07/08/2017 Breakfast


07/08/2017

The latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC's Breakfast team.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 07/08/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:00:00.:00:00.

Social media firms will have to delete your childhood posts

:00:07.:00:12.

New laws will also ban companies from using pre-selected tick boxes

:00:13.:00:17.

Good morning, it's Monday the 7th of August.

:00:18.:00:38.

The body of a man who was reported missing a month ago

:00:39.:00:42.

sparking a huge search has been found at his house.

:00:43.:00:45.

Now a police watchdog launch an investigation.

:00:46.:00:52.

Good morning from Waterloo station. One of a number of train stations

:00:53.:01:01.

across London where delays are likely this August as engineering

:01:02.:01:04.

work starts. All the details shortly.

:01:05.:01:05.

it was a disappointing night for Great Britain at these

:01:06.:01:09.

There was heartbreak for heptathlete Katarina Johnson-Thompson,

:01:10.:01:14.

who was one of those who missed out on a medal.

:01:15.:01:18.

And coming to a street near you, the growing number of bikes you can

:01:19.:01:22.

rent and then leave anywhere when you've finished.

:01:23.:01:31.

Today a band of rain crossing England and Wales, not getting to

:01:32.:01:39.

the far south-east until later and the Highgate sunshine and showers,

:01:40.:01:44.

the heaviest of which will be in Scotland. More in 15 minutes.

:01:45.:01:47.

New laws which will give people more control over what happens

:01:48.:01:52.

to their personal data online are to be introduced.

:01:53.:01:54.

The government is billing the changes as the right

:01:55.:01:56.

People will be able to ask for personal data or material

:01:57.:02:00.

they posted when they were children to be deleted.

:02:01.:02:03.

The bill will also require people to give explicit consent

:02:04.:02:05.

for their information to be collected online,

:02:06.:02:07.

rather than firms relying on pre-selected tick boxes.

:02:08.:02:09.

And extra powers will be given to the information

:02:10.:02:12.

watchdog to issue fines of up to 17 million to businesses

:02:13.:02:15.

Our political correspondent Leila Nathoo is in our Westminster

:02:16.:02:18.

Good morning to you. So much interest in the detail, what more

:02:19.:02:30.

can you tell us? Louise, this is the government bringing into UK law EU

:02:31.:02:34.

regulations on data protection that are due to come in to force next

:02:35.:02:40.

year. So even though we'll be going through the Brexit process, the

:02:41.:02:44.

government has decided these EU regulations are ones it wants to

:02:45.:02:48.

bring into domestic law. As you say, this is all about the use of

:02:49.:02:54.

personal data online, and this gives consumers more power, the government

:02:55.:02:58.

wants to rebalance the power between users of technology and those

:02:59.:03:02.

technology companies. So it's about how we protect our information

:03:03.:03:06.

online. As you say, we have a right to ask companies now, strengthening

:03:07.:03:10.

that right to ask companies to delete data they hold fast, making

:03:11.:03:15.

it easier to request from companies what data they hold, this law will

:03:16.:03:20.

do, and these tick boxes we are very used to, automatically giving

:03:21.:03:23.

companies consent, sometimes we don't notice what we are doing, they

:03:24.:03:27.

will be a thing of the past and we will have to give much more explicit

:03:28.:03:31.

consent for data be used online. Labour is saying that they have

:03:32.:03:36.

already made it clear that they want children... People to be able to

:03:37.:03:40.

delete posts they made when they were under 18, so they are

:03:41.:03:44.

supportive of this. Obviously we're waiting for some of the detail but

:03:45.:03:48.

this new bill is expected to be introduced in the Commons in the

:03:49.:03:51.

autumn. Thanks very much. We will be talking about this through the

:03:52.:03:53.

programme. The police watchdog in Scotland

:03:54.:03:54.

is investigating after officers failed to find the body

:03:55.:03:56.

of a 64-year-old man who had been After weeks of searching

:03:57.:03:59.

using police divers, dogs and a helicopter,

:04:00.:04:02.

Arnold Mouat was found 64-year-old Arnold Mouat

:04:03.:04:04.

was reported missing by his family on 7 July, the day after he'd last

:04:05.:04:15.

been seen in his own home. At the time, Police Scotland

:04:16.:04:19.

launched an investigation which included a search of that

:04:20.:04:21.

property, but no trace was found There was also a large-scale

:04:22.:04:24.

search in the area around involving the police helicopter,

:04:25.:04:29.

divers, rescue teams Then, yesterday, police confirmed

:04:30.:04:31.

that a body had been found There was no explanation

:04:32.:04:34.

of where it was found His death is being treated

:04:35.:04:38.

as unexplained but not suspicious. Police Scotland say they had

:04:39.:04:45.

voluntarily referred the case the Police Investigations and Review

:04:46.:04:50.

Commission. That same organisation started

:04:51.:04:53.

an investigation when police Scotland failed to respond

:04:54.:04:57.

to an emergency call about a car that had crashed off the M9

:04:58.:05:02.

near Stirling in 2015. Lamara Bell died in hospital

:05:03.:05:05.

after being found in the wreckage She was discovered alongside her

:05:06.:05:08.

husband, John Yuill, One independent review has

:05:09.:05:11.

already identified problems Passangers using Britain's busiest

:05:12.:05:14.

railway station have been warned to expect major

:05:15.:05:25.

disruption this month. Ten of the 19 platforms

:05:26.:05:27.

at Waterloo Station will be closed Steph, this is going to be a bit of

:05:28.:05:45.

a nightmare, isn't it? Yeah, good morning, good morning, everyone, it

:05:46.:05:48.

will be a bad night if you're travelling in and out of London this

:05:49.:05:53.

month as so many do. Already this morning you can see people looking

:05:54.:05:57.

at the signs and working out whether their train is running. Also I've

:05:58.:06:01.

seen a load of people in hard hats and high-viz, a lot of the people

:06:02.:06:06.

working on this site. Waterloo is one of the UK's biggest train

:06:07.:06:11.

stations, something like 270,000 journeys are made in and out of this

:06:12.:06:15.

station every day so it's certainly very busy and this is all about

:06:16.:06:19.

improving the station so Network Rail, who maintain the tracks and

:06:20.:06:25.

some of the stations, are spending ?400 million on this one to improve

:06:26.:06:29.

it. What they want to do is to lengthen some of the platforms so we

:06:30.:06:33.

can have longer trains and therefore get more passengers on, because

:06:34.:06:36.

anyone who travels in and out of London will know how busy it can be

:06:37.:06:41.

on the main commuter trains in and out of here. It's about increasing

:06:42.:06:45.

the capacity but it will mean a lot of disruption for people because we

:06:46.:06:49.

also understand this isn't just the only train station in London where

:06:50.:06:52.

it's happening, you've also got London Bridge and Sharyn Kross, so

:06:53.:06:57.

there's going to be major delays. I'll be talking to Network Rail

:06:58.:07:02.

later to find out what it will mean for passengers. -- charring cross.

:07:03.:07:08.

More from the in a bit. Thanks, Steph, we will be there at Waterloo

:07:09.:07:11.

station through the morning. Good luck to everyone travelling

:07:12.:07:13.

through there! President Trump and his South Korean

:07:14.:07:13.

counterpart have spoken by phone to discuss North Korea's

:07:14.:07:16.

recent missile tests. Mr Trump said he was happy

:07:17.:07:18.

and impressed with the unanimity at the United Nations Security

:07:19.:07:21.

Council on North Korea sanctions. Chronic overcrowding in some

:07:22.:07:26.

of Europe's top tourist hotspots is fuelling an angry

:07:27.:07:28.

backlash from residents, who say that a sharp rise

:07:29.:07:30.

in visitors is ruining neighbourhoods and making

:07:31.:07:33.

life intolerable. British tourists on board

:07:34.:07:36.

a sightseeing bus in Barcelona feared they were being ambushed

:07:37.:07:38.

by terrorists when masked men attacked their open-top bus

:07:39.:07:41.

and slashed its tyres and covered And we'll be talking

:07:42.:07:44.

about the protests at mass tourism Brazilian police say a British woman

:07:45.:07:55.

has been shot and wounded Officials say a couple

:07:56.:08:00.

and their three children were targeted by an armed group

:08:01.:08:03.

after taking a wrong turn. The woman's condition isn't thought

:08:04.:08:06.

to be life-threatening. The American sprinter

:08:07.:08:19.

Justin Gatlin, who won the 100m at the World Athletics Championships

:08:20.:08:22.

in London, was given a mixed reception yesterday evening

:08:23.:08:25.

at his medal ceremony. Some of the crowd booed Gatlin

:08:26.:08:27.

who has twice tested positive Away from all the controversy

:08:28.:08:30.

around his win there was another significant medal ceremony,

:08:31.:08:34.

as Natalie Pirks reports. Gold-medallist and world champion,

:08:35.:08:46.

representing the United States... A smattering of boos for the champion,

:08:47.:08:50.

an unfamiliar medal around the neck of the Jamaican, after his two

:08:51.:08:58.

doping bans, Justin Gatlin understandingly was the villain of

:08:59.:09:01.

the peace when he collected his gold for winning the 100 and final. This

:09:02.:09:06.

wasn't what Usain Bolt had planned, of course, but he still not the

:09:07.:09:13.

moment. Cheats aren't meant to prosper. Today then finally tribute

:09:14.:09:17.

and four Jessica Ennis Hill. Cheated out of gold by a Russian doper in

:09:18.:09:23.

2011. Six years she's waited for this upgrade on silver, no wonder

:09:24.:09:27.

she shed a tear. My husband said to me you're not going to cry, you? I

:09:28.:09:32.

said no, no, but I'd forgotten that feeling when you step out in an

:09:33.:09:36.

arena like this and actually hear the crowd cheering for you. From the

:09:37.:09:41.

old generation to the new. Katarina Johnson-Thompson has long been

:09:42.:09:48.

considered Britain's hair to Ennis-Hill's the Capital One crown

:09:49.:09:52.

but in a major championships yet again she had her hopes plummeted.

:09:53.:09:56.

She let herself with too much to do in the final event, the 800 metres.

:09:57.:10:02.

Eventually finished fifth overall. Disappointment too for Holly

:10:03.:10:05.

Bradshaw. She had a great chance for a medal in the pole vault but after

:10:06.:10:10.

failing at 4.75, the dream was over and the emotion took hold. From

:10:11.:10:17.

Gatlin to Bowie. By the end of the night the USA had yet another shock

:10:18.:10:22.

100 and champion. Jamaica's darling Elaine Thompson was left for dust

:10:23.:10:27.

and out of the medals by Tory Bowie, she timed her run and heard it to

:10:28.:10:32.

perfection. Natalie Pirks, BBC News, at the London Stadium.

:10:33.:10:35.

And later this morning we'll be speaking to

:10:36.:10:37.

That is Toni Minichiello. Yesterday Jess said that Toni Minichiello

:10:38.:10:50.

could help out Katarina Johnson-Thompson on the mental side

:10:51.:10:54.

of things. We will talk to him about that as well as other things too.

:10:55.:10:56.

Jeremy Clarkson has said he won't be back at work for quite some time

:10:57.:11:00.

after being diagnosed with pneumonia.

:11:01.:11:01.

The former Top Gear presenter was admitted to hospital

:11:02.:11:03.

in Majorca, where he's on holiday with his family.

:11:04.:11:06.

He said it was the first time he'd been off sick since he started

:11:07.:11:10.

working in 1978 and thanked fans for all their good wishes.

:11:11.:11:17.

Were like to see some racing of a slightly different kind? -- would

:11:18.:11:21.

you. The English village

:11:22.:11:22.

of Bonsall were host to this The annual World Hen

:11:23.:11:24.

Racing Championships. As you can see

:11:25.:11:28.

competition was tough. After checking out their opponents

:11:29.:11:30.

and a little refuelling Some hens resorted to foul play

:11:31.:11:32.

but there could only ever Who won? Egbert? A bit of speed at

:11:33.:11:58.

the end and Jack was the trainer of the winner. I think that is Jack.

:11:59.:12:05.

Well done, Jack. I think Jack won. Seems a little disorganised but

:12:06.:12:09.

there he is. Not quite like the 100 metres at the start. Usain Bolt was

:12:10.:12:14.

complaining about his blocks in the early round, maybe there was a block

:12:15.:12:16.

issue! You're watching

:12:17.:12:16.

Breakfast from BBC News. Let's have a look at the papers

:12:17.:12:26.

quickly. Sticking with the athletics, quite a few of the papers

:12:27.:12:30.

have Jessica Ennis Hill on the front cover, she was fighting back the

:12:31.:12:34.

tears yesterday. Must be an extraordinary moment to be on your

:12:35.:12:37.

own and given your gold. And knowing six years ago in 2011 when she felt

:12:38.:12:45.

she should have won those World Championships and Tatiana Sinn over

:12:46.:12:49.

has since been stripped of that gold so Jessica Ennis Hill is three-time

:12:50.:12:53.

world champion and one-time Olympic champion, winning silver in Rio last

:12:54.:12:58.

summer as well, the main story NHS abuse of mental patient is endemic,

:12:59.:13:02.

the warning over the use of force over record violence. Various things

:13:03.:13:06.

on the front page of the Daily Telegraph, including that picture of

:13:07.:13:10.

Jessica Ennis Hill yesterday, they are talking about the Conservative

:13:11.:13:15.

Party saying Brexit negotiators have been accused of trying to ram

:13:16.:13:18.

through a ?36 billion divorce bill while most of the Cabinet is on

:13:19.:13:25.

holiday. Talking about backlash from ministers and senior Eurosceptic

:13:26.:13:28.

Conservatives and they are talking about the NHS hiring British nurses.

:13:29.:13:35.

This is a lead story we have after a ban on website tick boxes and the

:13:36.:13:39.

ability to ask companies to remove things that you don't want online.

:13:40.:13:44.

Front page of the Daily Mirror, they have a story with the British model

:13:45.:13:51.

who feared for her life every minute. She was taken abroad and you

:13:52.:13:57.

can read the full story in there. British cops told me there was a

:13:58.:14:02.

plot to kill Diana, Father's shock claim, Henri Paul claims UK police

:14:03.:14:07.

told him she was murdered. The Guardian has this story that a

:14:08.:14:11.

couple of the papers mentioned, what they are calling an IVF postcode

:14:12.:14:16.

lottery, there have been cuts in various areas of England, 13 areas

:14:17.:14:20.

are restricting or stopping IVF treatment for women struggling to

:14:21.:14:23.

conceive since the start of the year. A further eight are consulting

:14:24.:14:30.

on taking similar steps. Holland's captain celebrating, holding the

:14:31.:14:34.

Euro 2017 trophy. Stories from the inside pages, this

:14:35.:14:41.

is the Sun, there's the former Prime Minister Mr David Cameron, quite

:14:42.:14:44.

easy to spot here with the ring around his head, putting his face in

:14:45.:14:49.

a selfie taken by these two. Vanessa Price was getting a selfie with her

:14:50.:14:54.

husband, Steve, and she later spotted David Cameron in the

:14:55.:14:57.

background. This is at the Wilderness Festival, near The

:14:58.:15:03.

Cotswolds, and his wife, Sam Cam, there. Do you choose your holiday

:15:04.:15:10.

airport carefully? Where you fly from? I try to, not always but I do.

:15:11.:15:17.

They are saying you can spend 14 times more based on your airport.

:15:18.:15:23.

One example, a family of four would pay ?2941 to fly from Heathrow to

:15:24.:15:30.

Pharoah next Saturday leaving at 425 4:25am but if you can wait an hour

:15:31.:15:35.

and you get to Glasgow the same flight instead of ?2941 would be

:15:36.:15:46.

?500. Worth shopping around! You could travel first class on a train

:15:47.:15:51.

from Euston to Glasgow, stay in a 5-star hotel, get a limousine to the

:15:52.:15:54.

airport and still save thousands! The weather. It wasn't looking great

:15:55.:16:07.

yesterday. How was it going to be this week is looking unsettled. It

:16:08.:16:17.

will be unsettled. Rain at times. Showers. Sunshine. Cool and breezy

:16:18.:16:25.

at times. This morning, a weather front going south taking rain with

:16:26.:16:30.

it. Later, going to south-west England. As far as Dorset. The other

:16:31.:16:34.

side of the country, rain in Scotland in the north. That could be

:16:35.:16:39.

thundery. Dry weather for Scotland, Northern Ireland, and northern

:16:40.:16:44.

England. You can expect showers here through the day and in Wales. Again,

:16:45.:16:49.

they are going through Lincolnshire and The Wash into Norfolk and the

:16:50.:16:54.

Midlands and down into the south-west. Ahead of that, cloud.

:16:55.:17:00.

The south-east, dry and bright starts. Through the day, this

:17:01.:17:06.

weather front will go up. The western end of it will. Behind that,

:17:07.:17:12.

heavy showers. Lighter showers in northern England. Temperatures of

:17:13.:17:21.

14- 21. 23- 24 is possible with the sunshine in Kent and Sussex. The

:17:22.:17:27.

athletics today. Increasingly, as the weather front goes out, the

:17:28.:17:32.

cloud will build. The risk of rain later in the day in London. Through

:17:33.:17:37.

the evening and overnight, this is the weather front. It will start to

:17:38.:17:43.

retreat north. Dry weather around as well. A few showers and clear

:17:44.:17:49.

spells. Overnight lows, 10- 15. Tomorrow, well, this weather front

:17:50.:17:54.

is still with us. Pivoting a little bit. Low pressure not far away. They

:17:55.:18:02.

shall meet. A wet day in south-eastern England. Scotland and

:18:03.:18:04.

Northern Ireland, sunshine and showers. The driest conditions. Wet

:18:05.:18:10.

in Wales as well. The weather front is pivoting. Coming up from the near

:18:11.:18:15.

continent. Wet. Torrential downpours tomorrow for example in Kent and

:18:16.:18:20.

Southampton as well. The sunshine, well, it will feel pleasant enough.

:18:21.:18:25.

Tuesday into Wednesday, we still have that mixture of weather fronts.

:18:26.:18:31.

The rain is pushing down towards the south-east. It is dry behind it for

:18:32.:18:35.

the bulk of the UK with a few showers. Temperatures by then, 15-

:18:36.:18:41.

18. Thursday, it is looking more dry for both of us. Thank you. We will

:18:42.:18:50.

have more through the morning. Birmingham is in danger of sinking

:18:51.:18:54.

in a "sea of rubbish," that's according to one councillor

:18:55.:18:57.

concerned at the backlog of waste that is mounting up

:18:58.:19:00.

on the city's streets. Bin collectors are stepping up

:19:01.:19:02.

industrial action by refusing to work every day for two hours

:19:03.:19:05.

in a dispute over job losses. Kathryn Stanczyszyn is there

:19:06.:19:08.

for us this morning. And we can see a little bit of the

:19:09.:19:10.

problem escalated? And we can see a little bit of the

:19:11.:19:19.

scale of the problem. Good morning. Good morning. This has been a timely

:19:20.:19:24.

topic of conversation in Birmingham this summer. It is not getting

:19:25.:19:29.

better. This dispute started at the end of June. Some streets like this

:19:30.:19:36.

one that I am on an Quinton have not seen collections for at least a

:19:37.:19:41.

month. This pile is repeating a few times up the street. As you can see,

:19:42.:19:47.

it looks awful. I can tell you it smells pretty bad as well. And we

:19:48.:19:51.

have just seen a rat run behind. It is causing problems. People here are

:19:52.:19:57.

tearing their hair out. One person is having to take their bin bags to

:19:58.:20:14.

work to get rid of them, and one mother says she doesn't want her

:20:15.:20:17.

children playing outside because of the rubbish. It is concerning the

:20:18.:20:19.

city. I spoke to some of yesterday. For this woman, British summertime

:20:20.:20:24.

usually means hoping for hot weather. But not this year. 13- 15.

:20:25.:20:28.

