09/08/2017 Breakfast


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09/08/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Naga Munchetty.

:00:00.:00:08.

President Trump warns North Korea it will face an unprecedented response

:00:09.:00:13.

As Pyongyang says it's considering a missile strike close

:00:14.:00:19.

to an American military base, tensions between the two countries

:00:20.:00:22.

North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States. They

:00:23.:00:39.

will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.

:00:40.:00:51.

Good morning, it's Wednesday, August 9th.

:00:52.:00:54.

An extra 500 medical school places in England are confirmed.

:00:55.:00:59.

The government calls it the biggest ever expansion of the NHS workforce

:01:00.:01:03.

but unions say it doesn't address the immediate shortage.

:01:04.:01:07.

It's been ten years to the day since the start

:01:08.:01:10.

That's when banks started to realise they had bet that couldn't afford to

:01:11.:01:20.

be paid back. have been learned and whether it

:01:21.:01:21.

could happen again. Anger at the Athletics

:01:22.:01:25.

World Championships, after one of the favourites to win

:01:26.:01:27.

the 400 metres is told he can't compete following an

:01:28.:01:30.

outbreak of norovirus. Yes, the fallout from the virus

:01:31.:01:38.

really overshadowed the 400 metres final last night. The runner didn't

:01:39.:01:46.

feature and in his absence Wayde van Niekerk cruised to victory to retain

:01:47.:01:48.

his title. Country star Glen Campbell has died

:01:49.:01:56.

at the age of 81. Good morning. We have a wet start in

:01:57.:02:11.

England and Wales and through the day the showers pushing in the

:02:12.:02:15.

direction of the south-east. Heavy and thundery. Some issues with

:02:16.:02:23.

fluttering -- flooding. In the sunshine it will feel pleasant. More

:02:24.:02:24.

in 15 minutes. Thank you. Tensions between the US

:02:25.:02:27.

and North Korea have President Trump has warned

:02:28.:02:30.

Kim Jong-un that if he continues to threaten America,

:02:31.:02:35.

he would be met, in Mr Trump's North Korea says it considers

:02:36.:02:48.

carrying out missile strikes on an American island in the Pacific. This

:02:49.:02:51.

report from Washington. North Korea best not make any more

:02:52.:02:59.

threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury like

:03:00.:03:07.

the world has never seen. Unprecedented language from an

:03:08.:03:10.

American president. Donald Trump officially escalated the US

:03:11.:03:14.

stand-off with North Korea from his perch on a walking vacation at his

:03:15.:03:19.

golf course in New Jersey -- working. The trigger, a report

:03:20.:03:24.

saying Pyongyang had produced a nuclear warhead small enough to fit

:03:25.:03:28.

inside its missiles. That much closer to the capability of striking

:03:29.:03:35.

the US. The president's angered response could draw range in the

:03:36.:03:39.

hopes of the dramatic solution. After a rare decision by the UN to

:03:40.:03:48.

slap sanctions on the regime. North Korea news is Kim Jong-un already

:03:49.:03:53.

has a plan to strike the US Pacific territory of Guam, which appears to

:03:54.:03:56.

have been put on place before Trump's remarks. President Trump

:03:57.:04:01.

often we decide his predecessor Barack Obama for not sticking to his

:04:02.:04:04.

red lines on foreign policy when he was in the White House. But now Mr

:04:05.:04:08.

Trump has drawn a breadline with harsh new rhetoric. -- red line. The

:04:09.:04:14.

question is, what happens if North Korea crosses it?

:04:15.:04:16.

500 new medical school places will be made available in England

:04:17.:04:19.

next year, as the government attempts to boost the number

:04:20.:04:21.

The target is to increase the total number of training places by a x 20

:04:22.:04:33.

20 to help ease staffing pressures. The British Medical Association says

:04:34.:04:35.

it won't address the immediate shortage.

:04:36.:04:38.

The government has given more detail today on what it says

:04:39.:04:44.

will be the biggest ever expantion of the medical workforce in England.

:04:45.:04:48.

What we're doing is ensuring that we train enough home-grown

:04:49.:04:52.

doctors so the NHS becomes self-sufficient in doctors over

:04:53.:04:55.

the period of the next ten years or so.

:04:56.:04:59.

And we think that that's the best way to ensure

:05:00.:05:02.

that we have the doctors we need for the future.

:05:03.:05:04.

Next year, an extra 500 medical school places

:05:05.:05:06.

By 2020, that number will grow to 1500, reprsenting a 25% increase

:05:07.:05:14.

And medical schools will have to win many of those extra places

:05:15.:05:21.

by showing that they can get graduates to work in rural

:05:22.:05:28.

or coastal areas, where recruitment's more of a struggle,

:05:29.:05:31.

and by bringing in trainees from diverse and disadvantaged

:05:32.:05:33.

We welcome the government's approach, looking at how they can

:05:34.:05:36.

get more people from poorer backgrounds to study medicine.

:05:37.:05:39.

It is something which the BMA has been talking about for many years

:05:40.:05:42.

but there are lots of questions about how these medical school

:05:43.:05:45.

places are going to be funded and how the government

:05:46.:05:48.

is going to tackle the immediate recruitment and retention crisis

:05:49.:05:51.

This is all part of wider plans to create thousands more training

:05:52.:05:59.

places for nurses, midwives and health professionals.

:06:00.:06:01.

The Labour Party says it does not add up to any

:06:02.:06:04.

But, ultimately, it will be patients who decide whether this extra dose

:06:05.:06:08.

of doctors proves to be an effective medicine.

:06:09.:06:10.

We'll be speaking to a health minister about those

:06:11.:06:21.

You know when they say time flies? It really does.

:06:22.:06:26.

It's exactly ten years today since what many consider to be

:06:27.:06:29.

Steph, you loved it, didn't you? Yes, there is good that comes with

:06:30.:06:40.

bad. It was good for my career but not for the rest of the world.

:06:41.:06:44.

It gave us a real insight into the financial industry. You remember 11-

:06:45.:06:52.

13 years ago it was hard to make this interesting for people and then

:06:53.:06:56.

on this day ten years ago the banks started to realise they were

:06:57.:06:59.

hoarding lots of toxic debt, debt that people had taken out and

:07:00.:07:05.

couldn't be paid back. A lot of it was linked to house sales in

:07:06.:07:09.

America, so people who were overborrowing essentially and

:07:10.:07:12.

realised they couldn't afford to pay it out and it had been dressed up in

:07:13.:07:17.

so many different ways by the banks and sold on to other banks. No one

:07:18.:07:21.

had a clue what these things were worth and that was the critical

:07:22.:07:25.

point. Ten years ago this French bank pulled out a statement saying

:07:26.:07:28.

they didn't know what some of their assets were worth. That sent jitters

:07:29.:07:33.

around the world. In the weeks and months following that all of the

:07:34.:07:37.

banks started to realise that they too had things they didn't really

:07:38.:07:41.

know what were worth, so we had massive banks like Northern Rock,

:07:42.:07:46.

they had a run on the bank, it ended up leaving the high street and we

:07:47.:07:51.

saw the collapse of Leeman Brothers, another huge bank in America. So it

:07:52.:07:56.

really changed the way banking was done and it meant is in an new rules

:07:57.:08:00.

have come out about how much banks have to hold in order to actually

:08:01.:08:05.

function as a bank and we've seen banks being looked at in terms of

:08:06.:08:08.

separating the whiskey site compared to the high street.

:08:09.:08:12.

They basically have to behave. Yes and we have seen interest rates

:08:13.:08:16.

cut, so that's been the biggest thing, the fact that we saw interest

:08:17.:08:22.

rates go from about 6% down to 0.25% and nobody thought they would still

:08:23.:08:26.

be that low. We will be talking about the

:08:27.:08:29.

morning. A decade since the credit crunch. Thanks.

:08:30.:08:31.

Children's services are being "pushed to breaking point" due

:08:32.:08:34.

to increased demand and cuts in council budgets, according

:08:35.:08:36.

The LGA says three-quarters of English councils overspent

:08:37.:08:50.

on child social care by a total of more than

:08:51.:08:53.

A government spokesman said councils would receive around ?200 billion

:08:54.:09:01.

for local services up to 2020. The LGA says it's not enough.

:09:02.:09:04.

Kenya's incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta has taken a strong lead

:09:05.:09:07.

as votes are counted after Tuesday's election.

:09:08.:09:09.

With three quarters of results in, Mr Kenyatta has a lead

:09:10.:09:12.

of close to ten % over his rival.

:09:13.:09:14.

However, the opposition coalition has rejected the figures,

:09:15.:09:16.

and has accused officials of publishing fake results.

:09:17.:09:20.

Five men facing criminal charges over the Hillsborough disaster

:09:21.:09:22.

Three of them are accused of trying to cover up what happened in 1989.

:09:23.:09:28.

The police match commander on the day, former chief

:09:29.:09:30.

superintendent David Duckenfield, won't be in the dock.

:09:31.:09:32.

Our reporter Ben Schofield has more on this.

:09:33.:09:37.

Ben, why is David Duckenfield not going to be in court?

:09:38.:09:42.

It is about one month since the Crown Prosecution Service said they

:09:43.:09:47.

wanted to charge six men with various different offences relating

:09:48.:09:52.

to Hillsborough. David Duckenfield faces the most serious charges. 95

:09:53.:09:56.

individual councils manslaughter. But prosecutors need to apply to the

:09:57.:10:01.

High Court to lift a court order banning him from being prosecuted

:10:02.:10:04.

before they can take that case forward. The remaining five include

:10:05.:10:11.

the secretary and safety officer from Sheffield Wednesday football

:10:12.:10:16.

club at the time of the disaster. He and David Duckenfield were the only

:10:17.:10:20.

two who face charges relating to be fatal crushing itself. Three men as

:10:21.:10:23.

you say face charges of perverting the course of justice. They are two

:10:24.:10:28.

police officers from South Yorkshire Police and a lawyer, who was

:10:29.:10:32.

providing advice to the police force. And the fifth man we are

:10:33.:10:37.

expecting is Sir Norman Peterson, a former chief Constable who ran both

:10:38.:10:41.

Merseyside and west York police forces. -- Sir Norman George

:10:42.:10:51.

Bettison. It is expected to be a brief hearing, but nevertheless a

:10:52.:10:56.

significant step as these cases progress, some 28 years after the

:10:57.:10:59.

disaster. More coverage on the Rapid Bay. Thank you.

:11:00.:11:02.

Athletics chiefs have been criticised for denying a medal

:11:03.:11:05.

favourite entry to the London Stadium amid concerns over

:11:06.:11:07.

Around 30 athletes and support staff have been affected by sickness

:11:08.:11:12.

at the World Championships, but only Botswana's Isaac Makwala

:11:13.:11:14.

has been prevented from competing, as Andy Swiss reports.

:11:15.:11:24.

As Wayde van Niekerk charged to the 400 metres title, the first gold of

:11:25.:11:33.

a potential double at these championships, much of the focus was

:11:34.:11:37.

still on his absent challenger. Isaac Makwala was told he couldn't

:11:38.:11:40.

compete after his sickness because organisers had to protect the

:11:41.:11:43.

welfare of the athletes. At the team from Botswana were left frustrated.

:11:44.:11:48.

We respect the decision if it is based on public health issues,

:11:49.:11:52.

however, it is the manner in which this decision was arrived at which

:11:53.:11:56.

is quite disturbing and as we have indicated this matter has been

:11:57.:11:59.

approached in Britain grabs. We feel very sorry for the athletes that

:12:00.:12:03.

have to not participate but we have a responsibility for all of the

:12:04.:12:09.

athletes and if we allowed them all to sit down, it's a tight community,

:12:10.:12:14.

we need to make sure that all of the athletes are protected as well.

:12:15.:12:18.

Meanwhile, Britain's medal near misses continue, despite the

:12:19.:12:22.

performance of Karl Langford. Ron is just eluding him in the 800 metres

:12:23.:12:26.

by an agonising four hundredths of a second. And among today's highlights

:12:27.:12:32.

is the return of Mo Farah, as he goes in the heats of the 5000

:12:33.:12:36.

metres. He is still the British team's only medallist here and it is

:12:37.:12:40.

now halfway through the championships.

:12:41.:12:45.

Tributes have been paid to the American country music star

:12:46.:12:47.

Glen Campbell, who's died after what his family called a "long

:12:48.:12:50.

and courageous battle" with Alzheimer's.

:12:51.:12:52.

Dolly Parton said he had "one of the greatest voices of all time".

:12:53.:12:56.

He was famous for hits including Rhinestone Cowboy and Wichita

:12:57.:12:59.

Our arts correspondent David Sillito looks back on his life.

:13:00.:13:04.

Wichita Lineman, it's wide open spaces, yearning,

:13:05.:13:13.

loneliness, America turned into song.

:13:14.:13:17.

But what truly made it a masterpiece was the voice of Glen Campbell.

:13:18.:13:20.

# I hear you singing in the wires...#

:13:21.:13:24.

He had been born in Billstown Arkansas, a large poor

:13:25.:13:30.

His escape was his Uncle Boo, who taught him to play guitar.

:13:31.:13:41.

and on hundreds of singles with the session

:13:42.:13:54.

musicians the Wrecking Crew, Phil Spector, the Righteous

:13:55.:13:56.

Brothers, Frank Sinatra, it was Glenn Campbell on guitar.

:13:57.:13:59.

And eventually... A breakthrough hit of his own.

:14:00.:14:01.

But it was the partnership with songwriter Jimmy Webb that

:14:02.:14:06.

gave him his career-defining songs By The Time

:14:07.:14:08.

Clean cut, Conservative, he was suddenly

:14:09.:14:13.

country music's biggest star, with his own TV show.

:14:14.:14:16.

# But I'm going to be where the lights

:14:17.:14:25.

Rhinestone Cowboy was a glorious return to form after a dip

:14:26.:14:32.

in his fortunes that had taken place in the '70s.

:14:33.:14:35.

But his personal life was far from glorious.

:14:36.:14:39.

I think I probably just quit letting God run

:14:40.:14:42.

my life and I actually just got into the drugs and the booze pretty

:14:43.:14:46.

# I am a lineman for the county, and I...#

:14:47.:14:50.

That slight stumble over the words, it was

:14:51.:14:58.

He'd long put his wild days behind him, but

:14:59.:15:07.

What stayed with him when so much else had gone

:15:08.:15:15.

It doesn't look too nice, please tell me that's going to change? This

:15:16.:15:38.

is one of our pictures from yesterday. It is a cracking photo of

:15:39.:15:57.

some tornadoes and over the water, cold waterspouts. We will see these

:15:58.:16:04.

systems pushing down into the south-east, some heavy and Bunbury

:16:05.:16:07.

rain and showers over the south-east. Other areas starting off

:16:08.:16:12.

on a dry note, brightening up, but don't be fooled. A dry start for

:16:13.:16:17.

Scotland and Northern Ireland, also northern England, bits and pieces of

:16:18.:16:21.

cloud around. Coming across Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, threw --

:16:22.:16:28.

through the Midlands, this is where we've got some rain. Some showers in

:16:29.:16:34.

Wales and cloud, pushing in from the far side of East Anglia and Kent, a

:16:35.:16:38.

cloudy start but starting to brighten up. Through the course of

:16:39.:16:43.

the day, that will change. Expecting heavy downpours across east Anglia

:16:44.:16:47.

and south-east England. Some disruption because of this, and

:16:48.:16:54.

there could be some surface water flooding issues. Keep tuned to your

:16:55.:16:58.

television and radio station. Through the day, rain sinks out.

:16:59.:17:02.

Temperatures rising, some home-grown showers in the south-east. That,

:17:03.:17:06.

nation is causing downpours. Expect some fonder. Behind that, across the

:17:07.:17:13.

Midlands and through parts of Yorkshire, Wales, brightening up.

:17:14.:17:18.

South-west England as well, a bit of sunshine. Sunshine further north. 21

:17:19.:17:24.

and light breezes in Glasgow, feeling quite pleasant. Under the

:17:25.:17:31.

cloud and rain, quite pleasant. Some of us will see low double figures.

:17:32.:17:36.

Overnight, rain around in the south-east corner. It is fragmenting

:17:37.:17:41.

and starting to weaken. A lot of dry weather around. Some late showers,

:17:42.:17:47.

some mist and fog patches as well. Cloud thickening across the far

:17:48.:17:50.

North of Scotland. Some spots of rain. You can see why. This weather

:17:51.:17:57.

fronts not too far away. Tomorrow, high-pressure exceeding its

:17:58.:18:01.

influence. For many of us, a dry day with a lot of sunshine. Eventually

:18:02.:18:05.

we lose the dregs of rain from the south-east, cloud vicar from the

:18:06.:18:09.

north of Scotland. The low pressure with that front is starting to

:18:10.:18:15.

arrive. Temperatures lower in Glasgow, quite different in the

:18:16.:18:19.

south-east. High temperatures and dry. A bit of a change afoot. Look

:18:20.:18:31.

at that little guilty smile! It's fine. See you later.

:18:32.:18:37.

Time for a look at the papers. The Guardian, covering Sir Glenn

:18:38.:18:47.

Campbell, who died at the age of 81. Tributes pouring in.

:18:48.:18:50.

Donald Trump, warning of fire and fury, reacting to North Korea's

:18:51.:19:09.

military threats. The main headline again, there is no picture at this

:19:10.:19:15.

story is appearing in a lot of papers about this jogger, who pushed

:19:16.:19:35.

a woman into the path of a bus. The woman tried to speak to him when he

:19:36.:19:40.

came back, but he apparently ignored her and jogged on. Not a very nice

:19:41.:19:45.

person at all. The Daily Mail leading with a story saying that

:19:46.:19:50.

migrants have made 30,000 attempts to reach Britain and Calais this

:19:51.:19:54.

year, despite costly security measures. And the Daily Telegraph,

:19:55.:20:00.

Glenn Campbell again. A very impressive photo on the front of the

:20:01.:20:06.

Telegraph. He died at the age of 81. We will be reflecting on this

:20:07.:20:15.

morning. And ten years since the start of the global financial

:20:16.:20:20.

crisis. Interestingly, the stock market is hitting record highs at

:20:21.:20:23.

the moment. We will be talking more about that in half an hour. This is

:20:24.:20:31.

a really interesting story about a scam from people imitating Royal

:20:32.:20:38.

Mail. People are getting cards through the post, not official Royal

:20:39.:20:44.

Mail cards, but when you ring the phone number you get charged 45

:20:45.:20:52.

quid. It is a bit of a shocker. They are warning about that, saying don't

:20:53.:20:55.

ring that number. There is an official Royal Mail information

:20:56.:21:05.

number. Also, when you go to the cinema, you have to think about when

:21:06.:21:09.

you are going to go to the loo, time it correctly. Someone has developed

:21:10.:21:20.

an app that will tell you when the boring bits of the movie are on so

:21:21.:21:24.

you can go to the toilet. It also gives you a summary, so that when

:21:25.:21:28.

you go to the toilet, you haven't missed anything. That is quite

:21:29.:21:40.

clever! Surely you could just go before the film starts. I don't

:21:41.:21:45.

think I have ever born in a movie, not even in Lord of the Rings.

:21:46.:21:49.

Ladder of steel. -- Bladder. North Korea says it's

:21:50.:21:57.

considering carrying out a ballistic missile strike on the US territory

:21:58.:22:01.

of Guam in the Western Pacific. Earlier, President Trump declared

:22:02.:22:04.

that any further threats from Pyongyang would be met,

:22:05.:22:06.

as he put it, with fire, Let's talk to Niall Stanage,

:22:07.:22:09.

White House columnist for the US political website The Hill,

:22:10.:22:13.

based in Washington DC. Could you tell us what you make of

:22:14.:22:20.

