02/08/2017 Breakfast


02/08/2017

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After 65 years of service, Prince Philip prepares to step back from

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public life. He will meet Royal Marines in his

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final appearance before a officially retiring from royal duties.

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Good morning. It's Wednesday, the second of August. Also coming up

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this morning... I've given up my car, I can't afford holidays. More

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than 1 million women have become poorer because of delays to their

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state pensions, according to new research. Up to 3000 elderly people

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won't be able to find a bed at a UK care home to the end of next year.

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We have a special investigation. It has been for months been -- since

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those business rate changes affected millions of companies. Didcot has

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seen some of the biggest rises. In sport, as Usain Bolt get set to

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race for the final time, a time Olympic champion has told us the

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sport will die if athletes keep doping.

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And plans to rip up speed bumps in a -- an effort to tackle speed bumps.

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For many of us it's a dry and bright start, with a couple of showers. But

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we have rain coming to the south-west. That will be moving

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north-east. Some will be heavy and possibly thundery as well. It will

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be accompanied by casting wins. More details on 15 minutes.

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The Duke of Edinburgh will carry out his final public engagement

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before he retires from royal duty this afternoon.

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Prince Philip, who is 96 years old, will attend a parade

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In May it was announced he would be retiring after spending more

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than six decades supporting the Queen as well as attending

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events for his own charities and organisations.

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Here's more from our royal correspondent, Nicholas Witchell.

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He has been a familiar and sometimes forthright feature of national life

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ever since his marriage to the then Princess Elizabeth in November 1947.

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And although his robust approach to people and events has sometimes

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got him into trouble, few can criticise his devotion

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to royal duty, most often in support of the Queen and also in pursuit

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of his own programme, with issues like the environment

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and the development of the awards programme for children,

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which he created and which is named after him.

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But this afternoon it will come to an end.

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The Duke, who turns 96 in June, will attend his last solo

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engagement, a parade by the Royal Marines

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on the forecourt of Buckingham Palace.

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It is not a complete retirement from public life.

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The Duke may still accompany the Queen to certain events,

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but after more than 22,000 solo engagements and 600

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solo overseas visits since the Queen came to the throne it marks

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a significant moment for the Duke and for the Queen.

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No longer will she have her husband at her side for most of the public

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appearances, other younger members of the Royal family

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will take his place, as the self-declared leading plaque

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unveiler in the world finally takes things a little easier.

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We'll be speaking to the Royal Editor of the Sunday Express

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about Prince Philip's role within the Royal family at 7:10am.

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More than 1 million women in their early 60s are worse-off

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financially as a result of the rise in the state pension age.

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The Institute for Fiscal Studies found that the change,

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which saves the government ?5 billion a year,

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sees those affected lose more than ?30 a week on average.

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Our Personal Finance correspondent Simon Gompertz reports.

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Waiting for your pension and struggling to get by.

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Shirley from Aberdeen is 61, not working because of ill-health

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and she won't qualify for the state pension until she's 66.

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I can't afford holidays, I've given up my car.

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But it's the only thing I've got really, not getting my pension,

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Pension ages used to be 60 for women and 65 for men.

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By the end of the decade they'll be 66 for both with reform

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The result is more than a million women in their early 60s having

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weekly average incomes ?32 less than they would have been,

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the hit would be bigger but for the fact many are working.

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18% are living in poverty, that's on under ?237 a week

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Perhaps the group who are worst off in this reform are the ones

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who want to work, perhaps retire a bit later, but can't do

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so because they can't find work or their health prevents them

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Women have been campaigning for compensation saying they weren't

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given enough warning of the pension changes which save ?5

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But the government says they're fair and, because of rising life

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expectancy, women now get the state pension for longer

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Recent unrest in English and Welsh prisons is causing "grave concern",

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according to the President of the Prison Governors Association.

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In an open letter to her organisation, Andrea Albutt said

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a decision to separate operational and policy decisions in the prison

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The letter comes after two days of trouble at The Mount Prison in

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The Ministry of Justice said it was dealing with long-term

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Stronger powers to cut off funding for terrorists,

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by freezing their assets and blocking access to bank

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accounts, will form part of the Government's plans

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to introduce the UK's own post-Brexit sanctions regime.

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Our assistant political editor Norman Smith is in Westminster

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Norman, the government says this new legislation will make it easier

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It will set out a distinctive British sanctions policy. At the

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moment our sanctions are trade embargoes, travel ban is, as it

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freezes on suspected tariffs, all imposed through the EU. We operate

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as a block. Now we will have to have our own sanctions policy. The

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government is saying they want to make it easier to seize the assets

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of terror suspects because under the current EU system the government has

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to show that not only is someone thought to be part of a terrorist

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organisation but they also represent a threat to the public. Under the

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new system they will simply have to show that they believe they might be

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part of a terror organisation, so it will be easier to stop them selling

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their house or stop them selling their car to raise funds for

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terrorism and on our way, say the government, they believe it will

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give the government are better chance to tackle terrorism. Thanks

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for explaining that. America is not seeking to invade

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North Korea or oust its leader Kim That's according to its Secretary

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of State, Rex Tillerson. He was speaking after a senior

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Republican senator said President Trump considered

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going to war with North Korea Last week, the communist country

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carried out a second test of an intercontinental ballistic

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missile, in defiance Police looking for the missing

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airman Corrie McKeague say they're examining

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whether material found at an incinerator plant

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in Ipswich is linked to him. The 23-year-old was last seen

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near a bin loading bay following a night out

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in Suffolk last September. Police ended a 20 week search

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of a nearby landfill site last Road safety campaigners say

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a government proposal to reduce air pollution by removing speed humps

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would be dangerous and ineffective. They claim the move would make

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pedestrians less safe and encourage more parents to drive

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their children to school. The BBC's Environment and Energy

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correspondent Roger Harrabin Children are vulnerable to polluted

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air. It can harm to develop and their lungs. But the government's

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plan to combat pollution includes paying council to rip up speed humps

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installed to protect those same children. Here is why cars will

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typically break as they reach a hump and then accelerate their way out of

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it, increasing pollution in the process. Safety campaigners say if

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councils remove humps without replacing them with something else

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to slow traffic it simply increase the risk for children. -- it will

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simply. Rachel is a safety campaign based in Cardiff, where she walks

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her two-year-old to nursery. Her organisation is writing to

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ministers, criticising the decision to remove speed bounce. It's a

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really weak plan based on really weak evidence. Getting Redox be

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bumps and spending that money is not going to improve our air quality.

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It's going to increase the likelihood of accidents in urban

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areas like this and the money could be spent elsewhere. The challenge

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over humps created confusion in Whitehall, with different department

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saying they weren't responsible for the policy. A government spokesman

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said later that he would ensure that any changes on roads didn't reduce

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safety. Former Spitfire pilot

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Ken Wilkinson has died, Ken was one of the last surviving

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Battle of Britain pilots who were known as The Few,

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after Winston Churchill's famous phrase, "never was so much owed

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by so many to so few." In a statement, the Battle

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of Britain Memorial Trust said Ken He famously made headlines in 2015

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when he jokingly told off Prince William for flying

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helicopters instead of planes. Well, because he doesn't fly proper

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aeroplanes, he flies choppers. I said, there's nothing like the sound

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of a Merlin and he hasn't got that pleasure.

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Three Australian women trying to save their bowls club

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from closure have become overnight internet stars,

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after posting a video of themselves performing a parody of the Beyonce

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The women, who are in their 70s and 80s, made the video

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after their local council said it wanted to bulldoze their bowls lawn

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A warning, there is some flash photography at the very start

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What does the queen of pop, Beyonce, and the genteel sport of lawn balls

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Meet Terri, Janine and Wyn, from Melbourne.

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Their parody of Beyonce's Single Ladies has been watched at least 1

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They are hoping the video will persuade the council to rethink

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plans to build an indoor stadium on this site.

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One of our younger members, Denise, she had obviously been in PR,

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just cottoned on to the song, Beyonce's song, and two of us had

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heard of Beyonce, but two of us had not any idea about that song.

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Wyn says the club, founded in the 1950s,

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has 600 members and is like a big family.

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The council says no final decision has been made, but it is struggling

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with demand for sporting facilities. Now the ladies hope their fancy

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footwork may just catch Beyonce's attention.

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Don't mess with them! Two of them didn't know who Beyonce

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was. It didn't stop them.

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They were fantastic. What do you reckon? I think they are

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brilliant! I hope I can still do that in my 70s.

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Good luck to them. What have you got for us?

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Usain Bolt, who is racing in London this weekend. He would have the --

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retired by Sunday. Will we win the 100 metres? He has only run

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undetected seconds once this season, a couple of weeks ago in Monaco, the

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people are saying... Perhaps ex-con it a -- perhaps. He is confident as

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ever. It's not a big enough word to describe how he thinks of himself.

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One of sports biggest stars, Usain Bolt, as I said has issued

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a stark warning ahead of the final races of his career.

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The eight-time Olympic champion who will retire

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after the World Championships in London which begin this weekend.

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But he told the BBC that athletics "will die" if doping in the sport

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That is actually fairly low key for him.

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England goalkeeper Karen Bardsley will miss the rest of Women's Euro

:13:40.:13:42.

2017 after breaking her leg in Sunday's quarter-final win over

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Siobhan Chamberlain is now likely to step in to face the Netherlands

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There's another injury scare for Daniel Sturridge.

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The Liverpool striker scored, but then goes off injured in a pre

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season friendly against Bayern Munich in Germany.

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Manager Jurgen Klopp says he hopes it isn't serious.

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And Big Orange failed to become the first horse to win

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the Goodwood Cup three times in a row.

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Frankie Dettori's favourite lost out to Stradivarius on the opening

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Much more on Usain Bolt and the fantastic press conference that he

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held yesterday. We've got a treat on the sofa today.

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Lots of treats. I thought you meant chocolate, what you mean Adam Peaty.

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Both pretty sweet! And Alastair Cook. As well as talking about Usain

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Bolt. I thought you were going to say they

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were tasty. Only in private...

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This morning for some of us, a fine but chilly start. For others, a wet

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one. Rain coming in from the south-west accompanied by stronger

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winds, that is moving north eastwards. Concentrating on this

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area of pressure in the north. The wind is going to strengthen. Ahead

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of that, a lot of dry weather. Some heavy rain this morning across parts

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of Cornwall and Devon, South Wales as well. As that moves north, some

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fragmenting. Cloud moving ahead of that as well. Four Northwest

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England, a bright start. One or two showers. Rain close to Southern

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Ireland, Northern Ireland mostly dry. For most of Scotland, dry and

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sunny to start. Highlands temperatures have dipped. A chilly

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start. Across north-east England, a dry and bright start. That extends

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down across the Midlands, east Anglia, Essex and Kent. Temperatures

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around six degrees Celsius in London. These weather fronts,

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spreading out as they move north eastwards. Heavy and persistent rain

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across the Channel Islands and Southern counties. Pushing through

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Northern Ireland into Scotland, leaving behind that some showers.

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You will find it will be quite muggy in some parts, humid air across

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Northern Ireland and Wales. Rain continuing to journey, steadily

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moving in the direction of the North Sea. Picking up overnight across the

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south-east. Quite windy, but also quite humid. Not a cold night. Low

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temperatures, 12- 16 degrees. That is how the day starts tomorrow. The

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rain ensconced across the Northern Isles, behind that, rotating around

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this area of low pressure, showers. Some heavy and thundery, some hail

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across Northern Ireland and Scotland. Try a further south,

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temperatures roughly where they should be. High temperatures, 14- 22

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as they pushed further south. On Friday, a day of sunshine and

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showers. Most showers across Scotland and Northern Ireland. Some

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blown in across northern England, possibly into Wales. Driest

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conditions in the south. Saturday, the driest conditions in the south.

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Some showers in the breeze further north. Temperatures 14- 22. In the

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next couple of days, heading through Friday, Saturday and Sunday, looking

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pretty good weatherwise. Back to you in the studio.

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At last, it is looking better fantastic. -- better, fantastic.

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The Daily Mail drawing attention to some of the problems that they say

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British tourists are having. Queueing up for four hours at

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airports across the UK. They are saying that new restrictions, lack

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of staff and other problems are affecting travel. We will be talking

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about that with the Association of British travel agents later in the

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programme. Now, there is a row erupting between British Gas and the

:18:26.:18:30.

government over renewable subsidies. British Gas is claiming that this is

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going to rise because the government has put, because of a rise in

:18:37.:18:41.

electricity bills, we spoke to the head of that yesterday. They are

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blaming the government for the rise. She looks brilliant, doesn't she?

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She is saying that, to get more golfers into the game, young golfers

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should be allowed to wear what they are comfortable in. If that means it

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is short shorts or a deep neck on your T-shirt, that should be fine.

:19:07.:19:13.

This is in retaliation to be LPGA saying that they do not want women

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wearing shorts that shows a" bottom areas", nor do they want women

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wearing low-cut shirts. If you want to wear a short pair of shorts on a

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hot day, you should do it. Why does sport, why do women need to be over

:19:40.:19:46.

sexualised, wearing what ever pair of shorts and whatever colour

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T-shirt you want to wear should not make a difference. The attention

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should be on your game, not on what you are wearing. I get the point,

:19:55.:20:00.

this woman wants young people to be interested in sport, surely that's a

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good thing. I am going to call it 15- 15. The Daily Mirror, the

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biggest killer shark caught in the UK, but they did put it back. I

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don't know how big it is, but it looks quite big.

:20:22.:20:24.

I don't know how big it is, but it looks quite

:20:25.:20:28.

There is a growing shortfall in the number of beds needed to care

:20:29.:20:31.

for the elderly across the UK according to a BBC investigation.

:20:32.:20:34.

By the end of next year up to 3,000 people won't be able to find a place

:20:35.:20:39.

The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services is calling

:20:40.:20:43.

for more money to be spent on nurses and carers so people can receive

:20:44.:20:46.

This man visits his grandmother every day. She moved into the home

:20:47.:21:01.

care centre 12 months ago after her dementia deteriorated and she could

:21:02.:21:04.

not be looked over our time -- looked after. She is really looked

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after, they provide her activities and take her on trips, she recently

:21:11.:21:15.

went to Blackpool. We are really happy with that. But in June,

:21:16.:21:19.

Bradford Council decided to close the home. It was supposedly too

:21:20.:21:24.

expensive to maintain, they are now looking for another place for her to

:21:25.:21:28.

live. This is not an isolated case. One in 20 care home beds have closed

:21:29.:21:33.

in the UK in the past three years. In two months, work will be

:21:34.:21:42.

complete. This will be a television room. There will also be 70 bedrooms

:21:43.:21:47.

with en suites. Research suggests we are not building enough care homes

:21:48.:21:51.

like this, and we are facing a huge shortfall. The data suggest that by

:21:52.:21:58.

the end of next year, there will be a shortfall of 3000 beds. By 2026,

:21:59.:22:05.

they predict the industry could be 70,000 beds short. There are more

:22:06.:22:09.

people living for longer. Next day, there will be 2.5 million more

:22:10.:22:15.

people over 65. That means there will be anticipated demand for hair

:22:16.:22:25.

to make care homes. As capacity decreases, there will be more

:22:26.:22:28.

pressure on NHS beds as elderly people are admitted to hospital,

:22:29.:22:32.

because they can't cope at home. This company builds more care homes

:22:33.:22:38.

than any other provider. They add 600 beds per year. But it isn't

:22:39.:22:42.

enough. In the future, those that need help might not be able to get

:22:43.:22:48.

it. Potentially, the eligibility criteria will be waived, so

:22:49.:22:55.

increasingly, we will see only the most wealthy clients will meet the

:22:56.:23:00.

criteria in future. The government say they have given local

:23:01.:23:07.

authorities an extra ?2 billion to help, but the fear is that they will

:23:08.:23:12.

end up in a similar situation to this woman. This care home will

:23:13.:23:16.

close in the autumn, and they are struggling to find a new one. She is

:23:17.:23:20.

going to have to move. It is a question of, is it going to be my

:23:21.:23:23.

bedroom? Where am I going? You can hear more about this

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on "You and Yours" on Radio 4 And Samantha will join us

:23:31.:23:34.

to answer your questions about care home provision in

:23:35.:23:37.

just under an hour. Back in April, businesses in England

:23:38.:23:39.

and Wales faced what analysts called the largest changes to business

:23:40.:23:46.

rates in a generation. We reported that 25,000 small

:23:47.:23:51.

businesses were facing big hikes, 4 months on, Sean is in Didcot

:23:52.:23:54.

to find out how firms Is this an illustration of some of

:23:55.:24:10.

the Riblon -- problems? Yes, it closed down on Saturday, hence the

:24:11.:24:15.

bare shelves. Business rates are not the only reason they have closed

:24:16.:24:19.

down, they saw a big rise in April. A big change in valuations. Many

:24:20.:24:32.

companies saw a big rise. Around the back of these buildings, this is the

:24:33.:24:39.

old high Street, but around the back there is a new shopping centre.

:24:40.:24:44.

Yesterday, I got a two to find out how much had changed around the

:24:45.:24:49.

area. What has changed over the years? Ten years ago, this wasn't

:24:50.:24:59.

here. This is the developing area, this is the first phase of the new

:25:00.:25:03.

centre. We have a second phase being built now, we might see that a bit

:25:04.:25:09.

later. We have elicited from having lots of new businesses come in.

:25:10.:25:15.

Should we go and have a look at the independent stores on the

:25:16.:25:20.

traditional high-street? You know these places a bit better than I do.

:25:21.:25:30.

?300,000, when you look at that price, is that expensive? I assume

:25:31.:25:39.

that they have looked at the overall values of the buildings, residential

:25:40.:25:42.

or business, and they have adjusted the rates to that higher value. They

:25:43.:25:50.

feel they should be getting that business because they are on the

:25:51.:25:53.

high street. The area has changed? Yes, it used to be the busy shopping

:25:54.:25:59.

area, now it is all in the shopping centre. So, the calculation is being

:26:00.:26:04.

made as if this was a busy high street, but that was decades ago.

:26:05.:26:16.

Exactly. It was really interesting walking around this street. There

:26:17.:26:22.

are a lot of charity shops, takeaway is, very few independent businesses

:26:23.:26:29.

like there were many years ago. They are effectively acting as a council

:26:30.:26:37.

tax on businesses, they are based mainly on property value and the

:26:38.:26:42.

rent you can get for it. We are looking at what else has affected

:26:43.:26:47.

the businesses to get them to close down. We will be talking to business

:26:48.:26:49.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:26:50.:30:09.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:30:10.:30:15.

Now though it's back to Naga and Charlie.

:30:16.:30:17.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

:30:18.:30:21.

We'll have the latest news and sport in just a moment.

:30:22.:30:28.

Thousands of holidaymakers are being caught up in long delays

:30:29.:30:32.

We'll ask why some border and security checks are taking

:30:33.:30:36.

As a child he refused to sit in the bath and now at the age of 22

:30:37.:30:46.

Adam Peaty is here on our sofa after 8am.

:30:47.:30:57.

If you like singers to have soul, you'll

:30:58.:30:59.

the Queen of British blues, who'll also join us later.

:31:00.:31:04.

But now a summary of this morning's main news.

:31:05.:31:11.

The Duke of Edinburgh will carry out his final public engagement

:31:12.:31:14.

before he retires from royal duty this afternoon.

:31:15.:31:17.

Prince Philip, who'se 96 years old, will attend a parade

:31:18.:31:19.

In May it was announced he would be retiring after spending more

:31:20.:31:26.

than six decades supporting the Queen as well as attending

:31:27.:31:29.

events for his own charities and organisations.

:31:30.:31:32.

Here's more from our royal correspondent, Nicholas Witchell.

