08/08/2017 Breakfast


08/08/2017

The latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC's Breakfast team.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 08/08/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

This is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:00:07.:00:09.

More than 40 maternity units in England closed their doors

:00:10.:00:12.

to new admissions at some point last year.

:00:13.:00:14.

The Government says it's misleading to blame staff shortages.

:00:15.:00:37.

Sickness at the World Athletics Championships.

:00:38.:00:47.

Yes, organisers here confirm a number of cases of gastroenteritis

:00:48.:00:50.

Heartbreak for Great Britain's Laura Muir,

:00:51.:01:05.

who just misses out on a medal in the 1,500 metres by less

:01:06.:01:08.

Doctors say a British woman who was shot while on holiday

:01:09.:01:13.

Eloise Dixon is reported to have been attacked when her family drove

:01:14.:01:18.

Tesco has announced it's scrapping 5p carrier bags altogether in favour

:01:19.:01:22.

of the more expensive "bags for life."

:01:23.:01:24.

I'll be asking if other retailers will do the same.

:01:25.:01:27.

Also this morning, the challenge of finding the right pair of shoes

:01:28.:01:30.

We'll be getting the latest advice on a problem troubling many parents

:01:31.:01:34.

And Carol has the weather. Good morning. Good morning from the roof

:01:35.:01:41.

of the Broadcasting House in London. Grey skies. Dry at the moment. Rain

:01:42.:01:48.

and showers. Heavy downpours in East Anglia and the south-east. For the

:01:49.:01:52.

rest of the UK, it is sunshine and showers. I will have more details in

:01:53.:02:01.

15 minutes. Thank you, Carol. We will start with our top story.

:02:02.:02:02.

More than 40% of maternity wards in England closed their doors

:02:03.:02:05.

to expectant mothers at least once in 2016,

:02:06.:02:07.

42 out of 96 trusts in England that responded to a Freedom

:02:08.:02:12.

of Information request said they'd shut maternity wards temporarily

:02:13.:02:14.

For some years, maternity units have Dominic Hughes, has more.

:02:15.:02:24.

For some years, maternity units have been struggling to recruit enough

:02:25.:02:29.

midwives. The Royal College of Midwives says there is a shortfall

:02:30.:02:34.

of 3500. Based on a Freedom of Information request, weather says a

:02:35.:02:38.

growing number of maternity units are closing doors to new mothers. In

:02:39.:02:44.

England, 136 NHS Trust offer maternity services. Last year, 42 of

:02:45.:02:48.

them closed their doors at least one. There are 382 separate

:02:49.:02:54.

locations where they close, up by 20% since 2014. It is quite right

:02:55.:02:59.

hospitals take these drastic decisions when they want to put the

:03:00.:03:03.

interests of the patient's first. I don't blame them. But it is

:03:04.:03:07.

happening so often and is increasing year on year significantly. That

:03:08.:03:13.

suggests an underlying problem. You cannot keep trying to run the NHS on

:03:14.:03:17.

a shoestring, putting them through the biggest financial squeeze in its

:03:18.:03:20.

history and not expect standards of care to slip. Some closures were

:03:21.:03:26.

relatively short-lived and others lasted more than 24 hours. A

:03:27.:03:29.

Department of Health spokesperson said they needed temporary closures

:03:30.:03:35.

to manage peaks in admissions and it was misleading to use these figures

:03:36.:03:39.

to indicate a shortage of staff because of the difficulties of

:03:40.:03:43.

planning for birth. The Royal College of Midwives agreed it was

:03:44.:03:46.

sometimes right to close the unit by doing so ornate regular basis showed

:03:47.:03:52.

underlying problems with the number of expert staff. -- on a regular.

:03:53.:03:55.

Dominic Hughes, BBC News. A British woman is recovering

:03:56.:03:58.

in hospital after being shot while on holiday with

:03:59.:04:04.

her family in Brazil. Eloise Dixon from South London

:04:05.:04:07.

was driving with her partner and three children when they took

:04:08.:04:09.

a wrong turn into an area controlled Our South America correspondent,

:04:10.:04:13.

Katy Watson, has more. And innocent family on a summer

:04:14.:04:20.

holiday. -- an. Eloise Dickson made one mistake which nearly cost them

:04:21.:04:25.

their lives. It all happened about 90 miles south of Rio de Janeiro. A

:04:26.:04:31.

part of Brazil that is popular with tourists and has some of the most

:04:32.:04:34.

beautiful beaches in the country. The family had rented a car, and

:04:35.:04:39.

according to local media, were looking for a place to find water

:04:40.:04:43.

when they made a wrong turn into a a slum controlled by drug traffickers.

:04:44.:04:52.

Eloise Dickson in the front passenger seat was shot twice. Taken

:04:53.:04:59.

to a local hospital, she underwent two hours of surgery. This could so

:05:00.:05:03.

easily have been fatal, but she survived. TRANSLATION: The bullet

:05:04.:05:08.

passed through the abdomen and fortunately did not hit big blood

:05:09.:05:13.

vessels, important organs. She was lucky. The favela is in Brazil are

:05:14.:05:19.

notorious. Some can be so dangerous that even police are not welcome.

:05:20.:05:23.

TRANSLATION: We have a community that we cannot enter, the press

:05:24.:05:27.

cannot enter, the public service cannot enter. That is inadmissible.

:05:28.:05:32.

We have to take urgent measures. According to doctors, she is

:05:33.:05:36.

recovering well from surgery. Awake and talking, she is expected to be

:05:37.:05:40.

transferred to hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro where she will

:05:41.:05:45.

continue her recovery. Katie Watson, BBC News.

:05:46.:05:47.

Scientists are warning that systems currently used to measure greenhouse

:05:48.:05:49.

gas emissions around the world are seriously flawed.

:05:50.:05:51.

A BBC investigation has found that not all gases which are produced

:05:52.:05:55.

A group of leading researchers in the field, have told

:05:56.:05:58.

the Counting Carbon programme, on BBC Radio four, that the issue

:05:59.:06:01.

poses a major threat to the Paris climate agreement.

:06:02.:06:09.

South African MPs will vote in secret later on a motion

:06:10.:06:11.

of no-confidence in President Jacob Zuma.

:06:12.:06:13.

The motion was tabled by the opposition in response

:06:14.:06:16.

to Mr Zuma's sacking of his highly respected Finance Minister

:06:17.:06:18.

earlier this year, a move which sparked nationwide protests.

:06:19.:06:21.

Mr Zuma has survived several previous votes of no-confidence

:06:22.:06:23.

The Welsh government has announced plans today,

:06:24.:06:32.

to invest over ?1 million in dental health.

:06:33.:06:34.

That means, 10,000 new NHS dental places will be created,

:06:35.:06:37.

in some of the most deprived parts of Wales.

:06:38.:06:39.

However, critics including The British Dental Association,

:06:40.:06:41.

say the Welsh government took more than ?6 million out of the Welsh

:06:42.:06:45.

dental budget in 2016, due to missed target,

:06:46.:06:47.

and today's investment does not replace that.

:06:48.:06:49.

For the last few years, finding an NHS dentist has been

:06:50.:06:53.

Patients have found it tough to enlist, whilst children have been

:06:54.:06:57.

waiting for long periods of time for orthodontic treatment

:06:58.:06:59.

In an effort to improve the situation, the Welsh government

:07:00.:07:04.

have announced today an initial investment of ?1.3 million worth,

:07:05.:07:07.

to create extra capacity for 10,000 new places.

:07:08.:07:10.

There will never be a time when resources are perfect.

:07:11.:07:15.

There are challenges across the whole country.

:07:16.:07:18.

I'm announcing specific funding today where we recognise

:07:19.:07:20.

there is an issue about more money going into parts of the country.

:07:21.:07:27.

Further funding has been allocated the specialist children's

:07:28.:07:29.

However, the British Dental Association insisted this investment

:07:30.:07:32.

They say it's just a quarter of the amount that's already been

:07:33.:07:36.

taken out of the dental budget in 2016 for not meeting targets.

:07:37.:07:44.

The Welsh government argued this is new funding,

:07:45.:07:46.

and they are disappointed the British Dental Association don't

:07:47.:07:49.

Recent reports show oral health amongst children was improving

:07:50.:08:01.

amongst Wales, but even the Secretary of Health admits

:08:02.:08:03.

the overall situation here is far from perfect.

:08:04.:08:06.

More details have emerged in the case of the British model

:08:07.:08:15.

who was allegedly drugged and held captive for nearly a week by a gang

:08:16.:08:19.

The lawyer representing Chloe Ayling,

:08:20.:08:21.

who's 20 and from South London, says she was told by her kidnappers

:08:22.:08:25.

that she would be sold as a slave in the Middle East.

:08:26.:08:28.

He says that she was acting under duress when she was seen shopping

:08:29.:08:32.

with her captor before she was freed.

:08:33.:08:34.

She was told that people were there watching her and ready to kill her

:08:35.:08:39.

if they tried anything. So she thought that the best idea was to go

:08:40.:08:45.

along with it and to, umm, be nice, in a way, to her captor. Because he

:08:46.:08:52.

told her that he wanted to release her.

:08:53.:09:04.

The organisers of the World Athletics Championships in London

:09:05.:09:07.

have revealed that a number of athletes have contracted

:09:08.:09:09.

Botswana's Isaac Makwala, who was one of the favorites

:09:10.:09:12.

for today's 400 metres final, was forced to withdraw from the 200

:09:13.:09:15.

German and Canadian athletes are also thought

:09:16.:09:18.

The organising committee says its working closely

:09:19.:09:21.

with Public Health England to manage the situation.

:09:22.:09:23.

Today is day five of the World Athletics Championships

:09:24.:09:26.

in London, but yesterday left many British fans disappointed

:09:27.:09:28.

after Laura Muir missed out on a medal in the 1,500 metre final.

:09:29.:09:32.

It was an extraordinary race and we will see more of that later.

:09:33.:09:35.

There were high hopes for hammer thrower, Sophie Hitchon,

:09:36.:09:38.

who ended up in tears after she ended seventh.

:09:39.:09:40.

Here are some of the highlights from our correspondent,

:09:41.:09:43.

Scotland's very own Laura Muir running for Great Britain. It was

:09:44.:09:50.

not the day British fans had hoped for. There were tears, but not of

:09:51.:09:55.

joy. Eight talented field and the odd were stacked against us. They

:09:56.:10:02.

had never had a woman in this race. They wanted to go out hard. With a

:10:03.:10:08.

look of determination etched across her face, the bronze medal was in

:10:09.:10:12.

her sight. Buy from nowhere, 800 metres specialist Katya fan speed to

:10:13.:10:22.

snatch the way at the end. Seven hundredths of a second separated her

:10:23.:10:26.

from her first global metal. I gave everything I could. It just went

:10:27.:10:33.

past me. I gave everything that I could. I guess considering what

:10:34.:10:39.

happened this year, I gave it all I could and that is all I can do.

:10:40.:10:43.

There was more heartbreak in the hammer cage. Sophie Hutchinson's

:10:44.:10:51.

heartbreak went nowhere. She never recovered. These images are becoming

:10:52.:10:56.

all too familiar at these championships. There was at least

:10:57.:11:00.

some British success to cheer. Daniel Talbot, the track favourites,

:11:01.:11:06.

went all the way in the first round of the 100m to make it to the

:11:07.:11:14.

semi-final. Hughes was one of the fastest losers. And return's second

:11:15.:11:19.

fastest 200 metre runner of all time also made it to the next round. With

:11:20.:11:24.

no Usain Bolt, there will be a new champion. Could Britain crashed the

:11:25.:11:31.

party? The pressure is ramping up. Expectations of fans are high,

:11:32.:11:36.

especially after what happened in Rio. Mo Farah's medal seems the only

:11:37.:11:42.

one for a target of six. They need to change, and soon. Natalie Pirks,

:11:43.:11:45.

BBC News, at the London Stadium. We will talk about that more this

:11:46.:11:52.

morning. Jessica is at the stadium this morning for us. Amazing. The

:11:53.:12:02.

pace is just staggering! It is hard for Steve, he is like come on, Laura

:12:03.:12:05.

Muir! But he has to be objective. After a four year stakeout

:12:06.:12:11.

by wildlife experts, footage of one of England's rarest

:12:12.:12:14.

animals, the Pine Mareten has finally been captured

:12:15.:12:17.

in the North York Moors. The sighting is the first living

:12:18.:12:19.

record in the area for around 35 years, and it's all thanks to

:12:20.:12:22.

The Yorkshire Pine Marten Project, run by NatureSpy and the Forestry

:12:23.:12:25.

Commission who set up various camera traps around the Moors

:12:26.:12:29.

in order to get a glimpse There is the little fellow. This is

:12:30.:12:39.

very rare footage. Oh, amazing. Excellent.

:12:40.:12:45.

Last night, a stunning lunar eclipse was visible in many parts of the

:12:46.:12:54.

world. We will have a look. They happen when the Earth passes between

:12:55.:12:57.

the sun and the moon, casting a shadow. This one can be seen on many

:12:58.:13:02.

continents, though some countries could only see part of it. A second

:13:03.:13:06.

full eclipse will have another 24th of August in North America, the

:13:07.:13:10.

first of its kind in nearly a century. That first one was from

:13:11.:13:17.

Greece. Amazing. Wonderful. Good morning. Welcome back. I know you

:13:18.:13:24.

were here last week and things, but... Talking about beautiful

:13:25.:13:27.

things in the sky, but at this gorgeous picture of a RAF Tornado

:13:28.:13:37.

flying through a rainbow. You would not think it is possible. That looks

:13:38.:13:49.

like Guardians of the Galaxy. Surely there is no filter on that. Don't be

:13:50.:13:53.

such a cynic. The newspapers. The Daily Telegraph. Interesting. We had

:13:54.:13:56.

the complete opposite of this last week. According to the former GCHQ

:13:57.:14:01.

boss, he is saying children must get digital skills to keep ahead of

:14:02.:14:07.

Britain's rivals. Parents should encourage their children to spend

:14:08.:14:10.

more time on line to improve cyber skills and save the country rather

:14:11.:14:17.

than mooching around on the streets. That is an interesting point of

:14:18.:14:21.

view. Also they are talking about this British mother who was shot in

:14:22.:14:26.

Rio after taking a wrong turn and ending up in a favela. That was a

:14:27.:14:32.

dangerous situation. According to experts, she is lucky to be alive.

:14:33.:14:37.

She was shot twice and it went around her stomach and did not hit

:14:38.:14:41.

any major organ. Amazing. The Times this morning. Tesco will stop

:14:42.:14:46.

selling disposable plastic bags. You will talk about this this morning.

:14:47.:14:54.

The picture is of Roman Abramovich who were separating from his wife.

:14:55.:15:03.

Zukova, I think is her name. There is talk about the value of the

:15:04.:15:07.

settlement. It could be ?7 billion. Wow! I used to call him Abramovich,

:15:08.:15:24.

but it is pronounced different, according to a friend who knows.

:15:25.:15:29.

Lots of details on the Daily Mirror about this model who says she was

:15:30.:15:36.

kidnapped, saying the captor slept in the same bed as her. She is now

:15:37.:15:44.

back in the UK after six days. The front page of the Sun, lots of

:15:45.:15:48.

fallout over Channel 4 broadcasting these tapes of Diana talking about

:15:49.:15:53.

Prince Charles. What have you got, Steph? Holidays. I really like every

:15:54.:15:58.

year looking at where people are going and what is on the up and what

:15:59.:16:03.

is on the down. We love cruises. I talked about this not long ago. We

:16:04.:16:08.

are going on four times as many as 20 years ago but it's interesting

:16:09.:16:12.

the countries on the up in of ones we are visiting. Dubai, a lot of

:16:13.:16:18.

people going to Dubai. Poland, Croatia, Iceland, Romania. On the

:16:19.:16:24.

wane, Turkey, Tunisia, Egypt, Kenya, nobody will be shocked given what's

:16:25.:16:27.

happened there recently but interesting to see more people going

:16:28.:16:31.

on cruises. I don't know about cruises, being stuck on a boat with

:16:32.:16:36.

the same people for that long, I think I would go a bit loopy! I'm

:16:37.:16:40.

with you on that! I just spent a week on a boat and it was all white.

:16:41.:16:46.

Everyone get all right? Year. A very small boat and it went all right --

:16:47.:16:50.

all right -- year. -- yeah. I have signed you up, you are in!

:16:51.:17:05.

Would you like to see a big plant? I love this story. Julia and the

:17:06.:17:10.

Beanstalk. You've often heard these stories about plants that lay

:17:11.:17:15.

dormant for many years and this is an Agaba eight Americana, planted 18

:17:16.:17:21.

years ago by the previous owners in this lady's Garden. She once put a

:17:22.:17:28.

blanket over it in a harsh winter, she never watered it, then it grew

:17:29.:17:34.

30 foot in four weeks. You can see houses next to it. She is down

:17:35.:17:40.

there. Tiny little lady. Then it's a massive plant. Is surely a Borrower?

:17:41.:17:46.

She isn't, she is average size I believe. That's amazing! Let's all

:17:47.:17:50.

go on holiday, Steph! You're watching

:17:51.:17:52.

Breakfast from BBC News. A number of athletes competing

:17:53.:17:54.

at the World Championships in London More than 40 maternity wards

:17:55.:17:59.

in England closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once

:18:00.:18:02.

last year according to data obtained Carol is out on the roof of our

:18:03.:18:20.

London newsroom this morning to have a look at the weather. Not looking

:18:21.:18:22.

fantastic as yet? No, for some it's not looking

:18:23.:18:29.

fantastic unless you like the rain because there's the chance of heavy

:18:30.:18:34.

downpours today, especially in East Anglia and south-east England.

:18:35.:18:39.

There's also showers in the forecast, some of those will be

:18:40.:18:42.

heavy and thundery. If we take a look at the whole of the UK at 9am

:18:43.:18:47.

running to the afternoon, we can see where we've got rain in a curl

:18:48.:18:51.

coming in across parts of England and down to the south coast. In the

:18:52.:18:55.

centre of that there's a lot of cloud, brightening up for a bit, but

:18:56.:19:00.

raining quite a bit too. Out to the west, some showers, and also in the

:19:01.:19:04.

north, but in between those we could see sunshine but even some of those

:19:05.:19:08.

could be heavy and possibly thundery. 4pm in Scotland, it's the

:19:09.:19:12.

mix of sunshine and showers and again some of the showers will be

:19:13.:19:17.

thundery but not all of them. As we come into north-west England,

:19:18.:19:20.

similar scenario, sunshine and showers but north north-east England

:19:21.:19:25.

heading to the Pennines and East Anglia, the south-east, the Midlands

:19:26.:19:28.

and the south coast, that's where we've got the rain and we could see

:19:29.:19:32.

large rainfall totals especially in Norfolk and Suffolk in a short

:19:33.:19:36.

period. There could be some surface water issues. As we go further west

:19:37.:19:40.

in the direction of south-west England and Wales, you can see again

:19:41.:19:44.

we're looking at the mixture of sunshine and showers, some of those

:19:45.:19:48.

are likely to be heavy and thundery, especially across Wales. As we go

:19:49.:19:52.

across the Irish Sea into Northern Ireland again we're looking at the

:19:53.:19:55.

mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. As we head through the

:19:56.:20:00.

course of the evening we will still have some of that rain sweeping in

:20:01.:20:03.

across parts of northern England, through the Midlands and down

:20:04.:20:06.

towards Dorset for example and heading over to Somerset as well.

:20:07.:20:10.

Temperature wise we're looking at ten to 13. Those are indicative of

:20:11.:20:15.

towns and cities. In rural areas in the north it will feel quite chilly.

:20:16.:20:19.

That's how we start the day tomorrow, with that arm of rain,

:20:20.:20:23.

that big curl, and if anything it will pull back to the south-east.

:20:24.:20:28.

Again there's the chance of some torrential downpours, particularly

:20:29.:20:31.

across East Anglia and the south-east, again leading to the

:20:32.:20:35.

risk of issues with surface water flooding. But moved to the west and

:20:36.:20:40.

the north, brighter skies with some sunshine with fewer showers. Them

:20:41.:20:43.

for Thursday we've got the dregs of that rain across the south-east,

:20:44.:20:47.

that will eventually clear awake and for most of us we're looking at a

:20:48.:20:51.

dry day and make the most of it, because if you look to the

:20:52.:20:54.

north-west of Scotland there's something else waiting in the winds

:20:55.:21:01.

