03/08/2017 Breakfast


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03/08/2017

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This is Breakfast with Steph McGovern and Naga Munchetty.

:00:00.:00:10.

Hundreds of mental health patients are kept waiting to be discharged

:00:11.:00:13.

from hospital, despite being medically fit to leave.

:00:14.:00:19.

Research for the BBC finds some have faced delays of up to three years.

:00:20.:00:22.

Many more have had to wait for over six months.

:00:23.:00:33.

Also this morning: Nearly 200 buildings in England are now known

:00:34.:00:52.

to have failed safety tests on cladding and insulation

:00:53.:00:55.

We'll speak to the man in charge of making them safe.

:00:56.:01:00.

Britain's big business bosses earned ?4.5 million on average last year.

:01:01.:01:06.

That's down nearly 20%, but can that level of pay be justified?

:01:07.:01:10.

It's a big night for English football as the Lionesses play

:01:11.:01:18.

the Netherlands in the semi-finals of the Women's Euros.

:01:19.:01:21.

I'm out on the training pitch this morning to see how the excitement

:01:22.:01:25.

We're asking if any footballer is worth the record breaking ?200

:01:26.:01:40.

million expected to be paid for Neymar to move from Barcelona

:01:41.:01:43.

And five weeks into a bin strike that's left rubbish piling up

:01:44.:01:48.

on the streets of Birmingham, we meet the volunteers taking

:01:49.:01:51.

Good morning. Today we are looking at a day of sunshine and showers,

:01:52.:02:03.

the heaviest across Scotland, northern England and Northern

:02:04.:02:06.

Ireland with a wee bit of thunder thrown in and in between quite a bit

:02:07.:02:11.

of sunshine, though it is going to the windy, especially for England

:02:12.:02:14.

and why. I will have more in 15 minutes. Thanks, see you in a bit.

:02:15.:02:18.

Research by BBC News has revealed that some mental health patients

:02:19.:02:25.

are waiting more than three years to be discharged from hospital

:02:26.:02:28.

Figures from across the UK, obtained through Freedom

:02:29.:02:32.

of Information requests, show that at least five patients

:02:33.:02:34.

have waited more than three years, while hundreds have been waiting

:02:35.:02:37.

NHS England says its providing ?400 million to help

:02:38.:02:41.

Our social affairs correspondent Michael Buchanan reports.

:02:42.:02:51.

It helps when I am bored or anything and I haven't got anything to do.

:02:52.:03:02.

Toni lives with five other people in supported accommodation.

:03:03.:03:06.

The 32-year-old suffers from schizophrenia and a personality

:03:07.:03:08.

She has spent almost half her life in psychiatric hospitals.

:03:09.:03:17.

But arguments over who should pay for her care means she spent months

:03:18.:03:22.

longer in hospital than she needed to.

:03:23.:03:29.

I would see other people leaving before me.

:03:30.:03:31.

I thought I was ready for a long time.

:03:32.:03:33.

Many psychiatric patients would recognise her experience.

:03:34.:03:39.

We've discovered that at least five patients waited more than three

:03:40.:03:42.

More than 300 spent six months longer in hospital

:03:43.:03:48.

Often people are in a revolving door of hospital placement and they don't

:03:49.:03:53.

get into community placement because it is too significant a step.

:03:54.:04:01.

By providing a comprehensive package of support, we hope

:04:02.:04:04.

The complex is provided by a national charity who say

:04:05.:04:20.

She says she will soon move into a small bungalow

:04:21.:04:26.

Too many mental health patients are being denied a similar chance.

:04:27.:04:33.

In just over an hour we'll hear more on this issue from the Royal College

:04:34.:04:37.

Children from the very poorest families in some parts of England

:04:38.:04:40.

are continuing to fall further behind at school.

:04:41.:04:42.

The Education Policy Institute says by the end of secondary school,

:04:43.:04:45.

the most disadvantaged children can be two years behind their peers.

:04:46.:04:48.

The government says it's directing an extra ?72 million into areas

:04:49.:04:51.

It starts in primary school and widens in the years that followed,

:04:52.:05:08.

the attainment gap between poorer and wealthier children. Now, for

:05:09.:05:13.

some disadvantaged kids that gap did close slightly over the last decade.

:05:14.:05:18.

But when you look at the very poorest children, it didn't. The

:05:19.:05:22.

report calculates that by the time they sit their GCSEs they are two

:05:23.:05:26.

years behind. But the picture does vary nationwide. You can speculate

:05:27.:05:31.

that funding would be a factor in certain parts of the country. We

:05:32.:05:36.

know that aspirations are quite important, and cultural expectations

:05:37.:05:40.

as well. So, I think all of these things will be having, and more,

:05:41.:05:45.

we'll be having an influence. Disadvantaged children are more

:05:46.:05:48.

likely to earn less in future and suffer bad health. Put simply, it

:05:49.:05:54.

leads to wasted potential. The Department for Education says there

:05:55.:05:58.

is over ?2 billion this year to support schools in this area, and

:05:59.:06:01.

money to help young people in so-called social mobility cold

:06:02.:06:07.

spots. Today's report acknowledges there has been progress overall but

:06:08.:06:11.

the conclusion - it is far too slow. If the rate of change over the last

:06:12.:06:16.

decade continues the study says it would take a staggering 50 years for

:06:17.:06:17.

the gap is closed. More than 100 buildings have failed

:06:18.:06:22.

the latest fire safety test, implemented in the wake

:06:23.:06:25.

of the Grenfell Tower fire. It was the second in a set of six

:06:26.:06:28.

tests ordered by the government and takes the number of buildings

:06:29.:06:32.

that don't meet current regulations The BBC has learnt that cladding

:06:33.:06:35.

and insulation panels failed the test within seven minutes

:06:36.:06:38.

of being set alight. We'll be speaking to the chair

:06:39.:06:42.

of the panel in charge of making buildings safe after

:06:43.:06:46.

Grenfell at around 7:40am. The Venezuelan President,

:06:47.:06:51.

Nicolas Maduro, has dismissed allegations of fraud

:06:52.:06:53.

in the country's controversial A company based in London,

:06:54.:06:55.

responsible for providing the voting system, has claimed electoral

:06:56.:06:59.

authorities inflated the turn-out The opposition has called for more

:07:00.:07:01.

mass demonstrations. A cot death charity has raised

:07:02.:07:11.

concerns over the use of Finnish-style baby boxes designed

:07:12.:07:15.

for newborns to sleep in. The cardboard box,

:07:16.:07:18.

filled with baby products and a mattress, became synonymous

:07:19.:07:20.

with record-low infant mortality They're now given to new parents

:07:21.:07:23.

by some NHS trusts, but the Lullaby Trust warns

:07:24.:07:28.

there is no evidence that they reduce the likelihood

:07:29.:07:30.

of sudden infant death syndrome. It's been revealed that it

:07:31.:07:39.

would take the average UK worker 160 years to earn what a top chief

:07:40.:07:42.

executive earns in just one. Sean's got more on the latest report

:07:43.:07:46.

on what the country's bosses Loads in the news about pay, so this

:07:47.:07:59.

is timely. It is, and continues a similar story we heard about BBC pay

:08:00.:08:06.

as well. This is the FTSE 100 bosses, the 100 biggest companies on

:08:07.:08:10.

the stock exchange people can invest in, pension funds invested in these

:08:11.:08:14.

companies, so what goes on is important. The average pay fell 20%

:08:15.:08:19.

last year to four and a half million on average each. That is to do with

:08:20.:08:25.

investors and shareholders kicking up a fuss more than previously on

:08:26.:08:29.

bass's pay and talked about how they should do more to use their power to

:08:30.:08:34.

reduce executive pay. It seems they are starting to do that now. When

:08:35.:08:38.

you look at the detail it has gone down partly because Martin Sorrell,

:08:39.:08:43.

who is boss of WPP, the advertising company, his pay fell from ?75

:08:44.:08:49.

million to ?48 million, which has a big effect on the average figures.

:08:50.:08:57.

And you mentioned it takes the average worker to earn that money

:08:58.:09:01.

and the issue around women's pay is noticeably different. Six bosses in

:09:02.:09:04.

the FTSE 100 are women and on average they earn 2.6 million, ?1

:09:05.:09:10.

million on average less than the average male. We will talk about

:09:11.:09:14.

this in half an hour, looking at the issue of why company bosses are not

:09:15.:09:18.

paid the same. You have to balance it share price, profit, performance,

:09:19.:09:23.

targets, to see if they match up as well. And the FTSE 100 has done well

:09:24.:09:28.

over the last year. They are getting a pay cut while the share price is

:09:29.:09:32.

increasing. High pay has been talked about for a while. They haven't got

:09:33.:09:37.

anything on this next man. No, nothing. This is eye watering.

:09:38.:09:40.

Brazilian striker Neymar will become the most expensive footballer

:09:41.:09:42.

in history when he completes his transfer from Barcelona to Paris St

:09:43.:09:45.

The French club have agreed to pay nearly ?198 million to release him

:09:46.:09:49.

The 25-year-old is expected to earn ?40 million a year before tax.

:09:50.:10:07.

Neymar gave me the green light in August, so I went to Barcelona with

:10:08.:10:17.

a proposal from PSG for a pay clause that will be done in the next few

:10:18.:10:21.

hours. We will talk about that through the programme.

:10:22.:10:22.

The UK has become a nation of binge watchers according to research

:10:23.:10:25.

It suggests that eight in ten adults now view multiple episodes

:10:26.:10:35.

of their favourite shows in a single sitting.

:10:36.:10:37.

It is really not good if you have to get up early the next morning. And

:10:38.:10:44.

it is ten o'clock and you are like, oh, just one more episode.

:10:45.:10:45.

However, most of us still watch at least some live TV each week.

:10:46.:10:49.

Our entertainment correspondent Lizo Mzimba has more.

:10:50.:10:51.

For decades TV watching was something families often enjoyed

:10:52.:10:57.

together. Now, increasingly, the different generations are enjoying

:10:58.:11:01.

TV in different ways. We need to get back. According to Ofcom watching

:11:02.:11:07.

multiple episodes of this series back-to-back is something done

:11:08.:11:11.

weekly by only around one in six adults over the age of 64. But it is

:11:12.:11:17.

the norm for more than half of all teenagers either using catch up

:11:18.:11:22.

services like the iPlayer or streaming services like Netflix and

:11:23.:11:28.

Amazon, often to ensure they have watched an episode before spoilers

:11:29.:11:32.

appear on social media. The thing is the young generation is inherently

:11:33.:11:37.

impatient, so everything they want they have instantly. If they have

:11:38.:11:40.

watched episode one and they are desperate for the second episode,

:11:41.:11:44.

they want it now. Younger adults are also the biggest viewers of online

:11:45.:11:48.

services in general with three quarters of them watching

:11:49.:11:51.

subscription on demand or streaming services. But older viewers are not

:11:52.:11:56.

being totally left behind. Overall around eight out of ten adults have

:11:57.:12:01.

at some point taken advantage of the recent technology to watch more than

:12:02.:12:06.

one episode of a series at a time. Even so, despite the growing

:12:07.:12:13.

popularity of everything from the iPlayer to Netflix, the overwhelming

:12:14.:12:16.

majority of TV is still watched live.

:12:17.:12:22.

It was a big night for English football.

:12:23.:12:27.

The Lionesses play the Netherlands in the semi-finals of the women's

:12:28.:12:30.

My favourite IIc. Absolutely brilliant. -- to see.

:12:31.:12:37.

Is the sport on target when it comes to bringing girls

:12:38.:12:40.

and young women onto the pitch though?

:12:41.:12:42.

Mike is at the Manchester City's academy for us this morning.

:12:43.:12:45.

Morning, Mike. Yes, good morning. They are putting me through my paces

:12:46.:12:51.

early on. Yes, the academy, the community players getting involved.

:12:52.:12:56.

And they have certainly been inspired by the success of the

:12:57.:12:59.

Lionesses not in this tournament only but in the World Cup, and in

:13:00.:13:05.

2009, when England reached the semifinals of the Euros to beat the

:13:06.:13:10.

Netherlands, ironically enough. So, will history repeat? In terms of how

:13:11.:13:16.

it is inspiring, well, evidence is clear, with a 19% increase since

:13:17.:13:22.

2011, and the FA say football is the biggest sport for women in this

:13:23.:13:26.

country. Sorry, just got in your way. We will be glued to the TV and

:13:27.:13:31.

radio this evening cheering on the Lionesses, the highest ranked team

:13:32.:13:34.

in the competition, and the girls over their want meat to put in as

:13:35.:13:40.

they get some training in at the academy. Oh, dear. It was too low.

:13:41.:13:45.

Almost a chance. Plenty more. We will speak with some former

:13:46.:13:50.

Manchester City players later on here at the Etihad academy. Thanks

:13:51.:13:56.

very much, Mike. I am glad they are putting you through your paces. You

:13:57.:14:00.

need it. I am not sure about the sportswear. Have you seen how out of

:14:01.:14:06.

breath he is? You wanted to see shorts? I do. No, we don't. It is

:14:07.:14:09.

too early! See later, Mike. Here's Carol with a look

:14:10.:14:13.

at this morning's weather. Well, looking at the map, it looks

:14:14.:14:23.

hot in places. Absolutely, yes. There has been record-breaking heat

:14:24.:14:28.

yesterday in Corsica, temperatures reaching 44 degrees. Rome, 43

:14:29.:14:35.

degrees. Today, 42 in Rome and the heat extends three Italy into the

:14:36.:14:42.

Balkans. We have a red warning in place. If you add the humidity,

:14:43.:14:47.

there are nasty situations. It is life-threatening heat and there is a

:14:48.:14:52.

shortage of water in Italy, the equivalent of the whole lake Como, a

:14:53.:14:56.

round 22 billion cubic metres of water. That is a lot of deficit. The

:14:57.:15:03.

heat is going to continue. We have a different scenario at home. Sunny

:15:04.:15:07.

spells, heavy showers and windy across England and Wales. This

:15:08.:15:12.

morning, quite a lot of showers, they will develop further through

:15:13.:15:15.

the day, rotating around this low pressure area. You can see from the

:15:16.:15:20.

squeeze on the isobars across England and Wales that we are

:15:21.:15:23.

looking at windy conditions. We also have showers. If anything further

:15:24.:15:31.

south. There is a lot of dry weather around and sunshine. On either side

:15:32.:15:35.

of the showers you will also see some sunshine. Further north into

:15:36.:15:40.

northern England, Ireland and Scotland, showers are more prolific

:15:41.:15:43.

today, not just this morning, some with hail and thunder and lightning

:15:44.:15:48.

embedded in them. This is yesterday's rain ensconced across

:15:49.:15:52.

the Northern Isles. Through the day the showers will rattle quickly

:15:53.:15:55.

across England and Wales on the wind. There will be bright and

:15:56.:16:00.

sunniest is in between. Heavier showers across Scotland and Northern

:16:01.:16:03.

Ireland continue. Even so there will be some sunshine in between. The

:16:04.:16:07.

rain continuing to move steadily northwards. Temperatures 14- 22 out

:16:08.:16:13.

of the wind. Into the sunshine and it is 22 and feeling nice. The cough

:16:14.:16:18.

at Kingsbarns not far from Saint Andrews can expect showers and some

:16:19.:16:24.

can be heavy with highs of around 20 degrees -- golf. Overnight, well, we

:16:25.:16:30.

will have the wind to start with and there will be a lot of dry weather

:16:31.:16:35.

around with showers. The rain coming south across Scotland into the north

:16:36.:16:39.

and west. Temperatures 13- 15 degrees. Into tomorrow, a lot of dry

:16:40.:16:47.

weather around. Yes, there will be showers. A low pressure centre in

:16:48.:16:51.

the North Sea. We are pulling the showers around that across Northern

:16:52.:16:54.

Ireland and into northern England with one or two popping up almost

:16:55.:16:58.

anywhere. We are looking at sunshine in between. I don't want to paint a

:16:59.:17:01.

really gloomy picture. We will see a rash of showers and we

:17:02.:17:13.

could see them almost anyway. Not all of us will catch them. Lots of

:17:14.:17:17.

dry weather around as well. Hires 13- 21.

:17:18.:17:23.

Thank you, Carol. You know how much we love you, we could never protect

:17:24.:17:31.

price on you. You know that. The only reason I say that it is,

:17:32.:17:36.

obviously Neymar is loved, but not as loved as Carol, because you can

:17:37.:17:40.

put a price on Neymar. Yeah. What do you make of it? It is a lot of

:17:41.:17:47.

money, that is they are. ?198 million! For a footballer. Shall we

:17:48.:17:52.

go through the facts? We were trying to think of what else you could buy

:17:53.:17:55.

for ?198 million. Well, ?198 million buys you three

:17:56.:17:59.

Boeing 737-700 passenger planes. It is enough to match the cost

:18:00.:18:01.

of the GDP of six countries, including Tuvalu

:18:02.:18:05.

in the South Pacific. You could also buy 440 million

:18:06.:18:06.

individual pints of milk - that's enough to fill 100

:18:07.:18:11.

Olympic-size swimming pools. If you want to visualise that, 100

:18:12.:18:26.

Olympic swimming pools. That is lots of milk. I think PSG made the right

:18:27.:18:31.

decision. Has the Financial Times done a more smart analysis? What,

:18:32.:18:37.

measuring them in milk is not smart? Well, the fact that it makes the

:18:38.:18:41.

front page of the Financial Times, offer a start. They have spoken

:18:42.:18:45.

quite a bit about the Qatar links. PSG have strong links with Qatar.

:18:46.:18:49.

Barcelona used to have strong links with Qatar until recently, when

:18:50.:18:54.

Cattai rail lines used to sponsor Barcelona, but that has dropped. --

:18:55.:19:00.

Katter airlines. There is some talk about Neymar being an ambassador for

:19:01.:19:03.

them. There are financial FairPlay issues. If you just look at the

:19:04.:19:08.

business side of it, football clubs in and around Europe are supposed to

:19:09.:19:12.

make money every year, not get into losses. But his name, it is not just

:19:13.:19:17.

the money that he is earning from, here, it is on the back pages, it is

:19:18.:19:22.

not just his salary, is it? It is endorsements and other things as

:19:23.:19:28.

well. Exactly. Agents' fees, some of those are our watering. The people

:19:29.:19:33.

who work around him are making huge amounts off this. One agent

:19:34.:19:37.

involved, it might have been his father, he was being paid more than

:19:38.:19:42.

Lionel Messi. Yes, he gets more than Lionel Messi's football salary.

:19:43.:19:47.

Crazy. We were looking at this story yesterday. The Guardian put this

:19:48.:19:52.

down as the final engagement, but it will not be the final engagement of

:19:53.:19:55.

the Duke of Edinburgh. It is his last official public and --

:19:56.:20:01.

engagement. We're not watching yesterday morning, Steph? We were

:20:02.:20:05.

told this. They said he would continue doing work with his

:20:06.:20:09.

charities. The major events, he was still accompany Her Majesty the

:20:10.:20:13.

Queen, but he has taken a step. He is 96. He is on many front pages

:20:14.:20:19.

today. We were at an event with him not long ago, Carol and are, and he

:20:20.:20:24.

is such a chip of local for his age. That is how I want to be like. He is

:20:25.:20:28.

on the front page of the Daily Telegraph as well. A lovely picture

:20:29.:20:33.

of him. After 65 years of selfless service and more than 22,000

:20:34.:20:37.

official engagements, Prince Philip is deserving of the nation's

:20:38.:20:41.

gratitude. And the front page of the times. Do you know much about this

:20:42.:20:47.

story of Lloyd's being sued for $10 million? It is to do with the

:20:48.:20:51.

cancellation of one of Kanye West's tours. I have not looked into this

:20:52.:20:57.

in great detail. Lloyds are a big insurance company. Yes. There are

:20:58.:21:03.

questions about cancellations in his tour. A nice way to get in the

:21:04.:21:07.

headlines again, isn't it? Whether or not he will be successful in

:21:08.:21:11.

suing them will be interesting. Any more? An interesting story here.

:21:12.:21:22.

Asda profits plunged 20% yesterday, sales down nearly 6%. One of the

:21:23.:21:25.

nation's supermarkets not doing well at the all -- not doing well at all

:21:26.:21:30.

at the moment. William Hill saying they have seen a large increase in

:21:31.:21:34.

betting on women's sport this summer, ?3 million on the women's

:21:35.:21:39.

cricket World Cup, ?3 million on the euro Twitter 17. That could come

:21:40.:21:45.

into and more lucrative area for bookmakers as well as those of us

:21:46.:21:49.

watching on TV. There is a story in the times this morning about

:21:50.:21:52.

somebody who won a quarter of ?1 million based on picking horses with

:21:53.:21:56.

a nice name. See, that theory works. That is what I have always done.

:21:57.:22:01.

There are many different ways. Do you talk to your neighbours? Do they

:22:02.:22:06.

ever come around for a cup of tea? I recently moved, so I have to put in

:22:07.:22:10.

more effort. You should bake a cake. OK. I suppose I have committed now.

:22:11.:22:16.

When I moved into a house, that is what the neighbours did, they sent

:22:17.:22:19.

the kids round with a plate of Brownies. It became a tradition. We

:22:20.:22:23.

are talking about that today. Whether not you ask your neighbours

:22:24.:22:26.

to what your plans on holiday, or where the often pop around.

:22:27.:22:31.

Apparently not many of us do. A survey by the social networking app

:22:32.:22:34.