That is because Colin's rubbish has not being elected from his house

:20:29.:20:34.

ends June. -- collected. High temperatures make it worse. It is

:20:35.:20:40.

not very good. You are living somewhere in people see bags of

:20:41.:20:44.

rubbish at the front of your house. He is now having to store beanbags

:20:45.:20:50.

in his garden as well. -- bin bags. You see rats and foxes as well. It

:20:51.:21:00.

is disgusting. Birmingham City Council wants to modernise its waste

:21:01.:21:08.

service, but refuse workers say they are facing pay cuts. The collateral

:21:09.:21:16.

damage is visible to all, and it is attracting vermin. As you can see,

:21:17.:21:20.

there are many ripped bags. It is like takeaway, isn't it? One firm

:21:21.:21:26.

has seen a 20% increase in callouts over the past six weeks, and says

:21:27.:21:31.

this could cause public problems. Rats carry diseases which are

:21:32.:21:37.

harmful to human beings. So, if a human being was to touch somewhere

:21:38.:21:46.

where a rat has urinated, it could cause a serious disease. People

:21:47.:21:50.

living here are concerned. It is going to get worse. If it gets

:21:51.:21:54.

warmer... The Commonwealth Games is coming. It is ridiculous. It is

:21:55.:21:59.

avoidable, the scale of it. There is no organisation for the distribution

:22:00.:22:02.

of this stuff. It doesn't look good. It doesn't smell good. There should

:22:03.:22:08.

be industrial action. Intense talks continue between the two sides. Last

:22:09.:22:13.

week, volunteers took to the streets to help clear up some of the worst

:22:14.:22:17.

areas. But with weeks of action left to go, it seems getting on top of

:22:18.:22:20.

this rubbish could prove difficult. It is a game of cat and mouse

:22:21.:22:28.

between the Birmingham City Council and the Unite members. Unite says

:22:29.:22:36.

Birmingham is trying to cut pay by ?5,000 in some cases. Birmingham

:22:37.:22:41.

City Council says it is saving ?5 million and modernising the area.

:22:42.:22:47.

What of the clean-up operation? Birmingham City Council says it has

:22:48.:22:53.

had emergency teams out this weekend with agency staff as well. It has

:22:54.:22:57.

cleared two thirds of the backlog. But there are still streets like

:22:58.:23:03.

this. Some are saying we will believe it when we see it. Quite a

:23:04.:23:08.

picture. We will speak to someone from Birmingham City Council about

:23:09.:23:14.

that. Some people are having to keep bins inside their houses. The smell

:23:15.:23:16.

must be terrible. UK soldiers stationed

:23:17.:23:17.

are helping to fight poachers, who are threatening the existence

:23:18.:23:19.

of rare forest elephants in Gabon. Tens of thousands of elephants have

:23:20.:23:22.

been killed in the West African state of Gabon, mostly

:23:23.:23:26.

for their ivory, but now, the British Army is sharing tactics

:23:27.:23:28.

to teach gamekeepers how to track Our defence correspondent,

:23:29.:23:31.

Jonathan Beale, reports. Some of the images may be

:23:32.:23:38.

disturbing. We're travelling through

:23:39.:23:43.

the second-largest rainforest in the world trying to find

:23:44.:23:47.

an animal whose numbers have declined by more than 60%

:23:48.:23:52.

over the last ten years. And this is about as close

:23:53.:23:56.

as you'll ever get to them. We had to turn the engine

:23:57.:24:01.

off and stay silent. They're much smaller

:24:02.:24:06.

than the better-known savanna elephant, but just as vulnerable

:24:07.:24:10.

to poachers, who target them This is what's been happening

:24:11.:24:19.

to them, another victim 85% of Gabon is covered

:24:20.:24:26.

in rainforest that stretches This is the last sanctuary

:24:27.:24:44.

for the elusive forest elephant, but it's also ideal hiding and cover

:24:45.:24:48.

for the poachers who are killing And with the help

:24:49.:24:52.

of the British Army. For the first time, we've been

:24:53.:24:57.

allowed to film the small team of UK soldiers who are helping train

:24:58.:25:01.

Gabon's national park agency Gabon has got a real high density

:25:02.:25:03.

of forest elephants. That's why it's got

:25:04.:25:08.

a poaching problem. Out here, training the Gabonese

:25:09.:25:14.

National Parks Agency to combat that, both at the tactical

:25:15.:25:17.

and operational levels, means that the British Army can make

:25:18.:25:19.

a difference in that fight They've even brought in jungle

:25:20.:25:22.

warfare specialists, who, in this exercise,

:25:23.:25:29.

show them how to find and then But the British are also teaching

:25:30.:25:33.

them the importance of recovering evidence that might

:25:34.:25:39.

lead to prosecutions. Among those being trained

:25:40.:25:49.

are former poachers who have Ulrich says as a boy he used to hunt

:25:50.:25:51.

elephants with his father That used to be tolerated,

:25:52.:25:57.

but not anymore. These days, the greatest threat

:25:58.:26:07.

to these elephants is not the locals, but criminal gangs

:26:08.:26:09.

who operate across the border. We're faced, you know,

:26:10.:26:12.

with organised crime cartels, And now, we're in a situation

:26:13.:26:14.

where, in most, in many of our national parks,

:26:15.:26:39.

it's a warzone. Even with a global ban

:26:40.:26:41.

on the sale of ivory there's And hidden away in these forests,

:26:42.:26:44.

these elephants are still easy prey. It is lovely to see those beautiful

:26:45.:26:59.

animals. There is still plenty to come on Breakfast this morning. It

:27:00.:30:22.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London Newsroom

:30:23.:30:26.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:30:27.:30:30.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:30:31.:30:35.

We'll have the latest news and sport in just a moment.

:30:36.:30:41.

They are supposed to transform our streets into clean and safe places,

:30:42.:30:47.

we'll ask if cycle-share schemes are being taken for a ride

:30:48.:30:50.

Would you swap a chocolate chip cookie for one

:30:51.:30:54.

We'll meet the couple on a mission to get more of us eating grub

:30:55.:31:00.

The 10-year-old girl on the mission of a lifetime to find out

:31:01.:31:07.

what happened to her family during the Partition of India

:31:08.:31:10.

But now, a summary of this morning's main news.

:31:11.:31:16.

Social media firms will soon have to delete information

:31:17.:31:21.

about their users when asked to do so under new proposals announced

:31:22.:31:24.

The Data Protection Bill, which will go before Parliament

:31:25.:31:28.

in the autumn, will also forbid companies from using pre-selected

:31:29.:31:31.

tick boxes to gather information and will give the information

:31:32.:31:34.

watchdog powers to issue fines of up to 17 million.

:31:35.:31:38.

The police watchdog in Scotland is investigating why it took over

:31:39.:31:41.

a month to find the body of a man in his own home.

:31:42.:31:45.

Divers, sniffer dogs and a helicopter were used

:31:46.:31:47.

in a high profile search operation to find

:31:48.:31:49.

after his family reported him missing July.

:31:50.:31:52.

Police Scotland reported finding his body at home yesterday.

:31:53.:31:58.

Thousands of commuters will have their journeys disrupted

:31:59.:32:01.

today because of major improvement work at Britain's busiest railway

:32:02.:32:03.

More than half of its platforms are closed

:32:04.:32:07.

so they can be extended to accommodate longer trains.

:32:08.:32:09.

Network Rail has warned of challenging days

:32:10.:32:11.

Steph is at Waterloo for us through the morning and we will be back with

:32:12.:32:26.

her very shortly. President Trump and his South Korean

:32:27.:32:27.

counterpart have spoken by phone to discuss North Korea's

:32:28.:32:30.

recent missile tests. Mr Trump said he was happy

:32:31.:32:32.

and impressed with the agreement at the United Nations Security

:32:33.:32:35.

Council on North Korea sanctions. Chronic overcrowding in some

:32:36.:32:38.

of Europe's top tourist hotspots is fuelling an angry

:32:39.:32:40.

backlash from residents, who say that a sharp rise

:32:41.:32:42.

in visitors is ruining neighbourhoods and making

:32:43.:32:45.

life intolerable. British tourists on board

:32:46.:32:49.

a sightseeing bus in Barcelona feared they were being ambushed

:32:50.:32:51.

by terrorists when masked men attacked their open-top bus

:32:52.:32:54.

and slashed its tyres and covered Brazilian police say a British woman

:32:55.:32:56.

has been shot and wounded Officials say a couple

:32:57.:33:05.

and their three children were targeted by an armed group

:33:06.:33:09.

after taking a wrong turn. The woman's condition isn't thought

:33:10.:33:12.

to be life-threatening. All the sport with Jessica, who is

:33:13.:33:28.

at the London Stadium very shortly. She'll be telling us about last

:33:29.:33:29.

night, the medal ceremony. The American sprinter

:33:30.:33:31.

Justin Gatlin who won the 100m at the World Athletics Championships

:33:32.:33:34.

in London received a mixed reception Fantastic night for Jessica Ennis

:33:35.:33:41.

Hill, who is now a three-time world champion because she got a gold from

:33:42.:33:46.

day to in 2011 when she got the silver and Tatiana Genova got gold.

:33:47.:33:56.

-- Daegu. We will be talking with her coach

:33:57.:34:00.

about that and plenty of other things later.

:34:01.:34:00.

Jeremy Clarkson has said he won't be back at work for quite some time

:34:01.:34:04.

after being diagnosed with pneumonia.

:34:05.:34:05.

The former Top Gear presenter was admitted to hospital

:34:06.:34:08.

in Majorca, where he's on holiday with his family.

:34:09.:34:10.

He said it was the first time he'd been off sick since he started

:34:11.:34:14.

working in 1978 and thanked fans for all their good wishes.

:34:15.:34:17.

A brown bear has had a flipping good time after it entered an elderly

:34:18.:34:22.

woman's home in Romania and ate a stack of pancakes straight

:34:23.:34:25.

It's one of a handful of hungry bears leaving

:34:26.:34:29.

the mountains for Harghita, a county in central

:34:30.:34:31.

Romania, to scavenge for food in local bins,

:34:32.:34:33.

Experts say the bears won't attack unless provoked.

:34:34.:34:45.

I had a friend working in South Africa once, he woke up in the

:34:46.:34:51.

middle of the night and a massive baboon was in his hotel room, it

:34:52.:34:57.

opened the patio window. He just lay perfectly still in his bedroom. The

:34:58.:35:02.

baboon was looking around for food. Found a bar of chocolate in his

:35:03.:35:09.

suitcase and sat there at the end of the bed, ate the entire bar of

:35:10.:35:13.

chocolate, and then they had a staring match and then jumped back

:35:14.:35:19.

out of the window. Extraordinary! If you have any animal based stories,

:35:20.:35:26.

hopefully with a happy ending, just like that, let us know.

:35:27.:35:30.

Let's speak to Jess who is at the London Stadium for us

:35:31.:35:33.

ahead of day four of the World Athletics Championships.

:35:34.:35:35.

So much to talk about, where should we start? Good morning, no animals

:35:36.:35:41.

here but a few birds. What a day yesterday. A bit disappointing for

:35:42.:35:46.

the Brits. The world at have stood up at the World Championships and

:35:47.:35:49.

they have made their mark, yesterday it was an opportunity for the

:35:50.:35:53.

British athletes to impress in front of this incredible home support but

:35:54.:35:58.

actually they just fell short and it was quite a disappointing day. In

:35:59.:36:05.

the heptathlon Katarina Johnson-Thompson was touted to win a

:36:06.:36:09.

medal but she could only finish fifth.

:36:10.:36:10.

to do after a poor high jump on Saturday but performed admirably

:36:11.:36:15.

in the three events yesterday, finishing second in her

:36:16.:36:18.

But She'd ultimately left herself too far behind.

:36:19.:36:21.

The Olympic champion, Belgium's Nafi Thiam, won gold.

:36:22.:36:29.

I feel like I've got a lot of talent to show and I feel like one of these

:36:30.:36:37.

days it will happen for me. I felt like it's the second event and I

:36:38.:36:40.

knew it was always going to be difficult bouncing back. I feel like

:36:41.:36:45.

I've done a good job trying to find myself normally, now I feel a bit

:36:46.:36:49.

defeatist but I've tried to change my attitude a bit and I feel like

:36:50.:36:53.

I've come back and showed even though I've had a difficult time in

:36:54.:36:55.

the second event, I'm a fighter. Pole vaulter Holly Bradshaw

:36:56.:36:56.

finished sixth in her final. She failed to get over

:36:57.:37:01.

with the bar set at 4.75m. She had the height but her knee

:37:02.:37:04.

caught the bar on the way down. Better news in the men's marathon,

:37:05.:37:08.

where Callum Hawkins equalled the best performance

:37:09.:37:22.

by a British athlete at a World Championships

:37:23.:37:24.

by finishing fourth. The 25-year-old Scot missed out

:37:25.:37:26.

on the medals but clocked an impressive personal

:37:27.:37:34.

best time of 2:10:17. And we'll be speaking to Callum

:37:35.:37:36.

later here on BBC Breakfast. There was drama in the final

:37:37.:37:41.

of the women's 100m, no British interest in this one

:37:42.:37:44.

but for the second night running, an American athlete surprised

:37:45.:37:47.

the Jamaican favourite in the race. This time it was Tori Bowie,

:37:48.:37:50.

who produced a powerful finish to claim gold by one

:37:51.:37:56.

hundredth of a second. champion Elaine Thompson could only

:37:57.:37:59.

finish fifth. We were talking yesterday about

:38:00.:38:14.

Justin Gatlin obviously becoming the world 100 and champion here.

:38:15.:38:16.

Now, it was right here that the various medal ceremonies

:38:17.:38:19.

There was debate about whether he would be booed by the crowd. Let's

:38:20.:38:32.

take a look. World champion, representing the United States of

:38:33.:38:34.

America, Justin Gatlin! BOOING Yes, there were some boos but it

:38:35.:38:41.

I reckon it was more of a mixed reception for Gatlin

:38:42.:38:45.

from the London crowd last night. Lord Coe, who presented

:38:46.:38:47.

him with the medal, had earlier said that the two-time

:38:48.:38:50.

drugs cheat beating Usain Bolt There was a bigger cheer

:38:51.:38:53.

for Jessica Ennis-Hill, though. She received her gold from the 2011

:38:54.:39:01.

games after the athlete that had It's great to be honest, it couldn't

:39:02.:39:19.

have been a better time to receive the medal other than at the time.

:39:20.:39:24.

So, yeah, I'm very thankful it's been here and I've been able to say

:39:25.:39:28.

bye-bye for one last time. I felt like I haven't forgot an ounce of

:39:29.:39:32.

feeling about how it felt five years ago stepping out into the stadium,

:39:33.:39:36.

but actually I had kind of forgotten that feeling a little bit and

:39:37.:39:40.

actually standing here and hearing the crowd again, it just brought it

:39:41.:39:43.

all flooding back and that's why it's so emotional.

:39:44.:39:44.

England will be looking to wrap up the fourth test and a series win

:39:45.:39:48.

against South Africa this morning.

:39:49.:39:49.

They'll resume on 224 for eight in their second innings,

:39:50.:40:02.

It was thanks largely to some late big hitting from Moeen Ali,

:40:03.:40:06.

who even managed to pick out teammate Jonny Bairstow

:40:07.:40:09.

on the balcony during his innings!

:40:10.:40:14.

Arsenal won the FA Community Shield for the 15th time by beating

:40:15.:40:17.

Chelsea took the lead early in the second half but Gunners

:40:18.:40:21.

new signing Sead Kolasinac equalised with ten minutes left to take

:40:22.:40:24.

Chelsea missed twice before Olivier Giroud struck the winning

:40:25.:40:28.

Rangers started their Scottish premiership season beating

:40:29.:40:49.

Motherwell 2-1 and Aberdeen won 2-0. Double Olympic silver-medallist

:40:50.:40:54.

Jonathan Brownlee could only finish fourth at the Montreal leg

:40:55.:40:56.

of the World Triathlon Series. as Spain's Javier

:40:57.:40:59.

Gomez took the win. Jonny Brownlee of course, one of the

:41:00.:41:14.

stars at London 2012, Dan. I want to say, the medals haven't really so

:41:15.:41:18.

far been coming in for Great Britain, they have a target of six

:41:19.:41:22.

to eight and they've only won one so far so it's hard to see where

:41:23.:41:26.

they're going to come from. Thanks for the moment. What else have we

:41:27.:41:30.

got to look forward to today, no morning session in the stadium

:41:31.:41:35.

today? There isn't but I'm very excited to see what Sophie Hitchen

:41:36.:41:38.

can do, she is the hammer thrower and can you imagine, she used to be

:41:39.:41:45.

able ballerina. The nets are off at the moment but this large structure

:41:46.:41:49.

with the purple polls will be the hammer. The nets go around the

:41:50.:41:53.

outside and if you've seen the hammer, incredible sport, they spin

:41:54.:41:58.

at 360 degrees at such speed and then they released the hammer to the

:41:59.:42:02.

field as you can see and Sophie Hitchon will hopefully be in the

:42:03.:42:06.

medals. We don't know yet, we will have to see how she gets on. She

:42:07.:42:11.

comes on to the field a bit later this evening and it will be

:42:12.:42:14.

interesting to see how she gets on. You can see how the ballet helps!

:42:15.:42:19.

Experiment, see you later! Ellie Doyle and also Laura Milne and Lori

:42:20.:42:25.

Wakeman in action, a busy evening but no morning section. A bit of

:42:26.:42:29.

switching tonight between BBC One and BBC Two. I don't mind when that

:42:30.:42:31.

happens. I go with the switching! In the future, social media firms

:42:32.:42:43.

will be forced to delete information about you, if you ask them,

:42:44.:42:46.

it is part of a raft of new measures aimed at giving people a greater

:42:47.:42:50.

"right to be forgotten" online. From next May, the Data Protection

:42:51.:42:53.

Bill, should make it simpler use and store their personal

:42:54.:42:56.

details. Brian Lord is the former deputy

:42:57.:42:59.

director of Intelligence and Cyber Operations at GCHQ,

:43:00.:43:02.

the government listening station. He joins us from our

:43:03.:43:04.

Bristol newsroom. Good morning. Good morning. Can I

:43:05.:43:10.

ask first up how these measures will be put into practice? The devil is

:43:11.:43:15.

always the detail with these kinds of things. In effect what we have is

:43:16.:43:19.

a regulation which starts to try to control two things, one is how our

:43:20.:43:24.

data is used and how our data is stored and protected. I think the

:43:25.:43:29.

principle of this regulation is sound. I think what we need to be

:43:30.:43:33.

able to do is look at the detail of how it's going to happen because I

:43:34.:43:37.

think there are a lot of pitfalls ahead if actually the benefit of

:43:38.:43:40.

this, which is people feeling far more comfortable transacting online,

:43:41.:43:46.

and their data will be protected, I think it's a good first step to have

:43:47.:43:51.

the regulation in place, the implementation is the key thing. Can

:43:52.:43:55.

I try to run through an example to give people a clear idea. Let's say

:43:56.:44:00.

I posted something on Facebook when I was 16 that I wanted to take down

:44:01.:44:04.

because I thought it was detrimental to getting a job and I didn't want

:44:05.:44:08.

others to see that, can I apply to Facebook and ask for it to be

:44:09.:44:13.

removed and they have to do it? You can and under the principles of the

:44:14.:44:16.

data protection regulation, they will have to do that. That's a great

:44:17.:44:21.

example, but of course what we also have to check is what has Facebook,

:44:22.:44:26.

to take the example, done with that picture beforehand? Has it given

:44:27.:44:31.

that information to anyone else, sold it to anyone else, can it track

:44:32.:44:35.

that information and track the flow of that information all the way

:44:36.:44:39.

through? On the flipside there has to be a recognition about how you

:44:40.:44:43.

have protected that photograph, have you put privacy settings around it

:44:44.:44:47.

or have you allowed any random person to copy it and put it across

:44:48.:44:51.

the Internet. This is what I mean about the detail. How do we make

:44:52.:44:57.

people safe online without having expectations of a service which is

:44:58.:45:04.

just totally impractical? These new measures are part of EU regulations

:45:05.:45:08.

that are filtering down. Is this all addressing a growing issue, are

:45:09.:45:11.

these coming into force because people are saying I want to do this

:45:12.:45:17.

and I can't at the moment? What's happening here is as we've seen

:45:18.:45:20.

we've had an explosion of technology, we as the public, and

:45:21.:45:27.

the industry, have increased that technology at speed. It's only now

:45:28.:45:31.

that the risks associated with that are coming to light and this

:45:32.:45:34.

regulation is a way of trying to balance that risk in a way that I've

:45:35.:45:39.

always said let's try to normalise some of the risks online. These are

:45:40.:45:44.

the measures coming into place next year which are supposed to

:45:45.:45:45.

recalibrate some of that. Will those companies play ball? I

:45:46.:46:00.

think they will. This is the direction of travel. The largest

:46:01.:46:04.

ones are starting to, as we have seen with the posting of terrorist

:46:05.:46:12.

material. I think, in the end, they will. As with all things, the

:46:13.:46:16.

solution will never be perfect. What we need to do is get the social

:46:17.:46:20.

media companies in this example to start moving towards slightly more

:46:21.:46:27.

social responsibility. We as the public need to recognise the

:46:28.:46:30.

solution is never as straightforward as it can be, but it can certainly

:46:31.:46:35.

be better than it is now. Thank you very much. It is good to talk to

:46:36.:46:39.

you. Everyone watching will have there own views about what they want

:46:40.:46:45.

to have removed, for example. It makes me thankful social media was

:46:46.:46:48.

not around when I grew up. Extremely thankful in many ways. We will not

:46:49.:46:55.

go into them. Everything is out there, isn't it? Photographs and

:46:56.:47:00.

everything. It is so hard to be a child these days. Send us your

:47:01.:47:05.

thoughts. And the weather. Good morning. You are

:47:06.:47:15.

showers. Some will be heavy. Cool and breezy. The driest day will be

:47:16.:47:25.