-- clear awake. If you're in East Anglia or the south-east, make sure

:21:02.:21:05.

you have a sturdy brolly at hand because you're going to need it.

:21:06.:21:08.

I'm going to put the normal brolly away and bring out the sturdy one! I

:21:09.:21:14.

don't think I have any sturdy ones! Teenagers across Scotland will be

:21:15.:21:18.

waking to their Highers results this morning, the Scottish

:21:19.:21:21.

equivalent of A-levels. The country has traditionally had

:21:22.:21:22.

a strong education system, but in recent years

:21:23.:21:25.

standards have declined. As the Scottish Government admits

:21:26.:21:27.

things need to improve, John Maguire has been to find out

:21:28.:21:29.

what's being done to improve Tonight these youngsters are

:21:30.:21:39.

practising their stop frame animation skills. Who knows, a

:21:40.:21:44.

future macro three all Wallace and Gromit might be created right here

:21:45.:21:50.

in Cambuslang on the outskirts of Glasgow -- Morph. This youth cloud,

:21:51.:21:54.

one of nine centres called universal connections, are funded by south

:21:55.:21:59.

Lanarkshire council's budget. Qualifications here are offered that

:22:00.:22:05.

aren't offered in other schools. There's a Duke of Edinburgh Awards

:22:06.:22:09.

and Rebecca has been training for her Gold expedition. This morning

:22:10.:22:13.

she is receiving the results of her Highers and she believes the school

:22:14.:22:16.

has prepared her well for the future. Teachers are there to

:22:17.:22:23.

prepare you for what you need so you just have to aim for that. At the

:22:24.:22:28.

same time some subjects like PSE, they can get you ready for going out

:22:29.:22:34.

in the world. Her mum, Cheryl, is a member of the national parent Forum

:22:35.:22:38.

and has a keen interest in Scottish education. She says children can

:22:39.:22:44.

succeed if they're supported. I appreciate education is going

:22:45.:22:47.

through so many changes, but it's now about narrowing it and working

:22:48.:22:51.

with the parents of the schools and local authorities and government to

:22:52.:22:54.

bring everyone together to make it more attainable. But recent years

:22:55.:22:58.

have seen standards decline. So what's been going on? There's

:22:59.:23:05.

certainly no single cause. I think the introduction of Scotland's

:23:06.:23:09.

national curriculum, which has been going on for some 13 years now, has

:23:10.:23:15.

been badly organised and has led to a number of serious adverse

:23:16.:23:23.

consequences, not least of them being excessive teacher workload and

:23:24.:23:27.

loss of morale as a result of that. The Deputy First Minister John

:23:28.:23:31.

Sweeney is in charge of education. Today he's visiting a community

:23:32.:23:34.

enterprise in Kilmarnock that works with everyone from the elderly, ex-

:23:35.:23:39.

prisoners to children struggling at school. He accepts improvements need

:23:40.:23:45.

to be made, he wants children from poorer backgrounds to do better and

:23:46.:23:49.

he believes schools and teachers are the best people to affect change.

:23:50.:23:55.

It's at the heart of the reforms I want to take into the curriculum, to

:23:56.:23:58.

make sure a generation of young people today can have access to the

:23:59.:24:02.

best quality of education and the best opportunities available to

:24:03.:24:06.

them. We want to make sure we do that in consort with the education

:24:07.:24:11.

profession to make sure that is able to be deployed in every single

:24:12.:24:14.

school, the length and Brett Favre Scotland. And the main teaching

:24:15.:24:17.

union wants more support for staff -- length and breadth. Teachers need

:24:18.:24:24.

to spend their time working on the improvement of the learning of young

:24:25.:24:27.

people. We need more than just promises in these areas, weenie

:24:28.:24:31.

actually need action from government and educational agencies -- we

:24:32.:24:35.

actually need. At the youth cloud the band is in full swing and full

:24:36.:24:40.

volume as teenagers across Scotland tear open envelopes or are informed

:24:41.:24:44.

via text, anxious to discover how they've done. This morning was past

:24:45.:24:48.

results aren't just important to them but also to the government and

:24:49.:24:52.

to the country. John Maguire, BBC News.

:24:53.:24:58.

I thought there was going to be another one! We will be speaking to

:24:59.:25:07.

a student in that piece live later on to see how they're doing. If

:25:08.:25:11.

you're getting your results this morning then good luck!

:25:12.:25:12.

to buy your first pair of school shoes?

:25:13.:25:19.

Well, it seems these days, more than half of parents don't

:25:20.:25:23.

get their children properly measured.

:25:24.:25:24.

In the next half-hour we'll find out why that could mean

:25:25.:25:27.

Did you know that you're meant to wait until the end of the summer to

:25:28.:25:35.

buy shoes? I did not know this and this could explain a lot. Because

:25:36.:25:41.

your feet grow more because... This is where I have been going wrong.

:25:42.:25:46.

You should wait right before school to buy school shoes. I am so

:25:47.:25:50.

disorganised! I normally do buy them late but I didn't know that was the

:25:51.:25:53.

reason! Time Now, though, it's back

:25:54.:29:12.

to Louise and Dan. This is Breakfast with

:29:13.:29:15.

Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. We'll bring you all the latest news

:29:16.:29:29.

and sport in a moment. It's been revealed contaminated eggs

:29:30.:29:32.

from Europe have been distributed We'll be asking the Food Standards

:29:33.:29:36.

Agency how concerned we should be. Bucket and spade beach holidays

:29:37.:29:45.

are booming in foreign travel. At 7:50, Steph will be here to

:29:46.:29:55.

explain how holiday habits have changed. I was struggling to read

:29:56.:30:07.

the time there. I felt like we needed a fresh start, so, here I am.

:30:08.:30:11.

And from being confirmed as the next Dr Who, to "Doctor Who?"

:30:12.:30:14.

After 8:30, we'll find out about actress Jodie Whittaker's

:30:15.:30:16.

new role in the BBC thriller, where she's definitely not

:30:17.:30:19.

I have to apologise for perhaps the worst reading of the time in BBC

:30:20.:30:32.

history. All that is still to come. But now, a summary of this morning's

:30:33.:30:33.

main news. More than 40% of maternity wards

:30:34.:30:34.

in England closed their doors to expectant mothers

:30:35.:30:37.

at least once in 2016, 42 out of 96 trusts in England that

:30:38.:30:39.

responded to a Freedom of Information request said they'd

:30:40.:30:44.

shut maternity wards temporarily Our health correspondent,

:30:45.:30:46.

Dominic Hughes, has more. For some years, maternity units

:30:47.:31:00.

have been struggling The Royal College of Midwives says

:31:01.:31:03.

there's a shortfall of around 3,500. Now, based on a Freedom

:31:04.:31:14.

of Information request, Labour says a growing number

:31:15.:31:17.

of maternity units are closing doors In England, 136 NHS Trusts

:31:18.:31:20.

offer maternity services. Last year, 42 of them

:31:21.:31:26.

closed their doors to new admissions There were 382 separate locations

:31:27.:31:30.

where units were closed, I think it is quite right hospitals

:31:31.:31:35.

take these drastic decisions when they want to put the interests

:31:36.:31:41.

of the patient's safety first. But the fact it is happening

:31:42.:31:44.

so often and is increasing year on year significantly suggests

:31:45.:31:52.

an underlying problem. You cannot keep trying to run

:31:53.:31:55.

the NHS on a shoestring, putting them through the biggest

:31:56.:32:00.

financial squeeze in its history, and not expect standards

:32:01.:32:02.

of care to slip. Some closures were relatively

:32:03.:32:05.

short-lived but others lasted more A Department of Health spokesperson

:32:06.:32:08.

said that Trusts need to use temporary closures to manage peaks

:32:09.:32:16.

in admissions and it was misleading to use these

:32:17.:32:19.

figures to indicate a shortage of staff because of the difficulties

:32:20.:32:21.

around planning for birth. The Royal College of Midwives agreed

:32:22.:32:24.

it was sometimes right to close a unit, but that doing

:32:25.:32:28.

so on a regular basis showed underlying problems

:32:29.:32:31.

with the number of expert staff. After 8am, we'll be speaking to the

:32:32.:32:40.

Royal College of Midwives about the closures.

:32:41.:32:40.

A British woman is being treated in hospital after being shot

:32:41.:32:43.

while on holiday with her family in Brazil.

:32:44.:32:45.

Eloise Dixon from South London was driving with her partner

:32:46.:32:48.

and three children when they took a wrong turn into an area controlled

:32:49.:32:51.

She was shot twice and the medics treating her say she's lucky

:32:52.:32:56.

More details have emerged in the case of the British model

:32:57.:33:00.

who was allegedly drugged and held captive for nearly a week

:33:01.:33:03.

The lawyer representing Chloe Ayling, who's 20

:33:04.:33:06.

and from South London, says she was told by her kidnappers

:33:07.:33:09.

that she would be sold as a slave in the Middle East.

:33:10.:33:13.

He explained that she was acting under duress when she was seen

:33:14.:33:16.

shopping with her captor before she was freed.

:33:17.:33:26.

Scientists are warning that systems currently used to measure greenhouse

:33:27.:33:28.

gas emissions around the world are seriously flawed.

:33:29.:33:30.

A BBC investigation has found that not all gases which are produced

:33:31.:33:34.

A group of leading researchers in the field, have told

:33:35.:33:37.

the Counting Carbon programme on BBC Radio4 that the issue poses a major

:33:38.:33:41.

threat to the Paris climate agreement.

:33:42.:33:44.

South African MPs will vote in secret later on a motion

:33:45.:33:47.

of no-confidence in President Jacob Zuma.

:33:48.:33:48.

The motion was tabled by the opposition in response

:33:49.:33:51.

to Mr Zuma's sacking of his highly respected Finance Minister

:33:52.:33:54.

earlier this year, a move which sparked nationwide protests.

:33:55.:33:56.

Mr Zuma has survived several previous votes of no-confidence

:33:57.:33:59.

A victim of the 9/11 attack in New York City has been identified 16

:34:00.:34:24.

years on. The man's identity was uncovered when DNA was retested with

:34:25.:34:26.

new technology. The Welsh government has announced

:34:27.:34:32.

plans to invest more than ?1 million It says the move will create 10,000

:34:33.:34:35.

new NHS dental places, including in some of the most

:34:36.:34:39.

deprived parts of Wales. However, critics, including

:34:40.:34:42.

The British Dental Association, say the Welsh government took more

:34:43.:34:43.

than ?6 million out of the Welsh dental budget last year

:34:44.:34:47.

and the investment announced today After a four-year stakeout

:34:48.:34:49.

by wildlife experts, footage of one of England's rarest

:34:50.:34:53.

animals, the pine mareten, has finally been captured

:34:54.:34:56.

in the North York Moors. The sighting is the first

:34:57.:34:58.

in the area for more than 30 years. The Yorkshire Pine Marten Project

:34:59.:35:02.

managed to capture the footage after setting up camera

:35:03.:35:05.

traps around the Moors. There it is. I am speaking quietly

:35:06.:35:13.

because I don't want to scare it but it is on the television... A job in

:35:14.:35:28.

spring watch beckons, surely. Last night, a stunning lunar eclipse

:35:29.:35:29.

was visible in many parts Eclipses happen when the Earth

:35:30.:35:32.

passes between the sun and the moon, This one could be viewed

:35:33.:35:36.

on several continents, although many countries

:35:37.:35:39.

could only see part of it. A second full eclipse will occur

:35:40.:35:41.

on the 21st of August over North America, the first of its kind

:35:42.:35:44.

in nearly a century. The pictures are stunning, aren't

:35:45.:35:56.

they? Shall we talk about the athletics again?

:35:57.:35:57.

Last night saw one of the most dramatic races

:35:58.:35:59.

of the World Athletics Championships so far as Laura Muir missed out

:36:00.:36:02.

on a medal in the 1,500 meters by the smallest of margins.

:36:03.:36:06.

Jessica is at the London Stadium for us this morning.

:36:07.:36:14.

She is in lane number five. Good morning. Good morning. As you said,

:36:15.:36:23.

one of the best races I have ever seen. That is exactly why we love

:36:24.:36:31.

elite sport. I am standing on the finish line just to highlight the

:36:32.:36:34.

fine margins between winning a medal and missing out. Laura Muir was

:36:35.:36:40.

just, just beaten, but it was a brave run by the 20 foyer rolled. It

:36:41.:36:45.

was a tough field. It included the Olympic champion. She was in the mix

:36:46.:36:51.

right until the end but was just hit on the line by South Africa's Kasta

:36:52.:36:56.

Semenya. I gave it everything I could. Just

:36:57.:37:08.

that last 50 metres I was tied up. I gave everything that I could.

:37:09.:37:13.

Considering what has happened this year, I gave it all I could and that

:37:14.:37:15.

is all I can do. Disappointment, too,

:37:16.:37:17.

for the Olympic bronze medallist, Sophie Hitchon, she couldn't quite

:37:18.:37:19.

match her achievements Her best effort of 72.32

:37:20.:37:21.

in the hammer final wasn't enough for a medal as she finished

:37:22.:37:25.

in seventh place. Yeah, I just, umm... I couldn't

:37:26.:37:39.

quite find the rhythm that I had in qualification. I was disappointed. I

:37:40.:37:44.

did not produce it tonight, yeah... Better news for team

:37:45.:37:47.

captain Eilidh Doyle, was one of two British women

:37:48.:37:49.

who made it into the semi finals There was a great performance

:37:50.:37:53.

by Britain's Danny Talbot He qualified for the semi-finals,

:37:54.:38:09.

with a lifetime best of 20.16 seconds, finishing just behind

:38:10.:38:13.

the reigning olympic champion Fellow Britsons, Zharnel Hughes

:38:14.:38:15.

and Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake, We were expecting to see the fastest

:38:16.:38:19.

man in the world over 200 metres, Botswana's Isaac Makwala,

:38:20.:38:24.

run last night. But he was absent from his heat

:38:25.:38:26.

and it later emerged he was one of a number of athletes suffering

:38:27.:38:29.

from gastroenteritis at one And now a round-up of the rest of

:38:30.:38:32.

the day's sport. Moeen Ali was England's hero once

:38:33.:38:41.

again, as he and his teammates secured a 3-1 series

:38:42.:38:44.

win over South Africa. Ali took 25 wickets over

:38:45.:38:46.

the course of the series. He helped England claim a 177-run

:38:47.:38:49.

victory in the fourth test, and also ensured that the team

:38:50.:38:52.

climbs to third in the International Cricket Council's Test

:38:53.:38:56.

rankings, above Australia. It's a first home Test series win

:38:57.:38:57.

against South Africa since 1998. And a first for Joe Root

:38:58.:39:00.

as England captain. It is great to see Moeen Ali in

:39:01.:39:14.

particular step up and put in some unbelievable performances to win

:39:15.:39:21.

games for us. Hopefully that can be something that is repeated on a

:39:22.:39:25.

number of occasions in the future. But I think throughout the whole

:39:26.:39:29.

series the squad has performed very well.

:39:30.:39:30.

Could Gareth Bale be heading back to the Premier League?

:39:31.:39:32.

Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho says he will "fight

:39:33.:39:35.

with other coaches" to sign the 28-year-old Welshman.

:39:36.:39:37.

The two clubs play each other tonight in the Uefa Super Cup in

:39:38.:39:41.

Bale joined the Spanish champions from Tottenham in 2013,

:39:42.:39:43.

for a then-world record fee of ?85 million, and has since won

:39:44.:39:47.

Mourinho says he'll be waiting for Bale if he doesn't figure

:39:48.:39:51.

No morning sessions today at the World Athletics Championships. But

:39:52.:40:15.

Kyle Langford is going on the 800 metre final. His parents owned a

:40:16.:40:22.

fish and chip shop, interestingly, and say if he wasn't going to be and

:40:23.:40:30.

could be a potato peeler in the family business. -- an athlete. I

:40:31.:40:37.

find peeling potatoes very therapeutic. That is one of my pet

:40:38.:40:46.

hates. Perfect. There we go, dinner's on!

:40:47.:40:46.

As we have been hearing, lots of action on the track

:40:47.:40:49.

and field at the World Athletics Championships and lots more to come.

:40:50.:40:52.

Britain's Kyle Langford finished second in the semi-final to take an

:40:53.:41:06.

automatic one slot. He is just 21 and got the junior title in 2014.

:41:07.:41:14.

This is the 400 metre Olympic champion. He cruised into the 400

:41:15.:41:20.

metre final and is expected to go further. He is hoping to do the 200

:41:21.:41:28.

and 400 metre double. Next up, the European champion from 2014, a

:41:29.:41:31.

two-time Commonwealth silver-medallist. She was also voted

:41:32.:41:37.

the British team champion. She says she is in good shape coming into the

:41:38.:41:43.

event. She races at 835 tonight. This Frenchman won the Olympic title

:41:44.:41:53.

here in 2012. He is hoping to win again. He only started training in

:41:54.:41:57.

May this year after a foot injury disqualified him from the final. If

:41:58.:42:01.

you want to keep up with the day's action, tune in to BBC Two from

:42:02.:42:05.

6:30pm to 10:30pm tonight. That is a bit of a rave tune, that,

:42:06.:42:26.

isn't it? Might have to get my whistle out. Waking everyone up. The

:42:27.:42:28.

main stories. More than 40% of maternity wards

:42:29.:42:28.

in England closed their doors to expectant mothers

:42:29.:42:31.

at least once in 2016, A number of athletes competing at

:42:32.:42:42.

the World Championships in London have fallen ill with suspected

:42:43.:42:50.

gastroenteritis. We have already had a sturdy umbrella alert from Carol.

:42:51.:42:57.

What else? Good morning. It may be dry for you now, but rain and

:42:58.:43:02.

showers are in the forecast. In London, it is quite thick. The cloud

:43:03.:43:09.

is breaking in places. Rain later on, but sunshine first of all. It

:43:10.:43:15.

will be heavy. Some of them will be thundery. Today, a chance of some

:43:16.:43:20.

downpours. Especially so across East Anglia and also south-east England.

:43:21.:43:24.

It may well lead to some surface water issues. Something to consider.

:43:25.:43:29.

This morning, a lot of dry weather around as well. Sunshine to start

:43:30.:43:33.

the day and showers in the north and west. Also a bit of rain rotating

:43:34.:43:39.

around an area of low pressure. It will continue to be with us through

:43:40.:43:42.

the day and temperatures rise bringing with it downpours with

:43:43.:43:47.

showers in the south-east. Sunshine and showers in Scotland this

:43:48.:43:52.

afternoon. Some could be heavy as well. North-east England, sunshine

:43:53.:43:56.

and showers. North-east England is where we start to run into the rain

:43:57.:44:00.

to be some will be heavy and thundery. That extends through the

:44:01.:44:06.

Pennines, East Anglia, the south-east, Kent, in the direction

:44:07.:44:11.

of the Isle of Wight. Keep that in mind. As we go further west, what we

:44:12.:44:18.

are looking at is again a mix of sunshine and showers. The West

:44:19.:44:21.

Country, Wales, some showers heavy, some will be thundery. Temperatures

:44:22.:44:27.

will come down under those. Northern Ireland, sunshine and showers. Not

:44:28.:44:32.

as heavy. Also not as frequent as in some parts of the UK. As we go to

:44:33.:44:37.

the evening and overnight, where we have the rain today it will drift

:44:38.:44:42.

further north. Again, we have it in north-east England heading down to

:44:43.:44:46.

the Midlands, east Wales, Dorset, Somerset as well. Temperature-wise,

:44:47.:44:51.

looking at 10- 15 in towns and cities. In rural areas, especially

:44:52.:44:56.

in the north of the country, it will feel quite chilly. So, we start

:44:57.:45:00.

tomorrow again with this rain moving around an area of low pressure

:45:01.:45:04.

driving our weather. And through the course of the day it drags it down

:45:05.:45:08.

once again towards the south-east. Once again tomorrow there is the

:45:09.:45:13.

risk of downpours across East Anglia and south-east England which, again,

:45:14.:45:16.

may well lead to surface water issues. Moving away from this area

:45:17.:45:21.

and for the rest of the UK we are looking at dry conditions with some

:45:22.:45:25.

sunshine. By the time we get to Thursday, we have the last of the

:45:26.:45:29.

rain in the south-east. That eventually will pull away leaving

:45:30.:45:33.

many of us with a dry day with sunny spells. However, take a look at what

:45:34.:45:37.

is happening in north-west Scotland. A weather front not too far away.

:45:38.:45:43.