:31:33.:31:34.

We'll be speaking to the Royal Editor of the Sunday Express

:31:35.:31:40.

He has been a familiar and sometimes forthright feature of national life

:31:41.:31:43.

ever since his marriage to the then Princess Elizabeth in November 1947.

:31:44.:31:47.

And although his robust approach to people and events has sometimes

:31:48.:31:49.

got him into trouble, few can criticise his devotion

:31:50.:31:52.

to royal duty, most often in support of the Queen and also in pursuit

:31:53.:31:56.

of his own programme, with issues like the environment

:31:57.:32:00.

and the development of the awards programme for children,

:32:01.:32:02.

which he created and which is named after him.

:32:03.:32:08.

But this afternoon it will come to an end.

:32:09.:32:10.

The Duke, who turns 96 in June, will attend his last solo

:32:11.:32:14.

engagement, a parade by the Royal Marines

:32:15.:32:16.

on the forecourt of Buckingham Palace.

:32:17.:32:21.

It's not a complete retirement from public life,

:32:22.:32:23.

the Duke may still accompany the Queen to certain events,

:32:24.:32:26.

but after more than 22,000 solo engagements and 600

:32:27.:32:28.

solo overseas visits since the Queen came to the throne it marks

:32:29.:32:31.

a significant moment for the Duke and for the Queen.

:32:32.:32:35.

No longer will she have her husband at her side for most of the public

:32:36.:32:39.

appearances, other younger members of the Royal family

:32:40.:32:41.

will take his place, as the self-declared leading plaque

:32:42.:32:44.

unveiler in the world finally takes things a little easier.

:32:45.:32:55.

More than a million women in their early 60s are worse off

:32:56.:32:58.

financially as a result of the increase in the state pension

:32:59.:33:02.

According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, raising the age

:33:03.:33:17.

from 60 to 63 was saving the government ?5 billion a year

:33:18.:33:21.

but those affected were losing more than ?30

:33:22.:33:24.

The Department for Work and Pensions says the changes are fair

:33:25.:33:28.

Recent unrest in English and Welsh jails is causing "grave concern",

:33:29.:33:32.

according to the President of the Prison Governors Association.

:33:33.:33:35.

In an open letter to her organisation, Andrea Albutt said

:33:36.:33:37.

a decision to separate operational and policy decisions was "madness".

:33:38.:33:40.

The letter comes after two days of trouble at The Mount

:33:41.:33:43.

The Ministry of Justice said it was dealing with long-term

:33:44.:33:46.

America is not seeking to invade North Korea or oust its leader Kim

:33:47.:33:51.

That's according to its Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson.

:33:52.:33:54.

He was speaking after a senior Republican senator said

:33:55.:33:56.

President Trump considered going to war as an option.

:33:57.:33:58.

Last week North Korea carried out a second test of an intercontinental

:33:59.:34:02.

ballistic missile, in defiance of a United Nations ban.

:34:03.:34:09.

Police looking for the missing airman Corrie McKeague

:34:10.:34:11.

say they're examining whether material found

:34:12.:34:13.

at an incinerator plant in Ipswich is linked to him.

:34:14.:34:16.

The 23-year-old was last seen near a bin loading bay

:34:17.:34:18.

following a night out in Suffolk last September.

:34:19.:34:24.

Police ended a 20 week search of a nearby landfill

:34:25.:34:27.

Road safety campaigners say a government proposal to reduce air

:34:28.:34:32.

pollution by removing speed humps would be dangerous and ineffective.

:34:33.:34:39.

Humps cause cars to burn more fuel, as drivers accelerate

:34:40.:34:42.

Motoring groups have welcomed the proposal,

:34:43.:34:46.

but others say the move would endanger pedestrians

:34:47.:34:49.

and force more parents to drive their children to school.

:34:50.:34:51.

Former Spitfire pilot Ken Wilkinson has died,

:34:52.:34:53.

Ken was one of the last surviving Battle of Britain pilots

:34:54.:34:58.

who were known as 'the few', after Winston Churchill's famous

:34:59.:35:07.

phrase, that never "was so much owed by so many to so few".

:35:08.:35:10.

The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust said Ken would be "dearly" missed.

:35:11.:35:14.

He hit the headlines in 2015 when he jokingly told off

:35:15.:35:17.

Prince William for flying helicopters instead of planes.

:35:18.:35:23.

They may be God's representatives on earth, but it seems that even

:35:24.:35:26.

priests can struggle to get past the beady eye of a pub bouncer.

:35:27.:35:30.

This group of trainee clergymen were initially turned away

:35:31.:35:32.

from a bar in central Cardiff because the doorman assumed

:35:33.:35:35.

they were a stag party in fancy dress.

:35:36.:35:38.

A member of staff quickly realised the mistake and invited them

:35:39.:35:41.

The group are said to have seen the funny side.

:35:42.:35:47.

They had a good night out. Easy mistake to make, really.

:35:48.:36:01.

I've never seen as dad -- a stag party dressed up as priests.

:36:02.:36:06.

You haven't lived! Have you ever seen Father Ted? That's what that

:36:07.:36:14.

story reminds me of. Talking about Usain Bolt for possibly one of the

:36:15.:36:17.

last times in a competitive sense. He was speaking yesterday at head of

:36:18.:36:22.

his race in London this weekend. I mentioned earlier he will go in the

:36:23.:36:26.

100 metres and the relay as well. So we haven't quite seen the last of

:36:27.:36:31.

him. IT has been talking about in athletics and how that needs to be

:36:32.:36:35.

tackled more than anything else -- but he has been.

:36:36.:36:37.

The eight-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt has told the BBC that

:36:38.:36:40.

if athletes continue to use drugs the sport "will die."

:36:41.:36:43.

Bolt will run the final races of his career

:36:44.:36:46.

at the World Championships in London, which start this weekend.

:36:47.:36:49.

He says after hitting "rock bottom", athletics is now beginning to move

:36:50.:36:52.

We are going in the right direction now. I think we made changes and I

:36:53.:37:03.

said earlier that the sport hit rock bottom last season, so now it's

:37:04.:37:07.

moving forward and I think it's going in the right direction now. I

:37:08.:37:11.

think as long as athletes understand that if they keep this up the sport

:37:12.:37:16.

will die and then they won't have a job, so hopefully athletes

:37:17.:37:20.

understand that and will help the sport move forward.

:37:21.:37:22.

England goalkeeper Karen Bardsley will miss the rest of Women's Euro

:37:23.:37:25.

2017 after it's been revealed she broke her leg.

:37:26.:37:27.

The Manchester City keeper was injured in the second half

:37:28.:37:30.

of Sunday's quarter-final win over France but managed to walk

:37:31.:37:33.

Siobhan Chamberlain, who came on for Bardsley,

:37:34.:37:37.

is now likely to face the Netherlands in tomorrow night's

:37:38.:37:41.

The camp was a bit down, but from her point of view we will all

:37:42.:37:51.

rallying around her and support her. We know she did a fantastic job to

:37:52.:37:56.

get to this point, in the last tournament and the last three years,

:37:57.:38:01.

and she will play a big part of the field. She will be with us,

:38:02.:38:05.

supporting her teammates from the sidelines rather than the field.

:38:06.:38:06.

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp says he hopes Daniel Sturridge's thigh

:38:07.:38:09.

injury isn't serious, after the striker went off injured

:38:10.:38:11.

Sturridge scored his sides last goal in a 3-0 win

:38:12.:38:18.

against Bayern Munich in Germany, but he immediately pulled up

:38:19.:38:21.

and was subbed just before full time.

:38:22.:38:23.

Injuries have limited Sturridge to 46 league appearances in the past

:38:24.:38:26.

Ahead of England's fourth and final test against South Africa,

:38:27.:38:37.

Stuart Broad says the side are firmly focussed

:38:38.:38:40.

England go into the match, which starts on Friday

:38:41.:38:43.

at Old Trafford, with a 2-1 lead in the series.

:38:44.:38:46.

I certainly don't think we will be looking to go out

:38:47.:38:49.

We need to play the way that naturally we've got characters

:38:50.:38:55.

That is that sort of counter-attacking, free-flowing

:38:56.:38:58.

play, but using the experience and adaptability to be able

:38:59.:39:00.

So we will be going out to win this Test match,

:39:01.:39:07.

and I think that is when we play at our best, when we are looking

:39:08.:39:11.

Britain's Kyle Edmund is through to the second

:39:12.:39:15.

He beat Hyeon Chung of South Korea in straight sets.

:39:16.:39:19.

Heather Watson is out of the Women's Singles.

:39:20.:39:21.

She was beaten in straight sets by Patricia Maria Tig from Romania,

:39:22.:39:24.

who's ranked 134 in the world, 59 places below Watson.

:39:25.:39:27.

Tig took both sets on a tie-break, as Watson double-faulted

:39:28.:39:29.

He's been described as the finest racing driver of his generation.

:39:30.:39:39.

Robert Kubica was amongst the fastest in Formula 1

:39:40.:39:42.

until his arm was severely injured in a rally crash in 2011.

:39:43.:39:45.

He thought back then he'd never race at the top level again.

:39:46.:39:48.

Earlier this year he drove an old Formula 1 car.

:39:49.:39:52.

Later today, it's a big day for him, he'll get behind the wheel

:39:53.:39:56.

of a current Renault in a test in Hungary to see if he's

:39:57.:39:59.

got what it takes to return to the sport.

:40:00.:40:02.

I was hoping to get the chance to try the 2017 car and I think,

:40:03.:40:12.

you know, to have this opportunity in the official test,

:40:13.:40:17.

post the Hungarian Grand Prix, is something special and I really

:40:18.:40:20.

appreciate and, yeah, Renault gave me such

:40:21.:40:22.

Ellie Downie will miss October's World Gymnastics Championships

:40:23.:40:28.

in Canada to recover from ankle surgery.

:40:29.:40:30.

The 18-year-old injured her left ankle at the British Championships

:40:31.:40:32.

in March, but went on to win four medals in April's European

:40:33.:40:36.

Downie plans to return for next year's Commonwealth

:40:37.:40:40.

Her older sister Becky will also miss the Worlds,

:40:41.:40:44.

as she continues to recover from an elbow injury.

:40:45.:40:47.

Finally, the favourite and two time winner Big Orange couldn't make it

:40:48.:40:50.

No horse has managed to take the race for three consecutive years

:40:51.:40:55.

and Frankie Dettori's mount could only finish second behind

:40:56.:40:58.

the 6-1 shot Stradivarius on the feature race on day one

:40:59.:41:01.

The three year old is now second favourite for the final classic

:41:02.:41:07.

of the season, the St Leger, next month.

:41:08.:41:12.

Isn't it great to see Robert back in a car? An amazing achievement. And

:41:13.:41:18.

it is years since that accident, so it has taken a long time to recover

:41:19.:41:23.

and I think a lot of it was a mental recovery, as well as the physical.

:41:24.:41:28.

The confidence to get back in. I was mindful of... You are in the when

:41:29.:41:31.

Nicky louder had that terrible accident? It was a matter of weeks

:41:32.:41:38.

in those days. They are made of stern stuff, motor racing drivers.

:41:39.:41:44.

Yes, and Robert spoke very publicly about the challenge of sitting back

:41:45.:41:47.

in the car and the physical challenge of a Formula 1 car. Not an

:41:48.:41:52.

easy thing to do. The pressure on your whole body, your neck and arms,

:41:53.:41:56.

is huge, which will be interesting day.

:41:57.:41:56.

Thanks. Tightened security checks at some

:41:57.:41:58.

European airports means holidaymakers are waiting in queues

:41:59.:42:00.

for more than four hours. The measures were brought

:42:01.:42:05.

in after the Paris and Brussels But a trade body representing some

:42:06.:42:08.

of the UK's biggest airlines calls the situation "shameful",

:42:09.:42:12.

with reports that some passengers Sean Tipton is from the Association

:42:13.:42:14.

of British Travel Agents and joins Thanks we'll time this morning. We

:42:15.:42:27.

are hearing a lot of reports about considerable delays. What's

:42:28.:42:31.

happening? Back in April the European Union brought in new

:42:32.:42:34.

requirements for passport holders who aren't in the Schengen zone. It

:42:35.:42:38.

sounds technical but that means as and the Republic of Ireland and

:42:39.:42:41.

other countries around the world. They said that if you aren't in the

:42:42.:42:45.

Schengen zone, once you arrive at the airport your passport will be

:42:46.:42:49.

subject to extra checks. They will basically be taking details and they

:42:50.:42:54.

also do this on departure. So in the past they would check you had a

:42:55.:42:58.

valid passport, that it was you and leave you through. They say the new

:42:59.:43:03.

checks will be a couple of minutes, but in the past if it took just 15-

:43:04.:43:08.

20 seconds and it is now two minutes, all that is adding to the

:43:09.:43:12.

length of queues. At this time of year you often see long queues

:43:13.:43:16.

anyway, at the height of summer. You say it should only take a couple of

:43:17.:43:21.

extra minutes. Anecdotally and through evidence we've heard it is

:43:22.:43:24.

taking up to four hours in some places and they are looking at the

:43:25.:43:29.

booth is they would normally go through, the staffing levels haven't

:43:30.:43:34.

gone up. -- booths. As you say, already there is an upscale in the

:43:35.:43:40.

numbers anyway. A couple of minutes is just per passenger but all of

:43:41.:43:43.

that adds up. It is incredibly important. They obviously knew this

:43:44.:43:47.

extra security was coming in. The most annoying thing is when you

:43:48.:43:52.

arrive at the airport and we see a big queue and there are two empty

:43:53.:43:56.

booths. Sevigny to make sure they have additional staff to keep

:43:57.:44:00.

accused to a minimum. So that's pretty unlikely it will happen to

:44:01.:44:04.

those people. The issue is we are already busy, they need to have the

:44:05.:44:09.

staff in place and a lot of it is luck of the draw. If your flight

:44:10.:44:12.

arrives in conjunction with a few other flight you will see longer

:44:13.:44:16.

queues. If it arrives on its own the queues will be shorter. In Majorca,

:44:17.:44:22.

that's getting a lot of coverage, I've been through them many times

:44:23.:44:25.

and when you travel in July and August it is incredibly busy. So the

:44:26.:44:29.

main thing to bear in mind is you probably will end up queueing longer

:44:30.:44:33.

than in the past. That's annoying when you arrive, but you will be

:44:34.:44:38.

subject to these checks when you depart as well. They haven't

:44:39.:44:41.

previously when people didn't know they would end up queueing longer

:44:42.:44:49.

and they ended up missing flights. And at the airport make sure you

:44:50.:44:53.

have extra staff involved to make sure we keep the queues to a

:44:54.:44:57.

minimum. However annoying these situations are, ultimately people

:44:58.:45:01.

have to bear in mind that the only reason these delays are happening is

:45:02.:45:04.

because someone is trying to keep you safe? Exactly. This extra

:45:05.:45:08.

requirements were brought in by the EU after the Brussels and Paris

:45:09.:45:12.

attacks. They wanted to see how they could make sure these people

:45:13.:45:15.

couldn't get into the country. So it is annoying but there is a good

:45:16.:45:19.

reason for it. I want to stress that as long as you bear in mind that you

:45:20.:45:23.

will have to wait longer, being prepared for that is less

:45:24.:45:26.

frustrating and leave that extra time so you don't risk missing your

:45:27.:45:30.

flight. Our members who sell package holidays have been factoring the

:45:31.:45:33.

scene when taking people to the airports and they haven't reported

:45:34.:45:37.

any major problems. So it is annoying but as long as you know we

:45:38.:45:41.

will have to queue longer it won't massively inconvenienced you. Thank

:45:42.:45:42.

you. Here's Carol with a look

:45:43.:45:50.

at this morning's weather. It looks a bit wet outside. Indeed,

:45:51.:46:01.

we do have some rain. Spilling across the south-west. It be

:46:02.:46:05.

accompanied by strengthening winds, gales from the south-western coasts.

:46:06.:46:12.

This weather front coming in from the Atlantic, squeezing the I --

:46:13.:46:27.

isobars. That is making good progress in towards Northern

:46:28.:46:31.

Ireland. A wet start, heavy rain across Cornwall, Devon and South

:46:32.:46:35.

Wales. It is pushing north eastwards. They had of it, cloud

:46:36.:46:39.

building. One to showers across north-west England. Off to a bright

:46:40.:46:45.

start and they mostly dry one. You can see some showers ahead of the

:46:46.:46:49.

band of rain coming in across Northern Ireland. A lot of dry and

:46:50.:46:53.

bright weather. Clear skies across the Highlands. A cold but sunny

:46:54.:46:58.

start. Cloud as we come further south. In north-east England, a

:46:59.:47:04.

bright side with some sunny spells. Extending to the Midlands into east

:47:05.:47:07.

Anglia, the odd shower here and there. Showers building ahead of the

:47:08.:47:12.

band of rain. Through the day, the wind picking up. Along the coast,

:47:13.:47:17.

rain heavy and persistent. Parts of Wales with height. But it will

:47:18.:47:22.

eventually clearing from Northern Ireland and moving across northern

:47:23.:47:26.

England into central and southern Scotland. Quite a warm air mass at

:47:27.:47:31.

the moment. Feeling quite humid. Not feeling cold, that's for sure.

:47:32.:47:36.

Heading through the evening and overnight, rain continuing to push

:47:37.:47:41.

towards the North Sea. Moving into the Channel Islands and the

:47:42.:47:44.

south-east corner of England, then becoming ensconced in the north of

:47:45.:47:49.

Scotland with a platter of showers following behind. In this mild,

:47:50.:47:55.

humid air, not going to be a cold night. Starting on that note

:47:56.:47:59.

tomorrow. Rain across far north Scotland. A lot of showers rotating

:48:00.:48:04.

around this area of low pressure. Some across Northern Ireland

:48:05.:48:08.

Scotland be heavy, possibly some hail and thunder and lightning. Less

:48:09.:48:14.

likely to see them further south. If you are going to the country

:48:15.:48:19.

tomorrow, take your umbrella just in case. But you would be unlucky to

:48:20.:48:26.

catch one. But as 14- 22. On Friday, more showers, low pressure in the

:48:27.:48:31.

North Sea. Showers in Scotland and Northern Ireland, a few getting in

:48:32.:48:35.

across northern England. In the south and sunshine, 23 degrees. And

:48:36.:48:41.

that will feel quite pleasant! If you run a small business,

:48:42.:48:52.

you're probably all too aware that back in April business rates

:48:53.:48:55.

were revalued for the first time Many areas - especially

:48:56.:48:58.

in the south-east - saw a big jump in rates to reflect

:48:59.:49:01.

increasing property values. Sean is in Didcot to see how

:49:02.:49:04.

businesses there are coping. What's the picture? It is quite

:49:05.:49:13.

varied down the high street this morning in Didcot. It is effectively

:49:14.:49:21.

the old high Street. The shop we are in now, Saturday was its last day.

:49:22.:49:30.

