07.:11:07.

Wimbledon. In the last two years,

:11:08.:11:09.

the number of acid attacks in London Up to the end of April this year,

:11:10.:11:12.

the Met has recorded a staggering 66 assaults involving corrosive

:11:13.:11:16.

substances. Currently, there are no age restrictions

:11:17.:11:18.

on buying household bleach or drain cleaning products in the UK,

:11:19.:11:20.

but there are calls for regulations to be tightened after five people

:11:21.:11:23.

were attacked in the We're joined now by Simon Harding,

:11:24.:11:25.

a criminologist and expert on gangs Good morning. Thank you for joining

:11:26.:11:43.

us. Wides in Greece? What's going on here? UK's bucking the trend

:11:44.:11:48.

internationally -- why this increase. Acid throwing

:11:49.:11:51.

internationally in Asia, Southeast Asia, it is largely men attacking

:11:52.:11:55.

women, usually around issues of honour -based violence and domestic

:11:56.:12:00.

violence. But here it is men attacking men. And what appears to

:12:01.:12:05.

have happened is the idea of throwing acid has now been picked up

:12:06.:12:09.

and adopted by urban street gangs, and they are using it quite often as

:12:10.:12:15.

a weapon of first resort rather than a weapon of last resort. We've been

:12:16.:12:20.

talking today about Labour and certain campaigners calling for

:12:21.:12:23.

tighter laws when it comes to carrying corrosive liquids. Is that

:12:24.:12:29.

going to make a difference? In comparison to the laws surrounding

:12:30.:12:33.

knives and harmful weapons? Well, I certainly hope so. I think some

:12:34.:12:37.

action does need to be taken. One of the issues around acid is that its

:12:38.:12:43.

ease of purchase and availability. These are rough and household

:12:44.:12:47.

products, but they are also products that people can acquire -- these are

:12:48.:12:51.

often household products. These are also products that people can

:12:52.:12:54.

acquire from retailers and wholesalers in high strength and

:12:55.:12:58.

high-volume, we need to crack down on that. The Government are looking

:12:59.:13:02.

at the policies, that is part of their research around this. One of

:13:03.:13:06.

the potential avenues for us is around the transportation or the

:13:07.:13:12.

carrying of this material. How would that be monitored, though? I mean,

:13:13.:13:16.

are we talking about street searches, by police? Very difficult.

:13:17.:13:20.

You may have to introduce some kind of license saying in order to

:13:21.:13:27.

transport or carry... But what young lads will do is they will transfer

:13:28.:13:33.

the acid material into a sports bottle or a drinks bottle, and then

:13:34.:13:37.

carry it with them. And they know that when there is a stop and

:13:38.:13:40.

search, possibly for a knife, the police are not going to be looking

:13:41.:13:44.

for a liquid in a bottle that is odourless, colourless, and they will

:13:45.:13:50.

be able to get rid of it very easily if they are searched for it. The UK

:13:51.:13:55.

is bucking the international trend. Is that because the rules here are

:13:56.:14:00.

different from other countries? No, I don't think it's quite so much

:14:01.:14:04.

that, Jon Magrin. It's more the fact that it is based here around

:14:05.:14:08.

criminal activity. Another reason for the escalation or the rise in

:14:09.:14:13.

acid attacks in this country is that it's actually used in a wide variety

:14:14.:14:18.

of different types of criminal activity. So, intimidation of court

:14:19.:14:22.

witnesses, robbery, theft, drug deals that have gone wrong. Revenge

:14:23.:14:28.

and retaliation against somebody who has disrespected you all annoyed

:14:29.:14:32.

you. What we do know is that the vast majority of attacks in this

:14:33.:14:39.

country, the victim is known to the offender. Whilst the general public

:14:40.:14:42.

may feel that there is a load of random attacks taking place, in

:14:43.:14:46.

actual fact they are pretty targeted. Also, I was reading your

:14:47.:14:50.

research into this. It seems it has been brought into initiation of gang

:14:51.:14:55.

members as well. I haven't quite found that yet, but I have spoken to

:14:56.:14:59.

a few gang members. They are certainly aware of the clamp-down on

:15:00.:15:04.

knives. So there is some anecdotal suggestion that there is a shift

:15:05.:15:09.

from carrying knives to carrying acid. And when I asked them why,

:15:10.:15:13.

they would say, well, if you're going to use a knife against

:15:14.:15:16.

somebody, you have to get very close to them. There is a proximity that

:15:17.:15:20.

you have to have. Whereas with acid, you can throw it at a distance. So

:15:21.:15:25.

in actual fact, they feel safer than approaching somebody with a knife.

:15:26.:15:29.

It's a rather extraordinary situation. But one of them described

:15:30.:15:35.

it as... I said, why do you have this? Why would you consider doing

:15:36.:15:40.

this? And they said, well, its instant torture in a bottle is to

:15:41.:15:45.

point wow, it's just terrific. Thank you so much for your time this

:15:46.:15:46.

morning, Simon Harding. J Wynne joins us with the weather

:15:47.:15:55.

this morning. Ominous black clouds behind you there? Yes, there is a

:15:56.:15:59.

lot of cloud up there this morning and some rain as well. Most of it as

:16:00.:16:03.

a way from the southernmost counties of England, and for most places it

:16:04.:16:08.

will be a warm and muggy day today. Warm air coming in from the

:16:09.:16:11.

Atlantic, coming in with these weather fronts. You can see the ice

:16:12.:16:15.

bars, a bit breezy and cloudy, and there is some rain to be had as well

:16:16.:16:19.

-- the isobars. Most of the rain will be across the western side of

:16:20.:16:23.

Scotland, there will be some further south, but not much south of the M4

:16:24.:16:32.

corridor. Today it will be wet for much of the day across central and

:16:33.:16:34.

western Scotland. Maybe a little bit drier developing towards

:16:35.:16:36.

Aberdeenshire into the afternoon. Rain on and off through this morning

:16:37.:16:38.

across Northern Ireland, a further spell of rain pushing south into the

:16:39.:16:42.

afternoon. Quite warm, in the mid-20s. In northern England, most

:16:43.:16:45.

of the rain will be through this morning. Come the afternoon, dry

:16:46.:16:49.

weather but pretty cloudy, pretty grey on the western side of the

:16:50.:16:53.

Pennines, drizzle continuing. Low cloud lingering in Wales, and the

:16:54.:16:56.

south-west. The odd spot of light rain. Most of the rain clears away

:16:57.:17:03.

from East Anglia. It will be a warm afternoon in the London area for

:17:04.:17:07.

Wimbledon. Chance of a bit of rain in the early afternoon. But becoming

:17:08.:17:11.

drier or while, staying warm and humid. Increasingly so until

:17:12.:17:15.

tomorrow. This evening and overnight we have rain eventually moving away

:17:16.:17:19.

from Scotland and Northern Ireland. Sinking its way south into northern

:17:20.:17:24.

England. No cloud in Wales and the south-west. A warm night ahead, 16

:17:25.:17:29.

or 17 -- low cloud in Wales. Usher in the North of Scotland, 10-11d.

:17:30.:17:35.

Fresh air is coming in behind this weather front, sinking slowly

:17:36.:17:39.

southward, bringing cloud and a few spots of rain into tomorrow. In

:17:40.:17:44.

north- south split through tomorrow, the northern half of the UK staying

:17:45.:17:47.

cloudy with an odd spot of rain, becoming lighter and patchy. Further

:17:48.:17:53.

north it is brighter, good spells of sunshine. A shower or two in the

:17:54.:17:57.

North and Scotland. Temperatures in the upper teens, but it will be in

:17:58.:18:02.

adult 20s further south. It will be still fairly humid. -- in the upper

:18:03.:18:09.

20s. You're watching breakfast microbe from BBC News, thank you for

:18:10.:18:12.

being with us this Saturday morning. It's time to look at the morning

:18:13.:18:17.

papers. Tim Walker is here to tell us

:18:18.:18:20.

what's caught his eye. Good morning. We'll be with you in a

:18:21.:18:28.

second to find out what you've seen. We'll look at the front pages,

:18:29.:18:32.

starting with the Times newspaper. They have a picture of the Queen

:18:33.:18:36.

saying goodbye to the King of Spain. Following on from the debate that we

:18:37.:18:39.

were just having about acid attacks, saying that the law should be used

:18:40.:18:44.

to class acid attacks and the possession of acid in the same way

:18:45.:18:47.

that nice crime has been tackled in the UK. Let's take a look at the Sun

:18:48.:18:52.

newspaper, taking a look at the comment that the Chancellor, Phil

:18:53.:18:57.

Hammond, allegedly said. He was talking about driving trains, and he

:18:58.:19:02.

said now so easy that even a woman can do it. This remark was

:19:03.:19:06.

reportedly made in front of the whole Cabinet. Apparently it led to

:19:07.:19:09.

a withering slap down the Prime Minister, Theresa May. The front

:19:10.:19:14.

page of this morning's Mira, they lead with the fact that but American

:19:15.:19:21.

doctor who wants to treat Charlie Gard and believes he might be able

:19:22.:19:26.

to deal with him and give him some hope of survival will be coming into

:19:27.:19:30.

the UK on Monday to examine Charlie and give his findings to a court.

:19:31.:19:35.

Let's look at the Daily Mail. It's taking a look at a summer hire car

:19:36.:19:39.

rip-off, saying that holiday-makers face a bill of up to ?2200 if they

:19:40.:19:45.

damage their higher abroad. It's taking a look at excess charges that

:19:46.:19:49.

car hire firms are imposing upon customers involved in an accident

:19:50.:19:53.

overseas. Tim, the first thing you have chosen is this interview with

:19:54.:19:57.

Vince Cable in the Guardian about Brexit, a subject close to your

:19:58.:20:03.

heart, I know. Absolutely. Vince Cable, a challenge of course for the

:20:04.:20:07.

Lib Dem leadership, and a man of course he warned us of the banking

:20:08.:20:11.

crisis, the actually talks really of his despair at quite how

:20:12.:20:16.

inflammatory our discourse, our language in politics is now

:20:17.:20:20.

becoming. We saw in the Commons this week, you know, MPs, often women

:20:21.:20:24.

MPs, talking of the terrible abuse, the threats that they have received.

:20:25.:20:28.

We saw a man jailed for the threats that he made to Gina Miller, who

:20:29.:20:33.

took the Government to court over Article 50. And I read of course

:20:34.:20:37.

last night of a senior television journalist, I won't name her because

:20:38.:20:40.

it would make things even worse, who has also been subjected to terrible

:20:41.:20:44.

threats to the extent that she needs police protection. Vince Cable says,

:20:45.:20:48.

particularly on this issue of Brexit, the book seem to have lost

:20:49.:20:51.

any sense of proportion. And he isn't a man of 74, he is saying that

:20:52.:20:56.

people routinely threatened to beat him up, who abuse him online. And he

:20:57.:21:01.

says, we really do need, all of us on all sides of the argument, to be

:21:02.:21:04.

very careful about the language that we now use. He says that Brexiteers

:21:05.:21:08.

have warned of riots at the first sign of backsliding over Brexit. He

:21:09.:21:15.

said that is dangerous and inflammatory language, and

:21:16.:21:18.

incitement to violence. Is it? I think so. I think language has an

:21:19.:21:24.

effect. I did think even after Theresa May said after the terrible

:21:25.:21:27.

terrorist incident in London, enough is enough. I think certain language

:21:28.:21:31.

you use in certain situations. And I think sometimes it can cause...

:21:32.:21:36.

Cause people to become more heated. I think there's a lot to be said for

:21:37.:21:41.

using language, particularly maybe with some tabloid newspapers do, I

:21:42.:21:47.

might add, conducive to a more rational debate, maybe. , violent

:21:48.:21:51.

stuff cannot be excused, but there is a lot of frustration out that for

:21:52.:21:57.

people who voted for Brexit that people like Vince Cable and Tony

:21:58.:21:59.

Blair are refusing to accept what the people have said. I accept that.

:22:00.:22:03.

Cable in this interview said committee accepts what people have

:22:04.:22:06.

said. What this man is warning about is that it is a more concentrated

:22:07.:22:10.

issue than people had envisaged. What depresses me. I mean, there are

:22:11.:22:14.

newspapers that I used to work on and we would always be prepared to

:22:15.:22:19.

see another side or be prepared to have a discourse. What saddens me

:22:20.:22:22.

about our political debate now is it kind of, I'm right and you're wrong,

:22:23.:22:26.

not let's chat about the conversations of it. Let's take a

:22:27.:22:32.

look at this story you picked up. The press watchdog upholding the

:22:33.:22:34.

royal privacy complaint by Prince Harry. Prince Harry and the Royal

:22:35.:22:38.