Nextdoor found that nearly 50% of us do not know our neighbours well, or

:22:35.:22:38.

at all. Nearly half of us feel that the neighbourhood we grew up in was

:22:39.:22:42.

friendlier and safer than the one we live in now. Rose tinted glasses,

:22:43.:22:45.

perhaps. Max Chambers from Nextdoor joins us. Good morning. Thank you

:22:46.:22:49.

for talking to us. What have you found out in this survey? This

:22:50.:22:55.

research, we have essentially found that sense of community that we used

:22:56.:22:59.

to have in the United Kingdom is dying away. A big cause of that,

:23:00.:23:04.

according to the people we surveyed, is actually technology. So the more

:23:05.:23:08.

time that we spend on our phones, talking to people that we already

:23:09.:23:12.

know in the virtual world, the biggest problem gets. The good news

:23:13.:23:17.

is that technology can actually be part of the solution. Next door is a

:23:18.:23:23.

-- Nextdoor is a private social network apps for your neighbourhood,

:23:24.:23:26.

designed to connect people who do not already know each other, around

:23:27.:23:30.

the thing they share in common, the neighbourhood. We find people are

:23:31.:23:34.

using Nextdoor in the UK for everyday things like finding a good

:23:35.:23:38.

plumber or babysitter, but also personal things. Nextdoor is the

:23:39.:23:41.

best way to find a lost pet is all to start a running club or a mother

:23:42.:23:46.

and toddler group. We are also seeing Nextdoor Iain Hughes for more

:23:47.:23:50.

urgent things. After the dreadful Grenfell Tower disaster, we saw

:23:51.:23:53.

neighbours coming together to talk about disaster relief, how they

:23:54.:23:57.

could get supplies to the right places. So designed in the right

:23:58.:24:01.

way, even though technology has helped cause the problem, it can be

:24:02.:24:05.

part of the solution as well. It is a bit ironic that you are the

:24:06.:24:09.

director of the south, saying that we are spending too much time on our

:24:10.:24:13.

phones, but you want us to use your up. But it is for obvious reasons.

:24:14.:24:17.

You are a former counterterrorism policy adviser for ten Downing St,

:24:18.:24:22.

so you have looked at how we are integrating quite closely, and what

:24:23.:24:26.

can be done about it. I said when we reintroduced in you, that many of us

:24:27.:24:30.

think it was better when we were growing up, that the streets were

:24:31.:24:34.

friendlier and we spoke more to each other. Why do you think that is? Is

:24:35.:24:38.

it because there has been a change in social housing all the way we are

:24:39.:24:41.

informed about crime on the streets. What do you think is changing

:24:42.:24:45.

attitudes? I think a lot of this is about the way we behave in the

:24:46.:24:48.

modern world. What is interesting about the research is that it shows

:24:49.:24:52.

that there are some places, Wales, the West Midlands, Yorkshire, where

:24:53.:24:57.

these problems are less acute. But the big cities, London, parts of

:24:58.:25:02.

Manchester, the problem is bigger. I think that is about people being

:25:03.:25:06.

more mobile, perhaps more transient in big cities, not feeling like they

:25:07.:25:10.

need to invest the time in getting to know their neighbours. As I say,

:25:11.:25:15.

technology as well. There is nothing wrong with those social networks

:25:16.:25:18.

like Facebook and Twitter, which are mentioned. What we are saying is

:25:19.:25:22.

that actually having a social network that connects you to people

:25:23.:25:26.

you do not already know, and maybe don't share the same background, you

:25:27.:25:29.

know, didn't go to the same university, maybe they have

:25:30.:25:33.

different life experiences, that is a good thing. Especially if you

:25:34.:25:37.

focus it on utility, you know, getting things done with each other

:25:38.:25:41.

and cooperating, sorting out problems together, that is the way

:25:42.:25:44.

to start to break down some of these barriers. Certainly in my time in

:25:45.:25:48.

government this was a problem we started to get very concerned about.

:25:49.:25:51.

It does lead to all sorts of other problems, whether it is to do with

:25:52.:25:55.

social isolation, problems with well-being, also issues around

:25:56.:25:59.

extremism and people feeling like they don't belong in the UK. Part of

:26:00.:26:04.

the reason that I became involved with Nextdoor was to try to help

:26:05.:26:09.

bring people together, and Nextdoor is a great way of doing that. There

:26:10.:26:14.

are a lot of issues that need to be tackled, but I am afraid we do not

:26:15.:26:18.

have any more time to talk to you about this. Thank you for bringing

:26:19.:26:22.

this to our tension. The exchanges, director of Nextdoor. Thank you.

:26:23.:26:23.

Ashley Max Chambers. Still to come this morning,

:26:24.:26:28.

with bags of rubbish piling up in Birmingham as bin

:26:29.:26:32.

collectors continue to strike, we'll meet the volunteers working

:26:33.:26:34.

to clear up the city's streets. We are literally going to be talking

:26:35.:26:37.

rubbish. Now though, it's back

:26:38.:30:02.

to Steph and Naga. This is Breakfast with

:30:03.:30:04.

Steph McGovern and Naga Munchetty. We'll bring you all the latest news

:30:05.:30:12.

and sport in a moment, but also on Breakfast this morning:

:30:13.:30:16.

Some mental health patients are waiting years to be

:30:17.:30:18.

discharged from hospital After 7am, we'll ask

:30:19.:30:20.

the Royal College of Psychiatrists The main character wasn't even

:30:21.:30:30.

there. Having scooped the Best Actress

:30:31.:30:45.

prize at the Scottish Comedy Awards for her political musings,

:30:46.:30:47.

we'll be joined by three year old Isla's father to find out how

:30:48.:30:50.

the toddler has taken the news. And after 8:30am, Def Leppard

:30:51.:30:54.

front-man Joe Elliot will be here, as we celebrate the rock band made

:30:55.:30:57.

of Sheffield steel who went But now a summary of this

:30:58.:31:00.

morning's main news. Some mental health patients

:31:01.:31:10.

are waiting three years to be discharged from hospital,

:31:11.:31:13.

despite being medically Figures obtained by the BBC

:31:14.:31:15.

through freedom of information requests show that at least five

:31:16.:31:19.

patients waited more Meanwhile, hundreds more have been

:31:20.:31:22.

waiting for more than six months. NHS England says it's committed ?400

:31:23.:31:26.

million to help ease the problem. And then I used to see other people,

:31:27.:31:37.

like, leaving before me and I would be like, yeah, but I have been ready

:31:38.:31:42.

for a long time and I am more equipped, but they seem to get out

:31:43.:31:46.

quicker, so, yeah. NHS England says it's committed ?400

:31:47.:31:50.

million to help ease the problem. We will be talking more about that

:31:51.:31:54.

later in the programme. Children from the very poorest

:31:55.:31:58.

families in some parts of England are continuing to fall

:31:59.:32:01.

further behind at school. The Education Policy Institute says

:32:02.:32:03.

by the end of secondary school, the most disadvantaged children can

:32:04.:32:06.

be two years behind their peers. The government says it's directing

:32:07.:32:09.

an extra ?72 million into areas More than 100 buildings have failed

:32:10.:32:12.

the latest fire safety test, implemented in the wake

:32:13.:32:18.

of the Grenfell Tower fire. It was the second in a set of six

:32:19.:32:21.

tests ordered by the government and takes the number of buildings

:32:22.:32:24.

that don't meet current regulations The BBC has learnt that cladding

:32:25.:32:27.

and insulation panels failed the test within seven minutes

:32:28.:32:31.

of being set alight. In just over an hour,

:32:32.:32:33.

we'll be speaking to the chair of the panel in charge

:32:34.:32:36.

of ensuring buildings safe, The Venezuelan President,

:32:37.:32:39.

Nicolas Maduro, has dismissed allegations of fraud

:32:40.:32:42.

in the country's controversial A company based in London

:32:43.:32:44.

responsible for providing the voting system has claimed electoral

:32:45.:32:49.

authorities inflated the turn-out The opposition has called for more

:32:50.:32:51.

mass demonstrations. More education is needed to help

:32:52.:32:57.

people treat the victims of acid The Royal College of

:32:58.:33:01.

Emergency Medicine warns corrosive liquids are fast replacing

:33:02.:33:04.

knives as the weapon Writing in the British Medical

:33:05.:33:06.

Journal, the medics advise people to use water to help

:33:07.:33:10.

remove the chemical. The pay of the UK's top chief

:33:11.:33:23.

executives' has fallen, but a report has found there's

:33:24.:33:26.

still a huge gap between them Research from the High Pay Centre

:33:27.:33:30.

think tank reveals the bosses of FTSE 100 companies now make

:33:31.:33:34.

on average 4.5 million pounds a year - that's down nearly

:33:35.:33:38.

20% on two years ago. But it would take the average UK

:33:39.:33:40.

worker 160 years to make The six female CEOs on the list also

:33:41.:33:43.

earned on average nearly ?2 million a year less than their

:33:44.:33:49.

male counterparts. The UK has become a nation of binge

:33:50.:33:51.

watchers, according to research New research suggests eight in ten

:33:52.:33:55.

adults now view multiple episodes of their favourite shows

:33:56.:33:59.

in a single sitting, though most of us still watch

:34:00.:34:01.

at least some live TV each week. Like, perhaps, maybe our show. May

:34:02.:34:18.

be. The thing is, you know, the younger generation is inherently

:34:19.:34:21.

impatient, they have grown up with all this technology, so everything

:34:22.:34:24.

they want they have instantly, so the if they have watched episode one

:34:25.:34:30.

and they desperately want to see two, they want it now.

:34:31.:34:33.

Health warnings are in place across Europe as temperatures reach

:34:34.:34:36.

The strongest heatwave of the year is predicted to hit large swaths

:34:37.:34:40.

of the continent in the coming days, with Italy, France, Spain and parts

:34:41.:34:44.

of the Balkans among the countries affected.

:34:45.:34:46.

Now, I don't know about you, but I am properly excited about tonight,

:34:47.:34:55.

with England playing against the Netherlands in the semifinals this

:34:56.:34:58.

evening - I am getting more loud with my voice!

:34:59.:35:01.

Mike's at Manchester City's Etihad Academy to see how the Lionesses'

:35:02.:35:04.

success so far will affect the sport at grassroots level.

:35:05.:35:07.

Yes, good morning. I am not sure how loud Steph is going to be by the

:35:08.:35:17.

time kickoff, with excitement building and it is as you say a huge

:35:18.:35:21.

night for English football, the Lionesses the highest ranked team

:35:22.:35:24.

left in the Euros this year after beating France, their nemesis, for

:35:25.:35:29.

the first time since the 1970s, and Germany surprisingly knocked out by

:35:30.:35:33.

Denmark, so it is England against the Netherlands. The hosts in front

:35:34.:35:37.

of 21,000 fans and millions watching on TV to see if the Lionesses can

:35:38.:35:42.

win their first ever major tournament. We are reflecting that

:35:43.:35:46.

here at the Manchester academy. England are without their

:35:47.:35:47.

goalkeeper. Siobhan Chamberlain will replace

:35:48.:35:48.

the injured Karen Bardsley. That doesn't seem to worry her

:35:49.:35:52.

team-mates or manager. Mark Sampson says she is now

:35:53.:35:55.

the best goalkeeper England are the highest ranked

:35:56.:35:57.

team left in the Euros Holland will be the team that under

:35:58.:36:12.

pressure because if it has been in their home country the crowd will be

:36:13.:36:16.

full of Dutch people and they will be all against us but I think we

:36:17.:36:19.

have obviously been three experiences where we have been in

:36:20.:36:23.

the dog, we went to Canada and beat a host nation in the quarter-final,

:36:24.:36:26.

which was a fantastic experience. We have better players now and we have

:36:27.:36:30.

players that have really improved their individual games and really

:36:31.:36:33.

want to put on the England shirt and do what is right for the team.

:36:34.:36:35.

The biggest transfer in world football should be completed today.

:36:36.:36:38.

Brazillian forward Neymar will leave Barcelona and sign

:36:39.:36:40.

for Paris St Germain for a world record, wait

:36:41.:36:43.

He left Barcelona for the French capital yesterday.

:36:44.:36:53.

His new deal at PSG is believed to be worth 45 million euros a year,

:36:54.:36:57.

Here's what some PSG fans think of the move.

:36:58.:37:03.

We are all very excited for his coming. I think he can make good

:37:04.:37:15.

things in this team. The price is ridiculous, that's the only thing I

:37:16.:37:19.

think about. I think it's good that they take him, but let's be honest,

:37:20.:37:24.

it's ridiculous, the prices they pay for players is ridiculous at this

:37:25.:37:25.

moment. Scottish champions Celtic are now

:37:26.:37:28.

just one step away from a place in the group stages

:37:29.:37:32.

of the Champions League after a hard-fought victory over

:37:33.:37:34.

the Norwegian side Rosenborg. James Forest's brilliant second-half

:37:35.:37:36.

strike was enough to give Brendan Rodgers' side

:37:37.:37:39.

a 1-0 aggregate win. They now go into the playoff

:37:40.:37:40.

round which will be drawn tomorrow. This time last year I was going into

:37:41.:37:53.

these games with the hope that we could get through and try and find a

:37:54.:37:58.

way. Now we go into them and we come up to here to play with that level

:37:59.:38:02.

and that composure, and, you know, everyone is talking about the

:38:03.:38:06.

pressure of the game. But to play that way was sensational, really,

:38:07.:38:13.

and, yeah, I am really happy about the players.

:38:14.:38:15.

There was a surprise in the big race of the day at Goodwood with 20-1

:38:16.:38:19.

outsider Here Comes When winning the Sussex Stakes.

:38:20.:38:21.

Odds-on favourite Ribchester finished in second after rival

:38:22.:38:24.

Churchill was forced to pull out because of the heavy rain.

:38:25.:38:27.

Here Comes When held on to win by a neck.

:38:28.:38:29.

Rory McIlroy says that he and former caddy JP Fitzgerald remain the best

:38:30.:38:33.

of friends since ending their professional relationship.

:38:34.:38:35.

The pair worked together for nine years but the four time major winner

:38:36.:38:38.

And a lot of great times, a lot of great times on and off

:38:39.:38:45.

And I still consider JP one of my best friends,

:38:46.:38:49.

But sometimes to preserve a personal relationship,

:38:50.:38:55.

you might have to sacrifice a professional one.

:38:56.:39:08.

We are watching the young community players from Broadheath and Ashton

:39:09.:39:18.

and I am joined by Kevin, technical director. We can see the enthusiasm

:39:19.:39:21.

for what the Lionesses is doing. What impact it is it having on the

:39:22.:39:27.

grassroots level? It has been absolutely massive. At the football

:39:28.:39:32.

club we have the "Is and we had over 800 participants apply. -- so, to

:39:33.:39:40.

see 800 girls participating is fantastic. -- we have the open

:39:41.:39:46.

girls. They are participating in football. It has had a massive

:39:47.:39:50.

impact. You saw that in the World Cup and the European Championships.

:39:51.:39:53.

And what's crucial is seven Manchester City players playing for

:39:54.:39:56.

England on the same features as these girls in the community. It is

:39:57.:40:01.

huge for us. The Manchester City women's team are fantastic models.

:40:02.:40:05.

Alice is within the academy, the young girls aspire to be the Steff

:40:06.:40:10.

Wharton, these girls play in the same as the women's team as well,

:40:11.:40:15.

they have the same aspirations. Without the injured Barnsley and

:40:16.:40:21.

Scott suspended, do they have the depth and strength to win?

:40:22.:40:26.

Absolutely. It is a major blow to lose the players from the squad. The

:40:27.:40:30.

team has shown in the past the depth of talent they have in the team. I

:40:31.:40:33.

genuinely think tonight that they will win the game and go through.

:40:34.:40:38.

Thank you, Kevin. Let's go and get the reaction from some of the girls

:40:39.:40:47.

to see what they think. We have Izzy. You are from Broadheath, how

:40:48.:40:51.

confident that England beat the Netherlands in a friendly, have they

:40:52.:40:55.

got too much for the Dutch? It is going to be hard, and I hope they

:40:56.:40:59.

win, obviously, and it is going to be as vital to way through. We will

:41:00.:41:03.

see if they can keep it together. That is confidence for you. And you

:41:04.:41:08.

play alongside the top players, so how inspirational is that for you?

:41:09.:41:13.

Honestly, people hope you are gonna be one of them players in future.

:41:14.:41:19.

The Kizhi a role model, doesn't it? Yeah. Can I have a ball? This keeper

:41:20.:41:25.

is doing so well, she needs a proper test. Just give a bit of a warmup.

:41:26.:41:32.

Oh, what a save, fantastic. I will see you later on for more. Oh, Mike,

:41:33.:41:39.

"Proper test Klose you just got nailed. I am loving the analysis as

:41:40.:41:44.

well. We -- We are used to football finances

:41:45.:41:48.

hitting the headlines, from record transfers and high

:41:49.:41:51.

wages, to the cost of TV rights. Yet, even for a sport flush

:41:52.:41:54.

with cash, the likely transfer fee of Brazilian striker,

:41:55.:41:57.

Neymar, from Barcelona to Paris St Germain

:41:58.:41:59.

seems eye-watering. The near ?200 million move

:42:00.:42:04.

represents a 110% increase Kieran McGuire is a football finance

:42:05.:42:06.

lecturer and joins us now. good morning. Is he worth it? He is

:42:07.:42:24.

to the Qatari owners to PSG and he probably is to PSG as well because

:42:25.:42:27.

they have struggled to make an impact on European football in terms

:42:28.:42:31.

of competing with the big boys. Can one man make a difference, ?200

:42:32.:42:36.

million man, can he make the difference? If he can push them past

:42:37.:42:40.

the quarter-finals of the Champions League he can, and he brings a lot

:42:41.:42:44.

with him, he has a bigger social media following is an Real Madrid,

:42:45.:42:47.

than Manchester United individually, so PSG will piggyback on his fame to

:42:48.:42:54.

become more famous. Why is it so much bigger than anything we have

:42:55.:42:58.

seen before? I know they are always heading upwards. Why is it bigger?

:42:59.:43:02.

His side a contract with Barcelona last year. In the contract it was

:43:03.:43:06.

written his clause would be 220 million euros and at the time

:43:07.:43:09.

everyone laughed and thought it would never be paid. I think because

:43:10.:43:14.

the Qatari owners are desperate to increase their profile - this is

:43:15.:43:18.

done for political and full ball reasons - they have said they will

:43:19.:43:21.

bite the bullet and pay the money. Political reasons? If you look at

:43:22.:43:26.

what's happening in the Middle East with Qatar isolated by the other

:43:27.:43:32.

countries, this is a show of defiance, "We are still in business,

:43:33.:43:38.

still able to buy whatever we want." What does it mean for the football

:43:39.:43:44.

market? It will be ratcheted up. Barcelona have ?200 million in the

:43:45.:43:48.

bank account. They are going to have to replace Neymar. So the clubs they

:43:49.:43:53.

will approach will save, well, previously we try to sell you a plea

:43:54.:43:57.

for 60 million, but maybe it will increase, so the clubs will say they

:43:58.:44:04.

want 100. How can you break down the money? Often you talk about, OK,

:44:05.:44:09.

this is the player salary, then we look at the endorsements,

:44:10.:44:12.

advertising, sponsorship. How does it work with Neymar and his

:44:13.:44:17.

management team? His manager is his father. He will take a proportion of

:44:18.:44:21.

the fee as they negotiator. Did you say that he is going to earn more

:44:22.:44:29.

than Messi? He will earn more than tour might Messi owns? Certainly.

:44:30.:44:34.

You would expect the manager fee to be significant. There will be image

:44:35.:44:40.

rights and whether they will go to PSG or Neymar will determine how

:44:41.:44:44.

much money will be split between them. PSG may be able to recover the

:44:45.:44:50.

sea because they will get a proportion every time his signature

:44:51.:44:54.

is on a commercial deal, they will take a slice out of that. The worry

:44:55.:44:59.

when I hear these numbers, I know the money comes from TV rights and

:45:00.:45:03.

all of the commercial deals, as you say. What does it mean for the fans?

:45:04.:45:07.

They already fork out money for the tickets. Are we going to see this

:45:08.:45:11.

push up the prices? No. If you look at pricing over the last five or six

:45:12.:45:15.

years, the Premier League has realised it has reached a tipping

:45:16.:45:20.

point. Most prices have been frozen or close to the rates of inflation.

:45:21.:45:30.

Football clubs get money from three sources - the fans, I don't think

:45:31.:45:34.

they can be squeezed further, they get it from TV. TV money will

:45:35.:45:37.

continue to increase. And they get it from commercial sponsors. The

:45:38.:45:41.

sponsors in relation to PSG will pay more. The fans will be safe in this.

:45:42.:45:45.

That is good to hear. You could talk about it for hours. It is

:45:46.:45:49.

fascinating. It is a lot of money. We were working out earlier it is

:45:50.:45:53.

the equivalent of buying three Boeing planes. 440 million pints of

:45:54.:45:59.

milk if you needed it. Thank you. Neymar in milk.

:46:00.:46:03.

I wonder what tempted -- Carol is worth. She is priceless. I tell you

:46:04.:46:13.

what, lots of people want to be enjoying these temperatures we are

:46:14.:46:14.

seeing in Europe. Absolutely right. These are

:46:15.:46:22.

life-threatening temperatures. There are warnings out for the heat and

:46:23.:46:25.

the humidity. These are yesterday's temperatures. 44 in Corsica and

:46:26.:46:32.

Sardinia, 43 in Rome. That is a good 10- 15 above average for this time

:46:33.:46:36.

of year. In Italy there is a drought. The extent of the drought

:46:37.:46:44.

is equivalent to Lake Como. That is how much water they are lacking.

:46:45.:46:48.