That is why the shells are so bare. Some of the customers enjoyed their

:49:31.:49:38.

shelves so much, they are actually purchasing them. They have had to

:49:39.:49:42.

close down, partly because the change in business rates saw a big

:49:43.:49:48.

increase. Before we go on, those are effectively a council tax on

:49:49.:49:52.

businesses, business rates. This property has a rental value, and

:49:53.:49:58.

then a business tax is worked out based on that rental value. That was

:49:59.:50:02.

changed in April, affecting a lot of businesses. A lot of witnesses saw

:50:03.:50:10.

increases, but many more saw decreases. You had to close your

:50:11.:50:16.

shop down. How much of a change did you see when it came to the changing

:50:17.:50:21.

business rates? House went up sixfold. It was not the only reason

:50:22.:50:27.

we decided to close, but it was a factor. What scale are you talking

:50:28.:50:33.

about? Before and after? We were paying about ?350 per month, I know

:50:34.:50:41.

that is not a huge amount, but nevertheless, it was an increase we

:50:42.:50:45.

did not expect that the time. We had already lost our European retail

:50:46.:50:52.

rate relief, so it was just another cost on the building that pushed us

:50:53.:50:57.

over the edge. We had to re-evaluate what we were doing and whether or

:50:58.:51:02.

not we would survive in future. It is not the only thing, but it

:51:03.:51:08.

reflected the business rate change. You see a lot of charity shops on

:51:09.:51:12.

the high street. You said to me you had a pottery service out the back,

:51:13.:51:17.

it was a very community focused place. How did it feel having

:51:18.:51:21.

charity shops next door that were getting rate relief, but you

:51:22.:51:25.

provided community services and didn't get them? I love charity

:51:26.:51:31.

shops, I have worked for many of them in my lifetime. But it is very

:51:32.:51:35.

hard for an independent family business, even charity shops have

:51:36.:51:41.

huge head office is backing them up. They are able to shop fit with

:51:42.:51:47.

lovely fittings and fixtures when they get a property. We were always

:51:48.:51:55.

borrowing furniture, it was quite tough for any family business to get

:51:56.:51:59.

going. There is room for both of us on the high street, but we do feel

:52:00.:52:04.

that Independents do get the rough end of the stick. Having a quick

:52:05.:52:10.

chat with Dean. You keep an eye on the wider business rates market? Is

:52:11.:52:16.

this reflective of what's going on across the country? There are more

:52:17.:52:20.

than a million businesses seeing falling business rates. Yes, they

:52:21.:52:26.

are, but we are seeing seven years of growth here. The revaluation is

:52:27.:52:30.

meant to take base every five years. The government put that back to

:52:31.:52:35.

seven years. So you are seeing seven years of growth, all cumulating in

:52:36.:52:41.

an increase in this property. There can be relief given, but what you

:52:42.:52:50.

are seeing here is a rental value before April at ?50 per month, now

:52:51.:52:57.

we are faced with a bill of ?350 per month. So, a different valuation

:52:58.:53:02.

might have helped manage that. Through the morning, we will be

:53:03.:53:07.

looking at other shops in the high street. There is a broad mix of

:53:08.:53:11.

businesses, hairdressers and things like that. We will be looking at

:53:12.:53:15.

others this morning to see how they have been affected.

:53:16.:53:18.

We will be looking at others this morning to see how they have been

:53:19.:53:25.

Last night an opera company, which has received millions

:53:26.:53:28.

in funding from the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea,

:53:29.:53:30.

gave a special performance in aid of those affected

:53:31.:53:33.

It's been criticised as the symbol of a council which prioritised

:53:34.:53:37.

the needs of its richer residents over their poorer neighbours.

:53:38.:53:40.

Verdi's Requiem is often used in memoriam, and last night

:53:41.:53:53.

it was used for those who lost their lives and their homes

:53:54.:53:56.

a couple of miles up the road in Grenfell Tower.

:53:57.:54:05.

The disaster was more than geographically close to this

:54:06.:54:07.

opera company - it directly affected one of their own,

:54:08.:54:10.

a member of staff, Debbie, who lived on the 16th floor,

:54:11.:54:13.

It is difficult for me to talk about it because last time

:54:14.:54:22.

I saw her was sitting at this bench on the night of the fire.

:54:23.:54:26.

We were listening to the end of the opera we were performing that

:54:27.:54:29.

night and we say good night at the end of it,

:54:30.:54:32.

So, yes, that helps the feeling why we wanted to make such an impact,

:54:33.:54:37.

Grenfell is to the north of Kensington, the part

:54:38.:54:41.

of the borough the council has been accused of neglecting,

:54:42.:54:44.

all the while amassing a huge budget surplus.

:54:45.:54:46.

Until two years ago the opera was a council service,

:54:47.:54:49.

the same as any leisure facility, like a gym or swimming pool,

:54:50.:54:52.

and that has led to criticism from those who have questioned

:54:53.:54:55.

the priorities of those of the Royal Borough

:54:56.:54:57.

The philistine council would rather spend ?30 million on opera

:54:58.:55:01.

for a minority in Holland Park over 20 years -

:55:02.:55:04.

why is it relevant to the debate today?

:55:05.:55:06.

Kensington and Chelsea council has misspent government and council

:55:07.:55:08.

taxpayer funds on countless vanity projects and handouts,

:55:09.:55:11.

as we have heard, and underfunding essential services.

:55:12.:55:13.

But those who run the operating system that theirs is the most

:55:14.:55:32.

accessible opera company in the country and have long

:55:33.:55:34.

contributed to north Kensington through fundraising and direct

:55:35.:55:37.

When you put it as opera is not as important as homes and living

:55:38.:55:41.

standards in the borough, then that is not an argument

:55:42.:55:44.

I would ever have with you or anybody else.

:55:45.:55:47.

But they spend millions of lots of other services

:55:48.:55:49.

and I think it is the word opera that is clearly

:55:50.:55:52.

Perhaps if we were a straight theatre company it wouldn't

:55:53.:55:56.

But in this country opera generally has this stereotype that people

:55:57.:56:01.

Stereotype or not, last night's one-off performance was a sell-out

:56:02.:56:06.

with all proceeds going to help the victims of Grenfell Tower.

:56:07.:56:15.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:56:16.:59:38.

More in the way of sunny spells, fewer showers

:59:39.:59:40.

as we head into the weekend and temperatures staying at around

:59:41.:59:43.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:59:44.:59:46.

Now though it's back to Naga and Charlie.

:59:47.:59:48.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

:59:49.:00:08.

After 65 years of service, Prince Philip prepares to step back

:00:09.:00:12.

He'll meet Royal Marines in his final solo appearance before

:00:13.:00:15.

officially retiring from royal duties.

:00:16.:00:29.

Good morning, it's Wednesday the 2nd of August.

:00:30.:00:40.

Also coming up: Grave concern at the state of prisons in England

:00:41.:00:44.

Governers say the rise in violence and pressure

:00:45.:00:47.

Up to 3,000 elderly people won't be able to find a bed in a UK care home

:00:48.:00:54.

It has been four months since those business rate changes affected many

:00:55.:01:06.

businesses and shops like these. I am in Didcot, looking at how it has

:01:07.:01:09.

affected its high street. In sport, as Usain Bolt gets set

:01:10.:01:11.

to race for the final time. The eight time Olympic champion has

:01:12.:01:14.

told us the sport will die And how three Australian pensioners

:01:15.:01:17.

have chanelled their inner Beyonce in an attempt to save

:01:18.:01:32.

their local bowls club. Good morning. Some of us are

:01:33.:01:43.

starting on a dry and bright note. A couple of showers. However, we have

:01:44.:01:48.

a batch of rain coming in the west and south, which will spread

:01:49.:01:50.

north-eastwards through the date and the wind will strengthened. More

:01:51.:01:54.

details later. The Duke of Edinburgh

:01:55.:01:56.

will officially retire from royal duties today when he carries

:01:57.:02:00.

out his final public engagement. Prince Philip will be guest

:02:01.:02:03.

of honour at a parade by the Royal The Duke, who is 96,

:02:04.:02:06.

announced his retirement in May, after more than six decades

:02:07.:02:09.

of supporting the Queen, and attending events for his own

:02:10.:02:12.

charities and organisations. Here's our royal correspondent,

:02:13.:02:14.

Nicholas Witchell. He has been a familiar and sometimes

:02:15.:02:24.

forthright feature of national life ever since his marriage to the then

:02:25.:02:27.

Princess Elizabeth in November 1947. And although his robust approach

:02:28.:02:31.

to people and events has sometimes got him into trouble,

:02:32.:02:34.

few can criticise his devotion to royal duty, most often in support

:02:35.:02:37.

of the Queen and also in pursuit of his own programme,

:02:38.:02:40.

with issues like the environment and the development of the awards

:02:41.:02:43.

programme for children, which he created and

:02:44.:02:45.

which is named after him. But this afternoon it

:02:46.:02:51.

will come to an end. The Duke, who was 96 in June,

:02:52.:02:53.

will attend his last solo engagement, a parade

:02:54.:02:57.

by the Royal Marines on the forecourt

:02:58.:02:59.

of Buckingham Palace. It's not a complete

:03:00.:03:01.

retirement from public life, the Duke may still accompany

:03:02.:03:03.

the Queen to certain events, but after more than 22,000

:03:04.:03:14.

solo engagements and 600 solo overseas visits since the Queen

:03:15.:03:17.

came to the throne it marks a significant moment for the Duke

:03:18.:03:20.

and for the Queen. No longer will she have her husband

:03:21.:03:23.

at her side for most of the public appearances, other younger

:03:24.:03:27.

members of the Royal family will take his place,

:03:28.:03:29.

as the self-declared leading plaque unveiler in the world finally takes

:03:30.:03:31.

things a little easier. We can show you Buckingham Palace

:03:32.:03:43.

this morning, where the Duke will carry out his final engagement.

:03:44.:03:49.

Buckingham Palace have stressed that although his diary of engagements

:03:50.:03:54.

will come to an end, we may choose to attend certain events alongside

:03:55.:03:58.

the Queen from time to time. We will talk about what the future holds

:03:59.:04:01.

with a royal editor of the Sunday express NFU minutes. -- in a fume

:04:02.:04:04.

minutes. More than 1 million women

:04:05.:04:05.

in their early 60s are worse-off financially as a result of the rise

:04:06.:04:08.

in the state pension age. The Institute for Fiscal Studies

:04:09.:04:11.

found that the change, which saves the government

:04:12.:04:14.

?5 billion a year, sees those affected lose more

:04:15.:04:16.

than ?30 a week on average. Our personal finance correspondent

:04:17.:04:19.

Simon Gompertz reports. Waiting for your pension

:04:20.:04:22.

and struggling to get by. Shirley from Aberdeen is 61,

:04:23.:04:25.

not working because of ill-health and she won't qualify for the state

:04:26.:04:28.

pension until she's 66. I can't afford holidays,

:04:29.:04:34.

I've given up my car. But it's the only thing I've got

:04:35.:04:37.

really, not getting my pension, Pension ages used to be 60

:04:38.:04:43.

for women and 65 for men. By the end of the decade

:04:44.:05:01.

they'll be 66 for both, The result is more than a million

:05:02.:05:04.

women in their early 60s having weekly average incomes ?32 less

:05:05.:05:09.

than they would have been, the hit would be bigger

:05:10.:05:12.

but for the fact many are working. 18% are living in poverty,

:05:13.:05:15.

that's on under ?237 a week Perhaps the group who are worst off

:05:16.:05:18.

in this reform are the ones who want to work, perhaps retire

:05:19.:05:22.

a bit later, but can't do so because they can't find work

:05:23.:05:25.

or their health prevents them Women have been campaigning

:05:26.:05:28.

for compensation saying they weren't given enough warning of the pension

:05:29.:05:33.

changes which save ?5 But the government says they're fair

:05:34.:05:35.

and, because of rising life expectancy, women now get

:05:36.:05:39.

the state pension for longer Recent unrest in English and Welsh

:05:40.:05:42.

prisons is causing "grave concern", according to the President

:05:43.:05:50.

of the Prison Governors Association. In an open letter to her

:05:51.:05:52.

organisation, Andrea Albutt said a decision to separate operational

:05:53.:05:55.

and policy decisions in the prison The letter comes after two days

:05:56.:05:58.

of trouble at The Mount Prison in There have been days of disorder at

:05:59.:06:14.

prisons in Wiltshire and Hertfordshire, where riot trained

:06:15.:06:17.

officers were deployed to some due on unruly prisoners. This past year

:06:18.:06:23.

has brought an average of 28 takes a day on staff in prisons in England

:06:24.:06:28.

and Wales following a decline in a number of prison officers over the

:06:29.:06:32.

past few years and complaints over pay. Now the president of the prison

:06:33.:06:38.

governor's associations blaming the government for what she calls a

:06:39.:06:41.

crisis in many jails and unacceptable stress and anxiety

:06:42.:06:45.

amongst workers. In an open letter to prison governor is she says the

:06:46.:06:51.

state has failed to help them cope with population pressures in prison,

:06:52.:06:55.

having changed the way prisons have run for the worse. She says the

:06:56.:06:59.

government's decision taken early this year to separate operational

:07:00.:07:03.

control of the prison system from responsibility for policy was

:07:04.:07:07.

madness, leaving a gaping hole in operational intelligence. The

:07:08.:07:12.

Ministry of Justice says she recognises the long-standing

:07:13.:07:15.

challenges facing prisons and is recruiting more officers, but with

:07:16.:07:20.

only 75 more in place since last year she recruitment remains in a

:07:21.:07:21.

critical condition. Stronger powers to cut off

:07:22.:07:26.

funding for terrorists by freezing their assets

:07:27.:07:29.

and blocking access to bank accounts will form part

:07:30.:07:31.

of the Government's plans to introduce the UK's

:07:32.:07:33.

own post-Brexit sanctions regime. Our assistant political editor

:07:34.:07:37.

Norman Smith is in Westminster We know lots of things need

:07:38.:07:48.

unpicking in the run-up to Brexit and this is one of those? It is. At

:07:49.:07:53.

the moment are sanctions policy, like trade embargo is, as it

:07:54.:08:00.

freezes, travel bans, are all operated through the EU. So when we

:08:01.:08:04.

leave we will have to have our system and what the government is

:08:05.:08:08.

doing today is setting out the sort of us spoke British sanctions policy

:08:09.:08:14.

and part of that is to make it easier to freeze the assets of

:08:15.:08:17.

suspected terrorists, in other words to stop them selling their house or

:08:18.:08:23.

their car to raise funds for terrorism. So what they're doing is

:08:24.:08:27.

lowering the threshold at which the government can in those an asset

:08:28.:08:31.

freeze. At the moment they have to show not only that someone is a

:08:32.:08:37.

suspected terrorist, but in the future they will just have to show

:08:38.:08:41.

someone is a member of a terrorist organisation before they can freeze

:08:42.:08:46.

their assets. So the argument is it will actually make it easier to stop

:08:47.:08:50.

terrorist accessing funds. Thanks for the moment.

:08:51.:08:53.

America is not seeking to invade North Korea or oust its leader Kim

:08:54.:08:57.

That's according to its Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson.

:08:58.:09:01.

He was speaking after a senior Republican senator said

:09:02.:09:04.

that President Trump considered going to war with North Korea

:09:05.:09:06.

Last week, North Korea carried out a second test

:09:07.:09:15.

of an intercontinental ballistic missile, in defiance

:09:16.:09:17.

Road safety campaigners say a government proposal to reduce air

:09:18.:09:21.

pollution by removing speed humps would be dangerous and ineffective.

:09:22.:09:24.

Humps cause cars to burn more fuel as drivers accelerate

:09:25.:09:27.

Motoring groups have welcomed the proposal,

:09:28.:09:33.

but others say the move would endanger pedestrians and force

:09:34.:09:36.

more parents to drive their children to school.

:09:37.:09:38.

Former Spitfire pilot Ken Wilkinson has died,

:09:39.:09:40.

Ken was one of the last surviving Battle of Britain pilots

:09:41.:09:47.

who were known as The Few, after Winston Churchill's famous

:09:48.:09:55.

phrase, "never was so much owed by so many to so few".

:09:56.:09:59.

The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust said Ken

:10:00.:10:01.

He famously made headlines in 2015 when he jokingly told off

:10:02.:10:05.

Prince William for flying helicopters instead of planes.

:10:06.:10:09.

Three Australian women trying to save their bowls club

:10:10.:10:12.

from closure have become overnight internet stars,

:10:13.:10:13.

after posting a video of themselves performing a parody of the Beyonce

:10:14.:10:17.

The women, who are in their 70s and 80s, made the video

:10:18.:10:26.

after their local council said it wanted to bulldoze their bowls lawn

:10:27.:10:29.

A warning, there is some flash photography at the very start

:10:30.:10:33.

What does the queen of pop, Beyonce, and the genteel sport of lawn balls

:10:34.:10:42.

Meet Terri, Janine and Wyn, from Melbourne.

:10:43.:10:56.

Their parody of Beyonce's Single Ladies has been watched at least 1

:10:57.:10:59.

They are hoping the video will persuade the council to rethink

:11:00.:11:11.

plans to build an indoor stadium on this site.

:11:12.:11:15.

One of our younger members, Denise, she had obviously been in PR,

:11:16.:11:19.

just cottoned on to the song, Beyonce's song, and two of us had

:11:20.:11:22.

heard of Beyonce, but two of us had not any idea about that song.

:11:23.:11:39.

The council says no final decision has been made,

:11:40.:11:44.

but it is struggling with demand for sports facilities.

:11:45.:11:46.

Now the ladies hope their fancy footwork may just catch Beyonce's

:11:47.:11:49.

They were going for it. They did really well. We will have

:11:50.:12:04.

all the sport and the weather coming up later.

:12:05.:12:06.

After 65 years, 22,000 solo engagements and 600 overseas visits,

:12:07.:12:09.

the Duke of Edinburgh officially retires from public duty today.

:12:10.:12:13.

Let's speak now to Camilla Tominey, Royal Editor of the Sunday Express,

:12:14.:12:16.

We will see the Duke there later. Good to have you with us. What do

:12:17.:12:31.

you think people will be saying about the Duke and his role? He has

:12:32.:12:36.

been there all the time and he isn't disappearing completely from public

:12:37.:12:42.

life, is he? Exactly. What is interesting about what Buckingham

:12:43.:12:45.

Palace has been telling us is they haven't been using the word

:12:46.:12:48.

retirement. Only people like me and the media have. They are saying he

:12:49.:12:53.

is stepping down from the day-to-day unveilings old clerks and planting

:12:54.:12:58.

of trees, but behind palace gates he will be carrying on his

:12:59.:13:00.

administrative duties. It also stressed that he will be by the

:13:01.:13:06.

row's site for major occasions, so I can't imagine him being away from

:13:07.:13:12.

things like trooping the colour. -- the Queen's side. It feel seismic

:13:13.:13:19.

because he has been by the side of the Queen since the Coronation and

:13:20.:13:23.

we are used to them being together. On the other hand the notion of a

:13:24.:13:26.

96-year-old retiring is hardly a shock and I think most people out

:13:27.:13:30.

there will think it is probably about time stop white peers of

:13:31.:13:35.

course known to be a character, do have a twinkle in his eye. -- about

:13:36.:13:42.

time. He is of course known. He has also worked a lot on his own charity

:13:43.:13:47.

work? If you look at what he has done with the Duke of Edinburgh

:13:48.:13:51.

awards scheme, which is lovely when you see him handing out awards to

:13:52.:13:56.

young people, and there is in his 90s engaging with them and relating

:13:57.:14:01.

to them, that's what he's on jobs. Of course journalists like me always

:14:02.:14:07.

follow him around so when the Queen and Kym split at events you would

:14:08.:14:13.

always follow him in case he said something unusual. There have been

:14:14.:14:21.

an -- I'm seeing remarks, but they are of yesteryear. He puts people at

:14:22.:14:28.

ease because when he and the Queen need people publicly, they are often

:14:29.:14:31.

like rabbits in headlights. He will often make a funny joke. A couple of

:14:32.:14:36.

years ago he started having a go at this young chap because he had a

:14:37.:14:40.

beer. Shouldn't you have shaved this morning if you are going to meet Her

:14:41.:14:45.