That is coming our way as well. In the next few days, especially across

:45:44.:45:46.

south-east England and East Anglia, it is going to be rather wet.

:45:47.:46:00.

The 5p carrier bag charge was introduced in 2015,

:46:01.:46:03.

but now one major supermarket is taking it a step further

:46:04.:46:06.

by scrapping single use bags altogether.

:46:07.:46:08.

Prices probably going up? You are right. Tesco have announced this is.

:46:09.:46:22.

From the end of this month Tesco will stop the sale

:46:23.:46:25.

Shoppers will have to bring their own or buy a bag

:46:26.:46:29.

We've had the 5p charge for single use carrier bags in England

:46:30.:46:33.

When it first came in obviously it was a bit of a shock because we're

:46:34.:46:44.

not used to paying for bags but I really think, a lot of the

:46:45.:46:48.

supermarkets put their money into good causes rather than keep it for

:46:49.:46:55.

themselves. If I have to pay the MP it's my own fault so I don't mind,

:46:56.:47:00.

it's reasonable, yeah. If you can remember to take the bag, that's the

:47:01.:47:03.

biggest problem. I've got one in the car now.

:47:04.:47:04.

James Lowman is the chief executive of the Association

:47:05.:47:07.

of Convenience Stores, which has over 30,000 members.

:47:08.:47:11.

Good morning. Good morning. What are your thoughts? The carrier bag

:47:12.:47:18.

charge has been released accessible, it's seen a reduction in usage of

:47:19.:47:24.

plastic bags. As Bagai said on the film, retailers can put that towards

:47:25.:47:29.

local good causes -- as that guy. When it came in in England and Wales

:47:30.:47:36.

all retailers were covered and smaller retailers had to charge.

:47:37.:47:40.

Smaller businesses are example from the charge. A third choose to do it

:47:41.:47:45.

voluntarily so we think it would be easier for everyone covered by the

:47:46.:47:48.

charge so everyone knew what was going to happen when they turn up.

:47:49.:47:54.

Why is there a difference in terms of a lot of your members not having

:47:55.:47:59.

to charge? There's an exemption that has been brought in when the

:48:00.:48:02.

legislation came in in England, other parts of the UK the charging

:48:03.:48:07.

covers everyone. It would be simpler for everyone and it would reduce

:48:08.:48:12.

carrier bag use, in Wales and we talked to members there, they say

:48:13.:48:16.

it's been good, they've reduced the number of bags they are using and

:48:17.:48:20.

they are generating money to give to local good causes and that works

:48:21.:48:24.

well. Usually we often ask for exemptions for small businesses, in

:48:25.:48:28.

this case we are asking for the opposite. How has it gone down with

:48:29.:48:32.

customers? We heard from a couple of shoppers there, what are people

:48:33.:48:36.

telling your members? Generally well. The vast majority like the

:48:37.:48:43.

charges being in place. As we heard there, people get used to carrying a

:48:44.:48:47.

bag with them when they go shopping. We were concerned about

:48:48.:48:50.

inconvenience stores because often it's an unplanned and people might

:48:51.:48:54.

not remember to bring bags, but in reality talking to members in Wales

:48:55.:48:58.

especially they say that hasn't been a problem and they like having the

:48:59.:49:02.

opportunity to charge and give the money to local causes and reduce

:49:03.:49:06.

plastic use. Why do you think now Tesco think we should move to the

:49:07.:49:10.

10p carrier bags? They are saying they are bags for life but there's

:49:11.:49:15.

still a lot of people that won't use them for life. The point of bags for

:49:16.:49:19.

life is you can take them back and have them replaced. Tesco is simply

:49:20.:49:25.

saying they have still got a lot of 5p bags they are charging for and

:49:26.:49:29.

giving away and the purpose of the policy from the government is to

:49:30.:49:33.

reduce plastic bag usage, single use usage, so it is quite brave for them

:49:34.:49:37.

to go this extra step, that's great, the government could do more by

:49:38.:49:40.

bringing small businesses in as well. Will we see more supermarkets

:49:41.:49:46.

doing that? Possibly, many of our members use bags for life and try to

:49:47.:49:50.

make a feature of that, some have charges above 5p for that reason for

:49:51.:49:55.

longer lasting bags so we will see changes I think but fundamentally we

:49:56.:49:59.

need to get the clarity and consistency across all retailers of

:50:00.:50:04.

the 5p bag charge. We've seen from the figures plastic bag usage for

:50:05.:50:09.

them, great news, environmental groups very happy about that but

:50:10.:50:12.

what about the money made from selling them, what does it go into?

:50:13.:50:16.

It was mentioned briefly by yourself and one of our vox pops? It will be

:50:17.:50:23.

used for a local school or local charities. In Wales there's been an

:50:24.:50:27.

emphasis on environmental charities. When we talk to members and we ask

:50:28.:50:33.

if they voluntarily charge, a third of them do so, if they voluntarily

:50:34.:50:37.

charge, or in Wales if you are part of the compulsory charge, where does

:50:38.:50:41.

the money go, it is normally local good causes and it's a great focal

:50:42.:50:45.

point for people to give their extra support to local causes. Are you one

:50:46.:50:50.

of those people like me who has bags all over the house ready to take to

:50:51.:50:54.

the shops? I always have a bag in my bag I take to work. People are now

:50:55.:51:02.

prepared in that way and they have got used to it, which is great.

:51:03.:51:05.

James, thanks for your time. We've had lots of messages? Elaine says

:51:06.:51:13.

I've I would be more inclined to buy if they were black. I object to the

:51:14.:51:18.

advertisement. This woman says I do one online shop each week and my

:51:19.:51:22.

choices to help the delivery guy load six crates of individual

:51:23.:51:27.

groceries, taking ten minutes, rather than pay for plastic bags so

:51:28.:51:31.

he can dump them in the kitchen. It depends on how quickly Tesco want

:51:32.:51:34.

their drivers to deliver the groceries. Their choice, not mine.

:51:35.:51:39.

Sometimes they let you give back the bags. Richard says why not return to

:51:40.:51:44.

paper bags and resize them? And this woman talks about the amount of

:51:45.:51:51.

plastic being used around vegetables -- read cycle them. That's my

:51:52.:51:55.

favourite message of the day. -- recycle them. Thanks very much for

:51:56.:52:03.

your messages on that. Keep those in. We will read them later.

:52:04.:52:07.

When was the last time you had your children's feet measured?

:52:08.:52:13.

Probably six months ago. Are you trying to make me feel guilty?

:52:14.:52:21.

Well, according to the College of Podiatry,

:52:22.:52:23.

more than half of kids in the UK have suffered foot damage

:52:24.:52:26.

because of ill fitting or unsuitable shoes.

:52:27.:52:28.

So if you're preparing to buy new shoes your little ones before

:52:29.:52:31.

they go back to school, you might want to watch

:52:32.:52:34.

Breakfast's Jayne McCubbin has been to meet one family and get advice

:52:35.:52:38.

that could help avoid big problems for little feet.

:52:39.:52:41.

Ready? Ready. Steady? Yeah. Go! We are with the Kelly family in

:52:42.:52:52.

Whitby and we are on the hunt for... Shoes. Shoes. Expensive definitely.

:52:53.:52:59.

Feet grow into all the age of 21 and with three children and two

:53:00.:53:03.

stepchildren, Amy has a lot of shoes to buy. Their feet seemed to grow so

:53:04.:53:09.

fast! Definitely! Chase's do especially, he has a super massive

:53:10.:53:16.

big to that's got a mind of his own! When was the last time you had your

:53:17.:53:22.

kids' feet measured? I'm going to have to be honest, I don't think

:53:23.:53:25.

I've ever had any of them measured ever. So this is it, this is the

:53:26.:53:35.

lot? This is it. Let me ask you, these all fit? I hope so. Let's find

:53:36.:53:38.

out! Because today we are bringing in the

:53:39.:53:48.

big guns to check out the small feat which reside here. I hope you're not

:53:49.:53:53.

going to tell me off! Are you going to show me your feet? Emma Supple is

:53:54.:54:02.

from the College of Podiatry. A nice good heel, that is too small, isn't

:54:03.:54:08.

it? A survey from the College of Podiatry found 29% of British

:54:09.:54:11.

children could be wearing shoes that are completely the wrong size. Can

:54:12.:54:15.

you see how your toes are all switched? 56% of parents admitted

:54:16.:54:22.

buying kids' shoes without having their feet measured and 55% of

:54:23.:54:25.

children have suffered damage to their feet because of shoes that are

:54:26.:54:29.

too small or simply unsuitable. Feels comfortable. Yeah, feels

:54:30.:54:34.

comfortable but getting to the edge. Your feet have grown but you haven't

:54:35.:54:37.

noticed. I guess what we're talking about our

:54:38.:54:43.

crimes against kids' feet. Yes, we are. Worst culprits please? Crime

:54:44.:54:51.

one, ill fitting shoes. Get the... Crime two, slip on shoes. If they

:54:52.:54:55.

are wearing slip on shoes it should be temporarily, holidays and high

:54:56.:55:01.

days and everything else should be a fastened on buckled on HSU. Crime

:55:02.:55:06.

three, floppy heels. If it collapses in like a slipper, unsupported, put

:55:07.:55:10.

it back on the shelf. The shops that don't have a fit measurement, where

:55:11.:55:15.

you buy the cheaper ones, is there anything wrong with buying cheaper

:55:16.:55:20.

shoes? Nothing to do with price, all to do with style. Some people go and

:55:21.:55:25.

feel awkward about going into the shops that measure feet and leaving

:55:26.:55:29.

without buying anything. Independent shoe fitters are a wonderful group

:55:30.:55:33.

of professionals and they don't have any problem with you going in and

:55:34.:55:36.

having your feet measured and leaving without having bought a pair

:55:37.:55:41.

of shoes. Because bad shoes cause bad problems, corns, calluses,

:55:42.:55:45.

hammer toes. Am I going to get told off? You are, the recommendation is

:55:46.:55:50.

to go every six months to get your feet measured and that's a really

:55:51.:55:56.

good yardstick. Definitely. Kids' feet grow fast, they don't need a

:55:57.:56:00.

lot of money throwing at them but they do need protecting. Jayne

:56:01.:56:02.

McCubbin, BBC News. Possibly inappropriate footwear!

:56:03.:56:10.

Possibly too big. Sending your thoughts. -- send in your thoughts.

:56:11.:56:19.

I bought trainers for my two girls a few months ago and I bought the ?1

:56:20.:56:23.

insoles, bought them big and then you take them out later. You've got

:56:24.:56:27.

to remember to take them out, though! I can deal with that! Other

:56:28.:56:31.

ideas, please send them in. This is Breakfast,

:56:32.:59:53.

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. More than 40 maternity units

:59:54.:00:26.

in England closed their doors to new admissions at

:00:27.:00:29.

some point last year. The Government says it's misleading

:00:30.:00:31.

to blame staff shortages. Also this morning: Sickness

:00:32.:00:48.

at the World Athletics Yes, organisers here confirm

:00:49.:00:53.

a number of cases of gastroenteritis Heartbreak for Great

:00:54.:00:57.

Britain's Laura Muir, who just misses out on a medal

:00:58.:01:08.

in the 1,500 metres by less Doctors say a British woman

:01:09.:01:12.

who was shot while on holiday Eloise Dixon is reported to have

:01:13.:01:16.

been attacked when her family drove We're going on more foreign

:01:17.:01:22.

holidays than ever before, but our holiday habits have changed

:01:23.:01:28.

a lot in the last 20 years according Also this morning, the challenge

:01:29.:01:32.

of finding the right pair of shoes We'll be getting the latest advice

:01:33.:01:38.

on a problem troubling many parents And Carol has the weather. Sunshine

:01:39.:01:52.

and showers, I think. Good morning. Add in some rain as well. The

:01:53.:01:57.

heaviest rain today will be in East Anglia and the south-east.

:01:58.:02:01.

Torrential downpours later on. For the rest of us, sunshine and

:02:02.:02:05.

showers, though some will be heavy and thundery. Not all of us will

:02:06.:02:10.

catch one either. I will have all of the details and 15 minutes. Banks,

:02:11.:02:17.

More than 40% of maternity wards in England closed their doors

:02:18.:02:20.

to expectant mothers at least once in 2016,

:02:21.:02:22.

42 out of 96 trusts in England that responded to a Freedom

:02:23.:02:27.

of Information request said they'd shut maternity wards temporarily

:02:28.:02:29.

Our health correspondent, Dominic Hughes, has more.

:02:30.:02:41.

For some years, maternity units have been struggling

:02:42.:02:43.

The Royal College of Midwives says there's a shortfall of around 3,500.

:02:44.:02:48.

Now, based on a Freedom of Information request,

:02:49.:02:50.

Labour says a growing number of maternity units are closing doors

:02:51.:02:53.

In England, 136 NHS Trusts offer maternity services.

:02:54.:02:59.

Last year, 42 of them closed their doors to new admissions

:03:00.:03:02.

There were 382 separate locations where units were closed,

:03:03.:03:11.

I think it is quite right hospitals take these drastic decisions

:03:12.:03:16.

when they want to put the interests of the patient's safety first.

:03:17.:03:19.

But the fact it is happening so often and is increasing year

:03:20.:03:24.

on year significantly suggests an underlying problem.

:03:25.:03:26.

You cannot keep trying to run the NHS on a shoestring,

:03:27.:03:29.

putting them through the biggest financial squeeze in its history,

:03:30.:03:32.

and not expect standards of care to slip.

:03:33.:03:33.

Some closures were relatively short-lived but others lasted more

:03:34.:03:36.

A Department of Health spokesperson said that Trusts need to use

:03:37.:03:46.

temporary closures to manage peaks in admissions and it was misleading

:03:47.:03:49.

to use these figures to indicate a shortage of staff

:03:50.:03:52.

because of the difficulties around planning for birth.

:03:53.:03:54.

The Royal College of Midwives agreed it was sometimes right to close

:03:55.:03:57.

a unit, but that doing so on a regular basis showed

:03:58.:04:00.

underlying problems with the number of expert staff.

:04:01.:04:02.

A British woman is recovering in hospital after being shot

:04:03.:04:13.

while on holiday with her family in Brazil.

:04:14.:04:15.

Eloise Dixon from South London was driving with her partner

:04:16.:04:18.

and three children when they took a wrong turn into an area controlled

:04:19.:04:22.

Our South America correspondent, Katy Watson, has more.

:04:23.:04:26.

An innocent family on a summer holiday.

:04:27.:04:39.

Eloise Dixon together with her partner and three young

:04:40.:04:42.

children made one mistake which nearly cost them their lives.

:04:43.:04:44.

It all happened about 90 miles south of Rio de Janeiro,

:04:45.:04:48.

a part of Brazil that's popular with tourists and has some

:04:49.:04:51.

of the most beautiful beaches in the country.

:04:52.:04:53.

The family had rented a car, and according to local media,

:04:54.:04:56.

were looking for a place to buy water when they made a wrong turning

:04:57.:05:00.

into a favela, or slum, controlled by drug traffickers.

:05:01.:05:09.

Men fired at the car after the family failed

:05:10.:05:11.

Eloise Dixon, in the front passenger seat, was shot twice.

:05:12.:05:15.

Taken to a local hospital, she underwent two hours of surgery.

:05:16.:05:19.

This could so easily have been fatal, but she survived.

:05:20.:05:22.

TRANSLATION: The bullet passed through the abdomen and fortunately

:05:23.:05:30.

did not hit the big blood vessels or the important organs.

:05:31.:05:33.

Some can be so dangerous that even police are not welcome.

:05:34.:05:38.

TRANSLATION: We have a community that we cannot enter,

:05:39.:05:41.

the press cannot enter, the public service cannot enter.

:05:42.:05:43.

According to doctors, Eloise Dixon is recovering

:05:44.:05:51.

Awake and talking, she's expected to be transferred to hospital

:05:52.:05:57.

in the city of Rio de Janeiro where she'll continue her recovery.

:05:58.:06:00.

More details have emerged in the case of the British model

:06:01.:06:04.

who was allegedly drugged and held captive for nearly a week

:06:05.:06:07.

The lawyer representing Chloe Ayling, who's 20

:06:08.:06:10.

and from South London, says she was told by her kidnappers

:06:11.:06:13.

that she would be sold as a slave in the Middle East.

:06:14.:06:16.

He says that she was acting under duress when she was seen shopping

:06:17.:06:20.

with her captor before she was freed.

:06:21.:06:32.

She was told that people were there watching her and ready

:06:33.:06:35.

So she thought that the best idea was to go along with it and to be

:06:36.:06:41.

Because he told her that he wanted to release her.

:06:42.:06:55.

Scientists are warning that systems currently used to measure greenhouse

:06:56.:06:58.

gas emissions around the world are seriously flawed.

:06:59.:07:00.

A BBC investigation has found that not all gases which are produced

:07:01.:07:03.

A group of leading researchers in the field, have told

:07:04.:07:07.

the Counting Carbon programme on BBC Radio4 that the issue poses a major

:07:08.:07:10.

threat to the Paris climate agreement.

:07:11.:07:12.

A victim of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Centre

:07:13.:07:15.

in New York City has been identified 16 years on,

:07:16.:07:18.

according to the city medical examiner.

:07:19.:07:20.

The man's identity was determined after DNA recovered in 2001

:07:21.:07:23.

South African MPs will vote in secret later on a motion

:07:24.:07:36.

of no-confidence in President Jacob Zuma.

:07:37.:07:37.

The motion was tabled by the opposition in response

:07:38.:07:40.

to Mr Zuma's sacking of his highly respected Finance Minister

:07:41.:07:42.

earlier this year, a move which sparked nationwide protests.

:07:43.:07:45.

Mr Zuma has survived several previous votes of no-confidence

:07:46.:07:47.

The organisers of the World Athletics Championships in London

:07:48.:07:52.

have revealed that a number of athletes have contracted

:07:53.:07:54.

Botswana's Isaac Makwala, who was one of the favorites

:07:55.:07:57.

for today's 400 metres final, was forced to withdraw from the 200

:07:58.:08:01.

German and Canadian athletes are also thought

:08:02.:08:03.

The organising committee says its working closely

:08:04.:08:06.

with Public Health England to manage the situation.

:08:07.:08:18.

Today is day five of the World Athletics Championships

:08:19.:08:21.

in London, but yesterday left many British fans disappointed

:08:22.:08:23.

after Laura Muir missed out on a medal in the 1,500 metre final.

:08:24.:08:26.

There were high hopes for hammer thrower, Sophie Hitchon,

:08:27.:08:29.

who ended up in tears after she ended seventh.

:08:30.:08:31.

Here are some of the highlights from our correspondent,

:08:32.:08:34.

COMMENTATOR: Scotland's very own Laura Muir running

:08:35.:08:43.

It was not the day British fans had hoped for.

:08:44.:08:47.

The odds and a talented field were stacked against her.

:08:48.:08:59.

Britain had never had a woman in the 1500 metres.

:09:00.:09:04.

The tactic, they wanted to go out hard.

:09:05.:09:06.

With a look of determination etched across her face,

:09:07.:09:08.

But from nowhere, 800 metre, specialist, Katya Semenya,

:09:09.:09:19.

found speed to snatch the way at the death.

:09:20.:09:24.

Seven hundredths of a second separated muir from her

:09:25.:09:26.

I guess considering the disruptions I had this year, I gave it

:09:27.:09:40.

all I could and that is all I can do.

:09:41.:09:42.

There was more heartbreak in the hammer cage.

:09:43.:09:44.

Sophie Hitchon's heartbreak went nowhere.

:09:45.:09:52.

These images are becoming all too familiar at these championships.

:09:53.:09:56.

There was at least some British success to cheer.

:09:57.:10:05.

Daniel Talbot track the favourite all the way in the first

:10:06.:10:07.

round of the 100m to make it to the semi-final.

:10:08.:10:10.

Hughes was one of the fastest losers.

:10:11.:10:24.

And Mitchell-Blake, Britain's second fastest 200 metre runner of all time

:10:25.:10:28.

With no Usain Bolt, there will be a new champion.

:10:29.:10:32.

Expectations of fans are high, especially

:10:33.:10:36.

Britain's Sir Mo Farah's medal seems the only one to achieve anything

:10:37.:10:47.

Natalie Pirks, BBC News, at the London Stadium.

:10:48.:10:52.

you can see it is a murky day above the stadium. In five minutes we will

:10:53.:11:00.

have more for you. We will be live inside the stadium with Jessica as

:11:01.:11:06.

well. We were looking at the same shot yesterday and it was a

:11:07.:11:13.

different scene, based in sunshine. -- bathed.