Thursday. For some of us, Wednesday. A weather front at the moment moving

:47:26.:47:31.

slowly south. In doing so, later in the day it will go up. Rain in the

:47:32.:47:37.

far north of Scotland. Aberdeenshire, heavy and thundery

:47:38.:47:41.

showers. At the moment, dry weather would showers in the west. Northern

:47:42.:47:46.

England and Northern Ireland scene showers. Wales, cloud around with

:47:47.:47:51.

showers. This is the weather front extending towards The Wash and south

:47:52.:47:59.

west England. Cloud is wielding ahead of that. The driest conditions

:48:00.:48:04.

will be in the far south-east. The weather front goes south-east. It is

:48:05.:48:09.

going up across the Midlands and the Isles of Scilly. Then it goes across

:48:10.:48:14.

the Midlands. Behind that, sunshine and showers. The heaviest will be in

:48:15.:48:23.

Scotland and Northern Ireland. The athletics. We are looking at the

:48:24.:48:28.

afternoon. It should be dry early in the afternoon. The cloud is

:48:29.:48:33.

thickening as the weather front goes south. The odd bit of rain coming

:48:34.:48:40.

out of that later. Than the rain goes north through the night. --

:48:41.:48:46.

then. Mist and fog in the south-west. Showers in the

:48:47.:48:51.

north-west of Scotland and Northern Ireland. That brings us to tomorrow.

:48:52.:48:55.

The weather front pivots in the direction of the south-east. A

:48:56.:49:01.

weather front coming up from the near continent. Labelled meat and it

:49:02.:49:05.

will be a wet day in central and southern England and the south-east

:49:06.:49:10.

corner. -- they will meet. Torrential downpours in parts of

:49:11.:49:14.

Kent heading towards Hampshire and East Anglia. North of that, Scotland

:49:15.:49:18.

and Northern Ireland, sunshine and showers. More heavy rain the next

:49:19.:49:24.

day on Wednesday. Surface water issues without. The bulk of the UK,

:49:25.:49:32.

it is dry. -- with that. What is striking is that weather is

:49:33.:49:34.

different to Europe. Absolutely different. They have had extremely

:49:35.:49:39.

high temperatures in southern Europe. Temperatures into the 40s

:49:40.:49:45.

and even mid- 40s for some. Droughts in Italy. Water rationing. In the

:49:46.:49:53.

next few days, temperatures in Europe will come down a bit. It will

:49:54.:49:58.

still be hot and humid, but not as much as it has been. I was not

:49:59.:50:02.

prepared for wet weather this morning when I left the house. You

:50:03.:50:11.

weren't? I had to go back in for a coat.

:50:12.:50:14.

Thousands of dockless bikes have appeared up and down the country

:50:15.:50:17.

They are located using a mobile app, and can be unlocked and hired

:50:18.:50:22.

I was cycling around the office. I heard you were quite reckless.

:50:23.:50:33.

But not all of them are staying on the road.

:50:34.:50:36.

Police in Manchester say some have been dumped in canals,

:50:37.:50:39.

bins and hedges, in Bristol, one company says around 100

:50:40.:50:41.

of their bicycles have been vandalised.

:50:42.:50:43.

So, is cycle-sharing and similar schemes really the future

:50:44.:50:45.

Communal cycling in our capital is a common sight. But now thousands of

:50:46.:50:56.

dockless bicycles that can be parked anywhere are appearing on our

:50:57.:50:59.

streets. I have come to Bristol because this is the first place in

:51:00.:51:03.

the country to have dockless bicycles. I have downloaded the app

:51:04.:51:09.

and as you can see there 100 is available right now the big we will

:51:10.:51:14.

find the nearest one. Just around the corner, as promised, it is

:51:15.:51:23.

waiting for me. With the app I scan the barcode, the bicycle is

:51:24.:51:26.

unlocked, I am ready to go. They arrived three months ago and already

:51:27.:51:31.

the take-up is quite promising. They get written 1500 times a day. We are

:51:32.:51:43.

the first dockless bike sharing initiative in the UK. There are some

:51:44.:51:51.

problems. One in eight have been vandalised. And some are found with

:51:52.:51:57.

wheels missing. Are people looking after them? Most are doing well but

:51:58.:52:02.

we have had issues. About 900 cases so far. It is a decent car.

:52:03.:52:10.

Automatic. It is not just bicycles we are sharing. This man has 28

:52:11.:52:16.

cars. Today he is giving one of them to Will. I don't use them very

:52:17.:52:21.

often. When I do need one, it makes sense to use one someone else is not

:52:22.:52:27.

using. I had an injury and I could not walk. So why was sitting at home

:52:28.:52:32.

thinking I have two family cars in my driveway and they are not being

:52:33.:52:37.

used. I put them on a platform on the Internet gold HireCar and both

:52:38.:52:46.

of them were rented out. -- cold. One day I gave it out and we had

:52:47.:52:52.

none and my wife needed one. We bought a new one and I rented that

:52:53.:52:56.

out as well. Bot like the bicycles, one of them has been damaged. I said

:52:57.:53:03.

please be careful. Later he sent me a picture and said I have had an

:53:04.:53:09.

accident. -- One hour. He said it was heartbreaking. Many people are

:53:10.:53:14.

hiring out cars for as little as ?15 a day. In 15- 20 years' time, it

:53:15.:53:20.

will be abnormal to have your own car. The cost of journeys will come

:53:21.:53:24.

down substantially as we go towards a future where cars are autonomous,

:53:25.:53:30.

electric, and shared. Not everyone agrees this is the only way forward

:53:31.:53:34.

for the future of transport. We need to recognise human behaviour in all

:53:35.:53:38.

of this. A lot of people like to own things and they will want to carry

:53:39.:53:43.

on owning things into the future. Part of the future, not all of it.

:53:44.:53:46.

But with hundreds more rolling into our cities each month, it looks like

:53:47.:53:52.

dockless bikes will be on our roads for the foreseeable future. We have

:53:53.:53:59.

one in the studio. I promise not to writers around the studio. -- ride

:54:00.:54:05.

it around the. And this is a quick look at some of

:54:06.:54:15.

the key moments in the athletics ahead.

:54:16.:54:18.

There is no morning session today. We start with a former ballet

:54:19.:54:27.

dancer, Sophie Hitchon, who got bronze in Rio last summer in the

:54:28.:54:36.

hammer throw. She is up at 7am. Next is the former European champion and

:54:37.:54:38.

two-time Commonwealth silver-medallist, a lay Doyle. She

:54:39.:54:46.

goes in the 400 metre hurdles at 730. Finally, the two Lauras are in

:54:47.:54:56.

the final. Laura Muir qualified second in her semi-final and is

:54:57.:55:00.

going for the 5000 double. If you want to keep up with the action, go

:55:01.:55:18.

to BBC Two first, then One, then Two for the final half-hour of the

:55:19.:55:22.

coverage. That was a bit of channel hopping. And now for another type of

:55:23.:55:30.

hopping. Bugs. Eating them. Similar to beef and chicken.

:55:31.:55:35.

It makes you feel squeamish. I have some for you. Thank you so much.

:55:36.:55:49.

What would you like? Cricket powder. Cricket cookies that look like they

:55:50.:55:57.

are made of raisins. This is a biscuit. It has crickets and it.

:55:58.:56:03.

This smells a bit like a pet shop. -- in it. We are talking about this

:56:04.:56:14.

because we have guests on later who say

:56:15.:59:34.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London Newsroom

:59:35.:59:37.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:59:38.:59:40.

Now, though, it's back to the Breakfast sofa.

:59:41.:59:42.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:59:43.:00:13.

Social media firms will have to delete your childhood posts

:00:14.:00:17.

New laws will also ban companies from using pre-selected tick boxes

:00:18.:00:23.

Also this morning: The body of a man who was reported missing a month

:00:24.:00:47.

ago, sparking a huge search, has been found at his house.

:00:48.:00:50.

Now, the police watchdog launches an investigation.

:00:51.:00:59.

Good morning from Waterloo station. The number of train stations across

:01:00.:01:07.

London which will be facing major disruption this summer, as

:01:08.:01:10.

engineering work takes place. I will have all the details shortly.

:01:11.:01:11.

Here at the London Stadium - two ceremonies, two

:01:12.:01:14.

Boos again for Justin Gatlin at the 100m medal ceremony,

:01:15.:01:18.

but warm applause for Jessica Ennis-Hill,

:01:19.:01:20.

as she received her retrospective medal from six years ago.

:01:21.:01:32.

And I am in Birmingham, where an ongoing dispute to refuse workers

:01:33.:01:38.

and the City Council is starting to lead to concerns over public health.

:01:39.:01:40.

Good morning. We have got a weather front crossing us today,

:01:41.:01:49.

particularly across England and Wales, taking some rain with it.

:01:50.:01:53.

Kind that some brighter skies but also some showers, some of which

:01:54.:01:56.

will be heavy and thundery, especially across Scotland and

:01:57.:02:00.

Northern Ireland. But I will have more details in 15 minutes.

:02:01.:02:02.

First, our main story: New laws which will give people more control

:02:03.:02:07.

over what happens to their personal data online are to be introduced.

:02:08.:02:10.

The Government is billing the changes as the right

:02:11.:02:12.

People will be able to ask for personal data or material

:02:13.:02:16.

they posted when they were children to be deleted.

:02:17.:02:20.

The bill will also require people to give explicit consent

:02:21.:02:22.

for their information to be collected online,

:02:23.:02:24.

rather than firms relying on pre-selected tick boxes,

:02:25.:02:28.

and extra powers will be given to the information watchdog to issue

:02:29.:02:31.

fines of up to ?17 million to businesses for breaking the rules.

:02:32.:02:34.

Our political correspondent Leila Nathoo is in our Westminster

:02:35.:02:37.

Good morning to you. Thank you so much for joining us. The figures,

:02:38.:02:49.

really, the interesting thing will be the details. What more do we

:02:50.:02:55.

know? This is a law which is due to go before Parliament in the autumn,

:02:56.:02:59.

but it is based on EU regulations that were already due to come into

:03:00.:03:05.

force next year, and this bill is designed to bring those EU

:03:06.:03:10.

regulations into UK law, to provide continuity after Brexit. So as you

:03:11.:03:14.

say, they are sweeping new powers for consumers, really, this right to

:03:15.:03:19.

be forgotten, the right to ask tech companies to delete information that

:03:20.:03:26.

they hold on you, the right to know what information they do actually

:03:27.:03:30.

hold on you. And as you say, these tick boxes which we are very used to

:03:31.:03:34.

seeing, we gloss over them, we don't even realise they are there, they

:03:35.:03:39.

will be a thing of the past and you will have to give your exquisite

:03:40.:03:42.

consent to hand over your information. And the definition of

:03:43.:03:45.

personal information will be expanded under these proposals to

:03:46.:03:49.

include things like IP addresses -- explicit consent. So it is a

:03:50.:03:55.

reshaping of the rights that we as users of tech companies have but the

:03:56.:03:59.

details will be worked out when this bill comes before Parliament in the

:04:00.:04:00.

autumn. New laws which will give people more

:04:01.:04:01.

control over what happens to their personal data online

:04:02.:04:04.

are to be introduced. The police watchdog in Scotland

:04:05.:04:05.

is investigating after officers failed to find the body

:04:06.:04:08.

of a 64-year-old man who had been After weeks of searching,

:04:09.:04:11.

using police divers, dogs, volunteers, and a helicopter,

:04:12.:04:14.

Arnold Mouat was found 64-year-old Arnold Mouat

:04:15.:04:17.

was reported missing by his family on 7 July, the day after he had last

:04:18.:04:23.

been seen in his own home. At the time, Police Scotland

:04:24.:04:27.

launched an investigation, which included a search of that

:04:28.:04:30.

property, but no trace was found There was also a large-scale

:04:31.:04:33.

search in the area around, involving

:04:34.:04:40.

the police helicopter, divers, mountain rescue teams

:04:41.:04:41.

and police dogs. Then, yesterday, police confirmed

:04:42.:04:43.

that a body had been found There was no explanation

:04:44.:04:46.

of where it was found, His death is being treated

:04:47.:04:50.

as unexplained but not suspicious. Police Scotland say they had

:04:51.:04:54.

voluntarily referred the case to the independent watchdog,

:04:55.:04:57.

the Police Investigations and Review That same organisation started

:04:58.:05:00.

an investigation when police Scotland failed to respond

:05:01.:05:04.

to an emergency call about a car that had crashed off the M9

:05:05.:05:08.

near Stirling in 2015. Lamara Bell died in hospital

:05:09.:05:11.

after being found in the wreckage She was discovered alongside her

:05:12.:05:14.

husband, John Yuill, One independent review has

:05:15.:05:21.

already identified problems Passengers using Britain's busiest

:05:22.:05:24.

railway station have been warned to expect major

:05:25.:05:30.

disruption this month. Ten of the 19 platforms

:05:31.:05:32.

at Waterloo Station will be closed You have a few passengers behind

:05:33.:05:54.

you, as you would expect, but it will be a nightmare for passengers.

:05:55.:05:59.

Yes, it is. Good morning everybody. It will be a nightmare for everyone

:06:00.:06:03.

travelling out of London through August. As you can see, already a

:06:04.:06:07.

lot of people here. Lots of engineers beyond the gates working

:06:08.:06:11.

on the platforms. This is one of the busiest train stations in the UK.

:06:12.:06:15.

There is something like 270,000 journeys made in and out of this

:06:16.:06:21.

station every day, so this is all about improving things for

:06:22.:06:24.

passengers. So Network Rail, who maintain the rail lines and run some

:06:25.:06:29.

of the stations, they are spending ?400 million on this one to improve

:06:30.:06:34.

it. So as I say there are about 1000 engineers working on this project

:06:35.:06:38.

every single day, up to the 28th of August, and what they are trying to

:06:39.:06:42.

do is to increase the capacity here. So they are making the platforms

:06:43.:06:46.

longer in the hope they can have longer trains so there will be more

:06:47.:06:49.

space for passengers and more seats as well. It is a big project. It is

:06:50.:06:53.

going to cause disruption. I don't know if you can read the science

:06:54.:06:57.

behind me but they are saying about these platforms being closed. Lots

:06:58.:07:00.

of people turning up and wondering where they will get their trains

:07:01.:07:04.

from. They say it will impact about 14% of the trains from here. It is

:07:05.:07:07.

not just this station. There is also Charrington 's and London Bridge,

:07:08.:07:11.

where you will see significant disruption -- Charing Cross. I will

:07:12.:07:18.

be talking to them a bit later on in the programme to find out what it

:07:19.:07:22.

will mean for passengers. More from me in a bit. And we shall be back at

:07:23.:07:26.

Waterloo a little bit later on in the programme. It will be one of

:07:27.:07:31.

those months, I think. If you are preparing to travel, at least there

:07:32.:07:34.

is an early warning that they will be disruption. I suppose at least it

:07:35.:07:38.

is August, that is why they are trying to do it now.

:07:39.:07:40.

President Trump and his South Korean counterpart have spoken by phone

:07:41.:07:43.

to discuss North Korea's recent missile tests.

:07:44.:07:45.

Mr Trump said he was happy and impressed with the agreement

:07:46.:07:48.

at the United Nations Security Council on North Korea sanctions.

:07:49.:07:55.

Brazilian police say a British woman has been shot and wounded

:07:56.:07:58.

Officials say a couple and their three children

:07:59.:08:01.

were targeted by an armed group after taking a wrong turn.

:08:02.:08:04.

The woman's condition isn't thought to be life-threatening.

:08:05.:08:06.

The American sprinter Justin Gatlin, who won the 100m

:08:07.:08:08.

at the World Athletics Championships in London, was given a mixed

:08:09.:08:11.

reception yesterday evening at his medal ceremony.

:08:12.:08:13.

Some of the crowd booed Gatlin, who has twice tested positive

:08:14.:08:16.

Away from all the controversy around his win, there was another

:08:17.:08:21.

significant medal ceremony, as Natalie Pirks reports.

:08:22.:08:24.

ANNOUNCER: Gold-medallist and world champion, representing

:08:25.:08:26.

A smattering of boos for the champion.

:08:27.:08:33.

An unfamiliar medal around the neck of the Jamaican.

:08:34.:08:38.

After his two doping bans, Justin Gatlin understandably

:08:39.:08:40.

was the villain of the piece when he collected his gold

:08:41.:08:46.

This wasn't what Usain Bolt had planned, of course,

:08:47.:08:51.

Today then, finally, retribution for Jessica Ennis-Hill,

:08:52.:09:05.

cheated out of gold by a Russian doper in 2011.

:09:06.:09:09.

Six years she has waited for this upgrade on silver.

:09:10.:09:12.

My husband said to me, "You're not going to cry, are you?"

:09:13.:09:20.

But I'd forgotten that feeling, when you step out

:09:21.:09:26.

in an arena like this, and actually hear the crowd

:09:27.:09:29.

Katarina Johnson-Thompson has long been considered Britain's heir

:09:30.:09:34.

But yet again, in a major championships, her hopes plummeted.

:09:35.:09:44.

Despite a season's-best in the javelin, she had left herself

:09:45.:09:47.

far too much to do in the final event, the 800m.

:09:48.:09:51.

Eventually, she finished fifth overall.

:09:52.:09:52.

There was disappointment too for Holly Bradshaw.

:09:53.:09:54.

She had a great chance for a medal in the pole vault,

:09:55.:09:57.

but after failing at 4.75m, the dream was over and the emotion

:09:58.:10:01.

From Gatlin to Bowie, by the end of the night,

:10:02.:10:12.

the USA had yet another shock 100m champion.

:10:13.:10:18.

Jamaica's darling Elaine Thompson was left for dust and out

:10:19.:10:21.

She timed her run and her dip to perfection.

:10:22.:10:25.

Natalie Pirks, BBC News, at the London Stadium.

:10:26.:10:27.

This is the view of the London stadium this morning,

:10:28.:10:30.

host to the World Athletics Championships.

:10:31.:10:31.

And a little later this morning we will be speaking

:10:32.:10:34.

to Jessica Ennis-Hill's former coach.

:10:35.:10:36.

He knows a little bit about virtually every single field event,

:10:37.:10:53.

and we will be speaking to him a little later on.

:10:54.:10:54.

The village of Bonsall were host to this rather egg-celent race -

:10:55.:10:57.

the annual World Hen Racing Championships.

:10:58.:11:01.

As you can see, competition was tough.

:11:02.:11:10.

They absolutely go off at quite some pace here. There was all sorts

:11:11.:11:16.

happening as they tried to convince their hands to move a little faster

:11:17.:11:20.

than they were currently. These two were disqualified, I have been

:11:21.:11:24.

reliably informed, for fighting -- hens. And some of the names you

:11:25.:11:37.

could see that,, Egg-wina, all sorts of funds. What a moment for Jack,

:11:38.:11:56.

the winner of the World Hen Racing Championships.

:11:57.:12:01.

Chronic overcrowding in some of Europe's top tourist hotspots

:12:02.:12:03.

is fuelling an angry backlash from residents,

:12:04.:12:05.

who say that a sharp rise in visitors is ruining

:12:06.:12:08.

neighbourhoods and making life intolerable.

:12:09.:12:09.

There have been a series of protests in Spain.

:12:10.:12:12.

More than 75 million people visited the country last year,

:12:13.:12:14.

The most serious trouble was in Barcelona.

:12:15.:12:17.

In one incident, masked protestors attacked a tourist bus and daubed

:12:18.:12:20.

"Tourism kills neighbourhoods" on it.

:12:21.:12:21.

Some locals claim that uncontrolled visitor numbers are ruining

:12:22.:12:24.

neighbourhoods, forcing up rents because landlords can make more

:12:25.:12:26.

Spanish officials insist visitors are still welcome.

:12:27.:12:32.

And it is not just Spain where tourist numbers

:12:33.:12:34.