Majesty! -- a beard. That's the kind of thing that makes people feel

:14:46.:14:50.

relaxed. Often his comments are focused on and what is often

:14:51.:14:56.

overlooked is his role in the royal family and his keenness to make sure

:14:57.:14:59.

the next generation comes through with their own personalities as

:15:00.:15:02.

well, at upholding certain traditions. Sisley. We describe her

:15:03.:15:08.

as the head of state -- precisely. He is the head of the family. We

:15:09.:15:13.

don't on his grandchildren and great chunk -- grandchildren. He has

:15:14.:15:20.

always spoken his mind. If he does go on engagement he has banter with

:15:21.:15:25.

the people his meeting and we instil that in his grandchildren and says

:15:26.:15:28.

you also need to have your own opinions. We are not a secret

:15:29.:15:32.

society, you need to get out there and engage with the people you meet.

:15:33.:15:36.

If you look at some of the stats that Buckingham Palace gave us,

:15:37.:15:40.

22,000 solo engagements, more than 5000 speeches, 6000 countries, he is

:15:41.:15:46.

as well travelled as his wife, which means he has built up a lot of

:15:47.:15:50.

knowledge and he has all met a lot of different people. As William and

:15:51.:15:54.

Harry have said in the past, there's not much he doesn't know little bit

:15:55.:15:58.

about and that's because he has been there and done it and got the

:15:59.:16:02.

T-shirt. We have just been showing pictures of Prince Philip unveilings

:16:03.:16:10.

many plaques. He once described himself as the world's most

:16:11.:16:19.

experienced plaque unveilings. He will now be with the Queen? I think

:16:20.:16:25.

we will see her having a number of different plus ones. Prince Charles,

:16:26.:16:31.

the Duke of York, printers and and also we should expect to see more of

:16:32.:16:35.

the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge -- Princess Anne. And Prince Harry. At

:16:36.:16:41.

the moment the young royals will have to come and do more. Prince

:16:42.:16:46.

George will start school in September as they are moving down.

:16:47.:16:51.

We are going to be seeing more engagements from them. So I think

:16:52.:16:55.

there will be a bit of a reordering of the family, just to support the

:16:56.:16:59.

Queen and make sure she has someone either side, albeit not her husband,

:17:00.:17:04.

but a member of the family to help with this engagements moving

:17:05.:17:05.

forward. Thank you very much. You're watching

:17:06.:17:10.

Breakfast from BBC News. The Duke of Edinburgh will take part

:17:11.:17:20.

in his final official It will be a parade

:17:21.:17:25.

at Buckingham Palace to mark the end Research suggests more

:17:26.:17:29.

than a million women in their early 60s are worse off as a result

:17:30.:17:33.

of the increase in the state pension Here's Carol with a look

:17:34.:17:37.

at this morning's weather. Take your umbrella this morning, we

:17:38.:17:56.

have got rain on the cards. It is also going to be windy. Low pressure

:17:57.:18:00.

driving the weather, you can see the range coming in with it. Moving in

:18:01.:18:05.

from the south-east. Isobars squeezing across the south-west, we

:18:06.:18:12.

have got later on. Rain cladding in across the Channel Islands,

:18:13.:18:16.

south-west England, heading into Northern Ireland. The heaviest rain

:18:17.:18:21.

in the and Southern counties of England and South Wales. As this

:18:22.:18:27.

moves north-east, starting to fragment. A fair bit of cloud ahead

:18:28.:18:31.

of it, and some showers. North-west England, a bright start to the day.

:18:32.:18:36.

One to showers. Some rain crossing Northern Ireland, a cool start

:18:37.:18:42.

across the Highlands. Temperatures currently six degrees. Sunshine,

:18:43.:18:48.

temperatures picking up quickly. Across north-east England, more

:18:49.:18:52.

cloud. A bright start with some sunny intervals. The odd shower at

:18:53.:19:00.

this stage in the day. Through the morning, watch how this way rain

:19:01.:19:08.

continues to drift. Moving north eastwards as a weaker feature

:19:09.:19:12.

fragmenting. In between, dry and brighter slot. Some sunshine at

:19:13.:19:16.

times. All south-west England, Wales and Ireland, a return to sunshine

:19:17.:19:22.

and showers are softening. Going to feel quite humid. Through the

:19:23.:19:26.

evening and overnight, rain continues to drift in the direction

:19:27.:19:33.

of the North Sea. Moving up across the south-east portion of England,

:19:34.:19:37.

becoming ensconced in Scotland and the northern islands. An array of

:19:38.:19:42.

showers coming in from the west. Humid air mass, not going to be a

:19:43.:19:47.

cold night. Temperatures about 13- 16 Celsius. Tomorrow, a band of rain

:19:48.:19:55.

left over from today. Low pressure brings showers, that is across

:19:56.:20:02.

Scotland, northern England and Northern Ireland. Some will be heavy

:20:03.:20:06.

with hail and thunder. The further south, the less likely you are to

:20:07.:20:12.

catch a shower. Thaisa to 22 degrees. In any sunshine, that will

:20:13.:20:17.

feel quite pleasant. Friday, low pressure moves over to the North

:20:18.:20:22.

Sea. Piling in showers across Scotland and Northern Ireland.

:20:23.:20:26.

Breeze across north-west England, a lot of dry weather around. Few

:20:27.:20:33.

showers the further south you travel, highs of 23 degrees.

:20:34.:20:36.

Few showers the further south you travel, highs of 23

:20:37.:20:41.

There is a growing shortfall in the number of beds needed to care

:20:42.:20:45.

for the elderly across the UK according to a BBC investigation.

:20:46.:20:47.

By the end of next year, up to 3,000 people won't be able

:20:48.:20:51.

to find a place in a care home.

:20:52.:20:53.

Sam visits his nan Jean in this care home every day.

:20:54.:21:02.

She moved into this home care centre 12 months ago after her dementia

:21:03.:21:11.

deteriorated and Sam could not look after her at home.

:21:12.:21:13.

She is really looked after, they provide her activities

:21:14.:21:16.

and take her on trips, she recently went to Blackpool.

:21:17.:21:20.

But in June, Bradford Council decided to close

:21:21.:21:25.

It was supposedly too expensive to maintain,

:21:26.:21:27.

they are now looking for another place for Jean to live.

:21:28.:21:30.

One in 20 care home beds have closed in the UK in the past three years.

:21:31.:21:47.

In 10 months' time, work will be complete.

:21:48.:21:49.

I am standing in what will be a television room.

:21:50.:21:52.

There will also be 70 bedrooms with en suites.

:21:53.:21:55.

Research for the BBC suggests we are not building enough care

:21:56.:21:58.

homes like this, and we are facing a huge shortfall.

:21:59.:22:00.

The data suggests that by the end of next year,

:22:01.:22:03.

there will be a shortfall of 3000 beds.

:22:04.:22:05.

By 2026, they predict the industry could be

:22:06.:22:08.

There are more people living for longer.

:22:09.:22:11.

Next decade, there will be 2.5 million more

:22:12.:22:14.

That means there will be anticipated demand for care homes.

:22:15.:22:28.

To fix that, we need to double the rates of delivery.

:22:29.:22:31.

As capacity decreases, there will be more

:22:32.:22:33.

pressure on NHS beds as elderly people are admitted to hospital

:22:34.:22:36.

This company builds more care homes than any other provider.

:22:37.:22:40.

Every year they add 600 beds per year.

:22:41.:22:43.

In the future, those that need help might not be able to get

:22:44.:22:47.

Potentially, the commissioners will raise eligibility criteria

:22:48.:23:02.

to justify entry to care homes, so increasingly, we will see only

:23:03.:23:16.

the most poorly off clients will meet the criteria in future.

:23:17.:23:19.

The government say they have given local

:23:20.:23:20.

authorities an extra ?2 billion to help, but the fear

:23:21.:23:23.

is that they will end up in a similar situation to Sam

:23:24.:23:26.

This care home will close in the autumn,

:23:27.:23:29.

and they are struggling to find a new one.

:23:30.:23:32.

It is a question of, is this going to be my

:23:33.:23:37.

It is a really sad situation, what will happen to people like them?

:23:38.:23:58.

Their worries that that care home is closing, and that is around the

:23:59.:24:03.

corner from where Sam lives. His worry is that the new care home

:24:04.:24:09.

could be a long way away. It is so important, continuity of people

:24:10.:24:13.

visiting and that sort of thing. Yes, for people with dementia,

:24:14.:24:16.

seeing new things constantly does really help them. It can also be

:24:17.:24:20.

incredibly disruptive for someone with dementia to be moved away from

:24:21.:24:26.

home. The numbers we are hearing, the number of people who could be

:24:27.:24:30.

affected and how that rises, how is being calculated? We have looked at

:24:31.:24:35.

population increases and expected growth over the age of 65 for the

:24:36.:24:41.

next ten years. We expect there will be 14,000 more people looking to be

:24:42.:24:46.

in a care home in the next ten years. We know that we build about

:24:47.:24:51.

7000 care homes every year, so we need to double the rate we are

:24:52.:24:56.

building those to meet demand. Who benefits from this and who needs to

:24:57.:25:02.

build this? There is pressure being put on the government for land, as

:25:03.:25:07.

well as contracts for private contractors? The government say they

:25:08.:25:13.

have allocated an extra ?2 billion to help pay for social care over the

:25:14.:25:23.

next few years. They also planned... They have introduced more measures,

:25:24.:25:29.

those we talked about later in the year. They also want people to

:25:30.:25:33.

remain at home, but they also want more funding to be put into nursing

:25:34.:25:39.

care so that people can be looked after at home.

:25:40.:25:41.

You can hear more about this on "You and Yours" on Radio 4

:25:42.:25:46.

And Samantha will join us to answer your questions about care

:25:47.:25:51.

I imagine this touches a lot of people at home.

:25:52.:25:59.

And Samantha will join us to answer your questions about care

:26:00.:26:03.

home provision in just under an hour.

:26:04.:26:05.

Still to come this morning, Sean is in Didcot to find out how businesses

:26:06.:26:17.

are coping with hikes in business rates. You could see we were talking

:26:18.:26:22.

a bit earlier about the new shopping centre that has been built. We were

:26:23.:26:27.

on the older high street. Now, we are a little bit closer to this new

:26:28.:26:33.

area. We are looking at how business rates and those changes that came in

:26:34.:26:38.

in April have affected these shops. We saw one shop struggling that had

:26:39.:26:43.

to close down. This hair and beauty shop is doing a bit better. Sally

:26:44.:26:49.

runs this place. What is your biggest challenge at the moment?

:26:50.:26:54.

Rates are the biggest issues. In what way? They have gone up

:26:55.:27:00.

considerably this year. I commissioned a review earlier this

:27:01.:27:04.

year, so I'm hoping appeal that. We will talk of it about that this

:27:05.:27:09.

morning. Lots of questions about is the Straits

:27:10.:30:30.

Now though it's back to Naga and Charlie.

:30:31.:30:33.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

:30:34.:30:43.

The main news: The Duke of Edinburgh will carry out his final public

:30:44.:30:47.

engagement before he retires from royal duty this afternoon.

:30:48.:30:57.

The 96-year-old will attend a parade by the Royal Marines.

:30:58.:31:01.

In May it was announced he would be retiring after spending more

:31:02.:31:04.

than six decades supporting the Queen as well as attending

:31:05.:31:07.

events for his own charities and organisations.

:31:08.:31:09.

He has attended more than 20,000 solo engagements over his time.

:31:10.:31:13.

More than a million women in their early 60s are worse off

:31:14.:31:17.

financially as a result of the increase in the state pension

:31:18.:31:20.

According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, raising the age

:31:21.:31:23.

from 60 to 63 was saving the government ?5 billion a year

:31:24.:31:26.

but those affected were losing more than ?30

:31:27.:31:28.

The Department for Work and Pensions says the changes are fair

:31:29.:31:32.

Recent unrest in English and Welsh jails is causing "grave concern",

:31:33.:31:38.

according to the President of the Prison Governors Association.

:31:39.:31:41.

In an open letter to her organisation, Andrea Albutt said

:31:42.:31:43.

a decision to separate operational and policy decisions was "madness".

:31:44.:31:46.

The letter comes after two days of trouble at The Mount

:31:47.:31:49.

The Ministry of Justice said it was dealing with long-term

:31:50.:31:52.

America is not seeking to invade North Korea or oust its leader Kim

:31:53.:32:02.

Stronger powers to block terrorist access to bank accounts will forge

:32:03.:32:10.

part of the government's plans to forge post Brexit sanctions. The UK

:32:11.:32:15.

currently backs EU sanction such as travel bans and asset freezes

:32:16.:32:20.

against regimes including Russia, North Korea, Iran and the Islamic

:32:21.:32:22.

State group and Al Qaeda. America is not seeking to invade

:32:23.:32:23.

North Korea or oust its leader Kim That's according to its Secretary

:32:24.:32:27.

of State, Rex Tillerson. He was speaking after a senior

:32:28.:32:30.

Republican senator said President Trump considered

:32:31.:32:32.

going to war as an option. Last week North Korea carried out

:32:33.:32:35.

a second test of an intercontinental ballistic missile, in defiance

:32:36.:32:38.

of a United Nations ban. Police looking for the missing

:32:39.:32:45.

airman Corrie McKeague say they're examining

:32:46.:32:47.

whether material found at an incinerator plant

:32:48.:32:48.

in Ipswich is linked to him. The 23-year-old was last seen

:32:49.:32:57.

near a bin loading bay following a night out

:32:58.:32:59.

in Suffolk last September. Police ended a 20 week search

:33:00.:33:01.

of a nearby landfill Road safety campaigners say

:33:02.:33:04.

a government proposal to reduce air pollution by removing speed humps

:33:05.:33:09.

would be dangerous and ineffective. Humps cause cars to burn more fuel,

:33:10.:33:14.

as drivers accelerate Motoring groups have

:33:15.:33:16.

welcomed the proposal, but others say the move

:33:17.:33:23.

would endanger pedestrians and force more parents

:33:24.:33:25.

to drive their children to school. Former Spitfire pilot

:33:26.:33:28.

Ken Wilkinson has died, Ken was one of the last surviving

:33:29.:33:30.

Battle of Britain pilots who were known as 'the few',

:33:31.:33:35.

after Winston Churchill's famous phrase, that never "was so much owed

:33:36.:33:38.

by so many to so few". The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust

:33:39.:33:42.

said Ken would be "dearly" missed. Well, because he doesn't

:33:43.:33:52.

fly proper aeroplanes, And I said to him, there's nothing

:33:53.:33:54.

like the sound of a Merlin A couple of other stories. It sounds

:33:55.:34:11.

like the beginning of a joke. Seven Priest walk into a bar. This group

:34:12.:34:17.

of trainee clergyman were originally turned away from a pub. The Dorman

:34:18.:34:23.

assumed they were a stag party in that address. -- doorman.

:34:24.:34:31.

A member of staff quickly realised the mistake and invited them

:34:32.:34:34.

The group are said to have seen the funny side.

:34:35.:34:38.

How do you prove you are Priest? Maybe some kind of ID. Sally might

:34:39.:34:46.

know. Ten hail Mary's? I don't know. I've got a shark attack story you

:34:47.:34:53.

might like. We all get a bit snappy when we aren't in the mood. Take a

:34:54.:34:57.

look at the moment when a great white shark took a bite out of a

:34:58.:35:06.

marine researcher's camera. Greg was diving off the coast of when this 12

:35:07.:35:11.

foot shark... Look at that!

:35:12.:35:19.

Took a bite. The key and the camera remained intact.

:35:20.:35:23.

He thought of just opened his doors to have a look inside and then

:35:24.:35:26.

backed off again. I think it romped on it. Here we go.

:35:27.:35:37.

-- chomped. Comes in, gave it a little nick.

:35:38.:35:45.

There we are. Anyway, everyone was fine.

:35:46.:35:47.

That's an image you really don't want imprinted on your brain. Great

:35:48.:35:52.

teeth. Talking about great, great smile.

:35:53.:36:01.

Fantastic smile. His smile has lit up the athletics world for years.

:36:02.:36:06.

Usain Bolt who we will see running in London in a few days. He has been

:36:07.:36:11.

reflecting on his career. He will raise the 100 metres and then go in

:36:12.:36:16.

the relay. He is in a serious mood. We normally see him chirpy and

:36:17.:36:21.

happy. He has told the BBC that if athletes continue to use drugs the

:36:22.:36:23.

sport will quite simply died. Bolt will run the final

:36:24.:36:26.

races of his career at the World Championships

:36:27.:36:29.

in London, which start this weekend. He says after hitting "rock bottom",

:36:30.:36:32.

athletics is now beginning to move We are going in the

:36:33.:36:35.

right direction now. I think we made changes and I said

:36:36.:36:37.

earlier that the sport hit rock bottom last season, so now it's

:36:38.:36:41.

moving forward and I think it's I think as long as athletes

:36:42.:36:44.

understand that if they keep this up the sport will die and then

:36:45.:36:50.

they won't have a job, understand that and will help

:36:51.:36:53.

the sport move forward. How fast can he run? Have to

:36:54.:37:08.

remember, his record was 9.85 seconds, setting 2009. -- set in.

:37:09.:37:17.

People say those kinds of times aren't likely now.

:37:18.:37:18.

There is a reason he is retiring. England goalkeeper Karen Bardsley

:37:19.:37:20.

will miss the rest of Women's Euro 2017 after it's been

:37:21.:37:23.

revealed she broke her leg. The Manchester City keeper

:37:24.:37:25.

was injured in the second half of Sunday's quarter-final win over

:37:26.:37:28.

France but managed to walk Siobhan Chamberlain,

:37:29.:37:30.

who came on for Bardsley, is now likely to face

:37:31.:37:33.

the Netherlands in tomorrow night's The camp was a bit down,

:37:34.:37:36.

but from KB's point of view we're all rallying around her

:37:37.:37:47.

and supporting her. We know she did a fantastic job

:37:48.:37:49.

to get to this point, in this tournament and

:37:50.:37:53.

the last three years, and she'll play a big

:37:54.:37:56.

part of the field. She'll be with us, supporting her

:37:57.:37:58.

teammates from the sidelines rather Not only did she walk off, but I

:37:59.:38:08.

didn't realise what happened. A fairly innocuous collision with a

:38:09.:38:17.

teammate. She carried on for a fair bit and then managed to walk.

:38:18.:38:21.

Obviously she was in significant pain.

:38:22.:38:22.

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp says he hopes Daniel Sturridge's thigh

:38:23.:38:25.

injury isn't serious, after the striker went off injured

:38:26.:38:27.

Sturridge scored his sides last goal in a 3-0 win

:38:28.:38:34.

against Bayern Munich in Germany, but he immediately pulled up

:38:35.:38:37.

and was subbed just before full time.

:38:38.:38:39.

Injuries have limited Sturridge to 46 league appearances in the past

:38:40.:38:42.

Daniel Sturridge himself is playing down the injury, saying he thinks he

:38:43.:38:53.

will be OK. Britain's Kyle Edmund

:38:54.:38:54.

is through to the second He beat Hyeon Chung

:38:55.:38:57.

of South Korea in straight sets. Heather Watson is out

:38:58.:39:01.

of the Women's Singles. She was beaten by Patricia

:39:02.:39:03.

Maria Tig from Romania, who's ranked 134 in the world,

:39:04.:39:05.

59 places below Watson. Tig took both sets on tie-breaks

:39:06.:39:08.

as Watson double-faulted Ahead of England's fourth and final

:39:09.:39:10.

test against South Africa, Stuart Broad says the side

:39:11.:39:18.

are firmly focussed England go into the match,

:39:19.:39:21.

which starts on Friday at Old Trafford, with a 2-1

:39:22.:39:24.

lead in the series. I certainly don't think

:39:25.:39:28.

we will be looking to go out We need to play the way that

:39:29.:39:33.

naturally we've got characters That is that sort of

:39:34.:39:37.

counter-attacking, free-flowing play, but using the experience

:39:38.:39:40.

and adaptability to be able So we will be going out

:39:41.:39:42.

to win this Test match, and I think that is when we play

:39:43.:39:47.

at our best, when we are looking Who would be the England captain? We

:39:48.:40:00.

can ask that question! We know someone who has done it and

:40:01.:40:04.

didn't want to do it any more. Alastair Cook will be coming in in

:40:05.:40:07.

about one hour. Talking about Friday and Old

:40:08.:40:11.