:11:14.:11:16.

After a four year stakeout by wildlife experts,

:11:17.:11:19.

footage of one of England's rarest animals, the Pine Mareten has

:11:20.:11:22.

finally been captured in the North York Moors.

:11:23.:11:29.

The sighting is the first living record in the area for around 35

:11:30.:11:33.

years, and it's all thanks to The Yorkshire Pine Marten Project,

:11:34.:11:36.

run by NatureSpy and the Forestry Commission who set up various camera

:11:37.:11:40.

traps around the Moors in order to get a glimpse

:11:41.:11:42.

I have been promising some facts. They are not fascinating animals.

:11:43.:11:52.

They are rare so we don't know much. They are territorial. That is why we

:11:53.:11:55.

don't see them that much. They travel a long way to find territory.

:11:56.:11:58.

But you don't see them. Interesting. And now for another story this

:11:59.:12:04.

morning for you. Contaminated eggs imported

:12:05.:12:06.

from the Netherlands have been distributed in the UK,

:12:07.:12:08.

according to the Food Standards They were found to contain

:12:09.:12:11.

the toxic insecticide, Fipronil, which can

:12:12.:12:14.

be harmful to humans. Health officials say only a "very

:12:15.:12:15.

small number" of the affected eggs have reached UK shores and the risk

:12:16.:12:19.

to the public is low. So, how concerned should

:12:20.:12:22.

we be about eating them? Let's speak to Steve Wearne,

:12:23.:12:24.

who's Director of Policy Thank you very much indeed for

:12:25.:12:34.

talking to us. We will talk about this insecticide. What is it used

:12:35.:12:45.

for? It is authorised for use in the EU as an agricultural pesticide. It

:12:46.:12:50.

is also licensed for use as a medicine to treat ticks and fleas on

:12:51.:12:58.

cats and dogs. But it is not authorised for use on food animals

:12:59.:13:04.

like chickens. Why has it been used and what effect does it have? The

:13:05.:13:08.

Belgian and Dutch authorities are still investigating. We understand

:13:09.:13:15.

criminal charges may be pending. What we are talking about is a small

:13:16.:13:18.

number of eggs, other than bags, which sounds like a large number,

:13:19.:13:23.

but remember, in the UK, we eat about 20 billion eggs a year, 1.8

:13:24.:13:27.

billion of which are imported. We just talking about just one egg in

:13:28.:13:37.

every million we will eat this year. They were imported between March and

:13:38.:13:41.

June so the vast majority of them will have already been consumed. We

:13:42.:13:44.

have not identified any products they have been used in that still

:13:45.:13:50.

have time before expiry. Tell us about the potential impact on human

:13:51.:13:54.

health. Why is it not allowed to be used, for example? It is not allowed

:13:55.:13:58.

not because of any particular concerns about toxicity and the

:13:59.:14:04.

extent it has to poison us. There are very few reports of acute

:14:05.:14:11.

effects at low doses We know when there have been poisonings,

:14:12.:14:17.

deliberately drinking insecticide, there has been noisier and seizures.

:14:18.:14:25.

-- nausea. But at the levels found, it is highly unlikely there will be

:14:26.:14:29.

any impacts. Some of them have been sold in the UK. From your point of

:14:30.:14:34.

view, even if you had one of them, you should be fine. That is right.

:14:35.:14:39.

We don't think there is any reason people should avoid bags or change

:14:40.:14:45.

the way they cook or consume them. -- eggs. The vast majority of them

:14:46.:14:51.

have been eaten already. Any still on the market will be taken off

:14:52.:14:58.

sale. And you will go back down the food chain as it were, will you, and

:14:59.:15:02.

follow what is happening with the investigation?

:15:03.:15:06.

We are doing that now as a matter of emergency. We learned on Saturday

:15:07.:15:13.

that of eggs have in imported, some have gone into retail and have in

:15:14.:15:18.

consumed. Some would have gone into catering and been incorporated into

:15:19.:15:23.

products such as sandwiches. We are checking through to make sure we

:15:24.:15:27.

know where every last one of them has gone to. In the UK, we are very

:15:28.:15:33.

sensitive to food safety. Do you test them all the time? There is a

:15:34.:15:41.

robust programme of testing. We have a number of substances that we will

:15:42.:15:52.

be testing for. Thank you very much for your time this morning.

:15:53.:15:53.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:15:54.:15:56.

More than 40 maternity wards in England closed their doors

:15:57.:16:14.

to expectant mothers at least once last year,

:16:15.:16:16.

It blames staffing shortages, but the government says that's

:16:17.:16:20.

A number of athletes competing at the World Championships in London

:16:21.:16:23.

have contracted suspected gastroenteritis.

:16:24.:16:24.

If you have just turned on your television, you would have missed a

:16:25.:16:36.

sturdy brolly warning from Carol. You are quite right. The forecast

:16:37.:16:41.

today is full sunshine, showers and some rain. In London, grey skies.

:16:42.:16:47.

Some sunshine before the rain, but when the rain hits, the chance of

:16:48.:16:51.

some heavy downpours. Some of those could eat Sunbury. In east Anglia

:16:52.:16:56.

and the south-east, a lot of rain in a short amount of time. This

:16:57.:17:01.

morning, showers in the forecast. Some bright skies, some of us

:17:02.:17:07.

starting with some sunshine. You can see the cloud of rain rotating

:17:08.:17:12.

around an area of low pressure. Where we have got grey skies and it

:17:13.:17:20.

is dry, we could see some sunshine. Showers developing. In Scotland,

:17:21.:17:26.

some showers, some heavy and Bunbury. The same for Northwest

:17:27.:17:30.

England. In north-east England, across the Pennines and south

:17:31.:17:35.

through the Midlands into the home Counties, East Anglia and the

:17:36.:17:39.

south-east, down to Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, we are looking at

:17:40.:17:43.

rain, some of which will be heavy, especially in east Anglia and the

:17:44.:17:48.

south-east. We could have some surface water issues. Drifting

:17:49.:17:52.

further south towards Wales, looking at a mix of sunshine and showers.

:17:53.:17:57.

Some heavy and Sunbury. Especially across Wales. In Northern Ireland,

:17:58.:18:01.

sunshine and showers. Here, showers not as heavy and frequent. As we

:18:02.:18:07.

head through the evening and overnight, you can see we have the

:18:08.:18:14.

rain moving slightly north across England, through parts of the

:18:15.:18:17.

Midlands, east Wales, Gloucestershire and Somerset. A fair

:18:18.:18:23.

bit of cloud, chilli in rural areas. In towns and cities, temperatures

:18:24.:18:29.

10- 13. Starting with an arc of rain tomorrow through the day. Gliding

:18:30.:18:35.

down into the south-east. Once again tomorrow in east Anglia in

:18:36.:18:39.

south-east England, in for some torrential downpours. That could

:18:40.:18:44.

lead to some surface water issues. Away from this, some brighter skies

:18:45.:18:49.

with some sunshine. Thursday, the dregs of the rain in the

:18:50.:18:53.

south-eastern corner. Through the day, starting to drift away onto the

:18:54.:19:00.

near continent, leaving a largely dry day with some bright spells and

:19:01.:19:04.

sunshine. Look at what is lurking in the wings off the coast of

:19:05.:19:08.

north-west Scotland. More rain. That will also be coming our way.

:19:09.:19:13.

Unsettled, changeable and went with some sunshine probably sums it up

:19:14.:19:16.

quite nicely. Carrier bags, hotels

:19:17.:19:34.

and holidays, Steph is here Good morning, Tesco is scrapping 5p

:19:35.:19:36.

carrier bags, which means anyone wanting a bag their shopping

:19:37.:19:40.

will either have to bring their own Tesco says it's to cut down

:19:41.:19:44.

on plastic bag usage. A lot of you have been

:19:45.:19:50.

in touch about this. John said, well done, this is a good

:19:51.:20:00.

idea. People need to get better organised. Nicola works in one of

:20:01.:20:05.

the supermarkets and she said it is hard to check that everyone pays for

:20:06.:20:09.

their bags. She said that the majority do, and she does think it

:20:10.:20:14.

is a good idea to get rid of them. Aaron says that it is good to stop

:20:15.:20:20.

damaging the environment by plastic. David says, to Tesco keep a

:20:21.:20:29.

percentage of the bags? A lot of them give the money they make to a

:20:30.:20:38.

good cause, but not all of them -- do.

:20:39.:20:39.

The owner of the hotel chains like Holiday Inn,

:20:40.:20:43.

Crowne Plaza and Indigo has announced a rise

:20:44.:20:45.

The hotel group has three quarters of a million rooms around the world

:20:46.:20:50.

and serves over 150 million guests each year.

:20:51.:20:52.

It has said they are focusing more on the boutique side of the

:20:53.:20:56.

business. And we are taking more foreign

:20:57.:21:01.

holidays than ever before - we did 45 million of them last year

:21:02.:21:04.

- that's up 70% compared But one of the biggest chages

:21:05.:21:08.

is that we're doing more shorter I will be looking more at how our

:21:09.:21:22.

habits have changed in about half an hour. A lot of people used to take a

:21:23.:21:26.

two-week trip in summer, there seems to be a change? Yes, there is. A lot

:21:27.:21:32.

to do with the cheaper airlines and the fact that we can get away more

:21:33.:21:36.

easily. People like to split up their holidays so that you are just

:21:37.:21:40.

waiting for that one holiday. When you finally get to it, you are tired

:21:41.:21:51.

and you might get six. I think it is better, you can properly relax.

:21:52.:22:01.

Otherwise you never have a break! Regarding carrier bags, Andy says

:22:02.:22:10.

10p won't make a difference, and we have a reader in the Netherlands who

:22:11.:22:15.

has said that you can't purchase any of these bags in the Netherlands,

:22:16.:22:20.

and people always bring their own. You rarely forget to take a bag,

:22:21.:22:25.

just keep one in the car is what she said. --A listener.

:22:26.:22:29.

Teenagers across Scotland will be waking to their Highers results this

:22:30.:22:34.

morning - the Scottish equivalent of A-levels.

:22:35.:22:36.

The country has traditionally had a strong education system,

:22:37.:22:39.

but in recent years standards have declined.

:22:40.:22:41.

As the Scottish Government admits things need to improve,

:22:42.:22:43.

John Maguire has been to find out what's being done.

:22:44.:22:47.

Tonight these youngsters are practising their stop

:22:48.:22:49.

Who knows, a future Morph or Wallace and Gromit might be created right

:22:50.:22:55.

here in Cambuslang on the outskirts of Glasgow.

:22:56.:23:06.

This youth Club, one of nine centres called Universal Connections,

:23:07.:23:09.

are funded by South Lanarkshire Council's education budget.

:23:10.:23:11.

Qualifications can be gained here that aren't offered

:23:12.:23:13.

For example, there's a Duke of Edinburgh Awards group

:23:14.:23:19.

and Rebecca has been training for her gold award expedition.

:23:20.:23:21.

This morning she is receiving the results of her Highers

:23:22.:23:24.

and she believes the school has prepared her well for the future.

:23:25.:23:28.

Teachers are there to help you get the grades you need so if you know

:23:29.:23:32.

what you want to do and what you need and you just have

:23:33.:23:36.

At the same time, some subjects, like PSE, they can get you ready

:23:37.:23:46.

Her mum, Cheryl, is a member of the National Parent Forum and has

:23:47.:23:51.

a keen interest in Scottish education.

:23:52.:23:53.

She says children can succeed if they're supported.

:23:54.:23:55.

I appreciate education is going through so many changes,

:23:56.:23:58.

but it's now about narrowing it and trying to work with the parents

:23:59.:24:01.

of the schools and local authorities and government to bring everyone

:24:02.:24:04.

But recent years have seen standards decline.

:24:05.:24:15.

I think the introduction of Curriculum for Excellence,

:24:16.:24:20.

which is effectively Scotland's national curriculum,

:24:21.:24:22.

which has been going on for some 13 years now, has been badly organised

:24:23.:24:26.

and has led to a number of serious adverse consequences,

:24:27.:24:28.

not least of them being excessive teacher workload and loss of morale

:24:29.:24:32.

The Deputy First Minister John Swinney is in charge of education.

:24:33.:24:40.

Today he's visiting a community enterprise in Kilmarnock that works

:24:41.:24:43.

with everyone from the elderly to ex-prisoners to children

:24:44.:24:45.

He accepts improvements need to be made, wants students from poorer

:24:46.:24:53.

backgrounds to achieve better results and believes schools

:24:54.:24:55.

and teachers are the best people to affect change.

:24:56.:25:05.

It's at the heart of the reforms I want to take into the curriculum,

:25:06.:25:08.

to make sure a generation of young people today can have access

:25:09.:25:12.

to the best quality of education and the best opportunities that

:25:13.:25:15.

We want to make sure we do that in consort with the education

:25:16.:25:24.

profession to make sure that is able to be deployed in every single

:25:25.:25:28.

school, the length and bredth Scotland.

:25:29.:25:30.

And the main teaching union wants more support for staff.

:25:31.:25:32.

I think if we could remove the bureaucracy so that teachers can

:25:33.:25:36.

spend their time working on the improvement of the learning

:25:37.:25:38.

of young people then that will make a difference.

:25:39.:25:41.

But we need more than just promises in these areas,

:25:42.:25:43.

we actually need action from government and educational agencies.

:25:44.:25:46.

Back at the youth club in Cambuslang, the band is in full

:25:47.:25:49.

swing and full volume as teenagers across Scotland tear open envelopes

:25:50.:25:52.

or are informed via text, anxious to discover how they've done.

:25:53.:25:55.

This morning's results aren't just important to them but also

:25:56.:25:58.

to the government and to the country.

:25:59.:26:00.

I think every report should end like that. We hope to speak to one of

:26:01.:26:17.

those students later. Still to come this morning,

:26:18.:26:18.

do you remember being taken to buy your first

:26:19.:26:22.

pair of school shoes? Well it seems, these days,

:26:23.:26:24.

more than half of parents don't get their children

:26:25.:26:27.

properly measured. In the next half-hour,

:26:28.:26:29.

we'll find out why that could mean Time now to get the news,

:26:30.:26:32.

travel and weather where you are. I'm back with the latest

:26:33.:29:56.

from the BBC London newsroom Now, though, it's back

:29:57.:29:59.

to Louise and Dan. This is Breakfast with

:30:00.:30:02.

Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. We'll bring you all the latest news

:30:03.:30:11.

and sport in a moment. More than 40 maternity units

:30:12.:30:14.

in England closed to new admissions at some point last year, according

:30:15.:30:18.

to data obtained by Labour. 42 out of 96 trusts

:30:19.:30:21.

in England that responded to a Freedom of Information request

:30:22.:30:23.

said they'd shut maternity wards The government says

:30:24.:30:26.

the numbers are misleading. In just over half an hour,

:30:27.:30:32.

we'll be getting the thoughts of the Royal College

:30:33.:30:35.

of Midwives on this. A British woman is being treated

:30:36.:30:38.

in hospital after being shot while on holiday with

:30:39.:30:41.

her family in Brazil. Eloise Dixon from South London

:30:42.:30:43.

was driving with her partner and three children when they took

:30:44.:30:46.

a wrong turn into an area controlled She was shot twice and the medics

:30:47.:30:49.

treating her say she's lucky More details have emerged

:30:50.:30:54.

in the case of the British model who was allegedly drugged and held

:30:55.:30:59.

captive for nearly a week The lawyer representing

:31:00.:31:02.

Chloe Ayling, who's 20 and from South London,

:31:03.:31:05.

says she was told by her kidnappers that she would be sold

:31:06.:31:08.

as a slave in the Middle East. He explained that she was acting

:31:09.:31:11.

under duress when she was seen shopping with her captor

:31:12.:31:15.

before she was freed. The organisers of the World

:31:16.:31:28.

Athletics Championships in London have revealed that a number

:31:29.:31:30.

of athletes have contracted Botswana's Isaac Makwala,

:31:31.:31:33.

who was one of the favorites for today's 400 metres final,

:31:34.:31:36.

was forced to withdraw from the 200 German and Canadian

:31:37.:31:39.

athletes are also thought The organising committee

:31:40.:31:42.

says its working closely with Public Health England

:31:43.:31:45.

to manage the situation. That is a particularly sunny shot.

:31:46.:31:57.

That is the London Stadium. We will be there in a few minutes' time with

:31:58.:32:04.

Jessica and a 400 metre runner as well, looking forward to the fifth

:32:05.:32:13.

day of the games. It is only on BBC One tonight. No channel hopping.

:32:14.:32:15.

Don't worry about that. Contaminated eggs imported

:32:16.:32:19.

from the Netherlands have been distributed in the UK,

:32:20.:32:21.

according to the Food Standards They were found to contain

:32:22.:32:24.

an insecticide which can be Health officials say only a "very

:32:25.:32:27.

small number" of the affected eggs have reached UK shores and the risk

:32:28.:32:31.

to the public is low. We don't think there is any reason

:32:32.:32:44.

why people should avoid eggs or change how they cook or eat them.

:32:45.:32:47.

The vast majority have been eaten already. If we find anything on the

:32:48.:32:56.

market with those eggs in them we will take them out as well.

:32:57.:32:57.

The Welsh government has announced plans to invest more than ?1 million

:32:58.:33:01.

It says the move will create 10,000 new NHS dental places,

:33:02.:33:04.

including in some of the most deprived parts of Wales.

:33:05.:33:07.

However, critics, including The British Dental Association,

:33:08.:33:09.

say the Welsh government took more than ?6 million out of the Welsh

:33:10.:33:12.

dental budget last year and the investment announced today

:33:13.:33:15.

Last night, a stunning lunar eclipse was visible in many parts

:33:16.:33:20.

Eclipses happen when the Earth passes between the sun and the moon,

:33:21.:33:24.

Look at that picture from Greece! Isn't it stunning?

:33:25.:33:31.

This one could be viewed on several continents,

:33:32.:33:33.

although many countries could only see part of it.

:33:34.:33:36.

A second full eclipse will occur on the 21st of August over

:33:37.:33:39.

North America, the first of its kind in nearly a century.

:33:40.:33:42.

Just so you know. I believe that is a Monday. Do you? Great knoiwledge.

:33:43.:33:57.

I think you are off on that day. You don't care because it is a Monday

:33:58.:34:02.

and you aren't working. We will have the weather soon. It was an amazing

:34:03.:34:09.

1500 metres last night with Laura Muir just missing out on a medal.

:34:10.:34:13.

Jessica is there for us this morning. Good morning. Good morning.

:34:14.:34:21.

As you said, one of the best races, that 1500 metres final last night.

:34:22.:34:34.

Just why we love to sports. A fine margin. Missing out on seven

:34:35.:34:39.

hundredths of a second. It was so, so close. Facing such a car field,

:34:40.:34:46.

the Olympic champion and the world champion. -- tough field. Caster

:34:47.:34:54.

Semenya just beat her to it. Agonisingly close.

:34:55.:34:57.

Just that last 50 metres I was tied up.

:34:58.:35:01.

Considering what has happened this year, I gave it

:35:02.:35:05.

all I could and that is all I can do.

:35:06.:35:15.

Disappointment, too, for the Olympic bronze medallist,

:35:16.:35:17.

Sophie Hitchon, she couldn't quite match her achievements

:35:18.:35:20.

Her best effort of 72.32 in the hammer final wasn't enough

:35:21.:35:24.

for a medal as she finished in seventh place.

:35:25.:35:30.

Yeah, I just, umm... I couldn't quite find the rhythm that I had in

:35:31.:35:50.

qualification. I knew I was in bad shape. Disappointed I didn't produce

:35:51.:35:51.

tonight. Better news for team

:35:52.:35:52.

captain Eilidh Doyle, was one of two British women

:35:53.:35:54.

who made it into the semi-finals There was a great performance

:35:55.:35:57.

by Britain's Danny Talbot He qualified for the semi-finals,

:35:58.:36:18.

with a lifetime best of 20.16 seconds, finishing just behind

:36:19.:36:25.

the reigning olympic champion We were expecting to see the fastest

:36:26.:36:27.

man in the world over 200 metres, Botswana's Isaac Makwala,

:36:28.:36:32.

run last night. But he was absent from his heat

:36:33.:36:34.

and it later emerged he was one of a number of athletes suffering

:36:35.:36:38.

from gastroenteritis at one And now a round-up of the rest

:36:39.:36:40.

of the day's sport. Moeen Ali was England's hero once

:36:41.:36:44.

again, as he and his teammates secured a 3-1 series

:36:45.:36:48.

win over South Africa. Ali took 25 wickets over

:36:49.:36:50.

the course of the series. He helped England claim a 177-run

:36:51.:36:53.

victory in the fourth test, and also ensured that the team

:36:54.:36:56.

climbs to third in the International Cricket Council's Test

:36:57.:36:59.

rankings, above Australia. It's a first home Test series win

:37:00.:37:00.

against South Africa since 1998. And a first for Joe Root

:37:01.:37:04.

as England captain. It is great to see Moeen Ali

:37:05.:37:06.

in particular step up and put in some unbelievable performances

:37:07.:37:10.

to win games for us. Hopefully that can be something

:37:11.:37:12.

that is repeated on a number But I think throughout the whole

:37:13.:37:15.

series the squad has Could Gareth Bale be heading back

:37:16.:37:19.

to the Premier League? Manchester United manager

:37:20.:37:32.