Donald Trump's reaction? Strong words, he's not messing about. No,

:22:21.:22:25.

he's not, he is clearly escalating the rhetoric and at the same time,

:22:26.:22:33.

risking escalating this crisis. We saw President Trump appearing to

:22:34.:22:37.

read from notes as he delivered the words you have recited, but I know

:22:38.:22:42.

from my own sources that there are people in the administration who

:22:43.:22:45.

think his approach can be a fact did. They see the real audience for

:22:46.:22:51.

these remarks as being China, basically warning China of

:22:52.:22:56.

instability if it does not bring North Korea, its ally, into line. It

:22:57.:23:01.

is a gamble if that strategy will work, and the dangers of losing that

:23:02.:23:06.

gamble could be catastrophic. China has said that it is 100% committed

:23:07.:23:13.

to enforcing the latest round of sanctions enforced by the UN. I

:23:14.:23:18.

wonder who this message is really to? There are reports of falling

:23:19.:23:23.

popularity, is he as setting himself? There are also questions

:23:24.:23:28.

about whether or not he is in a position where they are ready to

:23:29.:23:32.

meet this with fire and fury? The last point you've raised is

:23:33.:23:36.

particularly important. The idea that you cannot make threats if you

:23:37.:23:41.

are not prepared to follow them through, as people sometimes say in

:23:42.:23:44.

this part of the world, you shouldn't pull it done during a

:23:45.:23:50.

fight unless you are prepared to pull the trigger --a gun. It is not

:23:51.:23:56.

clear what military action Donald Trump could take in this case. He

:23:57.:24:01.

has even received criticism from some Republicans, including Senator

:24:02.:24:07.

John McCain. He talked about precisely this point, the idea that

:24:08.:24:13.

other great leaders that he has seen have not threatened to do things

:24:14.:24:18.

unless they are in a position to act. And in John McCain's opinion,

:24:19.:24:26.

President Trump is not in a position to act right now. Thank you for your

:24:27.:24:29.

time. What really drives you around the

:24:30.:24:35.

bend... We haven't got time, Dan! From people who don't say thank

:24:36.:24:42.

you or ignore you in favour of their mobile phones

:24:43.:24:45.

to inconsiderate drivers and queue jumpers, comedian Danny Wallace

:24:46.:24:48.

believes rudeness is getting worse. He'll be on our sofa

:24:49.:24:50.

later on this morning. But first, we've been chatting

:24:51.:24:53.

to people in Manchester about what sort of rude

:24:54.:24:55.

behaviour drives them mad. What do you think is rude? What

:24:56.:25:08.

rivals you? Language. Strong language in public. I was in my shop

:25:09.:25:14.

this morning. The person in front of me was obviously in a rush, and he

:25:15.:25:19.

made a loud sound. He was really rude. Sometimes I let it go. What

:25:20.:25:27.

makes the difference? It depends how big they are. It annoys me when

:25:28.:25:35.

people interrupted. When people put their feet on the seat. When people

:25:36.:25:42.

don't text back. When they don't write back at all, or they write a

:25:43.:25:49.

short message, like K. Bad driving. In what way? Cutting you off and

:25:50.:25:58.

stuff like that. When you are in the supermarket queue and the assistants

:25:59.:26:02.

are dealing with each other instead of dealing with you. Do you find the

:26:03.:26:06.

general members of the public really rude? They are generally all right!

:26:07.:26:17.

There are some very good points made there. Joanne says one of her pet

:26:18.:26:22.

peeve is queue jumping, it dries her insane. In Britain, you don't tend

:26:23.:26:28.

to tell people that they have jumped in front. Used you in your pot,

:26:29.:26:33.

rather than saying, hang on, get to the back of the queue. I do both, I

:26:34.:26:37.

stew and tell. Martin says cars at a zebra crossing

:26:38.:26:51.

have repeatedly ignored him, they drove on by. Amy says her main gripe

:26:52.:26:58.

is feet on seats on a train, and also bags on seats when you know

:26:59.:27:03.

someone is trying to sit there. Look at the fury. Your rucksack is in my

:27:04.:27:20.

seat, that is the answer. I can see you will be

:27:21.:30:40.

I'm back with the latest from BBC London news in half an hour.

:30:41.:30:44.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:30:45.:30:48.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Naga Munchetty.

:30:49.:30:52.

The latest news and sport is coming up.

:30:53.:30:56.

Ten years on from the start of the Global Financial Crisis,

:30:57.:31:02.

we'll look back at how it all began and ask if it

:31:03.:31:05.

We'll also hear how the stunning natural beauty of Skye is attracting

:31:06.:31:12.

Now the island is struggling to cope.

:31:13.:31:27.

And we'll reflect on the life of the original Rhinestone Cowboy,

:31:28.:31:34.

the legendary country music star Glen Campbell,

:31:35.:31:35.

But now a summary of this morning's main news.

:31:36.:31:40.

Tensions between the US and North Korea have reached

:31:41.:31:42.

North Korea has said it is considering carrying out

:31:43.:31:45.

missile strikes on the US Pacific territory of Guam.

:31:46.:31:48.

The report in state media, quoting an earlier military

:31:49.:31:50.

statement, came hours after President Donald Trump

:31:51.:31:52.

threatened North Korea with "fire and fury".

:31:53.:31:54.

The exchanges mark a sharp rise in rhetoric between the two countries.

:31:55.:31:59.

North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States.

:32:00.:32:11.

They will be met with fire and fury like

:32:12.:32:14.

He has been very threatening, eon the normal state, and as I say they

:32:15.:32:25.

will be met with fire, Furia and frankly power the likes of which

:32:26.:32:30.

this world has never seen before. -- fury.

:32:31.:32:31.

The NHS is aiming to bring about the biggest ever expansion

:32:32.:32:34.

to it's medical workforce in England, after health officials

:32:35.:32:36.

confirmed plans to increase training positions for doctors

:32:37.:32:38.

The Department of Health has confirmed that an extra 1,500

:32:39.:32:48.

doctors a year will be trained by 2020,

:32:49.:32:50.

The move aims to increase the amount of home-grown doctors and reduce

:32:51.:32:55.

how much is spent on agency and locum doctors.

:32:56.:33:00.

It's exactly ten years today since the start

:33:01.:33:02.

It started with a warning from French bank BNP Paribas

:33:03.:33:06.

about US housing loans and ended with a global credit

:33:07.:33:09.

crunch, as governments around the world propped up banks

:33:10.:33:12.

Here, banks including Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds TSB had to be

:33:13.:33:22.

rescued with billions in taxpayers' money.

:33:23.:33:24.

Children's services are being pushed to breaking point, due to increased

:33:25.:33:27.

demand and cuts in council budgets, according

:33:28.:33:29.

It says three quarters of English councils overspent on child social

:33:30.:33:37.

care I about half ?1 billion last year.

:33:38.:33:38.

A government spokesman said councils would receive around 200-billion

:33:39.:33:41.

pounds for local services up to 2020.

:33:42.:33:43.

Councils are facing a double whammy. A big cut in government grants and a

:33:44.:33:54.

big increase in the number of children who need those services and

:33:55.:33:59.

so we are saying there will be a ?2 billion gap by the end of this

:34:00.:34:02.

decade in the amount of money councils need compared to the amount

:34:03.:34:05.

of money councils have got. That will lead to big problems in making

:34:06.:34:09.

sure we can keep children safe on the way the members of the public

:34:10.:34:11.

would expect us to. Tributes are being paid to one

:34:12.:34:12.

of the most successful American singers, Glen Campbell,

:34:13.:34:15.

who's died six years after revealing As a session musician,

:34:16.:34:18.

Glen Campbell played on hundreds of recordings before his career

:34:19.:34:39.

as a singer took off. He was best known for hits including

:34:40.:34:42.

Rhinestone Cowboy and Wichita Dolly Parton said he had "one

:34:43.:34:45.

of the greatest voices Yes, lovely tribute this morning and

:34:46.:34:53.

many pictures of Glen Campbell on the front pages of many of the

:34:54.:34:57.

papers and also on the back pages lots of talk about the World

:34:58.:35:00.

Championship athletics. We can cross to London stadium. Jessica is there.

:35:01.:35:06.

The hind you is the podium and one of the men who could have been on

:35:07.:35:11.

their yesterday, the big stories he wasn't to race at all.

:35:12.:35:12.

Exactly. A fascinating day yesterday. That's exactly why I am

:35:13.:35:20.

at the podium. Wayde van Niekerk will receive his medal for the 400

:35:21.:35:25.

metres the night before the start of the evening, but you have to ask,

:35:26.:35:30.

like you say, what could have been had Isaac Makwala actually been in

:35:31.:35:34.

the race? Yesterday these championships were dominated by

:35:35.:35:37.

debate and discussion about whether the Botswana athlete should be

:35:38.:35:41.

allowed to compete in the 400 metres. As you've all been hearing

:35:42.:35:45.

this morning on Breakfast, he wasn't allowed to take part, despite

:35:46.:35:50.

arriving at the stadium ahead of the race. Isaac Makwala was affected by

:35:51.:35:55.

a stomach bug and withdrawn from the race by the IAAF. Public Health

:35:56.:35:59.

England guidelines recommended people with that illness should be

:36:00.:36:01.

quarantined for 48 hours. Makwala was believed to have been

:36:02.:36:05.

one of the athletes who could have mounted a serious challenge in

:36:06.:36:09.

the race to South Africa's Wayde Van But in his absence, the Olympic

:36:10.:36:12.

champion and world record holder came through to comfortably take

:36:13.:36:15.

Gold and retain his title. And Van Niekerk had

:36:16.:36:18.

sympathy for his rival. It is quite disappointing. I would

:36:19.:36:27.

love him to have his fair opportunity. He was in great form. I

:36:28.:36:33.

believe it would have -- he would have done very well this

:36:34.:36:35.

championships and, like I said earlier, I've got so much sympathy

:36:36.:36:39.

for him. I really wish I could even give him his medal.

:36:40.:36:45.

British team captain Eilidh Doyle will have the chance to win a medal.

:36:46.:36:49.

She qualified for Thursday's 400 metre hurdles final as one

:36:50.:36:51.

of the fastest losers after finishing third in her semi

:36:52.:36:55.

And it was a good night for Dina Asher-Smith in the stadium

:36:56.:37:00.

where she was a kit bag holder at the 2012 Olympics.

:37:01.:37:03.

She qualified for the semi-finals of the 200 metres in

:37:04.:37:06.

She's had a difficult year fitness wise after breaking her

:37:07.:37:10.

Bianca Williams also made the semi finals.

:37:11.:37:16.

Let's bring you up to date with the rest of the sport.

:37:17.:37:20.

Manchester United were beaten 2-1 by European champions

:37:21.:37:22.

Real Madrid in last night's Super Cup.

:37:23.:37:24.

Real took a deserved 2-0 lead early into the second half

:37:25.:37:27.

and, although Romelu Lukaku pulled a goal back for United,

:37:28.:37:29.

they couldn't stop the Spanish side lifting the Super Cup for a fourth

:37:30.:37:33.

Sometimes when I win I don't keep the medals. So imagine when I lose!

:37:34.:37:47.

You know? For me, the medal would go to some place in my house and for

:37:48.:37:54.

that kid it is the moon. For that kid it is for sure something that

:37:55.:37:56.

will keep and remember. The Women's Rugby World Cup gets

:37:57.:37:58.

under way in Ireland today. Defending champions England will be

:37:59.:38:01.

hoping for a win against Spain in their opening fixture,

:38:02.:38:06.

the hosts take on Australia while Wales face a tough task

:38:07.:38:10.

against New Zealand. To start the World Cup against New

:38:11.:38:19.

Zealand is bubbly the best position we can key in the showcase

:38:20.:38:25.

ourselves. They are the second best in the world, but as you've seen

:38:26.:38:29.

recently they have been beaten. They were beaten in last World Cup I

:38:30.:38:34.

Island. Citing the prep we've put in and the buildup we've had coming up

:38:35.:38:38.

to this World Cup, we are really cool place.

:38:39.:38:41.

Now of course the athletes here at the Championships have been

:38:42.:38:50.

taking centre stage, but there's someone who's been

:38:51.:38:52.

Hero the Hedgehog, the official mascot here,

:38:53.:38:56.

has been causing a bit of a stir with his antics.

:38:57.:38:59.

He's been keeping the crowds entertained during the sessions

:39:00.:39:01.

and he seems to fancy himself as a bit of an athlete.

:39:02.:39:06.

I think he's got a bit of work to do around his hurdles technique,

:39:07.:39:09.

Did you see this last night? I think everyone was covering their eyes

:39:10.:39:24.

with their hands! Marks for artistic effort. Thank you

:39:25.:39:29.

very much. We will be there later and we will also speak to Kyle

:39:30.:39:35.

Langford and others as well. We've been talking about how close the

:39:36.:39:38.

margins have been for Great Britain's athletes, just missing out

:39:39.:39:42.

on the podium. But they are trying their best.

:39:43.:39:50.

I think six to eight medals was the plan and currently we are at one.

:39:51.:39:55.

You heard Jessica talk about Isaac Makwala, who wasn't allowed to

:39:56.:39:59.

compete in the 400 metres final after a suspected outbreak of Nora

:40:00.:40:02.

virus. Let's discuss this with Graeme Close

:40:03.:40:05.

who's a sport nutrition specialist You can understand athletes' anger

:40:06.:40:15.

over this and frustration, because they train to do their best to get a

:40:16.:40:21.

place on the podium. But why has this caused so much controversy when

:40:22.:40:24.

basically the medics think to be following the advice of Public

:40:25.:40:28.

Health England? Exactly, people are trained for four years for this one

:40:29.:40:32.

event and then it is taken away. But what we can't take our mind away

:40:33.:40:37.

from is the Nora virus is one of the most contagious viruses and it's not

:40:38.:40:40.

just a problem for the virus, but it's a public health issue --

:40:41.:40:47.

norovirus. These people are on a -- in a packed stadium. You've got to

:40:48.:40:51.

respect the decision of the medics who have done it in the interests of

:40:52.:40:57.

everybody. Explain medically, it can spread quickly, can't it? It is

:40:58.:41:00.

commonly known as the winter vomiting bug. I am sure many people

:41:01.:41:06.

have had it. It is why if you do get it you are advised not to go to the

:41:07.:41:10.

GP, because you don't want to spread it. Within the elite sports I work

:41:11.:41:14.

with we do quarantine our athletes ourselves if we get somebody like

:41:15.:41:17.

that, just to make sure it doesn't spread. Because it is mainly spread

:41:18.:41:22.

by hand to mouth contact which athletes do a of. But also being in

:41:23.:41:27.

close proximity to people. So it's not necessarily airborne, but water

:41:28.:41:34.

particles, if you are in close box and key. So if you are actively

:41:35.:41:39.

still ill it can be a really nasty bug to spread quickly. How long are

:41:40.:41:43.

you in quarantine for? We would typically quarantine people for 24-

:41:44.:41:48.

48 hours after the symptoms cease. That's a key thing to separate them

:41:49.:41:55.

and give it time to go away. What we do know is how will you will

:41:56.:41:59.

actually still be infecting people once the symptoms have gone. So at

:42:00.:42:03.

that point we really need to increase our hygiene standards.

:42:04.:42:07.

Interesting that from Isaac Makwala's perspective, to his mind

:42:08.:42:13.

and for the team he was ready to race and then you've got the

:42:14.:42:16.

pictures of him being turned away and told, no, you can't come in

:42:17.:42:21.

here. We had a genuine chance for the gold medal. I think that's what

:42:22.:42:24.

has brought into public perception. Absolutely. As I keep saying, it's a

:42:25.:42:30.

public health issue and I think what the IAAF have done is taken advice

:42:31.:42:34.

from Public Health England, where the advice was to quarantine 48

:42:35.:42:41.

hours following the symptoms. You've got to remember, this comes from

:42:42.:42:45.

faecal to mouth contact. Research suggests that up to 60% off men and

:42:46.:42:50.

40% of girls don't wash their hands after going to the toilet and of

:42:51.:42:55.

them who do only 5% wash their hands properly. With soap and water,

:42:56.:43:00.

vigorously. It's not hard to see how this spread quickly. We all rely on

:43:01.:43:05.

this hand sanitisers and gels and they aren't really that effective.

:43:06.:43:08.

So they don't kill something like norovirus? No. Soap and water, 15

:43:09.:43:15.

seconds vigorously and a good try at the end. Not the old robber John

:43:16.:43:20.

Hillcoat and off we go. And a lot of sports teams, is something like this

:43:21.:43:29.

has happened, then we go to and -- a no handshake policy. Knuckles? You

:43:30.:43:35.

might try the odd fist pump, if you are young and trendy like me. But

:43:36.:43:39.

then we want to try to stop that spreading and quarantine is

:43:40.:43:42.

definitely the best way to do it. It's just really unfortunate that we

:43:43.:43:46.

train for four years your chance of a medal is taken away so cruelly,

:43:47.:43:50.

but probably rightly. You wash your hands well, don't you?

:43:51.:43:57.

Lovely having you on the show. The remainder when Robbie Williams

:43:58.:44:01.

got in all sorts of trouble on New Year's Eve when he went through the

:44:02.:44:04.

crowds and shook the hands of people, on BBC, and then he was seen

:44:05.:44:08.

on camera putting hand sanitiser on before he went to carry on.

:44:09.:44:11.

Sensible! It is hard not to win in that

:44:12.:44:16.

circumstance. That's exactly what we would advise

:44:17.:44:21.

elite athletes to do. They are compromised with their immunity

:44:22.:44:23.

anyway when they are training hard. So we've got to do everything we can

:44:24.:44:27.

to close that window. Thank you very much. Let us know

:44:28.:44:31.

what is it about that. I'm off to wash my hands! Good morning. This

:44:32.:44:38.

morning in the north of your country there's a lot of sunshine around. In

:44:39.:44:42.

the south it different story. Some heavy rain around. It has fallen

:44:43.:44:48.

through the night. Yesterday we had large rainfall totals. You can sit

:44:49.:44:53.

in many parts of England, Wales and the Channel Islands, but not the

:44:54.:44:57.

south-east. It will brighten up temporarily. This weather front is

:44:58.:45:01.

sinking south-eastwards and as temperatures rise the showers will

:45:02.:45:04.

develop. Some of those will be heavy. High pressure in charge of

:45:05.:45:10.

the rest of the UK, keeping things fine and settled. This is the rain

:45:11.:45:13.

sinking south. Cloud for England and Wales. Into Scotland and Northern

:45:14.:45:19.

Ireland we have a fine start to the day, with some sunshine. Sunshine

:45:20.:45:23.

across north-west England. Heading into Yorkshire and Lincolnshire and

:45:24.:45:27.

towards Manchester, the Midlands, down towards the south-west, that's

:45:28.:45:31.

where we've got the weather front and our aim. Cloud in Wales with a

:45:32.:45:35.

few showers. The head of it we have a largely dry start -- ahead of it.

:45:36.:45:41.

But we will have sunshine develop and break through the cloud of

:45:42.:45:44.

through the morning, but it won't last. The rainfall moves southwards

:45:45.:45:48.

and we have further showers developing. The two merge and we

:45:49.:45:53.

have heavy and thundery downpours. It will brighten up in south-west

:45:54.:45:57.

England, Wales, northern England and we hang on the sunshine across

:45:58.:46:01.

Scotland and Northern Ireland. A light breeze. 21 in Glasgow, 19 in

:46:02.:46:07.

Belfast. If you're stuck under the cloud and rain some of us won't even

:46:08.:46:11.

get into high double figures. London about 18. That's pretty

:46:12.:46:15.

disappointing for the time of year. We are looking at heavy rain and

:46:16.:46:20.

showers urging for east Anglia and south-east England. That could lead

:46:21.:46:25.

to issues later in the day, with surface water flooding. So be aware

:46:26.:46:29.

of it. Overnight this is the weather front continuing to drift to the

:46:30.:46:32.

south-eastern corner. Fragmenting as it does so. Behind it a lot of dry

:46:33.:46:38.

weather, cloud thickening in the north of Scotland and not especially

:46:39.:46:43.

cold. Cooler in rural areas. Where we have late rain there could be

:46:44.:46:47.

mist and fog forming. Tomorrow we lose the front through the day.

:46:48.:46:51.

High-pressure establishes itself temporarily and then we've got this

:46:52.:46:54.

set of fronts coming across the north of Scotland, which will

:46:55.:46:57.

introduce bigger cloud and eventually we have rain. The rain in

:46:58.:47:01.

the south-east clears away and turns more showery and then we have a fine

:47:02.:47:06.

and dry day for most of the UK, with some sunshine. After all the

:47:07.:47:11.

sunshine in the north today there will be more cloud tomorrow and

:47:12.:47:14.

after the rain in England and Wales yesterday and today we have a dry

:47:15.:47:18.

day with sunshine and higher temperatures.

:47:19.:47:26.

We love a bit of old money every now and then.