Trafford and how England will apparently go out and play to win.

:40:12.:40:14.

They don't want to settle for a draw.

:40:15.:40:16.

Lots of winners this morning. Let's mention the other one. Adam Peaty.

:40:17.:40:22.

He is coming on at 8:10am. Thank you.

:40:23.:40:25.

They are the bane of many driver's morning commute,

:40:26.:40:27.

particularly those with a bad back or in a car with poor suspension.

:40:28.:40:32.

But now the government is encouraging councils to rip up

:40:33.:40:35.

speed humps, not to make car journeys more comfortable

:40:36.:40:37.

The BBC's Environment and Energy Analyst Roger Harrabin

:40:38.:40:42.

Children are vulnerable to polluted air.

:40:43.:40:48.

It can harm the development of their lungs.

:40:49.:40:51.

But the government's plan to combat pollution includes

:40:52.:40:54.

paying councils to rip up speed humps installed to protect

:40:55.:40:56.

Cars will typically break as they reach a hump

:40:57.:41:02.

and then accelerate their way out of it, increasing pollution

:41:03.:41:05.

Safety campaigners say if councils remove humps without replacing them

:41:06.:41:09.

with something else to slow traffic it will simply increase

:41:10.:41:12.

Rachel is a safety campaigner based in Cardiff, where she walks

:41:13.:41:17.

Her organisation is writing to ministers, criticising

:41:18.:41:21.

It's a really weak plan based on really weak evidence.

:41:22.:41:30.

Getting rid of speed bumps and spending that money is not

:41:31.:41:33.

It's going to increase the likelihood of accidents in urban

:41:34.:41:38.

areas like this and the money could be spent elsewhere.

:41:39.:41:45.

The challenge over humps created confusion in Whitehall,

:41:46.:41:47.

with different departments saying they weren't responsible

:41:48.:41:49.

A government spokesman said later that he would ensure that any

:41:50.:41:53.

changes on roads didn't reduce safety.

:41:54.:42:05.

Joining us now is a professor from the centre of energy, environment

:42:06.:42:12.

and sustainability, at Sheffield university. Good morning. We saw the

:42:13.:42:18.

thinking, that it will prevent cars from exhilarating, helping the

:42:19.:42:23.

environment. -- accelerating. How quantifiable is that? The new

:42:24.:42:28.

recommendation to remove speed bumps is quite interesting. I think there

:42:29.:42:35.

are controversial views from different groups of stakeholders,

:42:36.:42:38.

whether this is from the government the spec if all from passengers, the

:42:39.:42:46.

drivers or from the wider public. The idea of removing speed bumps is

:42:47.:42:50.

just one of the very potential... One of the many measures to reduce

:42:51.:42:58.

air pollution. And air quality is one of the major concerns,

:42:59.:43:05.

especially in major cities. If we don't do anything as part of the

:43:06.:43:10.

solution mix to reduce our environmental emissions in this

:43:11.:43:18.

regard it will be very damaging. Part of the problem here is that you

:43:19.:43:22.

have the big picture and then the small picture. We heard from Rachel

:43:23.:43:26.

in Cardiff, who was walking her daughters to school. How does the

:43:27.:43:30.

science help us in relation to the argument she is talking about,

:43:31.:43:34.

saying the cars are speeding up and slowing down. At least they are

:43:35.:43:38.

slowing down and she's saying the air pollution wouldn't be any

:43:39.:43:42.

different if you kept it the way it was and changed it. It wouldn't make

:43:43.:43:46.

much difference. It wouldn't because there are bigger measures that will

:43:47.:43:49.

be more impactful in order to improve air quality and reduce

:43:50.:43:53.

emissions. For instance, we are improving driver behaviour in using

:43:54.:43:57.

other mechanisms such as Smart traffic light systems. And with the

:43:58.:44:03.

increased introduction, in terms of use of electric vehicles, in the

:44:04.:44:11.

future potentially autonomous vehicles, I think the entire

:44:12.:44:14.

transport system will become smarter and more intelligent and that will

:44:15.:44:18.

lead to automation in which congestion management can be done in

:44:19.:44:25.

a more efficient way, rather than simply using the old traditional

:44:26.:44:29.

speed humps. It does seem like this as more measures and if you say it

:44:30.:44:37.

won't make much difference, is council focusing on the wrong thing

:44:38.:44:41.

when they say they have a ?3 billion plan to tackle air pollution? It

:44:42.:44:44.

seems like the headlines are coming out without there being very

:44:45.:44:48.

effective. Is that fair? There are various ways of looking into it.

:44:49.:44:52.

Obviously we have to make sure that we make use of limited resources

:44:53.:44:56.

available and revive that the local authorities to manage air quality in

:44:57.:45:03.

certain cities and regions. As we know across the UK there are certain

:45:04.:45:06.

regions that are still underperforming in terms of air

:45:07.:45:10.

quality performance. I think it will be a mixture of solutions.

:45:11.:45:17.

One of the issues with individual streets, a car goes slower, if it is

:45:18.:45:27.

a diesel car, you will literally see the black smoke. They are trying to

:45:28.:45:33.

hurry through the speed bumps, it is very visible. People think, if they

:45:34.:45:39.

are standing next to it, they are going to breathe out in. Yes, diesel

:45:40.:45:45.

cars are very important contributor to this. Because of that, those key

:45:46.:45:56.

reasons, we are shifting to a more sustainable options such as an

:45:57.:45:59.

electric vehicle, that will be one of the most important moves in order

:46:00.:46:05.

to develop a much more environmental, sustainable future

:46:06.:46:11.

and a low carbon future. As part of this movement, I think policy change

:46:12.:46:17.

is key. This is one of the important drives from the government to meet

:46:18.:46:23.

the air quality targets, to reduce emissions as part of our commitment.

:46:24.:46:28.

I think there is plenty of research and innovation across the UK that

:46:29.:46:35.

drives that, investment in factories, autonomous vehicles and

:46:36.:46:38.

others, that will fit into this supply chain. A lot of the work we

:46:39.:46:44.

are doing already in preparation, in terms of how this initiative will

:46:45.:46:55.

move, and build towards that integrated future, that is what we

:46:56.:46:57.

are looking at. and build towards that integrated

:46:58.:46:59.

future, that is what we are looking You're watching

:47:00.:47:02.

Breakfast from BBC News. The Duke of Edinburgh will take part

:47:03.:47:04.

in his final official It will be a parade

:47:05.:47:08.

at Buckingham Palace to mark the end Research suggests more

:47:09.:47:12.

than a million women in their early 60s are worse off as a result

:47:13.:47:17.

of the increase in the state pension Here's Carol with a look

:47:18.:47:21.

at this morning's weather. A wet one for many of us? Yes, rain

:47:22.:47:40.

this morning and through the day for some of us. Also turning windy.

:47:41.:47:46.

Coastal gales across the south-west, rain piling in. It has been doing so

:47:47.:47:53.

as we go through the night. Continuing to drift north-east

:47:54.:48:00.

today. Quite a humid day. It is currently 18 degrees in Brighton, in

:48:01.:48:06.

Edinburgh, a bit colder at nine degrees. Even colder than that in

:48:07.:48:10.

the Highlands. This morning we have sunshine across the Highlands. A

:48:11.:48:16.

much drier day than yesterday. A big arc of rain continuing to fan out as

:48:17.:48:21.

it moves north-east. The heaviest rain across South Wales, south-west

:48:22.:48:27.

England and Wales. As it moves north, it tends to fragment. This

:48:28.:48:31.

afternoon across northern England, some rain. Not as heavy as in the

:48:32.:48:36.

south. In between, some bright spells and sunshine. South, lots of

:48:37.:48:43.

cloud, heavy and persistent rain. Right behind the rain, a lot of

:48:44.:48:47.

cloud. Starting to break up through the afternoon. Brightening up as

:48:48.:48:53.

well. Rain continuing across Wales through the day. And Northern

:48:54.:48:59.

Ireland, the main rain band pushing through. Behind that, sunshine and

:49:00.:49:06.

showers. It is the north that remains dry and sunny. Quite a humid

:49:07.:49:11.

feel wherever you are. Through this evening and overnight, here is our

:49:12.:49:18.

arc of rain. Becoming ensconced across northern Scotland and the

:49:19.:49:21.

Northern Isles. A plethora of showers coming in across the west.

:49:22.:49:29.

Not going to feel cold overnight. Lows of 11- 16. Tomorrow, rain

:49:30.:49:34.

across the Northern Isles. For the rest of us, showers rotating around

:49:35.:49:38.

this area of low pressure. Showers further south, but at times, bright

:49:39.:49:45.

and sunny. In the sunshine, feeling quite pleasant. Temperatures up to

:49:46.:49:53.

22 degrees. 90 degrees in Aberdeen and Glasgow. Friday, low pressure

:49:54.:49:59.

pushing into the North Sea. Showers coming around it across Scotland, a

:50:00.:50:04.

few of those getting into Northern Ireland and northern England. That

:50:05.:50:09.

aside, for most of the rest of England and Wales, a dry day. Some

:50:10.:50:13.

sunshine around, high temperatures up to 23 degrees. After the rain

:50:14.:50:19.

today, looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers. More sunshine,

:50:20.:50:25.

that is what I say. Sean is in Didcot to find out how

:50:26.:50:47.

businesses are coping with hikes in business

:50:48.:50:50.

Didcot saw one of the biggest rises in business rates. Lots of changes

:50:51.:51:00.

in Didcot, as they did in a lot of UK high streets. Yesterday I took a

:51:01.:51:07.

tour with one of the business leaders to see how much the area had

:51:08.:51:16.

changed. What has changed about Didcot over the years? Back ten

:51:17.:51:22.

years ago, this was not here. This is the developing area, the second

:51:23.:51:30.

phase is being built now. We have actually benefited from having lots

:51:31.:51:37.

of new businesses come in. Should we go and have a look at some of the

:51:38.:51:41.

independent businesses on the high street?

:51:42.:51:52.

You know these places a bit better than I do.

:51:53.:51:54.

?300,000, when you look at that price, is that expensive?

:51:55.:51:57.

I assume that they have looked at the overall

:51:58.:52:00.

values of the buildings, residential or business,

:52:01.:52:01.

and they have adjusted the rates to that higher value.

:52:02.:52:08.

They feel they should be getting that

:52:09.:52:09.

business because they are on the high street.

:52:10.:52:12.

Yes, it used to be the busy shopping area, now it is all in the shopping

:52:13.:52:17.

So, the calculation is being made as if this was a busy high street,

:52:18.:52:27.

Be busy area is over there now, there should be a readjustment for

:52:28.:52:43.

it. -- the. And we are in one of those busy areas now, in a salon. It

:52:44.:52:48.

is a business that has had to deal with a rise in business rates

:52:49.:52:55.

earlier in the year. Time to have a chat. You run this business, you are

:52:56.:53:00.

from the Federation of Small Businesses. Talking about your

:53:01.:53:11.

challenges, you are appealing your race, why? I discovered it had not

:53:12.:53:15.

been reviewed since April 2000 and eight. When I got the assessment, I

:53:16.:53:21.

discovered there were a number of things in the salon that were

:53:22.:53:25.

affecting the rate value. Things like uneven floors, damp in the

:53:26.:53:32.

walls, no natural light in half the salon. I knew I could get a

:53:33.:53:36.

reduction, but that has not been taken into consideration with what I

:53:37.:53:41.

am paying right now. How much of an effect is that having on your

:53:42.:53:53.

business? The way the salon is run, it is hard work. To try and get

:53:54.:53:58.

business in, the expenses going out as well, it is very challenging.

:53:59.:54:02.

That is a common problem. The fact that everything was valued in 2008,

:54:03.:54:07.

that is when the last values were done. How much of an effect is it

:54:08.:54:11.

having on businesses across the country? They are losing. They are

:54:12.:54:16.

having Starc arises because it has taken so long for the valuation.

:54:17.:54:21.

Those businesses are also seeing a reduction, because they are

:54:22.:54:25.

offkilter, they will only get 10% of their reduction. Nobody is winning.

:54:26.:54:31.

There are more than a million businesses who have seen a freeze or

:54:32.:54:35.

a fall in rates. It may not have been as much as they were hoping

:54:36.:54:39.

for, but that will theoretically, one day if busy -- be valuations

:54:40.:54:50.

keep going the way they are. Not necessarily. We are calling for a

:54:51.:54:55.

complete review of this tax, it is out of date, it does work. It stops

:54:56.:55:00.

businesses from borrowing and divesting themselves, it stops them

:55:01.:55:05.

from taking on apprentices. It is an interesting one. It is a tax that

:55:06.:55:10.

businesses have to pay, a bit like council tax. Do you think it needs

:55:11.:55:14.

to be changed fundamentally? Absolutely. I pay a lot of money,

:55:15.:55:21.

just short of ?900 per month, and what do I get for it? I don't even

:55:22.:55:27.

get my rubbish collected. There are a lot of things that affect the

:55:28.:55:32.

business. It is hard enough to run a business as it is. This is my third

:55:33.:55:46.

additional cost. One business closing down around the corner,

:55:47.:55:57.

several others are on the way out as well. She will be enjoying herself,

:55:58.:56:01.

and we will be talking more throughout the morning about how

:56:02.:56:08.

Didcot has changed. A lot of people have been getting in touch to say

:56:09.:56:11.

that similar things are happening around the country. You have said

:56:12.:56:16.

the classic wine, going anywhere nice on your holidays? It is not

:56:17.:56:20.

often I get to go, you see! Now, though, it's back

:56:21.:59:44.

to Naga and Charlie. Hello, this is Breakfast, with

:59:45.:59:47.

Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt. After 65 years of service,

:59:48.:00:24.

Prince Philip prepares to step Hello, this is Breakfast, with

:00:25.:00:27.

Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt. He'll meet Royal Marines

:00:28.:00:32.

in his final solo appearance before officially retiring

:00:33.:00:35.

from royal duties. Good morning.

:00:36.:00:46.

It's Wednesday, 2nd August. Grave concern

:00:47.:00:51.

at the state of prisons in England and Wales -

:00:52.:00:54.

governors say the rise in violence and pressure

:00:55.:00:57.

on staff is unacceptable. Up to 3,000 elderly people won't be

:00:58.:01:01.

able to find a bed in a UK care home It has been four months since the

:01:02.:01:18.

big business rate changes affected millions of businesses like that

:01:19.:01:22.

saloon here. I'm in Didcot where the rises have been particularly big

:01:23.:01:25.

looking at how it has affected its high street.

:01:26.:01:28.

In sport, as Usain Bolt gets set to race for the final time.

:01:29.:01:32.

The eight-time Olympic champion has told us the sport will die

:01:33.:01:35.

From being scared of the bath to a five-time world swimming champion.

:01:36.:01:49.

Good morning. For some of us it's a dry start to the day, even a bright

:01:50.:02:00.

one, but we have rain on the cards. It is already in the south and the

:02:01.:02:03.

west and it is moving north-east wards and the wind will pick up as

:02:04.:02:07.

well. I will have more details in 15 minutes.

:02:08.:02:09.

The Duke of Edinburgh will officially retire from royal

:02:10.:02:14.

duties today when he carries out his final public engagement.

:02:15.:02:16.

Prince Philip will be guest of honour at a parade

:02:17.:02:19.

The Duke, who is 96, announced that he was stepping away

:02:20.:02:27.

from the spotlight in May, after more than six decades

:02:28.:02:30.

of supporting the Queen, and attending events

:02:31.:02:32.

for his own charities and organisations.

:02:33.:02:33.

Here's more from our royal correspondent, Nicholas Witchell.

:02:34.:02:37.

He has been a familiar and sometimes forthright feature of national life

:02:38.:02:41.

ever since his marriage to the then Princess Elizabeth in November 1947

:02:42.:02:46.

and although his robust approach to people and events has sometimes

:02:47.:02:49.

got him into trouble, few can criticise his devotion

:02:50.:02:51.

to royal duty, most often in support of the Queen, but also

:02:52.:02:54.

in pursuit of his own separate programme, supporting issues

:02:55.:02:57.

like the environment and the development of the awards

:02:58.:03:00.

programme for young people which he created and

:03:01.:03:02.

But this afternoon it will come to an end.

:03:03.:03:12.

The Duke, who was 96 in June, will attend his last solo

:03:13.:03:14.

engagement, a parade by the Royal Marines on the

:03:15.:03:16.

It's not a complete retirement from public life.

:03:17.:03:19.

The Duke may still accompany the Queen to certain events,

:03:20.:03:22.

but after more than 22,000 solo engagements and 600 solo overseas

:03:23.:03:27.

visits since the Queen came to the throne, it does mark

:03:28.:03:31.

a significant moment both for the Duke and for the Queen.

:03:32.:03:33.

No longer will she have her husband at her side for most

:03:34.:03:36.

of her public appearances, other younger members

:03:37.:03:38.

of the Royal Family will take his place,

:03:39.:03:40.

as the self-declared leading plaque unveiler in the world finally takes

:03:41.:03:43.

That final event is taking place at Buckingham Palace. The Duke will

:03:44.:04:01.

carry out the final public engagement later on.

:04:02.:04:10.

We will speak to his friend of 40 years, the broadcaster.

:04:11.:04:13.

Recent unrest in English and Welsh jails is causing "grave concern",

:04:14.:04:20.

according to the Prison Governors Association.

:04:21.:04:22.

In an open letter, the President of the organisation said governors

:04:23.:04:24.

The letter comes after two days of unrest at The Mount

:04:25.:04:28.

There have been days of disorder at prisons Wiltshire

:04:29.:04:38.

and Hertfordshire where riot trained officers were deployed

:04:39.:04:40.

This past year has brought an average of 20 attacks a day

:04:41.:04:49.

on staff in prisons in England and Wales, following a decline

:04:50.:04:53.

in the number of prison officers over the past few years

:04:54.:04:56.

Now the President of Prison Governors' Association

:04:57.:05:01.

is publicly blaming the Government for what she calls a crisis in many

:05:02.:05:04.

jails and unacceptable stress and anxiety amongst workers.

:05:05.:05:10.

In an open letter to prison governors, Andrea Albutt says

:05:11.:05:14.

the State has failed to help them cope with population

:05:15.:05:17.

pressures in prison, having changed the way the prisons

:05:18.:05:19.

Ms Albutt says the Government's decision taken earlier this year

:05:20.:05:25.

to separate operational control of the prison system

:05:26.:05:30.

from responsibility for policy was madness, leaving a gaping hole

:05:31.:05:32.

The Ministry of Justice says it recognises the long-standing

:05:33.:05:39.

challenges facing prisons and that it's recruiting more officers.

:05:40.:05:42.

But with only 75 more in place since last year,

:05:43.:05:44.

Ms Albutt says recruitment remains in a critical condition.

:05:45.:05:56.

More than one million women in their early 60s are worse-off

:05:57.:05:59.

financially as a result of the rise in the state pension age.

:06:00.:06:02.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies found that the change,

:06:03.:06:04.

which saves the government ?5 billion a year, sees

:06:05.:06:07.

those affected lose more than ?30 a week on average.

:06:08.:06:11.

Our Personal Finance Correspondent, Simon Gompertz, reports.

:06:12.:06:13.

Waiting for your pension and struggling to get by.