That is equivalent to about 20 billion cubic metres. That is a lot

:46:49.:46:55.

of water they are short of. Last week we saw pictures of Corsica and

:46:56.:46:59.

the south of France, with wildfires. This area is at risk of wildfires,

:47:00.:47:03.

especially as we push from Corsica Italy into the Balkans and southern

:47:04.:47:08.

Poland. It is a serious situation. Raqqa time there is nothing this. We

:47:09.:47:14.

have sunny spells, showers, and it is going to be windy. The strongest

:47:15.:47:18.

winds will be across England and Wales. It is being driven by this

:47:19.:47:23.

area of low pressure. You can see the isobars and the centre of the

:47:24.:47:27.

low pressure system, with showers coming all the way around it. This

:47:28.:47:30.

morning we have showers across southern parts of England and Wales.

:47:31.:47:35.

Fairly hit and miss. Fewer showers today. They will be less intense

:47:36.:47:41.

than further north. On each side of those showers there will be

:47:42.:47:44.

sunshine, and some of us will miss them altogether. For northern

:47:45.:47:47.

England and Ireland, and Scotland, this is where we have the heaviest

:47:48.:47:52.

showers. Some of those, especially in Scotland, will be slow-moving.

:47:53.:47:55.

There will also be Honda rent -- thunder and possibly hail. The

:47:56.:48:03.

showers will get going through the day. Across the south, you will find

:48:04.:48:06.

generally in England and Wales we will see the showers blowing through

:48:07.:48:10.

quite quickly on those gusty winds. In between we will have sunshine. If

:48:11.:48:15.

you are out of the window and in the sunshine and out of the showers, 19-

:48:16.:48:20.

22 will not feel too bad. Through the evening and overnight it will

:48:21.:48:24.

still be windy. Lots of dry weather around. We will still see showers.

:48:25.:48:29.

If anything the rain across the Northern Isles will slip further

:48:30.:48:33.

south. No problem with the temperatures overnight. We are still

:48:34.:48:37.

looking at double figures in towns and cities. Tomorrow it is another

:48:38.:48:42.

showery day. Rain in Scotland. Turning more showery across Northern

:48:43.:48:47.

Ireland, England and Wales. Fairly isolated. Lots of us will not see

:48:48.:48:52.

them. We will hang on to a dry day with sunny spells and hires up to 23

:48:53.:48:57.

Celsius. As we head into the weekend, more showers on Saturday.

:48:58.:48:58.

Turning dry on Sunday. We've been talking about high pay

:48:59.:49:02.

this morning, looking especially high if you're

:49:03.:49:08.

the footballer Neymar. Sean's got more on the latest report

:49:09.:49:09.

about how much the UK's biggest Still a lot, but not as much as they

:49:10.:49:23.

had then? Not as much, but it is still high watering. Weather you are

:49:24.:49:29.

Neymar or you are the boss of BP, are you worth it? That is where the

:49:30.:49:31.

controversy comes from. Yes, high pay's certainly been

:49:32.:49:32.

in the spotlight recently. We're talking about some of the UKs

:49:33.:49:35.

highest earners this morning. The bosses at the top of Britain's

:49:36.:49:38.

biggest 100 companies that There's been some research

:49:39.:49:40.

carried out into this by the High Pay Centre,

:49:41.:49:44.

who look at this area. It found that the average pay

:49:45.:49:47.

package of a FTSE 100 chief executive last year

:49:48.:49:50.

was ?4.5 million. People who work full-time in the UK

:49:51.:49:52.

earn an average salary of ?28,000. So that means, it would take one

:49:53.:49:59.

of those workers about 160 years The report also found

:50:00.:50:02.

that top female bosses - and there are only six

:50:03.:50:06.

in those top 100 companies - earned an average of ?2.6 million,

:50:07.:50:12.

well below their male equivalents. Let's talk to Edwin Morgan,

:50:13.:50:15.

from a group representing business leaders, the Institute

:50:16.:50:19.

of Directors. Good morning. Good morning. These

:50:20.:50:39.

losses are earning a well over 100 times what their employees are

:50:40.:50:45.

earning. -- bosses. Is that right? The first thing to say is that at

:50:46.:50:49.

the Institute of directors we represent about 30,000 business

:50:50.:50:52.

leaders, and their average pay is more like ?100,000 a year, she is

:50:53.:50:56.

obviously very generous but nothing like the ?4.5 million a year. --

:50:57.:51:01.

which is obviously. It is important to recognise that lots of people in

:51:02.:51:05.

business do think that these very high salaries on the FTSE 100 are a

:51:06.:51:09.

risk to what people think of business in general. They have been

:51:10.:51:15.

signs today that there has been some moderation right at the top. That is

:51:16.:51:19.

obvious the positive. It shows that they are listening. Lau listening to

:51:20.:51:24.

public concerns and political pressure. So that annual moderation

:51:25.:51:29.

is a good thing. When it comes down to it, you say that even your

:51:30.:51:33.

members, lots of people are running smaller businesses around the UK and

:51:34.:51:37.

they look at these figures, some of the bosses, the boss of WPP earning

:51:38.:51:43.

nearly ?50 million. He is paid quadruple, ?22 million. Is that

:51:44.:51:49.

right? I think like you say, clearly, these are listed companies

:51:50.:51:52.

which are owned by the shareholders. The people who have the bigger stake

:51:53.:51:56.

in the mother 's shareholders, and of course the owners and the people

:51:57.:52:00.

who work for them. The moderation is positive. Clearly these levels are

:52:01.:52:05.

still incredibly high and they need to be kept down. With a quite a long

:52:06.:52:10.

period, in fact, in order to get back in line with the overall

:52:11.:52:14.

performance of these companies, of the FTSE, and really to get back in

:52:15.:52:19.

line with public expectations. If we look at the six female bosses,

:52:20.:52:24.

earning nearly half as much on average as the mail ulcers, how does

:52:25.:52:31.

that work? -- male bosses. I think the FTSE in general as a big issue

:52:32.:52:35.

with women at senior levels. It is not just these female CEOs who are

:52:36.:52:39.

earning less on average, it is the whole number of women in the

:52:40.:52:43.

executive positions. Is that because the boards of these companies not

:52:44.:52:46.

listening and are not actually saying, looking fairly at women in

:52:47.:52:51.

the top job, and saying, we will give you a fair amount? I think

:52:52.:52:57.

there are a whole range of problems. Headhunters are not putting thought

:52:58.:53:00.

enough women for the most senior jobs, there are not enough women in

:53:01.:53:04.

the pipeline right up to the top, so that is why they are

:53:05.:53:06.

underrepresented as a whole. Then you have everything, from

:53:07.:53:10.

unconscious bias, I am sure that plays a part, it is a big problem

:53:11.:53:15.

and it needs to be look that much more widely than just the pay issue.

:53:16.:53:19.

It is a big, systemic problem in business. The government is trying

:53:20.:53:23.

to tackle the particular issue of women in executive positions through

:53:24.:53:27.

the Hampson and Alexander Review. It is something that all business needs

:53:28.:53:31.

to recognise. We have a problem at the top of these biggest companies.

:53:32.:53:34.

Much more needs to be done. Thank you. So that pay scale is coming

:53:35.:53:41.

down to those chief executives. That shareholder revolt we have talked

:53:42.:53:44.

about for years seems to be having an impact, saying that they are paid

:53:45.:53:48.

too much. There are still big disparities between what the

:53:49.:53:51.

employees of the companies are paid and also the difference between

:53:52.:53:52.

women and men. Rubbish has been piling up

:53:53.:53:53.

in Birmingham after bin collectors Refuse workers are taking part

:53:54.:53:56.

in a series of walk-outs in a row Our Midlands correspondent,

:53:57.:54:01.

Sima Kotecha, is in Birmingham this Sima, some residents are taking

:54:02.:54:04.

matters into their own hands, Well, absolutely. It isn't very

:54:05.:54:24.

pleasant here at the moment. In fact it smells rather awful, if I'm

:54:25.:54:28.

honest. This strike has been going on since June 30. It has been five

:54:29.:54:32.

weeks. It is over the council wanting to change the shift patterns

:54:33.:54:37.

for bin workers. At the moment they do four-day weeks. Council wants

:54:38.:54:41.

them to do five-day weeks. In workers say that means less pay and

:54:42.:54:47.

fewer supervisor jobs. -- bin workers. The council says it

:54:48.:54:50.

doesn't, but they have to change the way that they work because they have

:54:51.:54:54.

to make some savings. People have become so fed up that in some cases

:54:55.:54:57.

they have started clearing up this rubbish themselves. I went out with

:54:58.:55:01.

some from the committee yesterday who got a tipper truck and do just

:55:02.:55:05.

that. The whole city knows that the binmen are on strike and we, as

:55:06.:55:11.

collective rudders, we have come together to clear up as much of the

:55:12.:55:15.

streets in Birmingham as we can. -- collective brothers. We are really

:55:16.:55:20.

upset that we have to live in these dire straits of rubbish. We did one

:55:21.:55:26.

load, we picked up one load, and the smell, and everything that has come

:55:27.:55:30.

out of it, we have been disgusted by it. The whole purpose of this is to

:55:31.:55:33.

encourage everybody else to stop lying on the council, roll up your

:55:34.:55:38.

sleeves, and if you cannot do it get in touch with us and we will happily

:55:39.:55:42.

come out and clear the rubbish for you. Why have you felt so strongly

:55:43.:55:46.

about coming out yourself with this tipper truck and all your friends to

:55:47.:55:50.

do this today? We feel that we as malls sums have a responsibility to

:55:51.:55:54.

our community, hence the reason, cleanliness is half of our religion,

:55:55.:55:59.

and clearly hear the cleanliness is an issue. This is why we as Muslims,

:56:00.:56:06.

and there that brothers, we have come together with one agenda, which

:56:07.:56:14.

is due keep our neighbourhoods clean, to come out and help you. As

:56:15.:56:22.

you heard there, some people taking it into their own hands to clean up

:56:23.:56:26.

this rubbish. Like I said, it smells grows here. Look at this rubbish.

:56:27.:56:31.

Piles of lack bags, falling out from these wheelie bins. This strike is

:56:32.:56:37.

due to go on until September, and if I am totally honest, speaking to

:56:38.:56:40.

people over the last couple of days there is not much optimism about a

:56:41.:56:45.

resolution any time soon between the council and The Unite union, which

:56:46.:56:48.

represents the bin workers. If there is no resolution any time soon, this

:56:49.:56:55.

city could become incredibly smelly. Not very pleasant as tall. -- at

:56:56.:56:58.

all. Time to get the Now though, it's back

:56:59.:00:21.

to Steph and Naga. This is Breakfast with

:00:22.:00:23.

Steph McGovern and Naga Munchetty. Mental health patients

:00:24.:00:29.

are being kept waiting to be discharged from hospital

:00:30.:00:31.

for up to three years, despite being medically

:00:32.:00:33.

fit to leave. Research for the BBC finds that

:00:34.:00:35.

hundreds of others across the UK are facing delays of

:00:36.:00:38.

more than six months. Also this morning: Nearly 200

:00:39.:00:46.

buildings in England are now known to have failed safety tests

:00:47.:01:12.

on cladding and insulation We'll speak to the man in charge

:01:13.:01:14.

of making them safe. Britain's big business bosses earned

:01:15.:01:18.

?4.5 million on average last year. That's down nearly 20%, but can that

:01:19.:01:27.

level of pay be justified? It's a big night for English

:01:28.:01:30.

football as the Lionesses play the Netherlands in the semi-finals

:01:31.:01:36.

of the Women's Euros. I'm out on the training pitch this

:01:37.:01:38.

morning to see how the excitement Health and weather warnings are put

:01:39.:01:42.

in place across large parts of Southern Europe as potentially

:01:43.:01:52.

life-threatening high Good morning. Not to that extent,

:01:53.:02:10.

Naga, looking at 40 degrees plus in Europe, today our best in Britain is

:02:11.:02:14.

23- 24, sunshine and showers heaviest in the northern half of the

:02:15.:02:18.

country and blowing through quickly in the southern half on quite a

:02:19.:02:22.

gusty wind. I will have more in 15 minutes.

:02:23.:02:22.

There are fresh concerns about the state of mental healthcare

:02:23.:02:27.

A BBC investigation has revealed that some patients are waiting more

:02:28.:02:32.

than three years to be discharged from hospital,

:02:33.:02:34.

despite being medically fit to leave.

:02:35.:02:36.

Figures obtained through freedom of information requests show

:02:37.:02:39.

at least five patients waited more than 1,000 days,

:02:40.:02:41.

while hundreds more have been waiting for more than six months.

:02:42.:02:43.

The government says the NHS is investing hundreds of millions

:02:44.:02:46.

of pounds in treating mental health patients in the community.

:02:47.:02:50.

Our social affairs correspondent Michael Buchanan reports.

:02:51.:02:57.

It helps when I'm bored or anything and I haven't got anything to do.

:02:58.:03:11.

Toni shows me round her home, where she lives with five other

:03:12.:03:14.

The 32-year-old suffers from schizophrenia and a personality

:03:15.:03:18.

She has spent almost half her life in psychiatric hospitals.

:03:19.:03:23.

She moved here last year, though, and loves it.

:03:24.:03:25.

But arguments over who should pay for her care means she spent months

:03:26.:03:29.

longer in hospital than she needed to.

:03:30.:03:31.

I would see other people leaving before me.

:03:32.:03:40.

I would be like, yeah, but I I've been ready

:03:41.:03:42.

Many psychiatric patients would recognise Toni's experience.

:03:43.:03:48.

We've discovered that at least five patients waited more than three

:03:49.:03:51.

While more than 300 spent six months longer in hospital

:03:52.:03:59.

Often, people are in a revolving door of hospital placement,

:04:00.:04:07.

and then then a failed community placement,

:04:08.:04:11.

because that step is just too significant.

:04:12.:04:14.

So, by providing a comprehensive package of support, we hope

:04:15.:04:17.

The complex where Toni lives is is provided by a national charity

:04:18.:04:24.

who say there aren't enough similar units.

:04:25.:04:26.

Toni says she will soon move into a small bungalow

:04:27.:04:32.

a further step towards rebuilding her life.

:04:33.:04:35.

Too many mental health patients are being denied a similar chance.

:04:36.:04:46.

In a few minutes we'll hear more on this issue from the Royal College

:04:47.:04:50.

Children from the very poorest families in some parts of England

:04:51.:04:54.

are continuing to fall further behind at school.

:04:55.:04:56.

The Education Policy Institute says by the end of secondary school,

:04:57.:04:59.

the most disadvantaged children can be two years behind their peers.

:05:00.:05:02.

The government says it's directing an extra ?72 million into areas

:05:03.:05:05.

It starts in primary school and widens in the years that follow,

:05:06.:05:12.

the attainment gap between poorer and wealthier children.

:05:13.:05:16.

Now, for some disadvantaged kids, that gap did close slightly over

:05:17.:05:19.

But when you look at the very poorest children, it didn't.

:05:20.:05:25.

The report calculates that by the time they sit their GCSEs

:05:26.:05:28.

But the picture does vary nationwide.

:05:29.:05:35.

You can speculate that funding would be a factor in certain parts

:05:36.:05:38.

We know that aspirations are quite important,

:05:39.:05:42.

So, I think all of these things will be having -

:05:43.:05:47.

and more - will be having an influence.

:05:48.:05:51.

Disadvantaged children are more likely to earn less in future

:05:52.:05:54.

Put simply, it leads to wasted potential.

:05:55.:05:59.

The Department for Education says there is over ?2 billion this year

:06:00.:06:02.

to support schools in this area, and money to help young people

:06:03.:06:06.

in so-called social mobility cold spots.

:06:07.:06:10.

Today's report acknowledges there has been progress overall

:06:11.:06:12.

but the conclusion - it is far too slow.

:06:13.:06:16.

If the rate of change over the last decade continues the study says it

:06:17.:06:20.

would take a staggering 50 years before the gap is closed.

:06:21.:06:31.

More than 200 buildings have failed the latest fire safety test,

:06:32.:06:34.

implemented in the wake of the Grenfell Tower fire.

:06:35.:06:37.

It was the second in a set of six tests ordered by the government

:06:38.:06:41.

and takes the number of buildings that don't meet current regulations

:06:42.:06:44.

The BBC has learnt that cladding and insulation panels failed

:06:45.:06:47.

the test within seven minutes of being set alight.

:06:48.:06:50.

In just over half an hour, we'll be speaking to the chair

:06:51.:06:53.

of the panel in charge of making buildings safe

:06:54.:06:56.

A cot death charity has raised concerns over the use

:06:57.:07:01.

of Finnish-style baby boxes designed for newborns to sleep in.

:07:02.:07:04.

The cardboard box, filled with baby products and a mattress,

:07:05.:07:07.

became synonymous with record-low infant mortality rates

:07:08.:07:09.

They're now given to new parents by some NHS trusts,

:07:10.:07:13.

but the Lullaby Trust warns there is no evidence

:07:14.:07:15.

that they reduce the likelihood of sudden infant death syndrome.

:07:16.:07:22.

It's been revealed that it would take the average UK worker 160

:07:23.:07:25.

years to earn what a top chief executive earns in just one.

:07:26.:07:30.

Sean's got more on the latest report on what the country's bosses

:07:31.:07:33.

We are talking a lot about pay at the moment. This year we have been

:07:34.:07:42.

talking about pay rises. And not keeping up with price rises. Then we

:07:43.:07:47.

have the BBC pay, with some quite eye watering figures. And today the

:07:48.:07:55.

FTSE 100 is what we are looking at, the 100 biggest companies on the

:07:56.:07:58.

stock exchange. Lots of pension funds invest in these companies. The

:07:59.:08:03.

high pay centre found those bosses running the companies are earning

:08:04.:08:07.

four and a half million, which is down 20% on the previous year.

:08:08.:08:11.

Shareholders have been criticised for not holding bosses and companies

:08:12.:08:15.

to account for the size of pay. They have started to kick up a fuss.

:08:16.:08:19.

Within that there are disparities that are still quite obvious. You

:08:20.:08:25.

mentioned 160 times the average worker on ?28,000 a year. The

:08:26.:08:31.

difference between women and men running these companies, only six

:08:32.:08:35.

women running these companies on the FTSE 100. That hasn't gone up over

:08:36.:08:46.

recent years. They earn to 6p -- 2.6 million a year. As we heard earlier,

:08:47.:08:51.

it is a fundamental problem in business. Starting from the bottom,

:08:52.:08:56.

recruitment, having people in the pipeline, then you end up with this

:08:57.:09:01.

figure on top. Thanks very much and I am sure we will talk about that a

:09:02.:09:05.

lot more. Yes, we are going to stick with pay.

:09:06.:09:06.

Brazilian striker Neymar will become the most expensive footballer

:09:07.:09:09.

in history when he completes his transfer from Barcelona to Paris St

:09:10.:09:12.

The French club have agreed to pay nearly ?198 million to release him

:09:13.:09:23.

The 25-year-old is expected to earn ?40 million a year before tax.

:09:24.:09:27.

Yeah, well, Ciaran McGuire told us this would in fact the rest of the

:09:28.:09:42.

market. Everything will be ratcheted up because Barcelona have ?200

:09:43.:09:46.

million in the bank account and they will have to replace Neymar so the

:09:47.:09:52.

clubs approaching him will say, previously resold you a plea for 60

:09:53.:09:57.

million, although if it is going to be Coutinho, whoever it will be,

:09:58.:09:59.

will say we want 80 or 90 or 100. The UK has become a nation of binge

:10:00.:10:02.

watchers according to research Health warnings are in place

:10:03.:10:06.

across Europe as temperatures reach A record-breaking heatwave

:10:07.:10:08.

is currently affecting swathes of the continent, from Romania,

:10:09.:10:11.

to Spain and Portugal. As much of Europe sizzles,

:10:12.:10:13.

just what is the best way An almost continent-wide heatwave

:10:14.:10:21.

has pushed temperatures above 40 degrees Celsius, breaking records

:10:22.:10:27.

and sending people and their pets In Austria, the elephants at

:10:28.:10:30.

Vienna Zoo took to the pool to cool. The city's horses had to go

:10:31.:10:41.

home, it was so hot. Others, though,

:10:42.:10:46.

weren't quite so lucky. It's experiencing its worst

:10:47.:10:48.

drought in 60 years. 11 of its 20 regions could soon

:10:49.:10:55.

declare a state of emergency. And there are weather warnings

:10:56.:11:01.

in place across Europe. After last week's wildfires

:11:02.:11:09.

in France, firefighters With dry conditions,

:11:10.:11:11.

the risk of further fires is high. In southern Spain, forecasters

:11:12.:11:16.

described the weather as extreme. A high of 47 degrees

:11:17.:11:20.

is expected in Cordoba. The advice is to drink plenty

:11:21.:11:31.

of water, and despite the lure of the Mediterranean sun,

:11:32.:11:34.

sea and sand, the authorities are urging people

:11:35.:11:36.

to stay inside during the hottest hours

:11:37.:11:38.

of the day. Carol will have more on that later

:11:39.:11:44.

on. As we've been hearing this morning,

:11:45.:11:46.

research by the BBC has revealed how some mental health patients

:11:47.:11:50.

are waiting three years to be discharged from hospital,

:11:51.:11:52.

despite being medically NHS England says its providing ?400

:11:53.:11:54.

million to help tackle the problem, but what exactly is going wrong

:11:55.:11:58.

and where should the money be spent? Doctor Arpan Dutta is from

:11:59.:12:02.

Royal College of Psychiatrists. Thank you very much for joining us

:12:03.:12:15.

this morning. Why is this such a delay? It sounds like such a long

:12:16.:12:19.

time people are staying in hospital when they should be discharged. Yes,

:12:20.:12:24.