:47:27.:47:30.

It's ten years to the day since a key event that most experts

:47:31.:47:33.

think marked the start of the global financial crisis.

:47:34.:47:36.

Steph's taking a look at what lessons have been learned

:47:37.:47:38.

Yes, it's a birthday that many would like to forget.

:47:39.:47:51.

On 9 August, 2007, the French bank BNP Paribas stopped investors taking

:47:52.:47:54.

US banks had been giving out high-risk loans to people

:47:55.:47:59.

They were packaged up into complex products and sold to investors

:48:00.:48:03.

When the economy took a downturn, banks were unsure how many bad loans

:48:04.:48:12.

could be on their rivals' books and stopped lending to them.

:48:13.:48:16.

Here in the UK, Bradford Bingley and Northern Rock had to be rescued.

:48:17.:48:24.

And Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds TSB received billions

:48:25.:48:26.

Authorities around the world pumped billions of pounds into the global

:48:27.:48:32.

And here, the Bank of England slashed interest rates from nearly

:48:33.:48:47.

Since the crisis financial, authorities have toughened up

:48:48.:48:51.

They have to hold more capital for emergencies and they've been

:48:52.:48:55.

forced to tighten up their lending rules.

:48:56.:48:57.

But the big question is, 10 years on, have we learned

:48:58.:49:00.

the lessons and could it happen again?

:49:01.:49:07.

Tom Stevenson is from the financial firm Fidelity International.

:49:08.:49:15.

Can you remember what you are doing ten years ago? Yes, I was on

:49:16.:49:23.

holiday, in America, I was enjoying the fact that the pound was doing so

:49:24.:49:29.

well. Interest rates were about five and three quarters at the time, it

:49:30.:49:33.

was a completely different world. When things started to unfold, it

:49:34.:49:42.

just showed... It was a real mess? Yes, it was. Authorities stepped in

:49:43.:49:45.

and took some extraordinary measures. The most important of

:49:46.:49:49.

those was slashing interest rates to zero. At the time, everyone thought,

:49:50.:49:57.

these are emergency measures. This will be short lived. Interest rates

:49:58.:50:01.

will go back to normal levels quite quickly. But we are ten years on and

:50:02.:50:06.

interest rates are still at a 300 year low.

:50:07.:50:14.

Yes, we have been wondering when they will get back to normal. Why

:50:15.:50:20.

has it not gone back up yet? We talked about what lessons have been

:50:21.:50:28.

learned, in some ways, we have not learned any lessons. We remain

:50:29.:50:35.

pretty highly in debt. It is difficult to raise interest rates

:50:36.:50:40.

because households simply cannot cope with higher interest rates. Low

:50:41.:50:44.

interest rates have been fantastic. If you have been lucky enough to own

:50:45.:50:49.

a property or stocks and shares, it may have made you look back and say,

:50:50.:50:56.

what crisis? But if you don't have a property or some stocks and shares,

:50:57.:51:00.

your wages have been flat, it is a very different balance. The last ten

:51:01.:51:04.

years has been very divisive between those who have and those who have

:51:05.:51:08.

not. We were talking about how the rules have changed, one being the

:51:09.:51:13.

fact that the banks have to have more capital. Could we see a

:51:14.:51:17.

situation where banks have to be railed out again? Banks are in

:51:18.:51:20.

better shape than they were. They are not sitting on toxic debt that

:51:21.:51:26.

you mention. That is the good thing. The bad thing is, what I mentioned,

:51:27.:51:30.

we are still very heavily indebted. The Bank of England says it is

:51:31.:51:35.

concerned about car loans. People are borrowing a lot of money to

:51:36.:51:42.

purchase a car, but we are still addicted to debt. If you look at

:51:43.:51:46.

personal debt, it is still incredibly high. Still in the

:51:47.:51:51.

trillions. Much too high in household and government terms. When

:51:52.:51:57.

we talk about deficit reduction, the debt owed by the government is still

:51:58.:52:02.

very high, higher than it was. Thank you very much for your time.

:52:03.:52:04.

Tonight a special production of Les Miserables has its premiere

:52:05.:52:07.

It was the favourite musical of the murdered MP Jo Cox

:52:08.:52:11.

and is being performed in her honour by school children

:52:12.:52:14.

But with a six figure budget and a team of experienced West End

:52:15.:52:22.

professionals behind the scenes, this is no ordinary piece

:52:23.:52:24.

Our entertainment correspondent Colin Paterson was at one

:52:25.:52:27.

It's the West End in West Yorkshire. All to honour the late MP, Jo Cox.

:52:28.:52:53.

Give me that energy, give me the eyes. The West End direct Nick Evans

:52:54.:52:58.

came up with the idea of putting on a show using children from Jo Cox's

:52:59.:53:04.

constituency. I want to show the communities that people across the

:53:05.:53:07.

UK, and in particular the West End community, cared about what

:53:08.:53:12.

happened. This project, to do Les Miserables in a warehouse in Batley

:53:13.:53:17.

and Spen, the town and Jo Cox represented. We are using the young

:53:18.:53:25.

people to tell the story and provide a narrative of hope. Although it is

:53:26.:53:33.

youth Theatre, everything is to be of a West End standard. The set is

:53:34.:53:39.

amazing, we have got amazing direct his working on it. We are working

:53:40.:53:44.

with experienced people. Even the costumes were warned by the West End

:53:45.:53:48.

at this -- theatre. Trying on my dress was insane, because this has

:53:49.:53:54.

been worn on a professional stage. I am in the lighting department, they

:53:55.:54:02.

can't do anything until I say. That is quite a lot of responsibility for

:54:03.:54:08.

a 15-year-old. Yes, but I have some professionals from the West End, so

:54:09.:54:12.

if I mess up I can get them to take it over. Jo Cox was a big fan of

:54:13.:54:19.

musicals. The late MP's seat was taken over by Coronation Street

:54:20.:54:26.

actress, Tracey Braeburn. I spoke to her husband and he said that they

:54:27.:54:32.

used to play the musical in the car, the kids know the words and it was

:54:33.:54:36.

her favourite musical. It's about passion, being a comrades, politics,

:54:37.:54:42.

working together. Having a vision. I think she would find it very

:54:43.:54:44.

powerful. Me of the cast had met her. How much

:54:45.:55:02.

did you know about Jo Cox? I knew her quite a lot. She came to visit

:55:03.:55:07.

our school quite frequently -- many. I met her about five or six times,

:55:08.:55:11.

she was lovely, really passionate. This is such a great inspiration, to

:55:12.:55:22.

do it in honour of her. This Les Miserables is on until Saturday, but

:55:23.:55:26.

it is hoped that the new youth Theatre will continue and provide a

:55:27.:55:31.

lasting legacy for a much loved MP -- theatre.

:55:32.:55:42.

Lots of hard work has gone into that. We are talking about rudeness

:55:43.:55:51.

later today, he thinks we are getting ruder and we are going to

:55:52.:55:59.

get to a level of, credit --a level of Armageddon. Lots of people have

:56:00.:56:07.

said, when sales assistants ignore them, that is extremely rude. Craig

:56:08.:56:18.

has said that people pushing in at the bar, and people skipping queues,

:56:19.:56:20.

that is very rude. Now, though, it's

:56:21.:59:40.

back to Naga and Dan. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:59:41.:00:17.

with Dan Walker and Naga Munchetty. President Trump warns North Korea it

:00:18.:00:20.

will face an unprecedented response As Pyongyang says it's

:00:21.:00:24.

considering a missile strike close to an American military base,

:00:25.:00:31.

tensions between the two countries They will be met with

:00:32.:00:33.

fire and fury like Good morning, it's

:00:34.:00:42.

Wednesday, August 9th. An extra 500 medical school places

:00:43.:01:02.

in England are confirmed. The government calls it the biggest

:01:03.:01:07.

ever expansion of the NHS workforce but unions say it doesn't address

:01:08.:01:10.

the immediate shortage. It's been ten years since the start

:01:11.:01:16.

of the global financial crisis, when banks started to realise

:01:17.:01:19.

they had debt that couldn't afford I'll be looking at what has happened

:01:20.:01:22.

since then and what lessons have Anger at the Athletics

:01:23.:01:28.

World Championships, after one of the favourites to win

:01:29.:01:32.

the 400 metres is told he can't compete following an

:01:33.:01:36.

outbreak of norovirus. Yes, the fallout from that virus

:01:37.:01:47.

really overshadowed the men's 400 metres here last night. Isaac Smith

:01:48.:01:51.

while didn't feature and in his absence the A12 record holder Wayde

:01:52.:01:57.

van Niekerk cruised to victory to retain his title. -- Isaac Smith

:01:58.:02:02.

Kuala. Famed for the Wichita Lineman

:02:03.:02:03.

and the Rhinestone Cowboy, country star Glen Campbell has

:02:04.:02:07.

died at the age of 81. We shall also be live on the

:02:08.:02:18.

beautiful Isle of Skye where they are struggling to cope with the

:02:19.:02:21.

number of tourists that keep visiting.

:02:22.:02:21.

Much of Scotland, Northern Ireland and northern England will have most

:02:22.:02:31.

of the sunshine today. For most of England and Wales it's a wet start.

:02:32.:02:36.

That pushes towards the south-east, meets with showers, so there will be

:02:37.:02:40.

heavy downpours, especially for east Anglia and south-east England later.

:02:41.:02:42.

More details on 15 minutes. Tensions between the US

:02:43.:02:44.

and North Korea have President Trump has warned

:02:45.:02:48.

Kim Jong-un that if he continues to threaten America,

:02:49.:02:54.

he would be met, in Mr Trump's North Korea has responded by saying

:02:55.:02:57.

it is considering carrying out missile strikes on the American

:02:58.:03:03.

territory of Guam, an island Suzanne Kianpour reports

:03:04.:03:06.

from Washington. North Korea best not make any more

:03:07.:03:09.

threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury

:03:10.:03:19.

like the world has never seen. Unprecedented language

:03:20.:03:28.

from an American president. Donald Trump officially escalated

:03:29.:03:30.

the US stand-off with North Korea from his perch on a working

:03:31.:03:32.

vaxcation, at his golf course A report by US Intelligence

:03:33.:03:35.

officials saying Pyongyang has produced a nuclear warhead small

:03:36.:03:42.

enough to fit inside its missiles, that much closer to the capability

:03:43.:03:45.

of striking the United States. The President's angry response

:03:46.:03:51.

could throw a wrench into hopes After a rare unanimous vote

:03:52.:03:53.

in the UN Security Council to slap strong sanctions on the regime -

:03:54.:04:00.

a move meant to bring North Korea North Korean state news said

:04:01.:04:03.

Kim Jong-un is already weighing a plan to strike the Pacific

:04:04.:04:09.

territory of Guam, which appears to have been in place

:04:10.:04:12.

before Mr Trump's remarks. President Trump often

:04:13.:04:15.

criticised his predecessor, Barack Obama, for not sticking

:04:16.:04:17.

to his red lines in foreign policy, But now, Mr Trump has drawn a red

:04:18.:04:20.

line with harsh new rhetoric. The question is, what happens

:04:21.:04:26.

if North Korea crosses it? Suzanne Kianpour,

:04:27.:04:29.

BBC News, Washington. 500 new medical school places

:04:30.:04:32.

will be made available in England next year, as the government

:04:33.:04:35.

attempts to boost the number The target is to increase the total

:04:36.:04:38.

number of training places by a quarter by 2020,

:04:39.:04:44.

to help ease staffing pressures. The British Medical Association says

:04:45.:04:47.

it won't address the immediate The government has given more detail

:04:48.:04:49.

today on what it says will be the biggest ever expansion

:04:50.:05:03.

of the medical workforce in England. What we're doing is ensuring

:05:04.:05:07.

that we train enough home-grown doctors so the NHS becomes

:05:08.:05:12.

self-sufficient in doctors over the period of the next

:05:13.:05:14.

ten years or so. And we think that that's

:05:15.:05:17.

the best way to ensure that we've got the doctors

:05:18.:05:22.

we need for the future. Next year, an extra 500

:05:23.:05:25.

medical school places By 2020, that number will grow

:05:26.:05:27.

to 1,500, reprsenting a 25% increase And medical schools will have to win

:05:28.:05:35.

many of those extra places by showing that they can get

:05:36.:05:41.

graduates to work in rural or coastal areas, where

:05:42.:05:44.

recruitment's more of a struggle, and by bringing in trainees

:05:45.:05:47.

from diverse and disadvantaged We welcome the government's

:05:48.:05:49.

approach, looking at how they can get more people from poorer

:05:50.:05:54.

backgrounds to study medicine. It is something which the BMA has

:05:55.:05:59.

been talking about for many years but there are lots of questions

:06:00.:06:02.

about how these medical school places are going to be funded

:06:03.:06:05.

and how the government is going to tackle the immediate

:06:06.:06:08.

recruitment and retention crisis This is all part of wider plans

:06:09.:06:11.

to create thousands more training places for nurses, midwives

:06:12.:06:15.

and health professionals. The Labour Party says it

:06:16.:06:20.

doesn't add up to any But, ultimately, it will be patients

:06:21.:06:23.

who decide whether this extra dose of doctors proves to be

:06:24.:06:28.

an effective medicine. We'll be speaking to a health

:06:29.:06:30.

minister about those Five men facing criminal charges

:06:31.:06:41.

over the Hillsborough disaster Three of them are accused of trying

:06:42.:06:47.

to cover up what happened in 1989. The police match commander

:06:48.:06:52.

on the day, former chief superintendent David Duckenfield,

:06:53.:06:55.

won't be in the dock. Our reporter Ben Schofield

:06:56.:06:57.

has more on this. Why won't David Duckenfield be in

:06:58.:07:04.

court today? It is just over one months in the Crown Prosecution

:07:05.:07:07.

Service said they would charge six individuals with various offences

:07:08.:07:10.

relating to the Hillsborough disaster. David Duckenfield faces

:07:11.:07:16.

the most serious set of charges. 95 individual counts of manslaughter.

:07:17.:07:20.

But prosecutors need to apply to the High Court to lift and ordered Dani

:07:21.:07:27.

King from being prosecuted before they can proceed with that case. Who

:07:28.:07:31.

are the other five men? They include Graham Mackrell, who was the safety

:07:32.:07:36.

officer and secretary of Sheffield Wednesday football club at the time

:07:37.:07:39.

of the disaster. He is facing allegations that he breached health

:07:40.:07:46.

and safety legislation. He and David Duckenfield are the only two men

:07:47.:07:48.

letting charges relating to the disaster itself. Then as you said

:07:49.:07:53.

there are three men, two former police officers and a retired lawyer

:07:54.:07:57.

facing charges of perverting the course of justice. Fifth man we are

:07:58.:08:05.

expecting in the court today is Sir Norman Bettison, a former chief

:08:06.:08:08.

Constable. He ran both the Merseyside and west Yorkshire police

:08:09.:08:11.

forces and he's facing allegations of misconduct in a public office. It

:08:12.:08:15.

is expected to be relatively short hearing this afternoon, but

:08:16.:08:18.

nevertheless a significant step as these cases progress 28 years after

:08:19.:08:21.

the disaster itself. Thanks. Children's services are being

:08:22.:08:24.

"pushed to breaking point" due to increased demand and cuts

:08:25.:08:27.

in council budgets, according The LGA says three-quarters of

:08:28.:08:29.

English councils overspent on child social care by

:08:30.:08:33.

a total of more than A government spokesman said councils

:08:34.:08:36.

would receive around ?200 billion Athletics chiefs have been

:08:37.:08:42.

criticised for denying a medal favourite entry to the London

:08:43.:08:51.

Stadium amid concerns over Around 30 athletes and support staff

:08:52.:08:54.

have been affected by sickness at the World Championships,

:08:55.:09:01.

but only Botswana's Isaac Makwala has been prevented from competing,

:09:02.:09:03.

as Andy Swiss reports. As Wayde van Niekerk charged

:09:04.:09:15.

to the 400 metres title, the first gold of a

:09:16.:09:18.

potential double at these championships, much of the focus

:09:19.:09:20.

was still on his absent challenger. Isaac Makwala was told he couldn't

:09:21.:09:23.

compete after his sickness because organisers had to protect

:09:24.:09:26.

the welfare of the athletes. But his Botswanan team

:09:27.:09:30.

were left frustrated. We respect the decision

:09:31.:09:32.

if it is based on public health issues, however, it is

:09:33.:09:36.

the manner in which this decision was arrived

:09:37.:09:39.

at which is quite disturbing and, as we have indicated,

:09:40.:09:43.

this matter has been We feel very sorry

:09:44.:09:45.

for the athletes that have to be withdrawn

:09:46.:09:51.

from the competition, but we have a responsibility

:09:52.:09:53.

for all of the athletes and if we allowed them all to sit,

:09:54.:09:58.

it's a tight community, we need to make sure that

:09:59.:10:01.

all of the athletes Meanwhile, Britain's medal

:10:02.:10:04.

near misses continue, despite the performance

:10:05.:10:10.

of Kyle Langford's life. First place just eluding

:10:11.:10:13.

him in the 800 metres And among today's highlights

:10:14.:10:15.

is the return of Mo Farah, as he goes in the heats

:10:16.:10:19.

of the 5,000 metres. He is still the British team's only

:10:20.:10:24.

medallist here and it's now halfway More on that throughout the morning.

:10:25.:10:39.

Jessica is doing the sport live from the London stadium on day six of the

:10:40.:10:41.

championships. Tributes have been paid

:10:42.:10:42.

to the American country music star Glen Campbell, who's died

:10:43.:10:45.

after what his family called a "long and courageous battle"

:10:46.:10:48.

with Alzheimer's. Dolly Parton said he had "one

:10:49.:10:49.

of the greatest voices of all time". He was famous for hits including

:10:50.:10:54.

Rhinestone Cowboy and Wichita Our arts correspondent David Sillito

:10:55.:10:57.

looks back on his life. Wichita Lineman, it's wide

:10:58.:11:00.

open spaces, yearning, loneliness, America

:11:01.:11:10.

turned into song. But what truly made it a masterpiece

:11:11.:11:15.

was the voice of Glen Campbell. # I hear you singing

:11:16.:11:18.

in the wires...# He had been born in Billstown,

:11:19.:11:22.

Arkansas, a large poor His escape was his Uncle Boo,

:11:23.:11:25.

who taught him to play guitar. He could play anything and ended

:11:26.:11:32.

up singing on TV shows and on hundreds of

:11:33.:11:39.

singles with the session musicians the Wrecking Crew,

:11:40.:11:47.

Phil Spektor songs, the Righteous Brothers, Frank Sinatra,

:11:48.:11:49.

it was Glenn Campbell on guitar. And eventually,

:11:50.:11:52.

a breakthrough hit of his own. # Rivers flowing

:11:53.:11:54.

Gentle on my mind...# But it was the partnership

:11:55.:11:59.

with songwriter Jimmy Webb that gave him his career-defining

:12:00.:12:01.

songs By The Time Clean cut, Conservative,

:12:02.:12:03.

he was suddenly country music's biggest star,

:12:04.:12:11.

with his own TV show. # But I'm going to be

:12:12.:12:14.

where the lights Rhinestone Cowboy was a glorious

:12:15.:12:22.

return to form after a dip in his fortunes that had

:12:23.:12:27.

taken place in the '70s. But his personal life

:12:28.:12:31.

was far from glorious. I think I probably just

:12:32.:12:36.

quit letting God run my life and I actually just got

:12:37.:12:39.

into the drugs and the booze pretty # I am a lineman for

:12:40.:12:42.

the county, and I...# That slight stumble

:12:43.:12:47.

over the words, it was He'd long put his wild

:12:48.:12:54.

days behind him, but What stayed with him

:12:55.:13:01.

when so much else had gone We will be one of the many buying

:13:02.:13:10.

one of his albums today. We sold over 40 million records in

:13:11.:13:33.

his career. Nine number one songs. Just hearing his voice at the end,

:13:34.:13:38.

that you the full tone. That's pretty up-to-date with one of

:13:39.:13:40.

our main story this morning. The NHS in England says it's aiming

:13:41.:13:42.

for what it calls the biggest ever expansion of it's workforce,

:13:43.:13:48.

by training an extra 1,500 There will also be additional

:13:49.:13:50.

training places for nurses, midwives and other

:13:51.:13:54.

health professionals. We'll discuss the plans

:13:55.:13:56.

with Health Minister Philip Dunne but first let's get reaction

:13:57.:13:58.

from someone who works in the NHS. We have a former British Medical

:13:59.:14:09.