In Italy, Rome is considering restricting access to certain parts

:12:35.:12:40.

of the city, including the Trevi Fountain, and Dubrovnik

:12:41.:12:42.

is planning to restrict the number of cruise ships that can visit

:12:43.:12:46.

Victoria is from the Association of British travel agents. Thank you for

:12:47.:13:02.

joining us. Let's talk specifically about what is going on in Spain and

:13:03.:13:06.

this incident in a tourist bus sounds very frightening for people

:13:07.:13:12.

there. What do you make of what is going on? Yes, well, clearly they

:13:13.:13:18.

have used very intimidating tactics in the Spanish authorities have come

:13:19.:13:21.

out and condemned those. The first thing to say is we support

:13:22.:13:24.

condemnation of the use of these kinds of intimidating tactics. It is

:13:25.:13:30.

clearly a protest, and we have seen protest in this country,

:13:31.:13:32.

anticapitalist protest in this country in the last few years, and

:13:33.:13:36.

the advice, first and foremost, if you are out there, is to be wary of

:13:37.:13:40.

any sort of demonstrations of that nature. And you know, be vigilant.

:13:41.:13:45.

We know that the Foreign Office have actually not change their travel

:13:46.:13:48.

advice, so that is the other important thing to just keep an eye

:13:49.:13:52.

on. And you arrive in the city, you have been looking forward to visit,

:13:53.:13:56.

and you see tourists go home, you are not welcome. It changes the tone

:13:57.:14:05.

of your holiday, doesn't it? Yes, well, it is a nice thing to see. It

:14:06.:14:09.

is is important to put this in context, clearly the overwhelming

:14:10.:14:12.

majority of Spanish people, this is a group as I understand that of 20

:14:13.:14:16.

people who protested in Barcelona. Tourism is very important to

:14:17.:14:19.

countries like Spain, and it has been for many, many years, and

:14:20.:14:22.

tourists in general are made to feel very, very welcome. Clearly it is

:14:23.:14:25.

important that the government gets on top of it. Interesting that some

:14:26.:14:29.

people are talking about the shift from booked holidays to people, for

:14:30.:14:35.

example, finding a place to stay on the internet, just peer to peer. Is

:14:36.:14:40.

there a change, do you think, in the nature of tourism? There are

:14:41.:14:43.

certainly greater challenges. The number-1 challenge is that no one

:14:44.:14:47.

really knows the volumes of people coming in. If you think about it, in

:14:48.:14:52.

the past you could have numbers of people, hotel beds, you would

:14:53.:14:55.

understand the volumes. At the moment it is virtually impossible

:14:56.:14:58.

for people in major cities to understand the volumes, and that is

:14:59.:15:01.

why we are seeing protests in other countries as well. We also know

:15:02.:15:05.

there are issues about pushing out local residents. If you are living

:15:06.:15:09.

and working in a city and people can make more money out of subletting

:15:10.:15:12.

their home, then that clearly is an issue. In cities where they have got

:15:13.:15:16.

a really strong tourism product, if you like, it is really important

:15:17.:15:20.

they do get on top of that, because it will ultimately have a damaging

:15:21.:15:23.

impact on the destination, unless people prop Lee understand the

:15:24.:15:24.

impacts that that is having. Would it be sensible for them to

:15:25.:15:40.

restrict numbers able to see the Trevi Fountain? We just need the

:15:41.:15:43.

government to have a better understanding of tourism. It is not

:15:44.:15:48.

in any one's interest for that destination, that city, sights and

:15:49.:15:56.

visits, to be restricted to people. While they are not fully

:15:57.:16:00.

understanding what is going on, the reality is, there is inconsistency

:16:01.:16:06.

around the way these companies are licensed and regulated. Hotels are

:16:07.:16:12.

licensed and regulated. Understanding has not kept pace.

:16:13.:16:18.

These are the things the government and local authorities in these

:16:19.:16:21.

destinations need to get on top of. Another thing to talk about. Long

:16:22.:16:27.

delays at European airports because of these changes. Will that

:16:28.:16:33.

continued? Feedback from people on the ground is that the delays at the

:16:34.:16:37.

moment, they are long, but actually, it is the biggest and busiest time

:16:38.:16:42.

of the year, the start of the summer. People are going on holidays

:16:43.:16:47.

that you can expect long queues. The advice is leave some extra time. You

:16:48.:17:02.

don't want to go hours and hours earlier, as you will be stuck, but

:17:03.:17:06.

leave some time. It is a busy time of year. What happens is people miss

:17:07.:17:10.

their flights because of long delays? We have seen a few on

:17:11.:17:16.

packaged tours of people missing flights. Operators will get you

:17:17.:17:21.

there in plenty of time. It is on your shoulders to do that. You don't

:17:22.:17:28.

have rights if you miss your flight. It is important you leave plenty of

:17:29.:17:32.

time to arrive at the airport and check-in with plenty of time. Thank

:17:33.:17:33.

you very much. A mixed weather picture across the

:17:34.:17:46.

UK. Live pictures from the BBC helicopter. Is it really a BBC

:17:47.:17:50.

helicopter? We will claim it as that anyway. This is the south of

:17:51.:17:56.

England. I don't know exactly where it is. It set off from Brighton on

:17:57.:18:01.

its way to Waterloo so I guess that must be Sussex. Let us know. It

:18:02.:18:07.

might be Woking. Good morning, Woking. Here is the weather. Carol

:18:08.:18:18.

has beat the helicopter. I have a nice picture to show you, but

:18:19.:18:22.

nothing like that. This is what the weather will do this week. Another

:18:23.:18:28.

unsettled week. Rain and showers at times. Sunshine at times as well.

:18:29.:18:33.

Cool and breezy. At the moment, we have a weather front going south

:18:34.:18:38.

across England and Wales. A bit of rain overnight fragment in at the

:18:39.:18:43.

moment that will get up later on. A front in the north of Scotland

:18:44.:18:48.

producing rain. Later in Aberdeenshire, showers. Showers in

:18:49.:18:53.

the west this morning. Dry weather as well. Northern Ireland and

:18:54.:18:57.

England, bright spells and sunny spells and a few showers. Cloud for

:18:58.:19:04.

Wales, Yorkshire, the weather front, producing rain and drizzle. Ahead of

:19:05.:19:10.

that, the cloud is building. Sunshine in the far south-east of

:19:11.:19:13.

England. Through the day, that front goes south, pipping up in the

:19:14.:19:21.

south-western flank so be it is the far south-east that has the

:19:22.:19:27.

brightest conditions. Scotland, Northern Ireland, sunshine. Light

:19:28.:19:31.

winds. Feeling pleasant. A few showers. The heaviest of which will

:19:32.:19:36.

be in Scotland. The athletics taking place today to be the weather front

:19:37.:19:39.

is coming south. The cloud will continue to build. In the afternoon,

:19:40.:19:46.

we have a risk of rain. Through the evening this front will be in

:19:47.:19:49.

southern counties. Then it goes north through the night. Dry weather

:19:50.:19:54.

behind that and ahead of that. A peppering of showers. Mist and fog

:19:55.:19:59.

in the south-west. That will clear tomorrow morning. This is the

:20:00.:20:03.

weather front producing rain lifting towards the south-east again. Low

:20:04.:20:08.

pressure coming up from the near continent means that will bring in

:20:09.:20:13.

heavy showers. They will meet. Rain in the morning 1st thing. Showers.

:20:14.:20:18.

Torrential downpours in East Anglia and into Hampshire, not forgetting

:20:19.:20:23.

tend. Rain moving through the Midlands and Wales. Northern

:20:24.:20:27.

England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, back in the sunshine and showers.

:20:28.:20:32.

Heading into Wednesday, more heavy rain in the south-eastern corner

:20:33.:20:35.

heading towards the Channel Islands. That could lead to surface water

:20:36.:20:40.

issues. Something to bear in mind. North of that, bright skies again

:20:41.:20:48.

with sunshine. Just a few showers. We were talking last week about what

:20:49.:20:51.

is happening in other parts of Europe. As you can see, yesterday

:20:52.:20:57.

was still hot. 43. Today, temperatures are coming down a

:20:58.:21:00.

little bit, retreating towards Greece, Turkey, and the Middle East.

:21:01.:21:05.

They are still high. We have lost a few warnings. Bear in mind, it is

:21:06.:21:11.

still hot and humid. Showers around. Torrential showers. Clearing. For

:21:12.:21:17.

ourselves towards the end of the week, after a dry day on Thursday,

:21:18.:21:24.

sunshine and showers on Friday with some rain. The temperatures in

:21:25.:21:34.

Europe are something, aren't they? Why are you eating a banana? We were

:21:35.:21:41.

talking about eating bugs earlier. It is a source of protein. It could

:21:42.:21:46.

be better for the environment. I ate a cricket. Well... I smell a bit

:21:47.:21:55.

like a pet shop. I have to tell you, the taste has remained in my mouth

:21:56.:22:03.

area for quite some time. I said I would it anything. You are not being

:22:04.:22:11.

a good advert for eating crickets. You will do used to it. What is the

:22:12.:22:16.

word I am looking for? In the interests of the environment... That

:22:17.:22:23.

is what I am looking for... I will continue to eat it. I am on my nice

:22:24.:22:31.

cup of tea. The thing is, I was going to try one, but you are

:22:32.:22:37.

putting me off. And now we will talk about rubbish.

:22:38.:22:38.

Birmingham is in danger of sinking in a "sea of rubbish," that's

:22:39.:22:41.

according to one councillor concerned at the backlog of waste

:22:42.:22:44.

that is mounting up on the city's streets.

:22:45.:22:46.

Bin collectors are stepping up industrial action by refusing

:22:47.:22:48.

to work every day for two hours in a dispute over job losses.

:22:49.:22:52.

Kathryn Stanczyszyn is there for us this morning.

:22:53.:22:54.

Kathryn, why has this problem escalated?

:22:55.:22:56.

We are getting a sense of how bad it is and what is going on. Good

:22:57.:23:07.

morning. There is no such thing as bin day in Birmingham any more. You

:23:08.:23:11.

put your rubbish outside and it is collected whenever. I am in Quinton.

:23:12.:23:24.

There are huge amounts of bin bags up and down the street. It smells

:23:25.:23:28.

bad and temperatures aren't even that high. I have seen one rat and I

:23:29.:23:38.

don't want to see another one. A man told me he cannot open this windows.

:23:39.:23:44.

It is concern over this that the public is now worried about, public

:23:45.:23:46.

health. For this woman, British summertime

:23:47.:23:48.

usually means hoping That is because Colin's rubbish

:23:49.:23:51.

has not being elected That is because Colin's rubbish

:23:52.:24:01.

has not being collected High temperatures

:24:02.:24:04.

would make it worse. You are living somewhere and people

:24:05.:24:09.

see bags of rubbish at the front He is now having to store bin bags

:24:10.:24:14.

in his back garden as well. Birmingham City Council wants

:24:15.:24:21.

to modernise its waste service, but refuse workers say

:24:22.:24:39.

they are facing pay cuts. The collateral damage is visible

:24:40.:24:42.

to all, and it is attracting vermin. As you can see, there

:24:43.:24:48.

are many ripped bags here. One firm has seen a 20% increase

:24:49.:24:51.

in callouts over the past six weeks, and says this could

:24:52.:24:59.

cause public problems. Rats carry many diseases

:25:00.:25:03.

which are harmful to human beings. So, if a human being was to touch

:25:04.:25:07.

a bag where where a rat has urinated,

:25:08.:25:18.

it could cause a serious disease. We are bidding for

:25:19.:25:20.

the Commonwealth Games. There is no justification

:25:21.:25:31.

for this stuff. Intense talks continue

:25:32.:25:40.

between the two sides. Last week, volunteers took

:25:41.:25:45.

to the streets to help clear up some But with weeks of action left to go,

:25:46.:25:49.

it seems getting on top of this The latest from United, the union,

:25:50.:26:02.

is there were open talks last week but there are two sticking points,

:26:03.:26:08.

such as pay grading. They say they are facing a ?5,000 pay drop.

:26:09.:26:12.

Birmingham City Council says there are no job losses and they will

:26:13.:26:16.

offer people jobs elsewhere. They say they have to do this to make the

:26:17.:26:20.

waste service more modern and efficient. But with plant stoppages

:26:21.:26:26.

going on in late September, people on streets like these are hopeful

:26:27.:26:29.

for a solution really soon. -- planned. Use a you have seen a rat.

:26:30.:26:39.

-- you say that is a serious problem. Thank you so much for the

:26:40.:26:41.

moment. Can we get a picture of that

:26:42.:26:48.

helicopter shot? We should do this every morning. Have it floating

:26:49.:26:54.

around over the UK and pick a spot and figure out where people are. The

:26:55.:27:00.

reason the helicopter is up is because we are talking about

:27:01.:27:05.

Waterloo and the trains. We are not in control of the helicopter. People

:27:06.:27:13.

might think the BBC has far too much cash. We are making the most of it.

:27:14.:27:19.

We will have more on the weather edit a bit later on. But while

:27:20.:30:48.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:30:49.:30:58.

New laws which will give people more control over what happens

:30:59.:31:01.

to their personal data online are to be introduced.

:31:02.:31:03.

People will be able to ask for posts or material they posted

:31:04.:31:07.

when they were children to be deleted.

:31:08.:31:09.

The bill will also require explicit consent for information to be

:31:10.:31:12.

collected online, rather than firms relying on pre-selected tick boxes.

:31:13.:31:21.

The police watchdog in Scotland is investigating why it took over

:31:22.:31:24.

a month to find the body of a man in his own home.

:31:25.:31:27.

Divers, sniffer dogs and a helicopter were used

:31:28.:31:29.

in a high-profile search operation to find Arnold Mouat,

:31:30.:31:32.

from Bo'ness, after his family reported him missing July.

:31:33.:31:34.

Police Scotland reported finding his body at home yesterday.

:31:35.:31:42.

Thousands of commuters will have their journeys disrupted

:31:43.:31:44.

today, because of major improvement work at Britain's busiest railway

:31:45.:31:47.

Ten of its 24 platforms are closed so they can be extended

:31:48.:31:54.

Network Rail has warned of challenging days

:31:55.:31:59.

President Trump and his South Korean counterpart have spoken by phone

:32:00.:32:07.

to discuss North Korea's recent missile tests.

:32:08.:32:09.

Mr Trump said he was happy and impressed with the agreement

:32:10.:32:12.

at the United Nations Security Council on North Korea sanctions.

:32:13.:32:21.

Brazilian police say a British woman has been shot and wounded

:32:22.:32:24.

Officials say a couple and their three children

:32:25.:32:27.

were targeted by an armed group after taking a wrong turn.

:32:28.:32:30.

The woman's condition isn't thought to be life-threatening.

:32:31.:32:36.

A village in Romania has been overrun with bears,

:32:37.:32:39.

A handful of hungry bears has left the mountains for Harghita,

:32:40.:32:43.

to scavenge for food in local bins, gardens and homes.

:32:44.:32:53.

I could see that they're running for those people.

:32:54.:33:02.

In one incident, a brown bear entered an elderly woman's home

:33:03.:33:05.

and ate a stack of pancakes straight from her table.

:33:06.:33:08.

Experts say the bears won't attack unless provoked.

:33:09.:33:10.

I was talking earlier about my friend who is in South Africa, and a

:33:11.:33:17.

baboon entered his hotel room, stared at him for quite sometime, a

:33:18.:33:21.

chocolate and then left. And thankfully our Breakfast viewers

:33:22.:33:25.

have come up with some lovable encounters. One viewer in Zambia

:33:26.:33:31.

came out and walked straight into a bull elephant and on the same trip

:33:32.:33:35.

they were charged by a hippo. Another was charged by a steel on a

:33:36.:33:47.

Tasmanian beach -- seal. Stopped for a picnic in the Rockies, noticed a

:33:48.:33:56.

big pile of hot bear poo. Jack says a herd of gear used to wander into

:33:57.:34:01.

the tennis courts where I worked. He used to scare them off with a Hoover

:34:02.:34:07.

-- deer. You want to get the Hoover out to scare the deer away.

:34:08.:34:10.

Coming up: Carol will bring you the weather

:34:11.:34:12.

She has been talking about cold and extremely hot temperatures on the

:34:13.:34:24.

continent. 8 million people plus were watching Usain Bolt get the

:34:25.:34:30.

bronze medal on Saturday night. The stadium today will be packed once

:34:31.:34:32.

again. Plenty to look forward to. Let's speak to Jessica,

:34:33.:34:34.

who is at the London Stadium for us, ahead of day four of

:34:35.:34:37.

the World Athletics Championships. You would not want to be standing

:34:38.:34:44.

there later, you might get a hammer in the face! Yes, as you can see, I

:34:45.:34:51.

am right near the hammer in closure. It was very much mixed emotions in

:34:52.:34:55.

the stadium last night. On the one hand you had one of Britain's

:34:56.:34:58.

favourite athletes, Jessica Ennis-Hill, to warm applause

:34:59.:35:02.

receiving her retrospective gold medal from the 2011 World

:35:03.:35:05.

Championships. On the other hand you have Justin Gatlin receiving his

:35:06.:35:09.

100m gold medal, and there was much talk, much debate, about the kind of

:35:10.:35:14.

reception he would receive after his two drug bans. We spoke to Darren

:35:15.:35:21.

Campbell yesterday, and he said that he could understand the fans wanting

:35:22.:35:25.

to express their frustration, but he also said that fans probably should

:35:26.:35:33.

not boo, but should remain silent. Judge for yourself the reception

:35:34.:35:40.

that Justin Gatlin got. Representing the United States of America, Justin

:35:41.:35:48.

Gatlin. As you can see, some boos but very much some cheers.

:35:49.:35:53.

Lord Coe, who presented him with the medal, had earlier said

:35:54.:35:56.

that the two-time drugs cheat beating Usain Bolt was not

:35:57.:35:59.

Earlier in the evening, there was a bigger cheer

:36:00.:36:02.

She received her retrospective gold medal from the 2011 Games,

:36:03.:36:06.

after the athlete that had beaten her was found to have doped.

:36:07.:36:09.

It's great to be honest, it couldn't have been a better time

:36:10.:36:13.

to receive the medal other than at the time.

:36:14.:36:15.

So, yeah, I'm very thankful it's been here and I've been able to say

:36:16.:36:19.

I felt like I hadn't forgot an ounce of feeling about how it felt five

:36:20.:36:24.

years ago stepping out into the stadium, but actually I had

:36:25.:36:27.

kind of forgotten that feeling a little bit and actually standing

:36:28.:36:30.

here and hearing the crowd again, it just brought it all flooding back

:36:31.:36:34.

Of course, the athlete hoping to take over Jessica Ennis-Hill's

:36:35.:36:42.

mantle in the heptathlon is Katarina Johnson-Thompson,

:36:43.:36:43.

but yesterday she could only finish fifth in the heptathlon.

:36:44.:36:46.

Johnson-Thompson had plenty of work to do after a poor high jump

:36:47.:36:49.

on Saturday, but performed admirably in the three events yesterday,

:36:50.:36:52.

But she had ultimately left herself too far behind.

:36:53.:37:01.

The Olympic champion, Belgium's Nafi Thiam, won gold.

:37:02.:37:10.

I feel like I've got a lot of talent to show and I feel like one of these

:37:11.:37:15.

I felt like it's the second event and I knew it was always going to be

:37:16.:37:21.

I feel like I've done a good job trying to find myself normally,

:37:22.:37:25.

I feel a bit defeatist but I've tried to change my attitude a little

:37:26.:37:29.

bit and I feel like I've come back and showed even though I've had

:37:30.:37:32.

a difficult time in the second event, I'm a fighter.

:37:33.:37:36.

Pole-vaulter Holly Bradshaw finished sixth in her final.

:37:37.:37:40.

She failed to get over with the bar set at 4.75m.

:37:41.:37:43.

She had the height, but her knee caught the bar on the way down.

:37:44.:37:47.

Better news in the men's marathon, where Callum Hawkins equalled

:37:48.:37:55.

the best performance by a British athlete in the men's marathon

:37:56.:37:58.

at a World Championships, by finishing fourth.

:37:59.:38:00.

The 25-year-old Scot missed out on the medals,

:38:01.:38:02.

but clocked an impressive personal best time of two

:38:03.:38:05.

And we will be speaking to Callum later here on BBC Breakfast.

:38:06.:38:17.

Away from here, England will be looking to wrap up the fourth Test

:38:18.:38:21.

and a series win against South Africa this morning.

:38:22.:38:23.

They will resume on 224-8 in their second innings,

:38:24.:38:26.