I think there is a number of factors within this, I think from the data I

:12:25.:12:29.

have seen. There is issues in terms of funding, in terms of disputes

:12:30.:12:36.

around funding issues. Funding in terms of what, though? In terms of

:12:37.:12:42.

accommodation placements for people. There are problems sometimes with

:12:43.:12:46.

delays around assessment for commendation. And what we know is

:12:47.:12:51.

one in six people who might be on an acute mental health inpatient ward

:12:52.:12:56.

don't need to be there any more but might be waiting for another

:12:57.:13:01.

service, maybe for supported accommodation, they might be waiting

:13:02.:13:07.

for mental health rehabilitation services. So the problem is you

:13:08.:13:11.

haven't really got anything between the hospital and going back into the

:13:12.:13:15.

community for lots of them, so there isn't anywhere to go next? I suppose

:13:16.:13:21.

it is trying to prevent that cycle of people returning back into

:13:22.:13:27.

hospital. So in some cases people often remain on inpatient mental

:13:28.:13:32.

health wards where there are actually better and more suitable

:13:33.:13:36.

alternatives. It is about the provision of those alternatives, and

:13:37.:13:40.

sometimes there isn't the availability of the appropriate

:13:41.:13:42.

supported accommodation. What does it do for their mental health in the

:13:43.:13:46.

meantime considering they are there to be helped? Absolutely, and I

:13:47.:13:54.

suppose they are people with vulnerability at that point, and it

:13:55.:13:58.

has a number of effects on them, not only in terms of getting to a point

:13:59.:14:01.

where people become institutionalised, they sometimes

:14:02.:14:07.

become deskilled, and it affects blocking the flow of people through

:14:08.:14:10.

the system, so that people coming in will often end up going to out of

:14:11.:14:17.

area placements hundreds of miles from their loved ones, families, and

:14:18.:14:21.

that has a big impact for families and carers. Tell me how it works for

:14:22.:14:25.

you. Have you been in the situation where you have had to assess someone

:14:26.:14:29.

and decide whether or not it is safe for them to leave hospital? Yeah. Or

:14:30.:14:35.

you have worked with people, because I don't genuinely understand how

:14:36.:14:38.

someone can be kept for three years in a hospital when they are

:14:39.:14:43.

medically fit? What process has taken place where doctors have said

:14:44.:14:47.

you are fine, but we can't help you move on, who have you spoken to, is

:14:48.:14:51.

it counsels, other parts of the NHS, how does this happen? Yes, the

:14:52.:14:58.

services are quite fragmented, and I suppose that needs development in

:14:59.:15:02.

terms of integration of services. Certainly there is a divide between

:15:03.:15:07.

health and social care. And a lot of placements for people are jointly

:15:08.:15:11.

funded. So in my work it would be linking up with social workers, with

:15:12.:15:15.

other professions trying to identify appropriate placements for people. I

:15:16.:15:22.

suppose it is finding the right placement for the right person. And

:15:23.:15:27.

that is often creating a delay. How does it make someone in that

:15:28.:15:31.

position Field who is in charge someone 's health? A doctor's job is

:15:32.:15:38.

to do the best job you can and physically your hands are tied? Yes,

:15:39.:15:42.

it can be really difficult. I think it is working with what we've got to

:15:43.:15:48.

maintain hope for people, to try to help them understand that, actually,

:15:49.:15:52.

it is finding the right placement. And I think that there is that

:15:53.:15:56.

opportunity for mental health rehabilitation services to really

:15:57.:16:01.

look at how they can improve things to prevent people returning back

:16:02.:16:05.

into hospital, 'cause what we don't want is... We want people to be

:16:06.:16:15.

in... Finding the right placements but also in terms of appropriately

:16:16.:16:18.

looking at alternatives to admission. So there is crisis

:16:19.:16:22.

resolution home treatment teams, there is other things like supported

:16:23.:16:27.

accommodation. So it is looking for the alternative options to

:16:28.:16:28.

admission. We talk a lot about NHS funding, and

:16:29.:16:38.

the NHS says they will provide an extra ?400 million for crisis

:16:39.:16:41.

resolution home treatment teams. What difference will this make, do

:16:42.:16:46.

you think? I think any funding is welcome. I think it will start to

:16:47.:16:53.

make a difference. I think part of the royal college of the country,

:16:54.:16:57.

part of the work that has been done is to look after the commission, to

:16:58.:17:03.

look at what service capacity is and how services can manage supply and

:17:04.:17:09.

demand. I think that is important. Resources are scarce these days. It

:17:10.:17:12.

is about working more efficiently and smarter with what we have. If

:17:13.:17:17.

the situation going to get worse or better? That is a difficult one

:17:18.:17:21.

to... The implication of your hesitation is that it is going to

:17:22.:17:24.

get worse. You have just been talking about funding being tight,

:17:25.:17:28.

and resources being scarce. If things are not changed, the services

:17:29.:17:35.

are at a critical point. We need things to change, really, so that

:17:36.:17:40.

people are moving forward. And that is not just doctors, that is the

:17:41.:17:45.

linked professions, occupational therapists, psychologists, nurses,

:17:46.:17:48.

it is investment in all of those professions linked together. A whole

:17:49.:17:52.

systems approach. Thank you for your candid thoughts and analysis. Yes,

:17:53.:17:54.

thank you. It's 7:18am and you're watching

:17:55.:17:57.

Breakfast from BBC News. Here's Carol with a look

:17:58.:18:00.

at this morning's weather. Temperatures in Europe are

:18:01.:18:03.

incredible at the moment. Way above average. Yes, Rome should

:18:04.:18:14.

have a temperature of about 30, as should Sardinia. You can see how

:18:15.:18:19.

much higher they are. There is a red heat warning across Sardinia,

:18:20.:18:22.

southern Italy, the Balkans and southern Poland. These are

:18:23.:18:25.

dangerous, life-threatening amounts of heat. If you are travelling to

:18:26.:18:33.

these areas, note that we are not acclimatise to this kind of heat.

:18:34.:18:37.

Bear that in mind. There is also the risk of wildfires, because

:18:38.:18:40.

everything is tinderbox dry. We saw wildfires in Corsica and southern

:18:41.:18:45.

France last week. All of these areas are at risk of that. In Rome they

:18:46.:18:51.

are rationing water, as well as in 20 other towns in Italy. No letup in

:18:52.:18:55.

this drought situation in the short-term forecasts. To be warned,

:18:56.:19:00.

if you are travelling there. Nothing quite like that at home. We are

:19:01.:19:04.

looking at a day of sunshine and showers. Some showers will be heavy

:19:05.:19:09.

in the north of the country and in the south there will be blown

:19:10.:19:13.

through quickly on strong winds. Low pressure is dominating our weather,

:19:14.:19:16.

high pressure is dominating the weather in Europe. You can see the

:19:17.:19:20.

squeeze in the isobars telling you that it is going to be windy. We

:19:21.:19:23.

have these showers rattling around the area of low pressure, so they

:19:24.:19:27.

are heaviest in the centre. They are not so heavy to come further south,

:19:28.:19:31.

but we are looking at some decent dry spells and quite a bit of

:19:32.:19:35.

sunshine. If you do catch a shower it will go through quickly than we

:19:36.:19:38.

will see the sunshine comeback. For northern England, Northern Ireland

:19:39.:19:41.

and Scotland, there are heavy showers. Some of those will be

:19:42.:19:45.

slow-moving because the wind here is not as strong, particularly across

:19:46.:19:49.

Scotland. Hail and thunder, and between them we will see sunshine.

:19:50.:19:53.

In the Northern Isles we have the remnants of yesterday's rent. That

:19:54.:19:56.

will continue to push north. Later tonight it will come south again.

:19:57.:20:01.

Sunshine and showers sums it up. Windy also sums it up, across

:20:02.:20:05.

England and Wales. In the sunshine, we are looking at highs in the low

:20:06.:20:10.

20s. That will feel quite as on. 22 in London, 19 as we sweep up towards

:20:11.:20:14.

Aberdeen. As we move into the evening and the overnight period, we

:20:15.:20:17.

will lose some of the showers. It will still be windy. This rain

:20:18.:20:22.

across the Northern Isles starts to sink south into Scotland.

:20:23.:20:28.

Temperature wise, we are in pretty good shape. 13- 15. That is how we

:20:29.:20:33.

start the day tomorrow. The rain in the north, and increasingly that

:20:34.:20:36.

will turn more showery through the day. Northern Ireland, Scotland and

:20:37.:20:42.

Wales will be looking at sunshine and showers, but fewer showers than

:20:43.:20:48.

today, with highs up to 23. As for the weekend, showers and sunshine on

:20:49.:20:52.

Saturday, but something drier for most of us on Sunday, with rain

:20:53.:20:55.

coming in to Northern Ireland later on.

:20:56.:21:05.

Carol, not just dry weather but a dry throat. Get some water. I need a

:21:06.:21:12.

cup of tea. I am as dry as a horse's hoof.

:21:13.:21:14.

LAUGHTER . When you were young, I mean really

:21:15.:21:25.

young... Not that long ago! Maybe eight years ago. What were you into?

:21:26.:21:31.

Children's TV programmes, you know. Thomas the Tank Engine, that sort of

:21:32.:21:35.

thing. You're not into politics and business and finance? Well, I did

:21:36.:21:39.

spreadsheets... Did you? Of course not. There is a reason we are

:21:40.:21:46.

talking about this. Yes, there is a very smart young girl, Isla. She has

:21:47.:21:52.

scooped the Best Actress prize at the Scottish Comedy catnap awards.

:21:53.:21:53.

Why? Her political musings. We'll speak to her father,

:21:54.:21:59.

comedian Mark Nelson, But first, here they are discussing

:22:00.:22:01.

the general election. You love elections. I am sick of the

:22:02.:22:21.

elections. Did you not even enjoy the debate? They were not even

:22:22.:22:26.

there. Who would you vote for? None of them. I think Theresa May is the

:22:27.:22:33.

leader we need right now. She will provide a strong... Strong and

:22:34.:22:36.

stable, strong and stable. That is all she says. What about Jeremy

:22:37.:22:47.

Corbyn, then? Leader material? He is too old to lead the country. What do

:22:48.:22:54.

you mean? Here looks older than that Papa. Ten two cannot even use an

:22:55.:22:59.

iPad. Do you not think he has good policies? How would we pay for them?

:23:00.:23:05.

You need to be realistic. What about the SNP? What if they wind all the

:23:06.:23:11.

seats in Scotland? We will be a 1-party state. We will all have to

:23:12.:23:16.

get the same haircut. You would not good with the Nicola Sturgeon how,

:23:17.:23:20.

dad. You can always vote for the Lib Dems. Good one, dad!

:23:21.:23:27.

Mark Nelson joins us now. Mark, good to have the reverse on the

:23:28.:23:31.

programme. You must be proud of. Extremely proud. It is really good

:23:32.:23:37.

fun. How much of this is Isla and how much of this is script writing,

:23:38.:23:40.

and you are and conversations that have kind of happened over playtime?

:23:41.:23:48.

It is pretty much all me writing it. Despite what a lot of people on

:23:49.:23:52.

Facebook think, that I was coming up with a lot of the stuff herself. --

:23:53.:23:57.

that Isla was coming up. But lots of it comes up when we are doing it. We

:23:58.:24:02.

can spend a small while chatting away, and lots of it comes out of

:24:03.:24:06.

that. So it is mostly me, but some of it is improvised. Tell me, how

:24:07.:24:11.

does the filming process work with Isla? You obviously have to get her

:24:12.:24:15.

in the mood. Because although you are doing the writing, she is the

:24:16.:24:20.

star. Yes, it is a process. The process of bribery, in a way. There

:24:21.:24:25.

are a lot of sweets in there. She knows that after every couple of

:24:26.:24:29.

lines she is going to get some sweets. So she knows how to play the

:24:30.:24:32.

system. I love your honesty about this. I think it is fantastic. It

:24:33.:24:36.

would have been quite easy for you to say, though, it is all her. How

:24:37.:24:41.

much does she understand of what she is talking about in terms of policy?

:24:42.:24:45.

Steph and I said we were not doing spreadsheets when we were three or

:24:46.:24:48.

four, and was certainly not having political conversations. She doesn't

:24:49.:24:52.

really understand initially, but after we do the videos, if we are

:24:53.:24:56.

listening to the car, she will recognise names like Theresa May or

:24:57.:25:00.

Donald Trump. Then she will acknowledge that we were talking

:25:01.:25:04.

about that as well. So she is starting to get a wee inkling about

:25:05.:25:08.

what we have in discussing. Tell us, what is of people have been watching

:25:09.:25:11.

these videos. Have you been surprised at just how popular this

:25:12.:25:13.

has become? Stunned. I thought the first couple

:25:14.:25:22.

of videos we did, we were delighted if that doesn't people have seen it.

:25:23.:25:27.

We were blown away with that. Then the one that we did over Easter got

:25:28.:25:32.

about 70 million. It was ridiculous. That whole weekend, we found out

:25:33.:25:36.

that we had people messaging me from Malaysia, Hong Kong, Mexico could

:25:37.:25:42.

all sorts of stuff. It has been a surprise. Not a natural thing to do

:25:43.:25:48.

with a three-year-old. Outages find out she has an aptitude for this? --

:25:49.:25:55.

how did you find out. Just from spending time with her. She has

:25:56.:25:59.

always been easy to chat to. She has always on how to be funny, which is

:26:00.:26:04.

nice. It is weird. Being a stand-up comedian, it is weird seeing

:26:05.:26:07.

somebody that young know exactly what a joke is. She has aways been

:26:08.:26:13.

very expressive and she has been talking. So we just worked it from

:26:14.:26:19.

there. What next? Are there more programmes to come? Do you think she

:26:20.:26:27.

is moving on? I hope so. There is a time frame on it, in terms of

:26:28.:26:31.

eventually her getting bored of doing it, but I think there is a

:26:32.:26:36.

view things that are going on in the world that I would like to do videos

:26:37.:26:39.

about. -- a view things. So hopefully will doing more. She is a

:26:40.:26:44.

delight to watch. I hope she enjoyed herself birthday. Thank you for

:26:45.:26:45.

joining us. Thank you so much. Mark Nelson is performing his

:26:46.:26:47.

new show, Irreverence, at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe

:26:48.:26:49.

until the 27th of August. Charlie is going up there. He will

:26:50.:26:58.

be there tomorrow. Yes, the fund. No, he is working. That was the

:26:59.:27:05.

wrong thing to say. He'll be working very hard from the Edinburgh

:27:06.:27:06.

Festivals were. Now though, it's back

:27:07.:30:27.

to Steph and Naga. This is Breakfast with

:30:28.:30:29.

Steph McGovern and Naga Munchetty. Some mental health patients

:30:30.:30:40.

are waiting three years to be discharged from hospital,

:30:41.:30:43.

despite being medically Figures obtained by the BBC

:30:44.:30:44.

through freedom of information requests show that at least five

:30:45.:30:47.

patients waited more Meanwhile, hundreds more have been

:30:48.:30:50.

waiting for more than six months. NHS England says it's committed ?400

:30:51.:30:54.

million to help ease the problem. The services are at a critical point

:30:55.:31:07.

and we need things to change, really, so that people are moving

:31:08.:31:12.

forward, and that's not just sort of doctors, that is the lead

:31:13.:31:17.

professions, psychologists, nursing, all of those, investment in all of

:31:18.:31:21.

those professions put together, a whole systems approach, I suppose.

:31:22.:31:23.

Children from the very poorest families in some parts of England

:31:24.:31:26.

are continuing to fall further behind at school.

:31:27.:31:29.

The Education Policy Institute says by the end of secondary school,

:31:30.:31:31.

the most disadvantaged children can be two years behind their peers.

:31:32.:31:34.

The government says it's directing an extra ?72 million into areas

:31:35.:31:37.

More than 100 buildings have failed the latest fire safety test,

:31:38.:31:43.

implemented in the wake of the Grenfell Tower fire.

:31:44.:31:45.

It was the second in a set of six tests ordered by the government

:31:46.:31:49.

and takes the number of buildings that don't meet current regulations

:31:50.:31:52.

The BBC has learnt that cladding and insulation panels failed

:31:53.:31:56.

the test within seven minutes of being set alight.

:31:57.:32:03.

In a short while, we'll be speaking to the chair of the panel in charge

:32:04.:32:08.

of ensuring building's safe, following the Grenfell Tower fire.

:32:09.:32:11.

The Venezuelan President, Nicolas Maduro, has dismissed

:32:12.:32:13.

allegations of fraud in the country's controversial

:32:14.:32:15.

A company based in London responsible for providing the voting

:32:16.:32:18.

system has claimed electoral authorities inflated the turn-out

:32:19.:32:20.

The opposition has called for more mass demonstrations.

:32:21.:32:31.

More education is needed to help people treat the victims of acid

:32:32.:32:35.

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine warns corrosive

:32:36.:32:38.

liquids are fast replacing knives as the weapon

:32:39.:32:40.

Writing in the British Medical Journal, the medics advise people

:32:41.:32:44.

to use water to help remove the chemical.

:32:45.:32:54.

The pay of the UK's top chief executives has fallen,

:32:55.:32:56.

but a report has found there's still a huge gap between them

:32:57.:33:00.

Research from the High Pay Centre think tank reveals the bosses

:33:01.:33:04.

of FTSE 100 companies now make on average 4.5 million pounds a year

:33:05.:33:08.

- that's down nearly 20% on two years ago.

:33:09.:33:10.

But it would take the average UK worker 160 years to make

:33:11.:33:14.

The UK has become a nation of binge watchers, according to research

:33:15.:33:21.

New research suggests eight in ten adults now view multiple episodes

:33:22.:33:26.

of their favourite shows in a single sitting,

:33:27.:33:28.

though most of us still watch at least some live TV each week.

:33:29.:33:38.

The thing is, you know, the younger generation is inherently

:33:39.:33:40.

impatient, they have grown up with all this technology,

:33:41.:33:43.

so everything they want they have instantly,

:33:44.:33:45.

so the if they have watched episode one and they desperately want to see

:33:46.:33:48.

Binge watching. Yeah. I was up to it last night. Once you start on the

:33:49.:34:06.

Yukon stop, can you? When you know that there are eight episodes -- you

:34:07.:34:13.

can't stop. I get upset if I have to watch only one per week, I feel I am

:34:14.:34:19.

being deprived. Yeah, thankfully, though, we are still alive. You

:34:20.:34:24.

can't ever get too much of carol, though, I will tell you that much.

:34:25.:34:28.

We will have the weather with her in a short while. First, Mike, again,

:34:29.:34:33.

someone you can never have too much of. Are you sure? Mike, are you

:34:34.:34:42.

there? I am indeed. My OK to go? I will pay you later for the lovely

:34:43.:34:48.

compliment, Naga, thank you very much indeed. We are at the home of

:34:49.:34:52.

the English champions in football and it is a huge night ahead for

:34:53.:34:57.

everyone who will be cheering on the Lionesses, here are the England

:34:58.:35:01.

stars of the future, inspired by the England team, who have done so well.

:35:02.:35:06.

Such a chance to make history. Let's not underestimate what it means.

:35:07.:35:07.

England face Holland tonight in the semi-finals

:35:08.:35:09.

of the European Championships as they look to win their first

:35:10.:35:12.

This time they can't be knocked out or beaten in the final by Germany.

:35:13.:35:21.

They have gone, as have France, the team England failed to beat since

:35:22.:35:27.

1974. England have put it right, the Lionesses did it, they beat them in

:35:28.:35:31.

the quarter-finals. They have good form against the Dutch team as well,

:35:32.:35:37.

beating them in the semifinals in 2009 in the Euros, and in November

:35:38.:35:41.

England beat the Netherlands in a friendly there as well. There is a

:35:42.:35:46.

real hope they can win a major tournament for the first time. I

:35:47.:35:51.

know that they have a couple of suspensions with Jill Scott out and

:35:52.:35:55.

their keeper, Karen Barnsley, after the collision in the quarter-finals,

:35:56.:35:56.

so she is out as well. Siobhan Chamberlain will replace

:35:57.:35:58.

the injured Karen Bardsley. That doesn't seem to worry her

:35:59.:36:00.

team-mates or manager. Mark Sampson says she is now

:36:01.:36:03.

the best goalkeeper England are the highest ranked

:36:04.:36:05.

team left in the Euros Holland will be the team that under

:36:06.:36:09.

pressure because if it has been in their home country the crowd

:36:10.:36:19.

will be full of Dutch people and they will be all against us

:36:20.:36:22.

but I think we have obviously been three experiences where we have been

:36:23.:36:26.

in the dog, we went to Canada and beat a host nation

:36:27.:36:29.

in the quarter-final, We have better players now

:36:30.:36:31.

and we have players that have really improved their individual games

:36:32.:36:36.

and really want to put on the England shirt and do

:36:37.:36:38.

what is right for the team. The biggest transfer in world

:36:39.:36:44.

football should be completed today. Brazillian forward Neymar

:36:45.:36:47.

will leave Barcelona and sign for Paris St Germain

:36:48.:36:50.

for a world record, wait He left Barcelona for

:36:51.:36:52.

the French capital yesterday. His new deal at PSG is believed

:36:53.:36:55.

to be worth 45 million euros a year, Here's what some PSG

:36:56.:36:59.

fans think of the move. We are all very excited

:37:00.:37:04.

for his coming. I think he can make good

:37:05.:37:06.

things in this team. The price is ridiculous,

:37:07.:37:09.

that's the only thing I think about. I think it's good that they take

:37:10.:37:12.

him, but let's be honest, it's ridiculous, the prices they pay

:37:13.:37:15.

for players is ridiculous Scottish champions Celtic are now

:37:16.:37:18.

just one step away from a place in the group stages

:37:19.:37:31.

of the Champions League after a hard-fought victory over

:37:32.:37:34.

the Norwegian side Rosenborg. James Forest's brilliant second-half

:37:35.:37:36.

strike was enough to give Brendan Rodgers' side

:37:37.:37:38.

a 1-0 aggregate win. They now go into the playoff

:37:39.:37:41.

round which will be drawn tomorrow. This time last year I was going

:37:42.:37:46.

into these games with the hope that we could get through

:37:47.:37:50.

and try and find a way. Now we go into them and we come up

:37:51.:37:52.

to here to play with that level and that composure, and,

:37:53.:37:57.

you know, everyone is talking But to play that way

:37:58.:37:59.

was sensational, really, and, yeah, I am really

:38:00.:38:03.

happy about the players. Rory McIlroy says that he and former

:38:04.:38:13.

caddy JP Fitzgerald remain the best of friends since ending

:38:14.:38:17.

their professional relationship. The pair worked together for nine

:38:18.:38:19.

years but the four time major winner Back here at the Manchester City

:38:20.:38:34.

academy and this is where the English champions Manchester City

:38:35.:38:44.

play. I am joined by two teammates. Thank you, ladies. You know what it

:38:45.:38:49.

is like to be in the thick of it, don't you. First of all, how do you

:38:50.:38:55.

feel for Karen after the injury in the quarter-final? Devastating. We

:38:56.:39:00.

are all gutted for her. As soon as we heard how it was. Knowing Karen,

:39:01.:39:05.

the ultimate professional, she will be back note -- no doubt about it. I

:39:06.:39:12.

think they will get the job done. What it -- is it like coming in at

:39:13.:39:20.

this stage of the tournament with the pressure on? She will be fine.