Association representative. Your reaction to this confirmation of

:14:10.:14:13.

these numbers, how was it going to work in practice? We all welcome

:14:14.:14:18.

changes like this, but what we are most concerned about is how late

:14:19.:14:22.

this is. We are looking at about eight years. If we implement the

:14:23.:14:25.

changes in the next 12 months it will take five years for a medical

:14:26.:14:29.

student to be trained to become a junior topped up and spent two years

:14:30.:14:35.

to become a junior doctor -- junior doctor. The other concern I have is

:14:36.:14:42.

we have an all-time low of college students applying for medicine for

:14:43.:14:45.

the first time ever. St George is university in London was clearing

:14:46.:14:51.

places for medicine and those are the questions I have the most

:14:52.:14:55.

concerns about. There is a concern about home-grown doctors and nurses

:14:56.:14:59.

coming through and that's where you see the problem? Absolutely and it's

:15:00.:15:05.

not 35%. We have about 7500 new medical students every year. Of

:15:06.:15:11.

course 20% of that is 1500, so it's not 25%. The number of vacancies for

:15:12.:15:17.

medics in the UK is about 50,000. We have massive amounts of vacancies.

:15:18.:15:23.

How is 1500 new doctors from the year 2023, 2024 going to address

:15:24.:15:30.

that? What would you want to ask the health minister now in terms of

:15:31.:15:34.

making a difference to your life as a junior doctor? One of the biggest

:15:35.:15:39.

concerns we have in paediatrics is retention of current trainees.

:15:40.:15:44.

Recruitment of current trainees. For the first year the Royal college of

:15:45.:15:48.

paediatric soprano second round of interviews for paediatric cases

:15:49.:15:51.

because not enough people were recruited in the first round. How

:15:52.:15:56.

are we going to address that with more junior doctors feeling like

:15:57.:15:59.

they can't cope with the gaps we can't feel? Thank you very much.

:16:00.:16:05.

We will be putting some of those questions to the health Minister,

:16:06.:16:15.

Philip Don. The first point that was made, on the issue of what you're

:16:16.:16:19.

going to do to address the immediate crisis, training these new doctors,

:16:20.:16:23.

we won't see them in service for eight years? -- Dunn. We are

:16:24.:16:29.

committing today to what we said we would do before the general

:16:30.:16:32.

election, to increase the number of home-grown, trained doc is by 25%

:16:33.:16:38.

over the coming years. We recognise there are pressures on doctors and

:16:39.:16:43.

on the health service system, that is why we've been increasing the

:16:44.:16:49.

number of doc is since 2012. Today, there are some 11,000 more doctors

:16:50.:16:56.

than 12,000 more nurses. There are some pressure points however. --

:16:57.:17:07.

doctors. This will not happen tomorrow, Doctor Patel is right

:17:08.:17:11.

about that. It will take some time. We have to manage pressures in

:17:12.:17:18.

certain areas. On the issue of repayment, do you know how much it

:17:19.:17:23.

costs to train Doctor? ?230,000. Is it a fair argument to say that there

:17:24.:17:28.

should be tighter NHS contracts, so that when you spend that money on

:17:29.:17:32.

training a doctor, it is easier for the doctor to stay in the NHS, and

:17:33.:17:37.

it is a benefit to the NHS by keeping those members of staff in

:17:38.:17:42.

jobs? Bout was something we did consult on over the three months

:17:43.:17:46.

from March - June. We are not yet announcing the response. We think we

:17:47.:17:50.

need to do some more work. It is a very complex issue. We are asking

:17:51.:17:54.

health education England to do some work on Mount to see how we can

:17:55.:18:00.

balance the competing demands for the individual doctors -- on

:18:01.:18:14.

amounts. There ask you about the issue with Rotor gaps? Raised by our

:18:15.:18:18.

junior doc is. The difficulty of those who feel that they are not

:18:19.:18:22.

able to do the job they wanted to do. They went into medicine to do

:18:23.:18:26.

these jobs, but there are not enough staff and not enough hours? The

:18:27.:18:32.

pressures on the system are acknowledged, the particular

:18:33.:18:36.

pressures in certain errors, such as emergency ... You are not

:18:37.:18:45.

specifically addressing the issues they are raising. The junior doctors

:18:46.:18:50.

raised a lot of issues last year, a lot of those were about the worklife

:18:51.:18:57.

Alan and the pressures on two new doctors. We have got 11,800 more

:18:58.:19:05.

doctors than we have in 2010, so there are more doctors coming into

:19:06.:19:10.

the system right now. We have a new cohort that began only at the

:19:11.:19:14.

beginning of this month. A new academic year has meant more junior

:19:15.:19:19.

doctors are coming into the system. Today's announcement is focused on

:19:20.:19:24.

the future and how we can ensure that this country becomes more

:19:25.:19:27.

self-sufficient in training our own doctors. That is why we are adding

:19:28.:19:32.

an additional 1500 races to be current places that we have been

:19:33.:19:38.

funding in recent years. We will be producing seven and a half thousand

:19:39.:19:44.

new doctors each year. I understand you are saying this is good news

:19:45.:19:49.

today, but on one more issue, nursing. Janet Davies, the general

:19:50.:19:57.

secretary of the Royal College of nursing, she said, the government is

:19:58.:20:00.

turning off the tap. Nursing degree applications have fallen sharply in

:20:01.:20:04.

the take-up is forcing many nurses out of a job that they love. There

:20:05.:20:10.

is a lack of funding for those coming in, and for those already in

:20:11.:20:18.

it. How are you addressing that? We have committed to funding the

:20:19.:20:22.

clinical placements for an additional 10,000 nurses starting

:20:23.:20:28.

from this current autumn. That is an immediate response to that

:20:29.:20:32.

challenge. As I said, there are over 12 one half thousand more nurses on

:20:33.:20:36.

our wards today than there were in 2010. What we are looking to do is

:20:37.:20:42.

to continue to increase the flow of nurses into the system. We have got

:20:43.:20:48.

52,000 more nurses than we have ever had before. That covers a number of

:20:49.:20:56.

specialties, including midwives. We are trying to address more people

:20:57.:21:02.

getting into the NHS, and today's announcement is another component to

:21:03.:21:05.

that. Wanki for your kind this morning. And your reaction to that?

:21:06.:21:13.

I am really struggling to understand where this is coming from. Making it

:21:14.:21:18.

simple, if you turn up to work one day and I told you there were none

:21:19.:21:22.

of you for the entire week and the cameraman has gone, just do your

:21:23.:21:26.

best. That is the kind of Rotor gap we are talking about. The minister

:21:27.:21:30.

is saying they are bringing in staff this autumn and working to bring in

:21:31.:21:35.

more... It is too late. In paediatrics, we have seen too

:21:36.:21:41.

impatient to make --2 inpatient units closed and a whole lot of

:21:42.:21:48.

other units closed as well. We have seen a 25% increase of admissions.

:21:49.:21:53.

We are getting more work and demand, but less staff than ever. There are

:21:54.:22:01.

11,000 new doctors, we have got 49,000. 'S graduating every year,

:22:02.:22:07.

but is not something new that they have done. Will

:22:08.:22:10.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:22:11.:22:18.

mixed fortunes today. In the north, it is fine, in the south, heavy rain

:22:19.:22:25.

and showers developing through the day. A weather front draped across

:22:26.:22:29.

England and Wales. Showers in The Channel Islands, some dry conditions

:22:30.:22:33.

in the south-east. Dry across much of the rest of the UK. I pressure is

:22:34.:22:38.

exerting its influence. This weather front producing the rain at the

:22:39.:22:42.

moment will sink towards the south-east, merge with some showers,

:22:43.:22:45.

so later we will see some heavy downpours. Drifting off, we are

:22:46.:22:51.

already in some sunshine. Hanging on to that through the day. A beautiful

:22:52.:22:55.

day across Scotland and Northern Ireland. A few showers in the

:22:56.:22:59.

Highlands at the moment. They will fade across northern England. The

:23:00.:23:04.

further north you are, the brighter it is. Then you can see where we've

:23:05.:23:08.

got the rain. That extends into the Midlands and the south-west. In

:23:09.:23:12.

Wales, more cloud. A few showers. Brightening up for you. That band of

:23:13.:23:19.

rain, through east Anglia and Essex and Kent, some rain, but the sun

:23:20.:23:23.

coming through for a time. It won't last. Temperatures rising, thundery

:23:24.:23:29.

downpours merging with rain heading south. As it heads south,

:23:30.:23:32.

brightening up across northern Wales and the Midlands. Northern England,

:23:33.:23:38.

Scotland and Wales will have a fine end to the day. Some of us will have

:23:39.:23:44.

a fine day. I is up to 21 in Glasgow, 19 in Belfast. Feeling

:23:45.:23:48.

quite nice. At the other end of the country. Heavy rain across east

:23:49.:23:54.

Anglia in south-east England. That could lead to some disruption with

:23:55.:23:58.

some surface water flooding. This evening and overnight, that weather

:23:59.:24:01.

front continues to drift towards the south-east. Where we have had some

:24:02.:24:08.

late rain, we could see patchy mist and fog. Away from that, dry

:24:09.:24:11.

weather. Clouding over in the far north of the head of our next set of

:24:12.:24:16.

weather fronts. Those fronts are attached to this area of low

:24:17.:24:20.

pressure. I pressure exerting its influence across most of the UK.

:24:21.:24:24.

Today's weather front continues its journey into the near continent. A

:24:25.:24:29.

feature in the morning, leaving Kent. Some light rain and a lot of

:24:30.:24:35.

sunshine. Quite a change compared to the last couple of days. A change

:24:36.:24:39.

across the north of Scotland, more cloud coming in. Temperatures as

:24:40.:24:46.

high as 22 degrees. That weather front continuing south during the

:24:47.:24:51.

course of Friday. A week feature by the time it gets into the

:24:52.:24:54.

south-east. And Saturday and Sunday looking quite nice.

:24:55.:25:01.

With it's rugged mountains and pristine lochs, it's no surprise

:25:02.:25:13.

that the Isle of Skye attracts large numbers of tourists.

:25:14.:25:15.

But the island has become so popular its services

:25:16.:25:18.

are struggling to cope with the numbers.

:25:19.:25:20.

James Shaw is there for us this morning.

:25:21.:25:28.

What is the problem? Too much of a good thing? It looks beautiful and

:25:29.:25:37.

tranquil, you can see the houses along the harbour. This is the main

:25:38.:25:42.

town in the sky. You can see the hill behind me, that is where the

:25:43.:25:47.

Highland games are going to take place. The busiest day of the year

:25:48.:25:54.

on this island. The population will probably double or more. It starts

:25:55.:26:00.

to give you a sense of just how much pressured areas on the

:26:01.:26:02.

infrastructure and services of this beautiful island.

:26:03.:26:05.

Skye has a unique and stunning combination of rivers,

:26:06.:26:07.

mountains and sea lochs, but now it's under increasing

:26:08.:26:09.

Some of Skye's most stunning locations are victims

:26:10.:26:30.

of their own success, suffering increasing road

:26:31.:26:32.

But, still, visitors are drawn to them.

:26:33.:26:35.

What do you think of what you've seen so far?

:26:36.:26:37.

I mean, just the landscape is amazing.

:26:38.:26:40.

Something you don't see anywhere else.

:26:41.:26:42.

Yeah, it's been lovely and everything is beautiful,

:26:43.:26:45.

but there are so many tourists that there isn't the infrastructure

:26:46.:26:47.

to deal with that, unless they manage it in some way.

:26:48.:26:51.

I fear that the prettiness will be damaged by all

:26:52.:26:53.

I didn't imagine so many people, but, yeah, we were quite

:26:54.:26:57.

You know, you have the vast landscape you can walk

:26:58.:27:01.

Not so much space on Skye's singletrack roads.

:27:02.:27:21.

Incidents like this are surprisingly common.

:27:22.:27:22.

And more people are coming to Skye because they've seen it on film.

:27:23.:27:37.

The problem at the moment is the car parking, disposal of waste,

:27:38.:27:40.

and, you know, people come to where the films were made,

:27:41.:27:43.

jump out of the car or the coach, take a quick picture and gone again.

:27:44.:27:47.

And, you know, it's nothing coming into the island economy from some

:27:48.:27:50.

Who wouldn't want to come to Skye to be so surrounded by natural

:27:51.:27:55.

It's clear that pressures are growing and some on the island

:27:56.:27:59.

believe that there need to be solutions sooner rather than later.

:28:00.:28:02.

Well, the biggest challenge over singletrack roads...

:28:03.:28:03.

Shirley runs one of Skye's most famous restaurants.

:28:04.:28:06.

She's also setting up an organisation which will pitch

:28:07.:28:08.

for government grants to improve the island's infrastructure.

:28:09.:28:10.

We need the Scottish government to get right behind tourism,

:28:11.:28:13.

which is now recognised as being a major economic driver

:28:14.:28:16.

We need to get them onside and perhaps supporting us with extra

:28:17.:28:30.

funding for the development of tourism as an industry.

:28:31.:28:33.

Other people suggest a tourism tax, or even making all or part

:28:34.:28:36.

But the consensus is that there should be action soon.

:28:37.:28:57.

there. Could there be a tourism tax to help protect the infrastructure?

:28:58.:29:09.

Probably the Scottish government would not be in favour of that.

:29:10.:29:15.

There could be a fund that might help again with that infrastructure.

:29:16.:29:20.

These are all options to consider. If you see me hitting myself, don't

:29:21.:29:26.

worry, it's just the midges, they are really bad today. We can

:29:27.:29:32.

actually see them all over the camera! You have done very well. It

:29:33.:29:36.

just makes you want to get rid of them. Thank you very much. Thank you

:29:37.:29:42.

for all your comments on the issue of rudeness. We have set the

:29:43.:29:48.

breakfast Twitter and social media account alight with what you think

:29:49.:29:52.

is very annoying. Lots to talk about later on.

:29:53.:29:52.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:29:53.:33:10.

I will be back with more in about half an hour. See you soon. Take

:33:11.:33:14.

care. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:33:15.:33:19.

with Dan Walker and Naga Munchetty. Tensions between the US

:33:20.:33:28.

and North Korea have North Korea says it is considering

:33:29.:33:39.

carrying out missile strikes on the US territory of Guam. And earlier

:33:40.:33:46.

military statement came out after North Korea threatened America with

:33:47.:33:48.

action. North Korea best not make any more

:33:49.:33:49.

threats to the United States. They will be met with

:33:50.:33:55.

fire and fury like He has been very threatening,

:33:56.:33:57.

beyond a normal state, and as I said they will be met

:33:58.:34:11.

with fire, fury and frankly power the likes of which this world

:34:12.:34:15.

has never seen before. 500 new medical school places

:34:16.:34:17.

will be made available in England next year, as the government

:34:18.:34:20.

attempts to boost the number The target is to increase the total

:34:21.:34:23.

number of training places by a quarter by 2020,

:34:24.:34:29.

to help ease staffing pressures. The British Medical Association says

:34:30.:34:33.

it won't address the immediate Earlier the health minister Philip

:34:34.:34:44.

Dunn admitted there are pressure points on NHS services. We recognise

:34:45.:34:50.

there are pressures on doctors, on the health service system, and

:34:51.:34:53.

that's why we've been increasing the number of doctors working in the

:34:54.:34:57.

health service since 2012. Today there are some 11,800 more doctors

:34:58.:35:03.

than in 2010, some 12,500 more nurses. There are some pressure

:35:04.:35:07.

points in certain specialties and part of the announcement today is to

:35:08.:35:10.

make sure that we recruit into specialties where there are

:35:11.:35:15.

shortages. We've had a massive response to that interview. One

:35:16.:35:21.

says, husband just turned off the TV, shouting over that interview.

:35:22.:35:26.

Paul says, my daughter has just finished her first year as a nurse.

:35:27.:35:30.

So many have pulled out of the course as they can't afford to live.

:35:31.:35:38.

Tanya says her daughter has four A stars but no medical school offers.

:35:39.:35:42.

She is desperate to be a doctor. Thanks for getting in touch.

:35:43.:35:46.

The latest in the world of business now. Good morning!

:35:47.:35:52.

It is kind of a birthday you don't want to remember. Like you say, it

:35:53.:36:05.

has flown by. Good morning. Bank started giving out high risk loans

:36:06.:36:11.

to people with pure credit histories and we know how much these loans

:36:12.:36:14.

would be worth and whether they could pay it back. So the financial

:36:15.:36:19.

system is frozen and interest rates were slashed. Of course they are

:36:20.:36:24.

still at that historical low. Even we are an economy still largely

:36:25.:36:29.

built on debt, people are wondering if we have learnt anything at all.

:36:30.:36:33.

We will talk more about this in about 30 minutes. People are being

:36:34.:36:39.

warned about a scam involving those delivery cards. You know when you

:36:40.:36:43.

miss your post and you get a card saying the caller number or go and

:36:44.:36:50.

collect your parcel. Apparently fake cards are posted to people, which

:36:51.:36:54.

look like official Royal Mail ones, and they ask you to call a number in

:36:55.:36:58.

order to retrieve your post. But what victims are finding out is they

:36:59.:37:02.

are actually being charged ?45 for that call. So watch out and make

:37:03.:37:07.

sure it is legitimate when you get one of those. And a story on

:37:08.:37:11.

parking. This is something we only really want to pay cash for,

:37:12.:37:15.

apparently. Apparently seven out of ten drivers will avoid parking in

:37:16.:37:19.

places that require payment by phone. They say motorists prefer to

:37:20.:37:24.

pay by cash, even if the metre doesn't give change. The AA says

:37:25.:37:30.

many are put off by administration fees and voice controlled payment

:37:31.:37:33.

systems. I am a bit like that. Same.

:37:34.:37:38.

You're thinking, did it really works?

:37:39.:37:42.

You don't trust it. You've got to get up-to-date with a

:37:43.:37:47.

modern times. I am amazed I am the one saying this, but it does work

:37:48.:37:51.

and it remembers your car, gives you an option.

:37:52.:37:56.

Nah... I like getting a ticket out of and putting their cash in.

:37:57.:37:59.

Tributes are being paid to one of the most successful American

:38:00.:38:02.

singers, Glen Campbell, who's died six years after revealing

:38:03.:38:05.

As a session musician, Glen Campbell played on hundreds

:38:06.:38:23.

of recordings before his career as a singer took off.

:38:24.:38:27.

He was best known for hits including Rhinestone Cowboy and Wichita

:38:28.:38:30.

Dolly Parton said he had "one of the greatest voices

:38:31.:38:33.

A few months ago Glen Campbell's daughter told us his father wanted

:38:34.:38:43.

to carry on making music as long as he could. He said, I feel fine, he

:38:44.:38:47.

literally said that, and I want to keep doing what I love, I want to

:38:48.:38:51.

keep touring, and I love performing for people. So he said he was going

:38:52.:38:54.

to do it as long as he could. Coming up on the programme: Carol

:38:55.:38:56.

will be here with the weather. That's in about six or seven

:38:57.:39:03.

minutes. Time to catch up with what's been happening not just at

:39:04.:39:07.

the World Athletics Championships but in the sport. Jessica is at the

:39:08.:39:13.

London stadium for the sixth day of the World Championships.

:39:14.:39:14.

Good morning. It was meant to be the men's 400 metres final last night,

:39:15.:39:21.

one of the most eagerly anticipated races of the World Athletics

:39:22.:39:26.

Championships, billed as one of the highlights of the entire

:39:27.:39:30.

competition. Actually it was very much overshadowed by all of this

:39:31.:39:33.

talk and discussion around the Botswana athlete Isaac Makwala and

:39:34.:39:37.

whether he would be allowed to compete in the final. As you've been

:39:38.:39:41.

hearing most of this morning, he wasn't allowed to take parts despite

:39:42.:39:46.

coming to the stadium ahead of the race. He was affected by a stomach

:39:47.:39:51.

and was withdrawn by the IAAF medical staff. Public Health England

:39:52.:39:56.

guidelines recommend people with such an illness should be

:39:57.:39:57.

quarantined for 48 hours. Makwala was believed to have been

:39:58.:39:59.

one of the athletes who could have mounted a serious challenge in

:40:00.:40:03.

the race to South Africa's Wayde Van But in his absence, the Olympic

:40:04.:40:06.

champion and world record holder came through to comfortably take

:40:07.:40:09.

gold and retain his title. And Van Niekerk had

:40:10.:40:12.

sympathy for his rival. I would love him to have

:40:13.:40:14.

his fair opportunity. I believe he would have done very,

:40:15.:40:22.

very well this championships and, like I said earlier,

:40:23.:40:31.