Family have established a red light in terms of what they are prepared

:22:39.:22:42.

to put up with, in terms of the way that they are treated and what

:22:43.:22:45.

people say about them. Pictures of course that are taken of them. Harry

:22:46.:22:49.

was on a private beach in Jamaica with his girlfriend, Meghan Markle,

:22:50.:22:54.

when he was photographed. And the pictures ended up on the website of

:22:55.:22:58.

a national paper. Harry Winks Tuitt so, the Independent press standards

:22:59.:23:03.

organisation, -- Harry went to it so. He had a reasonable expectation

:23:04.:23:09.

of privacy. If you are a member of the Royal Family, your expectation

:23:10.:23:12.

of privacy is not going to be great. But he is saying, there are times

:23:13.:23:16.

when I'm in a private situation when I shouldn't be photographed.

:23:17.:23:19.

Interestingly, they have upheld the complaint, and it will have an

:23:20.:23:23.

effect on the way that particularly the younger royals are reported. The

:23:24.:23:26.

younger royals are perhaps prepared to put up with what their parents

:23:27.:23:31.

had to put up with. Body language reading experts are having a field

:23:32.:23:37.

day, aren't they, analysing the meetings between President and

:23:38.:23:39.

President Trump in Paris over the last couple of days. I mean, this

:23:40.:23:44.

handshake of 29 seconds when neither of them was prepared to be the one

:23:45.:23:48.

who let go... It's very odd. It's all areas. The White House are

:23:49.:23:51.

denying that it went on for a full 29 seconds, 29 minutes would be a

:23:52.:24:02.

long one even for him! There they were, and neither of them would let

:24:03.:24:06.

go. It became after a while I would say almost an invasion, certainly of

:24:07.:24:11.

their body space. There is a point when you should be able to let go.

:24:12.:24:15.

Trump is a man who can't seem to let go. People say that it's a man

:24:16.:24:20.

thing. It is one man said in his power and dominance of another man.

:24:21.:24:23.

Unfortunately for the women, he does it to them too. And indeed with

:24:24.:24:28.

Brigitte Macron, he wouldn't let go of her. In fact, he also shook her

:24:29.:24:32.

hand and then he kissed her, maybe it was the other way around. I do

:24:33.:24:36.

think it is either one or the other, you shouldn't both kiss somebody...

:24:37.:24:40.

He famously held onto Theresa May other White House. Brigitte Macron

:24:41.:24:46.

has a very thin hand... Have figured... I sound like Trump Wow!

:24:47.:24:50.

She moves her hand up get away from him. It was almost like he was

:24:51.:24:55.

attempting to dislocate her shoulder. There is a point in life

:24:56.:24:58.

when you have to let go. Thank you very much indeed. You two carry on

:24:59.:25:08.

with that, OK! We'll see how long that lasts. Let's talk about buying

:25:09.:25:09.

a new house. If you buy a new house you might

:25:10.:25:12.

assume that it is freehold, meaning you own the building

:25:13.:25:15.

and the land it is on outright. But, for new homes in many

:25:16.:25:18.

modern developments, that is not the case.

:25:19.:25:20.

Many new builds are leasehold, which means that you only

:25:21.:25:22.

own the property for a fixed This can cause expensive

:25:23.:25:25.

and unexpected problems. Legally, and structurally, as time

:25:26.:25:30.

goes on. Paul Lewis from Radio 4's Money Box

:25:31.:25:32.

programme has been investigating. He has been investigating all of

:25:33.:25:43.

this. Good morning, Paul. I was or is under the impression that if you

:25:44.:25:46.

bought a flat that is when the leasehold came into account, but

:25:47.:25:50.

this is now happening with new-build homes? In some parts of England,

:25:51.:25:53.

particularly the north-west and north-east, it is happening more, it

:25:54.:25:57.

seems, with new-build homes, or at least it was. The problem is that it

:25:58.:26:01.

is not just the length of time you have the least four, which is

:26:02.:26:05.

normally very long, 999 years, the problem is that you don't own the

:26:06.:26:12.

land under the building. Normally when you buy a house you think you

:26:13.:26:15.

by your little bit of planet Earth, really. You owned the land under it

:26:16.:26:18.

and you can do what you like with it within the planning tools. But if

:26:19.:26:21.

you only own the leasehold, then the freeholder, which originally is the

:26:22.:26:24.

developer, can decide, they set ground rent for example, charge you

:26:25.:26:28.

to sit on the land, and also they can make charges for extensions and

:26:29.:26:32.

alterations as well. So that can cause problems. What has been

:26:33.:26:37.

happening recently is the freeholders, the house-builders,

:26:38.:26:41.

have been selling on these freeholds basically to investment firms, put

:26:42.:26:49.

up the price that they charge. We had one example where a lady wanted

:26:50.:26:52.

to buy the freehold of her property. She was told after two years she

:26:53.:26:55.

could, it would cost of ?4000, something like that. But when she

:26:56.:26:58.

went to do so she found it had been bought by an investor and she was

:26:59.:27:03.

told it would cost her ?13,500. Those are the kind of problems

:27:04.:27:07.

people are facing. Are these negotiable, these increasing prices?

:27:08.:27:12.

Not really, no. The freeholder can set them. There was a famous case

:27:13.:27:17.

with Taylor Wimpey where it had a clause in its leases whereby the

:27:18.:27:22.

ground rent bubbled every ten years. In fact, the first Dublin was after

:27:23.:27:25.

eight years and then after ten years. And that was causing problems

:27:26.:27:30.

to people because suddenly their ground rent was ?175 per year, but

:27:31.:27:36.

then it went up to ?350. Over the next 40 years, if they stayed there

:27:37.:27:39.

that long, it could well have been in the thousands. They found that

:27:40.:27:43.

unfair. Taylor Wimpey has set aside that money to try and resolve that

:27:44.:27:47.

problem, but so far not very much seems to have happened. That's

:27:48.:27:51.

Taylor Wimpey, what about house-builders in general, however

:27:52.:27:59.

justifying this? Taylor Wimpey say there in the middle of negotiations

:28:00.:28:01.

which are very complex and they wouldn't talk to us about how those

:28:02.:28:04.

are going, understandably. Other house-builders have said that it is

:28:05.:28:06.

in some cases in the leasehold is' interest, because they can control

:28:07.:28:10.

the quality of the estate and make sure that things look right. But

:28:11.:28:15.

some people have been charged thousands of pounds if they want to

:28:16.:28:19.

build an extension, just for permission. It's that kind of thing

:28:20.:28:22.

when you think you own the house, but you don't. The house-builders

:28:23.:28:27.

generally defend it. I think it is a practice that is beginning now to

:28:28.:28:32.

die away, although it did grow for a while. A lot of this freeholds are

:28:33.:28:36.

already in the hands of investors, investment companies, and they can

:28:37.:28:39.

really set the tone. After two years you have the Right to Buy it, but

:28:40.:28:43.

that can be an expensive business. Paul, thanks for a taster on that.

:28:44.:28:49.

You have been doing an investigation on this and you are looking at what

:28:50.:28:50.

the Government plans to do about it. More on Money Box today,

:28:51.:28:56.

at midday on Radio 4. looking head to all the action

:28:57.:29:03.

on Ladies' Final Day. Almost 8:30am, taking in the calm

:29:04.:29:12.

and tranquillity on centre court. You can hear the soft purr of Rick's

:29:13.:29:18.

lawn mower. Imagine the sound, the excitement this afternoon. This

:29:19.:29:21.

weekend we could see history made. Not just this afternoon, as Venus

:29:22.:29:25.

Williams, at the age of 37, tries to become the oldest winner of the

:29:26.:29:30.

women's title in the Open era since indeed 1908 when she takes on

:29:31.:29:34.

Garbine Muguruza. But tomorrow, Roger Federer, who also won the

:29:35.:29:39.

title Wakely Venus did back in 2007, he will be aiming for title Monbeg

:29:40.:29:45.

Dude in the men's singles here -- he will be aiming for title number

:29:46.:29:50.

eight. Why we guaranteed a British winner in the mixed doubles? We are

:29:51.:29:54.

very excited to see you soon on centre court.

:29:55.:30:16.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Naga Munchetty and Jon Kay.

:30:17.:30:20.

Coming up before 9am, Jay will have a the weekend

:30:21.:30:22.

But first, a summary of this morning's main news.

:30:23.:30:28.

Laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the government

:30:29.:30:32.

following attacks which took place in London on Thursday night.

:30:33.:30:37.

Five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them,

:30:38.:30:39.

including one man who is said to have suffered

:30:40.:30:41.

Two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion

:30:42.:30:46.

of robbery and grievous bodily harm with intent.

:30:47.:30:52.

There are calls for a more consistent response to major

:30:53.:30:55.

incidents from all fire brigades in the UK following

:30:56.:30:57.

Under its policy at the time, the London brigade didn't send

:30:58.:31:03.

an aerial ladder immediately to the blaze.

:31:04.:31:07.

Now, a BBC News investigation found that crew levels and equipment vary

:31:08.:31:10.

significantly across the country - leading to what the Fire

:31:11.:31:13.

Brigade Union has described as a postcode lottery.

:31:14.:31:17.

The former Prime Minister Tony Blair has that claimed senior figures

:31:18.:31:21.

in the EU have told him they are prepared to be flexible

:31:22.:31:24.

on freedom of movement, in order to accommodate

:31:25.:31:27.

Mr Blair made the claim in an article written

:31:28.:31:30.

Just last week the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier,

:31:31.:31:36.

said the freedom of movement of people, goods, services

:31:37.:31:38.

7,000 police officers, soldiers, officials and academics have

:31:39.:31:47.

been sacked in Turkey, where a national holiday

:31:48.:31:49.

is being held to mark the first anniversary of a failed attempt

:31:50.:31:51.

The authorities have accused them of being members of terrorist

:31:52.:31:58.

organisations or of groups working against the national interest.

:31:59.:32:00.

150,000 people have now been arrested or sacked

:32:01.:32:02.

There are plans to extend a scheme which allows members of the public

:32:03.:32:13.

to call for harsher sentences in England and Wales.

:32:14.:32:16.

The Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme already covers serious terror

:32:17.:32:19.

offences and crimes such as murder and rape.

:32:20.:32:21.

The Ministry of Justice now wants it to apply to people who have been

:32:22.:32:24.

convicted of offences such as encouraging terrorism.

:32:25.:32:31.

Wages are increasing at their slowest rate for five

:32:32.:32:33.

years, which is hitting young families in particular -

:32:34.:32:36.

The Resolution Foundation - which analyses living standards -

:32:37.:32:44.

says average income growth halved to 0.7% in the 12 months before last

:32:45.:32:47.

A shortlist of five contenders has been announced in the race to be UK

:32:48.:32:53.

City of Culture 2021, taking over from Hull.

:32:54.:33:00.

Have you practised your drum roll yet? Maybe we'll save that for later

:33:01.:33:05.

in the year. Coventry, Paisley, Sunderland,

:33:06.:33:05.

Swansea and Stoke-on-Trent are all still in the running to host

:33:06.:33:07.

the year-long celebration of art and performance,

:33:08.:33:09.

which happens every four years. The winner will be

:33:10.:33:12.

announced in December. Some of the world's largest

:33:13.:33:14.

carnivores are being squeezed out of their natural habitat due

:33:15.:33:20.

to farming and human settlements. In the first global

:33:21.:33:22.

study of its kind - scientists have found six species -

:33:23.:33:24.

including tigers and lions - have lost at least 90% of the areas

:33:25.:33:28.

they've historically occupied. Researchers say reintroduction

:33:29.:33:31.

into these landscapes would mean humans being more willing to share

:33:32.:33:33.

habitats with animals Would you want to share your habitat

:33:34.:33:51.

with a wolf? I'm not sure. They're beautiful but they also kill people.

:33:52.:33:53.

It's a huge weekend of sport, not least there. Mike is in amongst, not

:33:54.:34:04.

the crowd yet, but Centre Court. You can almost hear the atmosphere

:34:05.:34:10.

tangling -- feel the atmosphere tangling.

:34:11.:34:10.

Wimbledon will be full of history breakers this weekend,

:34:11.:34:18.

I asked the groundsman what does he listen to on his headphones? He says

:34:19.:34:25.

it's on the Shuffle, anything but heavy metal. It's a huge day, let's

:34:26.:34:35.

put it into context. 1908 was the time when the last female over a

:34:36.:34:45.

certain age one and Wimbledon. Wimbledon will be full of history

:34:46.:34:47.

breakers this weekend, starting today if Venus Williams can

:34:48.:34:49.

win her sixth singles titles here and become the oldest

:34:50.:34:52.

Grand Slam winner at 37. Garbine Muguruza stands in her way

:34:53.:34:54.

on centre court later today. And in the men's final tomorrow,

:34:55.:34:57.

Roger Federer is back there, He beat Tomas Berdych

:34:58.:34:59.

in straight sets to book his 11th Wimbledon Final -

:35:00.:35:03.

as he looks for a record She played her sister Serena and

:35:04.:35:05.

lost a couple of years ago. And in the men's final tomorrow,

:35:06.:35:19.