:39:21.:39:24.

She came in the previous World Cup in the quarter-finals and did a

:39:25.:39:27.

great job. The girls have faith in her. She has plenty of ready and

:39:28.:39:32.

experience. She will just enjoy the occasion. And hopefully they will

:39:33.:39:37.

get the job done. You played for the under 23s. What will it be like as

:39:38.:39:45.

they wake before this semi-final? They will be relaxed. They have made

:39:46.:39:49.

a name for themselves. It is just rooting for them now. It is a big

:39:50.:39:54.

occasion. They are ready for them. And they know what it takes to beat

:39:55.:39:58.

the Dutch. They did it in 2009, a long time ago, and last year in a

:39:59.:40:03.

friendly. Holland are on a good run. Just the same as England. So I hope

:40:04.:40:08.

they get the job done. How important is it for England to have this

:40:09.:40:12.

momentum, and they have been together a long time, they got to

:40:13.:40:16.

the semifinals of the World Cup, came third, and kept it going - how

:40:17.:40:19.

important is that cohesion, togetherness? Yes, obviously, they

:40:20.:40:26.

have a feelgood approach, they know the friends and family, that is

:40:27.:40:30.

important to the girls and that has got them through so far.

:40:31.:40:34.

Togetherness on and off the pitch shows, and look what they are doing

:40:35.:40:38.

on the pitch when together, it is amazing. Just watching the little

:40:39.:40:43.

one spine due. To see how inspirational it is, starting out

:40:44.:40:46.

their career, we cannot underestimate the impact on women's

:40:47.:40:50.

football. It is the bigger sport according to the FA with a 19%

:40:51.:40:57.

increase in grassroots since 2011. When you have teams like Manchester

:40:58.:41:02.

City putting all the resources into it, and now as you say, six and

:41:03.:41:07.

seven-year-old girls can aspire to be the next Steph, the next Karen,

:41:08.:41:11.

and they have fantastic role models. Hopefully they will look back and

:41:12.:41:16.

go, England were the European champions. In a nutshell, the

:41:17.:41:26.

prediction? 1-0 England. And you? 2- zero. It is going to be tight but,

:41:27.:41:33.

as the players say, England have what it takes to beat the Dutch -

:41:34.:41:39.

they know what to do. I can't wait for the match. You have the England

:41:40.:41:43.

planned, have you? Of course of. What time should I come around?

:41:44.:41:48.

Straightaway after work, we have to get the snacks in. We are going to

:41:49.:41:54.

speak with Carol in a minute about the weather, but first.

:41:55.:41:55.

Nearly two months after a deadly fire spread

:41:56.:41:57.

through Kensington's Grenfell Tower, thousands of people

:41:58.:41:59.

across the country remain unsure about the safety of their own homes.

:42:00.:42:02.

Nearly 200 buildings in England have failed safety tests ordered

:42:03.:42:05.

Sir Ken Knight chairs the Government's independent fire

:42:06.:42:09.

safety panel and we can speak to him now.

:42:10.:42:13.

Thank you very much for joining us. Just looking at the figures now

:42:14.:42:20.

nearly 200 buildings which are unsafe. What needs to be done to

:42:21.:42:25.

make these buildings safe? Good morning. You will recall we started

:42:26.:42:30.

off, I chair the expert panel advising government, and we started

:42:31.:42:36.

off doing some screening tests of the external part of the cladding to

:42:37.:42:41.

see is combustibility. This phase of tests is recommended by the expert

:42:42.:42:46.

panel to test the cladding system as a whole. And as you see the latest

:42:47.:42:50.

results show that the first screening tests were correct and

:42:51.:42:53.

with the cladding together the cladding system with the aluminium

:42:54.:42:59.

composite materials have failed those tests to meet the current

:43:00.:43:04.

building regulations. So the importance is to ensure that

:43:05.:43:09.

landlords know what to do. The residents need to feel safe and we

:43:10.:43:13.

are also made recommendation measures they need to put in place

:43:14.:43:16.

and have started to put in place already. So how quickly will this

:43:17.:43:21.

happen, then, when will people in buildings feel safe? I hope they

:43:22.:43:24.

feel safe now because every one of these buildings has had an

:43:25.:43:29.

inspection from the local Fire and Rescue Service. They have all had a

:43:30.:43:33.

fire risk inspection. The landlords have made interim measures such as

:43:34.:43:36.

making sure smoke detectors work, people know what to do in the event

:43:37.:43:41.

of fire and special measures they have put in place. I hope residents

:43:42.:43:46.

feel the expert panel on the advice we gave the government is being

:43:47.:43:51.

heeded and is undertaken. And landlords themselves have been

:43:52.:43:55.

responsible to take those mitigating actions required. What is the advice

:43:56.:44:00.

you are giving? The advice we are giving is first of all to ensure

:44:01.:44:04.

that in advance of the test results being known, and landlords know, and

:44:05.:44:08.

that's important to make sure their residents know that the landlords

:44:09.:44:13.

ensure there is a risk assessment taken place in the building. Such as

:44:14.:44:17.

the fire doors working, smoke detectors working, people know what

:44:18.:44:21.

to do in the event of fire. All of those measures have to be put in

:44:22.:44:26.

place as well as the local Fire and Rescue Service both being available

:44:27.:44:29.

for advice and having given advice to each of these buildings. It is

:44:30.:44:33.

all very well giving advice and saying to make sure people know what

:44:34.:44:38.

to do in the event of a fire but they are still in buildings that are

:44:39.:44:42.

not safe. And the cladding is so should not be in those buildings and

:44:43.:44:47.

we are also giving advice on removing that cladding. And as the

:44:48.:44:52.

test continues, these are full-scale test to test the whole cladding

:44:53.:44:57.

system of what happens in the event of fire, and it is a well-respected

:44:58.:45:01.

standard test used around the world, actually, so that as the further

:45:02.:45:07.

test results emerge we can give further advice not only on those

:45:08.:45:11.

buildings that have been found to be unsafe, but more importantly how to

:45:12.:45:15.

make those buildings safe and take the cladding of that is on now. Is

:45:16.:45:21.

it fair to say this is a fairly chaotic process? Some authorities

:45:22.:45:25.

have removed cladding. Others haven't. This process have taken a

:45:26.:45:29.

long time. People are not sure if homes are safe or not. I don't think

:45:30.:45:35.

it is chaotic. I certainly wouldn't, nor did we recommend, that the

:45:36.:45:40.

outside cladding should be taken off prematurely to leave what is the

:45:41.:45:44.

installation of loan underneath. And we have issued new advice on that.

:45:45.:45:49.

Longer term it is important to know that only last week the government

:45:50.:45:54.

announced a review of building regulations and fire safety

:45:55.:45:57.

generally, chaired by Dame Judi Hackett, which will be an important

:45:58.:46:01.

milestone as well. My role and the expert panel's role is to deal with

:46:02.:46:05.

the immediacy - the question you asked - how to make sure people feel

:46:06.:46:09.

safe and that they are safe and we are doing everything we can to give

:46:10.:46:13.

the best possible expert advice to government. This isn't the first

:46:14.:46:17.

time you've looked at fire safety in tower blocks because he wrote a

:46:18.:46:21.

report after a fire in 2009. One of the things you said was not to

:46:22.:46:26.

retrofit sprinklers and instead take a more holistic look at fire safety.

:46:27.:46:31.

Do you think it is still the case, and what do you mean by a holistic

:46:32.:46:35.

approach to fire safety? That was some time ago. Since then technology

:46:36.:46:41.

has moved on as well. There are other fire suppression systems. I am

:46:42.:46:46.

pleased to see the wider field, not just sprinklers, automatic systems,

:46:47.:46:53.

the technical aspect is an important, the holistic aspect is

:46:54.:46:57.

insuring sprinklers play a very important part in fire safety. But

:46:58.:47:01.

that is not instead of making sure smoke detectors work and people know

:47:02.:47:05.

what to do in the event of fire. And that fire doors were properly and

:47:06.:47:09.

close properly. The holistic fire safety is the whole of the parts

:47:10.:47:13.

working together to keep people safe in the buildings they live and work

:47:14.:47:15.

in. Have you changed your mind about

:47:16.:47:23.

retrofitting sprinklers? No, I think that is right to be considered a lot

:47:24.:47:28.

of the time. That is why, after the last review, and after the

:47:29.:47:31.

Southampton fire, in which we tragically saw the death of

:47:32.:47:34.

firefighters, the government did write to all local authorities and

:47:35.:47:37.

ask them to carefully consider the retrofitting of sprinklers were it

:47:38.:47:42.

was appropriate to do so. I'm sure that debate will come further and

:47:43.:47:47.

faster as we go through both the review of the building regulations

:47:48.:47:50.

and the wider public enquiry, which of course has also been announced.

:47:51.:47:52.

Thank you. It's 07:47 and you're watching

:47:53.:47:57.

Breakfast from BBC News. Here's Carol with a look

:47:58.:48:00.

at this morning's weather. Carroll, you are looking at these

:48:01.:48:08.

dangerous, really, some people might think they are fabulous, but these

:48:09.:48:11.

temperatures can be harmful? Absolutely right. In fact, in

:48:12.:48:17.

certain parts of Europe, such as Sardinia, Italy, the Balkans and

:48:18.:48:22.

southern Poland, there is a red heat warning in force. That is the top

:48:23.:48:26.

level of warning. We don't see many of those in the course of a year. It

:48:27.:48:30.

is not just heat, it is also humidity. Life-threatening heat

:48:31.:48:34.

false on people. What we have at the moment is no rain in the short-term

:48:35.:48:39.

forecast. There is also a drought across parts of Italy. In fact,

:48:40.:48:42.

there is water rationing in Rome and another 20 cities across Italy.

:48:43.:48:48.

Those temperatures are a good ten to 15 degrees above where they should

:48:49.:48:52.

be at this stage of the year. If you are travelling to any of these

:48:53.:48:55.

places across southern Europe, bear that in mind. We British are not

:48:56.:49:00.

acclimatise to this kind of heat and humidity. Back home we have

:49:01.:49:03.

something quite different. Sunshine and showers, some of those showers

:49:04.:49:07.

will be heavy on the northern half of the country, and also pretty

:49:08.:49:10.

windy across England and Wales. You will see that in the isobars. If you

:49:11.:49:14.

catch a shower in England and Wales, it will rattle through quite

:49:15.:49:17.

quickly. In the centre of the high pressure there isn't much wind at

:49:18.:49:21.

all. The showers will be slow-moving and heavy. You can also see the high

:49:22.:49:25.

pressure dominating much of Europe at the moment. To translate that

:49:26.:49:29.

onto our charts, it is basically sunshine and showers. The showers

:49:30.:49:33.

are blowing through quite quickly on the wind, which means if you catch a

:49:34.:49:37.

shower in England or Wales it will not be as heavy or as frequent as

:49:38.:49:41.

further north, and you will see sunshine fairly quickly afterwards,

:49:42.:49:44.

as soon as that shower goes through. For Northern Ireland Scotland, we

:49:45.:49:48.

are also at sunshine and showers. Those showers, from the lack of

:49:49.:49:52.

wind, will be slow-moving. There is lots of dry weather around and some

:49:53.:49:55.

sunny spells as well. The rain across the northern islands will

:49:56.:49:59.

continue to push northwards and will come south later on. Northern

:50:00.:50:02.

England, some showers, lots of dry weather. As we come south into the

:50:03.:50:09.

Midlands, East Anglia, Fx and Kent, heading to Hampshire and the Isle of

:50:10.:50:13.

Wight, lots of dry weather around and fewer showers. Fewer showers as

:50:14.:50:18.

well, as we go from the Isle of Wight towards the Isles of Scilly

:50:19.:50:22.

and all points in between. Sunshine and showers. Wales will see some

:50:23.:50:25.

showers, but it will be windy, especially close to the coast.

:50:26.:50:28.

Inland you will notice it. This evening and overnight we hang on to

:50:29.:50:32.

the wind. We will see that rain across the north of Scotland go

:50:33.:50:36.

further south, and there will be lots of dry weather around as well.

:50:37.:50:39.

No problems with the minimum temperatures. 13- 15. Tomorrow we

:50:40.:50:45.

begin with that rain across Scotland turning more showery through the

:50:46.:50:49.

day. Then we're back into a day of sunshine and showers. Fewer showers

:50:50.:50:53.

than most of us saw today. As a result, with the lighter winds, it

:50:54.:50:56.

will feel warm across single and Wales and cool Scotland and Northern

:50:57.:51:00.

Ireland. That leaves us into Saturday, which is sunshine and

:51:01.:51:05.

showers. Sunday is looking dryer for most of us, with rain in Northern

:51:06.:51:07.

Ireland later. The high street clothes retailer

:51:08.:51:11.

Next has just reported it's sales They are often a bellwether for the

:51:12.:51:20.

high street. So how are they doing? Better than earlier in the year, but

:51:21.:51:24.

they have already told us they do not expect it to be a great year. So

:51:25.:51:27.

it is a slight improvement. Next is a big name

:51:28.:51:29.

on our high street, in our shopping centres,

:51:30.:51:33.

on many retail parks - but it's those physical stores

:51:34.:51:36.

where it's struggling. What they call full price sales have

:51:37.:51:38.

fallen by nearly 8% in-store compared to the first

:51:39.:51:41.

half of last year. But online sales are up

:51:42.:51:43.

by a similar amount. I'm joined now by Kirsty McGregor

:51:44.:51:52.

who's the deputy editor of the fashion and retail

:51:53.:51:55.

magazine, Drapers. Good news or not? Good and bad news.

:51:56.:52:01.

They potentially cancel each other out. We have is -- we have falling

:52:02.:52:07.

retail sales in their stores, but a good increase across their online

:52:08.:52:13.

sales. The problem there is that with the retail sales, stores are

:52:14.:52:16.

expensive to run. You might be moving people online, but you still

:52:17.:52:20.

have the overhead costs of those stores. They said earlier this year

:52:21.:52:24.

that even though sales are falling in store, they will Ashley be

:52:25.:52:28.

expanding their stores. Why? Is that wise? At the beginning of the year

:52:29.:52:33.

they modelled what would happen if retail sales continued to fall for

:52:34.:52:36.

them. What they realise was that stores are still profitable, so it

:52:37.:52:40.

is still worth having them to now. What they are going to do is try to

:52:41.:52:44.

get some shorter leases, I think. So it makes things more fixable. In a

:52:45.:52:48.

few years more time at that store is not profitable any more, they can

:52:49.:52:51.

exit that recent shock them. There may be a point where Next have to

:52:52.:52:55.

make a decision, whether they have the stores that they have at the

:52:56.:52:59.

moment. Absolutely. I do not think they will open a lot of new stores.

:53:00.:53:03.

Lots of retailers at the moment are looking at their whole store

:53:04.:53:06.

portfolio and shrieking it as more people shop online. They said

:53:07.:53:09.

earlier in the year they expected profits to fall this year. If you

:53:10.:53:12.

are a regular customer and you walk can last you and your walking in

:53:13.:53:16.

this year, what kind of changes will you see from what they are offering?

:53:17.:53:20.

There are a couple of changes we have seen coming through, not

:53:21.:53:23.

necessarily the changes. One of the things they held their hands up to

:53:24.:53:27.

at the beginning of the was product. They tried to make it more trends

:53:28.:53:32.

driven. Much more responsive. That is good in theory. It is what people

:53:33.:53:36.

are used are now, seeing the latest trends in the shops in a matter of

:53:37.:53:40.

weeks. They went too far down that road and took their eye off the ball

:53:41.:53:44.

when it came to their core product. The T-shirts and different basics

:53:45.:53:49.

that you would normally go into a Next to store to pick up. They are

:53:50.:53:53.

trying to correct that now, at it takes a little while to come

:53:54.:53:56.

through. So there is the product is side of things. They also need to

:53:57.:54:01.

invest in their online offers, making sure that delivery is a to

:54:02.:54:05.

scratch. There are competitors like is on coming in. They are upping

:54:06.:54:09.

their fashion offerings. And they are for delivering quickly. The big

:54:10.:54:14.

battle on the high street over the decade has been M and Next. Next

:54:15.:54:20.

have had a great run of it. Who is winning right now. Next did have a

:54:21.:54:25.

good run for a lot of years. It felt like they could do no wrong. Marks

:54:26.:54:29.

Spencer, we saw a slight improvement last quarter, but their womenswear

:54:30.:54:34.

sales have continued to decline, just not at the same rate as they

:54:35.:54:37.

were before. So they are possibly turning a corner. Not obviously both

:54:38.:54:42.

are struggling. I think what that shows is that there are wider

:54:43.:54:45.

factors affecting high-street retailers at the moment. That

:54:46.:54:49.

spending squeeze that we talk about. Yes, the squeeze on incomes, the

:54:50.:54:54.

exchange rate issue which brings that costs are going up lots of

:54:55.:54:59.

retailers, so they have to put prices up when customers are feeling

:55:00.:55:03.

the squeeze anyway. Right, you wouldn't want to be running one of

:55:04.:55:07.

these businesses. Kirsty, thank you. No resolution yet to that battle on

:55:08.:55:11.

the high street, as you can see. M and Next still having a tough time

:55:12.:55:16.

of it. Yes, struggling to target the audience. Trouble figuring out who

:55:17.:55:20.

their audience -- their customer is these days. We have been talking

:55:21.:55:28.

about a courageous. Sorry. Not your fault! It is the companies who are

:55:29.:55:31.

not fixing it. Any to do better, obviously. Sean, thank you.

:55:32.:55:37.

Still to come this morning, we'll be joined by rock star

:55:38.:55:41.

Joe Elliot to hear about the impact of thirty years

:55:42.:55:43.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:55:44.:59:12.

Now though, it's back to Steph and Naga.

:59:13.:59:14.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Steph McGovern

:59:15.:59:47.

Mental health patients are waiting up to three years to be

:59:48.:59:52.

discharged from hospital - despite being medically fit to leave.

:59:53.:59:55.

A BBC investigation finds that hundreds of others across the UK

:59:56.:59:58.

are facing delays of more than six months.

:59:59.:00:16.

Good morning, it's Thursday 3rd August.

:00:17.:00:18.

Nearly 200 buildings in England are now known to have failed safety

:00:19.:00:25.

tests on cladding and insulation following the Grenfell fire -

:00:26.:00:32.

the man in charge of the process tells as residents should feel

:00:33.:00:40.

reassured. I hope they feel safe, every one of these buildings have

:00:41.:00:44.

had an inspection by the Fire Service and have had a new fire risk

:00:45.:00:46.

inspection. It's a big night for English

:00:47.:00:47.

football as the Lionesses play hosts the Netherlands in the semi-finals

:00:48.:00:57.

of the Women's Euros. I'm out on the training pitch this

:00:58.:00:59.

morning to see how the excitement is gripping the sport

:01:00.:01:02.

at all levels. Britain's big business

:01:03.:01:04.

bosses earned ?4.5 million on average last year,

:01:05.:01:06.

that's down nearly 20%, but there are still big gaps between what men

:01:07.:01:09.

and women being paid. Health and weather warnings are put

:01:10.:01:11.

in place across large parts of Southern Europe -

:01:12.:01:16.

as potentially life threatening Today we are looking at sunshine and

:01:17.:01:30.

showers across Scotland, Northern Ireland and northern England, some

:01:31.:01:33.

are slow-moving, heavy and sundry but for the rest of England and

:01:34.:01:37.

Wales, few and far between. Not as heavy and they blow through quite

:01:38.:01:42.

quickly on the wind. More details in 15 minutes. See you then!

:01:43.:01:45.

There are fresh concerns about the state of mental

:01:46.:01:49.

A BBC investigation has revealed that some patients are waiting more

:01:50.:01:53.

than three years to be discharged from hospital, despite being

:01:54.:01:56.

Figures, obtained through freedom of information requests,

:01:57.:01:58.

show that at least five patients waited more than 1,000 days.