I've got so much sympathy for him. I really wish I could

:40:32.:40:35.

even give him my medal. Also last night, a thrilling

:40:36.:40:38.

performance from Britain's Kyle The 21-year-old missed out

:40:39.:40:41.

on a medal by 400ths of a second after a sprint for the line

:40:42.:40:50.

in the home straight. He qualified for the final

:40:51.:40:52.

as the slowest athlete in the field but came oh so close

:40:53.:40:56.

to winning a bronze medal. It is bittersweet because I knew in

:40:57.:41:05.

my head I wanted a medal coming into the night. I did the best I could. I

:41:06.:41:12.

finished strong. Just a bit gutted to be honest. It is so hard being so

:41:13.:41:17.

close to a medal. But I am 40 and the world now and I'm only 21, so

:41:18.:41:21.

hopefully down the years to come you will see me taking over that Mo

:41:22.:41:23.

Farah! British team captain Eilidh Doyle

:41:24.:41:25.

will have the chance to win a medal. She qualified for Thursday's 400

:41:26.:41:29.

metre hurdles final as one of the fastest losers

:41:30.:41:31.

after finishing third And it was a good night

:41:32.:41:33.

for Dina Asher-Smith in the stadium where she was a kit bag holder

:41:34.:41:38.

at the 2012 Olympics. She qualified for the semi-finals

:41:39.:41:41.

of the 200 metres in She's had a difficult year fitness

:41:42.:41:43.

wise after breaking her Bianca Williams also

:41:44.:41:48.

made the semi finals. The Women's Rugby World Cup gets

:41:49.:42:00.

under way in Ireland today. Defending champions England will be

:42:01.:42:03.

hoping for a win against Spain in their opening fixture,

:42:04.:42:06.

the hosts take on Australia while Wales face a tough task

:42:07.:42:08.

against New Zealand. We've come out here along with 11

:42:09.:42:15.

other teams in the competition for the start of a brand-new

:42:16.:42:18.

competition. What's gone before has gone before and everyone is proud,

:42:19.:42:23.

but the slate is wiped clean and everyone is fighting and vying for

:42:24.:42:26.

that trophy come the end of the competition.

:42:27.:42:27.

Now of course the athletes here at the Championships have been

:42:28.:42:30.

taking centre stage, but there's someone who's been

:42:31.:42:33.

Hero the Hedgehog, the official mascot here,

:42:34.:42:42.

has been causing a bit of a stir with his antics.

:42:43.:42:49.

They've been keeping the crowds entertained. I think they fancy

:42:50.:42:57.

themselves as a bit of an athlete. Clearly got a bit of work to do

:42:58.:43:00.

around maybe their hurdles technique...

:43:01.:43:05.

It's not the easiest thing to master.

:43:06.:43:10.

At least the cone was there to save him. We will be speaking to Kyle

:43:11.:43:15.

Langford a little bit later on and also Laura Weightman.

:43:16.:43:19.

Two of those who just missed out on medals at this championships.

:43:20.:43:22.

There's a whole debate about whether or not we are doing well enough with

:43:23.:43:25.

the medals. One other thing, yesterday I took

:43:26.:43:31.

the kids to the Opening Ceremony of the Special Olympics. Absolutely

:43:32.:43:35.

brilliant. I know we will be there tomorrow on BBC Breakfast to cover

:43:36.:43:39.

the four-day event. It was a wonderful Opening Ceremony and the

:43:40.:43:44.

atmosphere was amazing. I just think with sport like this,

:43:45.:43:49.

so inspirational. Loss to look forward to on day six of the

:43:50.:43:53.

championship. Three gold medals are up for grabs including the shotput,

:43:54.:43:57.

the 400 metre hurdles and the women's 400 metres. Let's see what's

:43:58.:43:59.

in store. Britain's Shara Proctor and Jasmine

:44:00.:44:08.

Soyuz will be looking to make the final in the long jump. Shara

:44:09.:44:12.

Proctor won the silver in the 2015 World Championships and Jasmine

:44:13.:44:18.

Soyuz is a medallist from European Championships. After gold and attend

:44:19.:44:21.

us it is, Mo Farah will start his campaign at the 5000 metres and he

:44:22.:44:26.

has won this event in the last five global championships. Great written

:44:27.:44:30.

have three men in the semis at this event, including Danny Tolbert, 21

:44:31.:44:35.

year rolls who ran a lifetime best of 20.16 seconds to qualify just

:44:36.:44:38.

behind reigning Olympic champion Wayde van Niekerk. The Briton is an

:44:39.:44:44.

else use and Mitchell Blake also made it through. American Felix is

:44:45.:44:50.

seeking a second world title at this distance but in the semifinals the

:44:51.:44:55.

Iranian athlete, 19, beat her and posted a new personal best and a

:44:56.:45:01.

national record of 50.08 seconds. If you want to keep up-to-date with the

:45:02.:45:05.

day's action you can watch BBC Two between 6:30pm and 10:30pm.

:45:06.:45:09.

All that to look forward to the day. 6:30pm on BBC Two.

:45:10.:45:29.

With North Korea saying it's considering a missile strike on a US

:45:30.:45:32.

territory in the Pacific and President Trump threatening

:45:33.:45:34.

Pyongyang with "fire and, fury" tensions between the two

:45:35.:45:37.

Lets get some reaction from South Korea.

:45:38.:45:40.

The journalist Alex Jensen joins us from the capital,

:45:41.:45:42.

Thank you for taking the time to talk to us. How worried should we

:45:43.:45:48.

be? How seriously should we take this ratcheting up of tensions? I

:45:49.:45:51.

was up early this morning, just about when Donald Trump was making

:45:52.:45:59.

those comments. I have to say, it was something different. We might

:46:00.:46:03.

think some of the things he does and the things he tweets are

:46:04.:46:09.

light-hearted, but this looks like a planned statement. There is a bit of

:46:10.:46:13.

poetry, it has not just spontaneously rolled off the tongue.

:46:14.:46:18.

He has also said a red line, laid down the challenge to North Korea.

:46:19.:46:22.

Coincidently, around the same time, North Korea released a statement

:46:23.:46:26.

saying they were prepared to possibly attack around Wylam. We

:46:27.:46:30.

know there are some significant military outposts there which

:46:31.:46:36.

sometimes make little journeys over South Korea. They did that

:46:37.:46:39.

yesterday. I think things are getting more serious. Looking around

:46:40.:46:44.

here in Seoul, people are very much business as usual. We are so

:46:45.:46:48.

desensitised here that I would not take it as a barometer of anything.

:46:49.:46:54.

Where does this go next? You have got fire, theory and power as a

:46:55.:46:59.

threat or a reaction. What more can be said for we see physical action?

:47:00.:47:07.

From the US, not much more can be said. If it came to blows, I don't

:47:08.:47:12.

know whether there would be any kind of formal statement. I suspect that

:47:13.:47:18.

would not be the case. At this point, my overall feeling is that

:47:19.:47:23.

this is still lost, it is still rhetoric from the US. President

:47:24.:47:27.

Trump is putting himself in a position where I think the American

:47:28.:47:30.

people are increasingly becoming worried about their mainland being

:47:31.:47:37.

threatened. Various people in the Trump administration are talking

:47:38.:47:40.

about preventative war. The language is ratcheting up. You can only talk

:47:41.:47:45.

like that for so long before some action has to be taken. North Korea

:47:46.:47:51.

has danced a one-sided tango for decades. You have got a US president

:47:52.:47:56.

talking in those terms now. It becomes very dangerous. He is also

:47:57.:48:00.

saying, if you threaten the US, North Korea are going to do it. So

:48:01.:48:06.

then what will happen? How will Kim Jong-Un react? I am sure, the same

:48:07.:48:13.

as always, because otherwise Pyongyang might consider that

:48:14.:48:20.

statement, threatening Guam, within hours of what Donald Trump had said.

:48:21.:48:26.

Even if it had been planned... I think that with the military drills

:48:27.:48:33.

this month, we will see some provocation. We saw two launches

:48:34.:48:37.

last month knowing they would get sanctioned again. North Korea is

:48:38.:48:42.

very likely to carry out a provocation of some kind. Then the

:48:43.:48:51.

ball will be in Donald Trump's Court. -- court.

:48:52.:48:59.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:49:00.:49:06.

For some of us, but not all, if you're in the northern half of the

:49:07.:49:15.

country, it some sunshine. In the south, heavy rain. That is courtesy

:49:16.:49:21.

of this heavy front, and a high pressure building behind it is

:49:22.:49:29.

giving us are unsettled conditions. But you can see some brightness in

:49:30.:49:33.

the south-east. Some early sunshine. As temperatures rise, sparking off

:49:34.:49:40.

some heavier thundery downpours. We are off to a bright start in

:49:41.:49:44.

northern England with some sunshine. As the rain pushes south, it will

:49:45.:49:50.

continue across England and Wales. Heavy rain merging with heavy

:49:51.:49:54.

showers, some torrential downpours in the south-east. This afternoon,

:49:55.:49:59.

hanging onto sunshine across Scotland and Northern Ireland.

:50:00.:50:03.

Temperatures 20- 21. Feeling quite pleasant with a light breeze. Rain

:50:04.:50:09.

in northern England and torrential downpours yesterday, you might need

:50:10.:50:14.

an umbrella. Brightening up in Wales. Later in the day, brightening

:50:15.:50:19.

up in south-west England. You can see, where we have rain pushing

:50:20.:50:25.

south-east, merging with showers, again some torrential downpours to

:50:26.:50:30.

look out for. For some of us, the temperature won't even get higher

:50:31.:50:34.

than the low double figures. In east Anglia and the south-east, they are

:50:35.:50:41.

in the firing line for that. We could see some surface water

:50:42.:50:45.

flooding. Take extra care. As we head through the afternoon, those

:50:46.:50:50.

are our temperature values. Here is the rain, continuing into the

:50:51.:50:55.

evening and overnight. Pushing down into the south-east. Where we have

:50:56.:51:00.

late rain or showers, we might see some patchiness and fog forming. For

:51:01.:51:04.

most of us, a dry night. Chilly in rural areas. These temperatures

:51:05.:51:09.

indicative of towns and cities. In the north, starting to cloud over.

:51:10.:51:14.

We have got a weather front not too far away. Producing some rain later

:51:15.:51:18.

in the day in the Northern Isles and then in the western Isles. At the

:51:19.:51:22.

other end of the country, losing that rain to the near continent.

:51:23.:51:26.

High-pressure exerting its influence. For a lot of the UK

:51:27.:51:32.

tomorrow, a fine and dry day. Some will notice a difference across

:51:33.:51:35.

England and Wales. This weather front is thinking south during the

:51:36.:51:40.

course of the day. A week feature as it gets into the south. On Saturday

:51:41.:51:52.

and Sunday, not looking too shabby. Thank you very much.

:51:53.:51:58.

All this summer here on Breakfast, we're talking to some of the UK's

:51:59.:52:02.

This morning Steph is talking to a woman who's achieved rare

:52:03.:52:06.

success in the world of science and energy.

:52:07.:52:12.

Yes, this is the third in our summer series talking to inspirational

:52:13.:52:16.

businesswoman at the top of their field.

:52:17.:52:18.

The energy industry, which has been much in the news

:52:19.:52:22.

recently, is dominated by men - with only 6 percent of the places

:52:23.:52:26.

on the boards of power companies taken by women.

:52:27.:52:28.

My guest today is chief exec of Good Energy,

:52:29.:52:31.

an energy company she founded in 1999.

:52:32.:52:33.

It sells gas and electricity to around 115,000 customers

:52:34.:52:35.

generated only from renewable or carbon neutral sources.

:52:36.:52:37.

It also operates its own wind and solar farms.

:52:38.:52:41.

Juliet Davenport, welcome to BBC Breakfast.

:52:42.:52:46.

Take us back to the beginning of where this started for you? It feels

:52:47.:52:52.

like a really long time ago. In 1999, I guess I was really

:52:53.:52:57.

interested and passionate about trying to look for a cleaner future

:52:58.:53:03.

for the energy. I had come out of a consultancy, doing a lot of

:53:04.:53:06.

technology and looking at the policies around it, the finances

:53:07.:53:15.

around it. A lot of studies forgot consumers. Nobody had thought about

:53:16.:53:19.

this power and whether that would shift in a new world where you have

:53:20.:53:23.

low government power. That became really interesting to me. I was

:53:24.:53:27.

really lucky to bump into somebody at a conference who had the same

:53:28.:53:32.

thought. We came together and set up the business back in 1999. It is

:53:33.:53:39.

quite something to set up a business. Was it purely the

:53:40.:53:47.

motivation to make businesses Greener, or was it the real -- or

:53:48.:53:55.

was it something else? If you knew all the problems about setting up

:53:56.:53:58.

your own business, you might not do it. You have to be passionate,

:53:59.:54:02.

really focused on that. You have to hold onto that all the way through.

:54:03.:54:08.

The thing about businesses is that they do stuff. A lot of policymakers

:54:09.:54:14.

try to tinker around, moneymakers give you the money. Business people

:54:15.:54:21.

actually do things, you get to be fantastically creative. You work

:54:22.:54:25.

with fantastic people, lots of great customers. You get to do it and it

:54:26.:54:32.

is really exciting. The energy industry is quite an interesting

:54:33.:54:38.

area to penetrate. We talk about the big companies that dominate the

:54:39.:54:42.

market is, what is that like? I came up through a background of physics.

:54:43.:54:46.

That is what I studied at university. I got quite used to

:54:47.:54:52.

being in a bit of a minority. I was really lucky, I spent two years

:54:53.:54:56.

teaching maths and physics. It gives you huge confidence about explaining

:54:57.:55:08.

complex ideas in speaking out loud. Nobody gave me a hard time or tried

:55:09.:55:15.

to put me down. It surprised me. Where they surprised you were

:55:16.:55:18.

intelligent quest of surprised I had something to say, a challenge to the

:55:19.:55:22.

way they were thinking about it. It was very interesting, we -- when I

:55:23.:55:33.

first came into it, customers were just metres, not real people.

:55:34.:55:38.

Customers can generate their own power today. We have lots of

:55:39.:55:42.

customers who do that. We look at the market in a completely different

:55:43.:55:46.

way. They haven't really thought about that. I think that is why you

:55:47.:55:51.

need diversity in business, to look at problems in different ways. It is

:55:52.:55:57.

interesting that it is heavily criticised. What are your thoughts?

:55:58.:56:01.

I think it is in a period of transition. My fingers are crossed

:56:02.:56:05.

that the way we look at things in the future will be different, the

:56:06.:56:12.

customer coming clean as opposed to being the person on the end of the

:56:13.:56:16.

wire. We have seen price changes, there is a lot of playing around. It

:56:17.:56:24.

is a competitive market. The successes, nearly 4 million people

:56:25.:56:27.

switched this year. That is a huge change from what we have seen

:56:28.:56:32.

before. It is very easy to switch. Consumers can take their own power.

:56:33.:56:38.

If they don't like what they are getting, you can find more suppliers

:56:39.:56:41.

in the market than ever before. There is so much choice. I think it

:56:42.:56:46.

is a better consumer market and we have ever seen. I hope we continue

:56:47.:56:50.

to see customers drive forward a real choice in the future. You can

:56:51.:56:55.

hear my optimism coming through. We can see a future where customers are

:56:56.:57:00.

in charge, they generate their own power and decide what they want to

:57:01.:57:05.

do. Your home becomes a smart place, not somebody down the road.

:57:06.:57:10.

Interesting to see what happens. Thank you for coming in.

:57:11.:57:13.

Talking about the credit crunch later on.

:57:14.:57:19.

Back with the headlines in a few minutes, but time

:57:20.:00:41.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Naga Munchetty.

:00:42.:00:52.

"Fire and fury" - President Trump warns North Korea it will face

:00:53.:00:55.

an unprecedented response if it continues to threaten America.

:00:56.:00:58.

As Pyongyang says it's considering a missile strike close

:00:59.:01:00.

to an American military base - tensions between the two

:01:01.:01:02.

They will be met with fire, fury and frankly power.

:01:03.:01:08.

The likes of which this world has never seen before.

:01:09.:01:27.

Good morning. It's Wednesday, 9th August.

:01:28.:01:32.

An extra 500 medical school places

:01:33.:01:35.

The Government calls it the biggest ever expansion of the workforce

:01:36.:01:40.

but unions say it doesn't address the immediate shortage.

:01:41.:01:45.

It has been ten years since the start of the global

:01:46.:01:54.

when banks started to realise they were sitting

:01:55.:01:57.

I'll be looking at what has happened since then

:01:58.:02:01.

Anger at the athletics world championships after one

:02:02.:02:05.

of the favourites to win the 400 metres is told he can't compete

:02:06.:02:08.

The fall-out from that virus very much overshadowed the men's 400

:02:09.:02:16.

meter final at the London Stadium last night.

:02:17.:02:29.

Makwala didn't compete. # Like a rhinestone cowboy. . #

:02:30.:02:34.

Famed for the Wichita Lineman and the Rhinestone Cowboy,

:02:35.:02:37.

country star Glen Campbell has died at the age of 81.

:02:38.:02:42.

We'll be live on the beautiful Isle of Skye where they're struggling

:02:43.:02:45.

Lovely across many parts of Scotland, Northern Ireland and also

:02:46.:02:58.

the far north of northern England. For the rest of us, it's cloudy.

:02:59.:03:02.

There is some rain around. Showers to develop and in the South East and

:03:03.:03:05.

East Anglia we're likely to see heavy thundery downpours later. But

:03:06.:03:08.

I'll have more details in 15 minutes. Thanks, Carol, see you

:03:09.:03:12.

then. Tensions between the US

:03:13.:03:15.

and North Korea have North Korea has said

:03:16.:03:17.

it is considering carrying out missile strikes on the US Pacific

:03:18.:03:20.

territory of Guam. While President Trump has declared

:03:21.:03:22.

that any further threats from the North Koreans will be met

:03:23.:03:24.

with a devastating response. Suzanne Kianpour reports

:03:25.:03:27.

from Washington. North Korea best not make any more

:03:28.:03:31.

threats to the United States. Unprecedented language

:03:32.:03:46.

from an American president. Donald Trump officially escalated

:03:47.:03:50.

the US stand-off with North Korea from his perch on a working vacation

:03:51.:03:52.

at his golf course in New Jersey. A report by US intelligence

:03:53.:03:55.

officials saying Pyongyang has produced a nuclear warhead small

:03:56.:04:03.

enough to fit inside its missiles - that much closer to the capability

:04:04.:04:06.

of striking the United States. The President's angry response

:04:07.:04:10.

could throw a wrench into hopes After a rare unanimous vote

:04:11.:04:12.

in the UN Security Council to slap strong sanctions on the regime -

:04:13.:04:16.

a move meant to bring North Korean State News says

:04:17.:04:19.