Roger Federer is back there, He beat Tomas Berdych

:35:20.:35:21.

in straight sets to book his 11th Wimbledon Final -

:35:22.:35:25.

as he looks for a record I feel privileged to

:35:26.:35:27.

be in another final. I know how much it means to so many

:35:28.:35:33.

players to be able to go out on Centre Court at Wimbledon at any

:35:34.:35:37.

time in their career and I have had This time in another

:35:38.:35:40.

final, it is so good. Looking to spoil Federer's

:35:41.:35:44.

party on Centre Court The seventh seed came

:35:45.:35:51.

through a tough four set Cilic is into his second major final

:35:52.:35:58.

after winning the 2014 US Open. Jamie Murray and Martina Hingis

:35:59.:36:06.

are through to the mixed doubles final after beating

:36:07.:36:09.

Marcelo Demoliner and Maria Jose Martinez-Sanchez in straights sets

:36:10.:36:11.

on Centre Court... And waiting for them are

:36:12.:36:18.

Heather Watson and Henri Kontinen. we are guaranteed a British winner

:36:19.:36:25.

in the mixed doubles final. They beat Bruno Soares

:36:26.:36:33.

and Elena Vesnina two sets to one. Gordon Reid and Alfie Hewett

:36:34.:36:36.

are back in the hunt for another Wimbledon title after Britain's star

:36:37.:36:39.

wheelchair tennis double After early defeats in the singles

:36:40.:36:41.

for the British pair, they rebounded as a team

:36:42.:36:44.

with victory over Argentinian Gustavo Fernandez

:36:45.:36:46.

and Japan's Shingo Kunieda. Away from the tennis,

:36:47.:36:48.

Hannah Cockcroft set a new world record at

:36:49.:36:50.

the World Para-athletics Cockroft won the 100 metre T34

:36:51.:36:52.

gold in 17.18 seconds. And it was a British one-two

:36:53.:36:57.

as as sixteen-year-old Kare Adenegan Going round the warm-up laps,

:36:58.:36:59.

I was getting a little emotional. The noise is so loud,

:37:00.:37:21.

we have not had that To be able to go in and put

:37:22.:37:23.

in such a good performance, it means so much and hopefully

:37:24.:37:27.

that's a sign of a good And Gemma Prescott won GB's third

:37:28.:37:30.

medal of the tournament with bronze in the F32 club final for seated

:37:31.:37:35.

athletes with cerebral palsy. Prescott's best throw

:37:36.:37:38.

was 19.97 metres. South Africa are 309-6 after day one

:37:39.:37:40.

of the second test at Trent Bridge. Hashim Amla top scored

:37:41.:37:44.

for the tourists with 78, but England picked up four wickets,

:37:45.:37:46.

including his, in the last The last time that we played

:37:47.:37:49.

here and bowled here, So I think was important

:37:50.:38:02.

that whatever we did, we stuck to our guns

:38:03.:38:09.

and we did that. They applied themselves

:38:10.:38:12.

well, credit to them. 170 odd for two, as I say,

:38:13.:38:13.

they were excellent. There's eight stages to go

:38:14.:38:16.

at the Tour de France and Chris Froome will start this

:38:17.:38:18.

morning in white, rather than yellow, for a second day -

:38:19.:38:21.

he's still six seconds behind Fabio But he says he's enjoying

:38:22.:38:24.

racing to try and take It was actually quite a great

:38:25.:38:28.

feeling to have to go out there and try to race for a win

:38:29.:38:32.

today, as opposed to racing defensively and having the pressure

:38:33.:38:35.

of defending the jersey. It was nice to have the shoe

:38:36.:38:37.

on the other foot. It's been a difficult few

:38:38.:38:43.

weeks for Rory McIlroy, he's been struggling for form

:38:44.:38:51.

and he's now missed the cut It means he misses the weekend's

:38:52.:38:53.

play, for the third time England's Callum Shinkwin

:38:54.:38:57.

is in a three-way tie for the lead on nine under par,

:38:58.:39:01.

with Ian Poulter a shot back. Celtic have beaten Northern Irish

:39:02.:39:04.

side Linfield 2-0 in a Champions Scott Sinclair and Tom Rogic

:39:05.:39:07.

scoring the goals for Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor

:39:08.:39:12.

were in London last night, promoting their much anticipated

:39:13.:39:17.

boxing match at the end of August. Like the three events before it,

:39:18.:39:19.

it was a highly charged affair but challenger Conor Mcgregor say's

:39:20.:39:22.

he can't wait to prove He could have walked off into the

:39:23.:39:46.

sunset 49-0, but this is the first time in a boxing ring and I love

:39:47.:39:49.

boxing! LAUGHTER All eyes will be on Centre Court

:39:50.:39:58.

later as Venus Williams takes on Garbine Muguruza in the Ladies'

:39:59.:40:01.

Final. Someone who knows a thing or two

:40:02.:40:03.

about finals day nerves is two-time Grand Slam champion,

:40:04.:40:06.

Tracy Austin who joins me now. Looking amazing in orange! If I go

:40:07.:40:15.

red, it's because I had posters of you on my wall. Let's look at today.

:40:16.:40:23.

You have to do pinch yourself, Venus Williams won her first proper title

:40:24.:40:30.

in 2000, they thought that was it in 2007, now with talking about it

:40:31.:40:34.

again. How does it go against all odds? This is the 20th Wimbledon

:40:35.:40:39.

that Venus Williams has played, and everyone realised, one Serena was

:40:40.:40:43.

out of the draw on maternity leave, that this was a wide open women's

:40:44.:40:48.

draw this year, and at the Thomas Pickering at the top of

:40:49.:40:51.

that can occur at the top of the list was Venus Williams with

:40:52.:40:57.

powerful groundstrokes, big serves, she's been dealing with a lot over

:40:58.:41:01.

the last few years. First her health and then the car accident a month

:41:02.:41:05.

ago that was very emotional, then of course the last five years, seeing

:41:06.:41:10.

her younger sister get Grand Slam after Grand Slam. This is a huge

:41:11.:41:14.

opportunity and that can't be overlooked. 37, that is just

:41:15.:41:19.

incredible. I can't get over that. Given the illness as well, would

:41:20.:41:25.

leave the tired? And the ability to? Possibly in a major, you you have

:41:26.:41:31.

the other day off, she has that time to recover and recoup, and it's an

:41:32.:41:38.

incredible story. Her opponent Garbine Muguruza is 23, younger than

:41:39.:41:42.

Venus, and she is an incredible talent with them Mick promise. She

:41:43.:41:51.

attacks the ball, but has struggled since she won the French Open. She

:41:52.:42:00.

has not been to a final since then. How much will it help her that she

:42:01.:42:05.

has been in a final here? Against a Williams, how will that help?

:42:06.:42:10.

Absolutely, coming out on Centre Court, it's the most treasured

:42:11.:42:14.

court, the most historic court and our game. It can be overwhelming

:42:15.:42:18.

when you walk out on court, and to have that experience a couple of

:42:19.:42:22.

years ago even though she lost, is important to Garbine Muguruza.

:42:23.:42:27.

Winning a major is also helpful. She shouldn't be intimidated, she also

:42:28.:42:34.

has a coach in the support camp, her coach won the title in 1994. She

:42:35.:42:38.

knows how to win on the surface and at Wimbledon. She seems to have

:42:39.:42:43.

calmed Garbine Muguruza down. Will we party like 2007? I think so, but

:42:44.:42:48.

very close. 51-49 for Venus. And of course it's the Ladies'

:42:49.:42:55.

final here at Wimbledon - there's coverage across the BBC

:42:56.:42:58.

starting at 11.00 on BBC two, from 2pm on BBC Radio five Live

:42:59.:43:00.

and on the BBC Sport website. Tracy Austin, thanks for joining us.

:43:01.:43:03.

That is it for now, see you later. School swimming lessons should teach

:43:04.:43:09.

children about the dangers of cold water shock after a sharp rise

:43:10.:43:11.

in the number of young people drowning, council

:43:12.:43:14.

leaders have urged. 300 people died in accidental

:43:15.:43:19.

drownings in the UK last year and 60 % of those died as a result

:43:20.:43:23.

of cold water shock. Joining us now is Simon Griffiths,

:43:24.:43:25.

founder of Outdoor Swimmer magazine, and water safety campaigner

:43:26.:43:28.

Beckie Ramsy who's son died in 2011 Good morning, thanks for joining us.

:43:29.:43:46.

Becky, if we could start with you. You go into schools and tell the

:43:47.:43:51.

stories about your son, explain what happened and the potential

:43:52.:43:52.

significance of cold -- my son what 13, nearly 14,

:43:53.:44:03.

decided to go thumbing with friends on a sunny day in a quarry, went for

:44:04.:44:08.

what he thought was an innocent swim. He was in for 20 minutes

:44:09.:44:12.

before he got into some kind of difficulty, he shouted for help

:44:13.:44:17.

three times. He was only underwater for three minutes in total. He was

:44:18.:44:22.

only that much underwater, he stood up when the guy pulled him out, gave

:44:23.:44:28.

him CPR immediately at the scene. I shouldn't be sitting here telling

:44:29.:44:33.

you my son died, I should say he had a near miss. But unfortunately, he

:44:34.:44:38.

died. He was a fit and healthy young man. He was eight superfit athlete

:44:39.:44:47.

of the year, two years in a row, competing out of the area, sporting

:44:48.:44:51.

offence against district level opponents. He was at the top of his

:44:52.:44:56.

game. He was a free running, swimming in the Lake District just

:44:57.:45:01.

before he died. He had been swimming since the age of eight months old,

:45:02.:45:07.

he was really fit and healthy. No underlying health issues. Hearing

:45:08.:45:10.

what she is talking about and hit what

:45:11.:45:13.

Dylan -- what happened to Dylan, most people are aware of that shop

:45:14.:45:23.

intake of breath in a drumming pool, and that is a surprise. -- in a

:45:24.:45:30.

swimming pool. People need to be aware of the longer term? Cold water

:45:31.:45:36.

shock is a real thing. I think the current campaign around this that

:45:37.:45:46.

has been picked up by LGA is talking about cold water shock, the

:45:47.:45:50.

immediate risk when you hit cold water, the sharp intake of breath

:45:51.:45:54.

and increasing heart rate. If you not expecting it, it can be very

:45:55.:46:00.

scary, causing you to panic, and that is when it happened. And you

:46:01.:46:08.

take the water in? If you're swimming for longer periods, there

:46:09.:46:11.

are other things to take into account, as Dylan was. You are in

:46:12.:46:17.

the water for a longer time. The blood flowing to your muscles

:46:18.:46:20.

decreases because in cold water, your body tries to preserve the heat

:46:21.:46:25.

in your core. So blood concentrate in your core and less muscle is

:46:26.:46:30.

going to your arms and your legs. If you are in cold water for a long

:46:31.:46:33.

time, you lose the ability to swim as well. That could be another

:46:34.:46:39.

factor and if you're in the water for longer you can get hypothermia.

:46:40.:46:46.

There is a series of risks that you have to deal with and be aware of

:46:47.:46:51.

when you are swimming in cold water. The campaign that the R and L I are

:46:52.:47:01.

pushing, is around the immediate effect of cold water shock when you

:47:02.:47:04.

hit the water, and if you are aware of that, and to know what's

:47:05.:47:09.

happening, you can reduce the risks. If you know what is happening and

:47:10.:47:16.

it's normal, you can take the right action and the normal action. Lots

:47:17.:47:20.

of people planning to go to the beach or swimming in a river in the

:47:21.:47:25.

next few weeks, other things he would tell people when you go into

:47:26.:47:31.

to minimise the chances of this happening? I always say you should

:47:32.:47:37.

go to a lifeguard or beach for a start. If they want to participate,

:47:38.:47:47.

go into organised events. Go to somewhere that has lifeguards, where

:47:48.:47:51.

your safety is paramount. Don't just jump into your nearest quarry

:47:52.:47:55.

already far or whatever. The chances are, even if you've been there

:47:56.:47:58.

before and been fine, you could this time, not the, and it could cost you

:47:59.:48:04.

your life. How do you teach people? It's not that children that needs to

:48:05.:48:10.

be taught? The for anyone. Who should teach children and adults to

:48:11.:48:13.

do this? In a safe environment where health is needed? -- help is needed?

:48:14.:48:21.

Everybody's got to learn. I think there is one thing talking about it

:48:22.:48:27.

and intellectually understanding it is a different thing. If you can get

:48:28.:48:33.

the chance to experience it in a safe way, you will reduce your risk

:48:34.:48:37.

because you know what's happening. The other thing of cold water shock,

:48:38.:48:41.

wanted experienced it a couple of times, the effect lessens. After

:48:42.:48:46.

another time, you don't experience it in the same way. So if anyone

:48:47.:48:53.

tries it, do it in a Safeway? That's the advice shared by us. If you do

:48:54.:49:00.

it, do it in a safe environment. Somewhere organise, and your safety

:49:01.:49:05.

is paramount. That is the most important thing for someone coming.