Jose Mourinho says he will "fight with other coaches" to sign

:37:33.:37:34.

the 28-year-old Welshman. The two clubs play each other

:37:35.:37:37.

tonight in the Uefa Super Cup in Bale joined the Spanish champions

:37:38.:37:40.

from Tottenham in 2013, for a then-world record fee of ?85

:37:41.:37:43.

million, and has since won Mourinho says he'll be waiting

:37:44.:37:46.

for Bale if he doesn't figure You might have noticed I am in the

:37:47.:38:14.

BBC TV sports studio. This is where the likes of Gabby Logan and Michael

:38:15.:38:21.

Johnson, the legend, and Paula Radcliffe six. -- sit. I want to

:38:22.:38:39.

introduce you in this seat, Logan. Next door is the Japanese

:38:40.:38:44.

broadcasters. Lots of branding in the studio. Even a Union Jack flag.

:38:45.:38:50.

This is a special touchscreen which you have seen if you are watching

:38:51.:38:54.

the coverage. It is very expensive. I am not going to touch it. I just

:38:55.:39:01.

thought I would give you a behind-the-scenes. You don't see

:39:02.:39:06.

this much. What a night of drama it was in that 1500 metre final. A

:39:07.:39:12.

brave run by Laura Muir. A tough field. The Olympic champion was

:39:13.:39:17.

there. You spoke to her after the race. Did she take any positives?

:39:18.:39:23.

The fact she left everything on that track. You come to the World

:39:24.:39:26.

Championships and you have to give your best. Every time she races, she

:39:27.:39:32.

leaves everything, blood, sweat, and he is, everything, on that field. So

:39:33.:39:39.

close. -- tears. Everyone was cheering for her to get that medal.

:39:40.:39:46.

It is tough, very tough, a fine margin. And tough for Sophie Hitchon

:39:47.:39:50.

in the hammer final. She was fighting back tears in her

:39:51.:39:58.

interview. Where does she go from here now that she finished so far

:39:59.:40:03.

down in the field? She was Olympic bronze medallist last year. She

:40:04.:40:07.

expected to at least equal that. She was winning at one stage in the

:40:08.:40:12.

first round. The crowd loved it. I thought, come on, the crowd wants

:40:13.:40:15.

it. You don't just turn up and compete, you train all year.

:40:16.:40:19.

Everything has to be completely right on the night. If you don't get

:40:20.:40:26.

a medal, you are heartbroken. But next issue will come back bigger and

:40:27.:40:30.

better and stronger. You have heard about the gastroenteritis that has

:40:31.:40:34.

got around. Some athletes have been affected. As a former athlete

:40:35.:40:40.

yourself, when you are dealing with diarrhoea and vomiting, how does

:40:41.:40:43.

that affect you? It affects everything, not just physically but

:40:44.:40:47.

psychologically as well. The human body, everything has to be perfect

:40:48.:40:52.

when you come to a championships. You have to get back on board and

:40:53.:40:58.

keep everything down. But psychologically, you go to the next

:40:59.:41:03.

race and you know you are not 100% perfect. You don't know the effect

:41:04.:41:06.

it will have on the performance. The last thing you want to have is a

:41:07.:41:12.

tiny chink in your armour. You have to be 100 ready to compete. Not only

:41:13.:41:16.

will they have felt weak and drained, mentally, they will feel

:41:17.:41:21.

bad as well. Such a special night on the track tonight for the 400 metre

:41:22.:41:27.

men's final. Wayde. What a special talent. You must be feeling good to

:41:28.:41:34.

see him. Normally this is all I see of Michael Johnson. The back of him.

:41:35.:41:41.

He is a supremely great athlete. He has done so much to get through. He

:41:42.:41:46.

has not left third gear. He is saving energy for the 200. He will

:41:47.:41:50.

do something good tonight. He won't smash the record. He has a 200. He

:41:51.:41:56.

has the talent to do it. Thank you. A pleasure to have you on BBC

:41:57.:42:03.

Breakfast. If you want to join everyone on the sofa, the coverage

:42:04.:42:06.

gets under way on BBC Two from 730 tonight. I love them. Thank you. And

:42:07.:42:18.

we will speak to Steve Batley, four-time European champion. He

:42:19.:42:23.

never got a gold. He is part of the commentary team. Also, we are

:42:24.:42:31.

keeping up-to-date with the weather. So much is going on. Good morning.

:42:32.:42:39.

Yes. Good morning. I am in London. The sky is grey. A bright start. We

:42:40.:42:45.

could see sunshine. Later, torrential showers. Excuse me. The

:42:46.:42:51.

pollen levels are up. For some of us, we are looking at sunshine.

:42:52.:42:55.

Especially in the north and west. Heavy downpours. Possibly thundery.

:42:56.:43:01.

The highest chance of that combination in the south-east and

:43:02.:43:05.

East Anglia, especially later on. This morning, we have sunshine.

:43:06.:43:10.

Bright spells. Showers. In the north and west of the UK, that is. Some

:43:11.:43:16.

rain as well rotating around an area of low pressure. Some of that will

:43:17.:43:20.

be heavy as we go through the morning. Behind that, carrying on

:43:21.:43:23.

with sunshine and showers in Scotland in the north-west England.

:43:24.:43:27.

Some thundery. North-east England this afternoon, rain. That extends

:43:28.:43:33.

across the Pennines, the Midlands, East Anglia, the south-east,

:43:34.:43:37.

Hampshire, the Home Counties, down towards the Isle of Wight as well.

:43:38.:43:41.

Cool temperatures. The other thing you will find us we could see large

:43:42.:43:47.

rainfall totals in East Anglia and the south-east in a small amount of

:43:48.:43:52.

time. Towards the south-west, a mixture of bright spells, sunshine,

:43:53.:43:56.

showers. Wales, more frequent showers. Some will be heavy and

:43:57.:44:00.

thundery. In between them, brightness. Northern Ireland,

:44:01.:44:04.

sunshine and showers as well. They will be not as heavy and less

:44:05.:44:09.

frequent. Through the evening and overnight we still have that rain.

:44:10.:44:12.

If anything, it goes north. Extending from north-east England

:44:13.:44:17.

through the Midlands to east Wales down towards Dorset and Somerset.

:44:18.:44:22.

Temperature-wise, we are looking at overnight lows and 13. In rural

:44:23.:44:28.

areas, especially in the north, it will be a chilly north. Tomorrow,

:44:29.:44:32.

that rain once again starting off. Through the day it will be dragged

:44:33.:44:37.

by the low pressure in the direction of the south-east as temperatures

:44:38.:44:40.

rise. Further showers will develop. Some will be thundery and

:44:41.:44:44.

slow-moving. Especially, once again, in East Anglia and the south-east.

:44:45.:44:48.

We could be looking at issues with surface water flooding. Away from

:44:49.:44:53.

that, for the rest of the UK, more dry and more bright with fewer

:44:54.:44:56.

showers and sunshine. By Thursday, the rest of that rain in the

:44:57.:45:01.

south-east. That will clear away leaving us with a dry day once again

:45:02.:45:06.

with sunny spells. But you can see what is waiting in the sides of

:45:07.:45:12.

Scotland. More rain coming our way. Fairly unsettled for the next few

:45:13.:45:16.

days. Thank you very much. It's no secret, us Brits have a long

:45:17.:45:25.

history of seeking out the sun - and we're going on more foreign

:45:26.:45:29.

holidays than ever before. But new figures suggest it's

:45:30.:45:32.

increasingly a case of bye-bye Steph's been looking

:45:33.:45:35.

into our changing holidaying I've been off for the last few

:45:36.:45:41.

weeks, what has happened to this chair? We are waving goodbye to the

:45:42.:46:01.

booze cruise? Yes, let's have a look at the research. The good news is,

:46:02.:46:15.

we are taking more foreign holidays. 45 million last year, up nearly 70%

:46:16.:46:23.

from 1996. The biggest changes that we am not going to wait for one long

:46:24.:46:29.

break as often, instead, we are opting for a week-long break or a

:46:30.:46:34.

long weekend. Statisticians say this is probably because of the rise of

:46:35.:46:41.

the low-cost carriers. Passengers have risen by 85% at UK airports.

:46:42.:46:50.

Something a lot of people have been noticing with all the long

:46:51.:46:53.

With me is Emma Coulthurst, is from Travelsupermarket.com

:46:54.:47:01.

It is amazing how holidays have changed. I used to go on a two-week

:47:02.:47:16.

holiday, you would go off on the to France, you would probably just take

:47:17.:47:21.

one holiday per year. Now, we are buying for one-week holidays, but

:47:22.:47:25.

trying to have more. Shorter holidays, but more frequently. A

:47:26.:47:30.

city break never really existed 20 years ago, but now we are going to

:47:31.:47:35.

places in Eastern Europe. As low as ?69 this September, three star

:47:36.:47:41.

accommodation and your flight, it is difficult to get a hotel in the UK

:47:42.:47:49.

for ?69 for one night. So we are really expanding our holidays,

:47:50.:47:52.

trying to spread them across the year. I think there are a lot of

:47:53.:47:56.

reasons for this. If we look at the advent of low-cost airlines, it has

:47:57.:48:07.

really opened up the sky above our heads. We have got easyJet, RyanAir

:48:08.:48:20.

and many others. So it is easy to get a low-cost flight. Holidays are

:48:21.:48:32.

our prized possessions. A lot of countries can just stay at home, but

:48:33.:48:37.

we need the sun. We've got to get on the plane and experience that lovely

:48:38.:48:42.

Mediterranean vibe. They are asking us for our cost. The prices this

:48:43.:48:49.

summer, 70 quid, 80 quid for a week. The holidays are actually cheaper

:48:50.:48:53.

than they were 20 years ago. The interesting thing about this is how

:48:54.:48:59.

much we used to like our cruises. There has been a quadrupling in

:49:00.:49:05.

people going on cruises? Yes, it has expanded about fourfold. The booze

:49:06.:49:12.

cruise, it has vanished. It is not cost efficient to bother doing it.

:49:13.:49:18.

Cruising is very popular, not just with older people. I also think when

:49:19.:49:24.

you look at this information, it is good to look at the countries people

:49:25.:49:28.

are going to and how that changes. Unsurprisingly, you've got places

:49:29.:49:34.

like Egypt and Tunisia which have fallen out of popularity. Poland,

:49:35.:49:41.

Croatia err... The whole of Eastern Europe has opened up in the last 20

:49:42.:49:50.

years -- Croatia... You can get breaks to these places for under

:49:51.:49:55.

?100 each. Poland has entered the European Union in 2004. Now you can

:49:56.:50:01.

have breaks their in some beautiful places, Warsaw, Krakow. There are so

:50:02.:50:09.

many new destinations. The best thing about going abroad is how

:50:10.:50:14.

expensive the UK is. When you go abroad, the cost of living is nearly

:50:15.:50:18.

half that of Eastern Europe. Eating out is really cheap and so our

:50:19.:50:22.

drinks. Despite the fact that the pound is not great in the markets.

:50:23.:50:31.

Yes, it has been volatile, but you can balance that out with the cost

:50:32.:50:35.

of living abroad if you pick the right destination to go to. The cost

:50:36.:50:41.

of living increase is 60% than the UK, 40% less in Turkey. Croatia has

:50:42.:50:47.

opened up, the Balkan war ended in 1995. Croatia, Dubrovnik is a very

:50:48.:50:54.

popular destination. And don't forget Iceland. Since 1998 and the

:50:55.:51:02.

enormous crash to their dollar, you can go to Iceland for about half the

:51:03.:51:07.

price it used to be. I think the news Le Sommer also had something to

:51:08.:51:20.

do with it. We found that breaks in Iceland were incredibly popular. I

:51:21.:51:24.

wish we could go on, this is making me very jealous! Very interesting.

:51:25.:51:31.

Warsaw is a very nice place to go for the weekend, by the way. When he

:51:32.:51:38.

asked me this earlier, I was not sure.

:51:39.:51:39.

When was the last time you had your children's feet measured?

:51:40.:51:42.

Well - according to the College of Podiatry -

:51:43.:51:45.

more than half of kids in the UK have suffered foot damage

:51:46.:51:48.

because of ill fitting or unsuitable shoes.

:51:49.:51:50.

So if you're preparing to buy new shoes your little ones before

:51:51.:51:54.

they go back to school, you might want to watch

:51:55.:51:56.

Breakfast's Jayne McCubbin has been to meet one family and get advice

:51:57.:52:03.

that could help avoid big problems for little feet.

:52:04.:52:05.

Ready? Ready.

:52:06.:52:06.

Steady? Yeah.

:52:07.:52:07.

Steady. Go!

:52:08.:52:11.

We are with the Kelly family in Whitby and we are on the hunt for...

:52:12.:52:15.

Expensive? Definitely.

:52:16.:52:20.

Feet grow into all the age of 21 and with three children and two

:52:21.:52:24.

stepchildren, Amy has a lot of shoes to buy.

:52:25.:52:26.

Chase's do especially, he's got like a super massive big

:52:27.:52:39.

When was the last time you had your kids' feet measured?

:52:40.:52:44.

I'm going to have to be honest, I don't know if I've ever had any

:52:45.:52:48.

So this is it, this is the lot? This is it.

:52:49.:52:56.

Let me ask you, these all fit? I hope so.

:52:57.:52:59.

Because today we are bringing in the big guns to check out

:53:00.:53:07.

I hope you're not going to tell me off!

:53:08.:53:18.

Emma Supple is from the College of Podiatry.

:53:19.:53:27.

These pass for me because they've got a nice good

:53:28.:53:30.

A survey from the College of Podiatry found 29% of British

:53:31.:53:48.

children could be wearing shoes that are completely the wrong size.

:53:49.:53:51.

Can you see how your toes are all squinched?

:53:52.:53:54.

56% of parents admitted buying kids' shoes without having

:53:55.:53:56.

55% of children have suffered damage to their feet because of shoes

:53:57.:54:02.

which are too small or simply unsuitable.

:54:03.:54:04.

Yeah, feels comfortable but it's getting to the edge,

:54:05.:54:07.

Your feet have grown but you haven't noticed.

:54:08.:54:10.

I guess what we're talking about our crimes against kids' feet.

:54:11.:54:13.

Get the child's shoes fitted and at least keep the information

:54:14.:54:19.

If they're wearing slip-on shoes it should be temporarily,

:54:20.:54:24.

holidays and high days and everything else should be

:54:25.:54:26.

If the heel collapses in like a slipper, very unsupported

:54:27.:54:38.

at the heel, put it back on the shelf.

:54:39.:54:41.

The shops that don't have a feet measurements in where you buy

:54:42.:54:44.

the cheaper shoes, is there anything wrong with looking

:54:45.:54:46.

Nothing to do with price, it's all to do with style.

:54:47.:54:50.

Some people feel awkward about going into the shops that

:54:51.:54:53.

measure feet and then leaving without buying anything.

:54:54.:54:55.

Independent shoe fitters are a wonderful group

:54:56.:54:57.

of professionals and they don't have any problem with you going

:54:58.:55:00.

in and having your feet measured and leaving without having bought

:55:01.:55:03.

Because bad shoes cause bad problems, corns,

:55:04.:55:09.

The recommendation is to go every six months to get your feet measured

:55:10.:55:17.

Kids' feet grow fast, they don't need a lot of money

:55:18.:55:27.

throwing at them but they do need protecting.

:55:28.:55:29.

I like a Golden slipper. And we've got some comments about this story.

:55:30.:55:43.

Someone has Britain in who used to work for a shoe department. Their

:55:44.:55:48.

tip is to shake talcum powder into the shoe, empty out the access and

:55:49.:55:54.

ask your child to walk in them. Take off the shoe, and then a footprint

:55:55.:55:58.

will appear so you can see where their toes go to. They say that

:55:59.:56:03.

there should be one centimetre between the end of that of and the

:56:04.:56:12.

end of the shoe. It can be quite hard to look into the shoe! Salang

:56:13.:56:22.

has said that nobody measures their children's beat any more. She works

:56:23.:56:28.

in a school, and she has said that often children have shoes that I'll

:56:29.:56:33.

much too big or small, but parents don't listen -- Shalane. My children

:56:34.:56:43.

love a slip on. Shalane has said there should be a law against ill

:56:44.:56:48.

fitting shoes. Possibly a little bit too far, but interesting.

:56:49.:56:51.

Hello this is Breakfast with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:56:52.:00:48.

More than 40 maternity units in England closed their doors

:00:49.:00:51.

to new admissions at some point last year.

:00:52.:00:54.

Labour blames a lack of midwives; the government says it's misleading

:00:55.:00:59.

Good morning it's Tuesday 8th August.

:01:00.:01:18.

Also this morning; sickness at the world Athletics Championships

:01:19.:01:28.

Organisers have confirmed a number of athletes have been affected by a

:01:29.:01:34.

stomach bug at one of the official team hotels. On the track,

:01:35.:01:39.

heartbreak for Britain's Laura Muir, she misses out on a medal in the

:01:40.:01:42.

1500 metres. Doctors say a British woman

:01:43.:01:46.

who was shot while on holiday Eloise Dixon is reported

:01:47.:01:49.

to have been attacked Tesco is scrapping 5p carrier

:01:50.:01:54.

bags and replacing them I'll be looking at why and whether

:01:55.:01:58.

other retailers will do the same. Jodie Whittacker will soon be

:01:59.:02:04.

the new face of Dr Who but her latest drama sees her playing

:02:05.:02:07.

someone who definitely isn't a doctor despite what she claims -

:02:08.:02:09.

we'll speak to the writer behind And Carol has the weather.

:02:10.:02:20.

Good morning. It's a mild start to the day. Temperatures 16 at the

:02:21.:02:25.

moment. We are looking at sunshine and showers today, some showers will

:02:26.:02:29.

be heavy and thundery. Also rain in the forecast. Particularly heavy in

:02:30.:02:35.

Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire. Further heavy rain for East Anglia

:02:36.:02:40.

and the north-east. More in 15 minutes.

:02:41.:02:44.

More than 40% of maternity wards in England closed their doors

:02:45.:02:50.

to expectant mothers at least once in 2016, according to data

:02:51.:02:52.

42 out of 96 trusts in England that responded to a Freedom

:02:53.:02:58.

of Information request said they'd shut maternity wards

:02:59.:03:01.

The government says the numbers are misleading.

:03:02.:03:06.

Our Health Correspondent, Dominic Hughes has more.

:03:07.:03:09.

For some years, maternity units have been struggling

:03:10.:03:11.

The Royal College of Midwives says there's a shortfall of around 3,500.

:03:12.:03:17.

Now, based on a Freedom of Information request,

:03:18.:03:20.

Labour says a growing number of maternity units are closing

:03:21.:03:24.

In England, 136 NHS Trusts offer maternity services.

:03:25.:03:31.

Last year, 42 of them closed their doors to

:03:32.:03:35.

There were 382 separate locations where units were closed,

:03:36.:03:41.

I think it is quite right hospitals take these drastic decisions

:03:42.:03:47.

when they want to put the interests of the patient's safety first.

:03:48.:03:50.

But the fact it is happening so often and is increasing year

:03:51.:03:56.

on year significantly suggests an underlying problem.

:03:57.:03:58.

You cannot keep trying to run the NHS on a shoestring,

:03:59.:04:02.

putting them through the biggest financial squeeze in its

:04:03.:04:06.

history, and not expect standards of care to slip.

:04:07.:04:10.

Some closures were relatively short-lived but others

:04:11.:04:14.