It was thanks largely to some late big hitting from Moeen Ali,

:38:27.:38:31.

who even managed to pick out teammate Jonny Bairstow

:38:32.:38:34.

Arsenal won the FA Community Shield for the 15th time by beating Chelsea

:38:35.:38:44.

Chelsea took the lead early in the second half,

:38:45.:38:48.

but Arsenal equalised with ten minutes left,

:38:49.:38:50.

Chelsea missed twice, before Olivier Giroud struck

:38:51.:38:57.

the winning spot-kick for the FA Cup holders.

:38:58.:39:12.

Elsewhere, Rangers started their Scottish Premiership season

:39:13.:39:14.

with a 2-1 win at Motherwell, while Aberdeen beat Hamilton 2-0.

:39:15.:39:27.

Now, you did mention I might get hit in the face by a hammer if I was to

:39:28.:39:36.

stand here. I am in the hammer in closure and this is where Britain's

:39:37.:39:40.

Sophie Hitchen will go in the final of that event in the evening

:39:41.:39:43.

session. Also to look forward to, Laura Mewar and Laura Weightman

:39:44.:39:48.

going in the 1500 metre final. There haven't been many medals here for

:39:49.:39:51.

Great Britain, but hopefully there should be a bit more to cheer about

:39:52.:39:56.

for British fans by this evening -- Muir. Thank you very much, Jessica.

:39:57.:40:01.

That is where the action will be taking place later on. Shall I tell

:40:02.:40:05.

you where you can watch it? You have to do a bit of channel hopping. On

:40:06.:40:11.

BBC Two from 6:30pm until 8:30pm and then BBC One from 8:30pm until 10:30

:40:12.:40:26.

p.m., and then we can go back. And a hammer is at 7pm, and then Laura

:40:27.:40:37.

Muir in the 1500, and the 5000 as well. I won't ask you what time that

:40:38.:40:42.

is. That is a little bit later on today. Just on the whole Justin

:40:43.:40:51.

Gatlin thing, he was roundly booed when he won the 100m. Yesterday

:40:52.:40:55.

Darren Campbell said you should fall silent and not cheer and not boo

:40:56.:41:05.

either. One of his bands was overturned because of this

:41:06.:41:09.

medication for being diagnosed with attention deficit disorder as a

:41:10.:41:14.

child -- bans. He disputes the other as well. That is not to say he

:41:15.:41:19.

hasn't been banned, but it is interesting here is booed roundly

:41:20.:41:22.

and everyone sees him as a super villain when so many athletes across

:41:23.:41:26.

many sports have been banned for drugs but don't get the same

:41:27.:41:31.

treatment as Justin Gatlin. Send us your thoughts on that. It is a bit

:41:32.:41:37.

of the Usain Bolt effect, as well. I suggested over the weekend and was

:41:38.:41:41.

roundly pilloried, even by members of my own family. Good luck with

:41:42.:41:43.

that, Dan. Commuters and tourists have been

:41:44.:41:45.

warned to prepare for major disruption to their journeys

:41:46.:41:48.

into London this August, with thousands of trains

:41:49.:41:50.

cancelled or delayed They are busy. Good morning

:41:51.:42:03.

everybody. There is a shift change going on at the moment, and as you

:42:04.:42:07.

can see here, some of the site workers. Around 1000 will be working

:42:08.:42:12.

everyday on improving Waterloo station. It is one of the busiest in

:42:13.:42:16.

the UK, with something like 270,000 journeys made in and out of it every

:42:17.:42:21.

day. It is all about improvement. They are not working at the moment

:42:22.:42:25.

because there is a shift change. About ten minutes ago it was

:42:26.:42:28.

absolutely manic here, and there were lots of digging noises and

:42:29.:42:36.

things. I am relieved to have a bit of a quieter time so we can have a

:42:37.:42:40.

chat with some of our guest. How important are these engineering

:42:41.:42:43.

works? These works are absolutely crucial. This is the busiest station

:42:44.:42:46.

in the country and on many of these trains coming in on the morning it

:42:47.:42:50.

is standing room only. Severe levels of overcrowding. So although it is

:42:51.:42:53.

going to be very disrupted this month, the hope is afterwards it

:42:54.:42:58.

will be a less crowded station, bringing relief to lots of

:42:59.:43:01.

passengers. Of course, it is only part of the solution to

:43:02.:43:05.

overcrowding, and we also need to do things like introduced fairly priced

:43:06.:43:08.

part-time season-ticket so people can choose to work from home and

:43:09.:43:13.

work flexibly. There are, as you say, going to be major disruption,

:43:14.:43:17.

not just this train station. Passengers aware of this? Lots of

:43:18.:43:21.

holidaymakers will be using the stations as well. There has been a

:43:22.:43:26.

good programme of communication. Online, offline, lots of signs up.

:43:27.:43:35.

But I hope that passengers who use other stations and change at

:43:36.:43:43.

Waterloo won't crowd the network elsewhere. I am going to Nick Browne

:43:44.:43:50.

don't introduce you to another guest as well. Mark as the chief executive

:43:51.:43:54.

of Network Rail, which maintains the rail lines and some of the stations.

:43:55.:44:00.

Can you explain what has happened. In terms of what they are doing,

:44:01.:44:05.

what engineering work is going on? We are extending the length of the

:44:06.:44:09.

first four platforms at Waterloo so we can bring ten car trains in. We

:44:10.:44:14.

will increase the capacity of this station by about 30% over the next

:44:15.:44:18.

year or so, which is 45,000 more people every day being able to use

:44:19.:44:25.

trains coming into London. So it is a real transformation, actually, of

:44:26.:44:28.

Waterloo Station. And for the people who will use this station. It is

:44:29.:44:33.

going to cause major disruption, though, isn't it? And for the

:44:34.:44:36.

commuters who use it will cause problems for them getting in and out

:44:37.:44:41.

of work. Also for holidaymakers, it is a nightmare when you face train

:44:42.:44:45.

delays and cancellations. I can only apologise, but I think people can

:44:46.:44:49.

see when they look at the scale of these works that there is no other

:44:50.:44:53.

way to do this, we have to remove all the railways, all the point

:44:54.:44:56.

systems to extend the platform. There is no other way to do it. So

:44:57.:45:01.

three weeks of disruption, yes, but decades of fantastically improved

:45:02.:45:05.

services. The train network is not known particularly for being

:45:06.:45:08.

punctual, with things like the engineering works. Is everything

:45:09.:45:12.

going to be on time? Will it be right in September? We have planned

:45:13.:45:18.

this but I hope military precision, 1000 people working night and day on

:45:19.:45:21.

this project over the next three weeks. I am confident, but there is

:45:22.:45:25.

always the chance that things will go wrong, but we have got

:45:26.:45:28.

contingency plans. We have worked really brilliantly across the

:45:29.:45:32.

industry to make sure that this is a success. And what about people

:45:33.:45:37.

facing delays in cancellations? Will get compensation? Well, that is not

:45:38.:45:41.

really an issue for Network Rail, that is train operators who can

:45:42.:45:45.

resolve these issues. People will have a fantastically improved

:45:46.:45:46.

service for years ahead. The shift is about to start. There

:45:47.:46:01.

will be more from me in a bit. We will see you later. The helicopter

:46:02.:46:06.

is on its way to Waterloo this morning. Yes. A picture of what is

:46:07.:46:13.

going on. It left this morning from the Brighton area. We have seen

:46:14.:46:22.

Weybridge. Now it is in Wimbledon. We will have more on the weather

:46:23.:46:27.

later on. The weather in the foreground seems OK. You can see

:46:28.:46:32.

foreboding clouds in the background at Wimbledon. Carol has a technical

:46:33.:46:38.

issue but she is solving it. I know her.

:46:39.:46:53.

Shared bicycle schemes are a cheap and green way to travel

:46:54.:46:56.

around our towns and cities but most of them need to be returned

:46:57.:46:59.

Now, dockless bikes are changing all that.

:47:00.:47:02.

Using a mobile app, they can be located and left anywhere,

:47:03.:47:05.

ideally, on a pavement, but there have been reports

:47:06.:47:08.

of people finding them dumped in back gardens,

:47:09.:47:10.

So, is Britain really ready to embrace and bike-share?

:47:11.:47:14.

Communal cycling in our capital is a common sight.

:47:15.:47:18.

But now thousands of dockless bikes that can be parked anywhere

:47:19.:47:21.

I have come to Bristol because this is the first place in the country

:47:22.:47:26.

I have downloaded the app, and as you can see there hundreds

:47:27.:47:30.

Just around the corner, as promised, it is waiting for me.

:47:31.:47:36.

With the app, I scan the barcode, the bike is unlocked,

:47:37.:47:39.

They arrived three months ago, and already the take-up

:47:40.:47:43.

We are the first dockless bike-sharing initiative in the UK.

:47:44.:47:52.

And some are found with wheels missing.

:47:53.:48:09.

But with hundreds more rolling into our cities each month,

:48:10.:48:12.

it looks like dockless bikes will be on our roads

:48:13.:48:15.

Steve Pyer is the UK general manager of Mobike,

:48:16.:48:21.

the company behind dockless bikes, and he joins us now.

:48:22.:48:24.

Thank you for joining us. It is a cool bicycle to look at. Do you

:48:25.:48:31.

really think we can move to a system where we are genuinely using them

:48:32.:48:37.

all time? Absolutely. You can get them to go anywhere. When they are

:48:38.:48:46.

that common and easy to use, it becomes more available. There have

:48:47.:48:50.

been problems with them being dumped in places it is not suitable for

:48:51.:48:56.

bikes to be. What about that? We have had a few. But in the scheme of

:48:57.:49:01.

things, thousands of success stories, it is a minority. Tell me,

:49:02.:49:09.

if I wanted to use this bike, I would have an application on my

:49:10.:49:14.

phone. You would know I had borrowed this bicycle. Yes. You open the

:49:15.:49:21.

camera and it opens the locker the back with the QR code. When you lock

:49:22.:49:27.

it again, your journey ends and you take the payment. It reduces the

:49:28.:49:34.

balance whenever you use it. In other councils, we know for example

:49:35.:49:46.

in some places, the council has confiscated them. Do you have many

:49:47.:49:50.

problems with councils? Manchester has been a good plane nearing start

:49:51.:49:56.

for us outside of China. We work with councils completely and we

:49:57.:50:02.

don't work without a memorandum and understanding from the council. Who

:50:03.:50:07.

is using these bicycles? Everyone. Just look at Twitter. You can see

:50:08.:50:14.

the people who have not been on a bicycle for years saying it is

:50:15.:50:19.

brilliant! Why choose this design? It is a sturdy bike. Would you mind

:50:20.:50:25.

if I had a bit of a go? Keep having a chat. Tell us about the design. We

:50:26.:50:36.

designed it specifically. A tight corner. Are you a bit nervous? Yes.

:50:37.:50:44.

I am nervous about the cameras. It does not have a chain. The lights

:50:45.:50:50.

are on it. The wheels are automatic. They are locked to keep it in place.

:50:51.:50:57.

What about safety? It is a personal thing but I always wear a bicycle

:50:58.:51:03.

helmet. To people wear them? We encourage people to do that. Just

:51:04.:51:09.

make sure you go to a shop and get one fitted specifically for your

:51:10.:51:13.

head. Thank you very much and hopefully you get this one back. As

:51:14.:51:17.

he goes in cycles off into the sunset, we will have the weather. A

:51:18.:51:26.

fine view indeed. This morning it is unsettled in many parts of the UK.

:51:27.:51:30.

Rain and sunshine. Some have showers. That is how it is going to

:51:31.:51:37.

look through the course of this week. Unsettled. It will continue. A

:51:38.:51:43.

bit of this and a bit of that. You can see the weather front

:51:44.:51:46.

responsible this morning moving across England and Wales and heading

:51:47.:51:51.

south. It will head up later on, especially in the south-west. Rain.

:51:52.:51:59.

Thundery showers in Aberdeenshire. Northern England and also Northern

:52:00.:52:04.

Ireland, well, looking at bright spells and sunshine and a few

:52:05.:52:07.

showers. Tending to be lighter than Scotland. A bit of cloud in the

:52:08.:52:12.

Midlands and Wales with a few showers. A band of rain. Again,

:52:13.:52:18.

drizzled on the eastern side. The western side will pick up during the

:52:19.:52:24.

day. South Kent and Sussex hang on to the sunshine for the longest. The

:52:25.:52:29.

highest temperatures. 23 is possible. North of the weather

:52:30.:52:35.

front, a regime of sunshine and showers. The athletics today.

:52:36.:52:40.

Increasingly, the cloud will build as the weather front goes out. Later

:52:41.:52:45.

on, the chance of the odd spot of rain coming out of it as it

:52:46.:52:49.

continues down and to the south. Deny the changes its mind and goes

:52:50.:52:53.

north again. -- tonight, it changes. One or two showers. Mist and fog

:52:54.:52:59.

patches as well in south-west England. That will lift quite

:53:00.:53:04.

readily tomorrow morning. A weather front going towards the south-east.

:53:05.:53:08.

Low pressure from the near continent. They will meet eventually

:53:09.:53:12.

through the day. Heavy downpours. North of that, more dry and bright.

:53:13.:53:19.

Again, sunshine and showers for northern England, Northern Ireland,

:53:20.:53:23.

Scotland. And wet day in Wales as well. Torrential downpours in south

:53:24.:53:28.

Hampshire, Kent, East Anglia. Wednesday. More of the same. Again,

:53:29.:53:33.

heavy rain in the south-eastern corner which could lead to some

:53:34.:53:36.

surface water issues. North of that, dry conditions with fewer showers.

:53:37.:53:43.

The end of the week. Thursday is looking not too shabby for most of

:53:44.:53:47.

us. Again, dry weather around. Clearing in the south-east.

:53:48.:53:53.

Brightening up. Friday, more rain in the forecasts. A few showers as

:53:54.:53:59.

well. At the top of the broadcaster said it was going to be unsettled. I

:54:00.:54:04.

was not lying. You never would. Thank you. Thank you. We will see

:54:05.:54:10.

you at quarter past eight this morning.

:54:11.:54:11.

Welsh cakes sprinkled with cinnamon and marbled with mealworms.

:54:12.:54:14.

Burgers made with a blend of toasted crickets,

:54:15.:54:16.

grasshoppers, spinach, and sundried tomatoes.

:54:17.:54:17.

This isn't any old food, no this is Bug Grub Food.

:54:18.:54:20.

To some, it might sound like food hell, but these are the dishes

:54:21.:54:25.

on offer from a couple who in a new BBC One documentary

:54:26.:54:28.

want to change our perception about food made with insects.

:54:29.:54:30.

Entomologist, Sarah Beynon, joins us now.

:54:31.:54:33.

Good morning. Thank you very much. Good morning. He has already tried a

:54:34.:54:44.

cricket and a cookie with crickets in it. That second one was nice. I

:54:45.:54:48.

am still tasting the cricket. The individual cricket. Those of the

:54:49.:54:55.

ingredients ground up into a powder. It would be like tasting a piece of

:54:56.:54:59.

meat rather than a finished dish. The idea is to change the way we

:55:00.:55:05.

look at food and possibly help the environment. Absolutely. First of

:55:06.:55:10.

all, the food has to taste great. No one will make any difference in

:55:11.:55:15.

sustainable food unless the food tastes good. They have to be

:55:16.:55:25.

sustainable to produce. That is where I come in as a scientist. It

:55:26.:55:30.

is about how we can feed a population efficiently looking out

:55:31.:55:35.

to the environment at the same time. You can produce the same quantity of

:55:36.:55:40.

protein with 25 times less feed and a fraction of the greenhouse gas

:55:41.:55:46.

emissions than livestock and beef. If we want to live sustainably and

:55:47.:55:51.

leave room for wildlife as well, we can adopt it in insects. We have a

:55:52.:55:59.

lot to ask you and you will be back in it a bit later. Thank you very

:56:00.:56:03.

much for that brief introduction into eating bugs. They all taste

:56:04.:56:11.

different. Thank you very much. I had one that tasted like

:56:12.:59:35.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:59:36.:59:39.

Social media firms will have to delete your childhood

:59:40.:59:43.

New laws will also ban companies from using pre-selected tick

:59:44.:59:49.

Good morning, it's Monday, 7th, August.

:59:50.:00:13.

The body of a man who was reported missing a month ago,

:00:14.:00:16.

sparking a huge search, has been found at his house.

:00:17.:00:19.

Now a police watchdog launches an investigation.

:00:20.:00:25.

Good morning from Waterloo station where, as you can see, there is

:00:26.:00:34.

major engineering work. It is one of the number of stations in London

:00:35.:00:39.

where there will be major disruptions. I will have the details

:00:40.:00:47.

shortly. Good morning, at the London stadium, two ceremonies, two very

:00:48.:00:48.

different champions. Boos again for Justin Gatlin

:00:49.:00:50.

at the 100m medal ceremony. But warm applause for

:00:51.:00:52.

Jessica Ennis Hill as she received her retrospective medal

:00:53.:00:55.

from six years ago. And good morning from Birmingham

:00:56.:01:06.

where a bin strike means some people have not had rubbish collected since

:01:07.:01:11.

June leading to this and concerns over public health.

:01:12.:01:12.

It is looking on settled with a weather front moving across England

:01:13.:01:23.

and Wales taking rain with it and behind it sunshine and showers, the

:01:24.:01:28.

heaviest in Northern Ireland and Scotland, but they could also be

:01:29.:01:30.

thundery. New laws which will give people more

:01:31.:01:32.

control over what happens to their personal data online

:01:33.:01:37.

are to be introduced. The government is billing

:01:38.:01:40.

the changes as the right People will be able to ask

:01:41.:01:42.

for personal data or material they posted when they were

:01:43.:01:47.

children to be deleted. The bill will also require people

:01:48.:01:49.

to give explicit consent for their information

:01:50.:01:51.

to be collected online, rather than firms relying

:01:52.:01:54.

on pre-selected tick boxes. Extra powers will be given to the

:01:55.:02:07.

information watchdog to issue fines up to ?70 million to businesses if

:02:08.:02:09.

they break the rules. Our political correspondent,

:02:10.:02:11.

Leila Nathoo, is in our Westminster We were speaking earlier to someone

:02:12.:02:21.

who used to work for GCHQ who suggested they are EU regulations

:02:22.:02:25.

filtering to us in Britain. That is right, EU regulations due to have

:02:26.:02:32.

come in next year. What this bill will do is bring those regulations

:02:33.:02:37.

into UK law, so they are in existence and have continuity after

:02:38.:02:44.

Brexit. These regulations are measures to rebalance the rights we

:02:45.:02:52.

have as consumers and users of tech companies over our information we

:02:53.:02:57.

put online and we are able to ask companies to disclose what

:02:58.:03:01.

information they hold on us and ask them to remove things we do not like

:03:02.:03:06.

and the tick boxes, things we might gloss over, not notice, we accept,

:03:07.:03:11.

agreed to information being used in certain ways will become a thing of

:03:12.:03:16.

the past. Instead we will have to give consent for data to be taken

:03:17.:03:20.

and used. The idea is these measures. Data being used and

:03:21.:03:28.

perhaps being passed on. So the Information Commissioner, watchdog,

:03:29.:03:33.

will have powers to fine up to ?70 million, or 4% of global turnover in

:03:34.:03:38.

the case of serious data breaches and so a deterrent for companies not

:03:39.:03:42.

to miss use data. We will get more detail when the bill comes before

:03:43.:03:47.

the House of Commons later this year. If you want more information

:03:48.:03:51.

on that there is plenty on the BBC website.

:03:52.:03:51.

The police watchdog in Scotland is investigating after officers

:03:52.:03:54.

failed to find the body of a 64-year-old man who had been

:03:55.:03:57.

After weeks of searching using police divers, dogs,

:03:58.:04:00.

volunteers, and a helicopter, Arnold Mouat was found

:04:01.:04:02.

64-year-old Arnold Mouat was reported missing by his family

:04:03.:04:12.

on 7th July, the day after he had last

:04:13.:04:14.

At the time, Police Scotland launched an investigation,

:04:15.:04:20.

which included a search of that property, but no trace was found

:04:21.:04:23.

There was also a large-scale search in the area around,

:04:24.:04:27.

involving the police helicopter, divers, mountain rescue teams

:04:28.:04:29.

Then, yesterday, police confirmed that a body had been found

:04:30.:04:34.

There was no explanation of where it was found,

:04:35.:04:37.

His death is being treated as unexplained but not suspicious.

:04:38.:04:43.

Police Scotland said they had voluntarily referred the case

:04:44.:04:46.

to the independent watchdog, the Police Investigations and Review

:04:47.:04:48.