:49:06.:49:10.

Dylan has not heard of cold water shock? It did take the tragedy for

:49:11.:49:15.

cold water shock to be even be mentioned for me. It is sadly the

:49:16.:49:18.

case for so many families, so many parents out there, cold water shock,

:49:19.:49:23.

the first time they hear about it is when they lose someone. It is

:49:24.:49:29.

tragic. The dangers in and around open waters should be as well-known

:49:30.:49:33.

as the Green Cross code, in my opinion. I know you mentioned your

:49:34.:49:37.

daughter, her crop confidence after the tragedy, she was initially

:49:38.:49:42.

scared to go in the water but is now more confident? Yes, the primary

:49:43.:49:46.

school has worked wonders with her. This time years ago she could not go

:49:47.:49:53.

near Ferman Paul now she wants to go in all the time. -- a swimming pool.

:49:54.:50:00.

Thank you so much for spreading your message.

:50:01.:50:09.

Here's Jay with a look at this morning's weather.

:50:10.:50:14.

We have a lot of cloud in the sky today bringing rain with it. Sunday

:50:15.:50:24.

will be the wetter of the days. It is warm and Maggie out there, the

:50:25.:50:27.

wedge of warm coming in from the Atlantic. It comes in with a breeze,

:50:28.:50:33.

quite a lot of cloud and rain as well. It will be wettest through the

:50:34.:50:38.

day on the western side of Scotland. The rain in northern England down to

:50:39.:50:43.

the Midlands, not too much getting into the southernmost counties. You

:50:44.:50:47.

see it moving its way eastwards, rain across central and eastern

:50:48.:50:52.

areas drying in the afternoon. It is wet in Scotland's west through the

:50:53.:50:58.

day. The north-east sees some rain developing. Rain on and off in

:50:59.:51:02.

Northern Ireland. Spreading its way south to the later part of the

:51:03.:51:06.

afternoon and evening. It clears away and leaves low cloud and the

:51:07.:51:12.

North of England. Maybe a little light rain and drizzle to go with

:51:13.:51:18.

that. A lot of cloud and the central and eastern areas. Temperatures

:51:19.:51:24.

around 20 or 23 degrees, maybe some spots of rain towards Wimbledon in

:51:25.:51:27.

early afternoon but that should clear away. There will be a warm and

:51:28.:51:33.

humid afternoon here. And walking again through tomorrow. The rain

:51:34.:51:37.

eventually place in Scotland, moving its way south, Hickling from

:51:38.:51:40.

Northern Ireland to settling into northern England through the

:51:41.:51:45.

evening. It is a warm night, 16 or 17 degrees, low cloud around

:51:46.:51:48.

particularly in the West. Turning pressure with clearer skies in

:51:49.:51:52.

northern areas. The fresh air will push its way southwards through

:51:53.:51:56.

tomorrow. Behind our increasingly weak band of cloud. And patchy rain.

:51:57.:52:02.

A weak band of rain, some in the morning, drifting south and the rain

:52:03.:52:06.

becomes light and patchy. In the south, it stays warm and humid.

:52:07.:52:10.

Behind it, fresh air is coming in with brighter skies. Although a few

:52:11.:52:14.

showers in northern Scotland. Temperatures around 19 in Aberdeen,

:52:15.:52:21.

and Belfast, but warm and humid, 25 in the south-eastern corner.

:52:22.:52:25.

Identifying inherited heart conditions can save lives -

:52:26.:52:27.

a disease known as HCM. carrying the gene that causes

:52:28.:52:33.

Sir David Frost had the condition - and while it didn't cause his death

:52:34.:52:36.

he did pass it on to one of his sons Miles who died at

:52:37.:52:39.

Now, his family is trying to help other people to find out

:52:40.:52:44.

Our correspondent Chris Buckler reports.

:52:45.:52:49.

In every child, you can find something of their parents,

:52:50.:53:04.

and often inherited alongside looks and characteristics are things

:53:05.:53:06.

Miles Frost shared with his father David a gene responsible

:53:07.:53:13.

for a heart condition that led to his sudden death.

:53:14.:53:15.

For your 31-year-old brother to die, suddenly and unexpectedly,

:53:16.:53:17.

And I'll never get over the pain of learning that for the first time.

:53:18.:53:30.

Miles loved sport, and he seemed extremely healthy, but he died

:53:31.:53:33.

His brothers have now set up a fund which, along

:53:34.:53:37.

with the British Heart Foundation, is paying for people to be tested

:53:38.:53:40.

Miles would have had to adapt his life and stop playing sport,

:53:41.:53:45.

Now, that didn't happen, and we can look back and we can

:53:46.:53:51.

complain about that, or we can look forward and make

:53:52.:53:53.

sure it doesn't happen again for the people.

:53:54.:53:58.

Sports clubs are starting to get to grips with how

:53:59.:54:01.

It is impossible to simply spot who might have an inherited

:54:02.:54:06.

condition on the pitch, but the Gaelic Athletic Association

:54:07.:54:09.

says being aware of the possibility could save someone's life.

:54:10.:54:19.

We've had a couple of sudden deaths within our own club,

:54:20.:54:24.

and it has been shocking, and we will go back to looking

:54:25.:54:29.

That doesn't necessarily mean not taking part in sport.

:54:30.:54:33.

It is just changing what they do on the field.

:54:34.:54:35.

Most of the risk is thought to be associated with high-intensity

:54:36.:54:38.

So we would normally steer people away from those activities.

:54:39.:54:47.

Encouraging them just to stay active still

:54:48.:54:54.

This is one of six centres across the country to be given funding.

:54:55.:55:00.

They will employ staff not just for families who have this gene,

:55:01.:55:03.

which is known as HCM, but also to offer

:55:04.:55:06.

Moira has been identified with the condition, and she has

:55:07.:55:12.

That means real adjustments for a football and rugby-mad teenager.

:55:13.:55:16.

Rugby is a no-no, but he can play in nets, provided that there is that

:55:17.:55:19.

Golf he can't continue with, which he also loves.

:55:20.:55:27.

The bottom-line is it is better that he knows, and that he can make

:55:28.:55:42.

those adjustments in his life, and to live with the

:55:43.:55:44.

It is thought tens of thousands of people are carrying the gene

:55:45.:55:48.

in the UK, and targeted screening is at the heart of attempts

:55:49.:55:51.

to ensure they live long and active lives.

:55:52.:55:53.

Let's get some more details on this now from Dr Mike Knapton

:55:54.:55:56.

good morning. Let's start with the explainer, getting the science bit

:55:57.:56:08.

out of the way. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, what is it? It's a

:56:09.:56:16.

disease of the heart. The heart muscle second so it's hypertrophic.

:56:17.:56:21.

The implications are that the heart doesn't pump as well. So low energy

:56:22.:56:26.

levels, breathless palpitations, chest pain, and causing fluid

:56:27.:56:30.

retention as well. Tragically in a proportion of cases, the first time

:56:31.:56:34.

do know you've got it is a sudden cardiac arrest. That is in the case

:56:35.:56:36.

of miles. -- case it is a risk even without testing?

:56:37.:56:48.

Some people will have no symptoms until they suddenly die. Steps

:56:49.:56:56.

forward we have made now is thanks to this case and all the supporters

:56:57.:57:02.

he raise money for us, is that we have done research, identifying

:57:03.:57:07.

mutations of genes that cause this, and we can identify those abnormal

:57:08.:57:16.

genes in you or me or anyone else, and screening family, and

:57:17.:57:19.

identifying whether they are affected early so you can offer them

:57:20.:57:23.

treatment for a catastrophic event. You are talking about testing within

:57:24.:57:27.

a family where something has happened already rather than

:57:28.:57:30.

screening the entire nation? Correct. As a diagnosing someone

:57:31.:57:37.

hopefully not, who died, or who was living with the condition. Because

:57:38.:57:44.

it will pass through 50% of the relatives, so a higher rate, but if

:57:45.:57:53.

you find another and you can test another relative, which is called

:57:54.:57:58.

Cascade screening. There are about 120,000 people living with this.

:57:59.:58:01.

Unfortunately I would imagine, many people have relatives who suffered

:58:02.:58:07.

with heart condition. How easy will it be, when people are listening

:58:08.:58:13.

today, we reached 6.5 million viewers a day, who think, I need to

:58:14.:58:18.

be tested, because this happened in my family? How do you distinguish

:58:19.:58:22.

between that and in her -- and an inherited condition? You're quite

:58:23.:58:27.

right, many won't have this condition. They will want to discuss

:58:28.:58:36.

it with their doctor, with symptoms such as chest pains. If it's thought

:58:37.:58:45.

that they might be carrying, having a gene known sequence. If you have

:58:46.:58:54.

jab who has suddenly died, prematurely,

:58:55.:59:03.

you should ask if it is a hereditary condition. Is this something that

:59:04.:59:11.

can be picked up at the baby stage or does it become thicker as it

:59:12.:59:14.

grows up it's usually diagnosed as a child or a young adult. We use the

:59:15.:59:22.

same technology to diagnose the case in adults. Using an ultrasound case

:59:23.:59:28.

of the heart. What do you do when you find out you have this? First,

:59:29.:59:32.

Guinea to have the diagnosis explained to you. They can be a bit

:59:33.:59:37.

of a boy. -- you need to have diagnosis explained to you. That can

:59:38.:59:45.

be a bit of a blow. Some might need more invasive treatments like

:59:46.:59:53.

pacemakers. Thanks for joining us. Stay with us, the headlines are

:59:54.:59:55.

coming up. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:59:56.:00:26.

with Naga Munchetty and Jon Kay. Tony Blair has told the BBC that

:00:27.:00:28.

continuing on the current path to Brexit would be

:00:29.:00:32.

the "biggest delusion". The former Prime Minister says

:00:33.:00:34.

European leaders have told him they would be prepared to make

:00:35.:00:36.

concessions to keep the UK He says a debate on the EU is

:00:37.:00:39.

needed. Good morning, it's

:00:40.:00:59.

Saturday the 15th of July. Demands for a crackdown

:01:00.:01:01.

to tackle acid attacks - a review will be carried out

:01:02.:01:05.

into whether laws A call for a more consistent

:01:06.:01:07.

approach to tower-block fires after the Grenfell disaster,

:01:08.:01:21.

as one in five Fire Brigades say they still won't automatically send

:01:22.:01:24.

a high ladder to a blaze. A world record for Hannah Cockroft,

:01:25.:01:27.

as Britain takes three medals on the opening night

:01:28.:01:29.

of the World Para-athletics Good morning from Wimbledon. It is

:01:30.:01:39.

women's final day, is 37-year-old Venus Williams aims to become the

:01:40.:01:45.

oldest winner in the Open era. She takes on Garbine Muguruza here on

:01:46.:01:48.

centre court, live on the BBC this afternoon.

:01:49.:01:50.

The story of Dunkirk is being told in a major new movie -

:01:51.:01:53.

we'll hear how boyband star Harry Styles took to

:01:54.:01:55.

I just, you know, I feel very grateful to be able to get to do two

:01:56.:02:05.

of the things that I like so much. And Jay Wynne has the weather for

:02:06.:02:09.

us. Good morning. Today will be the wetter of the two days of the

:02:10.:02:12.

weekend. And most of the rain will be in the North and the west of the

:02:13.:02:18.

UK. The further south you are, the temperatures are on the rise, as is

:02:19.:02:19.

the humidity. In the last half hour,

:02:20.:02:23.

Tony Blair has told the BBC are willing to consider changing

:02:24.:02:31.

rules on the free movement of people to accommodate Britain.

:02:32.:02:35.

Speaking to Radio 4's Today programme, Mr Blair refused to be

:02:36.:02:37.

drawn on his contacts within the EU, but insisted his claims were not

:02:38.:02:40.

just made on "a whim". He also said continuing on the

:02:41.:02:46.

Brexit path would be delusional. Let's get more on that

:02:47.:02:51.

interview, with our Political He's certainly not shy about making

:02:52.:03:02.

his views clear on Brexit, is he? Absolutely, Tony Blair is on a

:03:03.:03:05.

mission to highlight the people the dangers, the perils, as he sees it,

:03:06.:03:09.

is leaving the Single Market. This claim that he is now making today is

:03:10.:03:15.

that he believes senior EU figures, the EU leaders, would be prepared to

:03:16.:03:20.

change the rules on immigration and freedom of movement to accommodate

:03:21.:03:24.

Britain. Essentially saying that, yes, we could get greater control of

:03:25.:03:28.

Britain's borders but whilst remaining within a reformed EU. Of

:03:29.:03:33.

course, you may say, that may sound, well, having your cake and eating

:03:34.:03:37.

it. We don't believe that compromise is possible, opting out of freedom

:03:38.:03:41.

of movement, as we understand it, means leaving the Single Market. But

:03:42.:03:45.