A Department of Health spokesperson said that Trusts need to use

:04:15.:04:20.

temporary closures to manage peaks in admissions and it was misleading

:04:21.:04:23.

to use these figures to indicate a shortage of staff

:04:24.:04:26.

because of the difficulties around planning for birth.

:04:27.:04:30.

The Royal College of Midwives agreed it was sometimes

:04:31.:04:33.

right to close a unit, but that doing so on a regular basis

:04:34.:04:36.

showed underlying problems with the number of expert staff.

:04:37.:04:41.

A British woman is recovering in hospital after being shot

:04:42.:04:46.

while on holiday with her family in Brazil.

:04:47.:04:49.

Eloise Dixon from South London was driving with her partner

:04:50.:04:52.

and three children when they took a wrong turn into an area controlled

:04:53.:04:55.

Our South America Correspondent, Katy Watson, has more.

:04:56.:05:00.

An innocent family on their summer holidays.

:05:01.:05:01.

Eloise Dixon together with her partner and three young

:05:02.:05:05.

children made one mistake which nearly cost them their lives.

:05:06.:05:08.

It all happened in Angra dos Reis, about 90 miles south of Rio de

:05:09.:05:11.

Janeiro, a part of Brazil that's popular with tourists and has some

:05:12.:05:15.

of the most beautiful beaches in the country.

:05:16.:05:19.

The family had rented a car, and according to local media,

:05:20.:05:22.

were looking for a place to buy water when they made a wrong turning

:05:23.:05:26.

into a favela, or slum, controlled by drug traffickers.

:05:27.:05:30.

Men fired at the car after the family failed

:05:31.:05:34.

Eloise Dixon, in the front passenger seat, was shot twice,

:05:35.:05:41.

Taken to a local hospital, she underwent two hours of surgery.

:05:42.:05:47.

This could so easily have been fatal, but she survived.

:05:48.:05:50.

TRANSLATION: The bullet passed through the abdomen and fortunately

:05:51.:05:54.

did not hit the big blood vessels or the important organs.

:05:55.:05:57.

Some can be so dangerous that even police are not welcome.

:05:58.:06:06.

TRANSLATION: We have a community that we cannot enter,

:06:07.:06:09.

the press cannot enter, the public service cannot enter.

:06:10.:06:12.

According to doctors, Eloise Dixon is recovering well from surgery.

:06:13.:06:20.

Awake and talking, she's expected to be transferred to hospital

:06:21.:06:24.

in the city of Rio de Janeiro where she'll continue her recovery.

:06:25.:06:29.

More details have emerged in the case of the British model,

:06:30.:06:36.

who claims she was drugged and held captive for nearly a week

:06:37.:06:42.

The lawyer representing Chloe Ayling,

:06:43.:06:46.

who's 20 and from South London, says she was told by her kidnappers

:06:47.:06:49.

that she would be sold as a slave in the Middle East.

:06:50.:06:52.

He explained that she was acting under duress, when she was seen

:06:53.:06:55.

shopping with her captor before she was freed.

:06:56.:07:09.

She was told that people were there watching her and ready

:07:10.:07:12.

to kill her if she tried anything, so she thought that the best

:07:13.:07:15.

idea was to go along with it and to be nice,

:07:16.:07:18.

Because he told her that he wanted to release her.

:07:19.:07:23.

A victim of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Centre

:07:24.:07:26.

in New York City has been identified sixteen years on, according

:07:27.:07:29.

The man's identity was determined after DNA recovered in 2001

:07:30.:07:33.

South African MPs will vote on a motion of no-confidence

:07:34.:07:43.

The motion has been tabled by the opposition in response

:07:44.:07:48.

to the sacking of the finance minister earlier this year.

:07:49.:08:04.

The organisers of the World Athletics Championships in London

:08:05.:08:06.

have revealed that a number of athletes have contracted

:08:07.:08:09.

Botswana's Isaac Makwala, who was one of the favorites

:08:10.:08:14.

for today's 400 metres final, was forced to withdraw from the 200

:08:15.:08:16.

German and Canadian athletes are also thought

:08:17.:08:20.

The organising committee says its working closely

:08:21.:08:25.

with Public Health England to manage the situation.

:08:26.:08:31.

Meanwhile, it's day five of competition.

:08:32.:08:33.

Yesterday saw heartbreak for Laura Muir who narrowly missed

:08:34.:08:36.

There were also high hopes for hammer thrower, Sophie Hitchon,

:08:37.:08:41.

who ended up in tears after finishing seventh.

:08:42.:08:44.

Our Correspondent Natalie Pirks was following the action.

:08:45.:08:46.

COMMENTATOR: Scotland's very own Laura Muir

:08:47.:08:49.

It was not the day British fans had hoped for.

:08:50.:08:53.

The odds and a talented field were stacked against her.

:08:54.:08:59.

Britain had never had a woman in the 1500 metres.

:09:00.:09:02.

The tactic, they wanted to go out hard.

:09:03.:09:05.

With a look of determination etched across her face,

:09:06.:09:07.

But from nowhere, 800 metre, specialist, Katya Semenya,

:09:08.:09:13.

found speed to snatch the way at the death.

:09:14.:09:16.

Seven hundredths of a second separated Muir from her

:09:17.:09:19.

I guess considering the disruptions I had this year, I gave it all

:09:20.:09:35.

There was more heartbreak in the hammer cage.

:09:36.:09:39.

Sophie Hitchon's jubilation was one of the highlights of the Games.

:09:40.:09:43.

These images are becoming all too familiar at these championships.

:09:44.:09:53.

There was at least some British success to cheer.

:09:54.:09:55.

Daniel Talbot track the favourite all the way in the first

:09:56.:10:01.

round of the 100m to make it to the semi-final.

:10:02.:10:06.

Hughes was one of the fastest losers.

:10:07.:10:09.

And Mitchell-Blake, Britain's second fastest 200 metre runner of all time

:10:10.:10:13.

With no Usain Bolt, there will be a new champion.

:10:14.:10:19.

Expectations of fans are high, especially

:10:20.:10:30.

Britain's Sir Mo Farah's medal seems the only one to achieve anything

:10:31.:10:35.

Natalie Pirks, BBC News, at the London Stadium.

:10:36.:10:43.

This is the scene at the London Stadium this morning -

:10:44.:10:50.

we'll have more on all the action there yesterday and today

:10:51.:10:52.

Carol will also have the weather. We'll speak to her and Steve

:10:53.:11:09.

Backley. After a four year stakeout

:11:10.:11:12.

by wildlife experts, footage of one of England's rarest

:11:13.:11:15.

animals, the Pine Mareten, has finally been captured

:11:16.:11:18.

in the North York Moors. After a four year stakeout

:11:19.:11:21.

by wildlife experts, has finally been captured

:11:22.:11:26.

in the North York Moors. The sighting is the first

:11:27.:11:31.

in the area for more than 30 years. The Yorkshire Pine Marten Project

:11:32.:11:35.

managed to capture the footage after setting up camera traps around

:11:36.:11:38.

the Moors. After a four year stakeout by wildlife experts,

:11:39.:11:41.

footage of one of England's rarest animals, the Pine Mareten,

:11:42.:11:43.

has finally been captured Did you know there was a sighting

:11:44.:11:57.

earlier on in July in Shropshire and it was thought they died out over a

:11:58.:12:00.

century ago but they've been migrating. They're just hiding so

:12:01.:12:05.

people can't stare at them. There you go. I guarantee you will never

:12:06.:12:08.

repeat that fact. More than 40% of maternity wards

:12:09.:12:16.

in England closed their doors to expectant mothers at least

:12:17.:12:22.

once in 2016. That's according to data

:12:23.:12:24.

from the Labour party, which blames staffing shortages

:12:25.:12:27.

for the closures. Though the government says

:12:28.:12:29.

the numbers are misleading. Jacque Gerrard from the Royal

:12:30.:12:31.

College of Midwives joins us now. Your reaction first of all to the

:12:32.:12:42.

figures. Is this a surprise to you? It's absolutely not a surprise, it's

:12:43.:12:45.

something the Royal College of Midwives are hearing on a daily

:12:46.:12:50.

basis from those that work in the system. They're telling us the

:12:51.:12:56.

pressures that they're up against and they're working against on a

:12:57.:13:02.

daily basis, things like staffing levels with 3500 short. We have an

:13:03.:13:08.

increase in the birth rate, 2005-2016, 50,000 more births in

:13:09.:13:11.

England for example, so we have got a real worry there in terms of

:13:12.:13:15.

trying to meet the demands of the service with enough midwives and

:13:16.:13:21.

staff. Can you talk about the practicalities of it. It says half

:13:22.:13:26.

of England's maternity units almost closing to new mothers at some

:13:27.:13:30.

point. What does that mean in a practical level, because presumably

:13:31.:13:33.

people can turn up at any time of day or night? Yes. I think that is

:13:34.:13:38.

the nature of the issue. We know roughly how many mums are booked and

:13:39.:13:43.

given maternity units for a given of time. We don't know when they're

:13:44.:13:47.

going to go into labour. Sometimes the pressure is that a whole lot of

:13:48.:13:51.

women go into labour at one time. If you couple that with not enough

:13:52.:13:56.

midwives, for example if there are a lot off or if there are vacancies,

:13:57.:14:02.

illnesses, actually on the grounds of safety, the maternity manager or

:14:03.:14:06.

the head has to make a decision, it's not safe for women to come in.

:14:07.:14:11.

That can last for maybe 24 hours or a few days or could run into weeks

:14:12.:14:17.

and centres, small birth centres for example, sometimes may have to close

:14:18.:14:21.

for six or more weeks. It depends on the situation where you are in the

:14:22.:14:25.

country. I'm sure you know that expectant mothers will be watching

:14:26.:14:28.

and may be concerned because there is that strict birthing plan where

:14:29.:14:32.

you plan where you are going to go, you know the route, you have a snack

:14:33.:14:38.

bag with you and that nightmare scenario is you turn up and you are

:14:39.:14:43.

told, sorry we have no room here. Let me reassure women that that will

:14:44.:14:48.

not happen. This is planned. When services close the doors, they plan

:14:49.:14:52.

it. There is an escalation policy in place. The heads of midwifery in

:14:53.:14:56.

each region have an escalation plan. So as soon as things start to look a

:14:57.:15:00.

little tricky, they're on the phone to each other to say how many beds

:15:01.:15:05.

have you got, we are approaching crisis, can you help us out et

:15:06.:15:10.

cetera. A plan will be put in place, midwives will be told to tell women

:15:11.:15:17.

in the community, no women will turn up and will be turned away. If a

:15:18.:15:23.

woman turned up, she'd be assessed and cared for then a decision to

:15:24.:15:27.

transfer out would be made then so please don't worry about it, we will

:15:28.:15:31.

look after you but we have to plan and we have to be really careful and

:15:32.:15:35.

make sure that we are providing high quality safe care, safety is most

:15:36.:15:39.

important. It may be that you won't be having the baby in the hospital

:15:40.:15:42.

that you planned to have it though? That is correct. So therefore you

:15:43.:15:45.

have got a big disappointment and you have to manage that situation so

:15:46.:15:50.

you need to support the women and look and see where we can deliver

:15:51.:15:54.

their baby. You will be aware, we have asked the Department of Health

:15:55.:15:57.

for a response, they say we want the NHS to be one of the safest places

:15:58.:16:00.

in the world to have a baby and patients should be reassured we

:16:01.:16:03.

continue to have enough midwives in the NHS. They go on to say, to use

:16:04.:16:08.

the figures as an indication of safe staffing issues particularly when a

:16:09.:16:11.

number could have been for a matter of hours is misleading because

:16:12.:16:14.

maternity services are unable to plan the exact time and place for

:16:15.:16:18.

all of the women in their care. They are saying this is in some ways

:16:19.:16:21.

having to be the way it is? 9/11 Well, we would disagree with

:16:22.:16:32.

that because we know that we are 3500 midwives short. 2500 midwives

:16:33.:16:37.

don't come into the system because it takes three years to train a

:16:38.:16:40.

midwife, when we have looked closely at the figures and the data we're

:16:41.:16:47.

year-on-year basis only putting into the system 104 more midwives so

:16:48.:16:51.

that's not going to help the situation. We need to look at this

:16:52.:16:55.

closely and look closely at the maternity services that are closing

:16:56.:16:58.

on a regular basis. Where a service is closing once a year, a couple of

:16:59.:17:03.

times a year, we understand that and we support the heads of midwifery,

:17:04.:17:07.

but where they are closing it regularly, there is a pressure on

:17:08.:17:10.

that system and we have to look why. Is it staffing levels? Is it about

:17:11.:17:14.

the number of maternity beds? What's wrong in the system? We have to look

:17:15.:17:18.

closely and take this seriously so we would disagree with Government

:17:19.:17:21.

that we have enough in place. We need to drive this and please listen

:17:22.:17:28.

to this Government, we do need 3500 more midwives and we need them today

:17:29.:17:32.

and that will keep us treading water. We have an ageing midwifery

:17:33.:17:38.

workforce. We have one-third of our midwives who are over 50 and some

:17:39.:17:42.

are over 60. Thank you for explaining your case.

:17:43.:17:50.

In parts of three counties we have had up to nine millimetres of

:17:51.:18:06.

rainfall in the last hour. Here in London on the roof of Broadcasting

:18:07.:18:10.

House, it's fine and mild and it's brightening up. But don't be fooled

:18:11.:18:15.

because there is the chance of torrential downpours today

:18:16.:18:18.

particularly so across the South East and East Anglia which may well

:18:19.:18:21.

lead to surface water issues. Something to bear in mind. This

:18:22.:18:25.

morning as well as the rain and you can see where we have got that great

:18:26.:18:30.

big arc of rain, it is retating around an area of low pressure. We

:18:31.:18:34.

have got showers in the north and the west. In between the showers,

:18:35.:18:38.

sunshine. This scenario will carry on into the afternoon. Where we have

:18:39.:18:42.

got the cloud is where temperatures rise, it will spark off the heavy

:18:43.:18:47.

and thundery downpours. In Scotland, you're looking at sunshine and

:18:48.:18:50.

showers. Some of the showers will be heavy and thundery, but there will

:18:51.:18:53.

be a lot of dry or sunny conditions. It is the same for Cumbria and

:18:54.:18:59.

Lancashire, sunshine and showers, but for north-east England we are

:19:00.:19:02.

back into the rain fal and the rain extends across the Pennines, towards

:19:03.:19:06.

the Midlands, into East Anglia, through Cambridgeshire, the Home

:19:07.:19:09.

Counties, Kent, all the way down towards the Isle of Wight. In that

:19:10.:19:12.

rain, temperatures will come down and it will feel cool. But as we

:19:13.:19:16.

drift further west, in the direction of south-west England, we're back

:19:17.:19:20.

into bright spells, sunshine and showers and for Wales, some of the

:19:21.:19:23.

showers will be heavy and thundery. Some will be slow moving, but again

:19:24.:19:27.

in between them, we will see some brighter skies. For Northern

:19:28.:19:32.

Ireland, you will have sunshine and showers today, but the showers won't

:19:33.:19:36.

be as heavy and won't be as frequent, so a bit more sunshine for

:19:37.:19:39.

you. As we head through the course of the evening and overnight, we

:19:40.:19:43.

will have that rain. If anything, it will move a little bit further

:19:44.:19:47.

north. So extending across northern England, through parts of the

:19:48.:19:51.

Midlands, through parts of Wales, into Gloucestershire and also

:19:52.:19:54.

Somerset. Temperature wise tonight, ten to 13 Celsius in towns and

:19:55.:19:58.

cities. But in rural areas, we're looking at a chilly night. So we

:19:59.:20:01.

start off with that rain tomorrow and if anything, it's dragged by the

:20:02.:20:05.

low pressure back down towards the South East. And through the day.

:20:06.:20:09.

Again it is East Anglia and the South East of England that are

:20:10.:20:12.

likely to see heavy downpours. So again, there is the risk of surface

:20:13.:20:18.

water flooding. But for the rest of the UK, we're back into a drier day

:20:19.:20:21.

with fewer showers and some sunshine. And by the time we get to

:20:22.:20:26.

Thursday, well, we have got the dregs of the rain, it won't be as

:20:27.:20:29.

heavy in the South East, continuing to be pulled away on to the near

:20:30.:20:32.

Continent by the low pressure. So, most of us will have a dry day.

:20:33.:20:37.

There will be sunny spells. Take a glance at what's happening across

:20:38.:20:39.

the north-west of Scotland just off the coast. Another weather front is

:20:40.:20:43.

coming our way and that's going to be sinking south-east wards as well.

:20:44.:20:46.

So it is going to be fairly wet for some of us over the next couple of

:20:47.:20:51.

days, but particularly so in East Anglia and the South East, Dan and

:20:52.:20:52.

Lou. Carol, thank you very much, see you

:20:53.:21:02.

later. Thank you for your comments including carrier bags. Steph has

:21:03.:21:14.

the details. People have lots of opinions about paying for carrier

:21:15.:21:15.

bags. Good morning.

:21:16.:21:17.

Tesco is scrapping 5p carrier bags, which means anyone wanting

:21:18.:21:19.

to bag their shopping will either have to bring their own

:21:20.:21:23.

or pay for a bag for life which start at 10p.

:21:24.:21:26.

Tesco says it's to cut down on plastic bag usage.

:21:27.:21:29.

A lot of you have been in touch about this.

:21:30.:21:32.

Sue says "We managed without plastic before. Why do we need it now? It is

:21:33.:21:42.

do-able and the planet is worth it." Gaz says, "The bags can be recycled

:21:43.:21:49.

and reused." Rob says, "Why not get rid of the environmentally damaging

:21:50.:21:57.

plastic bags?" Peter says, "Since the introduction Tesco has donated

:21:58.:22:06.

its profits from the bags." We have seen the supermarkets donate the

:22:07.:22:09.

money that they have made from it, but they don't have to do it.

:22:10.:22:11.

The owner of the hotel chains like Holiday Inn,

:22:12.:22:17.

Crowne Plaza and Indigo has announced a rise in half year

:22:18.:22:20.

The chain has 750,000 rooms around the world and serves over

:22:21.:22:24.

It has said this morning it's focusing more on the boutique side

:22:25.:22:32.

of the business and reduce the budget hotel rooms.

:22:33.:22:34.

We are taking more foreign holidays than ever before.

:22:35.:22:36.

We did 45 million of them last year - that's up 70%

:22:37.:22:39.

One of the biggest changes is that we're doing more shorter

:22:40.:22:46.

More common is for us to do weekends away and then have a week away.

:22:47.:23:02.

Holidays, bags, hotels, you name it! I feel exhausted by it all!

:23:03.:23:05.

Thank you, Steph. First came Phileas Fogg,

:23:06.:23:09.

then Michael Palin and now it's the turn of cyclist,

:23:10.:23:11.

Mark Beaumont. He's aiming to travel

:23:12.:23:12.

around the world in 80 The challenge has seen him

:23:13.:23:15.

cover 240 miles a day, In a moment, we'll speak to Mark

:23:16.:23:22.

to find out how he's getting on, but first let's take a look

:23:23.:23:28.

at his journey so far It's great to get the first day in

:23:29.:23:47.

and put miles in the bank. It's great. I thought it was just a bit

:23:48.:23:51.

of sitting water and my front wheel in and it was just a huge hole. The

:23:52.:23:55.

first thing I felt was broken tooth in my mouth. I've chipped a good

:23:56.:24:00.

amount of my ka nine tooth there. I wasn't loving the last couple of

:24:01.:24:04.

days in Russia because of the trucks and the rough roads and the storms

:24:05.:24:07.

and the head wind, but days like today make up for it.

:24:08.:24:15.

This is back on tarmac. Oh, the end of day 26. That is the Chinese

:24:16.:24:21.

border. And it's closed! This is the end of leg one. 6675 miles from

:24:22.:24:33.

Paris in 28 days. I'm in Australia! I have to say, that's not sunk in

:24:34.:24:38.

yet. It all feels a little bit weird.

:24:39.:24:42.

I just felt it go uneven like, it wasn't pedalling level and that's

:24:43.:24:45.

when I shouted stop and change the pedals. Today was a good day because

:24:46.:24:50.

I clocked over 8,000 miles. I'm here with my hot-water bottle and food

:24:51.:24:55.

and I will be asleep in about 20 minutes.

:24:56.:25:03.

We are on a Skype line. It could go down any time.

:25:04.:25:11.

I'm between Adelaide and Melbourne so I'm in Victoria. It is later in

:25:12.:25:24.

the day for me. I'm already about 300 kilometres into my day. Most

:25:25.:25:32.

people here in the UK, they are getting to grips with the new day.