:01:59.:02:03.

Hundreds of others have been waiting for more than six months.

:02:04.:02:06.

The government says the NHS is investing hundreds of millions

:02:07.:02:08.

of pounds to treat mental health patients in the community.

:02:09.:02:10.

Our social affairs correspondent, Michael Buchanan, reports.

:02:11.:02:17.

It helps when I'm bored or anything and I haven't got anything to do.

:02:18.:02:26.

Toni shows me round her home, where she lives with five other

:02:27.:02:29.

The 32-year-old suffers from schizophrenia and a personality

:02:30.:02:33.

She has spent almost half her life in psychiatric hospitals.

:02:34.:02:38.

She moved here last year, though, and loves it.

:02:39.:02:40.

But arguments over who should pay for her care means she spent months

:02:41.:02:44.

longer in hospital than she needed to.

:02:45.:02:48.

I would see other people, like, leaving before me.

:02:49.:02:54.

I would be like, yeah, but I've been ready

:02:55.:02:57.

Many psychiatric patients would recognise Toni's experience.

:02:58.:03:05.

We've discovered that at least five patients waited more than three

:03:06.:03:07.

While more than 200 spent six months longer in hospital

:03:08.:03:18.

Often, people are in a revolving door of hospital placement,

:03:19.:03:23.

and then a failed community placement,

:03:24.:03:25.

because that step is just too significant.

:03:26.:03:27.

So, by providing a comprehensive package of support, we hope

:03:28.:03:29.

The complex where Toni lives is is provided by a national charity

:03:30.:03:38.

who say there aren't enough similar units.

:03:39.:03:45.

Toni says she will soon move into a small bungalow

:03:46.:03:51.

on the complex, a further step towards rebuilding her life.

:03:52.:03:53.

Too many mental health patients are being denied a similar chance.

:03:54.:03:56.

More than 200 buildings have failed fire safety tests,

:03:57.:04:04.

implemented in the wake of the Grenfell Tower fire.

:04:05.:04:06.

In the second in a set of six tests ordered by the government,

:04:07.:04:09.

more than 100 high-rises failed to meet current regulations.

:04:10.:04:12.

The BBC has learnt that cladding and insulation panels failed

:04:13.:04:14.

the test within seven minutes of being set alight.

:04:15.:04:18.

Sir Ken Knight, who chairs the government's independent fire

:04:19.:04:20.

safety panel, told Breakfast residents in these buildings

:04:21.:04:22.

I hope they feel safe now, because every one of these buildings has had

:04:23.:04:35.

an inspection by the local Fire and Rescue Service and have all had a

:04:36.:04:39.

new fire risk inspection. The landlords have made interim measures

:04:40.:04:42.

like making sure smoke detectors work and people know what to do in

:04:43.:04:46.

the event of a fire, and special measures they have put in place. I

:04:47.:04:51.

hope residents do feel that the expert panel and the advice given to

:04:52.:04:56.

the government is being heeded, and undertaken. And, landlords

:04:57.:05:00.

themselves are being responsible to take those mitigating actions

:05:01.:05:00.

required. Children from the very poorest

:05:01.:05:05.

families in some parts of England are continuing to fall further

:05:06.:05:07.

behind at school. The Education Policy Institute says

:05:08.:05:09.

by the end of secondary school, the most disadvantaged children can

:05:10.:05:12.

be two years behind their peers. The government says it's directing

:05:13.:05:15.

an extra ?72 million into areas with low social

:05:16.:05:17.

mobility. A cot death charity has said that it

:05:18.:05:24.

will no longer endorse the use of Finnish-style baby boxes,

:05:25.:05:27.

designed for newborns to sleep in. The cardboard box - filled with baby

:05:28.:05:29.

products and a mattress - has been connected with low infant

:05:30.:05:32.

mortality rates in They're now given out to some

:05:33.:05:34.

new parents through the NHS, but the Lullaby Trust warns

:05:35.:05:38.

there is no evidence that they reduce the likelihood

:05:39.:05:40.

of sudden infant death syndrome. It's been revealed that it

:05:41.:05:54.

would take the average UK worker 160 years to earn what a top chief

:05:55.:05:56.

executive earns in just one. Sean's got more on the latest

:05:57.:05:59.

report that looks at We are talking about FTSE 100

:06:00.:06:11.

bosses, the 100 biggest bosses on the stock exchange. A lot of

:06:12.:06:14.

familiar names in there that people will know from the high street and

:06:15.:06:18.

other parts of life, it is how much they are being paid. The high pay

:06:19.:06:22.

centre have looked at this and found ?4.5 million is the average salary

:06:23.:06:27.

of a chief executive of one of those companies. When you compare it to

:06:28.:06:30.

the year before, it is down nearly 20% and a lot of that is because

:06:31.:06:43.

shareholders, who can have on what executives are paid, have finally

:06:44.:06:46.

started in the last year or two to vote against the big pay packets of

:06:47.:06:49.

these big bosses. It has moved down a little but there are big

:06:50.:06:50.

disparities. Six chief executives are women and on average they are

:06:51.:06:54.

paid ?2.6 million, still a lot of women but compared to the 94 men

:06:55.:06:59.

running businesses in the FTSE 100 paid on average ?4.5 million, there

:07:00.:07:04.

is still quite a big disparity highlighted by the report. How do

:07:05.:07:09.

you judge what is correct? That is the big argument. We talk about

:07:10.:07:13.

rating chief executive pay with the average pay of the workforce, then

:07:14.:07:17.

you look at profits and share value, and progression of the company, how

:07:18.:07:22.

do you measure what the chief executive is worth? And ratio, if

:07:23.:07:28.

you look at the employees of these companies, it's about 129 times, the

:07:29.:07:35.

chief executive, what the average employee is earning. It has come

:07:36.:07:40.

down that it has politicised over the year, the Conservative and

:07:41.:07:44.

Labour parties making a point of ratios, the Conservative Party

:07:45.:07:47.

believe that the ratio should be lower, 20 times the amount of your

:07:48.:07:54.

average low earning employee but it is a fine art. They are running big

:07:55.:07:58.

businesses and employ a lot of people in this country, there are

:07:59.:08:05.

pension funds as well, it is a big job but are they worth the ?50

:08:06.:08:09.

million they were paid last year? That's where the controversy was --

:08:10.:08:15.

?15 million. Do you pinch watch television? Rarely, but when I do, I

:08:16.:08:18.

go big. But not that often. I'm not a big TV

:08:19.:08:23.

watcher. If you don't go big, don't do it at all! What is big for you,

:08:24.:08:27.

how many hours? I have done six episodes... So, six

:08:28.:08:34.

hours? It's a lot, to sit on your own watching light in a box!...

:08:35.:08:38.

Yeah, but we make a living out of it as well, so don't go... We are only

:08:39.:08:44.

on for three hours! Why are we talking about this?

:08:45.:08:50.

The UK has become a nation of 'binge watchers',

:08:51.:08:52.

according to research from the media regulator, Ofcom.

:08:53.:08:54.

New research suggests eight in ten adults now view multiple episodes

:08:55.:08:56.

of their favourite shows in a single sitting,

:08:57.:08:58.

though most of us still watch at least some live TV each week.

:08:59.:09:01.

So, staff, we are safe for now! That is good news! We are talking about

:09:02.:09:07.

the weather today... Health warnings are in place

:09:08.:09:09.

across Europe as temperatures reach A record-breaking heatwave

:09:10.:09:11.

is currently affecting swathes of the continent -

:09:12.:09:14.

from Romania to Spain and Portugal. As much of Europe sizzles,

:09:15.:09:16.

just what is the best way An almost continent-wide heatwave

:09:17.:09:20.

has pushed temperatures above 40 degrees Celsius, breaking records

:09:21.:09:23.

and sending people and their pets In Austria, the elephants at

:09:24.:09:26.

Vienna Zoo took to the pool to cool. The city's horses had to go

:09:27.:09:39.

home, it was so hot. Others, though,

:09:40.:09:43.

weren't quite so lucky. It's experiencing its worst

:09:44.:09:46.

drought in 60 years. 11 of its 20 regions could soon

:09:47.:09:53.

declare a state of emergency. And there are weather warnings

:09:54.:10:01.

in place across Europe. After last week's wildfires

:10:02.:10:05.

in France, firefighters With dry conditions,

:10:06.:10:06.

the risk of further fires is high. In southern Spain, forecasters

:10:07.:10:16.

described the weather as extreme. A high of 47 degrees

:10:17.:10:21.

is expected in Cordoba. The advice is to drink plenty

:10:22.:10:27.

of water, and despite the lure of the Mediterranean

:10:28.:10:30.

sun, sea and sand, the authorities are urging

:10:31.:10:31.

people to stay inside We will have more weather with Carol

:10:32.:10:48.

later on. Sticking with the pacing... -- pay saying.

:10:49.:10:55.

Brazilian striker, Neymar, will become the most expensive

:10:56.:10:57.

footballer in history when he completes his transfer

:10:58.:10:59.

The French club have agreed to pay nearly ?198 million to release him

:11:00.:11:03.

The 25-year-old is expected to earn ?40 million a year before tax.

:11:04.:11:13.

It has got us thinking. It is a big number to get your head around, 198

:11:14.:11:17.

million. We've been thinking about what else

:11:18.:11:19.

could you buy for the price of the soon-to-be most expensive

:11:20.:11:23.

footballer in the world. Well, ?198 million buys you three

:11:24.:11:28.

Boeing passenger planes. It is enough to match the cost

:11:29.:11:32.

of the GDP of six countries, including Tuvalu in the South

:11:33.:11:35.

Pacific. Your favourite, Steph. I often like

:11:36.:11:50.

covering the economy of two -- Tuvalu.

:11:51.:11:51.

Or you could buy 440 million individual pints of milk.

:11:52.:11:53.

That's enough to fill 100 Olympic-size swimming pools.

:11:54.:11:55.

Who decided what we look at here? You could bathe in milk for 100

:11:56.:12:03.

days... For ever! For the cost of Neymar... There is an image! Mike,

:12:04.:12:11.

how do we go to the back of -- Mike, how do we go to you on the back of

:12:12.:12:14.

that? The match tonight, it is huge and we

:12:15.:12:21.

are so excited about it! Some very strange images in my head

:12:22.:12:25.

of you two there. Here, it isn't about the money but the love of the

:12:26.:12:31.

game. We are at the home of the England champions, Manchester City.

:12:32.:12:34.

Some future stars going through their paces this morning. They will

:12:35.:12:39.

be cheering on the Lionesses tonight, a chance to get through to

:12:40.:12:47.

the Euros. Germany and France have gone, many fans will be glued to

:12:48.:12:50.

their radio and television sets tonight. Cheering on the Lionesses.

:12:51.:12:55.

Many have been sending in their messages, giving their salute as a

:12:56.:12:59.

way of giving their support to the team out there. Some famous faces

:13:00.:13:06.

across the country have been posting on social media, here are some of

:13:07.:13:10.

the best. A message to all of the England Lionesses going to the

:13:11.:13:14.

Euros... Wishing you all of the luck in the world, not that you needed

:13:15.:13:17.

but you can never have enough luck. Go out and get the trophy!

:13:18.:13:26.

# If you are winning, let me see your hands up

:13:27.:13:34.

# Salute, salute! England! We salute the Lionesses. Good luck to all of

:13:35.:13:42.

the Lionesses from all of the Birmingham city Alliance. We are

:13:43.:13:50.

rooting for you! Good luck, Lionesses, we are rooting for you!

:13:51.:13:53.

Good luck, Lionesses, we are rooting for you!

:13:54.:13:59.

Salute! # Representing all the women,

:14:00.:14:11.

salute, salute! # Wonderful tributes, and doing the

:14:12.:14:17.

salute for us now, two former England stars, Sue Smith and Lisa

:14:18.:14:21.

Johnson, well played, a cracking salute! What a night ahead. You were

:14:22.:14:25.

there, you played the last time England were in the semifinals, in

:14:26.:14:29.

the Euros 2009, weirdly enough against the Netherlands, and you

:14:30.:14:35.

one! So many emotions tonight? No pressure on the England goals but we

:14:36.:14:39.

did when. A different kind of game for them. The environment is

:14:40.:14:42.

slightly different, they are playing against Holland in Holland but the

:14:43.:14:46.

girls have shown so much belief and self-confidence, and I think they

:14:47.:14:50.

have got better in every game I have watched them. The first game against

:14:51.:14:56.

Scotland they were expansive, Spain were slightly different, they did

:14:57.:14:59.

not really have much of the ball and yet they were so clinical with Jody

:15:00.:15:04.

Taylor and Fran Kirby, getting the job done against Portugal in France,

:15:05.:15:08.

this game is different, Holland are a good attacking team that there's

:15:09.:15:11.

no reason why they can't go and win in my opinion.

:15:12.:15:16.

Psychologically how important is it to have beaten France, having not

:15:17.:15:22.

done it since 74, Germany have gone as well, so they can't lose to them

:15:23.:15:25.

in the final. Can they allow themselves to think this is our

:15:26.:15:30.

chance to make history? Realistically there will be on the

:15:31.:15:33.

back of their minds and they will be thinking about it, but as true

:15:34.:15:35.

professionals their job will be to beat Netherlands. But the eagerness

:15:36.:15:41.

to get to the final will be there because it is a great possibility

:15:42.:15:44.

for them to get to the final and the winners. How much should we read

:15:45.:15:49.

into the fact that England B the Netherlands last November 1-0 in a

:15:50.:15:54.

friendly? They will take great hope from that and believe. Like Sue

:15:55.:15:59.

said, the belief in that squad, you can see it, the resilience they have

:16:00.:16:04.

as a team, the togetherness, it is fantastic. It really gives me goose

:16:05.:16:07.

bumps watching that without believe they have. They will take positives

:16:08.:16:10.

but this is a totally different ball game tonight, in their backyard with

:16:11.:16:14.

the supporters, it will be difficult, but I think the girls can

:16:15.:16:19.

do it. Watching some of the youngsters, and talking of the

:16:20.:16:22.

strength in depth that England have got, that will be important because

:16:23.:16:27.

they are without England goalkeeper Karen Bardsley, can make it without

:16:28.:16:34.

two key players? That is a massive positive for England, the fact that

:16:35.:16:36.

Siobhan Chamberlain is so experienced. Place the Liverpool,

:16:37.:16:40.

has done before, because she had to come on in the quarterfinal at the

:16:41.:16:44.

World Cup in Canada, so she has been in this pressure situations and will

:16:45.:16:47.

be ready for this. She had a very good spring series. There are lots

:16:48.:16:52.

of players that can come in, the likes of Fara Williams, Toni Duggan,

:16:53.:16:55.

a lot of players who can come into that position and fill that role. Of

:16:56.:16:59.

course you will miss Jill Scott and Karen Bardsley because they are top

:17:00.:17:03.

professionals. But they have got a good squad and a squad that I think

:17:04.:17:08.

can cope with missing those players. We have been building up to this

:17:09.:17:13.

quite some time, since Mark Samsung to over. We have seven Manchester

:17:14.:17:16.

City players from here, how important is it to have that

:17:17.:17:18.

togetherness that has been building for a number of years, not just one

:17:19.:17:24.

tournament? I think that is a big plus for marks to have in the squad,

:17:25.:17:27.

and it has been building for three and half years since it charge of

:17:28.:17:31.

the role. But there was a big thing in the media when Mark said his

:17:32.:17:36.

squad. Three months before anybody else. Everyone said is that the

:17:37.:17:39.

right thing to do? It will only be proven towards the end but I think

:17:40.:17:42.

we can all see that togetherness, the squad belief is really good,

:17:43.:17:47.

think that is that is what is giving them that extra step. They are so

:17:48.:17:50.

difficult to break down. They have conceded one goal all tournament.

:17:51.:17:55.

And that was when there were resting players. Yes, give the girls a run

:17:56.:17:59.

out, so they have some minutes in their legs if they are needed to

:18:00.:18:03.

come on in the semifinal, or hopefully the final. So I think the

:18:04.:18:07.

way he has set about it is very good and I think hopefully we will get

:18:08.:18:11.

the results about and going to the final. Quick prediction? 2-1

:18:12.:18:19.

England. 1-0 England, it will be a tight one. The Netherlands have only

:18:20.:18:23.

conceded one goal, they haven't scored as many as England, but they

:18:24.:18:27.

have home advantage. You can follow the game live on five live. 7:45pm.

:18:28.:18:34.

STUDIO: At least both predictions are for a win for England, that's

:18:35.:18:38.

what we like. Definitely looking forward to that match. Time to have

:18:39.:18:41.

a look at the weather with Carol. Really extreme temperatures in parts

:18:42.:18:51.

of Europe, aren't there? At silly right, yes, good morning, these are

:18:52.:18:54.

yesterday's temperatures, but already for example inside an year,

:18:55.:19:00.

the temperature is 34 Celsius, 93 Fahrenheit, at this time in the

:19:01.:19:03.

morning. It is already 30 Celsius in Rome. There is a red warning out, a

:19:04.:19:09.

heat one across Sardinia, Italy, the Balkans and self:. The red warnings

:19:10.:19:15.

are as rare as hen's Keith, you only see them now and again to the cause

:19:16.:19:20.

of the year, they are not as prolific -- as rare as hen 's teeth.

:19:21.:19:26.

Not a good combination with the humidity. There is the risk to life

:19:27.:19:29.

with this kind of heat. If you are travelling to this part of the world

:19:30.:19:33.

and we are not used to it, we don't acclimatise to that quite so readily

:19:34.:19:36.

so bear that in mind. Last week, we were showing you pictures of

:19:37.:19:46.

wildfires across parts of South of France and Corsica. There is also a

:19:47.:19:52.

trout situation in Italy. The lack of rainfall is equivalent to the

:19:53.:19:58.

whole of Lake Como, about 20 billion cubic metres of rainwater that have

:19:59.:20:03.

not fallen. And there are droughts, not just in Rome but in other parts

:20:04.:20:08.

of Italy as well. Temperatures are a good ten or 15 degrees above where

:20:09.:20:13.

they should be. Back at home, the weather is completely different,

:20:14.:20:15.

sunshine and showers, some will be heavy in the northern part of the UK

:20:16.:20:19.

but in southern parts there is also quite a strong wind. Low pressure

:20:20.:20:23.

dominating our weather, whereas high pressure is dominating in Europe and

:20:24.:20:26.

there is no let up to that in the short term forecast. Back to our

:20:27.:20:30.

shores, you can see where we have the showers piling in on the centre

:20:31.:20:35.

of area of low pressure across Scotland, northern England and

:20:36.:20:38.

Northern Ireland. Not much wind to move them along so they will be

:20:39.:20:41.

heavy, slow moving and thundery, whereas for the rest of England and

:20:42.:20:44.

Wales, we are looking at sunshine and showers. They will whip through

:20:45.:20:51.

quite quickly on the wind. The Northern Ireland and Scotland

:20:52.:20:54.

through the afternoon, there will be some showers but equally there will

:20:55.:20:57.

be a lot of dry weather and some sunshine. The rain this morning in

:20:58.:20:59.

the northern isles pushing northwards but it will come south

:21:00.:21:03.

through the night. The northern England here too some heavy showers

:21:04.:21:06.

this morning, easing off a touch through the afternoon, but if you

:21:07.:21:09.

catch one it is likely to be heavy but there will be a lot of sunshine.

:21:10.:21:15.

Sunshine through the Midlands, East Anglia, Kent and to the Isle of

:21:16.:21:20.

Wight. There will be the odd shower here but it will whip through

:21:21.:21:23.

quickly and the sun will come out quite quickly behind it. The

:21:24.:21:27.

Southwest England and Wales, there will be some showers, but they will

:21:28.:21:30.

be fewer and further between, and in the strong winds they will blow

:21:31.:21:34.

through quite quickly too. Through the evening and overnight, still

:21:35.:21:37.

windy, we lose a lot of the showers. Rain across the North of England

:21:38.:21:41.

head southwards, and still if you showers piling in on. -- on the

:21:42.:21:48.

wind. Tomorrow not as Wendy across England and Wales. Fewer showers,

:21:49.:21:53.

more sunshine, so it will feel warmer, and for Northern Ireland,

:21:54.:21:58.

but it will be windier for you, and the Scotland the rain will turn more

:21:59.:22:02.

showery through the cause of the day. Temperatures 14 to 23, if you

:22:03.:22:05.

are in the sunshine out of the win that will feel quite nice. Saturday,

:22:06.:22:09.

sunshine and showers, Sunday mostly dry that rain coming into Northern

:22:10.:22:14.

Ireland later in the day. Thank you very much, we will see you later.

:22:15.:22:19.

Would you know what to do if faced with the victim of an acid attack?

:22:20.:22:22.

Doctors are so concerned about the number of people

:22:23.:22:24.

being attacked with corrosive liquids, they have now issued

:22:25.:22:27.

Writing in the British Medical Journal, they also warn acid is fast

:22:28.:22:31.

become the weapon of choice for criminals over knives.

:22:32.:22:33.

Martin Berry from the Royal College of Paramedics joins us now.

:22:34.:22:39.