Tony Blair is insisting that he is now hearing different noises from

:03:46.:03:49.

the EU, and another kind of way is possible. He has said there is a

:03:50.:03:53.

completely changed situation in Europe. Britain can get a better

:03:54.:03:56.

deal on immigration whilst staying in the EU. And he's warned against

:03:57.:04:01.

on along the path that we are on, saying that we need to consider

:04:02.:04:06.

other options. The biggest delusion would be to continue on this path of

:04:07.:04:10.

what is actually a hard Brexit, if we leave the Single Market and

:04:11.:04:14.

Customs union. And, you know, I think what is important is to

:04:15.:04:17.

understand there is already a lot that we know, now, that we didn't

:04:18.:04:20.

know one year ago, when we took the decision. All I'm saying is, our

:04:21.:04:26.

leaders today should be educating us, engaging with us, explaining to

:04:27.:04:30.

us, and having a range of options that allow us to do what is in the

:04:31.:04:35.

national interest. Some may say they feel pretty sceptical over whether

:04:36.:04:39.

there really is the political will to do this. Is there the evidence to

:04:40.:04:43.

back up Tony Blair's claims that people are really considering

:04:44.:04:49.

changing the rules just to suit Britain? He didn't give away where

:04:50.:04:53.

this has come from, but he said he hasn't said it on a whim. Tony

:04:54.:04:57.

Blair, though, of course, he's good at making headlines and being

:04:58.:05:01.

persuasive, and he wants to use some of his old touch, really, to try and

:05:02.:05:05.

steer the country in a different direction. But he risks of course by

:05:06.:05:10.

sticking to those Remain arguments, he risks the accusation that he is

:05:11.:05:14.

ignoring the referendum result that people voted for. To do that, some

:05:15.:05:20.

argue, could destroy trust in politics. Thanks, Emma Vardy.

:05:21.:05:22.

Laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the Government

:05:23.:05:25.

following a spate of attacks which took place in London

:05:26.:05:28.

Five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them,

:05:29.:05:31.

including one man who is said to have suffered

:05:32.:05:33.

Two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion

:05:34.:05:37.

of robbery and grievous bodily harm with intent.

:05:38.:05:40.

Andy Moore's report contains flashing images and some scenes

:05:41.:05:43.

We need to try and get water in your eyes...

:05:44.:05:52.

In the aftermath of the first attack, police doused

:05:53.:05:54.

He was protected by his helmet, and lucky to escape

:05:55.:05:58.

But even so, it was a terrifying experience.

:05:59.:06:04.

I took off my helmet, and I was just screaming for help,

:06:05.:06:07.

because it was getting dry, and as much as it was getting

:06:08.:06:10.

So I was just screaming for water, screaming for help, knocking

:06:11.:06:17.

Another moped rider attacked at this location was not so lucky.

:06:18.:06:26.

He has life-changing injuries to his face.

:06:27.:06:29.

The Shadow Home Secretary called the attacks horrific and barbaric.

:06:30.:06:32.

Nobody in their own home needs pure sulphuric acid.

:06:33.:06:39.

There are different alternatives for cleaning your drains.

:06:40.:06:45.

No-one should be able to buy sulphuric acid unless they're

:06:46.:06:51.

a builder or a workman who needs it in the course of their profession,

:06:52.:06:55.

and they should have to have a licence.

:06:56.:06:59.

The Government says it's working with the police to see what more can

:07:00.:07:02.

be done to combat the growing menace of acid attacks.

:07:03.:07:05.

There are calls for a more consistent response to major

:07:06.:07:08.

incidents from all Fire Brigades in the UK following

:07:09.:07:11.

the Grenfell Tower disaster. A BBC News investigation found that

:07:12.:07:13.

crew levels and equipment vary significantly across the country,

:07:14.:07:17.

leading to what the Fire Brigades Union has described

:07:18.:07:19.

More than a month on, there is now a clear picture of how

:07:20.:07:27.

the London Fire Brigade responded to the blaze.

:07:28.:07:31.

Last week, it emerged it took more than 30 minutes

:07:32.:07:33.

for a high ladder to arrive after the first fire engine.

:07:34.:07:37.

Until Grenfell, automatically bringing this piece of equipment

:07:38.:07:41.

to a tower block was not part of its predetermined

:07:42.:07:43.

But a BBC Newsnight investigation has found that differed from 70%

:07:44.:07:54.

of Fire Services in the UK with high-rise blocks

:07:55.:07:56.

The investigation also revealed significant variations in the number

:07:57.:08:00.

of fire engines dispatched across the country.

:08:01.:08:03.

It has prompted calls for the Government to implement

:08:04.:08:06.

mandatory minimum requirements for Fire Services who are

:08:07.:08:08.

We have raised concerns about this sort of issue

:08:09.:08:11.

We used to have national standards of fire cover.

:08:12.:08:16.

We now have local so-called risk management plans.

:08:17.:08:22.

What they are in reality are budget management plans.

:08:23.:08:28.

You have seen that the risk assessments over time,

:08:29.:08:30.

as budgets are squeezed, the response has declined

:08:31.:08:32.

Since Grenfell Tower, four services, including London and Manchester,

:08:33.:08:36.

have changed their attendance plans, while nine say they still would not

:08:37.:08:39.

send an aerial ladder in the first instance.

:08:40.:08:43.

The Home Office says it's the responsibility of each

:08:44.:08:46.

fire and rescue authority to manage their own resources.

:08:47.:08:48.

There are plans to extend a scheme which allows members of the public

:08:49.:09:02.

to call for harsher sentences in England and Wales.

:09:03.:09:04.

The Unduly Lenient Sentence Scheme already covers serious offences

:09:05.:09:06.

The Ministry of Justice now wants it to apply to people who have been

:09:07.:09:11.

convicted of offences such as encouraging terrorism.

:09:12.:09:14.

We've been looking at this for some time. A lot of work has gone into

:09:15.:09:19.

it. What we're making sure is that there is a proper system in place to

:09:20.:09:25.

reflect the wishes and interest of the British public, properly checked

:09:26.:09:29.

by the Attorney General and the Court of Appeal. And making sure

:09:30.:09:32.

that those who radicalise young people and those who wilfully and

:09:33.:09:36.

culpably turn a blind eye to terrorist activity feel the full.

:09:37.:09:36.

The law. 7,000 police officers, soldiers,

:09:37.:09:39.

officials and academics have been sacked in Turkey,

:09:40.:09:41.

where a national holiday is being held to mark the first

:09:42.:09:43.

anniversary of a failed attempt to remove President Erdogan.

:09:44.:09:46.

The authorities have accused them of being members of terrorist

:09:47.:09:48.

organisations or of groups working 150,000 people have now

:09:49.:09:51.

been arrested or sacked Wages are increasing

:09:52.:09:54.

at their slowest rate for five years, which is hitting young

:09:55.:10:01.

families in particular, according to new research.

:10:02.:10:04.

The Resolution Foundation, which analyses living standards,

:10:05.:10:06.

says average income growth halved to 0.7% in the year before

:10:07.:10:11.

the general election, A shortlist of five contenders has

:10:12.:10:20.

been announced in the race to be UK City of Culture 2021,

:10:21.:10:23.

taking over from Hull. Coventry, Paisley, Sunderland,

:10:24.:10:26.

Swansea and Stoke-on-Trent are all still in the running to host

:10:27.:10:28.

the year-long celebration of art and performance,

:10:29.:10:30.

which happens every four years. The winner will be

:10:31.:10:34.

announced in December. Some of the world's largest

:10:35.:10:38.

carnivores are being squeezed out of their natural habitat due

:10:39.:10:41.

to farming and human settlements. In the first global

:10:42.:10:45.

study of its kind, scientists have found six species -

:10:46.:10:47.

including tigers and lions - have lost at least 90% of the areas

:10:48.:10:51.

they've historically occupied. Researchers say reintroduction

:10:52.:10:56.

into these landscapes would mean humans would have to be more willing

:10:57.:10:59.

to share habitats with Do you have something to say about

:11:00.:11:12.

wolves? I was saying that I wouldn't want to share my habitat with

:11:13.:11:15.

Wolves. And I said they were but. Your I wasn't denying that. But but

:11:16.:11:25.

I have been put right by Wolfe fans. It's a common perception that they

:11:26.:11:30.

are more likely to attack us, but we are actually more dangerous.

:11:31.:11:32.

The use of acid and other corrosives in violent attacks can often leave

:11:33.:11:35.

victims with terrible life-changing injuries and trauma.

:11:36.:11:37.

The motivations for such attacks can be complex,

:11:38.:11:39.

ranging from domestic abuse to organised gang crime.

:11:40.:11:43.

An increase of acid attacks in the UK has prompted calls

:11:44.:11:46.

for tougher restrictions on the sale of acid-based products.

:11:47.:11:49.

Let's discuss this more now with Jaf Shah from

:11:50.:11:51.

Thank you very much indeed for joining us. The figures are shocking

:11:52.:12:05.

in terms of the number, the increase that we have seen just than the last

:12:06.:12:12.

few months. Well, I'm afraid, Jon, over the last three years the

:12:13.:12:19.

numbers have actually doubled. Around 2014, we were experiencing

:12:20.:12:24.

around 250 attacks per year. By the end of 2016, there were 700 attacks,

:12:25.:12:29.

of which around 400 were in London. Use being a victim yourself, haven't

:12:30.:12:34.

you? Just tell us what happened with usable you have been the victim. No,

:12:35.:12:38.

I've never been a victim. You haven't? I'm sorry. Explain why you

:12:39.:12:45.

think it has happened. We have had an explanation about gangs using

:12:46.:12:48.

acid but that's not the only thing that's going on here. It can happen

:12:49.:12:52.

in domestic situations and more randomly. Why do you think... What's

:12:53.:12:57.

going on? We have a very complex here in the UK. If you compare, say,

:12:58.:13:05.

the UK to the global patterns, we know that the vast majority of

:13:06.:13:11.

perpetrators on then and the vast majority of victims are women and

:13:12.:13:16.

girls. That makes it a form of gender based violence. But here in

:13:17.:13:21.

the UK, we actually have a trend that goes against the global pattern

:13:22.:13:25.

in that two thirds of victims are men. Which means that approximately

:13:26.:13:34.

500 male victims in the UK, judging by the early figures. That's really

:13:35.:13:39.

going against global pattern. And also, we don't really understand

:13:40.:13:44.

what the motivations are behind a lot of these attacks. Because, from

:13:45.:13:49.

what I understand from official figures, only about a quarter of

:13:50.:13:53.

these cases actually reach successful prosecution. Once we get

:13:54.:13:57.

an increase in successful prosecutions, we will better

:13:58.:13:59.

understand a lot of the motivations behind these attacks. At the

:14:00.:14:04.

survivors trust, the people you talk to you been on the receiving end of

:14:05.:14:08.

these attacks, how does it affect their lives? What kind of a pact

:14:09.:14:12.

does it have? Well, the impact is twofold. Clearly there's the

:14:13.:14:18.

physical aspect, which results in very often very severe facial

:14:19.:14:23.

disfigurement, because the face is often targeted. In some cases,

:14:24.:14:29.

blindness. Also, clearly, the psychological trauma that comes with

:14:30.:14:32.

acid attack. Because the principal purpose behind using acid attacks,

:14:33.:14:41.

using acid, is to really disfigure and maim. And the idea is, by

:14:42.:14:47.

disfiguring and maiming your intended victim you are trying to

:14:48.:14:49.

push them to a state of social isolation. And that often results in

:14:50.:14:58.

various forms of trauma. And psychological support needed.

:14:59.:15:02.

Because many survivors will undergo deep depression, anxiety, panic

:15:03.:15:09.

attacks, fear, loneliness. And in some rare cases suicidal thoughts.

:15:10.:15:13.

You gave us those figures at the beginning of the interview about the

:15:14.:15:17.

increase over the last few years. What would you like to see changed

:15:18.:15:20.

to try and stop this increase happening altogether? Well, I think

:15:21.:15:25.

there is a whole number of measures the Government can take. I think in

:15:26.:15:31.

the short-term, they certainly can introduce controls on the sale of

:15:32.:15:37.

concentrated forms of acid. Including household products, as

:15:38.:15:41.

well as just concentrated litres of acid that can currently be purchased

:15:42.:15:45.

relatively easily. That's the first measure. The second measure is to

:15:46.:15:48.

introduce an age restriction, because it's quite apparent that a

:15:49.:15:53.

number of attacks feature very young perpetrators. The third thing is to

:15:54.:16:01.

prevent cash sales. Introduce credit and debit card payments only, which

:16:02.:16:07.

would aid tracing payments, which in turn would offer support to the

:16:08.:16:10.

police who are investigating such crimes. But in the long term, I

:16:11.:16:14.

think we need to do a lot more research on the problem to better

:16:15.:16:18.

understand the groups of people involved in these attacks, to

:16:19.:16:23.

understand what are the motivations, what are the democratics, -- the

:16:24.:16:30.

demographics, which parts of the UK and London are most affected, what

:16:31.:16:33.

types of corrosive substances are most commonly used in the attacks?