Kim Jong-un is already weighing a plan to strike the US Pacific

:04:20.:04:26.

territory of Guam which appears to have been in place

:04:27.:04:29.

before Mr Trump's remarks. President Trump often

:04:30.:04:34.

criticised his predecessor, Barack Obama, for not sticking

:04:35.:04:36.

to his red lines in foreign policy when he was here in the White House,

:04:37.:04:39.

but now, Mr Trump has drawn a red The question is - what happens

:04:40.:04:43.

if North Korea crosses it? 500 new medical school places

:04:44.:04:51.

will be made available in England next year as the Gvernment attempts

:04:52.:04:53.

to boost the number of home-grown The target is to increase the total

:04:54.:04:56.

number of training places by a quarter by 2020,

:04:57.:05:04.

to help ease staffing pressures. The British Medical Association

:05:05.:05:06.

says it won't address The Government has given more detail

:05:07.:05:08.

today on what it says will be the biggest ever expansion

:05:09.:05:25.

of the medical workforce in England. What we're doing is ensuring

:05:26.:05:30.

that we train enough home-grown doctors so the NHS becomes

:05:31.:05:32.

self-sufficient in doctors over the period of the next ten years

:05:33.:05:35.

or so and we think that that's the best way to ensure

:05:36.:05:38.

that we have the doctors Next year, an extra 500

:05:39.:05:41.

medical school places By 2020, that number will grow

:05:42.:05:45.

to 1,500, reprsenting a 25% increase in yearly intake over

:05:46.:05:52.

all and medical schools will have to win many of those extra places

:05:53.:05:59.

by showing that they can get graduates to work in rural

:06:00.:06:02.

or coastal areas, where recruitment os more of a struggle,

:06:03.:06:05.

and by bringing in trainees from diverse

:06:06.:06:07.

and disadvantaged backgrounds. We welcome the Government's

:06:08.:06:13.

approach, looking at how they can get more people from poorer

:06:14.:06:16.

backgrounds to study medicine. It's something which the BMA has

:06:17.:06:19.

been talking about for many years, but there are lots of questions

:06:20.:06:21.

about how these medical school places are going to be funded

:06:22.:06:24.

and how the Government is going to tackle the immediate

:06:25.:06:27.

recruitment and retention crisis This is all part of wider plans

:06:28.:06:29.

to create thousands more training places for nurses,

:06:30.:06:33.

midwives and health professionals. The Labour Party says it

:06:34.:06:39.

doesn't add up to any But, ultimately, it will be patients

:06:40.:06:41.

who decide whether this extra dose of doctors proves to be

:06:42.:06:45.

an effective medicine. Five men facing criminal charges

:06:46.:06:53.

over the Hillsborough disaster Three of them are accused

:06:54.:06:56.

of attempting to pervert the course The police match commander

:06:57.:07:02.

on the day, former Chief Superintendent David Duckenfield,

:07:03.:07:07.

won't be in the dock. Our reporter Ben Schofield

:07:08.:07:10.

has more on this. Ben, why won't he be in the dock? It

:07:11.:07:23.

is over a month since the Crown Prosecution Service said they wanted

:07:24.:07:26.

to charge six individuals with various offences relating to

:07:27.:07:28.

Hillsborough. David Duckenfield faces the most serious charges. 95

:07:29.:07:32.

individual counts of mans slaughter, but before prosecutors can proceed

:07:33.:07:37.

with the case against him, they need to apply to the High Court to have a

:07:38.:07:42.

court order lifted which prevents him being prosecuted. Who are the

:07:43.:07:45.

five people we are expecting in the dock? They include the secretary and

:07:46.:07:52.

safety officer from Sheffield Wednesday football club. He is

:07:53.:07:55.

facing accusations that he breached health and safety legislation. He

:07:56.:07:59.

and David Duckenfield are the only two individuals charged in relation

:08:00.:08:03.

to the disaster itself. And then, there are three men charged with

:08:04.:08:07.

perverting the course of justice. They are two former police officers

:08:08.:08:11.

from South Yorkshire Police and a lawyer who was advising the force in

:08:12.:08:17.

the wake of the disaster. The fifth man in the dock, Sir Norman

:08:18.:08:20.

Bettison. He is the former Chief Constable of West Yorkshire and

:08:21.:08:24.

Merseyside Police forces and he's facing accusations of misconduct in

:08:25.:08:28.

a public office. It's expected to be quite a short and brief hearing at

:08:29.:08:35.

Warrington Magistrates' Court, but a significant moment as the cases

:08:36.:08:41.

progress, what is it, 28 years since the disaster its self. We will be

:08:42.:08:46.

following it later. Children's services are being

:08:47.:08:48.

"pushed to breaking point" due to increased demand and cuts

:08:49.:08:50.

in council budgets according The LGA says three-quarters

:08:51.:08:52.

of English councils overspent on child social care by a total

:08:53.:09:04.

of more than ?0.5 billion. A government spokesman said councils

:09:05.:09:07.

would receive around ?200 billion Kenya's incumbent President Uhuru

:09:08.:09:09.

Kenyatta has taken a strong lead as votes are counted

:09:10.:09:15.

after Tuesday's election. With more than three-quarters

:09:16.:09:17.

of results in, Mr Kenyatta has a lead of close

:09:18.:09:22.

to 10% over his rival. However, the opposition coalition

:09:23.:09:25.

has rejected the figures, and has accused officials

:09:26.:09:27.

of publishing fake results. Athletics chiefs have been

:09:28.:09:29.

criticised for denying a medal favourite entry

:09:30.:09:33.

to the London Stadium amid concerns Around 30 athletes and support staff

:09:34.:09:35.

have been affected by sickness at the World Championships,

:09:36.:09:40.

but only Botswana's Isaac Makwala has been prevented from competing

:09:41.:09:43.

as Andy Swiss reports. As Wayde van Niekerk charged

:09:44.:09:49.

to the 400 metres title, the first gold of a potential double

:09:50.:09:54.

at these championships, much of the focus was still

:09:55.:09:57.

on his absent challenger. Isaac Makwala was told he couldn't

:09:58.:10:01.

compete after his sickness because organisers had to protect

:10:02.:10:04.

the welfare of the athletes, but his Botswanan team

:10:05.:10:08.

were left frustrated. We respect the decision

:10:09.:10:10.

if it is based on public However, it is the

:10:11.:10:14.

manner in which this decision was arrived

:10:15.:10:18.

at which is quite disturbing and, as we have indicated,

:10:19.:10:20.

this matter has been We feel very sorry for the athletes

:10:21.:10:22.

that have to be withdrawn from the competition,

:10:23.:10:28.

but we have a responsibility for all of the athletes

:10:29.:10:31.

and if we allowed them all to sit, it's a tight close community

:10:32.:10:35.

and we need to make sure that all of the athletes

:10:36.:10:38.

are protected as well. Meanwhile, Britain's medal

:10:39.:10:40.

near misses continue, despite the performance

:10:41.:10:43.

of Kyle Langford's life. Bronze eluding him in the 800

:10:44.:10:53.

metres by an agonising And among today's highlights

:10:54.:10:55.

is the return of Mo Farah as he goes He's still the British team's only

:10:56.:10:59.

medallist here and it's now half-way We will be back in the London

:11:00.:11:18.

Stadium for the sport later in the programme. Day six, lots going on. I

:11:19.:11:23.

didn't mean to interrupt you. That's fine, Dan.

:11:24.:11:26.

Tributes are being paid to one of the most successful American

:11:27.:11:29.

singers, Glen Campbell, who's died six years after revealing

:11:30.:11:31.

As a session musician Glen Campbell played on hundreds

:11:32.:11:51.

of recordings before his career as a singer took off.

:11:52.:11:53.

He was best known for hits including Rhinestone Cowboy

:11:54.:11:55.

Dolly Parton said he had "one of the greatest voices of all time".

:11:56.:12:01.

A few months ago, Glen's daughter Ashley told Breakfast her father

:12:02.:12:04.

wanted to carry on making music as long as he could.

:12:05.:12:07.

He literally said that and he said I want to keep doing what I love.

:12:08.:12:18.

I've got an album to promote and I love performing for people.

:12:19.:12:22.

He just said I'm going to do it for as long as I can.

:12:23.:12:25.

Some lovely tributes. This one is from Louise, "When I was 16, I went

:12:26.:12:33.

to an album signing he was doing in Toronto. I was there to get

:12:34.:12:38.

interviewed for a school newspaper. He said, "I have got a conference to

:12:39.:12:43.

go to. Would you like to come with me? He took me into the press

:12:44.:12:49.

conference as part of his entourage. He was at the height of his fame. He

:12:50.:12:55.

gave me an interview for our local school newspaper. His actions spoke

:12:56.:13:00.

for a kind person who never lost sight of who he was. ."

:13:01.:13:09.

We will talk more about that with Chris Stevens later.

:13:10.:13:12.

Today marks the tenth anniversary of the start of the biggest

:13:13.:13:15.

financial crash since the Great Depression.

:13:16.:13:19.

It all began when the banks started to realise that they had

:13:20.:13:22.

They had been giving out high-risk loans to people

:13:23.:13:25.

But when the banks realised they had no idea what these loans were worth,

:13:26.:13:30.

and whether they would ever be paid back, the financial system froze.

:13:31.:13:33.

Here in the UK, we saw banks like Bradford Bingley,

:13:34.:13:35.

Northern Rock, RBS and Lloyds get into real trouble and billions

:13:36.:13:39.

of pounds of taxpayers' money was pumped in to try to save them.

:13:40.:13:42.

Money across the world became tight, banks were worried about lending.

:13:43.:13:46.

So to try to help, interest rates were slashed, with the Bank

:13:47.:13:57.

of England base rate cut from 6% to just 0.5%.

:13:58.:13:59.

Since the crisis, banks have to hold more capital for emergencies

:14:00.:14:02.

and the lending rules have been tightened up.

:14:03.:14:04.

But the big question is - ten years on, have we learned

:14:05.:14:07.

the lessons and could it happen again?

:14:08.:14:09.

Steph's here along with Claer Barrett, the personal finance

:14:10.:14:11.

Good morning. You have been talking about how the system has moved on

:14:12.:14:21.

and we are going to be asking that question ten years on... We have

:14:22.:14:25.

been talking. We have been financial journalists for sometime and we were

:14:26.:14:28.

talking about where we were when it happened because it is one of those

:14:29.:14:32.

things where you go, where were you when the credit crunch started? I

:14:33.:14:36.

was working with Robert Peston at the time when he was our business

:14:37.:14:40.

editor and you know it was a time when everyone suddenly thought oh my

:14:41.:14:44.

godness, none of us knows what's going to happen next. We talked

:14:45.:14:48.

about the banks suddenly realising they had this debt. They lent out

:14:49.:14:53.

too much money to people they didn't think could pay it back. This

:14:54.:14:57.

happened in America and this had been put into complex products which

:14:58.:15:01.

were sold to investors and the long shot was no one had a clue what was

:15:02.:15:05.

going to happen next. I remember times when even the Chancellor was

:15:06.:15:09.

ringing us to ask us what we knew on the news! Richard Branson was

:15:10.:15:14.

ringing us to ask us what was going on with Northern Rock and Virgin

:15:15.:15:18.

Money. What have we learnt? There has been a lot of work done on

:15:19.:15:22.

making sure the intRantion got the money now. They have got greater

:15:23.:15:25.

capital requirements so we don't have problems if there is ever a run

:15:26.:15:29.

on the banks again. So they have had to do that. They have had to make

:15:30.:15:32.

sure they have more money in the coffers. You remember the Northern

:15:33.:15:37.

Rock pictures of people queuing, because they were panicking and

:15:38.:15:42.

interest rates are incredibly low. This issing with Clare talks a lot

:15:43.:15:46.

about. It is the fact that it is cheap to borrow money and that's the

:15:47.:15:49.

danger still. We are in a lot of debt.

:15:50.:15:52.

It was all of a sudden business news, some people used to switch off

:15:53.:16:02.

that but it became important because it affected house prices, your

:16:03.:16:06.

mortgage, pensions. The key difference about this credit crisis

:16:07.:16:12.

related to others, you mentioned the great depression, this was global.

:16:13.:16:16.

It did not just affect the UK or America, it started to affect Asia.

:16:17.:16:23.

People were thinking, will it go away it didn't, it got worse, and it

:16:24.:16:28.

showed the global financial system was interconnected and what we have

:16:29.:16:31.

seen the last ten years is regulators around the world, UK, US,

:16:32.:16:39.

Europe, further afield, putting new rules to try to make banks and

:16:40.:16:43.

financial institutions take fewer risks. It has created an unnatural

:16:44.:16:49.

environment and if we return to the UK, look at what has happened to

:16:50.:16:53.

interest rates. The credit crunch personally has been good for me and

:16:54.:16:58.

Steph, we are journalists and our careers have blossomed. I bought a

:16:59.:17:03.

flat in London before mortgage lending was restricted. I only

:17:04.:17:09.

needed a deposit of ?1000. If I bought the same flat, even though my

:17:10.:17:14.

salary and house prices have gone up three times, I would need a deposit

:17:15.:17:25.

of ?100,000 to buy the same flat. Because I bought it, my mortgage is

:17:26.:17:28.

cheap and I am lucky. If I wanted to rent in my building, the rent would

:17:29.:17:31.

be three times as much as the mortgage I was paying because I took

:17:32.:17:34.

get out when lending the scarily cheap and banks have had to keep

:17:35.:17:38.

interest rates are at rock bottom levels to make sure there is not a

:17:39.:17:43.

wave of mass defaults. You think it was ten years ago, but we are still

:17:44.:17:48.

paying the price. Young people are still paying the price. Anybody who

:17:49.:17:53.

graduated ten years after Steph and I would have had a low-wage, waited

:17:54.:17:58.

longer for a job. You look at the economy and think yes, fewer people

:17:59.:18:02.

are claiming unemployment benefit, but a lot of the jobs are insecure.

:18:03.:18:08.

The gig economy sounds fun and sexy, but if you do not get a pension and

:18:09.:18:14.

holiday pay, you are on a lower rank of the market. Also quantitative

:18:15.:18:20.

easing, it rolls off the time. I was at a financial news Channel at the

:18:21.:18:27.

time and we all said quantitative easing, sub-prime. Common language.

:18:28.:18:35.

Debt obligations. Claer, Steph, thanks. We can talk to Carol and see

:18:36.:18:42.

if there is any quantitative easing in the clouds!

:18:43.:18:48.

Good morning, look at this beautiful picture. Cumbria. Lovely Lake

:18:49.:18:55.

Windermere and blue skies. In contrast, you move to Shropshire and

:18:56.:18:59.

you have rain. We have that contrast today going on with the weather with

:19:00.:19:04.

high-pressure establishing over the North, which means fine and settled

:19:05.:19:08.

but a weather front moving south-eastwards. Taking heavy rain

:19:09.:19:14.

with it. To start the day, although bright in the far south-east, as

:19:15.:19:17.

temperatures rise, thundery downpours develop and they will join

:19:18.:19:23.

forces with the rain. It will be a wet afternoon in the south-eastern

:19:24.:19:28.

quarter. Especially East Anglia and the south-east. Brightening up

:19:29.:19:33.

behind. Over most of North of England, northern and western parts

:19:34.:19:37.

of Wales and eventually south-west England, but Northern Ireland and

:19:38.:19:40.

Scotland and the far north of northern England will start on a

:19:41.:19:44.

sunny note and carry on with that. With gentle breezes and temperatures

:19:45.:19:51.

up to 20, maybe 21, it will feel pleasant. Brightening up again

:19:52.:19:55.

across the North Midlands, North Wales, and then we move into rain

:19:56.:20:00.

moving south-eastwards. It will brighten up later across the

:20:01.:20:03.

south-west of England and you will have a fine end to the afternoon.

:20:04.:20:09.

Rain running up through the Channel Islands, heading towards East Anglia

:20:10.:20:13.

and down into the south-east and joining forces with showers. Heavy,

:20:14.:20:18.

thundery downpours. Something to bear in mind if you're travelling

:20:19.:20:22.

because it could lead to disruption with surface water flooding. As we

:20:23.:20:29.

head on, overnight the same band of rain drifting down. Where we have

:20:30.:20:34.

late rain, we can see patchy mist and fog. For most of the UK it will

:20:35.:20:40.

be a dry night. These temperatures represent towns and cities and in

:20:41.:20:45.

rural areas it will be a bit cooler. You can see cloud and rain coming in

:20:46.:20:50.

over the far north as Scotland because this area of low pressure is

:20:51.:20:53.

trying to penetrate high-pressure, going over the top and depositing

:20:54.:20:58.

the rain. It will do the same tomorrow. The North of Scotland it

:20:59.:21:04.

will be a different day to the one you are having today. For most of

:21:05.:21:09.

the UK tomorrow it will be a dry day when we lose the rain from the

:21:10.:21:13.

south-east. If you are in England and Wales, you will notice the

:21:14.:21:19.

difference. It will feel better and there will be sunshine. On Friday,

:21:20.:21:23.

by the time the rain gets into southern counties it will be a weak

:21:24.:21:30.

feature. On Saturday, dry, with sunny spells, good news if you have

:21:31.:21:35.

been under that deluge of rain. I was under a deluge yesterday.

:21:36.:21:41.

Soggy trainers. Very squelchy and soggy.

:21:42.:21:47.

Tasked with winning six to eight medals at this year's

:21:48.:21:50.

World Championships, the British team is currently

:21:51.:21:51.

But there have been plenty of near misses.

:21:52.:21:56.

In the 800m final last night, Kyle Langford lost out on a bronze

:21:57.:21:59.

Kyle joins us now from the London Stadium, along

:22:00.:22:05.

with Laura Weightman, who came sixth in the 1500m

:22:06.:22:07.

Good morning, thank you for getting up early to talk to us. Kyle

:22:08.:22:18.

Langford, we will see pictures at the end of the 800th. Talk is

:22:19.:22:23.

through what was going through your mind. Immediately you look at the

:22:24.:22:27.

screen. Did you think you might have just got third? It was funny because

:22:28.:22:36.

I was driving down the home straight and looking at the athletes and

:22:37.:22:43.

counting how many. Four, five. I am trying to count. As I did, I

:22:44.:22:49.

thought, hopefully, I was praying, I thought my chest might have got it

:22:50.:22:53.

because I was looking to the athlete who got third and had an inkling I

:22:54.:22:55.

did not get it. It was gutting. I was looking at the screen and

:22:56.:23:07.

hoped my chest went ahead of his but it was gutting. A brilliant

:23:08.:23:14.

performance. Laura, sixth in the 1500 final, in which Laura Muir

:23:15.:23:18.

finished fourth. Your coach Steve Cram described the performance are

:23:19.:23:23.

superb at sixth place, there must be some disappointment with that, as

:23:24.:23:28.

well. I think as an athlete you always want more and do better. If I

:23:29.:23:32.

look at the high quality and strength in depth in the 1500 metres

:23:33.:23:37.

in the world, to make the final and be competitive, I am happy. You

:23:38.:23:43.

always want more. How well these girls are running, to be that

:23:44.:23:47.

competitive, I was pleased with the performance and coming back in the

:23:48.:23:51.

future it gives you believe you can be more competitive on the world

:23:52.:23:57.

stage. Laura, it is easy for presenters to sit and say, why are

:23:58.:24:03.

we not winning more medals? Do you as athletes? Is it part of your

:24:04.:24:10.

discussion? There is a target of six - eight to win in this

:24:11.:24:13.

Championships. There is the target and it is home games and it has

:24:14.:24:17.

lifted the team and we have brilliant performances and is fine

:24:18.:24:22.

margins. It is the world stage and you have to have everything 100%

:24:23.:24:28.

right. Callum Hawkins fourth in a marathon, Laura Muir, I was in the

:24:29.:24:32.

top six. We have more performances to come and more athletes coming

:24:33.:24:36.

through and fingers crossed, more performances through the week and we

:24:37.:24:41.

hope as a team we can keep on putting in performances like that.

:24:42.:24:45.

Kyle, you are 21. I read some quotes from you. You athletes are humble.

:24:46.:24:53.

But I know you have big plans for your career. How good do you think

:24:54.:25:01.

you can be? It is that cliche, the sky is the limit. I really think

:25:02.:25:08.

that for me is what it is. I have said for a long time, I want to come

:25:09.:25:13.

to London and come out with a medal, make the final. People say, you need

:25:14.:25:18.

to be realistic, just get there, it will be amazing. But I set my sights

:25:19.:25:23.

high. I would love to come out with a medal today, or yesterday. I set

:25:24.:25:31.

my sights high. I like to do everything, surpass Mo Farah and the

:25:32.:25:36.

likes of Seb Coe. I set my goal is really high. I think I can do it.

:25:37.:25:46.

Nothing wrong with high goals? Nothing wrong with high goals. It is

:25:47.:25:52.

achievable. It is not out of my reach. I have to keep training hard,

:25:53.:25:57.

stay humble and keep striving forward, and just enjoy the sport.

:25:58.:26:01.