That same organisation started an investigation when police

:04:49.:04:55.

Scotland failed to respond to an emergency call about a car

:04:56.:04:59.

that had crashed off the M9 near Stirling in 2015.

:05:00.:05:02.

Lamara Bell died in hospital after being found in the wreckage

:05:03.:05:05.

She was discovered alongside her partner, John Yuill,

:05:06.:05:08.

One independent review has already identified problems

:05:09.:05:16.

Passengers using Britain's busiest railway station have been

:05:17.:05:22.

warned to expect major disruption this month.

:05:23.:05:26.

10 of the 24 platforms at Waterloo Station will be

:05:27.:05:29.

We can see why it will have an impact on commuters.

:05:30.:05:43.

Good morning. Good morning. It is really busy. You can see Waterloo

:05:44.:05:51.

Station, the main hub, and then a lot of machinery and people working

:05:52.:05:57.

on major engineering works that will go one the whole of August. This is

:05:58.:06:04.

the busiest train station in the UK with something like 270,000 journeys

:06:05.:06:13.

made every day. This is about improving the service. Anybody who

:06:14.:06:17.

travels in and out of London will know how busy it can be so Network

:06:18.:06:22.

Rail that maintains the lines and some stations are spending ?400

:06:23.:06:27.

million on the project. You can see just how busy it is this morning.

:06:28.:06:33.

This is about extending the length of the platforms. So that trains can

:06:34.:06:38.

be longer and therefore you can fit more people onto them and passengers

:06:39.:06:41.

will have more room on those trains. It is not just this station where we

:06:42.:06:48.

will see engineering work. You have London Bridge, Charing Cross. At

:06:49.:06:53.

this station I understand there will be around 40% of journeys affected

:06:54.:07:00.

but there has been a lot of information going out. A lot of

:07:01.:07:03.

people use this to commute in and out of London. I will be chatting to

:07:04.:07:11.

guests later about why this is so important to happen and what it

:07:12.:07:16.

might mean for passengers. I love seeing this, it looks amazing. They

:07:17.:07:21.

have planned for it so long. We will be back with you later. Diggers all

:07:22.:07:27.

over the place. Very busy Waterloo station but not in terms of

:07:28.:07:28.

passengers on the platform. President Trump and his South Korean

:07:29.:07:30.

counterpart have spoken by phone to discuss North Korea's

:07:31.:07:32.

recent missile tests. Mr Trump said he was happy

:07:33.:07:37.

and impressed with the agreement at the United Nations Security Council

:07:38.:07:40.

on North Korea sanctions. Chronic overcrowding in some

:07:41.:07:48.

of Europe's top tourist hotspots is fuelling an angry backlash

:07:49.:07:50.

from residents, who say that a sharp rise in visitors

:07:51.:07:52.

is ruining neighbourhoods British tourists on board

:07:53.:07:54.

a sightseeing bus in Barcelona feared they were being ambushed

:07:55.:07:58.

by terrorists when masked men attacked their open-top bus

:07:59.:08:00.

and slashed its tyres and covered Brazilian police say a British woman

:08:01.:08:03.

has been shot and wounded Officials say a couple

:08:04.:08:12.

and their three children were targeted by an armed group

:08:13.:08:15.

after taking a wrong turn. The woman's condition isn't thought

:08:16.:08:18.

to be life threatening. The American sprinter Justin Gatlin

:08:19.:08:23.

who won the 100 metres at the World Athletics Championships

:08:24.:08:28.

in London was given a mixed reception yesterday evening

:08:29.:08:32.

at his medal ceremony. Away from all the controversy

:08:33.:08:37.

around his win, there was another significant medal ceremony

:08:38.:08:45.

as Natalie Pirks reports. ANNOUNCER: Gold-medallist and world

:08:46.:08:47.

champion, representing A smattering of boos

:08:48.:08:48.

for the champion. An unfamiliar medal around

:08:49.:08:54.

the neck of the Jamaican. After his two doping bans,

:08:55.:08:59.

Justin Gatlin understandably was the villain of the piece

:09:00.:09:04.

when he collected his gold This wasn't what Usain Bolt

:09:05.:09:06.

had planned, of course, Today then, finally,

:09:07.:09:11.

retribution for Jessica Ennis-Hill, cheated out of gold by a Russian

:09:12.:09:22.

doper in 2011. Six years she has waited

:09:23.:09:27.

for this upgrade on silver. My husband said to me,

:09:28.:09:30.

"You're not going to cry, are you?" But I'd forgotten that feeling,

:09:31.:09:34.

when you step out in an arena like this, and actually hear

:09:35.:09:40.

the crowd cheering for you. From the old generation to the new,

:09:41.:09:44.

Katarina Johnson-Thompson has long been considered Britain's heir

:09:45.:09:48.

to Ennis-Hill's heptathlon crown. But yet again, in a major

:09:49.:09:52.

championships, her hopes plummeted. Despite a season's best

:09:53.:09:57.

in the javelin, she had left herself far too much to do in the final

:09:58.:10:00.

event, the 800m. Eventually, she finished

:10:01.:10:02.

fifth overall. There was disappointment

:10:03.:10:04.

too for Holly Bradshaw. She had a great chance

:10:05.:10:08.

for a medal in the pole vault, but after failing at 4.75m,

:10:09.:10:12.

the dream was over, From Gatlin to Bowie,

:10:13.:10:14.

by the end of the night, the USA had yet another

:10:15.:10:21.

shock 100m champion. Jamaica's darling Elaine Thompson

:10:22.:10:26.

was left for dust and out She timed her run and her

:10:27.:10:28.

dip to perfection. Natalie Pirks, BBC News,

:10:29.:10:34.

at the London Stadium. This is the view of the London

:10:35.:10:45.

stadium this morning, host to the World Athletics

:10:46.:10:47.

Championships. In ten minutes, we'll speak to

:10:48.:10:52.

Jessica Ennis-Hill's former coach. So much to talk to him about.

:10:53.:11:07.

We are loving our helicopter shots this morning. I'm not sure that is.

:11:08.:11:10.

We do not have that many helicopters!

:11:11.:11:16.

The village of Bonsall were host to this race.

:11:17.:11:18.

The annual World Hen Racing Championships.

:11:19.:11:20.

As you can see competition was tough.

:11:21.:11:29.

I think you said they were disqualified for fighting.

:11:30.:11:35.

Some hens resorted to foul play but there could only

:11:36.:11:37.

Fantastically sprinting for the line. He was clearly delighted. But

:11:38.:11:51.

confused and delighted. Birmingham is in danger of sinking

:11:52.:11:57.

in a "sea of rubbish", that's according to one councillor

:11:58.:12:02.

concerned at the backlog of waste that is mounting up

:12:03.:12:04.

on the city's streets. It's a story we've been

:12:05.:12:08.

following on Breakfast. We have got a sense this morning of

:12:09.:12:19.

what is going on with piles of rubbish.

:12:20.:12:19.

Bin collectors are now stepping up industrial action by refusing

:12:20.:12:21.

to work every day for two hours in a dispute over job losses.

:12:22.:12:24.

For Colin, British summertime usually means hoping

:12:25.:12:34.

That is because Colin's rubbish has not being collected

:12:35.:12:41.

High temperatures would make a bad situation worse.

:12:42.:12:49.

You are living somewhere and people see bags of rubbish

:12:50.:12:54.

He is now having to store bin bags in his back garden as well.

:12:55.:13:05.

Birmingham City Council wants to modernise its waste service,

:13:06.:13:15.

but refuse workers say they are facing pay cuts.

:13:16.:13:22.

And have been striking two hours a day throughout July and now three

:13:23.:13:27.

hours a day. The collateral damage is visible

:13:28.:13:30.

to all, and it is attracting vermin. As you can see, there

:13:31.:13:33.

are many ripped bags here. It is like takeaway

:13:34.:13:35.

for them, isn't it? One pest control firm has seen a 20%

:13:36.:13:37.

increase in callouts over the past six weeks,

:13:38.:13:40.

and says this could Rats carry many diseases,

:13:41.:13:42.

Weils is harmful to human beings. So, if a human being was to touch

:13:43.:13:53.

a bag where a rat has urinated, We are bidding for

:13:54.:14:03.

the Commonwealth Games. There is no organisation

:14:04.:14:10.

for distrubuting this stuff. Intense talks continue

:14:11.:14:20.

between the two sides. Last week, volunteers took

:14:21.:14:25.

to the streets to help clear up But with weeks of action left to go,

:14:26.:14:28.

it seems getting on top of this Let's speak to Jacqui Kennedy

:14:29.:14:33.

from Birmingham City Council who is in our newsroom

:14:34.:14:37.

for us this morning. Thanks for your time on this. We

:14:38.:14:48.

have seen grim pictures of piles of rubbish. We have been in Birmingham

:14:49.:14:54.

seeing streets and pathways covered. Why has it taken so long to find a

:14:55.:14:58.

resolution? We want to make our waste management

:14:59.:15:06.

service effective and efficient and economic and be consistent in terms

:15:07.:15:10.

of how we deliver the service with other local authorities. That is

:15:11.:15:13.

something unfortunately we have not come to an agreement with the trade

:15:14.:15:17.

unions yet. Why is there no back-up plan in

:15:18.:15:22.

place? We have heard from angry residents and seen the situation. Is

:15:23.:15:24.

it unacceptable what is happening? We are two-thirds of the way through

:15:25.:15:33.

our recovery plan. The actual dispute started at the end of June,

:15:34.:15:39.

but we saw a significant increase in missed collections earlier than the

:15:40.:15:44.

actual industrial action started. Today is the start of week three.

:15:45.:15:49.

We're bang on time in terms of the plan. The two-thirds of the city

:15:50.:15:53.

have been cleared, that's two-thirds of 8200 streets. And two-thirds of

:15:54.:15:59.

over 330,000 properties. With respect, nobody wants to hear that

:16:00.:16:04.

you're to thirds of the way through your plan if they haven't had their

:16:05.:16:09.

rubbish collected for four weeks? I apologise to the people of

:16:10.:16:12.

Birmingham, but appreciate their patience so far. If we have a waste

:16:13.:16:16.

management service it must be effective and efficient because

:16:17.:16:20.

otherwise we're spending money on that service rather than other key

:16:21.:16:24.

services for the local authority. The union are saying you're more

:16:25.:16:28.

interested in conflict than finding a resolution. Is that true? No,

:16:29.:16:33.

absolutely not. The whole point of this restrict ture is we've really

:16:34.:16:38.

considered it. There are no job losses associated to this restrict

:16:39.:16:41.

ture. We've got roles at the same salary for all of the people

:16:42.:16:45.

impacted by the changes and actually, we're having some very

:16:46.:16:48.

positive dialogue with the trade union colleagues. OK, that positive

:16:49.:16:51.

dialogue, where is that going to lead? If people are watching this

:16:52.:16:55.

morning with a pile of rubbish outside their house, when are they

:16:56.:16:59.

going to get that rubbish collected? We're hoping for a speedy

:17:00.:17:03.

resolution. How quickly is a speedy resolution? That's a matter for the

:17:04.:17:07.

on going negotiations. Are we talking days? Are we talking weeks?

:17:08.:17:11.

As soon as possible. Again, but if you've got a pile of rubbish outside

:17:12.:17:15.

your house, as soon as possible, for some people is not good enough? So

:17:16.:17:19.

where we've got the third week, we will be clearing all that rubbish by

:17:20.:17:28.

the end of this week so I can give some assurances to people who

:17:29.:17:32.

haven't had their bins collected recently, that will happen this

:17:33.:17:35.

week. I know you say it will happen as soon as possible. Can you see a

:17:36.:17:40.

resolution in sight or are the two sides nowhere near other? I'm

:17:41.:17:46.

optimistic that there will be a resolution to this dispute.

:17:47.:17:49.

Hopefully you are correct and there will be a resolution because all

:17:50.:17:52.

sorts of issues for residents of Birmingham. We have been there live

:17:53.:17:56.

and seen the piles of rubbish on the street. It is really affecting

:17:57.:18:01.

residents. Shall we find out about the weather? There is a storm cloud

:18:02.:18:05.

behind CaroL. Good morning. We have had showers.

:18:06.:18:15.

Some of us will see thundery weather, but this week is going to

:18:16.:18:19.

be unsettled. There will be rain at times, showers at times. We will see

:18:20.:18:22.

sunshine, but it will be cool and breezy. Now what we have today is

:18:23.:18:27.

this weather front which is slowly sinking southwards. It's

:18:28.:18:30.

fragmenting, but later it will pep up. Low pressure is driving our

:18:31.:18:36.

weather and you you can see all this cloud swirling around the area of

:18:37.:18:41.

low pressure. Some showers across Northern Ireland, Scotland and

:18:42.:18:42.

northern England as well as Wales. Not everywhere, but there are some

:18:43.:18:46.

around this morning. So weather front sinks southwards. The cloud

:18:47.:18:49.

building ahead of T behind the cloud will start to break and we will see

:18:50.:18:54.

sunshine this afternoon for North Wales, northern England and Scotland

:18:55.:18:57.

and Northern Ireland, but the rain will pep up across the south-west as

:18:58.:19:00.

we go through the course of the afternoon. Fur' heading out, take

:19:01.:19:04.

your brolly with you is probably good advice. You can see the rain

:19:05.:19:08.

across southern areas. Not into the far south of Sussex or Kentment here

:19:09.:19:11.

we'll hang on to sunshine. Temperatures could get up to 23

:19:12.:19:15.

Celsius, but you can see the cloud associated with that band. Further

:19:16.:19:18.

north, we run into the cloud and the Midlands and then it breaks and we

:19:19.:19:21.

will see sunshine and showers across northern England. Showers in

:19:22.:19:24.

northern England tending to be lighter than they will be in

:19:25.:19:27.

Scotland and in Aberdeenshire and Caithness, some of them could not

:19:28.:19:31.

just be heavy, but thundery. For Northern Ireland, you have some

:19:32.:19:34.

bright spells, sunshine and showers. Some of the showers will be heavy

:19:35.:19:38.

and across Wales, not immune to a shower, but it will be a brighter

:19:39.:19:41.

afternoon compared to this morning. Now, through this evening and

:19:42.:19:45.

overnight, this weather front, this wiggly one here, tends to move back

:19:46.:19:50.

northwards for a time. We could see some mist and fog forming across

:19:51.:19:52.

parts of south-west England and we've got a few showers in the west

:19:53.:19:56.

and also the north, but equally a lot of dry weather. Tomorrow, this

:19:57.:20:00.

is our weather front. Again, it changes its mind and heads become to

:20:01.:20:03.

the south-east joining forces with this area of low pressure. Coming up

:20:04.:20:08.

from the nor Continent. So for parts of the south-east through the course

:20:09.:20:12.

of the day, look how they merge and we will see heavy downpours,

:20:13.:20:17.

especially for East Anglia and Kent and south Hampshire, but we will see

:20:18.:20:20.

the rain getting into Gloucestershire, Wales, Dorset as

:20:21.:20:22.

well, and there will be showers across northern England, Northern

:20:23.:20:25.

Ireland, and Scotland, but again, the best of the weather in these

:20:26.:20:30.

three areas with sunshine in between. Then as we move from

:20:31.:20:34.

Tuesday into Wednesday more rain across the south-eastern quarter of

:20:35.:20:37.

the UK. Some heavy downpours once again. By then we could be looking

:20:38.:20:42.

at some issues with surface water and flooding, but as we push north

:20:43.:20:47.

and west, drier and brighter with sunshine and fewer showers, Lou and

:20:48.:20:53.

Dan. STUDIO: I'm sure you've heard the

:20:54.:20:58.

news that Molly King from the Saturdays has been the first

:20:59.:21:02.

contestant revealed for this year's Strictly. Would you have some words

:21:03.:21:06.

of advice as a former contestant yourself? Yes, just enjoy it. Don't

:21:07.:21:11.

be worried about it and it doesn't matter how good or boy. Just really

:21:12.:21:18.

enjoy it is my advice. Very good advice, Carol, thank you very much

:21:19.:21:21.

indeed. I think she will be very good indeed. Frankie Bridge from the

:21:22.:21:27.

Saturdays, they're working their way through the Saturdays. Hold on to

:21:28.:21:30.

your hats, one at a time, everybody! It was meant to be a glittering

:21:31.:21:35.

farewell to the sprint Instead, boos rang round

:21:36.:21:38.

the London Stadium last night as Justin Gatlin,

:21:39.:21:41.

who has twice been suspended for being a drugs cheat,

:21:42.:21:43.

collected his 100 metres Jessica Ennis-Hill was cheered

:21:44.:21:45.

to the rafters as she was presented The original winner,

:21:46.:21:51.

Tatyana Chernova, was stripped Let's speak to Jessica's former

:21:52.:21:56.

coach, Toni Minichiello He has been part of the BBC team for

:21:57.:22:07.

the last few days. Good morning Toni. Nice to speak to you? Good

:22:08.:22:12.

morning. I know Jessica got a little bit emotional yesterday. As her

:22:13.:22:17.

coach for so many years, what were you like now you can say that

:22:18.:22:20.

Jessica is officially a three time world champion? It's really

:22:21.:22:27.

pleasing, you know, to finally get the medal and everything be cleared

:22:28.:22:31.

up from that point of view. No, really proud of her and the way she

:22:32.:22:35.

conducts herself through all her life on the track and off. At the

:22:36.:22:42.

time, when you looked back, did you think something was a miss? It's a

:22:43.:22:49.

strange situation with Jess. It was her under performance that got her a

:22:50.:22:53.

silver medal. She had a really bad javelin. It was more her under

:22:54.:22:57.

performance that allowed Tatyana Chernova or whoever to come in and

:22:58.:23:02.

win the gold medal. So, it's a slightly different position. It's

:23:03.:23:05.

not they Jessica was at the top of her game and performed really well

:23:06.:23:08.

and was beaten by a drug cheat. It's a little bit different and we've had

:23:09.:23:13.

that conversation over time. I'm just wondering how it affects an

:23:14.:23:19.

athlete? This many years later suddenly you're there with a gold

:23:20.:23:23.

medal. What were her emotions, do you think? I think being back in

:23:24.:23:29.

this stadium after 2012 was such a respectful, responsive supportive

:23:30.:23:32.

crowd is just fantastic and I think you saw that in her emotion and her

:23:33.:23:38.

joy from that and the fact that her young son and her husband and family

:23:39.:23:42.

members, it just made it a lovely fitting tribute and a fitting

:23:43.:23:46.

tribute to the whole of her career. You both are part of the BBC team

:23:47.:23:51.

this time around for the World Athletic Championships and with

:23:52.:23:55.

Jessica out of the picture a lot of attention on Katarina

:23:56.:23:57.

Johnson-Thompson who finished fifth in the heptathlon and failed to win

:23:58.:24:03.

a medal. Jessica suggested yesterday she should call on your services for

:24:04.:24:10.

help. It seems Toni, it's the mental side of the heptathlon that's

:24:11.:24:15.

proving an issue for Kat. You're laughing watching pictures of the

:24:16.:24:18.

heptathlon from yesterday. What is the issue? Could you have be of

:24:19.:24:23.

service to her? That's not within my gift to give or anything like that.

:24:24.:24:27.

An athlete makes a decision about where they want support. She made

:24:28.:24:30.

her decision. She is moving in the direction. That's something that

:24:31.:24:37.

you'd have to ask her. When you come to a major championships we know it

:24:38.:24:41.

is the pinnacle of the season. You should really perform and produce a

:24:42.:24:44.

season's best or a personal best at this championships. If you're not

:24:45.:24:48.

doing that then you're under performing at this championships.

:24:49.:24:53.

So, and I think also, another point here, we sort of assumed that she

:24:54.:24:59.

was going to get a medal. The lady was ranked fourth in the world. It

:25:00.:25:03.

would have been awkward for her to have won a medal. She would have had

:25:04.:25:07.

to really have raised her game. Yes, there are a couple of events that

:25:08.:25:10.

could have gone better, but that's multi-events. There is always

:25:11.:25:14.

something you can work on and there is always something you can improve.

:25:15.:25:20.

We know that Justin Gatlin was booed by some members of the crowd. Some

:25:21.:25:23.

people watching yesterday. What do you make of that? I think it was

:25:24.:25:32.

more of an ooh than a boo. It was a respectful crowd. There was no noise

:25:33.:25:36.

during the National Anthem. There is a lot of people heading to work on a

:25:37.:25:40.