:16:34.:16:37.

But also to better understand the needs of the survivors, because the

:16:38.:16:42.

survivors need an enormous amount of support at a medical and

:16:43.:16:44.

psychological level. We need to make sure that the health service that we

:16:45.:16:48.

have in the UK is sufficiently weak sauce to provide that service to

:16:49.:16:54.

survivors. Interesting suggestions -- is sufficiently resourced to

:16:55.:16:57.

provide that service. Jaf Shah, thank you for joining us.

:16:58.:17:00.

It is 916A. Time to take a look at the weather. , it is a busy sporting

:17:01.:17:09.

weekend. We have got the ladies final at Wimbledon today. How was

:17:10.:17:14.

looking? The British Grand Prix as well. We have a lot of cloud in the

:17:15.:17:17.

sky this morning, bring some rain with it. Today will be the worker of

:17:18.:17:22.

the two days of the weekend. Also it is fairly warm and fairly muggy up

:17:23.:17:26.

their -- today will be the wet. We have got warm air coming in from the

:17:27.:17:30.

Atlantic but it is coming in with a bit of a breeze, note the ice bars,

:17:31.:17:33.

and also the weather fronts bringing outbreaks of rain. It is a bit dull

:17:34.:17:39.

and dab across central and northern parts of the UK. Largely dry south

:17:40.:17:44.

of the M4 corridor, but rather cloudy. Wet in central and western

:17:45.:17:47.

parts of Scotland, the rain will be on for much of the day here. Towards

:17:48.:17:52.

the north-east of Scotland we should see something drier developing into

:17:53.:17:55.

the afternoon. The rain on and off into the afternoon across Northern

:17:56.:17:58.

Ireland, more persistent rain pushing south later on. Still quite

:17:59.:18:03.

warm, 21 degrees in Belfast. Early rain clears away from northern

:18:04.:18:07.

England, leaving behind low cloud and perhaps drizzle. The western

:18:08.:18:11.

side the Pennines and Wales, pretty grey into the afternoon. The morning

:18:12.:18:15.

rain clears away from East Anglia and the south-east, where it is

:18:16.:18:19.

certainly going to be like Apache. White warm through the afternoon,

:18:20.:18:26.

23-24d, -- it is going to be like Apache. The chance of a spot of rain

:18:27.:18:31.

at Wimbledon but it will ease off. This evening we still have rain

:18:32.:18:34.

across western Scotland and Northern Ireland. It is moving south by this

:18:35.:18:38.

stage, getting into northern England and the north of Wales. Out of that

:18:39.:18:43.

it stays fairly cloudy, quite a warm night ahead, 16 or 17 degrees behind

:18:44.:18:48.

that ring. We have got something a bit fresher moving into Scotland and

:18:49.:18:52.

Northern Ireland. The fresh air is coming in behind the weather front,

:18:53.:18:55.

drifting south through tomorrow. Any rain on the weather front becomes

:18:56.:18:59.

like Apache. The south of the weather front is going to stay warm,

:19:00.:19:05.

but behind it it is brightening up. It breeze in the far north of the

:19:06.:19:09.

UK, thickening cloud bringing some rain into the North West of Scotland

:19:10.:19:13.

through tomorrow, dry and bright weather for northern England,

:19:14.:19:18.

Northern Ireland. 17-19d. But quite warm, 25 or so, in the south-eastern

:19:19.:19:24.

corridor. Of course, the Grand Prix as well, so much sport. Too much to

:19:25.:19:28.

cope with! Those blue skies, perfect flying weather.

:19:29.:19:31.

The US Air Force Thunderbirds team is mostly made up

:19:32.:19:35.

has become the youngest woman to fly with them -

:19:36.:19:43.

remarkable, seeing as she only had her first flying lesson a year ago!

:19:44.:19:46.

She took up flying last year because she wanted to do something

:19:47.:19:49.

positive following the Shoreham air disaster, as Ben Moore reports.

:19:50.:19:55.

Coping with a force nearly ten times that of gravity is not

:19:56.:19:58.

Beth Moran is the youngest ever woman to fly with the Thunderbirds.

:19:59.:20:13.

Despite having had her first flying lesson just over a year ago.

:20:14.:20:16.

Now, she's in an F-16, belonging to the top American

:20:17.:20:18.

Beth wanted to do something to lift spirits after the Shoreham disaster.

:20:19.:20:34.

Her boss contacted the Thunderbirds on social media, asking

:20:35.:20:40.

It just still feels quite surreal that I actually went up

:20:41.:20:55.

I mean, I think my body's going to be recovering

:20:56.:21:03.

But it was a real experience, one I'll never forget.

:21:04.:21:09.

For being part of a such select team, Beth got her name

:21:10.:21:14.

on the plane, a round of applause and a framed photo.

:21:15.:21:17.

But this just has to be the best selfie ever.

:21:18.:21:19.

Do you think you could be that selfie?! No way, what, on the train

:21:20.:21:32.

on the way home! Time to look at the papers... Tim Walker is back with us

:21:33.:21:39.

to tell us what caught his eye. Good morning. Some heartbreaking stories.

:21:40.:21:46.

One of the things I remember this week is seeing an interview with

:21:47.:21:49.

Jermain Defoe, who was giving a press conference, the footballer. He

:21:50.:21:53.

became very attached to this young man, Bradley Lowery, who sadly died

:21:54.:21:58.

in the last week after battling cancer. And now lots of people are

:21:59.:22:05.

going to be paying their respects to this little boy, who really did win

:22:06.:22:10.

the hearts of so many. He had an extraordinary personality. And he

:22:11.:22:14.

did indeed touch the hearts of the nation. A fitting to page tribute

:22:15.:22:18.

here in the Daily Mirror to Bradley. As you say, he lived just six years,

:22:19.:22:23.

but what he achieved in that six years was extraordinary. So much

:22:24.:22:26.

good he achieved will live after him. He raised more than ?1 million

:22:27.:22:32.

for cancer research and charities. He formed a very genuine friendship

:22:33.:22:38.

with Jermain Defoe. The great England Star, who was among the

:22:39.:22:41.

mourners, who flew over from a training session in Spain to be

:22:42.:22:46.

there. Sometimes these friendships, people may be think it is a PR I can

:22:47.:22:50.

size or whatever, but in fact there was a genuine affection, as we saw

:22:51.:22:53.

in that interview -- Ebola think it is maybe PR or whatever. -- people

:22:54.:23:00.

think. They formed an incredibly close bond. Mark Renton Smith,

:23:01.:23:09.

Sunderland's FC's Chaplin, talked about him having a smile so big that

:23:10.:23:13.

it lit up the room. The great thing is, the good that he did will live

:23:14.:23:19.

after him. A lovely, touching point as France commemorated his life is

:23:20.:23:23.

that all football fans, because he was a massive football fan, wasn't

:23:24.:23:28.

he, wore their team colours. No clashes, just the hashtag, cancer

:23:29.:23:33.

has no collars, was made. Not just the Sunderland fans. Everybody. You

:23:34.:23:39.

saw that little lad doing his brave little salute with his hand. And you

:23:40.:23:45.

can't not be touched by that. Tim, let's look at this piece in The

:23:46.:23:50.

Times as well. On Monday, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, will celebrate

:23:51.:23:54.

her 70th birthday. This profile piece is looking at the

:23:55.:23:56.

transformation in her image and reputation. It's quite something,

:23:57.:24:02.

over the last 20 years. It is. Still, she's one of these people

:24:03.:24:05.

that people have opinions of, one way or the other. They will probably

:24:06.:24:09.

never change. But you have to respect the fact that she has made

:24:10.:24:14.

such a success of a marriage, of a relationship, that clearly has its

:24:15.:24:18.

strings and pressures. It is conducted very much in the public

:24:19.:24:25.

eye. At Highgrove, 250 of her closest friends will be gathering to

:24:26.:24:29.

celebrate it. I think everyone who has met her, she has a very strong

:24:30.:24:33.

and interesting character. She looked around the Telegraph wants, I

:24:34.:24:37.

was doing a gossip column at the time and there was a sense I should

:24:38.:24:40.

be kept well clear of her! But in fact she broke off from her royal

:24:41.:24:44.

party and came over and said, what's going on tomorrow? I told her she

:24:45.:24:48.

would have to read the paper! She is fun and entertaining. Although she

:24:49.:24:52.

is in the public eye, she's so recognisable, we don't know a huge

:24:53.:24:55.

amount about what makes her tick. She is also quite a private person,

:24:56.:25:03.

isn't she? Indeed, members of the Royal Family has given interviews

:25:04.:25:05.

over the years, but she never has. A big interview with Camilla would be

:25:06.:25:10.

an extraordinary gift for any major news organisation. This story caught

:25:11.:25:13.

my icon I'm pleased you picked this out. This has a total of eight legs,

:25:14.:25:25.

eight hands or whatever they are. I think Donald Trump, where he

:25:26.:25:32.

confronted by this tardy -- tardigrade is that it is resilient.

:25:33.:25:38.

Given the way this world is going with our climate change and

:25:39.:25:42.

everything, it may not be around all that long. This thing can live in

:25:43.:25:45.

temperatures that are incredibly low, incredibly high, it can live in

:25:46.:25:52.

water, out of water. It's not big, only half a millimetre in length. It

:25:53.:25:56.

looks like a little paper! Doesn't it? Yes, with a strange one eye. --

:25:57.:26:02.

a little pig. I wouldn't say it's going to be a -- making a career out

:26:03.:26:09.

of modelling! That Ricky Gervais book when he created all of those

:26:10.:26:13.

mystical, mythical characters, it looks like one of those, it doesn't

:26:14.:26:17.

look like a real thing! It's extraordinary that we haven't found

:26:18.:26:24.

it before. When the sun burns out, and I doubt we'll be here, it will

:26:25.:26:29.

survive. Apparently they live to a ripe old age, they go on into their

:26:30.:26:34.

60s, virtually. And you can't get rid of them. I've got certain

:26:35.:26:39.

friends like that! LAUGHTER

:26:40.:26:49.

A story in the Mirror. Imagine being fast tracked straight from primary

:26:50.:26:53.

school from university. This is what happened to this amazing young man.

:26:54.:26:58.

He was the youngest ever pupil to achieve and A-level grade, at age

:26:59.:27:03.

eight. He has graduated with a first-class honours degree, he is

:27:04.:27:06.

returning to his university to go for doctorate. The professor who

:27:07.:27:10.

taught him said that the most important thing about him is that

:27:11.:27:15.

he's a good bloke, good to be around. Forget the maps and

:27:16.:27:20.

studying, learn how to cook at University! That was the most

:27:21.:27:23.

important for me. We'll stick with a food themed...

:27:24.:27:28.

Saturday Kitchen takes over from us at 10am. Good morning. Our special

:27:29.:27:38.

guest is Julian Clary. You are here to facelock but heaven or food hell.

:27:39.:27:42.

Tell us your food haven't? Anything to do with fish, particularly

:27:43.:27:50.

salmon, I would like. OK. Tell us about your food hell? I don't like

:27:51.:27:57.

tomatoes, especially cooked tomatoes and tomato sauce, it feels a bit

:27:58.:28:03.

bland to be. And by the tomato Curry. Well, I've a lot to work

:28:04.:28:08.

with. We have two great chefs, Nadia Hussain, what's on the menu? Not a

:28:09.:28:15.

curry! Aubergine tart with feta and a simple salad with garlic dressing.

:28:16.:28:21.

We're going to be cooking outside. Barbecued turbot with fresh Polmans

:28:22.:28:28.

and mushrooms. Jane Park Nigel Lawson, you are here to talk about

:28:29.:28:33.

wines and drinks and all sorts of wonderful things. I've got literally

:28:34.:28:38.

something for everyone. You guys at home or in charge of voting for

:28:39.:28:44.

heaven or hell for Julian. I have a question that is probably better

:28:45.:28:52.

directed to noddy -- to Nadia. When do you know if garlic has blood? --

:28:53.:28:59.

has burned. When it is really, really black! Like toast, same kind

:29:00.:29:05.

of principle. You're watching breakfast Magrin. Coming up before

:29:06.:29:08.

10am... The weather and sport headlines. Coming up.

:29:09.:29:37.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Jon Kay.

:29:38.:29:45.

Let's bring you up to date with the main stories.

:29:46.:29:49.

Tony Blair has confirmed to the BBC that he believes senior EU figures

:29:50.:29:52.

are willing to consider changing rules on the free movement of people

:29:53.:29:55.

Speaking to Radio 4's Today programme, Mr Blair refused to be

:29:56.:29:59.

drawn on his contacts within the EU, but insisted his claims were not

:30:00.:30:02.