Good morning. Good morning. Are you seeing anecdotally a significant

:22:40.:22:47.

rise in the number of attacks with corrosive liquids? The use of

:22:48.:22:50.

corrosive liquids as weapons is not a new problem, it has been around a

:22:51.:22:55.

little while but we are seeing more cases, especially within cities over

:22:56.:22:58.

the last 12 months. We have to remember this is not just a tax on

:22:59.:23:01.

the public, we are also seeing attacks the members of the emergency

:23:02.:23:05.

services as well. So it is a problem that needs to be addressed. It is

:23:06.:23:09.

something you have personally dealt with as well. Yes, part of my job as

:23:10.:23:15.

a paramedic, I have seen some unpleasant things in my time that

:23:16.:23:17.

there is something quite uniquely disturbing about this kind of attack

:23:18.:23:23.

on a person. It leaves a really long lasting psychologically effects of

:23:24.:23:25.

the patient but also the staff treating them. It is becoming a real

:23:26.:23:32.

problem. So the advice is now water. Lots of flowing water. So if you

:23:33.:23:36.

have a bottle of water, normally get it, it is usually to the face, the

:23:37.:23:41.

attack, isn't it? Absolutely, this is a classic example of the simple

:23:42.:23:47.

solution makes all the difference. I have seen butter, milk and

:23:48.:23:51.

toothpaste, all of that absolute no. Just clean fresh water. In the

:23:52.:23:55.

unlikely situation you have a shower available, get that person in the

:23:56.:23:58.

shower, and just ten minutes of constant cool running water, and get

:23:59.:24:02.

that fluid as far away from the patient as you can. We are just

:24:03.:24:05.

seeing the pictures here come some of it being treated by the fire

:24:06.:24:09.

brigade, their heads to the forward as welcome as that an important

:24:10.:24:14.

part? Think of where that corrosive agent is going. If you have a victim

:24:15.:24:18.

that has had this fluid thrown at their face, make sure you are

:24:19.:24:21.

washing away from that side of the face and not across the face,

:24:22.:24:26.

thinking especially about the eyes. Sight loss is a significant impact

:24:27.:24:30.

of this. I want to pick up on something you mentioned about the

:24:31.:24:33.

emergency services being attack now. How is that coming about, is that

:24:34.:24:37.

when you are going to treat someone or just in your general...? We have

:24:38.:24:42.

seen cases of both. There was a paramedic recently in London that

:24:43.:24:46.

had some sort of corrosive agent thrown at her while on due to. In

:24:47.:24:51.

the immediate moment, it does not matter whether it is a corrosive

:24:52.:24:54.

agent or not, the psychological impact of the same and that member

:24:55.:24:58.

of staff is unable to respond to other people. If it is corrosive,

:24:59.:25:03.

the long Lastuvka the Zoko and psychological effects is damaging.

:25:04.:25:08.

Who do you think is behind this? What spoke about the fact that

:25:09.:25:10.

corrosive agents are being used in place of knives. Is this Gang

:25:11.:25:16.

Warfare? Who is behind this, what is the motivation? I wouldn't call

:25:17.:25:20.

myself an expert on gang culture and whether or not it is easy to get

:25:21.:25:23.

knives, but there is certainly a lot of pressure and a lot of drive to

:25:24.:25:27.

reduce knife islands across the cities, and it wouldn't be too much

:25:28.:25:30.

of a leap to suggest that at the moment there is no legislation

:25:31.:25:35.

around reducing or restricting the amount of corrosive agent or assets

:25:36.:25:38.

that people can purchase, then maybe that is causing the problem. Though

:25:39.:25:41.

the government has said it is looking at that, we have the Home

:25:42.:25:45.

Secretary talking about this on the programme before. Good news. I can't

:25:46.:25:51.

believe paramedics are being attacked, given all the work that

:25:52.:25:56.

you guys are doing. I can't believe I am sat on the sofa talking about

:25:57.:26:00.

this as a topic. It is absolutely bizarre that people think this is an

:26:01.:26:05.

OK thing to do. Our members and my colleagues are concerned about this,

:26:06.:26:12.

and more support is needed and more tied up thinking across the

:26:13.:26:16.

emergency services. What would help you? More tied up thinking. We need

:26:17.:26:21.

that change in legislation to stop people having these agents in the

:26:22.:26:25.

first place. Steph asked if you needed more protection, it is not

:26:26.:26:29.

new hearing of emergency service workers being attacked, is it? No.

:26:30.:26:37.

Unfortunately danger is an aspect of working for the emergency service.

:26:38.:26:42.

And our staff and paramedics are constantly vigilant about their own

:26:43.:26:45.

safety when treating people in public. However, there is more of an

:26:46.:26:50.

awareness currently going on, more work by the emergency service being

:26:51.:26:54.

done to remind staff to be more vigilant and careful of this sort of

:26:55.:26:57.

behaviour. It is terrible, thank you premature coming in to talk to us.

:26:58.:27:03.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:27:04.:30:22.

Now, though, it's back to Steph and Naga.

:30:23.:30:29.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Steph McGovern and Naga Munchetty.

:30:30.:30:34.

Some mental health patients are waiting three years to be

:30:35.:30:37.

discharged from hospital, despite being medically

:30:38.:30:38.

Figures obtained by the BBC through freedom of information

:30:39.:30:43.

requests show that at least five patients waited more than 1000 days.

:30:44.:30:46.

Meanwhile, hundreds more have been waiting for more than six months.

:30:47.:30:53.

The services are at a critical point, and we need things to change,

:30:54.:31:02.

really, so that people are moving forward, and that's not just

:31:03.:31:07.

doctors, that is the link to professions, occupational

:31:08.:31:09.

therapists, psychologists, nursing, all of those, it is investment in

:31:10.:31:13.

all of those professions. A whole system approach, I suppose.

:31:14.:31:21.

More than 200 buildings have failed fire safety test intimated in the

:31:22.:31:24.

wake of the Grenfell Tower fire. More than 100 high-rises failed to

:31:25.:31:28.

meet current regulations. The BBC has learned cladding and insulation

:31:29.:31:33.

panels failed the test within seven minutes of being set alight. Sir Ken

:31:34.:31:39.

Knight, who chairs the Independent fire safety panel, told Breakfast

:31:40.:31:42.

that residents should not be concerned. I hope they feel safe now

:31:43.:31:47.

because every one of these buildings have had an inspection by local Fire

:31:48.:31:50.

and Rescue Service, they have all had a new fire risk inspection, and

:31:51.:31:54.

landlords have made in twin measures such as making sure smoke detectors

:31:55.:31:58.

work, people know what to do to prevent a fire and the special

:31:59.:32:02.

measures they have put in place. So I hope residents do feel that the

:32:03.:32:15.

expert panel and the advice we give the Government is being heeded and

:32:16.:32:17.

is being undertaken, and landlords themselves are being very

:32:18.:32:19.

responsible to take those mitigating actions that are required.

:32:20.:32:20.

More education is needed to help people treat

:32:21.:32:22.

the victims of acid attacks, according to doctors.

:32:23.:32:24.

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine warns corrosive

:32:25.:32:26.

liquids are fast replacing knives as the weapon of

:32:27.:32:28.

Writing in the British Medical Journal, the medics advise people

:32:29.:32:31.

to use water to help remove the chemical.

:32:32.:32:33.

This is a classic example of simple and quick intervention makes the

:32:34.:32:41.

biggest difference. I have seen all sorts of things used on Burns, but,

:32:42.:32:46.

toothpaste, milk. All of that, absolutely no, it is just clean

:32:47.:32:49.

fresh water. In the unlikely situation you have a shower

:32:50.:32:54.

available, get that person in the shallow, ten minutes of constant

:32:55.:32:57.

cool running water and get that liquid as far away from that patient

:32:58.:32:59.

as you can. The pay of the UK's top chief

:33:00.:33:00.

executives' has fallen, but a report has found there's

:33:01.:33:03.

still "a huge gap" between them Research from the High Pay Centre

:33:04.:33:06.

think-tank reveals the bosses of FTSE 100 companies now make

:33:07.:33:09.

on average ?4.5 million a year - that's down nearly

:33:10.:33:12.

20% on two years ago. It would take the average UK

:33:13.:33:16.

worker 160 years to make Health warnings are in place

:33:17.:33:18.

across Europe as temperatures reach The strongest heatwave of the year

:33:19.:33:28.

is predicted to hit large swaths of the continent in the coming days,

:33:29.:33:35.

with Italy, France, Spain and parts of the Balkans among

:33:36.:33:38.

the countries affected. Carroll will have more on that later

:33:39.:33:46.

on. I know you are a binge watcher. So

:33:47.:33:53.

are you! There is research from the media

:33:54.:34:00.

regulator Ofqual which suggests eight in ten adults view multiple

:34:01.:34:04.

episodes of their favourite shows in a single setting. Fortunately for

:34:05.:34:11.

us, most of it is still watch at least some live TV every week.

:34:12.:34:15.

So if you are watching us, we are very grateful you are, thank you!

:34:16.:34:19.

There is plenty to come with us this morning.

:34:20.:34:22.

# Pour some sugar on me in the name of love

:34:23.:34:24.

In ten minutes we'll be joined by Def Leppard

:34:25.:34:29.

frontman Joe Elliot, as we celebrate the rock band made

:34:30.:34:32.

of Sheffield steel who went on to conquer the world.

:34:33.:34:37.

Sharing is caring, or too much information?

:34:38.:34:40.

Before nine, we'll speak to one family trying to strike a balance

:34:41.:34:45.

between posting online and protecting their

:34:46.:34:46.

And they're the Romeo Juliet of Poldark -

:34:47.:34:55.

as the third season of the BBC drama approaches its finale,

:34:56.:34:58.

we'll be joined by the actors who play Morwenna and Drake.

:34:59.:35:02.

Time to talk about the sport now because of course...

:35:03.:35:08.

Assume each match. The England women's football team

:35:09.:35:15.

play the Netherton 's -- the Netherlands.

:35:16.:35:19.

While we are all getting in the flag for this evening, Mike is at

:35:20.:35:22.

Manchester city's Academy to see how the team warfare. It looks like the

:35:23.:35:26.

predictions are in favour of England, aren't they?

:35:27.:35:29.

Definitely, that is what is different, a chance for England to

:35:30.:35:33.

make history. Two matches to go, semifinals and then hopefully a

:35:34.:35:37.

final against Denmark or Austria but England are the highest ranked team

:35:38.:35:41.

left in the competition because Germany, the favourite land-holders,

:35:42.:35:45.

were surprisingly beaten by Denmark in the

:35:46.:36:02.

quarterfinals and England. They have a 100% record, conceded one goal,

:36:03.:36:06.

but the Dutch are in the same boat, they can boast the same sort of

:36:07.:36:09.

record even if they have not scored as many goals as England, but they

:36:10.:36:11.

will have the home partisan crowd. There is a chance for England to

:36:12.:36:13.

make history tonight against the Netherlands and seven of the players

:36:14.:36:16.

in that squad train here on these pages at the Manchester city academy

:36:17.:36:18.

alongside the community players who are putting in their ships this

:36:19.:36:22.

morning and showing us the skills of potential England stars of the

:36:23.:36:25.

future and they will certainly be cheering but Mark Sampson's team

:36:26.:36:27.

tonight as they look to win their first tournament in the next few

:36:28.:36:32.

days. But England have a couple of selection problems. Jill Scott is

:36:33.:36:39.

suspended and the goalkeeper Karen Bardsley has a broken leg.

:36:40.:36:42.

Siobhan Chamberlain comes into the side.

:36:43.:36:43.

Sampson says Chamberlain is now the best goalkeeper

:36:44.:36:45.

left in the tournament, and will cope fine

:36:46.:36:47.

Despite being the highest-ranked team left in the tournament England

:36:48.:36:50.

know they face a tough test against the hosts and

:36:51.:36:53.

Holland will be the team under pressure because it is in their home

:36:54.:37:00.

country, the crowd will be full of Dutch people and they will be all

:37:01.:37:04.

against us but we have been through experiences where we have been in

:37:05.:37:10.

the dock, we went to Canada and beat the host nation there, which was a

:37:11.:37:15.

fantastic experience. We have got better players now, players that

:37:16.:37:18.

have really improved their individual games, really want to put

:37:19.:37:19.

their England shirt on and do what is right for the team. There is

:37:20.:37:25.

certainly a lot of excitement here in Manchester, I wonder what the

:37:26.:37:28.

feeling is like there in Utrecht. We can join my colleague Katie Gornall

:37:29.:37:34.

who is there for us this morning. Great to join you there, I wonder

:37:35.:37:46.

what the mood is like in the camp? We have actually left the England

:37:47.:37:56.

camp, we are where the match will be taking place, we are near the fan

:37:57.:37:59.

zone, which they are setting up at the moment. It is quiet but it will

:38:00.:38:03.

fill up later, the Netherlands really have thrown their support

:38:04.:38:06.

behind this Dutch team, sell-out crowds for the Netherlands

:38:07.:38:09.

throughout the tournament, we expect another one tonight here at FC 20's

:38:10.:38:16.

Stadium, around 30,000 fans, said that is what England are up against,

:38:17.:38:21.

a sea of orange. But they are sounding confident throughout the

:38:22.:38:24.

build-up to the tournament, Mark Sampson said in his press conference

:38:25.:38:27.

yesterday he is excited by seeing the crowd, the sea of orange later

:38:28.:38:32.

on today and they will certainly not underestimate the Netherlands, they

:38:33.:38:35.

are the only team other than England with a 100% record coming into this,

:38:36.:38:39.

they have looked dangerous on the front, their attacking three play

:38:40.:38:49.

for Liverpool and Barcelona and they have played well together so England

:38:50.:38:52.

will have to be at the very top of their game but these are two form

:38:53.:38:56.

teams coming together in a semifinal for a place in the final so a huge

:38:57.:39:01.

amount of excitement for this one. As you say, Katie, England will be

:39:02.:39:05.

lifted by that partisan crowd almost as much as the Dutch, they can cope

:39:06.:39:08.

with a big crowd. How important is it that England did beat the

:39:09.:39:16.

Netherlands there in a friendly last November 1-0?

:39:17.:39:18.

Yes, they said they learned a lot from that match but I think the

:39:19.:39:21.

Dutch will be desperate to prove they are better than they were when

:39:22.:39:25.

they lost back in November. You mentioned the partisan crowd, the

:39:26.:39:27.

reason I don't think it will phase England is because it be think back

:39:28.:39:31.

to the World Cup two years ago they knocked out the hosts, Canada, in

:39:32.:39:37.

front of 54,000 fans, overwhelming the Canadian, in

:39:38.:39:57.

Vancouver, and they will draw on that experience coming into this

:39:58.:40:01.

one, but of all the England teams I have covered over the years I have

:40:02.:40:04.

never seen one with so much belief in itself, confident about this

:40:05.:40:06.

tournament from the start. They have not said, we are looking to the next

:40:07.:40:09.

game, they said right at the beginning, this will be six games to

:40:10.:40:12.

play here, and they have been taking them up as they go along. They are

:40:13.:40:15.

unable, they have scored more goals than anyone else, Jody Taylor has

:40:16.:40:17.

scored five already, she has her sights set on the Golden Boot, but

:40:18.:40:19.

with Germany, the holders, unexpectedly knocked out, England

:40:20.:40:21.

have knocked out France, they have the confidence, they are the

:40:22.:40:23.

favourites, the highest ranked team left in the tournament and many

:40:24.:40:25.

people feel this is England's tournament to lose, they may never

:40:26.:40:28.

have a better chance of winning their first major tournament and

:40:29.:40:30.

that is what they have set their sights on but first they have to get

:40:31.:40:32.

past Netherlands. OK, we have to leave it there, we

:40:33.:40:35.

cannot wait for it to start. The host venue where the match will

:40:36.:40:39.

take place later on. Briefly, to the other sports

:40:40.:40:42.

stories... I cannot get my head around these figures.

:40:43.:40:44.

The biggest transfer in world football could be completed today.

:40:45.:40:46.

Brazillian forward Neymar will leave Barcelona and sign

:40:47.:40:48.

for Paris Saint Germain for an eye-watering ?198 million.

:40:49.:40:50.

He'll become the most expensive player in the world -

:40:51.:40:53.

His manager at Manchester United believes these sums could become

:40:54.:40:58.

For 200 million I don't think he is expensive. I think he is expensive,

:40:59.:41:13.

the fact that now you are going to have more players at 100 million,

:41:14.:41:19.

and you are going to have more players at 50 million, more players

:41:20.:41:23.

at 60 million, and I think that is the problem, because Neymar is one

:41:24.:41:27.

of the best players in the world. Scottish Champions Celtic

:41:28.:41:31.

are now just one step away from a place in the group stages

:41:32.:41:33.

of the Champions League after a hard-fought victory over

:41:34.:41:36.

the Norwegian side Rosenborg. James Forest's brilliant second-half

:41:37.:41:38.

strike gave Brendan Rodgers' side They now go into tomorrow's draw

:41:39.:41:40.

for the play off round. One of the story, Rory McIlroy says

:41:41.:42:00.

that... Oh, sorry. I was just saying JP Fitzgerald, Rory McIlroy's

:42:01.:42:03.

caddie, they are going their separate ways but Rory McIlroy says

:42:04.:42:07.

they will remain the best of friends, the fourth time major

:42:08.:42:10.

winner said it is time for a change, apologies there. Touring but the

:42:11.:42:14.

wind was interfering. We are getting things lined up back here at the

:42:15.:42:19.

Manchester Academy because I am joined by some of the community

:42:20.:42:22.

players who have been showing us their skills. What is your name?

:42:23.:42:29.

Lucy. How are you feeling about the match? Excited to see how they

:42:30.:42:32.

perform and excited about seeing Lucy Barnes. Do you think they will

:42:33.:42:40.

win? Yes. What is your name? Qayyarah. But does it feel like to

:42:41.:42:48.

play alongside those players on these pictures? It is good to have

:42:49.:42:52.

somebody to inspire you. How do you think the match will go, what is

:42:53.:42:58.

your name? Courtney. Do you think they will beat the Netherlands,

:42:59.:43:01.

despite them being the host? What will be the score? 2-0. How has it

:43:02.:43:08.

inspired you that England are on this winning run, that they could be

:43:09.:43:13.

in the final? I am excited to see the performances. You have just

:43:14.:43:18.

started playing for the community team, what is your name? Killy. How

:43:19.:43:24.

excited are you and what do you think will happen? I am really

:43:25.:43:30.

excited. How important is it to have the Manchester City players

:43:31.:43:33.

involved, the ones that you see here at the academy, how does it inspire

:43:34.:43:41.

you? It feels good. The girls are desperate to get kicking again and

:43:42.:43:44.

they need a goalkeeper, apparently. You are going to go easy on me! Who

:43:45.:43:50.

wants to commentate on this? You have been doing well, and Mara. I

:43:51.:43:55.

have not got any gloves so don't shoot too hard! You are going to

:43:56.:43:59.

commentate on my attempt to save a couple of penalties. Your big moment

:44:00.:44:05.

on BBC Breakfast! He is off. And she misses!

:44:06.:44:15.

STUDIO: Oh, no! Great commentary there, though! It

:44:16.:44:22.

sounds like they are on Mike's side. And she scores!

:44:23.:44:28.

Very good dive, I am worried about the grass stains on his outfit! One

:44:29.:44:39.

more? Through the legs! Good effort, Mike!

:44:40.:44:44.

Thank you, Mike, lovely to see you. And thank you Mara, as well.

:44:45.:44:50.

Great to see how excited everyone is about the football match, and we

:44:51.:44:53.

have someone else in the studio who is excited about this, Joe Elliott

:44:54.:44:57.

of Def Leppard, you are excited about this? The football, yes. I

:44:58.:45:03.

have got a lot of press after we finish here but there will be a TV

:45:04.:45:09.

on in the corner. I am absolutely going to be watching it. A perfectly

:45:10.:45:14.

justifiable thing to put on your rider! Yes, the football has to be

:45:15.:45:20.

on, at least pictures no sound! We got you on to talk about Hysteria,

:45:21.:45:26.

the album which I think many would say defined, itemised def Leopard.

:45:27.:45:31.

30 years after you first released it, 30-year today it has been

:45:32.:45:38.

revamped, remastered. It is kitchen sink, this one, the fashion with

:45:39.:45:43.

vinyl now is 180 grams, which basically means it is rock hard, for

:45:44.:45:50.

the vinyl freaks it is let the ultimate. There is a specific CD

:45:51.:45:57.

version, six discs, I think, or seven, DVDs, the album remastered

:45:58.:46:03.

this year, B sides, extended versions, all sorts. We can talk

:46:04.:46:06.

about it but there is nothing better than listening to it.

:46:07.:46:23.

# Break the bubble, break it up using macro for a sugar on me in the

:46:24.:46:35.

name of love # For some sugar on me, come on fire

:46:36.:46:45.

me up his macro for some sugar on me, I can't get enough.

:46:46.:46:53.

# I got to feel it in my blood use it macro I need your touch don't

:46:54.:46:59.

need your love # And I want and I need and I love

:47:00.:47:07.

# Animal # And I want and I need and I love

:47:08.:47:23.

you sick macro animal that last video, filmed with a circus? Yes,

:47:24.:47:29.

Wheeler with a circus for a couple of days. Everybody can sit --

:47:30.:47:34.

considers rock 'n' roll a bit of a circus but it was mad, but

:47:35.:47:39.

experience, never forget it. How do you feel looking back at the videos?

:47:40.:47:45.