:06:14.:06:17.

Shirley from Aberdeen is 61, not working because of ill-health

:06:18.:06:20.

and she won't qualify for the state pension until she's 66.

:06:21.:06:23.

But it's the only thing I've got really, not getting my pension,

:06:24.:06:36.

Pension ages used to be 60 for women and 65 for men.

:06:37.:06:45.

By the end of the decade they'll be 66 for both -

:06:46.:06:48.

The result is more than a million women in their early 60s having

:06:49.:06:53.

weekly average incomes ?32 less than they would have been,

:06:54.:06:56.

the hit would be bigger, but for the fact many are working.

:06:57.:06:59.

18% are living in poverty, that's on under ?237

:07:00.:07:02.

Perhaps the group who are worst off in this reform are the ones

:07:03.:07:10.

who want to work, perhaps retire a bit later, but are

:07:11.:07:13.

Perhaps they can't find work or their health prevents them

:07:14.:07:16.

Women have been campaigning for compensation saying they weren't

:07:17.:07:20.

given enough warning of the pension changes which save

:07:21.:07:22.

But the Government says they're fair and that

:07:23.:07:25.

because of rising life expectancy, women now retiring will get

:07:26.:07:27.

the state pension for longer than previous generations.

:07:28.:07:38.

Stronger powers to cut off funding for terrorists

:07:39.:07:41.

by freezing their assets and blocking access to bank

:07:42.:07:43.

accounts will form part of the Government's plans

:07:44.:07:46.

to introduce the UK's own post-Brexit sanctions regime.

:07:47.:07:48.

Our Assistant Political Editor Norman Smith is in Westminster

:07:49.:07:50.

Norman, the Government says this new legislation will make it easier

:07:51.:07:57.

Because at the moment our sanctions policy is operated through the EU

:07:58.:08:11.

and when we leave the EU, we have to have our own arrangement. So what

:08:12.:08:15.

the Government is doing today is setting out how a bespoke British

:08:16.:08:20.

sanctions policies, that's our trade embargoes, our asset freezes, our

:08:21.:08:24.

travel bans on suspected terrorists will operate and as part of that,

:08:25.:08:28.

they are saying they're going to make it easier to freeze the assets

:08:29.:08:32.

of suspected terrorists. That's to say to stop them selling their

:08:33.:08:37.

houses or cars to raise cash or to launder money by lowering the

:08:38.:08:42.

threshold at which their assets can be frozen because under the EU

:08:43.:08:46.

system you can only freeze the assets, not only if you suspect

:08:47.:08:49.

someone of being a terrorist, but also they have to be a threat to the

:08:50.:08:54.

public. Under the new system, the bespoke British system, all the

:08:55.:08:56.

Government will have to establish is that they believe someone may have

:08:57.:09:00.

links to a terrorist organisation and the argument is that will make

:09:01.:09:05.

it easier and swifter and simpler to freeze the money of suspected

:09:06.:09:08.

terrorists. OK. Norman, thank you very much for explaining that.

:09:09.:09:10.

Norman there from Westminster. America is not seeking

:09:11.:09:16.

to invade North Korea That's according to its Secretary

:09:17.:09:17.

of State, Rex Tillerson. He was speaking after a senior

:09:18.:09:21.

Republican senator said President Trump considered

:09:22.:09:23.

going to war as an option. Last week North Korea

:09:24.:09:25.

carried out a second test of an intercontinental

:09:26.:09:28.

ballistic missile in defiance Tightened security checks at some

:09:29.:09:30.

European airports means holidaymakers are waiting in queues

:09:31.:09:37.

for more than four hours. The measures were brought

:09:38.:09:40.

in after the Paris and But a trade body representing some

:09:41.:09:42.

of the UK's biggest airlines calls the situation "shameful",

:09:43.:09:50.

with reports that some passengers Earlier, the Association

:09:51.:09:52.

of British Travel Agents told us that airports need to make sure

:09:53.:09:55.

there are more staff in place. I mean obviously they knew this

:09:56.:10:06.

extra security was coming in. The most annoying thing I found when you

:10:07.:10:10.

arrive at an airport and there is a big queue and there are two empty

:10:11.:10:13.

booths. They need to make sure they have additional staff in place to

:10:14.:10:17.

keep the queues to a minimum. The four hours that we are hearing

:10:18.:10:19.

about, that's unlikely that's going to happen to most people. The issue

:10:20.:10:23.

we are already busy. They need to have the staff in place. A lot is

:10:24.:10:28.

the luck of the draw. If your flight arrives in conjunction with three or

:10:29.:10:31.

four other flights then you will see longer queues.

:10:32.:10:34.

Former Spitfire pilot Ken Wilkinson has died, he was 99.

:10:35.:10:37.

Ken was one of the last surviving Battle of Britain pilots

:10:38.:10:39.

who were known as "the few" after Winston Churchill's famous

:10:40.:10:42.

phrase that never "was so much owed by so many to so few."

:10:43.:10:45.

The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust said Ken would be "dearly" missed.

:10:46.:10:56.

Three Australian women trying to save their bowls club

:10:57.:11:03.

from closure have become overnight internet stars after posting

:11:04.:11:05.

a video of themselves performing a parody of the Beyonce song Single

:11:06.:11:08.

The women, who are in their 70s and 80s, made the video

:11:09.:11:13.

after their local council said it wanted to bulldoze their bowls

:11:14.:11:15.

A warning - there is some flash photography at the very start

:11:16.:11:20.

What does the queen of pop, Beyonce, and the genteel sport of lawn

:11:21.:11:31.

# All the bowling ladies. # All the bowling ladies. #

:11:32.:11:44.

Meet Terri, Janine and Wyn, from Melbourne.

:11:45.:11:46.

Their parody of Beyonce's Single Ladies has been watched at least

:11:47.:11:49.

# Is our life. # You can't be evicting me.

:11:50.:11:59.

They are hoping the video will persuade the council to rethink

:12:00.:12:02.

plans to build an indoor stadium on this site.

:12:03.:12:08.

One of our younger members, Denise, she'd obviously been in PR,

:12:09.:12:11.

just cottoned on to the song, Beyonce's song, and two of us

:12:12.:12:15.

had heard of Beyonce, but two of us had not any idea

:12:16.:12:18.

The council says no final decision has been made,

:12:19.:12:36.

but it is struggling with demand for sporting facilities.

:12:37.:12:39.

Now the ladies hope their fancy footwork may just catch

:12:40.:12:41.

They have got a lot of attention by doing that. They have got a load of

:12:42.:12:50.

energy! Sal has joined us. We have got a rather special guest coming

:12:51.:12:52.

in. As an Olympic gold medallist

:12:53.:12:55.

and five-time world champion, no one can deny that swimmer,

:12:56.:12:57.

Adam Peaty has reached But at last week's World

:12:58.:13:00.

Championships in Budapest he proved that when it comes

:13:01.:13:03.

to the breaststroke, We'll speak to Adam in a moment

:13:04.:13:05.

but first here is a reminder of just Double world champion at 20 years

:13:06.:13:21.

old. Hungry for more. He occupied himself with the pursuit of more

:13:22.:13:27.

precious metal. Adam Peaty takes Olympic gold. Fast forward to

:13:28.:13:34.

Budapest and Peaty arrives looking to make a bit of his own. He

:13:35.:13:39.

obliterated them. He is an absolute beast. World title number three. The

:13:40.:13:46.

best of the world by some distance. Distance and time. Not just the best

:13:47.:13:50.

in the world now, but the best in the world ever. 25.95. That's

:13:51.:14:05.

phenomenal. Utter dominance. Like a lion hunting its prey. Peaty is

:14:06.:14:11.

relentless. On to the next one and history becons. This is quite

:14:12.:14:16.

amazing. Absolutely brilliant breaststroke swimming. Now, gold

:14:17.:14:26.

number 15. The double, double, an outstanding achievement.

:14:27.:14:33.

Good morning, Adam. How are you? Great thank you. Sal is with us, of

:14:34.:14:37.

course, as well. What have you got in your hand? These are the gold

:14:38.:14:43.

medals from Budapest. This is what the relay got us, but hopefully

:14:44.:14:46.

we're going to catch the USA one day. Just explain, so you got your

:14:47.:14:50.

own two personal gold medals there. Yes. The silver, the one you're

:14:51.:14:55.

bitter about is because the Americans just pipped you? Yeah, I

:14:56.:15:03.

mean, we're such a young team and we are getting experience, Rio was an

:15:04.:15:07.

amazing experience and we're getting stronger and stronger each year. We

:15:08.:15:12.

are faster than Rio, but hopefully we will come together and get ahead

:15:13.:15:16.

in the zopb for Tokyo and try and take the USA down because they have

:15:17.:15:19.

never lost that race and that just makes me want to spoil the party. It

:15:20.:15:23.

is not that long ago that a swimmer, even the best swimmer could walk

:15:24.:15:26.

down the street in this country and probably nobody would notice. I bet

:15:27.:15:31.

you can't do that anymore? Yes. It has changed a lot. But I see that as

:15:32.:15:36.

a positive. My goal is to inspire as many people as possible, young and

:15:37.:15:40.

old. Getting people involved in sport because it has given me so

:15:41.:15:45.

much. Without sport I would be a different person and it's great to

:15:46.:15:50.

check my Twitter after the race and check Instagram and all the people

:15:51.:15:53.

saying thank you and I'm going swimming today or I'm going to work

:15:54.:16:00.

extra hard today. Without swimming, there would be rumours, you weren't

:16:01.:16:03.

a clean person because you were scared of taking a bath at one

:16:04.:16:07.

point. Do you want to tell us about that? My mum says, "Go down there

:16:08.:16:13.

with your friends and get the inflatables out. Ever since then, I

:16:14.:16:20.

was hooked. Wasn't it your brother's fault that you didn't like the bath?

:16:21.:16:25.

I used to think stuff came out of the drain. Like what? Like sharks

:16:26.:16:34.

and stuff. I think kids used to tell each other stories like that. If you

:16:35.:16:40.

are of a certain age or watched the movie Jaws. You got over it and

:16:41.:16:44.

swimming got you over that because even your mum couldn't take you

:16:45.:16:47.

swimming because she was worried about how much you cried.

:16:48.:16:58.

In overcame everything. Everything I did, still to this day, I make a

:16:59.:17:06.

decision whether it will make me faster or slower -- I overcame

:17:07.:17:12.

everything. One of the things that happens when you become world

:17:13.:17:15.

champion, we kind of getting our bit, but strangely we also get to

:17:16.:17:20.

know your family. A lot of your family become quite famous. Let's

:17:21.:17:25.

have a little look at an interview, and this was after the most recent

:17:26.:17:31.

exploits. COMMENTATOR: Good start from Peaty

:17:32.:17:35.

right in the centre, a very good start from him... Come on, you can

:17:36.:17:42.

do it! Absolutely fantastic. Adam Peaty takes Olympic gold... A

:17:43.:17:49.

wonderful world record. Yes! Oh, he has done it! This is really all

:17:50.:17:56.

about Adam Peaty. The world record is 57.1 three. -- 50 7.13. It meant

:17:57.:18:09.

the world to me. Amazing. Peaty in the centre, he is making the rest of

:18:10.:18:12.

the world beset their dreams, because their dreams are no longer

:18:13.:18:19.

quick enough. It is 20 years since I had flown, but it was well worth it.

:18:20.:18:25.

Something tells me you got a big hug from your nan at some point. Did you

:18:26.:18:30.

meet up immediately after the events? Yes, I caught her and my mum

:18:31.:18:38.

since the relay, but I have been quite busy. It is great obviously to

:18:39.:18:41.

have that support. Nothing like walking out when there are that many

:18:42.:18:50.

people, all cheering, but when you see the GB flag, my nan in a

:18:51.:18:53.

wheelchair, God bless her, and my mum next, it touched my heart. Who

:18:54.:19:03.

do you inherit the nan from? Is it your mum, your nan? -- would you

:19:04.:19:13.

inherit your grit from? You are very personable fellow, but very focused.

:19:14.:19:19.

Where is that from? A bit of both. My dad and my mum have always worked

:19:20.:19:22.

hard and I have always had that drive, in a sense. If I have taken

:19:23.:19:28.

my foot off Regasel I don't see the point. They were but 4am, taking me

:19:29.:19:34.

to the pool, and I thought I am not going to waste their time, with the

:19:35.:19:37.

opportunity they are giving me, I will train as hard as I can, so as

:19:38.:19:47.

fast as I can -- foot off the gas, then I don't see the point. We see

:19:48.:19:51.

the Olympic rings there but I want to speak about the word under those

:19:52.:19:56.

Olympic rings. Yes, not many people ask that actually. You see, we get

:19:57.:20:00.

in the special questions! LAUGHTER

:20:01.:20:04.

It is about balancing all areas of my life, at home, friends and

:20:05.:20:08.

family, financially, everything has to be OK, the training has to be

:20:09.:20:12.

perfect, and if all of those are in equilibria, nice and balanced, I can

:20:13.:20:23.

perform to the other strokes... I wouldn't be sitting here if I did

:20:24.:20:28.

other strokes! Is it really that extreme? You ever have a race

:20:29.:20:32.

against the guys with other strokes? Yes, all that annoy them. If I win

:20:33.:20:37.

it is game over. But there are dramatic differences. They can't

:20:38.:20:40.

compete in other... You can't see, this year, I will do... Yes, it is

:20:41.:20:46.

tough. I think to become an elite athlete in any kind of sport or

:20:47.:20:50.

stroke in this sense, 10,000 hours, a long time, so I think I would need

:20:51.:20:54.

to start doing that in backstroke to change. What are you doing for the

:20:55.:20:59.

rest of the day? Just chilling. Trying to spread the message,

:21:00.:21:02.

hopefully inspire a lot of people. Chilling. I love it! Good luck. We

:21:03.:21:08.

are all behind you. Thank you. See you later on. The time is 8:21am.

:21:09.:21:12.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:21:13.:21:18.

What is it like? Good morning. Some rain across the North and parts of

:21:19.:21:24.

the West and the South, all spreading north eastwards through

:21:25.:21:27.

the course of the day and also going to turn windy. Low pressure is

:21:28.:21:31.

driving our weather once again. We have an array of fronts squeezing in

:21:32.:21:35.

the eyes buyers, already some deals around the South Western approaches.

:21:36.:21:47.

-- some gales and an array of fronts squeezing in the isobars. You can

:21:48.:21:53.

see this fragmenting, I defined art currently but that will break up.

:21:54.:21:59.

Even though we will see rain crossing the UK, at times it will be

:22:00.:22:03.

brighter and we will see a little sunshine, but persisted across the

:22:04.:22:08.

south coast. Clearing through the south-west in the afternoon, leaving

:22:09.:22:10.

residual low cloud, but it will break up in the wind. But we hang on

:22:11.:22:14.

to the persistent rain across the southern counties, and from east

:22:15.:22:16.

Anglia into the Midlands, a lot of cloud, and we will start to see some

:22:17.:22:22.

showers with some patchy rain, again continuing to journey

:22:23.:22:24.

north-eastwards. We will have this across parts of North England, but

:22:25.:22:29.

equally some bright spells, rain in central and southern Scotland. For

:22:30.:22:33.

northern Scotland after a chilly start, sunny day, much drier than

:22:34.:22:38.

yesterday. For Northern Ireland, the rain pushes away, then a mixture of

:22:39.:22:43.

bright spells, sunshine and showers, and the rain on and off across Wales

:22:44.:22:48.

throughout the day. Wherever you are there it will feel quite humid. Then

:22:49.:22:53.

the rain picks up across the Channel Islands and the south-eastern

:22:54.:22:55.

quarter of England, and you can see that arc it into northern Scotland

:22:56.:23:00.

and the Northern Isles, then an array of showers across the West.

:23:01.:23:04.

Humid air mass across us at the moment so tonight it will not be

:23:05.:23:09.

cold. Temperatures are about 11-15. Tomorrow we start with rain across

:23:10.:23:13.

the Northern Isles, Centre of low pressure across Scotland, and all

:23:14.:23:16.

these showers rotating around it, coming in on the wind as well. Quite

:23:17.:23:20.

a breezy day tomorrow, but the further south you travel the drier

:23:21.:23:24.

and brighter it is likely to be, and if you are likely to get into any

:23:25.:23:29.

sunshine out of that breeze, 22 Celsius will feel quite pleasant.

:23:30.:23:33.

Friday, low-pressure anchored in the North Sea. Still showers around its

:23:34.:23:38.

Scotland, Northern Ireland, a few into Wales and the south-west on the

:23:39.:23:41.

breeze, but again the further east you travel warmer and drier and

:23:42.:23:46.

brighter it will be. After today, we back into sunshine and showers.

:23:47.:23:51.

STUDIO: Thank goodness, what I say! Thanks very much, Carol. The time is

:23:52.:23:56.

8:23am. An opera company which received

:23:57.:23:57.

millions of pounds in funding from Kensington and Chelsea council

:23:58.:23:59.

has staged a special performance in aid of those affected

:24:00.:24:02.

by the Grenfell Tower tragedy. One of its members died in the fire,

:24:03.:24:04.

but still the company has been the focus of some criticism -

:24:05.:24:07.

some believe that the council has prioritised the needs

:24:08.:24:10.

of its richer residents Verdi's Requiem

:24:11.:24:12.

is often used in memoriam. Last night in Holland Park

:24:13.:24:26.

it was used for those who lost their lives and their homes

:24:27.:24:28.

a couple of miles up The disaster was more

:24:29.:24:31.

than geographically close to this opera company -

:24:32.:24:40.

it directly affected one of their own, a member of staff,

:24:41.:24:42.

Debbie Lamprell, who lived on the 16th floor,

:24:43.:24:45.

missing presumed dead. It is difficult for me to talk

:24:46.:24:57.

about it really because the last time I saw her was sitting at this

:24:58.:25:00.

bench on the night of the fire. We were listening to the end

:25:01.:25:03.

of the opera we were performing that night and we said good night

:25:04.:25:06.

at the end of it, wasn't it So, yes, that helps the feeling why

:25:07.:25:10.

we wanted to make such an impact, Grenfell is to the north

:25:11.:25:14.

of Kensington, the part of the borough the council has been

:25:15.:25:18.

accused of neglecting, all the while amassing

:25:19.:25:20.

a large budget surplus. Until two years ago

:25:21.:25:22.

the opera in Holland Park was a council service,

:25:23.:25:24.

the same as any leisure facility, like a gym or swimming pool,

:25:25.:25:27.

and that has led to criticism from those who have questioned

:25:28.:25:29.

the priorities of those of the Royal Borough

:25:30.:25:32.

of Kensington and Chelsea. The philistine council would rather

:25:33.:25:34.

spend ?30 million on opera for a minority in Holland Park over

:25:35.:25:36.

20 years - why is this relevant Because Kensington and Chelsea

:25:37.:25:39.

Council has for many years misspent government and council

:25:40.:25:51.

taxpayer funds on countless vanity projects and handouts,

:25:52.:25:53.

as we have heard, while underfunding But those who run

:25:54.:25:56.

the operating system that theirs is the most accessible

:25:57.:26:02.

opera company in the country and have long contributed

:26:03.:26:05.

to North Kensington through fundraising and direct

:26:06.:26:07.

involvement with the community. When you pitch it as opera is not

:26:08.:26:11.

as important as homes and living standards in the borough,

:26:12.:26:14.

then that is not an argument I would But they spend millions

:26:15.:26:17.

of lots of other services and I think it is the word opera

:26:18.:26:21.

that is clearly Perhaps if we were a straight

:26:22.:26:23.

theatre company it wouldn't I don't know, but in this country

:26:24.:26:29.

opera generally has this stereotype Stereotype or not, last night's

:26:30.:26:33.

one-off performance was a sell-out, with all proceeds going to help

:26:34.:26:38.

the victims of Grenfell Tower. Now though it's back

:26:39.:26:51.

to Charlie and Naga. Hello, this is Breakfast

:26:52.:30:21.

with Naga Munchetty The Duke of Edinburgh will meet

:30:22.:30:22.