The government insists Brexit will give the UK greater control

:30:03.:30:08.

of its borders but Mr Blair insists continuing towards Brexit

:30:09.:30:11.

If people seriously believe that this is the wrong thing for the

:30:12.:30:21.

country, and I think there's every day passes, and the damage becomes

:30:22.:30:26.

clearer, not just the damage of doing Brexit but the damage of

:30:27.:30:30.

distracting from the big challenges facing the country, even if doctors

:30:31.:30:36.

talk about me being the lesion or an optimist, -- even if you talk about

:30:37.:30:43.

me being an optimist. Even if it happens, people should say this is a

:30:44.:30:47.

serious mistake, possibly the worst since the World War II

:30:48.:30:51.

we should think about the consequences.

:30:52.:30:53.

Laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the government

:30:54.:30:56.

following attacks which took place in London on Thursday night.

:30:57.:31:01.

Five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them,

:31:02.:31:03.

including one man who is said to have suffered

:31:04.:31:05.

Two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion

:31:06.:31:09.

of robbery and grievous bodily harm with intent.

:31:10.:31:12.

There are calls for a more consistent response to major

:31:13.:31:14.

incidents from all fire brigades in the UK following

:31:15.:31:16.

Under its policy at the time, the London brigade didn't send

:31:17.:31:20.

an aerial ladder immediately to the blaze.

:31:21.:31:22.

Now, a BBC News investigation found that crew levels and equipment vary

:31:23.:31:25.

significantly across the country - leading to what the Fire

:31:26.:31:27.

Brigade Union has described as a postcode lottery.

:31:28.:31:40.

There are plans to extend a scheme which allows members of the public

:31:41.:31:43.

to call for harsher sentences in England and Wales.

:31:44.:31:45.

The Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme already covers serious terror

:31:46.:31:48.

offences and crimes such as murder and rape.

:31:49.:31:49.

The Ministry of Justice now wants it to apply to people who have been

:31:50.:31:53.

convicted of offences such as encouraging terrorism.

:31:54.:31:57.

Wages are increasing at their slowest rate for five

:31:58.:31:59.

years, which is hitting young families in particular -

:32:00.:32:01.

The Resolution Foundation - which analyses living standards -

:32:02.:32:11.

says average income growth halved to 0.7% in the 12 months before last

:32:12.:32:14.

Some of the world's largest carnivores are being squeezed out

:32:15.:32:23.

of their natural habitat due to farming and human settlements.

:32:24.:32:25.

In the first global study of its kind -

:32:26.:32:27.

scientists have found six species - including tigers and lions -

:32:28.:32:30.

have lost at least 90% of the areas they've historically occupied.

:32:31.:32:33.

Researchers say reintroduction into these landscapes would mean

:32:34.:32:34.

humans have to be more willing to share habitats with

:32:35.:32:37.

And you've been doing some research into wolves? Wolf and is dangerous

:32:38.:32:54.

to us as I thought they were. I'm not sure I'd go as far as sharing

:32:55.:32:58.

their habitat, but apparently less dangerous than I realised.

:32:59.:33:01.

His the bouncing ball. We missed that ball, we will miss Wimbledon.

:33:02.:33:08.

What a fantastic couple of weeks we've had. There is so much sport

:33:09.:33:14.

this weekend to you. Grant Bray, Paralympics, fantastic. Mike is

:33:15.:33:17.

going to tell us all about what is going on. Looking glorious, the

:33:18.:33:25.

Centre Court's it is, though my voice has changed in terms of the

:33:26.:33:28.

sound and Echo because the roof has turned on. The roof is also on

:33:29.:33:36.

because we have had a little shower. Nothing to worry about. They are

:33:37.:33:43.

giving it one last vacuum and dried, and there are expecting a dry

:33:44.:33:47.

afternoon, the stage is set for a historic weekend.

:33:48.:33:51.

Wimbledon will be full of history breakers this weekend,

:33:52.:33:53.

starting today if Venus Williams can win her sixth singles titles

:33:54.:33:56.

here and become the oldest Grand Slam winner at 37.

:33:57.:33:58.

Garbine Muguruza stands in here way on Centre Court later today.

:33:59.:34:05.

17 years after Venus first won her title here.

:34:06.:34:12.

And in the men's final tomorrow, Roger Federer is back there,

:34:13.:34:14.

He beat Tomas Berdych in straight sets to book his

:34:15.:34:18.

11th Wimbledon Final - as he looks for a record 19th

:34:19.:34:20.

I feel privileged to be in another final.

:34:21.:34:23.

I know how much it means to so many players to be able to go out

:34:24.:34:27.

on Centre Court at Wimbledon at any time in their career and I have had

:34:28.:34:31.

This time in another final, it is so good.

:34:32.:34:35.

Looking to spoil Federer's party on Centre Court

:34:36.:34:44.

The seventh seed came through a tough four set

:34:45.:34:47.

Cilic is into his second major final after winning the 2014 US Open.

:34:48.:34:51.

Jamie Murray and Martina Hingis are through to the mixed

:34:52.:34:53.

doubles final after beating Marcelo Demol-iner and Maria Jose

:34:54.:34:56.

Martinez-Sanchez in straights sets on Centre Court...

:34:57.:35:01.

And waiting for them are Heather Watson and Henri Kontinen.

:35:02.:35:05.

They beat Bruno Soares and Elena Vesnina two sets to one.

:35:06.:35:07.

So that means Britain is guaranteed success one way

:35:08.:35:10.

Gordon Reid and Alfie Hewett are back in the hunt for another

:35:11.:35:29.

Wimbledon title after Britain's star wheelchair tennis double

:35:30.:35:31.

After early defeats in the singles for the British pair,

:35:32.:35:34.

they rebounded as a team with victory over

:35:35.:35:36.

Argentinian Gustavo Fernandez and Japan's Shingo Kunieda.

:35:37.:35:40.

The fire alarms are being tested here to to give me a bit of

:35:41.:35:46.

accompaniment. Away from the tennis,

:35:47.:35:47.

Hannah Cockcroft set a new world record at the World

:35:48.:35:49.

Para-athletics Championships Cockroft won the 100 metre T34

:35:50.:35:51.

gold in 17.18 seconds. And it was a British one-two

:35:52.:35:54.

as as sixteen-year-old Kare Adenegan Going round the warm-up laps,

:35:55.:35:57.

I was getting a little emotional. The noise is so loud,

:35:58.:36:04.

we have not had that To be able to go in and put

:36:05.:36:06.

in such a good performance, it means so much and hopefully

:36:07.:36:11.

that's a sign of a good And Gemma Prescott won GB's third

:36:12.:36:14.

medal of the tournament with bronze in the F32 club final for seated

:36:15.:36:20.

athletes with cerebral palsy. Prescott's best throw

:36:21.:36:22.

was 19.97 metres. South Africa are 309-6

:36:23.:36:28.

after day one of the second Hashim Amla top scored

:36:29.:36:30.

for the tourists with 78, but England picked up four wickets,

:36:31.:36:36.

including his, in the last The last time that we played

:36:37.:36:39.

here and bowled here, So I think was important

:36:40.:36:45.

that whatever we did, we stuck to our guns

:36:46.:36:48.

and we did that. They applied themselves

:36:49.:36:51.

well, credit to them. 170 odd for two, as I say,

:36:52.:36:52.

they were excellent. There's eight stages to go

:36:53.:37:02.

at the Tour de France and Chris Froome will start this

:37:03.:37:04.

morning in white, rather than yellow, for a second day -

:37:05.:37:07.

he's still six seconds behind Fabio But he says he's enjoying

:37:08.:37:10.

racing to try and take It was actually quite a great

:37:11.:37:13.

feeling to have to go out there and try to race for a win

:37:14.:37:20.

today, as opposed to racing defensively and having that pressure

:37:21.:37:24.

of defending the jersey. It felt quite nice to

:37:25.:37:26.

have the shoe on the other foot. Valtteri Bottas leads Lewis Hamilton

:37:27.:37:41.

in the second practice at the British Grand Prix, another

:37:42.:37:49.

highlight of the weekend. He was closer by 0.04 seconds, suffering

:37:50.:37:53.

the same year box problem that hit Hamilton at the Austrian Grand Prix

:37:54.:37:57.

last weekend. Back here at Wimbledon, one of those special

:37:58.:38:01.

moments on Wimbledon, such a privilege to be here. Getting ready

:38:02.:38:06.

for the rehearsal of the trophy presentation. While they do that, is

:38:07.:38:13.

the latest in our game, set and a mild challenge.

:38:14.:38:17.

He may be the former heavyweight world champion,

:38:18.:38:19.

but can David Haye put Andy Murray on the ropes to go top

:38:20.:38:22.

of the leaderboard in our game set mug challenge?

:38:23.:38:24.

We are in a privileged place this morning.

:38:25.:38:28.

We are inside the gym owned by the one and only Mr David Haye,

:38:29.:38:31.

I am feeling that you are ready for this.

:38:32.:38:45.

I have been waiting a long time for this.

:38:46.:38:48.

30 seconds to get as many balls into that mug.

:38:49.:38:52.

This is going to be a good one, here we go.

:38:53.:39:15.

The power in those fists is translating into a good result

:39:16.:39:18.

You are halfway there, 15 seconds left.

:39:19.:39:21.

I think I got around three or four, hopefully.

:39:22.:39:42.

I think you may have been beaten by Kim

:39:43.:40:14.

But for a boxer, that is very good, better

:40:15.:40:20.

I will come back and I will beat Andy.

:40:21.:40:24.

Swinging down the gauntlet for Andy Murray. That puts in joint third on

:40:25.:40:36.

the leaderboard. You can see the leaderboard there. Andy Murray is

:40:37.:40:48.

still way out in the lead. Back here and Centre Court they continue with

:40:49.:40:54.

the rehearsal on ladies final day, a special day. Before the final can

:40:55.:40:59.

start, an important moment for the match is the toss of the coin to

:41:00.:41:01.

decide who serves first. 12-year-old Rebecca Jones has been

:41:02.:41:08.

chosen to perform the prestigious task in front of an estimated

:41:09.:41:11.

worldwide audience She has been giving these

:41:12.:41:20.

opportunities XT children in need and the Wimbledon foundation. How do

:41:21.:41:30.

you feel? A little nervous but excited to meet the legends of Venus

:41:31.:41:41.

Williams and Garbine Muguruza. Have you been on the Centre Court before?

:41:42.:41:47.

I shot a video but that was the only time. Do you know what you will say

:41:48.:41:52.

to the players? Have you rehearsed it? Now, I think we're rehearsing at

:41:53.:41:58.

11am or 11:30am. Have you managed to sleep? I had a good sleep yesterday.

:41:59.:42:01.

Keeping Tom? I've got a pound coin, you will be

:42:02.:42:12.

using a special Wimbledon coin in the ceremony. I want to see your

:42:13.:42:15.

technique, I know you've been practising a time. There we are, one

:42:16.:42:21.

of the players will call heads, if it is Venus Williams she would get

:42:22.:42:27.

to serve first. Yeah. I don't want to put any map pressure that its 1.2

:42:28.:42:31.

billion people watching I know there's that many watching.

:42:32.:42:46.

Quite a few friends said do you have any spare tickets? They also will

:42:47.:42:50.

get all our family to watch and good luck, we are so proud of you. We

:42:51.:42:55.

wish you the best of luck as well. They will all be watching on the BBC

:42:56.:43:01.

at around 2pm. You can follow it on five live orders BBC sport website.

:43:02.:43:09.

Sue Barker comes fast, good morning. Looking forward to it at! We were

:43:10.:43:16.

saying we're going to watch it on BBC One. Alex Rowley to seeing it.

:43:17.:43:19.

Will have to leave them for now, leaving them to the rehearsal, best

:43:20.:43:26.

of luck, Rebecca, what a special moment for you and the rest of the

:43:27.:43:32.

team here. That's just marvellous. Sue Barker just casually walking

:43:33.:43:38.

along. It's really building up now, though momentum to this afternoon?

:43:39.:43:42.

Wotton atmosphere. Its spine tingling now, you have the

:43:43.:43:48.

rehearsing now. It's an amazing atmosphere and Centre Court. Enjoy

:43:49.:43:53.

your day. We will know the result tomorrow.

:43:54.:43:57.

You are watching breakfast and BBC News.

:43:58.:44:04.