That is what I have learned, I really love competing. As

:26:02.:26:11.

nerve-racking as it is. The crowd are crazy. The reception after the

:26:12.:26:15.

final yesterday, it has been amazing. You looked like you enjoyed

:26:16.:26:22.

it. Laura, the major story, the norovirus and various athletes

:26:23.:26:27.

struck down, including Isaac Makwala, who was not able to run and

:26:28.:26:33.

many felt he had a good chance for a medal. Is that something athletes

:26:34.:26:38.

are taking extra care with? It is a tough situation. Doctors are looking

:26:39.:26:44.

after the team and we have been strongly advised to keep on top of

:26:45.:26:52.

things, use the hand sanitiser. It is tough. All the athletes coming

:26:53.:26:57.

together and put in hotels and these things can easily travel around the

:26:58.:27:01.

teams. In our hotel, the signs are good and everybody is healthy and

:27:02.:27:05.

well and you have to keep an eye on yourself. Have you had breakfast

:27:06.:27:13.

yet? I have not had breakfast. I was told I was going to get breakfast

:27:14.:27:19.

but I have not had it yet, but I am waiting. Enjoy the rest of the World

:27:20.:27:23.

Championships. Peanut butter on toast. Who knows

:27:24.:27:25.

what they are eating. I'm back with the latest from BBC

:27:26.:30:49.

London News in half an hour. Now, though, it's

:30:50.:30:53.

back to Naga and Dan. Hello, this is Breakfast

:30:54.:30:55.

with Dan Walker and Naga Munchetty. These are the main stories at

:30:56.:31:05.

8:30am... Tensions between the US

:31:06.:31:07.

and North Korea have Pyongyang says it's

:31:08.:31:09.

considering launching a ballistic missile strike close to the US

:31:10.:31:12.

military base on Guam President Trump has declared

:31:13.:31:15.

that any further threats from the North Koreans will be met

:31:16.:31:25.

with a devastating response. North Korea best not make any more

:31:26.:31:28.

threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury

:31:29.:31:31.

like the world has never seen. He has been very threatening, beyond

:31:32.:31:45.

a normal state, and as I said they will be met with fire, fury, and

:31:46.:31:51.

frankly power, the likes of which this world has never seen before.

:31:52.:31:55.

Some breaking news this morning from Paris.

:31:56.:32:00.

Reports say that French soldiers have been hit by a vehicle

:32:01.:32:03.

in a suburb in the north-west of the city.

:32:04.:32:05.

French Radio says several people have been injured.

:32:06.:32:07.

Officials say police are now looking for the vehicle.

:32:08.:32:09.

As you will expect we will get you as much news on that as we have as

:32:10.:32:15.

we get it this morning, but just to let you know that is new coming to

:32:16.:32:22.

us from France this morning. 8:32am is the time.

:32:23.:32:24.

500 new medical school places will be made available

:32:25.:32:27.

in England next year, as the government attempts to boost

:32:28.:32:29.

the number of home-grown doctors in the NHS.

:32:30.:32:31.

The target is to increase the total number of training places

:32:32.:32:34.

by a quarter by 2020, to help ease staffing pressures.

:32:35.:32:36.

The British Medical Association says it won't address

:32:37.:32:38.

Earlier on Breakfast, the Health Minister Philip Dunne

:32:39.:32:42.

admitted there are pressure points on NHS services.

:32:43.:32:46.

We recognise there are pressures on doctors and

:32:47.:32:48.

That's why we've been increasing the number of doctors working

:32:49.:32:54.

There are today some 11,800 more doctors than there were in 2010,

:32:55.:33:01.

There are some pressure points in certain specialties,

:33:02.:33:06.

and part of today's announcement is to make sure that we recruit

:33:07.:33:09.

into specialties where there are shortages.

:33:10.:33:13.

Children's services are being "pushed to breaking point" due

:33:14.:33:19.

to increased demand and cuts in council budgets, according

:33:20.:33:21.

The LGA says three quarters of English councils overspent

:33:22.:33:25.

on child social care by a total of more than ?500 million

:33:26.:33:27.

A Government spokesman said councils would receive around ?200 billion

:33:28.:33:31.

Councils are facing a double whammy, a big cut in government grants,

:33:32.:33:44.

and also a big increase in the number of vulnerable children

:33:45.:33:47.

So we are saying there's going to be a ?2 billion gap by the end of this

:33:48.:33:54.

decade in the amount of money councils need, compared

:33:55.:33:56.

to the amount of money councils have got.

:33:57.:33:58.

That's going to lead to big problems in making sure that we can keep

:33:59.:34:01.

children safe in the way that members of the public

:34:02.:34:04.

Tributes are being paid to one of the most successful American

:34:05.:34:07.

singers, Glen Campbell, who's died six years after revealing

:34:08.:34:10.

As a session musician Glen Campbell played on hundreds

:34:11.:34:32.

of recordings before his career as a singer took off.

:34:33.:34:34.

He was best known for hits including Rhinestone Cowboy

:34:35.:34:36.

Dolly Parton said he had "one of the greatest voices of all time."

:34:37.:34:44.

A few months ago, Glen's daughter Ashley told Breakfast her father

:34:45.:34:46.

wanted to carry on making music as long as he could.

:34:47.:34:56.

He said, I feel fine, he literally said that,

:34:57.:34:58.

and he said I want to keep doing what I love, I want to keep touring,

:34:59.:35:02.

I've got an album to promote, and I love performing for people.

:35:03.:35:05.

So, he just said I'm going to do it as long as I can.

:35:06.:35:09.

Some lovely tributes come again. Really lovely. Many people who met

:35:10.:35:13.

him when he was on tour to the UK, seeing what a genuinely nice man he

:35:14.:35:16.

was when they met him face to face. We will be talking to journalists

:35:17.:35:17.

about his career a little later. Coming up here on Breakfast

:35:18.:35:26.

this morning... # Like a Rhinestone Cowboy... #.

:35:27.:35:37.

I don't think we will hear enough of Glen Campbell this morning.

:35:38.:35:40.

We'll look back at the life and music of the original

:35:41.:35:42.

Rhinestone Cowboy, the legendary Glen Campbell.

:35:43.:35:44.

We'll also hear how the stunning natural beauty of Skye is attracting

:35:45.:35:47.

so many tourists the island is being pushed to breaking point.

:35:48.:35:49.

And we'll be on our best behaviour with comedian Danny Wallace who says

:35:50.:35:52.

we should all be worried by the rise of rudeness.

:35:53.:35:55.

I'm a bit worried! Honestly, are lot of Glen Campbell tributes today, but

:35:56.:36:04.

rudeness has just kicked things off back. And the things people get

:36:05.:36:09.

annoyed about. Normal things, but some quite odd things. You can also

:36:10.:36:13.

tell when people care as well, because people are sending in

:36:14.:36:26.

obviously loads of tweets and social media comments, but you can see that

:36:27.:36:32.

people are saying via queueing and issues around that annoy them so

:36:33.:36:36.

much. Yes. Lovely to work with you once again. Marvellous! I was hoping

:36:37.:36:42.

for a hug, but nothing there. Thank you for being with us, Jess,

:36:43.:36:46.

bringing us the sport from the stadium! An absolute pleasure, Naga,

:36:47.:36:52.

a privilege to be here. Yes, thousands of fans packed into

:36:53.:37:01.

the stadium to see one of the most eagerly anticipated races of this

:37:02.:37:06.

championship, the men's 400 metres final, but much of the build-up was

:37:07.:37:10.

whether the Botswana athlete Isaac Makwala would actually be allowed to

:37:11.:37:14.

compete in that final, and as we have been hearing on Breakfast all

:37:15.:37:17.

morning, he was actually not allowed to take part.

:37:18.:37:24.

Makwala was affected by a stomach bug and was withdrawn from the race

:37:25.:37:27.

by IAAF medical staff as Public Health England guidelines

:37:28.:37:30.

recommend people with such an illness should be quarantined

:37:31.:37:32.

Makwala was believed to have been one of the athletes who could have

:37:33.:37:36.

mounted a serious challenge in the race to South

:37:37.:37:38.

But in his absence, the Olympic champion and world record holder

:37:39.:37:43.

came through to comfortably take Gold and retain his title.

:37:44.:37:51.

And Van Niekerk had sympathy for his rival after the race.

:37:52.:37:54.

I would love him to have his fair opportunity.

:37:55.:37:57.

I believe he would have done very well this championships and,

:37:58.:38:03.

like I said earlier, I've got so much sympathy for him.

:38:04.:38:17.

I really wish I could even give him my medal,

:38:18.:38:19.

There was a thrilling performance from Britain's Kyle Langford

:38:20.:38:27.

The 21-year-old missed out a medal by four hundredths of a second

:38:28.:38:31.

after a sprint for the line in the home straight.

:38:32.:38:33.

He qualified for the final as the slowest athlete in the field

:38:34.:38:36.

but came oh-so-close to winning a bronze medal.

:38:37.:38:39.

Let's bring you up to date with the rest of the sport now,

:38:40.:38:45.

and Manchester United were beaten 2-1 by European champions Real

:38:46.:38:47.

Real took a deserved 2-0 lead early into the second half,

:38:48.:38:51.

and although Romelu Lukaku pulled a goal back for United,

:38:52.:38:53.

they couldn't stop the Spanish side lifting the Super Cup

:38:54.:38:56.

The women's Rugby World Cup gets underway in Dublin later this

:38:57.:39:09.

afternoon. All the teams will be competing today and I believe

:39:10.:39:12.

Catherine Downes is their for us keeping a watchful eye on all the

:39:13.:39:21.

action. Yes, I am in Dublin, Jess. England open the tournament at two

:39:22.:39:24.

o'clock this afternoon, defending champions of the world's number one

:39:25.:39:28.

Test side, and they have a match against Spain this afternoon. Three

:39:29.:39:31.

of the reasons why they are favourites to win. Another is the

:39:32.:39:36.

other only fully professional side here at the World Cup. Many other

:39:37.:39:40.

players have to fit in training and competing around full-time jobs. The

:39:41.:39:44.

Ireland captain for example, Claire Molloy, she got the call to say she

:39:45.:39:48.

would be replacing the injured captain Niamh Briggs as the Ireland

:39:49.:39:53.

captain here at their home World Cup while she was working in her day job

:39:54.:39:57.

as an A doctor. Hughes what she had to say about it yesterday. Quite

:39:58.:40:03.

overwhelming, to be honest. I was at work at the time, finishing off back

:40:04.:40:08.

the shift, and the girls were thinking, she has gone very serious

:40:09.:40:11.

and the girls were thinking, she has gone very serious now, because it

:40:12.:40:16.

was all good buys. An honour to be asked, but this is a

:40:17.:40:19.

high-performance sport and these things do happen so I could step up

:40:20.:40:23.

and really honoured to do so just happy to be part of the squad of 20

:40:24.:40:31.

players. Ireland play Australia at seven o'clock tonight and the party

:40:32.:40:34.

will get started well before that. Wales have a difficult one for their

:40:35.:40:38.

opening match taking on the four-time world champions New

:40:39.:40:40.

Zealand, and there is a really interesting dynamic to look out for

:40:41.:40:44.

in the Welsh squad. What goes on tour stays on tour, rate? Not in the

:40:45.:40:49.

case of the Welsh captain, because her dad is the team's Korczyk, so

:40:50.:40:53.

she has to take him everywhere she goes, and I caught up with her

:40:54.:41:04.

yesterday. -- her dad is the team's coach. We get to do this for all the

:41:05.:41:13.

family, it is good terms. How do you feel doing this for your daughter as

:41:14.:41:19.

well as the country? Hopefully now she will listen. No, it has been

:41:20.:41:23.

fine. As you can imagine probably not the first day we have been asked

:41:24.:41:26.

this type of question but, you know, we're here to do a job. She knows

:41:27.:41:31.

that and the rest know that as well. I know that as well. There is enough

:41:32.:41:36.

work to do here to be worried about our personal relationship. You would

:41:37.:41:43.

hope, wouldn't you, Jess, that if Wales can pull of mica huge upset in

:41:44.:41:47.

Dublin and win their opening match, you might just let her out for a bit

:41:48.:41:50.

of a celebration! LAUGHTER

:41:51.:41:55.

Definitely. Thanks for bringing us up-to-date with the women's Rugby.

:41:56.:42:02.

Back at the London stadium and the former British 400 metre Alison

:42:03.:42:09.

joins me. As I was saying, this yesterday was one of the highlights

:42:10.:42:11.

of the competition, at least it was meant to be. The men's 400 metre

:42:12.:42:16.

final but so much of that build-up was not about -- so much of that

:42:17.:42:23.

build-up was about Isaac Makwala. And whether he would be able to

:42:24.:42:30.

compete. How well do you think that IAAF have handled this? You're

:42:31.:42:35.

right, it was the contradiction that was frustrating. We were on the

:42:36.:42:38.

programme constantly hearing his message and seen the video on

:42:39.:42:41.

Twitter. It was bizarre, when he turned up at the warm up track and

:42:42.:42:47.

was refused entry. I think the IAAF, if this happens again, I would

:42:48.:42:49.

expect it to pan out very differently. Clearly what he is

:42:50.:42:54.

saying and the medical team are saying our two very different

:42:55.:42:59.

stories. They are saying he presented himself having vomited a

:43:00.:43:02.

couple of times the night before, showing symptoms of the Nora virus,

:43:03.:43:07.

and of course with the Public Health England suggestion, they recommended

:43:08.:43:11.

the team quarantine, and that clearly was not done because he was

:43:12.:43:14.

walking around yesterday doing interviews. Bizarre, the best way I

:43:15.:43:19.

can describe it. Yes, the IAAF have a responsibility to the other

:43:20.:43:22.

athletes here, and their recommendation. They can't imprison

:43:23.:43:26.

him, and apart from saying to the team, you know, quarantine him,

:43:27.:43:30.

which they clearly did not feel was needed, has he got it or hasn't he?

:43:31.:43:35.

That is where we were left. And you have to feel for him slightly. He

:43:36.:43:39.

said he was OK to the race and the IAAF said no. As a former athlete

:43:40.:43:42.

yourself, if you're been stopped from racing in a final, how would

:43:43.:43:48.

feel? I can feel his frustration and I think at the point when he

:43:49.:43:51.

presented himself and they did all of the physical tests, they looked

:43:52.:43:54.

at him and he was showing the sides of having the Nora virus, I think it

:43:55.:43:58.

then dawned on him, this is serious, and when they spoke about having to

:43:59.:44:02.

quarantine him for 48 hours I think at that point it is when the

:44:03.:44:06.

Botswana team said, hang on a minute, took their checks, and of

:44:07.:44:17.

course he said, I am feeling all right and any athlete would, anyone

:44:18.:44:20.

in that position. And it is not any athlete but a guy who seriously

:44:21.:44:22.

could have pushed Van Niekerk. Only two weeks and Juan Monaco he pushed

:44:23.:44:25.

all the way to the line at the Diamond league, -- only two weeks

:44:26.:44:29.

ago in Monaco he pushed him all the way. It was a difficult night. For

:44:30.:44:35.

British fans, a brilliant performance from Kyle Langford. I

:44:36.:44:41.

know you were impressed with her coming sixth in the world stage,

:44:42.:44:54.

Laura Muir. Yes, the women's 50 by far, the strength and depth was

:44:55.:44:57.

there in that event. To see two women in the top six, phenomenal,

:44:58.:45:00.

and then Kyle Langford last night, the one-man who was not expected,

:45:01.:45:07.

ranked 40th coming into the championships, a real experience for

:45:08.:45:11.

him. With other athletes failing to get through, you know, the Americans

:45:12.:45:15.

have been a force this year and all three failed to get into the final,

:45:16.:45:21.

so it was, hang on, the door is for Kyle, and I don't think you would

:45:22.:45:24.

have done anything different had he had a run that race again. He did

:45:25.:45:30.

everything tactically perfect. Thank you so much for joining us on BBC

:45:31.:45:34.

Breakfast, always a pleasure. What a thrilling race it was, and more for

:45:35.:45:39.

British fans to cheer this evening because Mo Farah will be on the

:45:40.:45:43.

track. I will look forward to that one.

:45:44.:45:43.

STUDIO: We all will be! More on reports from Paris that

:45:44.:45:53.

several French soldiers have been hit by a vehicle in the north-west

:45:54.:45:58.

of the city. French radio says a number of people have been injured.

:45:59.:46:03.

Our correspondent is on the line from Paris. This is coming through

:46:04.:46:06.

in the last few minutes, what more had he been able to get in terms of

:46:07.:46:12.

information? It appears six soldiers who are part of what is called

:46:13.:46:22.

operation Sentinel, six soldiers have been injured after a car rammed

:46:23.:46:28.

into their patrol. Four of them lightly injured, two seriously

:46:29.:46:31.

injured. The car and its driver is being searched for in a large and

:46:32.:46:38.

serious police operation. The mayor of the suburb which is to the

:46:39.:46:45.

north-west of Paris, he has said this is definitely an intentional

:46:46.:46:50.

attack. It comes fairly hard on the heels of a series of attacks in

:46:51.:46:55.

Paris right up to the point of the election in May. The variety of

:46:56.:47:02.

attacks that have taken the form of knife attacks and gun attacks. This

:47:03.:47:08.

appears to be a vehicle ramming incident. Perhaps a surprising

:47:09.:47:12.

location. It's a very densely populated suburb, at the moment we

:47:13.:47:17.

know six have been injured, two seriously and a manhunt is under

:47:18.:47:22.

way. This suburb in the west of Paris as you mentioned. Can you give

:47:23.:47:26.

us some background on what the security alert level is at the

:47:27.:47:33.

moment in France? It's pretty high. What you notice across Paris and

:47:34.:47:37.

major points of population across France soldiers. Heavily armed

:47:38.:47:43.

soldiers on patrol constantly. Wherever people gather, you will see

:47:44.:47:49.

armed soldiers. It's a big change from 10-15 years ago. It's something

:47:50.:47:53.

Christians and people in the big cities of France have now got used

:47:54.:48:00.

to. It is quite a sight and it's not rare now, it's the same in Belgium

:48:01.:48:05.

as well, where attacks have taken place you see heavily armed soldiers

:48:06.:48:10.

on patrol. It now appears those soldiers have become a target. There

:48:11.:48:15.

is now a police operation underway to try and find the vehicle and the

:48:16.:48:22.

driver of the vehicle. This happened around 45 minutes ago, it's a fairly

:48:23.:48:26.

urgent operations. Thank you. Of course there will be much more on

:48:27.:48:29.

that incident with the updates coming through throughout the

:48:30.:48:33.

morning with our correspondence on the BBC News Channel.

:48:34.:48:37.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:48:38.:48:41.

This morning some of us have got some rain, some have got some

:48:42.:48:47.

sunshine. The further north you more likely to have pictures like this

:48:48.:48:52.

like this. This beautiful one shows lovely blue skies. As become further

:48:53.:48:56.

south into East Yorkshire, we have some rain and then south again it's

:48:57.:49:01.

been a misty start across parts of ethics. There is still some sunshine

:49:02.:49:05.

at the moment in Kent. We've got high pressure over the UK keeping

:49:06.:49:10.

things settled. This weather fronts sinking south is producing the rain.

:49:11.:49:15.

You can see where we've got the brighter skies in the south-east, as

:49:16.:49:19.

the rain continues to move down towards the south-east. The

:49:20.:49:23.

temperature is 14 Celsius. As soon as that hits 15 will see the cloud

:49:24.:49:27.

built. As temperatures continue to rise in the south-east we are

:49:28.:49:32.

looking at further showers. Joining forces with this rain. Behind it, it

:49:33.:49:37.

is going to brighten up and more of us will see some sunshine through

:49:38.:49:40.

the day. That will be the case across Scotland. We start off with

:49:41.:49:45.

some sunshine and the few showers. We'll hang on to the sunshine

:49:46.:49:48.

through the day. Glasgow and Edinburgh could hit 21. For Northern

:49:49.:49:53.

Ireland and northern England, we are off to a sunny start. The Cabinet

:49:54.:49:58.

brightens up as we go through the day. The rain pushes away dragging

:49:59.:50:03.

its cloud behind it. For Wales we are looking at a sunny afternoon.

:50:04.:50:07.

Later on in the day, it will brighten up across south-west

:50:08.:50:10.

England. We've got all this rain moving towards the south-east,

:50:11.:50:14.

joining forces with the shower which are yet to develop. That could lead

:50:15.:50:19.

to some disruption. There will be some heavy, thundery downpours. If

:50:20.:50:22.

you are travelling, bear that in mind. The areas most at risk of East

:50:23.:50:29.