Royal Marines in his final public engagement before he retires

:30:23.:30:29.

from royal duties. The 96-year-old announced

:30:30.:30:32.

he was stepping away from the spotlight in May,

:30:33.:30:35.

after decades of supporting the Queen, as well as attending

:30:36.:30:37.

events for his own charities Prince Philip has completed 22,219

:30:38.:30:40.

solo engagements since 1952. Recent unrest in English and Welsh

:30:41.:30:51.

jails is causing "grave concern", according to the President

:30:52.:30:54.

of the Prison Governors' In an open letter to her

:30:55.:30:56.

organisation, Andrea Albutt said a decision to separate operational

:30:57.:31:01.

and policy decisions was "madness". The letter comes after two days

:31:02.:31:06.

of trouble at The Mount The Ministry of Justice said

:31:07.:31:09.

it was dealing with long-term More than one million

:31:10.:31:13.

women in their early 60s This as a result of the increase

:31:14.:31:17.

in the state pension age. The Institute for Fiscal Studies

:31:18.:31:21.

found that raising the age from 60 to 63 was saving the government

:31:22.:31:24.

?5 billion a year. however, those affected were losing

:31:25.:31:28.

more than ?30 a week on average. The Department for Work and Pensions

:31:29.:31:33.

says the changes are fair Tightened security checks at some

:31:34.:31:36.

European airports means holidaymakers are waiting in queues

:31:37.:31:47.

for more than four hours. The measures were brought

:31:48.:31:50.

in after the Paris and But a trade body representing some

:31:51.:31:52.

of the UK's biggest airlines calls the situation shameful,

:31:53.:31:57.

with reports that some passengers Earlier, the Association

:31:58.:31:59.

of British Travel Agents told us that airports need to make sure

:32:00.:32:04.

there are more staff in place. They knew this extra security was

:32:05.:32:16.

coming in. The most annoying thing I found personally is when you arrive

:32:17.:32:20.

at an airport and see a big queue and there I2 empty booths. They need

:32:21.:32:24.

to make sure they have additional staff in place to keep the keys to a

:32:25.:32:29.

minimum. I think four hours is unlikely to happen to most people.

:32:30.:32:34.

They are already busy and they need to have staff in place. It is the

:32:35.:32:39.

luck of the draw. If your flight arrives along with a few others, as

:32:40.:32:44.

often happens, you will see longer queues.

:32:45.:32:46.

America is not seeking to invade North Korea

:32:47.:32:48.

That's according to its Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson.

:32:49.:32:51.

He was speaking after a senior Republican senator said

:32:52.:32:54.

President Trump considered going to war as an option.

:32:55.:32:56.

Last week North Korea carried out a second test of an intercontinental

:32:57.:32:58.

ballistic missile in defiance of a United Nations ban.

:32:59.:33:03.

Road safety campaigners say a government proposal to reduce air

:33:04.:33:05.

pollution by removing speed humps would be dangerous and ineffective.

:33:06.:33:08.

Humps cause cars to burn more fuel as drivers accelerate

:33:09.:33:10.

Motoring groups have welcomed the proposal but others say the move

:33:11.:33:16.

would endanger pedestrians and force more parents to drive

:33:17.:33:19.

Former Spitfire pilot Ken Wilkinson has died, he was 99.

:33:20.:33:28.

Ken was one of the last surviving Battle of Britain pilots

:33:29.:33:31.

who were known as "the few" after Winston Churchill's famous

:33:32.:33:35.

phrase that "never was so much owed by so many to so few."

:33:36.:33:40.

The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust said Ken would be "dearly" missed.

:33:41.:33:51.

He does not fly proper aeroplanes, he flies choppers and there is

:33:52.:33:59.

nothing like the sound of a Merlin and he has not got that pleasure.

:34:00.:34:11.

Just one other story, a picture story.

:34:12.:34:15.

We can all get a bit snappy when we're not in the mood to be

:34:16.:34:18.

photographed, but take a look at the moment when a great white

:34:19.:34:21.

shark took a bite of a marine researcher's camera.

:34:22.:34:24.

Greg Skomal was diving off the coast of Massachusetts in the USA

:34:25.:34:28.

when his close encounter with the 12-foot shark took place.

:34:29.:34:30.

Despite the Jaws-style drama, both he and his camera remained intact.

:34:31.:34:37.

Carol will have the weather in about ten minutes' time,

:34:38.:34:50.

but also coming up on Breakfast this morning:

:34:51.:34:54.

to have soul, you'll want to hear from Elkie Brooks,

:34:55.:34:59.

the British Queen of Blues's latest work sees her teaming up

:35:00.:35:01.

with Canadian rocker, Bryan Adams.

:35:02.:35:02.

He's been friends with Prince Philip for more than 40 years.

:35:03.:35:05.

The writer and broadcaster, Gyles Brandreth will assess

:35:06.:35:07.

what he'll do now that he's retiring from royal duties.

:35:08.:35:12.

We'll discover how a portrait led author Shrabani Basu to uncover

:35:13.:35:15.

the hidden friendship of Queen Victoria and her Indian

:35:16.:35:17.

servant Abdul and how that led to Dame Judi Dench

:35:18.:35:19.

But first let's get the sport with Sally.

:35:20.:35:33.

Can I tell you about a chat I had with Adam Peaty. I wanted to ask him

:35:34.:35:47.

how you get to 6% body fat. He has 6-8000 calories in the winter. Do

:35:48.:35:54.

you know what they are made of? Chicken, fish, salads, vegetables.

:35:55.:35:59.

No eggs. Chicken, fish, salads and vegetables. Does that mean he can do

:36:00.:36:05.

something a bit different after today? No, I think he stays on that.

:36:06.:36:12.

Here is another man with dedication. I think Usain Bolt has a more

:36:13.:36:20.

laissez faire attitude. Adam was sitting there and he gleams and he

:36:21.:36:25.

delights in what he does. Usain Bolt also does that, he loves what he is

:36:26.:36:29.

doing and the enjoyment he gives to people. He thrives on it. How much

:36:30.:36:34.

will he miss it when he stops running competitively?

:36:35.:36:35.

The eight-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt has told the BBC that

:36:36.:36:41.

if athletes continue to use drugs the sport "will die."

:36:42.:36:43.

Bolt, who will run the final races of his career

:36:44.:36:46.

at the World Championships in London which start this weekend,

:36:47.:36:48.

says after hitting "rock bottom", athletics is now beginning

:36:49.:36:50.

We are going in the right direction now.

:36:51.:36:56.

I think we made changes and I said earlier that the sport hit rock

:36:57.:36:59.

bottom last season, so now it's moving forward and I think it's

:37:00.:37:02.

I think as long as athletes understand that if they keep this up

:37:03.:37:08.

the sport will die and then they won't have a job,

:37:09.:37:11.

so hopefully athletes understand that and will help

:37:12.:37:14.

England goalkeeper Karen Bardsley will miss the rest of Women's Euro

:37:15.:37:20.

2017 after it's been revealed she broke her leg.

:37:21.:37:23.

The Manchester City keeper was injured in the second half

:37:24.:37:25.

of Sunday's quarter-final win over France but managed

:37:26.:37:27.

Siobhan Chamberlain, who came on for Bardsley,

:37:28.:37:31.

is now likely to face the Netherlands in tomorrow

:37:32.:37:33.

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp says he hopes Daniel Sturridge's thigh

:37:34.:37:42.

injury isn't serious after the striker went off injured

:37:43.:37:44.

Sturridge scored his side's last goal in a 3-0 win

:37:45.:37:49.

against Bayern Munich in Germany but he immediately pulled up and was

:37:50.:37:52.

Injuries have limited Sturridge to 46 league appearances

:37:53.:37:59.

Britain's Kyle Edmund is through to the 2nd

:38:00.:38:05.

He beat Hyeon Chung of South Korea in straight sets.

:38:06.:38:09.

Heather Watson is out of the Women's Singles.

:38:10.:38:11.

She was beaten in straight sets by Patricia Maria Tig from Romania,

:38:12.:38:14.

who's ranked 134 in the world, 59 places below Watson.

:38:15.:38:17.

Tig took both sets on tie-breaks as Watson

:38:18.:38:19.

He's been described as the finest racing driver of his generation.

:38:20.:38:27.

The Polish driver Robert Kubica was amongst the fastest

:38:28.:38:29.

in Formula One until his arm was severely injured

:38:30.:38:32.

He thought he'd never race at the top level again.

:38:33.:38:38.

Earlier this year he drove an old Formula One car.

:38:39.:38:42.

Later today he'll get behind the wheel of a current Renault

:38:43.:38:44.

in a test in Hungary to see if he's got what it takes to

:38:45.:38:48.

I was hoping to get the chance to try the 2017 car and I think,

:38:49.:38:52.

you know, to have this opportunity in the official test,

:38:53.:38:55.

post the Hungarian Grand Prix, is something special and I really

:38:56.:38:58.

appreciate and, yeah, Renault gave me such

:38:59.:39:02.

England's cricketers play their fourth and final Test

:39:03.:39:12.

against South Africa on Friday and with the series poised at 2-1

:39:13.:39:15.

But the former captain Alastair Cook, who remains part

:39:16.:39:19.

of the team, will be aiming much higher than that.

:39:20.:39:22.

A draw will not be enough for you, will it? We hope not. "- one up is

:39:23.:39:36.

nice, you cannot lose the series. Our side over the last 18 months has

:39:37.:39:40.

struggled to back-up a good performance with another good

:39:41.:39:44.

performance. Consistency is something we need to go up the

:39:45.:39:49.

rankings and this is a good test for us under Joe Root. How is it not

:39:50.:39:55.

being captain? It is a bit different. The break helped from the

:39:56.:40:01.

end of India when I announced I was not the captain up until the first

:40:02.:40:05.

test match at Lord's. It gave me time to get my head around it and it

:40:06.:40:10.

gave Joe time to fix his plans and get his ideas in order. It was not

:40:11.:40:20.

quite strange. There was a test match two weeks after, that would

:40:21.:40:25.

have been strange. There is a little bit less stress being back in the

:40:26.:40:30.

ranks. Did you give him any advice? It would have been wrong if I did

:40:31.:40:35.

not. But he is a Yorkshireman and he is strong willed and he knows what

:40:36.:40:39.

he is doing. A few ideas along the way is important because it is such

:40:40.:40:43.

a big job and nothing can prepare you for it. The job is so different.

:40:44.:40:52.

I am always at the end of the phone for him and he listens to my ideas

:40:53.:40:57.

and it is good. We were talking to Adam Peaty. You were saying Usain

:40:58.:41:03.

Bolt and Adam Peaty, there is something about them, they exude

:41:04.:41:06.

delight in what they are doing, the way they go about their business. He

:41:07.:41:11.

has that thing about him where he loves what he is capable of doing

:41:12.:41:15.

and the effect it has on other people. Seeing some of the pictures

:41:16.:41:19.

we have seen from the cricket you get a bit of a sense of the

:41:20.:41:23.

atmosphere growing within the group of players. Is there something

:41:24.:41:29.

different happening at the moment? I cannot speak about swimming, but it

:41:30.:41:32.

must be nice going into a race knowing you are going to win it

:41:33.:41:37.

before you start. You still have to do it. When you are so much faster

:41:38.:41:43.

than everyone else, it must be a great thing. Pressure is the thing.

:41:44.:41:47.

Pressure performing as a favourite constantly is tough in any

:41:48.:41:52.

profession. The one thing is this England side has been together quite

:41:53.:41:59.

a long time. Ben Stokes, Moeen Ali, they have played 30 odd test matches

:42:00.:42:05.

as a group together. If anyone watches our football in the morning,

:42:06.:42:08.

they will have seen our banter going. I scored a few hat tricks

:42:09.:42:14.

before in the football, but I have never got a cricket happy, that is

:42:15.:42:18.

what mowing Ali said. So it is brilliant. It is a good team to be

:42:19.:42:24.

part of and it does help when you are winning. Trent Bridge was a

:42:25.:42:28.

great win and there were smiles on your faces if you play like that.

:42:29.:42:32.

How much were you heard by the criticism in the press? If I am

:42:33.:42:37.

brutally honest, that is what happens when you play badly. If you

:42:38.:42:44.

play well, it is brilliant. We have all been around long enough to know

:42:45.:42:48.

that we will get criticism. What hurt us more was the way we played.

:42:49.:42:54.

In sport if you play badly, you accept the criticism, but to play as

:42:55.:42:58.

badly as we did and nacho anything in that last innings to get bowled

:42:59.:43:03.

out like we did at Trent Bridge as a batting group really hurt. To

:43:04.:43:08.

respond like we did at the Oval when the conditions were a lot tougher

:43:09.:43:14.

and to bat like we did, Ben Stokes' 100 was a really good 100. But we

:43:15.:43:19.

were all hurt by our own performance. Is there a kind of

:43:20.:43:25.

policy? You said it is great when you are winning, life is good and

:43:26.:43:30.

you get on well. When you do play badly and there is criticism, do you

:43:31.:43:34.

feel a responsibility amongst yourselves to cheer yourself up or

:43:35.:43:39.

do you retreat into yourselves? We do not retreat into our shells. We

:43:40.:43:45.

do not get too excited when we win and we laugh it off a little bit

:43:46.:43:49.

when we lose. That is quite a good way of dealing with it. The dressing

:43:50.:43:53.

room after Trent Bridge was a sad place for a bit. But it was like,

:43:54.:43:59.

how are we going to improve it? If you mope around, it will not help.

:44:00.:44:06.

You do not have to show everyone how much it is hurting, certainly not on

:44:07.:44:11.

TV. If you walk around looking sad, it is false. It hurts more inside.

:44:12.:44:17.

Leaving Trent Bridge we were embarrassed as a side. We left the

:44:18.:44:20.

dressing room saying, that was not good enough. In one way I do not

:44:21.:44:26.

want to use the word week, but it was a weak batting performance. Then

:44:27.:44:30.

to show the character we did at the Oval was really pleasing in tough

:44:31.:44:35.

batting conditions. It would have given Joe Root a lot of confidence

:44:36.:44:40.

as a captain. What he spoke about we put into action. Does a cricketer's

:44:41.:44:48.

diet match up to a swimmer's diet? Chicken, fish, vegetables and salad?

:44:49.:44:55.

No. I wish I could eat as much as he does!

:44:56.:44:59.

A new study has revealed a large and growing shortfall in the number

:45:00.:45:02.

of beds needed to care for the elderly across the UK.

:45:03.:45:10.

Add to 3000 people won't be able to find a place in a care home by the

:45:11.:45:14.

end of next year. Samantha Fenwick from Radio 4's

:45:15.:45:16.

You and Yours programme has been Sam visits his nan Jean in this

:45:17.:45:18.

care home every day. She moved into this home care centre

:45:19.:45:23.

12 months ago after her dementia deteriorated and Sam could not

:45:24.:45:26.

look after her at home. She is really looked after,

:45:27.:45:31.

they provide her activities and take her on trips,

:45:32.:45:35.

she recently went to Blackpool. But in June, Bradford

:45:36.:45:38.

Council decided to close It was supposedly too

:45:39.:45:42.

expensive to maintain, they are now looking for another

:45:43.:45:46.

place for Jean to live. One in 20 care home beds have closed

:45:47.:45:49.

in the UK in the past three years. In ten months' time,

:45:50.:45:58.

work will be complete. I am standing in what will

:45:59.:46:01.

be a television room. There will also be 70

:46:02.:46:04.

bedrooms with en suites. But research for the BBC suggests

:46:05.:46:11.

we are not building enough care homes like this, and we are

:46:12.:46:14.

facing a huge shortfall. The data from JLL suggests that

:46:15.:46:21.

by the end of next year, there will be a shortfall

:46:22.:46:24.

of 3000 beds. By 2026, they predict

:46:25.:46:26.

the industry could be There are more people

:46:27.:46:28.

living for longer. Next decade, there will

:46:29.:46:31.

be 2.5 million more That means there will be anticipated

:46:32.:46:33.

demand for care homes. To fix that, we need to double

:46:34.:46:39.

the rates of delivery. The worry is, as capacity

:46:40.:46:48.

decreases, there will be more pressure on NHS beds as elderly

:46:49.:46:50.

people are admitted to hospital This company builds more care homes

:46:51.:46:53.

than any other provider. Every year they add

:46:54.:46:59.

600 beds per year. In the future, those that need help

:47:00.:47:04.

might not be able to get Potentially, the commissioners

:47:05.:47:08.

will raise eligibility criteria to justify entry to care homes,

:47:09.:47:14.

so increasingly, we will see only the most dependent clients will meet

:47:15.:47:24.

the criteria in future. The government say

:47:25.:47:26.

they have given local authorities an extra ?2 billion

:47:27.:47:28.

to help, but the fear for families is that they will end

:47:29.:47:33.

up in a similar situation to Sam This care home will

:47:34.:47:36.

close in the autumn, and they are struggling

:47:37.:47:39.

to find a new one. She has been crying in her bed,

:47:40.:47:46.

knowing that she is going to have to move.

:47:47.:47:50.

It is a question of, is this going to be my

:47:51.:47:53.

It is a really sad situation, what will happen to people

:47:54.:47:59.

It is very touching, that was gene we saw with her grandson, Sam. It

:48:00.:48:08.

really brings it home, they are asking those questions and will be

:48:09.:48:15.

increasingly knowing over time there will be a lack of places. They are

:48:16.:48:21.

legally bound to find you a care home place. Sam is worried that his

:48:22.:48:25.

man may find another place but it will be a long way from where they

:48:26.:48:28.

live and he is worried they cannot visit every day as he may have a 40

:48:29.:48:34.

minute journey. For someone living with dementia, as Jean is, that is

:48:35.:48:38.

quite concerning for the family as that kind of disruption and lack of

:48:39.:48:44.

things happening all the time will really affect her state. We spoke to

:48:45.:48:49.

you about one hour ago, we asked viewers to get in touch. We had a

:48:50.:48:54.

lot of people getting in touch. Gary says that his mother is currently in

:48:55.:48:58.

care due to dementia. Families funding it privately after selling

:48:59.:49:04.

their home due to the poor quality of local authority care homes, in

:49:05.:49:08.

his opinion. He says that she is in a superb home but the money will run

:49:09.:49:13.

out. Everybody has that in mind. They have set aside a huge amount of

:49:14.:49:17.

the proceeds from selling their home but by the end of 2018 it will be

:49:18.:49:24.

gone, what happens then? If you have assets of lower than ?23,000,

:49:25.:49:29.

including your house and any other assets, you will be paid for by the

:49:30.:49:33.

local authority but what may happen to Gary is that she will become

:49:34.:49:37.

state funded, staying in the same home she is in. The local authority

:49:38.:49:42.

will pick up the fee and the family may be asked to tack up anything

:49:43.:49:47.

that will be paid for for her. Samantha, thank you. There is more

:49:48.:49:49.

on your investigation. Here's Carol with a look

:49:50.:49:55.

at this morning's weather. Rain in the forecast but some sun as

:49:56.:50:03.

well? Top of the class! That's right.

:50:04.:50:06.

Certainly there is rain in the forecast, some already have it, some

:50:07.:50:10.

are yet to get it and it will turn windy across the south-west, it

:50:11.:50:18.

gusts and as gale force. We have low pressure driving the weather, with

:50:19.:50:21.