In the last hour, Tony Blair has told the BBC that senior EU figures

:44:05.:44:12.

will make concessions to keep Britain in the single market but

:44:13.:44:16.

continuing on the current path of Brexit will be a delusion. There

:44:17.:44:24.

will be a review of the law into carrying acid following the attacks

:44:25.:44:29.

in London. Mike said its roof and, roof off, at Wimbledon, let's see

:44:30.:44:33.

what is here for the rest of the weekend. That's not an encouraging

:44:34.:44:37.

picture. A lot of cloud here. But owning some rain in it. It will be

:44:38.:44:43.

the wetter of the weekend but things will be what warm and humid. We have

:44:44.:44:48.

a wedge of warm air from the Atlantic, coming in with the breeze,

:44:49.:44:55.

and also with these weather fronts. Those are bringing the rain. The

:44:56.:44:59.

next few hours are drying up for the Midlands and northern England, that

:45:00.:45:03.

rain will shift its way out into the north sea but it stays pretty wet

:45:04.:45:07.

and windy, pretty much all day across central and western parts of

:45:08.:45:12.

Scotland. Not a great day here but towards the north-east, in

:45:13.:45:14.

Aberdeenshire, we should see something prior developing. Rain

:45:15.:45:21.

working its way south in the afternoon, quite warm, 21 degrees in

:45:22.:45:24.

Belfast. The afternoon to be mostly dry in the north, the Western

:45:25.:45:27.

Pennine still some low cloud and light rain and drizzle, but east of

:45:28.:45:32.

the Pennines will dry up. The West is also great with cloud and

:45:33.:45:37.

drizzle. But most Southern counties will be drier through the afternoon.

:45:38.:45:44.

22, 20 three degrees in the south-western corner, and good

:45:45.:45:47.

conditions at Wimbledon, the threat of rain easing through the

:45:48.:45:52.

afternoon. It should be dry tomorrow afternoon but cloudy and Maggie

:45:53.:45:56.

again. Into the evening, the rain moves away from Scotland but into

:45:57.:46:08.

Northern Ireland -- into well. A one night in the south but turning

:46:09.:46:14.

fresher across Scotland and Northern Ireland. The weather front continues

:46:15.:46:19.

to weaken in terms of rainfall, starting town in northern England

:46:20.:46:23.

and Wales, but rain becomes light and battery making its way

:46:24.:46:28.

southwards. Behind it, like the skies coming in, particularly in

:46:29.:46:33.

Scotland, the cloud will set him up and we see outbreaks of rain but for

:46:34.:46:37.

most of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, good spell.

:46:38.:46:41.

Sunshine, warm in the south-eastern corner, temperatures as high as 24

:46:42.:46:43.

or 25. When it comes to music

:46:44.:46:48.

Harry Styles takes some beating on the fame front -

:46:49.:46:50.

not only is he a member of the world's biggest

:46:51.:46:53.

boy band, but he's now Now, in his first major acting role,

:46:54.:46:55.

he joins some giants of the film world, including Sir Mark Rylance,

:46:56.:47:00.

Tom Hardy and Sir Kenneth Branagh Charlie has been speaking to Harry,

:47:01.:47:02.

and his fellow movie newcomer Fionn Whitehead

:47:03.:47:06.

about what it was like to take part I just wanted to

:47:07.:47:09.

reflect on where we're Because it, being

:47:10.:47:33.

close to a Spitfire, am I exaggerating, it's

:47:34.:47:36.

quite emotional isn't it? I think so, there's

:47:37.:47:42.

so much history in all this stuff, and that was

:47:43.:47:49.

a lot of the feeling getting to do it on the beach

:47:50.:47:51.

at Dunkirk, there was a lot of... It just felt very

:47:52.:47:58.

special doing that. Everyone was aware of the history

:47:59.:48:02.

that was under our feet and it made for a very sobering

:48:03.:48:06.

experience in general. Definitely, I think the first time

:48:07.:48:12.

everyone had one fly over their head, it's the most

:48:13.:48:17.

recognisable sound in the world. Everyone was just kind

:48:18.:48:21.

of in awe, really. Everyone stopped filming for

:48:22.:48:27.

a minute and followed it with their eyes, it was hard to do a shot

:48:28.:48:37.

because of it and one flew over How much of a learning

:48:38.:48:40.

curve for you two was it, learning about Dunkirk

:48:41.:48:44.

and what happened, then I think, when you learn about

:48:45.:48:51.

Dunkirk at school, so early in the war, it's obviously not considered

:48:52.:48:57.

our best moment in the war. So I think it's always told as this fairy

:48:58.:49:02.

tale thing that is washed over. They were stranded and then people came

:49:03.:49:07.

and then went home. I think through the filming process, it was just

:49:08.:49:13.

amazing to see it as each soldier is human, rather than the large number

:49:14.:49:20.

of people in an army. So it was cool to learn about it in more as a human

:49:21.:49:27.

way then a statistic way. Was there pinch yourself moments when Kenneth

:49:28.:49:34.

Branagh and Mark Rylance, Tom Hardy, with their moments when, and now you

:49:35.:49:36.

say everyone is embracing it and -- the mood, whether moments where

:49:37.:49:45.

you said, I'm here? Absolutely. Although it was an equal stage, I

:49:46.:49:50.

was still in shock when I met people I looked up to for so long. Also

:49:51.:49:56.

just the scale of the set is insane. The first time I walked up and saw

:49:57.:50:00.

Spitfires flying overhead, warships in the background, a kilometre of

:50:01.:50:07.

beach in a set dress to look the time with extras. It is an insane

:50:08.:50:12.

thing, anyone with an a person, -- Viktor matter whether

:50:13.:50:23.

you're an actor, you learn to adapt and take it in as normal. When you

:50:24.:50:29.

watch the film, you reflect, thinking, that was insane. Harry,

:50:30.:50:34.

you have had experience in a different world, the music world.

:50:35.:50:39.

You had to deal with all the attention that Fionn will get used

:50:40.:50:44.

to now maybe. Does it feel like a complete change to you all quite a

:50:45.:50:48.

natural progression? Obviously, the doing of it was so amazing. Any time

:50:49.:51:00.

you get to work with who you are a fan of, in any format, it's a a

:51:01.:51:05.

privilege to be around, getting to watch them work. You want to soak as

:51:06.:51:13.

much up of it as you can. In terms of the general switch from music to

:51:14.:51:17.

acting, I don't know, they feel so different to me. I feel, I have

:51:18.:51:23.

always felt, incredibly lucky to work in music and do something that

:51:24.:51:27.

I love and I enjoyed this so much. I feel very grateful to get two of the

:51:28.:51:32.

things I like so much. One last thing to ask why have you seen the

:51:33.:51:36.

committee having seen the film, there are some very moving sequences

:51:37.:51:44.

I was thinking of. The scenes of the capsize. I'm not sure how those were

:51:45.:51:50.

filmed, you are under water at times, they look quite difficult and

:51:51.:51:54.

obligated. Can you tell us a bit about that? -- difficult and

:51:55.:52:00.

completed. Some of that was the most fun for me. It was interesting to

:52:01.:52:07.

see the way that the set was and producing something so large that

:52:08.:52:13.

Frank. And just working in a set that is totally submerged in water

:52:14.:52:19.

and the whole crew, the cameras coming up to get some air and then

:52:20.:52:27.

going again. You don't get to work like that every day. Fionn, Harry,

:52:28.:52:28.

thank you so much. What I really want to see is how

:52:29.:52:38.

they got down from those chairs. They're still there, they are stuck.

:52:39.:52:45.

Charlie also interviewed Christopher Nolan and Mark Rylance, and the

:52:46.:52:48.

cinematography of that film is just amazing. It feels so big. So much is

:52:49.:52:54.

taken from the pilot's perspective, he said it's stunning. Seeing them

:52:55.:52:57.

coming onto the boat. Staying with the theme of amazing

:52:58.:52:58.

pictures. Jupiter's mysterious storm,

:52:59.:53:11.

the Great Red Spot, has captivated The Nasa spacecraft Juno has

:53:12.:53:13.

been orbiting the planet for more than a year,

:53:14.:53:21.

and earlier this week it got closer than any craft

:53:22.:53:23.

has managed to before, sending back exciting

:53:24.:53:25.

new images of the giant storm. Juno mission scientist

:53:26.:53:27.

Dr Jonathan Nichols is here to talk us through how significant those

:53:28.:53:30.

pictures are. Good morning. Thanks for coming in.

:53:31.:53:41.

How much do these pictures matter? These are incredible new images of

:53:42.:53:47.

the Great Red Spot. To now has passed closer to the Great Red Spot

:53:48.:53:50.

than any other spacecraft before. The images it sent back are

:53:51.:53:59.

incredible, telling us how the Great Red Spot works. How does it work and

:54:00.:54:06.

what is it? It's a huge fountain of gas inside Jupiter, one of the most

:54:07.:54:12.

iconic storms in the solar system. If you ask anyone to mention

:54:13.:54:15.

anything about to that they will mention the Great Red Spot. The

:54:16.:54:19.

still mysterious, like a hurricane on earth but not quite the same. A

:54:20.:54:23.

hollow chain needs an ocean to keep going and the earth but there is no

:54:24.:54:30.

ocean and Jupiter. -- a harder time. So we don't know how Great Red Spot

:54:31.:54:33.

has managed to survive for so long. In terms of the storm, bring it to

:54:34.:54:42.

life for us. We know about 80 or 100 mph winds that seem pretty

:54:43.:54:47.

ferocious. The winds and Great Red Spot go around 400 mph, its much

:54:48.:54:52.

larger than the earth, and the other could fit inside of it. You could

:54:53.:54:56.

fit earth inside that storm? Yes, it's huge. It's mind boggling. It's

:54:57.:55:03.

been getting smaller over the last 50 years or so, it has shrunk by

:55:04.:55:08.

about half its size, we have already lost an Earth sized Great Red Spot.

:55:09.:55:13.

But we still don't understand how it works. Will these pictures give us

:55:14.:55:18.

greater understanding? What happens, where'd you get stuck into the data?

:55:19.:55:25.

The themselves talk about wind flow in the Great Red Spot. You can see

:55:26.:55:32.

waves and waters inside the Great Red Spot. But that's the only the

:55:33.:55:35.

top layer. To show us what's on -- Great Red Spot

:55:36.:55:44.

can look below that, and see the structure of the Great Red Spot. How

:55:45.:55:49.

do we benefit? To that has no solid surface, made up mainly of gases.

:55:50.:55:55.

It's a gas giant planets. Our atmospheric models telling us

:55:56.:56:02.

whether it is going to rain, tell -- are based on that. But there is a

:56:03.:56:10.

pesky land that getaway in modelling, we want to run an ideal

:56:11.:56:16.

experiment to see how it works. The good thing about Jupiter's

:56:17.:56:19.

atmosphere is there is no land to get in the way. So we can learn

:56:20.:56:25.

about the's situation from this? Yes, the overall goal of Juno is to

:56:26.:56:30.

learn about the overall composition of Jupiter and the structure. That

:56:31.:56:35.

will tell us the story of Jupiter's formation billions of years ago and

:56:36.:56:39.

the story of our own formation of the Earth, Jupiter formed first,

:56:40.:56:44.

everything else formed after, Jupiter was obliterated in hurling,

:56:45.:56:47.

it is towards the earth which delivered the water we drink in our

:56:48.:56:52.

cups of tea. Talking about Juno, in terms of distance from the gas

:56:53.:56:58.

planets, and how long its journey is going to be, what are we expecting?

:56:59.:57:04.

Juno arrived about this time last year, and it is orbiting a special

:57:05.:57:09.

orbit taking it close to Jupiter, skimming over the cloud tops about

:57:10.:57:13.

clinic with 3000 kilometres over the cloud tops. But that is very small

:57:14.:57:24.

and the scale of Jupiter. It's smaller than the Great Red Spot. It

:57:25.:57:31.

guides income against the -- it glide in, gets the data, and glides

:57:32.:57:36.

out again. Originally there was no plan to the camera and so we

:57:37.:57:41.

wouldn't have got these pictures? That's right, the primary science of

:57:42.:57:47.

Juno doesn't require a camera, but it would be a crime to send a space

:57:48.:57:53.

mission to Jupiter without a camera. It's there as a public out wheat

:57:54.:57:59.

instrument. Everyone can get involved. Talk about citizen

:58:00.:58:04.

scientists, how are they being encouraged to get involved? There is

:58:05.:58:14.

no science team behind Juno camera. You can go on the Junocam website,

:58:15.:58:25.

vote for the top three images, they are downloaded and put onto the

:58:26.:58:31.

website, the Junocam website and processed by a citizen scientists

:58:32.:58:35.

around the world and the result is the spectacular images. Thank

:58:36.:58:40.

goodness they put the camera on! Absolutely. Now unite. Don't forget

:58:41.:58:44.

your camera. Roger and Sian will be

:58:45.:58:49.

here tomorrow morning from 6am. Enjoy the sport, have a lovely day.

:58:50.:58:54.

Don't forget your camera. When I think of the world

:58:55.:59:04.

we inhabit, everyone will think, Yeah. And it wasn't,

:59:05.:59:07.

it was done by hand over days and weeks

:59:08.:59:10.

and months and years. It was always

:59:11.:59:14.

a very, very deep love affair between this incredible,

:59:15.:59:18.

wonderful, glorious music

:59:19.:59:23.