:25:33.:25:35.

Tell us about the harder times you have had. There was that awful crash

:25:36.:25:39.

you had in Russia, wasn't there? That was day nine. I got through

:25:40.:25:45.

Europe in six days. I was flying and got east of Moscow. I was on such a

:25:46.:25:50.

high and putting in huge days and then early morning rain, crashed and

:25:51.:25:54.

I thought it was all over. I really did, day nine.

:25:55.:25:59.

Breaking my tooth was annoying and we had to get emergency dental

:26:00.:26:03.

repairs done on the roadside literally, but what ended up being a

:26:04.:26:07.

more long-term issue is the damage I've done to my left elbow. A month

:26:08.:26:13.

later and it's still giving me a lot of grief. It looks like there is a

:26:14.:26:16.

hairline fracture or an issue there. I'm on the bike for 16 hours a day

:26:17.:26:21.

so there is no time for the body to recover. I mean there has been many

:26:22.:26:25.

highs and lows. Some preting unforgiving weather as you might

:26:26.:26:29.

imagine. It's winter down here so the graveyard shift, the early

:26:30.:26:32.

morning shifts are incredibly cold and the battle in Australia is

:26:33.:26:35.

always the wind. Sometimes it's with me. Sometimes it's against me and

:26:36.:26:41.

that's incredibly tough. So 240 miles a day with a broken arm as

:26:42.:26:44.

well. You're nearly at the half-way point. Mentally, how are things

:26:45.:26:54.

going, Mark? Massive highs and lows. Anyone involved in endurance sport

:26:55.:26:59.

will know that. There is wonderful moments, riding through dawn every

:27:00.:27:02.

day is exciting. Completing a big day knowing... The mental battle

:27:03.:27:08.

every day. I will never be able to put into words where your mind goes

:27:09.:27:12.

on the bike. I'm only sleeping five hours a night. I'm on the bike from

:27:13.:27:17.

4am. I get off the bike at about half nine at night, but there is

:27:18.:27:22.

enough milestones along the way to keep the focus short. By the end of

:27:23.:27:26.

today I should behalf way around the world and that's massive, you know,

:27:27.:27:33.

that will be about 37 days and 18 hours since I left from Paris and

:27:34.:27:38.

I've gone 9,000 miles. I cycled around the world ten years ago and

:27:39.:27:42.

it took me a lot longer than that. Well, listen, all the best with it

:27:43.:27:46.

Mark, and we'll catch up with you again. Keep pounding the pavements

:27:47.:27:50.

and we will see you later on. Good luck, Mark. A broken arm. 240 miles

:27:51.:27:56.

a day. He's eating 8,000 calories. Incredible. Good luck to him.

:27:57.:27:59.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:28:00.:31:19.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:31:20.:31:33.

More than 40 maternity units in England closed to new admissions

:31:34.:31:38.

at some point last year, according to data

:31:39.:31:40.

42 out of 96 trusts in England that responded to a Freedom

:31:41.:31:44.

of Information request said they'd shut maternity wards

:31:45.:31:46.

The Government says the numbers are misleading.

:31:47.:31:52.

A British woman is being treated in hospital after being shot

:31:53.:31:55.

while on holiday with her family in Brazil.

:31:56.:31:58.

Eloise Dixon from South London was driving with her partner

:31:59.:32:01.

and three children when they took a wrong turn into an area controlled

:32:02.:32:04.

She was shot twice and the medics treating her say she's

:32:05.:32:11.

More details have emerged in the case of the British model

:32:12.:32:18.

who claims she was drugged and held captive for nearly a week

:32:19.:32:21.

The lawyer representing Chloe Ayling, who's 20

:32:22.:32:24.

and from South London, says she was told by her kidnappers

:32:25.:32:26.

that she would be sold as a slave in the Middle East.

:32:27.:32:29.

He explained that she was acting under duress when she was seen

:32:30.:32:32.

shopping with her captor before she was freed.

:32:33.:32:40.

Contaminated eggs - imported from the Netherlands -

:32:41.:32:42.

have been distributed in the UK, according

:32:43.:32:44.

They were found to contain an insecticide which can

:32:45.:32:47.

Health officials say only a "very small number" of the affected eggs

:32:48.:32:51.

have reached UK shores and the risk to the public is low.

:32:52.:33:00.

We don't think there's any reason why people should avoid eggs, or

:33:01.:33:08.

change the way they cook or con seemed them. The vast majority of

:33:09.:33:13.

them would have been eaten already. If we find any products still on the

:33:14.:33:17.

market that have got those eggs in them, we'll make sure they are taken

:33:18.:33:18.

off sale. A victim of the 9/11 attack on the

:33:19.:33:27.

World Trade Center has been identified 16 years on. The man's

:33:28.:33:32.

identity was determined after DNA was retested using new technology.

:33:33.:33:37.

The Welsh government has announced plans to invest more than ?1 million

:33:38.:33:40.

in dental health. It says the move will create 10,000

:33:41.:33:43.

new NHS dental places, including in some of the most

:33:44.:33:45.

deprived parts of Wales. However, critics - including

:33:46.:33:48.

the British Dental Association - say the Welsh government took

:33:49.:33:50.

more than ?6 million out of the Welsh dental budget last year

:33:51.:33:52.

and the investment announced today We had some pretty amazing pictures

:33:53.:34:08.

this morning of a lunar eclipse visible in many parts of the world.

:34:09.:34:12.

Eclipses happen when the Earth passes between the sun

:34:13.:34:14.

This one could be viewed on several continents,

:34:15.:34:17.

although many countries could only see part of it.

:34:18.:34:20.

A second full eclipse will occur on the 21st of August

:34:21.:34:23.

over North America - the first of its kind

:34:24.:34:25.

It looks a bit like a Star Wars set. It looks so beautiful.

:34:26.:34:43.

Coming up here on Breakfast this morning.

:34:44.:34:45.

We'll return to the London Stadium to speak to the former javelin

:34:46.:34:48.

world record holder, Steve Backley, about the World

:34:49.:34:50.

I felt like we needed a fresh start, so here I am.

:34:51.:34:59.

And from being confirmed as the next Dr Who...

:35:00.:35:02.

After 8:30, we'll find out about actress Jodie Whittaker's

:35:03.:35:05.

new role in the BBC thriller, Trust Me.

:35:06.:35:11.

And after 9am, we'll meet the former homeless man turned property tycoon,

:35:12.:35:14.

to find out why he's planning to give away a flat for free.

:35:15.:35:22.

Now let's find out what is happening at the world athletics

:35:23.:35:28.

Championships. Yesterday was a really exciting day.

:35:29.:35:30.

It was an amazing 1500 metres last night, with Laura Muir just

:35:31.:35:33.

Jessica is at the London Stadium for us this morning.

:35:34.:35:37.

What a great place to be standing, even though they aren't there. Good

:35:38.:35:43.

morning. We've moved up to the stadium now. The British team had

:35:44.:35:46.

such high hopes going into these championships. They were set an

:35:47.:35:51.

ambitious target of 6-8 medals. At this point the British team still

:35:52.:35:56.

only have one medal to their name, the fantastic gold won by Mo Farah

:35:57.:36:01.

in that brilliant 10,000 metre final. You begin to wonder as we

:36:02.:36:05.

start day five where those medals are going to come from. There were

:36:06.:36:08.

missed opportunities particularly last night.

:36:09.:36:10.

It was heartbreak for Great Britain's Laura Muir

:36:11.:36:12.

in the women's 1500m final, as she missed out on a medal

:36:13.:36:15.

by seven hundredths of a second on the finish line.

:36:16.:36:19.

She ran a very brave race in what was a tough field including the

:36:20.:36:26.

Olympic champion and the world champion.

:36:27.:36:28.

The 24-year-old was pipped right at the end by South

:36:29.:36:31.

Africa's Caster Semenya, who's perhaps better

:36:32.:36:32.

Just that last 50 metres I was tied up.

:36:33.:36:49.

Considering what has happened this year, I gave it all I could

:36:50.:36:55.

Disappointment too for the Olympic bronze medallist Sophie Hitchon -

:36:56.:37:00.

she couldn't quite match her achievements at Rio last year.

:37:01.:37:04.

Her best effort of 72.32 in the hammer final wasn't enough

:37:05.:37:06.

for a medal as she finished in seventh place.

:37:07.:37:19.

Better news for team captain Eilidh Doyle,

:37:20.:37:20.

was one of two British women who made it into the semifinals

:37:21.:37:23.

We were expecting to see the fastest man in the world over 200 metres,

:37:24.:37:30.

Botswana's Isaac Makwala, run last night.

:37:31.:37:31.

But he was absent from his heat and it later emerged he was one

:37:32.:37:35.

of a number of athletes suffering from stomach bug at one

:37:36.:37:37.

Moeen Ali was England's hero once again, as he and his team-mates

:37:38.:37:51.

secured a 3-1 series win over South Africa.

:37:52.:37:53.

He helped England claim a 177-run victory in the Fourth Test,

:37:54.:38:00.

and also ensured that the team climbs to third in the Test

:38:01.:38:03.

It's a first home Test series win against South Africa

:38:04.:38:07.

And a first for Joe Root as England captain.

:38:08.:38:21.

Thank you, Jessica. It's lovely to see you there.

:38:22.:38:26.

As you've been hearing, lots of action on the track at the world

:38:27.:38:31.

athletics Championships and plenty more to come. You've been having a

:38:32.:38:35.

look at what's in store today. Here it is.

:38:36.:38:40.

Britain's Kyle Langford finished second in his semi-final to take

:38:41.:38:43.

Langford is just 21, he won the European junior title in 2015.

:38:44.:38:50.

South African Wayde van Niekerk is the 400 metre Olympic champion.

:38:51.:38:55.

He cruised into the 400 metre final, and is expected to win gold.

:38:56.:38:59.

He's hoping to do the 200 and 400 metre double here in London.

:39:00.:39:07.

Next up, Eilidh Doyle, crowned European champion in 2014,

:39:08.:39:09.

a two-time Commonwealth silver-medallist.

:39:10.:39:13.

She was also voted the British team captain for these championships.

:39:14.:39:16.

She says she's in good shape coming into the event.

:39:17.:39:19.

Frenchman Renaud Lavillenie, who won the Olympic title here in 2012,

:39:20.:39:28.

will be aiming to win his first outdoor world title.

:39:29.:39:32.

He only started training in May this year after suffering a foot injury,

:39:33.:39:35.

If you want to keep up with today's action,

:39:36.:39:42.

tune in to BBC Two from 6:30pm to 10:30pm tonight.

:39:43.:39:53.

And we can speak now to the double Olympic javelin silver

:39:54.:40:00.

medallist Steve Backley, who is also part of

:40:01.:40:02.

the BBC's commentary team at the World Athletics.

:40:03.:40:04.

Thank you for joining us. We are looking ahead at what's happening

:40:05.:40:08.

today. I wondered how you would assess the British performance so

:40:09.:40:13.

far, still that single gold medal for Mo Farah. Yes, just the one

:40:14.:40:19.

gold. It's not been going great. We've had some marginal performances

:40:20.:40:24.

that have been the wrong side of the medals. Katarina Johnson-Thompson

:40:25.:40:27.

hope to get a medal and didn't. Laura Muir last night coming fourth

:40:28.:40:33.

in the 1500 metres. Sophie Hitchon to medal last year in the Olympics,

:40:34.:40:37.

she came in seventh place. It's not been the greatest so far. The medal

:40:38.:40:41.

chances are running out for the British team. Talk us through last

:40:42.:40:46.

night and Laura Muir and that 1500 metres. Laura, for me, I've watched

:40:47.:40:54.

a lot of middle-distance running over the years. I grew up in the

:40:55.:41:00.

said code area and I love the event. Laura got the tactics of the run. I

:41:01.:41:05.

think surely back and say she got it wrong. She went out fast and slowed

:41:06.:41:08.

it down and was swallowed up by field. Three laps in, to get bumped

:41:09.:41:14.

around a she did, is energy sapping. She just didn't have the legs in the

:41:15.:41:25.

final stages. Cast as many in the final -- Caster Semenya in the final

:41:26.:41:29.

closing in on her. I really feel for her. For the position, the worst

:41:30.:41:33.

position any athlete can come in. She really got it wrong

:41:34.:41:38.

strategically. At least she was able to perform. You know what it's like

:41:39.:41:42.

to prepare for these major championships we'd try and take care

:41:43.:41:46.

of every detail, then you arrive and you get a stomach bug which a number

:41:47.:41:50.

of athletes are suffering from. Quite a few people aren't even able

:41:51.:41:55.

to compete. Yes, you train for months and years comic you try to

:41:56.:42:02.

uncover every stone and be as diligent as you possibly can. Then

:42:03.:42:07.

to get take stomach bug which I understand is affecting German team

:42:08.:42:10.

in particular, this sort of stuff happens. You only drink bottled

:42:11.:42:15.

water, you take the ice out of your drinks, you wash your hands, you're

:42:16.:42:20.

careful. But if there's a bug flying around and it affects you

:42:21.:42:23.

systemically you are going to suffer the consequences. The margins of

:42:24.:42:27.

victory to not making the final that the World Championships are tiny,

:42:28.:42:31.

something like a stomach bug can be hugely debilitating. It can really

:42:32.:42:36.

take the legs out from under you. Literally! Let's look ahead to the

:42:37.:42:41.

200 metres semifinals. Three British men through, could there be a medal

:42:42.:42:49.

there? I think when athletes are in the mix in finals they have a

:42:50.:42:54.

chance. It's been going the wrong way for so many of the athletes,

:42:55.:42:59.

Katarina Johnson-Thompson, Holly Bradshaw, Sophie Hitchon, Laura

:43:00.:43:03.

Muir, just the wrong side of the medals. In the 200 metres we've got

:43:04.:43:11.

some chances. While athletes are in the mix, something has got to go our

:43:12.:43:16.

way at some point. We were talking yesterday to the guys who finished

:43:17.:43:19.

really well in the marathon and they were talking about the power and the

:43:20.:43:24.

pull of a home crowd. It can also affect you negatively. Could that be

:43:25.:43:29.

happening on some occasions? No. I think it's only positive. The one

:43:30.:43:33.

British performance that's been off the chart is the crowds in Nuremberg

:43:34.:43:38.

stadium, 60,000 people in every session pretty much. That's only

:43:39.:43:43.

positive. There's nothing negative about that. There's a real optimism.

:43:44.:43:49.

The atmosphere is incredible here inside the stadium. That can only be

:43:50.:43:53.

positive. We aren't really making the most of it yet. We are getting

:43:54.:43:59.

towards the halfway stage of the World Championships, more chances

:44:00.:44:04.

hopefully to convert. Let's hope so. It's lovely to hear about the crowd.

:44:05.:44:11.

Thank you. You can watch all the athletics coverage from 6:30pm

:44:12.:44:19.

tonight on BBC Two. More details have been urging the case of the

:44:20.:44:22.

British model who claims she was drugged and held captive for a week

:44:23.:44:26.

in Italy. The lawyer representing Chloe Ayling has been speaking to

:44:27.:44:31.

the BBC. Let's get more information from our Europe correspondent in

:44:32.:44:35.

Milan. Good morning. Tell us what the lawyer has been saying. Good

:44:36.:44:44.

morning. He believes, he told me, there has been a lot of conflicting

:44:45.:44:49.

reports about this. There has been a lot of concern for Chloe Ayling but

:44:50.:44:53.

also a lot of misreporting. What we know so far, what the lawyer has

:44:54.:44:58.

said and the police have confirmed, is that she was taken a fuse streets

:44:59.:45:03.

from here at a fake photo shoot she had left the UK for. She was

:45:04.:45:10.

injected with kept in, bundled into a bag in the back of a car and taken

:45:11.:45:19.

120 miles to the French border, an empty village farmhouse. Inside

:45:20.:45:23.

there, the lawyer Francesco Peschi said to me that she spent a few days

:45:24.:45:27.

tied to furniture. She was eventually released. At that point

:45:28.:45:34.

she was able to spend some time wandering the house. But she was

:45:35.:45:39.

always told if she moved, she was threatened with death. She's in a

:45:40.:45:43.

situation where, for her, her lawyer said she felt she had to comply.

:45:44.:45:47.

There have been reports that she went shopping with one of her

:45:48.:45:50.

captors the day before she was released. She is saying and her

:45:51.:45:56.

lawyer is saying this is because she was complying. She was told if she

:45:57.:46:00.

didn't do whatever they said she would be killed. We now know she

:46:01.:46:03.

stayed in Italy for another three weeks and was only released on

:46:04.:46:07.

Sunday. She has been showing police and helping them as much as she

:46:08.:46:09.

could. What do you know about the lines of

:46:10.:46:18.

inquiry the police are following? The police investigators here, they

:46:19.:46:22.

believe there are up to four men involved in this gang, the Black

:46:23.:46:26.

Death group behind this kidnapping, and on the face of it it seems to

:46:27.:46:31.

suggest they were trying to sell her online. The lawyer for Chloe said

:46:32.:46:36.

she was told she was going to be sold for sex in the Middle East. For

:46:37.:46:46.

?230,000. But there might be moderate than that. One Polish

:46:47.:46:51.

National from the West Midlands has been arrested already. We are told

:46:52.:46:58.

he is being questioned right now, and his name is Lukasz Herba. He is

:46:59.:47:02.

probably likely to appear in court in about six monthss' time in this

:47:03.:47:06.

case. STUDIO: Thank you for that update.

:47:07.:47:11.

If you're following the cycling, Mark Beaumont, cycling in

:47:12.:47:16.

Australia... Was speaking to us while he was cycling, obviously

:47:17.:47:20.

hands-free, an amazing athlete. Yes, if you want to find that interview

:47:21.:47:24.

again you can watch it on the eye player, at various points throughout

:47:25.:47:29.

the day as well. I think he was an act 20 past eight -- the iPlayer.

:47:30.:47:37.

That was the weather in Australia. Here's Carol with a look

:47:38.:47:38.

at this morning's weather. Thank you. I'm on the roof of the

:47:39.:47:47.

Broadcasting House in London. It is bright and we might even see a

:47:48.:47:51.

glimmer of sunshine however that is not necessarily the forecast today.

:47:52.:47:56.

We have showers, some rain, and the chance of some heavy downpours which

:47:57.:48:00.

could also be thundery. We have already had some heavy thundery

:48:01.:48:05.

downpours today, some heavy rain across Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire,

:48:06.:48:10.

for example, up to roughly nine millimetres of rainfall, and you can

:48:11.:48:12.

throw in Buckinghamshire as well. Not everywhere, just parts of these

:48:13.:48:17.

counties. You can see where we have that rain, heavy in Lincolnshire,

:48:18.:48:21.

down through the Midlands through parts of the South of England. Then

:48:22.:48:25.

there is a dryer area with a lot of cloud in East Anglia and the

:48:26.:48:28.

south-east and on the other side of that, sunshine and showers. Into the

:48:29.:48:39.

afternoon the forecast for Scotland is sunshine and showers, some heavy

:48:40.:48:41.

and thundery, but don't forget there will be a fair bit of sunshine in

:48:42.:48:44.

between. Cumbria, Lancashire, also bright spells and sunshine and

:48:45.:48:46.

showers. Then we run into the rain. North-east England, the Midlands,

:48:47.:48:50.

East Anglia, down towards the south coast and Kent. This is where we

:48:51.:48:54.

will see some torrential downpours, especially East Anglia and the

:48:55.:48:58.

south-east. Drifting further west, we are back into bright spells,

:48:59.:49:02.

sunshine and showers. We have that scenario for Wales this afternoon,

:49:03.:49:05.

but you will find the showers will be more frequent air, heavier and

:49:06.:49:15.

likely to be thundery. For Northern Ireland, sunshine and showers sums

:49:16.:49:18.

it up. The showers will be less frequent and also less intense.

:49:19.:49:20.

Through the evening and overnight, the band of rain will edge further

:49:21.:49:23.

north, extending from north-east and north-west England down towards the

:49:24.:49:27.