France coming this way. Isobars close together in the wind is

:50:22.:50:28.

continuing to strengthen. Rain piling in, this is what we have had

:50:29.:50:33.

through the early part of today. Heavy rain across Wales, south-west

:50:34.:50:37.

England, and southern coastal counties. Heavy across the Channel

:50:38.:50:43.

Islands, this big arc of a weather front drifting north-eastwards,

:50:44.:50:45.

fragmenting as we go through the day. Some rain but in between there

:50:46.:50:50.

will be bright spells, even glimpses of our old friend, the sun. In

:50:51.:50:57.

Scotland, a dry day, some sunshine for much of the day. That pushes

:50:58.:51:00.

across southern and central Scotland, into England, and then dry

:51:01.:51:08.

interludes, a couple of gradual breaks, and splashes of rain. The

:51:09.:51:12.

heaviest rain will be in Southern counties, is denoted by that green

:51:13.:51:17.

you see in the charts. Away from south-west England, left with a fair

:51:18.:51:22.

bit of cloud, wind breaking it up through the afternoon. In Northern

:51:23.:51:26.

Ireland, wind is with us on and off, cloud in between and in Northern

:51:27.:51:29.

Ireland, there goes the rain, sunshine with some showers. It is

:51:30.:51:36.

quite humid today too. Through the evening and overnight, rain across

:51:37.:51:40.

the Channel Islands, as it continues to journey into the North Sea,

:51:41.:51:45.

followed that arc round, and it is in Scotland and the Northern Isles.

:51:46.:51:52.

Showers in the West, 11-16d and with humid air, it will feel humid, not a

:51:53.:51:58.

cold night. Rain in the Northern Isles, Central low-pressure, and of

:51:59.:52:04.

radio showers, rotating around its -- an array of showers. Most of

:52:05.:52:07.

these showers will be in the south-east but generally across

:52:08.:52:11.

England and Wales, we will not see huge amounts. Up to 22 degrees,

:52:12.:52:16.

showers in Scotland and Northern Ireland could have hail and thunder

:52:17.:52:21.

and lightning embedded. On Friday, low-pressure moving into the North

:52:22.:52:27.

Sea, showers coming in across Scotland, Northern Ireland, some

:52:28.:52:29.

wind in northern England but a lot of dry weather around. Some sunshine

:52:30.:52:42.

and highs of up to 23 degrees, Naga. STUDIO: You always please me!

:52:43.:52:44.

Carol, see you later. Thank you. In a career spanning five decades,

:52:45.:52:50.

Elkie Brooks has worked with the likes of Robert Palmer,

:52:51.:52:52.

Humphrey Lyttelton and The Beatles. Dubbed the British Queen

:52:53.:52:56.

of the Blues, she was at one stage the biggest selling female artist

:52:57.:52:59.

in British chart history. We'll speak to Elkie in a moment

:53:00.:53:01.

but first let's take a listen to her collaboration

:53:02.:53:04.

with Canadian Rocker, Bryan Adams - # You want to walk

:53:05.:53:16.

# Back in my life # With your sweet apologies

:53:17.:53:21.

# And so many times I said # That's all right

:53:22.:53:28.

# Whatever will be will be... # Now listen

:53:29.:53:35.

# Before me, we see this through # It's something we've got to do

:53:36.:53:40.

# Ooh # Forgave and forget

:53:41.:53:49.

# No looking back, and no regrets # Just forgave... #

:53:50.:53:51.

You cannot help but rock along. I do not think you sound any different!

:53:52.:54:01.

Thank you. New music in this album and there is music that people will

:54:02.:54:08.

be very familiar with too. What is your message in this new album?

:54:09.:54:13.

Well, it is a compilation album with all of the old stuff I have done. Of

:54:14.:54:18.

course, I have two new songs as well. One of them isn't that new, it

:54:19.:54:28.

was written in 1965, I believe, by Wah Wah Watson, or Wawa Ragland, I

:54:29.:54:32.

do not know if they are the same person. And composed by the

:54:33.:54:40.

marvellous musician Bobby Womack. Tell us about the collaboration with

:54:41.:54:45.

Bryan Adams. That song we heard, how did it come about? A record company

:54:46.:54:53.

had the idea of putting this compilation out, virgin and EMI,

:54:54.:55:00.

they suggested to Bryan Adams that I would do some bonus tracks, did I

:55:01.:55:05.

have anything suitable? And Bryan Adams said, I have had this song a

:55:06.:55:10.

long time but maybe she will like this one? Did you have connections

:55:11.:55:15.

from the past, did you know him previously? He's a wonderful artist,

:55:16.:55:20.

a great musician. But no, it's marvellous, when I learn a song, I

:55:21.:55:25.

have to go through it 100 times. Once I get it I'm OK but it takes me

:55:26.:55:30.

a long time to really get my head around it and get used to it. It was

:55:31.:55:35.

nice listening to his voice, he is a very good singer. When you listen to

:55:36.:55:40.

a new song and you go through it 100 times, do you get to know it the way

:55:41.:55:44.

they have written it or do you get to make it more yours with your

:55:45.:55:48.

style? Hmm, that is a difficult one to answer, actually. I get into that

:55:49.:55:55.

phrasing but obviously I have my own sound. He sounds like Bryan Adams,

:55:56.:56:00.

and I sound like Elkie Brooks. I have to put my little thing on it. I

:56:01.:56:11.

have done with loads of stuff, like Knights in White Satin. I listen to

:56:12.:56:15.

their phrasing and he does that really well. And about the old days,

:56:16.:56:22.

you went with the Beatles, and you were their warm up act, have I got

:56:23.:56:27.

that right? A support act? Yes, but I was on the show with so many other

:56:28.:56:34.

artists. The Yard Birds, the Mike Cotton sound, they were my backing

:56:35.:56:41.

band, there were loads of people, not just me, on the show. I was just

:56:42.:56:47.

part of the whole thing. Interesting times, I would imagine? Well, I

:56:48.:56:52.

hated the 1960s, to be honest, I really did. Why? I was always on my

:56:53.:56:58.

own, and having to put up with house bands. In northern clubs and things,

:56:59.:57:06.

I hated it, I was driving myself, I didn't like it, it wasn't a happy

:57:07.:57:11.

time for me. I found myself in the 70s. People thought it must be a

:57:12.:57:16.

wonderful time? I was thinking about doing something else as I was not

:57:17.:57:21.

enjoying it. A music business is such a hard business that unless you

:57:22.:57:25.

really enjoy what you are doing, you may as well go and do something

:57:26.:57:31.

else. Really I was thinking of going back to Manchester and perhaps being

:57:32.:57:38.

a PE teacher. That is kind of what I thought of doing. I had all

:57:39.:57:44.

-- always been fairly athletic. And you have been adept at martial arts?

:57:45.:57:55.

My son, Jay, he manages me with his wife Joanna, he was looking for

:57:56.:58:00.

karate when he was a little boy in North Devon. There was an aikido

:58:01.:58:07.

master, he died many years ago, he was a wonderful man who brought it

:58:08.:58:12.

over from Malaysia when he was in the Army. We went to see what it was

:58:13.:58:17.

all about and it was wonderful. So yes, I have continued, as some of

:58:18.:58:21.

the family have, over the years with my aikido. I do it every day. I was

:58:22.:58:28.

up at 4:30am this morning doing the exercises and it keeps me going. And

:58:29.:58:33.

you, my darling, you are pretty fit. My friends and all of that. I try!

:58:34.:58:38.

Charlie... You just ask the questions!

:58:39.:58:43.

A lot of people would be happy to hear some of your classic songs.

:58:44.:58:53.

Puzzle Singer, that is on the album, -- Pearl is a Singer. I get everyone

:58:54.:59:02.

to join me, my saxophone player does a great solo. I have been singing it

:59:03.:59:08.

for 40 years. It is one of those songs, would you credit it with

:59:09.:59:13.

being the song that put you on the map is that how it worked? Without a

:59:14.:59:18.

doubt. When Jerry Lieber first played me the song, it did not have

:59:19.:59:22.

a middle section, he didn't think I would like it. But I love it, it is

:59:23.:59:27.

very country music. Rhythm and blues, country music. I said, write

:59:28.:59:34.

a middle, and it will be great. 30 minutes later he did. And you still

:59:35.:59:39.

have the gold dress? Is it she gorgeous...! Still is, thank you so

:59:40.:59:44.

much for joining us, Elkie Brooks. A pleasure having you with us. The

:59:45.:59:52.

album is called Pearls, the very best of Elkie

:59:53.:59:57.

After 65 years, 22,000 solo engagements and 600 overseas visits,

:59:58.:59:59.

the Duke of Edinburgh will officially retire

:00:00.:00:01.

Earlier this year, Prince Philip announced he'd be stepping

:00:02.:00:04.

away from the spotlight, but would continue as

:00:05.:00:06.

patron to the hundreds of charities he supports.

:00:07.:00:08.

The broadcaster and writer, Gyles Brandreth has been friends

:00:09.:00:10.

with Prince Philip for more than 40 years and joins us now

:00:11.:00:13.

Good morning. Della mac good morning. The friendship with Prince

:00:14.:00:21.

Philip, where did that start? I became the chairman of the National

:00:22.:00:29.

Playing Fields Association and it was the first national charity that

:00:30.:00:36.

began in 1947 when he became Duke of Edinburgh. He has been the Duke of

:00:37.:00:41.

Edinburgh for all those years. He began it as Prince Philip of Greece

:00:42.:00:46.

and then he became Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten of the Royal Navy and he

:00:47.:00:50.

ended it being the Duke of Edinburgh when he married Princess Elizabeth.

:00:51.:00:54.

He has been doing this longer than I have been alive. The thing about the

:00:55.:01:02.

film Dunkirk, Survival is Victory, the thing about the Duke of

:01:03.:01:06.

Edinburgh is he has survived and 96 he is still at it. He has stepped

:01:07.:01:12.

back from solo engagements, but he will pop up now and again supporting

:01:13.:01:18.

the Queen. People hold him in great affection not least because he goes

:01:19.:01:22.

about his business slightly differently from other royals. Give

:01:23.:01:25.

us examples of the stories you have heard and the occasions you have

:01:26.:01:32.

been involved in. He is his own man, he is completely natural. He is not

:01:33.:01:37.

interested in the media. He does not play to the camera and he does not

:01:38.:01:40.

like the camera, he lives in the moment and he is himself. He

:01:41.:01:46.

reflects his generation. Emperor Napoleon said if you want to

:01:47.:01:57.

understand a man, you must remember what the world was like in the year

:01:58.:02:00.

that man turned 21. Prince Philip turned 21 in 1942 and was mentioned

:02:01.:02:03.

in dispatches in the Royal Navy. He is of the wartime generation and his

:02:04.:02:05.

sense of humour and stoicism reflects that. He does not talk

:02:06.:02:08.

about his own private life and he does not wear his heart on his

:02:09.:02:15.

sleeve. He is direct and amusing. He said, if ever you see a man opening

:02:16.:02:19.

the car door for his wife, it is either a new car or a new wife. I

:02:20.:02:25.

was speaking at a function at Buckingham Palace and he was

:02:26.:02:28.

barracking me, we have heard all this before, shut up. He is

:02:29.:02:34.

completely natural, he is himself. But he goes out of his way to make

:02:35.:02:39.

people feel relaxed, he tries to break the ice. The Queen does not

:02:40.:02:44.

need to do that, she is Queen. The Duke of Edinburgh, coming down the

:02:45.:02:56.

line shaking hands, he has been doing it for 70 years, 23,000

:02:57.:02:58.

individual engagements, he tries to break the ice and he said something

:02:59.:03:01.

people think it's amusing. He dreads the press because he thinks they

:03:02.:03:04.

will be listening out hoping that it is one of his famous gaffes. The

:03:05.:03:09.

part of him that people do not get so much is his vision of the future

:03:10.:03:14.

and his role in creating the new face of the Royal family as they

:03:15.:03:19.

emerge now. It is a very important part of the role that he brings to

:03:20.:03:26.

the table. He is the author of the modern royal family. If we regard

:03:27.:03:30.

the Queen's rain, the longest reign in our history, as a success, the

:03:31.:03:34.

joint author is the Duke of Edinburgh. The Queen says, he has

:03:35.:03:39.

been my strength and stay all these years. He is very influential. He

:03:40.:03:45.

got the cameras into the palace for the first time and gave the first

:03:46.:03:49.

interview. He is interested in the world around him and not in himself.

:03:50.:03:55.

He has promoted science, engineering, technology, the

:03:56.:03:59.

worldwide fund for nature and the British Equestrian Association. He

:04:00.:04:04.

is the founder of the Duke of Edinburgh's awards scheme which has

:04:05.:04:07.

changed the lives of millions of people in this country and around

:04:08.:04:13.

the world. He is remarkable. If you look at him today, aged 96, how fit

:04:14.:04:19.

he is, how eagle eyed, he is a phenomena and somebody to salute. He

:04:20.:04:25.

is of his generation. He is not touchy-feely. He would not do like

:04:26.:04:30.

the princes have done recently, talk about, is in his own life. He had a

:04:31.:04:35.

challenging start to life himself, his parents separated when he was

:04:36.:04:41.

ten and he had a peripatetic life between Europe and Britain. He never

:04:42.:04:49.

talks about that. He believes in getting on with life. He will still

:04:50.:04:56.

be doing carriage driving, after all, he said, I am only 96. I was

:04:57.:05:02.

once in a room when he arrived and he arrives in a room and there is a

:05:03.:05:06.

certain bars. With the younger royals it is glamour. With the Queen

:05:07.:05:12.

it is very important. When the Duke of Edinburgh comes in the room there

:05:13.:05:17.

is a different atmosphere. People will miss that because he will not

:05:18.:05:22.

be doing those things on his own. No, he will not. He was involved in

:05:23.:05:29.

847 different organisations and has been captain, General, Colonel, air

:05:30.:05:35.

Marshal, Admiral of the fleet, Field Marshal, and I feel sorry for his

:05:36.:05:42.

valet having all those uniforms! When he comes into the room he

:05:43.:05:45.

crackles with energy and he comes and he can be a mixture of amusing,

:05:46.:05:53.

and sometimes a bit alarming. He looks at you and always questions

:05:54.:05:57.

you. He is always interested. The two words that come off and from his

:05:58.:06:03.

lips are yes, but. His spirit of inquiry is constantly there when you

:06:04.:06:07.

say something. He is very good with people. He has been doing this all

:06:08.:06:13.

these years, but he is particularly good with official people. With real

:06:14.:06:19.

people he is real. Lovely to talk to you this morning. Thank you so much.

:06:20.:06:25.

Giles Brandreth talking about Prince Philip as we look ahead to his last

:06:26.:06:30.

solo engagement today at Buckingham Palace. Time for a brief look at the

:06:31.:06:32.

headlines The close relationship

:06:33.:08:14.

between Queen Victoria and her young Indian servant caused uproar

:08:15.:08:16.

during the last years of her life. But a 100 years later,

:08:17.:08:20.

Abdul Karim had all but been That was until the author

:08:21.:08:23.

Shrabani Basu spotted From Queen Victoria's personal

:08:24.:08:28.

diaries, she learned he was her closest friend

:08:29.:08:36.

and confident, teaching her to write in Urdu, not to mention

:08:37.:08:38.

inspiring a love of curry. You have published a book that you

:08:39.:08:48.

have had to rewrite because history keeps popping up with new bits of

:08:49.:08:54.

information. We always knew about Victoria and Mr Brown and that

:08:55.:08:59.

relation, but this relationship is not so publicly spoken about.

:09:00.:09:04.

Absolutely because there was every attempt to delete it from history.

:09:05.:09:10.

John Brown died in 1883 and Queen Victoria was devastated. Four years

:09:11.:09:14.

later she is celebrating her Golden Jubilee and Abdul Karim is sent to

:09:15.:09:19.

her. If you are the Queen you get presents like that. She was sent a

:09:20.:09:26.

young man to be a servant. Two of them were sent and Abdul was one of

:09:27.:09:31.

them and their role was decorative. Where these gorgeous clothes, stand

:09:32.:09:36.

behind her representing empire as it were. But very quickly it moved on

:09:37.:09:41.

from that. Which is very unusual in that time for a servant to have such

:09:42.:09:46.

a close relationship which was disapproved of. Absolutely because

:09:47.:09:51.

he was not a servant for a very long. She liked him very much and

:09:52.:09:55.

she made him her teacher because she wanted to learn would do. Queen

:09:56.:10:00.

Victoria actually learned to read and write it and she was fluent in

:10:01.:10:07.

it by the end of her life. How was it that you gain insight into what

:10:08.:10:11.

their relationship consisted of? How did you find out about that? I knew

:10:12.:10:16.

a little bit about him and I knew she loved Carrie and I knew she had

:10:17.:10:21.

Indian servants who could them for her. But when I went to Osborne

:10:22.:10:26.

house there is this corridor and there is a portrait of Abdul Karim

:10:27.:10:30.

and he is painted in red and gold and cream and he is holding a book

:10:31.:10:35.

in his hand and he does not look like a servant. That was intriguing.

:10:36.:10:40.

There was another portrait and in Queen Victoria's dressing room there

:10:41.:10:45.

is a picture of John Brown and below it of Abdul Karim. That nailed it

:10:46.:10:49.

for me. I thought he was somebody special and I wanted to know more

:10:50.:10:54.

about him. To be very clear, he brought over his wife and family as

:10:55.:10:58.

well. He was given an elevated status. Also when it came to her

:10:59.:11:05.

funeral she specifically asked for him to be one of the chief mourners.

:11:06.:11:11.

That is when after she died the relationship was almost hidden. It

:11:12.:11:17.

was quite devastating. They hated him all along. He was Indian, a

:11:18.:11:22.

young Muslim, a commoner. So there was racism and class and Queen

:11:23.:11:26.

Victoria stood up with him and battled with her household over

:11:27.:11:31.

this. They used to call the Indians the Black brigade and there was a

:11:32.:11:35.

lot of racism around. But she backed him and they hated him and once she

:11:36.:11:42.

died they erased him. As with great stories, the movie people get

:11:43.:11:44.

interested and it has been made into a film. What can you be talking

:11:45.:11:54.

about? I would like the mango. They only grow in India. I am the Empress

:11:55.:12:01.

of India, so have one sent to me. I thought she was meant to be dying.

:12:02.:12:08.

Nobody knows what it's like to be Queen. Mother! Are you spying on me?

:12:09.:12:16.

What is the point, Abdul? Solace. I would like Mr Abdul to teach me. But

:12:17.:12:23.

he is an Indian. I am the Queen of England I will have everything I

:12:24.:12:29.

want. The film will bring even more attention to the book. I hope so. It

:12:30.:12:35.

is quite important because this is a hidden story that needs to be told.

:12:36.:12:40.

This is a young Muslim at the heart of the Royal Court at the time when

:12:41.:12:44.

the empire was at its height and it has never happened before that and

:12:45.:12:47.

it has never happened since. The fact they were trying to delete him

:12:48.:12:53.

from history... I found his grave and it was desperate, with brambles

:12:54.:12:59.

and stray dogs in Agra. Nobody knew him in India or here. I said, this

:13:00.:13:09.

man was important, he taught Queen Victoria urdu, he was a major part

:13:10.:13:14.

in her life and he caused a storm if nothing else. His story must be

:13:15.:13:17.

told, he cannot be deleted from history. Lovely to see you

:13:18.:13:20.

The book is called 'Victoria Abdul'.

:13:21.:13:29.

That brings as an end to this morning.

:13:30.:13:36.

I've always been told that breakfast is the most important meal

:13:37.:13:39.

of the day and it's certainly going down well here.

:13:40.:13:43.

But also important is every time the keepers feed the animals,

:13:44.:13:48.

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