It depends what videos, some of them are a bit naff. We ended up shooting

:47:46.:47:54.

a second video for Sugared because we didn't like it, NTV wouldn't show

:47:55.:48:01.

it because they thought it was rubbish. Doesn't feel like a long

:48:02.:48:08.

time ago? It doesn't, I have been talking to people about this, if you

:48:09.:48:14.

are wrongfully imprisoned for 30 years, it is a long time! LAUGHTER

:48:15.:48:22.

but if you are in a band that has done an album that becomes iconic,

:48:23.:48:29.

you know, we are not naive, we realise like Dark Side Of The Moon

:48:30.:48:34.

by Pink Floyd, most bands have some album, at least one, they will for

:48:35.:48:41.

ever be talked about, and if you make an album like that you should

:48:42.:48:43.

be blessed, accepted. We do not think of it as an

:48:44.:48:49.

albatross, that 30 years has flown by, it gave us the opportunity to

:48:50.:48:53.

work as often as we wanted and we have never stopped. All of a sudden

:48:54.:48:58.

people tap you on the shoulder and say, you realise it has been 30

:48:59.:49:03.

years? How did you go about making an album that needed to be so

:49:04.:49:07.

definitive? Most albums of this style, we didn't know what we were

:49:08.:49:12.

doing, we went incompletely blindfolded, we have this album that

:49:13.:49:18.

came out four years previously, it was a hit in the States, it didn't

:49:19.:49:22.

do anything anywhere else, we knew how to make a successful record of

:49:23.:49:25.

what we wanted to do was make a record that took that even the, not

:49:26.:49:31.

just replicated. Having a discussion with co-producer, we were discussing

:49:32.:49:40.

the Michael Jackson album Thriller and the producer walked in and said,

:49:41.:49:45.

why can't you do something like that and we said, why not? Was it almost

:49:46.:49:51.

commercialising foot you are doing? We were always a semicommercial band

:49:52.:50:03.

but when we had some songs in the collection, we had songs that we

:50:04.:50:08.

knew could cross over into pop. But it was the 80s, there was all the

:50:09.:50:11.

new technology coming out on a daily basis and we wanted to play with it,

:50:12.:50:17.

what does that button do? We went down a lot of dead end streets,

:50:18.:50:22.

trying to find things to do, and we would come back sometimes, three

:50:23.:50:30.

weeks down the toilet. We were talking about technology and how

:50:31.:50:33.

things were changing but you must have seen mega changes in the music

:50:34.:50:38.

industry, the last 30 years? Yes, you do, the changes that I notice

:50:39.:50:42.

the most are the ones we all noticed growing up through that era, you

:50:43.:50:49.

still had Top Of The Pops and use groups like soft cell the human

:50:50.:50:52.

league, all of these bands literally you could tell were playing over

:50:53.:50:59.

drum machines. You saw people like Gary Numan, taking over from where

:51:00.:51:06.

punk was. These days, the technology is like medicine, slowing down,

:51:07.:51:10.

waiting for the next big breakthrough, allowing the tiny

:51:11.:51:13.

little ones that normally only the producers know about and the ones

:51:14.:51:19.

that banks would not admit to. You gave us a little bit of a hint about

:51:20.:51:24.

living with a circus, are you still rock 'n' roll? Onstage, yes, because

:51:25.:51:30.

that is for it is important and that is always important. We have always

:51:31.:51:35.

been the odd ones out, really, when all that kind of, Los Angeles scene

:51:36.:51:43.

was happening in 87, 88, and all of these bands like Bon Jovi were

:51:44.:51:47.

breaking through, we were living in Holland next to a windmill, totally

:51:48.:51:54.

content, no Internet, no cellphones. Like smoke signals, there is a new

:51:55.:51:59.

movement going on in Los Angeles, really? We were living in our own

:52:00.:52:03.

bubble, making music, that is what we were concentrating on. You were

:52:04.:52:08.

never a bad? I am not saying that we weren't but we kept it under the

:52:09.:52:15.

radar as best we could. Smart. I am interested, you said you are still

:52:16.:52:18.

as busy as you work tell us what you are doing. We just finished an

:52:19.:52:24.

American tour, 38 gigs, literally and overspill from the tour last

:52:25.:52:28.

year, we had an album out towards the end of 2015 and we have been

:52:29.:52:33.

working it ever since, so much demand to play live. Is it the same

:52:34.:52:36.

audiences, or different ones coming through? You see the same faces,

:52:37.:52:41.

getting a little bit older each year but he bring their kids. You get

:52:42.:52:48.

excited when you see someone who is not 21 and they know all the words.

:52:49.:52:52.

I saw this happening some years ago with the Rolling Stones gig, kids

:52:53.:52:57.

not even born who were singing Satisfaction. It happens with

:52:58.:53:03.

generations, they get disappointed with their own generation of music

:53:04.:53:07.

and they go for iconic bands, I did the same thing at 12, once Glam Rock

:53:08.:53:11.

dissipated and we moved towards disco I started looking back at

:53:12.:53:18.

bands like There Who, The Small Faces... It has been a delight

:53:19.:53:26.

having new on the sofa. Enjoy the football tonight. Thank you.

:53:27.:53:30.

Def Leppard's album, Hysteria, is re-released tomorrow.

:53:31.:53:35.

It's better, but just as good. Is that there? Yes.

:53:36.:53:40.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:53:41.:53:49.

Let's look what is happening around the Mediterranean, the temperatures

:53:50.:53:58.

well above average, 44 degrees in Sardinia, to put this into context,

:53:59.:54:01.

the highest temperatures recorded in the UK was on the 10th of August

:54:02.:54:08.

2003, Faversham in Kent, we reached the Dieppe on five Celsius, over 101

:54:09.:54:15.

Fahrenheit, these temperatures we can't comprehend and if you are

:54:16.:54:18.

going on holiday there this in mind, heat and high levels of humidity. A

:54:19.:54:28.

red heat warning in force across the Balkans, Sardinia, Italy and in

:54:29.:54:32.

parts of Poland. Threatening to life, actually, wildfires, we saw

:54:33.:54:37.

them last week across southern parts of France, Corsica, all of this area

:54:38.:54:41.

is tinderbox dry, the risk of wildfires. Also a drought situation

:54:42.:54:47.

in Italy. The deficit in rainfall is the equivalent of the whole of Lake

:54:48.:54:53.

Como, the equivalent of 20 billion cubic metres of water. Water is

:54:54.:55:00.

actually being rationed not just in Rome but in another 20 towns in

:55:01.:55:04.

Italy. High pressure dominating the weather in this part of the world,

:55:05.:55:08.

not going anywhere fast, low pressure dominating our weather,

:55:09.:55:12.

sunshine and showers. England, Wales, pretty windy, the wind

:55:13.:55:16.

blowing the showers quite quickly across England and Wales, in the

:55:17.:55:20.

centre of this low pressure there is no wind, the showers will be

:55:21.:55:24.

slow-moving, heavy with hail and thunder in bed. The forecast for us,

:55:25.:55:30.

the showers continuing across Scotland, northern England and

:55:31.:55:32.

Northern Ireland, heavy and slow moving. But the rest of England and

:55:33.:55:38.

Wales, showers few and far between, lighter, rattling through quickly.

:55:39.:55:44.

If you manage to stay out of the wind, it won't feel too bad at all,

:55:45.:55:48.

and staying out of the showers, this afternoon, sunshine and showers

:55:49.:55:51.

across Northern Ireland and Scotland, rain in the northern isles

:55:52.:55:54.

pushing northwards, heading in the direction of lyric, coming south

:55:55.:55:59.

again for Northern England, you have sunshine and showers, slow moving,

:56:00.:56:05.

if you catch one it's likely to be heavy. Coming south into the

:56:06.:56:11.

Midlands, East Anglia and Kent, towards Hampshire and the Isle of

:56:12.:56:14.

Wight, fewer showers, drier weather and a fair bit of sunshine, if you

:56:15.:56:19.

catch a shower in the South West and Wales, you find it will blow through

:56:20.:56:24.

quickly, and then a return to sunny or bright skies. Still going to be

:56:25.:56:31.

windy tonight, the rain coming southwards through the course of the

:56:32.:56:37.

night, blowing in showers. Not going to be a cold night, temperatures

:56:38.:56:42.

ranging from 13-15. Heading into Friday, the wind starting to abate,

:56:43.:56:49.

for England and Wales, fewer showers, more sunshine, feeling

:56:50.:56:51.

warmer. Northern Ireland not faring badly, pretty windy, for Scotland,

:56:52.:56:58.

the rain coming south overnight will turn showery as we go through the

:56:59.:57:03.

day, temperatures rise between 14 and 23. On Saturday, looking at

:57:04.:57:09.

sunshine and showers, you'd know the drill, many of us will miss them,

:57:10.:57:13.

and on Sunday, dry weather with rain coming in across Northern Ireland

:57:14.:57:19.

later. Carol, I have been keeping note of the phrases to date stock it

:57:20.:57:25.

was as dry as a horses hoof. That was about Carol's throat. What's out

:57:26.:57:33.

there as hen's tease? Read health warnings and heat warnings across

:57:34.:57:36.

Europe. Do you want to leave us with another? I don't think I could think

:57:37.:57:42.

of one. These are the ones that you think of when you think of what am I

:57:43.:57:46.

going to say next? You do it so marvellously. But she has some that

:57:47.:57:50.

we can't say on the telly. We will talk about those later, shall we?

:57:51.:57:56.

Maybe not. Not on air, anyway. See you later. Starting to match the

:57:57.:58:03.

colour of her dress. Let's talk rubbish, that will make a change. It

:58:04.:58:08.

has been building up in Birmingham, refuse workers taking part in a

:58:09.:58:12.

series of walk-outs in a row over job losses. Aren't Midlands

:58:13.:58:18.

correspondent is in Birmingham for us and residents taking things into

:58:19.:58:22.

their own hands? I bet it's pretty smelly there at the moment! Just a

:58:23.:58:29.

little bit, yes, standing by some bins, piled high. This is just a

:58:30.:58:35.

snapshot of the situation across parts of Birmingham and as you say,

:58:36.:58:40.

it's down to a strike, bin men and women striking for around five weeks

:58:41.:58:44.

now, starting on the 30th of June and it's because the council want to

:58:45.:58:50.

change the way bin workers work, the scheduling, every week, they want

:58:51.:58:53.

them to do a five-day week, at the moment they are working four days,

:58:54.:58:58.

they say that means fewer supervisor jobs and less paid. But the council

:58:59.:59:02.

says that's not the case, we will give you alternative jobs if you

:59:03.:59:07.

want but this strike has been going on for some time now, people angry,

:59:08.:59:15.

frustrated, IQ said, it stinks, some skied all problems, some rats, pest

:59:16.:59:19.

control coming out to various places and some people in the community

:59:20.:59:25.

have gone out in there to track to collect the rubbish themselves. The

:59:26.:59:31.

whole city knows the binmen are on strike and we as brothers have come

:59:32.:59:37.

together to clear up as much of the streets in Birmingham as we can.

:59:38.:59:41.

Because we are really upset with the fact that we have to live in this

:59:42.:59:46.

dire Strait of rubbish, we have done one load and the smell, and

:59:47.:59:52.

everything that has come out of it, we are disgusted by it. The whole

:59:53.:59:57.

purpose of this is to encourage everyone else to stop relying on the

:59:58.:00:01.

council, will be your sleeves and if you cannot do it, get in touch with

:00:02.:00:04.

us and we've happily come out cleared the rubbish. Why have you

:00:05.:00:08.

felt so strongly about coming out yourself with this tip truck and

:00:09.:00:14.

your friends to do this? We feel we as Muslims have a responsibility to

:00:15.:00:19.

our community and hence the reason cleanliness is half of our religion

:00:20.:00:23.

and clearly here, this issue is a real issue and hence, we as Muslims

:00:24.:00:29.

and bearded brothers as you can see, half of the brothers here are

:00:30.:00:32.

bearded, we have come together with one agenda to keep these areas,

:00:33.:00:37.

whatever neighbourhood you are from, we will come out and help you.

:00:38.:00:45.

This strike is due to go on until September, the two sides say they

:00:46.:00:51.

are talking, they are trying to come up with a solution that they are

:00:52.:00:55.

both happy with. However, people here are not feeling very optimistic

:00:56.:00:59.

at the moment and they believe that a resolution really is not on the

:01:00.:01:02.

cards very soon. Thank you very much.

:01:03.:01:09.

When it comes to posting pictures of your child online,

:01:10.:01:16.

is sharing caring or self-indulgence and even dangerous?

:01:17.:01:20.

New figures from the media regulator Ofcom suggest that

:01:21.:01:22.

parents are pretty evenly split on the issue.

:01:23.:01:30.

It found 56% of mums and dads prefer not to upload pictures,

:01:31.:01:35.

while 42% like to share moments such

:01:36.:01:37.

We're joined by a family of bloggers. Tell us about your online

:01:38.:01:50.

habits, you are bloggers, are you posting a lot of pictures of the

:01:51.:01:52.

kids online? We post daily but not necessarily

:01:53.:02:02.

about the kids, but about the parenting experience. I think the

:02:03.:02:09.

word "sharents" has been bandied about, but it is about sharing your

:02:10.:02:14.

experiences online. The massive peaks, what is the difference

:02:15.:02:17.

between an earring and a worm, and the drops, the tantrums in Tesco,

:02:18.:02:22.

sharing the experience and becoming more of a community over just

:02:23.:02:26.

sharing pictures as a vanity project of your children.

:02:27.:02:29.

That is the difference, you are doing it because you blog and you

:02:30.:02:33.

have a message to put out but there is the issue of parents who don't

:02:34.:02:38.

have a blog who are just putting up pictures of their children perhaps

:02:39.:02:44.

with not as much thought for the children's' happiness or safety in

:02:45.:02:50.

sometimes? There was another interesting statistic in the report

:02:51.:02:55.

that 8485% of parents would not put up anything that they think their

:02:56.:02:58.

kids would be uncomfortable with and most people I think are sensible,

:02:59.:03:02.

they would not put up things that give away their address or where

:03:03.:03:05.

their child goes to school, that sort of thing, and there is quite a

:03:06.:03:09.

lot of advice online about the types of image you should not share and I

:03:10.:03:12.

think people are increasingly aware of that will stop but also I think

:03:13.:03:19.

it is something that, stay at home parents often feel patronised,

:03:20.:03:23.

working parents feel they have to hide their family away, and this

:03:24.:03:27.

gives people a way to connect to other parents, it is basically kind

:03:28.:03:32.

of like an extension of the school gates, effectively. But that then

:03:33.:03:35.

can almost become competitive as well, especially when you see an

:03:36.:03:39.

extension of the school gates, you hear of people competing at the

:03:40.:03:42.

school gates, so-and-so is doing this, and it is reflected online?

:03:43.:03:47.

And I think that is, in social media generally, but I think the more

:03:48.:03:53.

compelling trend that we have noticed, particularly with people

:03:54.:03:57.

writing about family experiences, is people being incredibly honest about

:03:58.:04:00.

it, a bit of a kickback to the perfect family vision that was

:04:01.:04:05.

presented maybe even just a couple of years ago on social media, people

:04:06.:04:09.

being much more honest about the horrors and humour of the parenting

:04:10.:04:13.

experience. It is interesting, I have a friend who will always post

:04:14.:04:17.

pictures when her kids are in a foul mood to prove the point it is not

:04:18.:04:21.

all happy days, but at the other end of this you have got your children

:04:22.:04:25.

and their experience of being online and there are lots of children as

:04:26.:04:28.

they get older into their teenage years and feel the pressure of

:04:29.:04:37.

everything looking so perfect online, what are your thoughts on

:04:38.:04:40.

that, Anna, how would you make sure Mae and either are all right online?

:04:41.:04:43.

Are the kids all right, will we ever know?! It is about that honesty, as

:04:44.:04:48.

long as we are honest in our experience, I think the thing that

:04:49.:04:52.

is happening at the moment is this huge sharenting movement is trying

:04:53.:04:57.

to cut through all that perfection, not with just airing your dirty

:04:58.:05:00.

laundry for the sake of it but actually with the reality of it.

:05:01.:05:06.

That makes, for me, out of our followers, five people per day maybe

:05:07.:05:12.

feel less alone, then that is great, whether Ray have got 100 or 100,000

:05:13.:05:18.

followers, it is about community and a united experience and that is

:05:19.:05:22.

something that I want my kids to grow up seeing, the reality. It was

:05:23.:05:27.

tough, but it was brilliant at the same time. Our Mae and Eva always

:05:28.:05:33.

this good? This is not a true reflection of the parenting

:05:34.:05:37.

experience! Mae, we promised to show what you have drawn, are we allowed

:05:38.:05:42.

to do so? What have you got there? Is it a rabbit? It is a rabbit. A

:05:43.:05:53.

rabbit! Sharing is caring! That is a brilliant rabbit. I didn't finish it

:05:54.:06:01.

yet! You can do that later, we would like to finish that picture and put

:06:02.:06:06.

it on the wall. Just maybe not on social media! Anna and Matt, thank

:06:07.:06:13.

you very much, and Eva and Mae. She has opened her eyes!

:06:14.:06:18.

We will be discussing Poldark in a moment, let's get out of this while

:06:19.:06:21.

the baby is still quiet! Let's take a last look at the

:06:22.:06:22.

headlines where If you're not up-to-date

:06:23.:07:55.

with Poldark you might Because we are going to spoil its

:07:56.:08:09.

just a little bit. One of the major plot lines of this

:08:10.:08:17.

series has been the blossoming romance between Elizabeth's cousin

:08:18.:08:20.

Morwenna and Demelza's Series three of the BBC drama

:08:21.:08:22.

reaches it's conclusion this weekend and viewers will be eager to find

:08:23.:08:26.

out what happens to the young couple We'll speak to actors

:08:27.:08:32.

Ellise Chappell and Harry Richardson in a moment, but first let's remind

:08:33.:08:34.

ourselves of when Morwenna Stay on the path and you

:08:35.:08:36.

come to it directly. Do we buy in these parts,

:08:37.:08:57.

or just be passing through? How does it feel watching that? The

:08:58.:09:47.

first 20 both said then was, that was ages ago! It is so strange to be

:09:48.:09:53.

nearly at the season finale and then watch something that feels... When

:09:54.:09:57.

did you finish filming? February this year. It must feel quite odd

:09:58.:10:04.

watching it back now. Will you be watching the last one? Oh, yes, it

:10:05.:10:10.

was my favourite episode. Do you watch it with your family and

:10:11.:10:15.

friends? Yeah, you have got to, it is so suited to that, everybody

:10:16.:10:21.

gossiping during the show! Do they not try to get you to spoil it for

:10:22.:10:27.

them, give them spoilers? My parents are always trying to get me to give

:10:28.:10:33.

them spoilers, no, you have got to watch at! Every I speak to her she

:10:34.:10:37.

is like, so, what is happening next? Really casually! What did it feel

:10:38.:10:43.

like being part of such a big TV show as well? It has done so well,

:10:44.:10:48.

such a massive part of the BBC schedule, what does that feel like?

:10:49.:10:54.

Just feel so lucky, it is so amazing, the six months that we

:10:55.:10:59.

shot, just so much fun and such wonderful people as well. It was

:11:00.:11:04.

amazing. Can you tell us the story of where you were? I know the story

:11:05.:11:07.

of where you were and how you found out and how your mum reacted! I was

:11:08.:11:14.

walking back to a cafe I was working in in north London to ask if I could

:11:15.:11:17.

pick up any shifts again because I had not worked there in a while, and

:11:18.:11:22.

I got the call on my walk to the cafe and I just kind of stopped in

:11:23.:11:28.

the street, rang my mum, and then just broke down, just a mess on the

:11:29.:11:33.

side of the street! And my mum was the same on the other end of the

:11:34.:11:38.

line. DG Noonan carry on the shifts just in case?! I stole the shifts!

:11:39.:11:45.

How about for you as well? The setting is just... It is gorgeous,

:11:46.:11:51.

that seemed a sunset was ridiculous, I remember in between shops just

:11:52.:11:56.

having to hide our phones and stuff because we were so obsessed with how

:11:57.:12:02.

beautiful the set is, it makes acting is so easy. Where in your

:12:03.:12:06.

course it do you hide a phone, Ellise?! Somewhere in there! The

:12:07.:12:14.

thing about dramas like Poldark is you see these beautiful scenes like

:12:15.:12:19.

this and they are charming and you feel swept away, but with those

:12:20.:12:23.

scenes, and strong female characters and strong male characters, with

:12:24.:12:27.

those scenes there has to be drama and something that keeps the viewer

:12:28.:12:33.

hooked and there was a rape scene last week on the drama between the

:12:34.:12:40.

vicar and his wife, and there was a lot of controversy surrounding the

:12:41.:12:45.

reaction because I think a lot of viewers want to see that it delete

:12:46.:12:48.

location and lovely love story and then it was quite shocking. How do

:12:49.:12:53.

you feel about how viewers have reacted to that? I think, in the

:12:54.:12:58.

books, Winston Graham wrote this relationship as being very harrowing

:12:59.:13:06.

and quite disturbing, and we didn't want to shy away from portraying

:13:07.:13:12.

that, portraying how despicable was born actually is and what Morwenna

:13:13.:13:16.

is enduring, so I think it is important to show the other side of

:13:17.:13:20.

things and how things could be in that era as well. The beauty in the

:13:21.:13:25.

show and the positivity is nothing without the risk of all the danger

:13:26.:13:34.

and... The darkness. And the darkness, so it was horrible to

:13:35.:13:38.

watch and also to work for, I know the actors found it quite tough, it

:13:39.:13:45.

is really important because it makes something to fight against and

:13:46.:13:49.

overcome. You are leading up to the last one, watching with your parents

:13:50.:13:54.

this weekend? Oh, get... Is that eight no?! Mine are not in the

:13:55.:14:02.

country! I will be speaking to mine afterwards! Good luck with it.

:14:03.:14:09.

These beautiful fellows are rainbow lorikeets.

:14:10.:14:16.

Unlike many birds, they don't eat seeds.

:14:17.:14:18.

Instead, they sip the nectar from flowers incredibly quickly.

:14:19.:14:22.

we've got some specialist camera equipment set up

:14:23.:14:28.