Monday morning, they're going to work, they're earning money and they

:25:41.:25:43.

buy a ticket and use that earnings to buy a ticket and you come in and

:25:44.:25:47.

watch it. Do we hear booing at football matches? Yes, we do. The

:25:48.:25:52.

crowd is entitled to express its opinion of the entertainment that's

:25:53.:25:56.

presented to it. So, I have no problem with the way the crowd

:25:57.:26:00.

conducted themselves, they were respectful at the times that you

:26:01.:26:03.

need to be respectful and they expressed their opinion

:26:04.:26:05.

appropriately. And it wasn't the whole of the crowd. It was more of

:26:06.:26:11.

an ooh than a boo if I'm brutally honest. That's sport. That's drama.

:26:12.:26:15.

That's why we come and watch it. That's why we're so fixed on it.

:26:16.:26:21.

Toni, do you think there might be a decent medal in the hammer later on?

:26:22.:26:29.

I think Sophie Hitchin is one to watch. Tune in and watch that. It

:26:30.:26:34.

will be a fascinating competition and I think she is a really good

:26:35.:26:39.

prospect. The way she qualified in the qualification, she did it with

:26:40.:26:45.

just one throw so that shows a confidence in her own abilities and

:26:46.:26:52.

of course, Laura Muir. I love your choice of words more than a ooh than

:26:53.:26:55.

a boo! This is Waterloo

:26:56.:27:00.

station this morning. Commuters and tourists

:27:01.:27:04.

are being warned there is going to be major disruption

:27:05.:27:06.

because of major works. Time now to get the news,

:27:07.:27:13.

travel and weather where you are. I'm back with the latest on the BBC

:27:14.:30:32.

London newsroom in half an hour. New laws which will give people more

:30:33.:30:48.

control over what happens to their personal data online

:30:49.:30:50.

are to be introduced. People will be able to ask for posts

:30:51.:30:54.

or material they posted when they The bill will also require explicit

:30:55.:30:57.

consent for information rather than firms relying

:30:58.:31:01.

on pre-selected tick boxes. The police watchdog in Scotland

:31:02.:31:07.

is investigating why it took over a month to find the body

:31:08.:31:10.

of a man in his own home. Divers, sniffer dogs

:31:11.:31:14.

and a helicopter were used in a high profile search operation to find

:31:15.:31:20.

Arnold Mouat from Bo'ness after his Police Scotland reported

:31:21.:31:23.

finding his body at home yesterday. Thousands of commuters

:31:24.:31:28.

will have their journeys disrupted today, because of major

:31:29.:31:30.

improvement work at Britain's busiest railway station,

:31:31.:31:32.

Waterloo in London. Ten of its 24 platforms are closed

:31:33.:31:37.

so they can be extended Network Rail has warned

:31:38.:31:40.

of "challenging days" President Trump and his South Korean

:31:41.:31:44.

counterpart have spoken by phone to discuss North Korea's

:31:45.:31:51.

recent missile tests. Mr Trump said he was happy

:31:52.:31:55.

and impressed with the agreement at the United Nations Security Council

:31:56.:31:58.

on North Korea sanctions. Brazilian police say a British woman

:31:59.:32:10.

has been shot and wounded near Rio de Janeiro.

:32:11.:32:13.

Officials say a couple and their three children

:32:14.:32:15.

were targeted by an armed group after taking a wrong turn.

:32:16.:32:17.

The woman's condition isn't thought to be life threatening.

:32:18.:32:23.

We were showing you the world hen racing championships this morning.

:32:24.:32:30.

This is Bears upsetting local residents in Romania.

:32:31.:32:34.

A village in Romania has been over-run with bears

:32:35.:32:36.

A handful of hungry bears has left the mountains

:32:37.:32:41.

for Harghita to scavenge for food in local

:32:42.:32:43.

In one incident a brown bear entered an elderly woman's home and ate

:32:44.:32:48.

a stack of pancakes straight from her table.

:32:49.:32:50.

Experts say the bears won't attack unless provoked.

:32:51.:32:59.

Extraordinary. It would be slightly concerning, though. Andy Last been

:33:00.:33:07.

sending animal encounters this morning. Jim said they once had

:33:08.:33:14.

orcas surrounding the boat, but they became rather concerned because they

:33:15.:33:18.

were hunting a sea lion that was hiding underneath the boat.

:33:19.:33:21.

Thankfully Jim survived and was able to get in contact with us on social

:33:22.:33:27.

media this morning. Inspired by not only that but my mate had a baboon

:33:28.:33:34.

in kiss hotel room. It ate some chocolate, stayed for ten minutes

:33:35.:33:35.

and then jumped away. Victoria Derbyshire is on at 9:00am

:33:36.:33:37.

this morning on BBC Two. Let's find out what's

:33:38.:33:41.

coming up today. But also coming up

:33:42.:33:43.

on Breakfast this morning... The 10-year old girl on the mission

:33:44.:33:45.

of a lifetime to find out what happened to her family

:33:46.:33:49.

during the Partition They were supposed to transform our

:33:50.:33:51.

streets into clean and safe places, but are cycle-share schemes

:33:52.:33:55.

being taken for a ride Would you swap a chocolate chip

:33:56.:33:57.

cookie for one made with crickets? We'll meet the couple on a mission

:33:58.:34:02.

to get more of us eating We will also be speaking to Josh

:34:03.:34:17.

Griffiths and Callum Hawkins, who both starred in the men's marathon

:34:18.:34:20.

in the world athletics championship yesterday.

:34:21.:34:22.

Let's speak to Jessica who is at the London Stadium

:34:23.:34:24.

for us ahead of day four of the World Athletics Championships.

:34:25.:34:27.

Lots to look forward to today. Should be another great day of

:34:28.:34:34.

action. We just want to talk about yesterday, the question on

:34:35.:34:37.

everyone's's lips yesterday was what sort of reaction would Justin Gatlin

:34:38.:34:40.

received from the crowd when he was on the podium to receive his 100

:34:41.:34:42.

metre gold medal. The former British sprinter

:34:43.:34:44.

Darren Campbell told us on Breakfast yesterday that he thought

:34:45.:34:47.

there should be silence Although he can understand fans

:34:48.:34:54.

wanting to express their frustration.

:34:55.:34:56.

Judge for yourself what the feeling was...

:34:57.:35:03.

ANNOUNCER: World champion, representing the United States of

:35:04.:35:07.

America, Justin Gatlin. Yes, there were some boos

:35:08.:35:09.

but I think it was more of a mixed reception

:35:10.:35:15.

for Gatlin from the fans Lord Coe - who presented

:35:16.:35:17.

him with the medal - had earlier said that Gatlin -

:35:18.:35:21.

who has been banned twice for doping - beating Usain Bolt was "not

:35:22.:35:24.

the perfect script". Earlier in the evening

:35:25.:35:29.

there was a bigger cheer She received her retrospective gold

:35:30.:35:34.

medal from the 2011 games after the athlete that had

:35:35.:35:38.

beaten her was found to have doped. It's great, to be honest. Couldn't

:35:39.:35:46.

have been a better time to receive the medal other than at the time.

:35:47.:35:49.

I'm very thankful that it's been here and I've been able to say

:35:50.:35:56.

goodbye for one last time. I felt I hadn't forgot one ounce of the

:35:57.:35:59.

feeling of how it felt five years ago stepping out into the stadium,

:36:00.:36:03.

but actually I had kind of forgotten the feeling a little bit. Actually

:36:04.:36:07.

standing here and here in the crowd again, it brought it all flooding

:36:08.:36:10.

back. That's why it was so emotional.

:36:11.:36:16.

The athlete hoping to take over Jessica Ennis-Hill's mantle

:36:17.:36:18.

in the heptathlon is Katarina Johnson-Thompson.

:36:19.:36:21.

But yesterday she could only finish fifth in the heptathlon.

:36:22.:36:23.

Johnson-Thompson had plenty of work to do

:36:24.:36:26.

but performed admirably in the three events yesterday,

:36:27.:36:30.

finishing second in her 800 metres heat.

:36:31.:36:35.

But she'd ultimately left herself too far behind.

:36:36.:36:37.

The Olympic champion, Belgium's Nafi Thiam, won gold.

:36:38.:36:42.

Johnson-Thompson wasn't the only one to miss out.

:36:43.:36:44.

Pole vaulter Holly Bradshaw finished sixth in her final.

:36:45.:36:47.

She failed to get over with the bar set at 4.75 metres.

:36:48.:36:52.

She had the height but her knee caught the bar on the way down.

:36:53.:36:55.

Away from here, England will be looking to wrap up the fourth

:36:56.:37:05.

Test and a series win against South Africa this morning.

:37:06.:37:09.

They'll resume on 224-8 in their second innings -

:37:10.:37:15.

It was thanks largely to some late big hitting from Moeen Ali -

:37:16.:37:19.

who even managed to pick out team-mate Jonny Bairstow

:37:20.:37:22.

Arsenal won the FA Community Shield for the 15th time by beating Chelsea

:37:23.:37:26.

4-1 on penalties at Wembley - the first in English football

:37:27.:37:32.

Goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois took Chelsea's

:37:33.:37:41.

second kick, looking to equalise, but blasted over before record

:37:42.:37:43.

Olivier Giroud then scored the decisive kick to give the FA

:37:44.:37:50.

Elsewhere, Rangers started their Scottish Premiership season

:37:51.:37:58.

One other thing I forgot to mention about the World Championships, a

:37:59.:38:11.

brilliant performance by Callum Hawkins in the men's marathon

:38:12.:38:14.

yesterday. He finished fourth. I know that you will be speaking to

:38:15.:38:18.

him later. STUDIO: Thank you very much. You have had a little look

:38:19.:38:24.

ahead for what to watch out for today. This will give few times and

:38:25.:38:30.

in idea of who to look out for on day four of the world athletics

:38:31.:38:31.

Championships. There is no morning session today so

:38:32.:38:42.

our ones to watch start with former ballet dancer Sophie Hitchon, who

:38:43.:38:46.

won a first Olympic hammer medal for a British woman with bronze in Rio

:38:47.:38:53.

last summer. She's up at 7pm. Next up, the former European champion and

:38:54.:38:58.

two time Commonwealth silver medallist Eilidh Doyle. The British

:38:59.:39:02.

team captain goes in the 400 metre hurdles at 7:30pm. Finally, the two

:39:03.:39:11.

Laura's have both made the women's 1500 metre final. Laura Muir was

:39:12.:39:16.

second in her semifinal and she's going for the 1500 and 5000 double.

:39:17.:39:34.

It all kicks off at 6pm on BBC Two. The British women's Open finished

:39:35.:39:50.

yesterday. IK Kim won that. But Georgia Hall was in the top three.

:39:51.:39:53.

More than a million people were killed and millions more

:39:54.:39:56.

were displaced by the Partition of India, it left a bloody legacy,

:39:57.:39:59.

shaping the lives of families for generations to come.

:40:00.:40:06.

It is 70 years since British colonial India was partitioned

:40:07.:40:08.

into two new nations - India and Pakistan, tearing

:40:09.:40:10.

Now, CBBC's Newsround has taken a group of children back

:40:11.:40:14.

Ten-year-old Sumayyah traced the route of her great grandmother

:40:15.:40:20.

Before we speak to Sumayyah, let's see her on her

:40:21.:40:24.

I feel as if I found a piece of the puzzle of my family's history, and

:40:25.:40:37.

I'm willing to find out the rest of this puzzle. By the time of

:40:38.:40:43.

partition I was 31 years old. As the country divided, suspicion grew

:40:44.:40:47.

between Hindu, Sikh and Muslim neighbours. I want you to go to

:40:48.:40:53.

India and find out what we can about the family history. Yeah! This is my

:40:54.:41:03.

great grandfather. It's very hot, different to India, lots of

:41:04.:41:07.

rickshaws, open cars. -- difference to England. This is like a really

:41:08.:41:14.

crazy football match. It's unlike anything I've ever seen in my life.

:41:15.:41:22.

This is open 24 hours a day. What?! I feel like I have this connection

:41:23.:41:28.

with her. Behind her smile and behind the lines on her face, there

:41:29.:41:34.

was a story and I just think she must have been such a strong woman

:41:35.:41:40.

to go through all that and I'm really proud that I could uncover my

:41:41.:41:49.

great-grandmother's story. Sumayyah is here. Lovely to see just a

:41:50.:41:54.

snippet of it there. He followed your great-grandmother's journey in

:41:55.:41:58.

some ways. Why did you want to do that and what did you learn? I

:41:59.:42:03.

learned so much about my great-grandmother. Everything that

:42:04.:42:10.

happened to her. I realised that she was such a strong woman to have gone

:42:11.:42:14.

through all that. I'm really proud to have uncovered her story. It was

:42:15.:42:20.

a brutal time for many families. How much did your family talk about it?

:42:21.:42:27.

At times when you were altogether? I think like many Asians we had

:42:28.:42:31.

nuggets of information, but it's not something that's really talked

:42:32.:42:35.

about. As you said, because it's such a brutal bit of history. And in

:42:36.:42:41.

a way it didn't happen that long ago. We had nuggets of information

:42:42.:42:45.

we knew about, but the journey was really amazing, uncovering all the

:42:46.:42:50.

aspects. Tel is a bit about your great-grandmother and what she had

:42:51.:42:58.

to do at the time. She was home alone and she had mobs outside so

:42:59.:43:05.

she fled with her 19 children to Pakistan in the night. She didn't

:43:06.:43:11.

know what would become of her. I realised it must have been

:43:12.:43:14.

terrifying for her to leave everything behind. She buried her

:43:15.:43:20.

jewellery in the dirt, hoping one day she would come back for it, but

:43:21.:43:26.

she never did. As anybody found the jewellery, do you know? We don't

:43:27.:43:31.

know, but somebody probably has. Was it sad to find out some of the

:43:32.:43:35.

story? I know it was probably exciting to find out what happened

:43:36.:43:40.

to a member of your family those years ago, but was a bit of it sad?

:43:41.:43:44.

It was sad to think she had to go through all that just to make a

:43:45.:43:49.

journey. But it's exciting to be able to go there and uncover her

:43:50.:43:54.

story. I'm proud to have been the first person in my family after 70

:43:55.:43:59.

years to go back to India. It's fantastic. And you were on their

:44:00.:44:02.

journey as well. Was it emotional for you to find out what had

:44:03.:44:08.

happened? It was. There was a point where we were at the house my

:44:09.:44:12.

grandmother fled from and it was quite overwhelming, the emotion. We

:44:13.:44:17.

both felt it, I think. I didn't expect to feel that connection, but

:44:18.:44:23.

it was quite special. We can look at another part from the programme.

:44:24.:44:28.

This is when you both arrived at the India and Pakistan border and you

:44:29.:44:31.

were not able to cross. You must remember it well.

:44:32.:44:36.

Sumayyah has reached the border. This is where her great-grandmother

:44:37.:44:42.

crossed over into Pakistan. But for Sumayyah, there is a problem. The

:44:43.:44:46.

film crew she has been travelling with have not been given permission

:44:47.:44:53.

to enter Pakistan. So for Sumayyah, this ends her journey with us. It's

:44:54.:44:57.

a sign that these two countries are still very divided. STUDIO: That's

:44:58.:45:02.

where your journey had to end. What a disappointing not to be able to

:45:03.:45:07.

get across? Yeah, I was hoping we could go to Pakistan with the film

:45:08.:45:13.

crew. But because they didn't get the permission, it shows how divided

:45:14.:45:17.

these countries still are. It's very clear. What an amazing thing to be

:45:18.:45:22.

able to tell your friends about. Have your school been interested,

:45:23.:45:26.

have you been able to talk to them about it? Yes, my teacher told the

:45:27.:45:32.

whole school. A bit embarrassing, but fun nonetheless! How much did

:45:33.:45:37.

you know about partition before this? Is it something you have been

:45:38.:45:42.

talking about? It's something I've always been interested in. I have

:45:43.:45:48.

gone out of my way to read books and research about it. But it's not

:45:49.:45:54.

something we learn about at school. So, yes, I knew about it because I

:45:55.:45:59.

had gone out of my way to do so, but Sumayyah hadn't, and so many of her

:46:00.:46:03.

school friends had not heard of partition. Is it something we should

:46:04.:46:07.

all be talking about at school? Definitely. Definitely. You seem

:46:08.:46:12.

really excited by the project. Could you see yourself going back? Yeah.

:46:13.:46:22.

You have a taste for it, do you want to know more? I would really like to

:46:23.:46:27.

find out about my father's side of my heritage as well. His family were

:46:28.:46:33.

from Somalia and the Yemen. Thank you very much for coming in and

:46:34.:46:35.

talking about it. Finding my Family -

:46:36.:46:39.

Partition: A Newsround Special Lovely to see you both. Thank you

:46:40.:46:41.

very much. Here's Carol with a look

:46:42.:46:47.

at this morning's weather. Not looking great for August, but

:46:48.:46:55.

perhaps normal for August? You are right. Normal for August. We have an

:46:56.:47:02.

unsettled week ahead. This is a beautiful Weather Watcher pictures

:47:03.:47:04.

sent in from Northern Ireland this morning, summing it up quite nicely.

:47:05.:47:08.

A rainbow, and through the course of this week we are looking at

:47:09.:47:12.

Sunshine, showers, some rain at times and it will also be cool and

:47:13.:47:17.

breezy. A bit disappointing for this stage in August. We have a weather

:47:18.:47:21.

front moving steadily southward. It is weakening at the moment, however

:47:22.:47:29.

it will pick up later on in the day in the south-west, and you can see

:47:30.:47:32.

all the cloud associated with it, wrapped around an area of low

:47:33.:47:34.

pressure. The top end also producing some rain in the far north of

:47:35.:47:37.

Scotland, but in between there is a lot of dry weather. Some showers

:47:38.:47:43.

coming across western Scotland, Northern Ireland, south-east

:47:44.:47:45.

England, but generally speaking ahead of the front of the South at

:47:46.:47:49.

this stage it is dry. The far south-east hanging the driest

:47:50.:47:54.

conditions for the longest period. Through the through the afternoon,

:47:55.:47:57.

the rain will pick up across south-west England, across southern

:47:58.:48:00.

counties, then the front into the Midlands and East Anglia. Quite a

:48:01.:48:10.

lot of cloud, but south of Kent and Sussex, looking at 23 this

:48:11.:48:13.

afternoon. On the other side of the front of the cloud continues to

:48:14.:48:15.

break up. Northern England is looking at a lot of dry weather,

:48:16.:48:18.

fair bit of sunshine and a few showers. The showers in Scotland

:48:19.:48:20.

will be heavier particularly in Aberdeenshire and Caithness where

:48:21.:48:24.

they could be thundery. Northern Ireland, a mixture of sunshine and

:48:25.:48:28.

showers but like Scotland some of those could prove to be heavy. For

:48:29.:48:33.

Wales, after a damp and cloudy start things are brightening up but there

:48:34.:48:36.

still is the risk of a shower. Through this evening and overnight

:48:37.:48:40.

this front moves steadily northwards. Ahead of that we will

:48:41.:48:44.

see some dry weather, mist and fog patches across the south-west, and

:48:45.:48:50.

pushing northwards across northern England, Northern Ireland and

:48:51.:48:52.

Scotland, dry shower with just a few showers again courtesy of this

:48:53.:48:56.

weather front. Tomorrow changes again, the front heading back to the

:48:57.:49:00.

south-east. Low pressure from the new continent joins forces with that

:49:01.:49:05.

sort through the day we will see some heavy rain, particularly a

:49:06.:49:08.

crossed East Anglia, Kent and South Hampshire, but as you can see a lot

:49:09.:49:12.

of rain across southern counties generally with a bit of cloud in

:49:13.:49:17.

between. Showers across the south-west, they mean we'll see some

:49:18.:49:20.

sunshine, but the lion's share of the sunshine tomorrow will be

:49:21.:49:24.

northern England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, but even here we

:49:25.:49:28.

are likely to see a few showers. With light breezes in the sunshine

:49:29.:49:32.

it will feel pleasant enough. Into Wednesday, more rain on the cards

:49:33.:49:36.

across the south-eastern quarter of England. Some of that will be heavy,

:49:37.:49:40.

especially across East Anglia, mainly with surface water issues,

:49:41.:49:44.

something to keep an eye on. North and west of that will be drier and

:49:45.:49:48.

brighter with some sunshine. So very unsettled, that probably sums it up

:49:49.:49:53.

quite nicely. OK, Carol. See you tomorrow. Thanks very much.

:49:54.:49:58.

Thousands of dockless bikes have appeared up and down the country

:49:59.:50:00.

They are located using a mobile app, and can be unlocked and hired

:50:01.:50:04.

But not all of them are staying on the road.