Anglia and south-east England. There could be some surface water issues

:50:30.:50:32.

with flooding for example. Overnight, the rain weakening as it

:50:33.:50:35.

continues to push through the rest of East Anglia and into Kent. Behind

:50:36.:50:40.

it where we've had some afternoon and late evening rainfall, patchy

:50:41.:50:44.

mist and fog forming. For most of us it will be dry. These temperatures

:50:45.:50:48.

represent towns and cities. In rural areas it will be lower than this. We

:50:49.:50:53.

also have this weather front attached to the low pressure which

:50:54.:50:56.

is trying to penetrate the high-pressure. It isn't working at

:50:57.:51:00.

this stage. During the course of tomorrow that means the cloud will

:51:01.:51:04.

continue to build in the north and north-west of Scotland. The islands

:51:05.:51:07.

will see some rain. Moving away from there and we are back into sunshine.

:51:08.:51:12.

The rain in the south-east pulling away. A wholly different day for

:51:13.:51:18.

England and Wales. This rainfall is sinking south during the course of

:51:19.:51:24.

Friday, by the time it gets into the South it will weaken and Saturday

:51:25.:51:28.

and Sunday are looking largely dry with sunny spells.

:51:29.:51:37.

Glen Campbell, the indelible voice behind country hits such

:51:38.:51:40.

as Rhinestone Cowboy and Wichita Lineman,

:51:41.:51:41.

Campbell had a discography unlike any other, releasing

:51:42.:51:45.

more than 70 albums during an illustrious

:51:46.:51:47.

Wichita Lineman - it's wide open spaces, yearning,

:51:48.:52:12.

loneliness, America turned into song.

:52:13.:52:15.

But what truly made it a masterpiece was the voice of Glen Campbell.

:52:16.:52:23.

# I hear you singing in the wire...#.

:52:24.:52:25.

He had been born in Billstown, Arkansas, a large, poor

:52:26.:52:27.

His escape was his Uncle Boo, who taught him to play guitar.

:52:28.:52:39.

I don't remember not having a guitar or a musical instrument in my hand.

:52:40.:52:48.

He bought me a guitar. The rope went around the hole in the guitar. The

:52:49.:52:53.

string was about that high off of the neck. I found out real quick

:52:54.:52:58.

that it was lighter than pulling a cotton sack or ploughing.

:52:59.:53:03.

He could play anything and ended up singing on TV shows

:53:04.:53:07.

and on hundreds of singles with the session

:53:08.:53:09.

musicians the Wrecking Crew, Phil Spector songs, the Righteous

:53:10.:53:11.

Brothers, Frank Sinatra, it was Glenn Campbell on guitar.

:53:12.:53:13.

And eventually, a breakthrough hit of his own.

:53:14.:53:17.

# Gentle on my mind...#.

:53:18.:53:21.

But it was the partnership with songwriter Jimmy Webb that

:53:22.:53:24.

gave him his career-defining songs By The Time

:53:25.:53:26.

Clean cut, conservative, he was suddenly

:53:27.:53:38.

country music's biggest star, with his own TV show.

:53:39.:53:41.

# But I'm going to be where the lights

:53:42.:53:50.

Rhinestone Cowboy was a glorious return to form after a dip

:53:51.:53:56.

in his fortunes that had taken place in the '70s.

:53:57.:53:59.

But his personal life was far from glorious.

:54:00.:54:10.

I think I probably just quit letting God run my life and I actually

:54:11.:54:14.

just got into the drugs and the booze pretty heavy.

:54:15.:54:19.

# I am a lineman for the county, and I...

:54:20.:54:21.

That slight stumble over the words, it was

:54:22.:54:29.

He'd long put his wild days behind him, but

:54:30.:54:37.

What stayed with him when so much else had gone was the music.

:54:38.:54:47.

It's a great reminder of some of the amazing music he'd produced.

:54:48.:55:05.

Joining us now to look back at Glen Campbell's

:55:06.:55:07.

life is Chris Stevens, who is a country music DJ

:55:08.:55:09.

You play music from the likes of Glenn Campbell. You fell in love

:55:10.:55:20.

with country music when you were living in America and he's been a

:55:21.:55:24.

huge part of that. Absolutely. He's one of those legendary singers along

:55:25.:55:29.

with Dolly Parton, Kenny Rogers and Johnny Cash. The passion and the

:55:30.:55:34.

soul that goes into the performances is incredible. Dolly Parton said one

:55:35.:55:39.

of the sweetest almost incredible voices the music industry has heard.

:55:40.:55:44.

I think what people really enjoyed about Glenn Campbell is that he

:55:45.:55:48.

grafted his way through the music industry. It wasn't instant success,

:55:49.:55:53.

he was a session singer for a long time. That's right. He played on

:55:54.:56:01.

sessions for Elvis, he was on the Pet Sounds album. He worked really

:56:02.:56:06.

hard writing songs as well and the hard work paid off. Wended his big

:56:07.:56:12.

break on? In the 60s he was writing songs and making demos and that's

:56:13.:56:16.

where his voice was being heard around the place. As well as his

:56:17.:56:21.

incredible guitar playing. As David Sillito said, there was a time when

:56:22.:56:26.

his star fell and he had problems with drink and drugs. 45 million

:56:27.:56:30.

records sold, six Grammy awards, yes there was a dip but there was such a

:56:31.:56:37.

longevity to his career as well. Completely. What is so great to see

:56:38.:56:41.

is that even when things were getting tough towards the end, he

:56:42.:56:44.

was still recording and releasing albums. His last two albums are

:56:45.:56:50.

fantastic pieces of work. They show that fragility of life, and the

:56:51.:56:55.

honesty as well, which country music is about. The music has gone on

:56:56.:57:00.

through his family. We had Ashley Campbell on the sofa, she is

:57:01.:57:04.

following a career in music inspired by him. He was very open about his

:57:05.:57:15.

Alzheimer's. He didn't shy away from being public, knowing that people

:57:16.:57:18.

still adored him and enjoyed his music. Completely, he was completely

:57:19.:57:23.

honest. He was recording right to the end. He spoke about his outlook

:57:24.:57:29.

on everything. That brings a real poignancy to the music when you

:57:30.:57:33.

listen to it now. Good on him for doing what he loved for as long as

:57:34.:57:37.

he could. Many of our viewers getting in touch with personal

:57:38.:57:41.

tributes. Lisa said, I saw him in Nottingham on his final tour, love

:57:42.:57:45.

his music so much. Andrew says, so sorry to hear the news, I enjoy and

:57:46.:57:51.

still enjoy his songs. As a child I was convinced he was singing about a

:57:52.:58:01.

nine stone cowboy! My wife still brings its limestone cowboy! And

:58:02.:58:05.

another viewer says, we always played his songs in the car,

:58:06.:58:11.

whenever we hear them they remind me of my father. He was a one of a

:58:12.:58:21.

kind. His voice was so unique. The responses show how much he's been

:58:22.:58:25.

loved over his career. Thank you for talking to us as we look back on the

:58:26.:58:29.

life of Brian Campbell who has died at the age of 81. Plenty more

:58:30.:58:32.

tributes on the BBC website. With it's rugged mountains

:58:33.:58:37.

and pristine lochs, it's no surprise that the Isle of Skye attracts large

:58:38.:58:39.

numbers of tourists. But the island has become

:58:40.:58:42.

so popular its services are being stretched to the limit

:58:43.:58:44.

and Police Scotland is warning visitors to stay away

:58:45.:58:46.

unless they have a reservation. James Shaw is there

:58:47.:58:49.

for us this morning. Look at this beautiful scene. You

:58:50.:59:11.

can see Portree harbour, the main town on Skye. And this is what they

:59:12.:59:15.

call the lump, for obvious reasons, where the Highland games will take

:59:16.:59:18.

place later on today, and the population of the stone will at

:59:19.:59:21.

least double, probably more than that. -- the population of this

:59:22.:59:28.

town. And look across the harbour at those Rocky Mountains in the

:59:29.:59:31.

background, to give you the sense of why so many people come here.

:59:32.:59:40.

Skye has a unique and stunning combination of rivers,

:59:41.:59:42.

mountains and sea lochs, but now it's under increasing

:59:43.:59:44.

Some of Skye's most stunning locations are victims

:59:45.:59:53.

of their own success, suffering increasing

:59:54.:59:54.

But, still, visitors are drawn to them.

:59:55.:00:00.

What do you think of what you've seen so far?

:00:01.:00:02.

I mean, just the landscape is amazing.

:00:03.:00:05.

Something you don't see anywhere else.

:00:06.:00:13.

Yeah, it has been lovely and everything is beautiful,

:00:14.:00:15.

but there are so many tourists that there isn't the infrastructure

:00:16.:00:21.

to deal with that, and unless they manage it in some way

:00:22.:00:24.

I fear that the prettiness will be damaged by all

:00:25.:00:26.

I didn't imagine it was so many people, but, yeah, we were quite

:00:27.:00:34.

You know, you have the vast landscape you can walk

:00:35.:00:38.

Not so much space on Skye's single-track roads.

:00:39.:00:43.

Incidents like this are surprisingly common.

:00:44.:00:49.

And more people are coming to Skye because they've seen it on film.

:00:50.:00:57.

The problem at the moment is the car parking,

:00:58.:00:59.

disposal of waste, and, you know, people come

:01:00.:01:04.

to where the films were made, jump out of the car or the coach,

:01:05.:01:07.

And, you know, it's nothing coming into the island economy from some

:01:08.:01:12.

Who wouldn't want to come to Skye to be so surrounded

:01:13.:01:17.

But it's clear that pressures are growing and some on the island

:01:18.:01:28.

believe that there need to be solutions sooner rather than later.

:01:29.:01:31.

Well, the biggest challenge over single-track roads...

:01:32.:01:35.

Shirley Spear runs one of Skye's most famous restaurants.

:01:36.:01:39.

She's also setting up an organisation which will pitch

:01:40.:01:41.

for government grants to improve the island's infrastructure.

:01:42.:01:44.

We need the Scottish Government to get right behind tourism,

:01:45.:01:47.

which is now recognised as being a major economic driver

:01:48.:01:49.

We need to get them onside and perhaps supporting us with extra

:01:50.:01:57.

funding for the development of tourism as an industry.

:01:58.:02:03.

Other people suggest a tourism tax, or even making all or part

:02:04.:02:06.

But the consensus is that there should be action soon.

:02:07.:02:18.

So some possible solutions there. Could there be a tourism tax to help

:02:19.:02:26.

the infrastructure? The Scottish Government is not in favour of that,

:02:27.:02:30.

but say they are open to discussion on these issues, so perhaps a

:02:31.:02:33.

special fund could be set up by the cover meant or perhaps even in the

:02:34.:02:37.

long term they could make Skye or parts of Skye, the most beautiful

:02:38.:02:41.

parts, into a national park. That is a solution that has worked in some

:02:42.:02:46.

other parts of Britain. STUDIO: James, thank you very much

:02:47.:02:50.

for that this morning. It looks so gorgeous and peaceful behind you as

:02:51.:02:53.

well. As long as there are not too many tourists! Part of the issue,

:02:54.:03:00.

isn't it? It is two minutes past nine.

:03:01.:03:01.

Tonight a special production of Les Miserables has its premiere

:03:02.:03:03.

It was the favourite musical of the murdered MP Jo Cox

:03:04.:03:07.

and is being performed in her honour by school children

:03:08.:03:09.

But with a six-figure budget and a team of experienced West End

:03:10.:03:13.

professionals behind the scenes, this is no ordinary

:03:14.:03:15.

Our entertainment correspondent Colin Paterson was at one

:03:16.:03:18.

# And the sun in the morning set to rise... #.

:03:19.:03:35.

It's the West End in West Yorkshire, all to honour the late MP Jo Cox.

:03:36.:03:40.

What you can do for me, guys, is give me that energy...

:03:41.:03:43.

The West End director Nick Evans came up with the idea of putting

:03:44.:03:46.

on a show using children from Jo Cox's constituency.

:03:47.:03:49.

I wanted to show the people of Batley and Spen, and the wider

:03:50.:03:52.

communities around there, that people right across

:03:53.:03:54.

the UK, and in particular the West End community,

:03:55.:03:56.

So I dreamed up a project to do Les Miserables

:03:57.:04:02.

in a warehouse in Batley and Spen, in the town Jo Cox grew up in,

:04:03.:04:05.

in the town she represented, and using the young people

:04:06.:04:08.

of West Yorkshire to tell that story, and provide

:04:09.:04:11.

And the idea is that although it's youth theatre,

:04:12.:04:17.

everything is to be of a West End standard.

:04:18.:04:25.

The set is amazing - obviously we've got West End

:04:26.:04:28.

directors and musical directors working on it,

:04:29.:04:29.

so you're working with these really professional, experienced people.

:04:30.:04:33.

Even the costumes were worn by the West End actors.

:04:34.:04:37.

So trying on my Cosette dress was insane, because I was like,

:04:38.:04:40.

this has been worn on a professional stage.

:04:41.:04:43.

On the night I'll be cueing every department in the show, like,

:04:44.:04:46.

And as soon as I say it, they can do it, they can't do it until I say.

:04:47.:04:52.

That's quite a lot of responsibility for a 15-year-old.

:04:53.:04:55.

But I'm with the West End professionals, so if I do

:04:56.:04:58.

get nervous or mess up, they can take over, which is good.

:04:59.:05:01.

The late MP's seat was taken over by Coronation Street

:05:02.:05:09.

actress Tracy Brabin, who says Les Mis was

:05:10.:05:11.

I spoke to Brendan, Jo's husband, and he said that they used to play

:05:12.:05:18.

the musical in the car, so the kids knew all the words,

:05:19.:05:21.

It's about passion, it's about being a comrade,

:05:22.:05:27.

it's about politics, and working together,

:05:28.:05:29.

She would come and visit our school quite frequently.

:05:30.:05:56.

I met Jo about five or six times myself, and she was a lovely lady,

:05:57.:06:00.

This is such a great inspiration to do for her,

:06:01.:06:03.

This Les Mis is on until Saturday, but it is hoped the new youth

:06:04.:06:14.

theatre will continue, and provide a lasting legacy

:06:15.:06:16.

STUDIO: It looks good! We will be talking to Danny Wallace about

:06:17.:06:38.

rudeness in a moment, something that has got many of you fired up.

:06:39.:08:12.

Well, I'm back with BBC London news at 1.30 with our lunchtime bulletin.

:08:13.:08:15.

Now, though, it's back to Naga and Dan.

:08:16.:08:17.

Welcome back to Breakfast. I'm glad you came back after a certain

:08:18.:08:34.

somebody told you to get lost! Yes, but it is about being rude to

:08:35.:08:38.

someone, remembering a time someone was rude to you. 45 seconds ago, in

:08:39.:08:40.

your case! When was the last time

:08:41.:08:41.

you were rude to someone? How about the last time

:08:42.:08:43.

someone was rude to you? Which age group do you

:08:44.:08:46.

think are the rudest? Is the world a less polite

:08:47.:08:48.

place then it once was? These are questions that comedian

:08:49.:08:51.

and author Danny Wallace has It all started after an unpleasant

:08:52.:08:53.

encounter with a hot dog seller. Yes, exactly. All I wanted was a hot

:08:54.:09:00.

dog. Without this moment this book would not have existed and I would

:09:01.:09:03.

not have spent so much time on it. I just wanted a hot dog, I was with my

:09:04.:09:07.

son, he wanted one, I have bought them before, knew how to do it, knew

:09:08.:09:12.

what to do. There was a place that sold hot dogs with a woman in it

:09:13.:09:15.

whose job it was to sell hotdogs, yet when I went into by the hotdog

:09:16.:09:20.

from the hotdog place I was met with this barrage of rudeness and I

:09:21.:09:23.

couldn't quite believe it. When someone is already out of the blue

:09:24.:09:26.

kind of messes with your brain and that is why people can't come up

:09:27.:09:30.

with something witty to say at the moment, and I had to pay upfront so

:09:31.:09:35.

I was stuck, had to wait for the hotdog, and to cut a long story

:09:36.:09:39.

short I had to wait an hour for the hotdog, which never arrive, and when

:09:40.:09:42.

it never arrived I was ejected and thrown out of the diner, waiting in

:09:43.:09:47.

the drizzle with no hotdog, wondering, what happened here? Did

:09:48.:09:54.

your child look at you disappointed? To be fair, they got his hotdog, I

:09:55.:09:58.

have to say. It was a junior little hotdog. Mine never arrived, but I

:09:59.:10:01.

felt disappointed in myself because I had engaged in a bit of rudeness

:10:02.:10:06.

with this woman in the end. Why did it happen? I was obsessed with it

:10:07.:10:11.

for a couple of days, wrote 200 word online review which then turned into

:10:12.:10:16.

an 85,000 book. We were talking about rudeness and that is how

:10:17.:10:22.

people deal with rudeness. And how we deal with it... We either tut and

:10:23.:10:27.

ignore it, like someone jumping in front of you in a queue, or are we

:10:28.:10:31.

get mad with rage and we can't contain ourselves. Yes, it goes

:10:32.:10:34.

right to the core of who we are because when it happens you feel put

:10:35.:10:38.

down and disrespected and you want some of that respect back, which is

:10:39.:10:42.

when either you tut, to teach the other person, this is how we do

:10:43.:10:46.

things, this is the system we have in place, that you should learn, we

:10:47.:10:50.

go crazy because we feel we need to claw something back. So many people

:10:51.:10:54.

have got in contact about this today. Queue jumping, called guys as

:10:55.:11:00.

opposed to Sir or Madam. Chris says, call me old-fashioned but that is

:11:01.:11:04.

what I need. Car -based fury, whatever that might be, jumping and,

:11:05.:11:09.

again queue related. A lot of it seems to come down to that, saying

:11:10.:11:12.

please and thank you. You have travelled around the world. Is it

:11:13.:11:17.

the same wherever? We all have different systems in place and the

:11:18.:11:24.

basics really are do unto others as you would have done to you. The

:11:25.:11:28.

thing irking me at the moment is I feel that the world really has

:11:29.:11:33.

gotten much ruder and that it has gotten dangerous and that with the

:11:34.:11:36.

deeper I have met and the research I have done, it could lead to some

:11:37.:11:39.

very dark places indeed, because scientists see it as a kid of

:11:40.:11:43.

neurotoxin that can spread the way a cold can spread. If you see someone

:11:44.:11:47.

being rude you are more likely to see rudeness later and be more rid

:11:48.:11:57.

yourself. You become less creative, worst dad, mum or family member, you

:11:58.:12:00.

are worse at your job, you can't concentrate... How do you stop it? A

:12:01.:12:05.

way of stopping it, because it is helping, and there are waves of it,

:12:06.:12:09.

you stop it by calling it out, shining a spotlight on it, saying,

:12:10.:12:14.

that is not the way, by tutting, are a little bit more. What I find

:12:15.:12:18.

really upsetting, this culture of people who say, I'm only being

:12:19.:12:22.

honest. People say, I'm only being honest, but... Then they see

:12:23.:12:26.

something mean. You just have to take me as I am, etc. No, you have

:12:27.:12:38.

to change, because it is awful being honest because you are confusing

:12:39.:12:40.

opinion with honesty so we can all stand round and applaud you for your

:12:41.:12:43.

boring offensive behaviour. And it is the same thing with the hotdog

:12:44.:12:45.

seller. It is hard to respond to rudeness without being rid yourself,

:12:46.:12:48.

and often at my those people who can see, no, you are being rude, without

:12:49.:12:53.

coming across as a bully themselves. Yes, I had to analyse my own

:12:54.:12:56.

behaviour and what I did to annoy this lady in the first place, so I

:12:57.:13:00.

talked to as many people as I could, to scientists, psychologists,

:13:01.:13:14.

behaviour or justs, -- behaviourists, are Nasa engineer...

:13:15.:13:17.

Your mum and dad could have helped? I dedicate the book to them because,

:13:18.:13:22.

yes, I have never genuinely seemed then be rude once, ever. They could

:13:23.:13:29.

teach us all a valuable lesson. Such a magical moment for us all. Danny

:13:30.:13:36.

has given us his book. The Truth About Why People Are So Rude. Thank

:13:37.:13:38.

you, Danny. Earlier in the series we met Tilly

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and Reuben, behind us, the first two reindeer to be born

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here in the park. But those early days were far from

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straightforward. Keepers had to intervene,

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because Reuben was very weak.

:13:52.:13:56.