Midlands, Wales, Gloucestershire and Somerset. On either side it will be

:49:28.:49:31.

dryer with a few showers and temperatures running about 10-13,

:49:32.:49:36.

but chilly in some rural areas. Tomorrow starts with that same arc

:49:37.:49:39.

of rain but it will be dragged further south by the low-pressure

:49:40.:49:43.

governing our weather at the moment, so again tomorrow in East Anglia and

:49:44.:49:46.

also the south-east we will see some heavy rain, and all of this

:49:47.:50:05.

could with surface water flooding, for example, in places. Moving away

:50:06.:50:08.

from that, back into bright skies and some sunshine. Thursday morning

:50:09.:50:10.

sees the remnants of that rain in the south-east eventually pulling

:50:11.:50:13.

away leaving most of us with a dry day with sunny spells, but as you

:50:14.:50:15.

can see just off the coastline of north-west Scotland, more rain

:50:16.:50:18.

waiting in the wings, and that is also coming our way. If you have not

:50:19.:50:21.

bought a brolly, get one now! Back to you. Their sales will increase to

:50:22.:50:23.

the! When Carol tells you to do something, you just have to do it!

:50:24.:50:28.

LAUGHTER Before we go to buy a brolly...

:50:29.:50:35.

While the world awaits her debut as the first female Doctor Who,

:50:36.:50:38.

Jodie Whittaker's next role will see her play a nurse

:50:39.:50:41.

who impersonates a doctor of the medical variety in new BBC

:50:42.:50:43.

Dan Sefton wrote the series and has more insight than most

:50:44.:50:47.

into the profession, because he's a doctor

:50:48.:50:49.

We'll speak to him in a moment, but first let's take a look

:50:50.:50:53.

We should warn you that if you're not a fan of medical

:50:54.:50:57.

Yes, very important. Close your eyes for just a moment, but stay with us!

:50:58.:51:17.

We're thinking of pulling the SAP, OK?

:51:18.:51:25.

The skin's already looking a bit stretched and Andy

:51:26.:51:44.

We don't want it falling off in x-ray - do we,

:51:45.:51:48.

I'll get the plaster trolley and we'll get cracking - literally.

:51:49.:52:00.

Definitely a broken ankle! LAUGHTER

:52:01.:52:03.

Possibly dislocated, but I'm not an expert.

:52:04.:52:03.

Good morning to you. In a moment we will come to what it is all about,

:52:04.:52:15.

but you yourself are an A doctor. And you have written the script, so

:52:16.:52:20.

you know what goes on in A? Absolutely. All the medical

:52:21.:52:23.

procedures in the show have happened to me or happens to people I know

:52:24.:52:28.

very well, and the ankle, that is slightly toned down from the worst

:52:29.:52:32.

one I have seen, but... It is pulled down? Yes, toned down. One of the

:52:33.:52:39.

things about the show, what it is really like in A, but it was

:52:40.:52:43.

important to show people what A doctors go through on a daily basis,

:52:44.:52:46.

so all of the medical things, the things that scare me, have disturbed

:52:47.:52:50.

me, it will hopefully show that the character, well she is playing a

:52:51.:52:55.

role as a doctor as an impostor, she has a tricky job and having to deal

:52:56.:52:59.

with these things night and day. That is another thing. She is a

:53:00.:53:03.

nurse, so she wants a clean break, moves to another part of the UK and

:53:04.:53:07.

takes on the identity of a friend of hers and essentially pretends to be

:53:08.:53:09.

a doctor. Is that something which you seem, or one of those stories

:53:10.:53:15.

you hear about? There are lots of examples of it, and if you Google

:53:16.:53:19.

impostor doctor you will find pages and pages throughout the last

:53:20.:53:23.

hundreds of years. There was one close to home when I was talking

:53:24.:53:27.

about this. Talking to the guys I work with and I asked, what about

:53:28.:53:31.

this? At the nurse said yes, we had one in our department couple of

:53:32.:53:34.

years ago, which I had no idea about, so I chased it up and asked

:53:35.:53:39.

about it, and it was true. A doctor just down the road, had worked in

:53:40.:53:44.

several other trusts in the UK, and that is when it started to take off,

:53:45.:53:48.

this does happen. While it is a big exciting premise, it is based on

:53:49.:53:57.

fact. I like the way you have written it, because we know she is

:53:58.:53:59.

an impostor and obviously all the other people in the drama don't.

:54:00.:54:01.

We've got an exclusive clip from tonight's episode.

:54:02.:54:03.

In an interview for the job as a doctor,

:54:04.:54:05.

So why the hell are you here? I'm sorry? This is a bloody great CV,

:54:06.:54:33.

you're so qualified, established, and why are you hanging around

:54:34.:54:37.

looking for work? I was looking for a new challenge professionally. But

:54:38.:54:44.

why here? Not exactly a service of excellence, so you have either

:54:45.:54:49.

killed and patient or, worse, you've placed someone off. Sorry... Rewind,

:54:50.:54:56.

start again. You are clearly good at this. Why here?

:54:57.:55:07.

You're right. There was something. I needed a change. I was married, and

:55:08.:55:20.

there were problems. We separated, but I have a daughter, and I didn't

:55:21.:55:26.

want her growing up in the middle of all that. I felt like we needed a

:55:27.:55:29.

fresh start, so here I am. So one lie, as anyone will know,

:55:30.:55:42.

often leads to bigger and bigger lies, and you can just see it on

:55:43.:55:49.

folding, can't you? Yes, this was at the heart of this, taking on a

:55:50.:55:53.

fundamentally honest character. Can you just take on one lie, and stay

:55:54.:55:57.

the same person, or does that change you? You see how life starts to

:55:58.:56:01.

unravel because she cannot stop lying, and where does that lead to?

:56:02.:56:06.

Does it change as a person? The thing I find fascinating, as an

:56:07.:56:10.

actor, Jodie Whittaker is lying, and then during the filming of this, is

:56:11.:56:15.

this when she learned about the role of Doctor Who, so she couldn't tell

:56:16.:56:21.

anybody about that either? She is impersonating being a doctor, even

:56:22.:56:25.

though she has a job as a doctor somewhere. Back Deeley see what I

:56:26.:56:26.

mean? LAUGHTER

:56:27.:56:33.

-- do you see what I mean? She is obviously very good liar. We needed

:56:34.:56:37.

someone who was a fantastic actress, so she is great for the role. She

:56:38.:56:41.

can't talk about what is going on in her head but the audience need to be

:56:42.:56:45.

able to read every emotion through her face, her interaction with the

:56:46.:56:49.

camera rather than dialogue. She didn't whisper a word of it while

:56:50.:56:53.

you were filming this, I know. At what point did you realise... Was it

:56:54.:56:57.

when you saw her face, when we heard that trailer, for Doctor Who, that

:56:58.:57:02.

it was going to be? As soon as I saw the first moment of it I just

:57:03.:57:08.

thought, oh, that is Jodie. And I had no clue about it. I was excited.

:57:09.:57:12.

I thought, they couldn't have made a better choice really. And in some

:57:13.:57:16.

ways, brilliant for you, because we know all about her. We did anyway,

:57:17.:57:21.

and you have in your drama as well? Yes, fantastic. It was a real coup

:57:22.:57:28.

for us, good fortune, really. Louise loved it, she walked in this morning

:57:29.:57:34.

and said, oh, it's good. Yes. LAUGHTER

:57:35.:57:35.

Trust Me begins tonight at 9pm on BBC One.

:57:36.:57:40.

Thank you for joining us, Dan. Good to talk to you.

:57:41.:57:43.

Teenagers across Scotland will be waking up this morning to receive

:57:44.:57:48.

Rebecca Burnett from Cambuslang on the outskirts of Glasgow

:57:49.:57:56.

has just received her higher results, and she joins us now.

:57:57.:57:58.

Let's find out how she got on. Rebecca, are you happy with what

:57:59.:58:03.

you've got? Yes, I'm quite pleased with what I got. I think I did quite

:58:04.:58:10.

well. Better than I thought, really. Dev us an idea, Rebecca? To stress

:58:11.:58:14.

or a day has today been? Not just for you but for your family as well.

:58:15.:58:20.

-- how stressful day has this been. It wasn't too bad because in terms

:58:21.:58:24.

of nerves I had thought about by results a lot before I got them. It

:58:25.:58:28.

was just coming up to it, the anticipation. It was a bit all over

:58:29.:58:33.

the place, if you know what I mean. Do you know how your school friends

:58:34.:58:36.

have got on as well? Have you been texting and calling each other? Some

:58:37.:58:40.

of them, yes. Some of them don't have their results in yet. Some

:58:41.:58:47.

people think they might have signed up for it but haven't got the text,

:58:48.:58:53.

if you know what I mean. Sorry, Rebecca, what are your plans for

:58:54.:58:58.

now? I imagine you will celebrate today, but what happens after that?

:58:59.:59:04.

What you want to do? Well, today I am going to do an addition for my

:59:05.:59:09.

gold, so I will be walking all-day day then camping until Friday, so

:59:10.:59:15.

that'll be fun. If there like a great way to celebrate. What about

:59:16.:59:21.

long-term plans? I am actually going to go to college at the end of this

:59:22.:59:31.

month, so I am doing an NC course in childcare. And eventually is that

:59:32.:59:35.

what you want to go into, to work and childcare? Yes, I want to go

:59:36.:59:41.

into teaching, and work with kids of different ages, primary school.

:59:42.:59:45.

Listen, thank you so much for talking to us. As you say, I know it

:59:46.:59:49.

has been a stressful day. Congratulations on those results and

:59:50.:59:52.

best, not only with you Duke of Edinburgh today, walking all day in

:59:53.:59:57.

preparation for that gold award, and all the best with the next course

:59:58.:59:59.

and hopefully a career in childcare going forward as well. Thank

:00:00.:00:00.

Rebecca. To all those people who got results

:00:01.:00:09.

today and over the next two weeks there are lots of results coming in.

:00:10.:00:13.

Good luck and I'm sure you've all worked really hard. I still remember

:00:14.:00:22.

going to get my A-level results. I grabbed the envelope and I just ran

:00:23.:00:27.

out. You don't want to open them in front of anybody! Good luck to

:00:28.:00:28.

everyone. When our next guest was diagnosed

:00:29.:00:32.

with pancreatic cancer at the age of 41, she was told she'd be

:00:33.:00:34.

unlikely to see out Today, ten years on, Ali Stunt

:00:35.:00:37.

is among the 1% with the disease In that time she's

:00:38.:00:41.

set up the charity, Pancreatic Cancer Action,

:00:42.:00:44.

to offer hope to others affected by the disease and help break

:00:45.:00:46.

the stigma that it's incurable. I just want to say congratulations,

:00:47.:00:59.

you're the 1%! I am indeed. It's a bit surreal. Ten years ago I didn't

:01:00.:01:05.

think that I would be hitting 50, let alone surviving ten years with

:01:06.:01:11.

pancreatic cancer. That 1% figure seems unachievable. When I was

:01:12.:01:16.

diagnosed the survival rate was 3%. It was a big hill to climb but I've

:01:17.:01:21.

got there. It's early diagnosis that has got me that. It took you a while

:01:22.:01:27.

to get that diagnosis because you had to visit the GP on several

:01:28.:01:32.

occasions and you were given various medication to deal with a stomach

:01:33.:01:36.

upset. Absolutely. I was one of those people who didn't go to the GP

:01:37.:01:41.

that often. Then I was turning up virtually every week and sometimes

:01:42.:01:44.

twice a week. I had symptoms that were like pain on eating which they

:01:45.:01:51.

put down to indigestion symptoms and told me to take over-the-counter

:01:52.:01:55.

medication. I had a change in bowel habits and I also had back pain. My

:01:56.:02:01.

back pain was up here and radiating run to the front. It wasn't a

:02:02.:02:08.

muscular pain and was very hard to describe. I was told to take

:02:09.:02:12.

painkillers, which I did. The escalation of the pain over a short

:02:13.:02:19.

period of time, about 5-6 weeks, and I was chewing all the analgesics I

:02:20.:02:23.

could get my hands on. Eventually I ended up in A How did somebody

:02:24.:02:29.

eventually diagnose it? They thought I might have gallstones that was

:02:30.:02:35.

causing the pain. Gallstones is a common misdiagnosis for pancreatic

:02:36.:02:38.

cancer. I was told I needed an ultrasound but it was bank holiday

:02:39.:02:42.

Monday in August. There was no one to operate the scan in Surrey. I was

:02:43.:02:49.

told to see my GP the next day. She told me it would be 4-6 weeks for an

:02:50.:02:55.

ultrasound because no one was expecting cancer including myself. I

:02:56.:03:00.

was in so much pain that I didn't feel I could wait that long, and

:03:01.:03:05.

luckily I was on my husband's medical insurance and I saw my

:03:06.:03:09.

consultant within two days. He admitted me straightaway and I had

:03:10.:03:15.

an emergency ultrasound followed by a CT scan 20 minutes later which

:03:16.:03:21.

showed I had a 5.5 centimetre mass on my pancreas. There's a lot of

:03:22.:03:29.

blood vessels in that area. Absolutely. It was in the body of my

:03:30.:03:35.

pancreas so it was away from those blood vessels. It was growing

:03:36.:03:39.

rapidly and if I'd waited for- six weeks, we don't know whether I would

:03:40.:03:43.

have been able to have the operation in which case I wouldn't be care. It

:03:44.:03:49.

was that close. It is the surgery followed by chemotherapy and, in my

:03:50.:03:56.

case, chemo radiotherapy. What lessons need to be learnt? If people

:03:57.:04:04.

get a diagnosis, what do they do? It's really, really difficult if

:04:05.:04:07.

you've got a diagnosis because a lot of people think that's it. But if

:04:08.:04:12.

you are diagnosed in time for surgery to be an option, or

:04:13.:04:18.

sometimes when you are borderline and they may use chemotherapy to

:04:19.:04:22.

shrink back the tumour to make you operable, there is a potential you

:04:23.:04:27.

may be cheered, like potentially I have -- you may be cured. It's a

:04:28.:04:34.

difficult diagnosis to take because the statistics are shocking, and

:04:35.:04:37.

it's difficult to get your head round. One of the things my husband

:04:38.:04:42.

helped me with was trying to think about being my own statistic, trying

:04:43.:04:48.

to think it was my own disease, my treatment and my outcome and time a

:04:49.:04:52.

statistic of one. He's proved me right on that. It is a way to get

:04:53.:04:57.

three that mentally, because it is quite difficult to think positively

:04:58.:05:03.

when you have pancreatic cancer. That's a message you try to get

:05:04.:05:09.

across your charity. Absolutely. Thank you very much for coming to

:05:10.:05:17.

talk to us. In a few minutes time will meet a former homeless man

:05:18.:05:21.

turned property tycoon who is giving away a flat for free.

:05:22.:05:23.

Now a last brief look at the headlines where

:05:24.:05:25.

As a child, our next guest, slept on a park bench

:05:26.:07:11.

as he and his mother struggled to make ends meet.

:07:12.:07:13.

Fast forward to the present day and Marco Robinson is now

:07:14.:07:16.

In an effort to help another family escape the financial

:07:17.:07:22.

hardship he once endured, Marco is giving a way

:07:23.:07:24.

a three bedroom flat in Preston - worth ?120,000.

:07:25.:07:30.

We'll speak to him in a moment, but first let's see

:07:31.:07:33.

a clip from the programme Get A House For Free.

:07:34.:07:44.

I really want to meet as many people as I can, get to know their story,

:07:45.:07:51.

find out the truth. Find out the reasons why they are where they are.

:07:52.:07:55.

But really, it's about how are they going to benefit from it. Am I going

:07:56.:08:00.

to benefit the right people? Are they going to get the most benefit

:08:01.:08:07.

from it by me giving a home to them? To meet has many of those who have

:08:08.:08:12.

applied for the property as possible, Marco has arranged an open

:08:13.:08:17.

day. Oh my goodness, it's like a dream come true. What's your

:08:18.:08:22.

situation now? We live at home with my mum and dad. We are in a

:08:23.:08:29.

two-bedroom flat. My daughter shares with my mum and dad and I've got him

:08:30.:08:36.

in the box room. It's small. We have 14 days to vacate. That means we are

:08:37.:08:40.

going to be on the street against PLO how do you feel about that? That

:08:41.:08:46.

is scary. It gets you down, doesn't it? What would happen if you were

:08:47.:08:52.

evicted? I don't know, I've never been in this situation before. We

:08:53.:08:55.

need to get a roof over our heads and then we'll take it from there.

:08:56.:08:58.

What we saw there was a selection of the thousands of people who applied.

:08:59.:09:10.

Give us an idea of how this came up. As you said, thousands, there were

:09:11.:09:17.

8000 official applicants. For me, basically, I wanted to do something

:09:18.:09:21.

to give back. I really wanted to make a difference to people's lives.

:09:22.:09:26.

I looked at my past and my struggle as a kid, and as an adult really, in

:09:27.:09:32.

terms of making a success of myself. I thought, why don't I give a home

:09:33.:09:38.

away, why don't I pay the mortgage off? What difference would that make

:09:39.:09:42.

to someone's lives? If you look at people's lives these days in this

:09:43.:09:47.

country and all over the world, people are finding it really

:09:48.:09:50.

difficult to get a house in the first place. Saving up for a deposit

:09:51.:09:55.

is really tough. People only buy one house in their lifetime and a lot of

:09:56.:09:58.

people lose it. You come from a positive side of this is what I went

:09:59.:10:04.

through, I'm trying to change someone's perspective and give them

:10:05.:10:08.

a chance. One paper called it poverty pawn dressed up as altruism

:10:09.:10:12.

and they say it's exploitative. When you see that how does it make you

:10:13.:10:17.

feel? It's a bit sad because I don't think they've seen the show. I don't

:10:18.:10:24.

think they are in touch with reality. That wasn't the intention.

:10:25.:10:27.

When you see the show it doesn't come across that way at all. I've

:10:28.:10:32.

seen quite a few times. It's really amazing, because it's an emotional

:10:33.:10:36.

experience for me to actually go back to some of the memories in my

:10:37.:10:40.

life when I was homeless and struggling like crazy. It was

:10:41.:10:43.

amazing to me these people from different backgrounds that in

:10:44.:10:47.

today's world they are struggling more. With so many diverse

:10:48.:10:53.

circumstances. It was like, I spent so much time with these people when

:10:54.:10:58.

I was choosing who to give the house to. How does it feel being in that

:10:59.:11:03.

position where you are meeting many people from all different

:11:04.:11:06.

backgrounds, in very difficult circumstances, and you have to make

:11:07.:11:09.

a choice? It was an impossible decision. I wish I had 8000 houses

:11:10.:11:19.

together! The people that really deserved this, and I wanted to give

:11:20.:11:22.

it to someone who really deserved it in the sense of it wasn't their

:11:23.:11:26.

fault where they were, they needed a break. Because if we think about

:11:27.:11:33.

people's lives, no one has access to millionaires to mentor them through

:11:34.:11:37.

making money in life, or being successful. The process doesn't help

:11:38.:11:40.

people that way. If you think about going to school, you don't learn

:11:41.:11:44.

anything about money, investing in property, you don't learn anything

:11:45.:11:50.

about being successful in life. Having debt and struggling is one of

:11:51.:11:53.

the most arable things to deal with. I'm sure lots of teachers would

:11:54.:11:57.

argue they do teach them things that help them along that journey in

:11:58.:12:02.

different ways. So you had to choose, and talk to us about some of

:12:03.:12:08.

those stories that you are hearing. You were two when you are homeless.

:12:09.:12:14.

Yes. My mum had to leave my dad because we had so much debt. It's a

:12:15.:12:18.

long story but basically we had nowhere to go and she had to sleep

:12:19.:12:23.

on a park bench. It was snowing and I was two years old. She was going

:12:24.:12:28.

crazy. I was like, oh my God, why did you have to do that? When she

:12:29.:12:33.

told me this and I learned about it, I went through struggles with her.

:12:34.:12:37.

One of the drives for me was to make sure that she was OK. One of the

:12:38.:12:43.

inner drives was fighting for her. I didn't like school, I dropped out

:12:44.:12:47.

early. I went to so many different schools that it wasn't really a part

:12:48.:12:54.

of my life. My life was about fighting for something better. I

:12:55.:12:56.

know you're not going to tell us who you chose because we'll see that

:12:57.:13:02.

night on Channel 4 but how is that relationship now? Are they happy, I

:13:03.:13:07.

used to spending time with them? Totally amazing. It's made a huge

:13:08.:13:11.

difference to them, and it's made a huge difference to me. Thank you.

:13:12.:13:15.

Get a House for Free is on Channel 4 tonight at 9pm.

:13:16.:13:18.

That's it from us for this morning, we'll be back tomorrow from 6

:13:19.:13:21.

Now it's time for Animal Park Summer Special

:13:22.:13:37.

Now, call me old-fashioned but I thought monogamy meant

:13:38.:13:41.