:50:05.:50:08.

Police in Manchester say some have been dumped in canals,

:50:09.:50:13.

bins and hedges - in Bristol, one company says around

:50:14.:50:15.

100 of their bicycles have been vandalised.

:50:16.:50:18.

So is cycle-sharing and similar schemes really

:50:19.:50:20.

Communal cycling in our capital is a common sight.

:50:21.:50:28.

But now thousands of dockless bikes that can be parked anywhere

:50:29.:50:31.

I have come to Bristol because this is the first place in the country

:50:32.:50:38.

I have downloaded the app, and as you can see there hundreds

:50:39.:50:45.

Just around the corner, as promised, it is waiting for me.

:50:46.:50:56.

With the app, I scan the barcode, the bike is unlocked,

:50:57.:50:58.

Yellow arrived three months ago, and already the take-up

:50:59.:51:06.

We are the first dockless bike-sharing initiative in the UK.

:51:07.:51:17.

Which means we do not need to install any furniture on the

:51:18.:51:22.

streets... One in eight have

:51:23.:51:24.

been vandalised here. And some are found

:51:25.:51:29.

with wheels missing. Most are looking after them well

:51:30.:51:31.

but we have had issues. It is not just bicycles

:51:32.:51:45.

we are sharing. Today, he is giving

:51:46.:51:51.

one of them to Will. So when I do need one,

:51:52.:51:57.

it makes sense to use one So I was sitting at home

:51:58.:52:05.

thinking, "I have two family cars in my driveway

:52:06.:52:16.

and they are not being used." I put them on a platform

:52:17.:52:20.

on the Internet called HireCar One day, I had rented them both

:52:21.:52:22.

out and we had none. We bought a new one

:52:23.:52:27.

and put it on the platform But, like the bicycles,

:52:28.:52:48.

one of them has been damaged. One hour later he sent me a picture

:52:49.:52:52.

and said "I have had an accident." Many people are hiring out cars

:52:53.:52:57.

for as little as ?15 a day. In 15-20 years' time, it will be

:52:58.:53:01.

abnormal to have your own car. The cost of journeys will come down

:53:02.:53:04.

substantially as we go towards a future where cars

:53:05.:53:07.

are autonomous, But not everyone agrees this

:53:08.:53:09.

is the only way forward I think we need to recognise human

:53:10.:53:12.

behaviour in all of this. A lot of people like to own things

:53:13.:53:16.

and they will want to carry So, part of the future,

:53:17.:53:20.

not all of it. But with hundreds more rolling

:53:21.:53:23.

into our cities each month, it looks like dockless bikes will be

:53:24.:53:26.

on our roads for the Commuters and tourists have been

:53:27.:53:28.

warned to prepare for disruption to their journeys

:53:29.:53:39.

into London this August with thousands of trains

:53:40.:53:41.

cancelled or delayed Because of improvement works at

:53:42.:53:43.

Waterloo station. Yes, have a look at this. They are

:53:44.:53:57.

extending the platforms here at Waterloo this morning. This is an

:53:58.:54:01.

engineering job that will take about three weeks to complete. I am told

:54:02.:54:06.

by the boss of Network Rail, a little earlier on, that it is a

:54:07.:54:09.

military operation, he said, and they want to make sure it is done by

:54:10.:54:13.

the 20th of August, all about increasing the capacity here because

:54:14.:54:21.

is -- this is one of the busiest is not the busiest rail station in the

:54:22.:54:24.

UK. I just want to show you something as well. Can you see

:54:25.:54:28.

machines blowing out a mist over there? That is to try to dampen down

:54:29.:54:33.

the dust, because obviously they don't want loads of dust as they

:54:34.:54:37.

move this storm, gravel and everything, so it is really

:54:38.:54:40.

fascinating to watch actually and just see this military operation. We

:54:41.:54:44.

have a couple of guest here we can chat about this,. Tel us first of

:54:45.:54:53.

what is going on here and what does it mean for passengers? The big plan

:54:54.:55:00.

is to make longer platforms and longer trains and four passengers

:55:01.:55:07.

crucially it means less being cramped up, more space, so for

:55:08.:55:11.

passengers it will mean a month of disruption, delays, crowding, not

:55:12.:55:13.

just here at Waterloo but other parts of the network which will be

:55:14.:55:16.

taking the strain as people make other journeys, but hopefully once

:55:17.:55:20.

the works have come to an end next month, they will be enjoying a

:55:21.:55:24.

better Waterloo and less crowded journeys. David, from the business

:55:25.:55:29.

lobby group, there are lots of people who use this to commute in

:55:30.:55:33.

and out of London. As Leanne was saying, not just the station. To

:55:34.:55:38.

does it work? It is vital but it will be very destructive and

:55:39.:55:41.

passengers and businesses need to prepare themselves for that. From a

:55:42.:55:44.

business point of view, far better to do this work in one go at a quiet

:55:45.:55:48.

time of years rather than the dreaded programme of weekend

:55:49.:55:53.

closures. We tried that with the Tube programme and it was far worse

:55:54.:55:56.

and more debilitating to businesses and passengers alike. We have the

:55:57.:55:59.

right idea but need these guys to deliver it. Do you think there has

:56:00.:56:03.

been enough information for passengers? I have had a few tweets

:56:04.:56:10.

saying, this was in the news, we know about it. Do you think that has

:56:11.:56:15.

been dealt with properly? Yes, lots of things online and lots of staff

:56:16.:56:19.

drafted in to assist people planning their journeys. But I think what we

:56:20.:56:22.

need to see is this kind of investment, this kind of upgrades,

:56:23.:56:26.

happening not just here in London and the south-east but in other

:56:27.:56:30.

parts of the country as well and the north. David, how debilitating is it

:56:31.:56:33.

for business when people can't get in and out easily, when they are

:56:34.:56:39.

overcrowded on trains? It is a frustration but people have had time

:56:40.:56:42.

to plan and obviously businesses have to be flexible and reasonable

:56:43.:56:45.

with their stuff. Don't worry about them sunbathing in the garden, you

:56:46.:56:51.

know. The reasonable. Quite good advice! Do some work. -- be

:56:52.:56:56.

reasonable. Those with flexibility, they need to take advantage of it

:56:57.:57:02.

not have extra pressure. Mark is the chief executive of Network Rail.

:57:03.:57:06.

Just tell us, people will face delays, but how crucial is this? We

:57:07.:57:10.

are talking about London here but the whole network really needs work,

:57:11.:57:15.

doesn't it? We are doing an amazing programme of works right across the

:57:16.:57:18.

country. The biggest railway programme is in the Victoria area.

:57:19.:57:24.

This is just one project, a huge project, which will increase the

:57:25.:57:28.

capacity at Waterloo, Britain's busiest station, by 30%. But look at

:57:29.:57:32.

what else we are doing. The Thameslink programme will be

:57:33.:57:36.

finished in the next year, we have Crossrail, electrification, the

:57:37.:57:39.

Glasgow to Edinburgh improvement project... It is not just about the

:57:40.:57:43.

South, which is what a lot of the criticism is when we talk about

:57:44.:57:50.

spending? It isn't, actually. 70% of all journeys either start or end in

:57:51.:57:55.

London so of course London is a hugely dominant part of the railway

:57:56.:57:57.

system, but it is a railway upgrade that will improve the journeys for,

:57:58.:58:01.

you know, most people in the country actually. Quick yes or no. Will it

:58:02.:58:08.

be on time? It will be on time. Will hold you to that! I will leave you

:58:09.:58:11.

with this view because it is amazing to see all of this operation

:58:12.:58:16.

happening, and a great operation on this morning. It is amazing and you

:58:17.:58:20.

can see obviously why the trains are disrupted but hopefully it finishes

:58:21.:58:24.

on time. Steph, thank you very much. Hard work!

:58:25.:58:27.

We're heading into day four of the World Athletics Championships

:58:28.:58:29.

and already it's been jam packed with emotion.

:58:30.:58:31.

Justin Gatlin was booed as he was presented with his 100 metres

:58:32.:58:34.

The sprinter has twice been suspended for doping.

:58:35.:58:41.

There was applause for Jessica Ennis-Hill who was presented

:58:42.:58:44.

The original winner was stripped of the title last year for doping.

:58:45.:58:56.

Two years ago, Great Britain and Northern Ireland team finished

:58:57.:58:58.

fourth in the medal table, behind Kenya, Jamaica and the USA.

:58:59.:59:01.

Let's speak now to marathon runners, Josh Griffiths and Callum Hawkins

:59:02.:59:03.

who are in the London Stadium for us.

:59:04.:59:09.

After a pretty busy weekend, congratulations to both of you.

:59:10.:59:14.

Callum Hawkins finished fourth and Josh finished 39th. In the London

:59:15.:59:19.

Marathon you started behind the elite runners with the club runners.

:59:20.:59:24.

You burst through to beat the vast majority of the elite runners, a

:59:25.:59:28.

cracking time at the London Marathon, and then running at the

:59:29.:59:32.

World Championships. What was that experience like? Yesterday was an

:59:33.:59:36.

amazing experience and one I will remember for a long time. My

:59:37.:59:40.

favourite ever race. The support was amazing and I want to say thank you

:59:41.:59:43.

to the crowds that came out to support us. What was it like for

:59:44.:59:48.

you, Calum? Fourth was a fantastic result? Yeah, but still a bit

:59:49.:59:56.

disappointed. I was hoping to maybe sneak a medal if everything went

:59:57.:00:00.

right and other people didn't perform on the day. It was a little

:00:01.:00:04.

bit frustrating being able to see third and second just up the road.

:00:05.:00:08.

But that's the way it is. Hopefully as the week goes on it will feel

:00:09.:00:13.

better. Josh spoke about the home crowd, what was the influence of

:00:14.:00:18.

that on you yesterday? I know you are understandably disappointed at

:00:19.:00:21.

missing out on a medal, but it did have an impact on the way you ran

:00:22.:00:26.

the race? Not the way I ran, but more towards the end when it was

:00:27.:00:31.

really hurting, the last seven K where the crowd really got behind

:00:32.:00:34.

you and helped push through the pain. It's such a long way. How are

:00:35.:00:42.

you both feeling this morning? You say you are disappointed, but how

:00:43.:00:47.

are you otherwise, Callum? It's pretty sore, my legs are pretty

:00:48.:00:51.

sore. It's pretty hard going up and down the stairs. Josh, the same for

:00:52.:00:57.

you? Definitely, the legs are sore, but I'm looking forward to some rest

:00:58.:01:02.

now. Josh, there you are in your British athletics top this morning.

:01:03.:01:08.

You are a self coached amateur living and training in rural Wales

:01:09.:01:12.

and without a sponsor at the moment. Surely the future looks bright for

:01:13.:01:18.

you at the moment? Yeah, I have enjoyed my experience here and I'm

:01:19.:01:21.

looking forward to building towards the Commonwealth Games next year and

:01:22.:01:26.

hopefully I will run well there. Callum, you have beaten some

:01:27.:01:30.

exceptional athletes in the past. The first British runner to beat Mo

:01:31.:01:34.

Farah in any race in seven years. What does that feel like? At the

:01:35.:01:41.

time I didn't really take it as a win, because Mo was clearly not at

:01:42.:01:48.

his best. I'd love to have a good go at him when he's at his best. But we

:01:49.:01:53.

will see what happens. That would be quite some race. Josh, you are

:01:54.:01:57.

playing a straight bat this morning, being very humble with the regards

:01:58.:02:01.

the fact that you are just a club runner who is now running in the

:02:02.:02:04.

World Championships. What will it be like when you go home? Will you get

:02:05.:02:13.

a hero's reception? I don't think so. But I'm looking forward to a bit

:02:14.:02:17.

of rest and let it all sink in. I didn't have time at the London

:02:18.:02:21.

Marathon to do that. But when I have some downtime I will look back over

:02:22.:02:24.

the last four months and realise I've come a long way in the last

:02:25.:02:29.

year. I don't think I have ever interviewed to people who are more

:02:30.:02:32.

modest than the pair of you. All those people who do marathons in

:02:33.:02:36.

four hours and are amazed. You were both incredible. Callum, what would

:02:37.:02:44.

be the best thing for you next? Right now? I don't really know! I

:02:45.:02:53.

don't quite know, there are too many options. What would make you happy,

:02:54.:03:03.

to win what would make you happy? I honestly don't know, I haven't

:03:04.:03:09.

thought that far forward. You are both so incredibly modest and

:03:10.:03:12.

congratulations to you both. Thank you for joining us. They are playing

:03:13.:03:19.

down their ability, but to remind you what happened in the London

:03:20.:03:23.

Marathon. Josh was a club runner. You have the elite runners at the

:03:24.:03:27.

front, then the club runners behind, and they are not expected to get

:03:28.:03:30.

close to the elite. There is expected to be at least 1015 minutes

:03:31.:03:35.

difference at the end. Josh ran past all of those. -- at least ten or 15

:03:36.:03:42.

minutes. He did really well in the London Marathon, and then finishes

:03:43.:03:46.

39th in the World Championships yesterday. Callum, very

:03:47.:03:53.

disappointed, but fourth place. 2:10.17. Extraordinary performance.

:03:54.:04:01.

Coverage from the World Championships continues tonight on

:04:02.:04:09.

BBC Two from 7:30pm. In a moment we will talk to a couple hoping to

:04:10.:04:13.

persuade us to swap chocolate cookies for ones made from crickets.

:04:14.:05:50.

That's it, I will be back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:05:51.:05:52.

at 1:30pm. Welsh cakes, sprinkled with cinnamon

:05:53.:06:02.

and marbled with mealworms. Burgers made with a blend of toasted

:06:03.:06:05.

crickets, grasshoppers, This isn't any old food,

:06:06.:06:07.

no this is Bug Grub food. To some, it might sound like food

:06:08.:06:15.

hell, but these are the dishes on offer from a couple who,

:06:16.:06:20.

in a new BBC 1 documentary want to change our perception

:06:21.:06:23.

about food made with insects. We'll speak to Andy Holcroft

:06:24.:06:27.

and Sarah Beynon in a minute, but first let's take a look

:06:28.:06:29.

at their documentary. To produce one burger,

:06:30.:06:34.

a cow has to drink over To get the same amount of protein

:06:35.:06:40.

value for a bug burger, So straightaway, just

:06:41.:06:44.

by choosing that burger, you are reducing the amount of water

:06:45.:06:55.

that is being consumed So, does anyone want

:06:56.:06:58.

to try something? After the dry bug nibbles,

:06:59.:07:03.

the audience are offered, What happened in there,

:07:04.:07:15.

I hated the bugs, but now I'm eating this,

:07:16.:07:21.

I quite like the bugs. The impact on the environment

:07:22.:07:24.

is just so much better. You are explaining their how much,

:07:25.:07:40.

if we all chose to eat bugs, this could have a really positive impact

:07:41.:07:45.

on the environment. Definitely, and apart from them tasting great and

:07:46.:07:48.

been very good for us to eat, they are much more sustainable to produce

:07:49.:07:51.

than conventional livestock. We're not trying to say to people not to

:07:52.:07:56.

eat meat, but just to think about how much we eat. We don't need to

:07:57.:08:00.

consume the amount that we do and we can't continue to do so. On the

:08:01.:08:07.

table this morning we have some cricket chip cookies, some roasted

:08:08.:08:12.

crickets, and some grounds down crickets as well. There is the ew

:08:13.:08:21.

factor. I ate one of those giant water beetles in the far east a few

:08:22.:08:24.

years ago. They are very nutritious, but there is the idea that you

:08:25.:08:27.

cracked off the head, the juices flow out and venue hollow it out.

:08:28.:08:32.

How do we get over that. -- and then new. It's all about pushing away

:08:33.:08:38.

from the novelty factor and trying to create a greater normalcy. We

:08:39.:08:45.

want to incorporate that high-quality protein, highly

:08:46.:08:50.

sustainable as well, into dishes. In these modern times, with food

:08:51.:08:54.

technology, we can reconstitute this protein in amazing ways. The first

:08:55.:08:59.

is this cricket powder. It's a way of fortifying conventional dishes.

:09:00.:09:02.

What can be easier than a cricket cookie? At the bug grub kitchen in

:09:03.:09:16.

Saint Davids many people are curious to try something. They will try a

:09:17.:09:19.

cookie, and next they'll come back and tuck into a nice big bug burger.

:09:20.:09:28.

Your specialism is knowing about the insects. You also have cows as well,

:09:29.:09:33.

looking after a herd of cattle and insects is quite different. It is,

:09:34.:09:37.

but it's the same basic concept. They are animals and we need to

:09:38.:09:43.

think about their welfare, how we farm them, and how we farm them

:09:44.:09:45.

efficiently. With a growing population we will have to produce

:09:46.:09:50.

more food. How will we do that and still leave space for wildlife at

:09:51.:09:55.

the same time? These ecosystems that we farm among text. If we can, bring

:09:56.:10:01.

farming in doors, create insect farms in doors, like you will see on

:10:02.:10:06.

the programme at 7:30pm. These are high efficiency farms with great

:10:07.:10:09.

welfare and we can produce plenty of protein to feed people. It makes

:10:10.:10:14.

sense from every angle. We have some crickets in the studio, this is

:10:15.:10:20.

another clip from the programme, cooking with crickets. I like to

:10:21.:10:24.

enhance the flavour of the Locust. What better than honey and a bit of

:10:25.:10:31.

Chile. Fry it in a bit of butter. The first thing you taste will be

:10:32.:10:35.

the nice honey flavour and then a bit of heat from the Cheyenne

:10:36.:10:39.

pepper. When you eat them a little bit you'll get the flavour of the

:10:40.:10:44.

Locust coming through. It's meaty, a bit like a prawn. They are

:10:45.:10:48.

effectively like a land pron. In Africa kids go to school with

:10:49.:10:53.

strings of locusts as their lunch. As a high-protein snack to eat on

:10:54.:10:58.

the fly, I think locusts are brilliant. Was that a little pun on

:10:59.:11:07.

purpose, on-the-fly? You make that interesting point about the cultural

:11:08.:11:12.

difference. We have an idea of what we want on a plate in this country,

:11:13.:11:15.

but going to other parts of the world it's a natural part of what

:11:16.:11:19.

you eat. 2 billion people eat insects around the world, not just

:11:20.:11:22.

because they have to do, but people understand how good they are for us,

:11:23.:11:27.

how nutritious and how readily available. Certain species, the ones

:11:28.:11:32.

we focus on using, are extremely sustainable. Sarah can probably

:11:33.:11:35.

enlighten us on particular ones, but they breed very quickly. Any

:11:36.:11:41.

information from the programme, it's not just the protein, they are

:11:42.:11:45.

better nutrients in insects, do you think? Very much so. It's similar

:11:46.:11:57.

protein to beef, weights by weight. And very good fats as well. These

:11:58.:12:02.

are little packages we can add to our diets. They taste amazing, these

:12:03.:12:07.

recipes, and it is key to have a top chef on board to turn them into

:12:08.:12:11.

dishes we are used to, that we want to eat and get away from the yuck

:12:12.:12:18.

factor. We are just being squeamish? We feel strongly about certain

:12:19.:12:22.

things, whether it's spiders or wasps or snakes. We don't quite know

:12:23.:12:26.

why we feel negative towards certain things. It's the same with eating

:12:27.:12:31.

insects. We are happy to eat a prawn which is very similar, it's an

:12:32.:12:36.

arthropod, something we have got our heads around. Sushi was seen as

:12:37.:12:42.

strange in the UK for a while but we are now happy to tuck in. It will

:12:43.:12:46.

take some time, but we investigate that in the programme, how can we

:12:47.:12:50.

get people to change their mind and will we see it become mainstream

:12:51.:12:56.

soon. How do you cook a wasp? For starters we don't really cook wasps.

:12:57.:13:03.

We would use the larvae. At that stage they are full of food, they

:13:04.:13:08.

are eating machines, eating a lot of food. The pupae metamorphosis eyes

:13:09.:13:17.

into the wasp. Would you put it into a cookie or a wasp? Saying a wasp,

:13:18.:13:24.

that is trying to use an insect we don't like. I wouldn't say... We

:13:25.:13:30.

wouldn't use them. If we were to get a load of them that were farmed

:13:31.:13:35.

sustainably and human grade then I would use them. We do need to leave

:13:36.:13:39.

the wasps, they control pests and look after crops. We should leave

:13:40.:13:40.

them alone! The Bug Grub Couple is on BBC One,

:13:41.:13:45.

tonight at 7:30pm. That's it from us for this morning,

:13:46.:13:51.

we'll be back tomorrow from six

:13:52.:13:55.