11/08/2017 Breakfast


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11/08/2017

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This is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Naga

:00:07.:00:09.

Arrests as the contaminated egg scandal spreads to more

:00:10.:00:13.

It's now known that 700,000 eggs have been sent to the UK from farms

:00:14.:00:18.

Some processed foods have been pulled from supermarket shelves,

:00:19.:00:24.

but officials insist it's unlikely the public is at risk.

:00:25.:00:41.

The US Defence Secretary says war with North Korea

:00:42.:00:47.

James Mattis insists diplomacy is delivering results.

:00:48.:00:55.

A friendship forged through football.

:00:56.:00:56.

One month on from the death of Bradley Lowery, Premier League

:00:57.:00:59.

striker, Jermain Defoe, tells us how he's been inspired

:01:00.:01:01.

He loved his football. He loved me. I loved him. For me, every time I

:01:02.:01:15.

saw him it was a special feeling. Good morning.

:01:16.:01:18.

And I'm live here at the London Stadium.

:01:19.:01:20.

It's day eight of the World Athletics Championships

:01:21.:01:22.

and all morning here on BBC Breakfast.

:01:23.:01:24.

I'll be rounding up the action for you.

:01:25.:01:26.

And there was no fairy tale ending for Isaac Makwala in the men's 200

:01:27.:01:30.

He finished sixth while Britain's Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake was fourth.

:01:31.:01:42.

Should the locals get to decide on what happens in the rough

:01:43.:01:48.

neighbourhood? Is people-power the answer

:01:49.:01:49.

to our housing crisis? A new campaign says locals

:01:50.:01:51.

should get more say It would speed up construction,

:01:52.:01:53.

but critics say it could It is a beautiful start to the day.

:01:54.:02:05.

Will the weather remain this way? I will have the full forecast in 50

:02:06.:02:08.

minutes. Thank you. -- 15 minutes. The scandal over contaminated eggs

:02:09.:02:13.

continues to spread across Europe, with Denmark the latest

:02:14.:02:18.

country to be affected. 20 tons of infected eggs have been

:02:19.:02:20.

sold in Denmark where authorities said boiled and peeled eggs

:02:21.:02:23.

were found to contain traces of Fipronil, an insecticide commonly

:02:24.:02:26.

used to rid animals of fleas, Two eastern European countries,

:02:27.:02:29.

Romania and Slovakia, have also reported

:02:30.:02:31.

tainted consignments. Police investigating the European

:02:32.:02:33.

egg contamination scandal have Supermarkets scrambling

:02:34.:03:03.

to clear shelves. A pesticide commonly in use to kill

:03:04.:03:05.

lice and fleas has made its way Earlier this week,

:03:06.:03:11.

the Food Standards Agency says The agency said you would have to

:03:12.:03:19.

eat 10,000 contaminated eggs to see an effect. There is no reason people

:03:20.:03:23.

should avoid it. It is unlikely there is any public health risk. We

:03:24.:03:27.

thing people deserve good they can trust. That means not having food

:03:28.:03:30.

that has a substance that should not be there. So far, some salads and

:03:31.:03:33.

sandwiches sold by these four supermarkets have been withdrawn,

:03:34.:03:38.

but whole eggs are safe. Despite those assurances, it is spreading

:03:39.:03:41.

through Europe. Millions of eggs will be destroyed, as will hundreds

:03:42.:03:46.

of thousands of hens. Four years ago, horsemeat was found in burgers

:03:47.:03:51.

and ready meals. Once again, questions are being raised about

:03:52.:03:54.

what goes in processed foods and where it comes from. Officials hope

:03:55.:03:58.

that the contaminated eggs will be out of the food chain soon, but the

:03:59.:04:03.

investigation into Europe's latest food scandal is likely to go on for

:04:04.:04:05.

some time. BBC News. The US Defence Secretary,

:04:06.:04:07.

James Mattis, says America is still trying to use diplomacy

:04:08.:04:09.

to resolve the growing tension He has been speaking after Pyongyang

:04:10.:04:12.

announced plans to fire four missiles near the American

:04:13.:04:16.

territory of Guam. President Trump says

:04:17.:04:18.

the regime should be "very, very nervous" if it does

:04:19.:04:20.

anything to the US. My portfolio, my mission, my

:04:21.:04:38.

responsibility, is to have military options should they be needed.

:04:39.:04:45.

However, right now, Secretary Rex Tillerson and Nikki Haley, you can

:04:46.:04:49.

see the American effort is diplomatically lead and has

:04:50.:04:55.

diplomatic traction and is gaining diplomatic results. And I want to

:04:56.:04:59.

stay right there in right now. The tragedy of war is well enough known

:05:00.:05:03.

and does not need another characterisation beyond the fact

:05:04.:05:05.

that it would be catastrophic. Robin Brant is in Seoul

:05:06.:05:06.

for us this morning. Good morning. We are hearing more of

:05:07.:05:16.

the war of words from both sides. What is the feeling over there? Life

:05:17.:05:22.

goes on, frankly. People here just after lunchtime are facing the idea

:05:23.:05:31.

of conflict. Only 35 miles away is where a barrage is facing the

:05:32.:05:36.

country. You are hearing the words from the president and the Defence

:05:37.:05:40.

Secretary. The South Koreans here would like to hear President Trump

:05:41.:05:46.

reminding the world he does not want to see North Korea threatening

:05:47.:05:49.

United States and its allies, Japan and South Korea as well. That

:05:50.:05:53.

reminds people hear of the military alliance they have with the United

:05:54.:05:56.

States. That is so important for protecting this country. That

:05:57.:06:01.

diplomatic effort you heard before, we don't know what Mattis is getting

:06:02.:06:08.

at. The new president of South Korea, he is more conciliatory in

:06:09.:06:14.

his tone than his predecessor. They were talking about ending the sabre

:06:15.:06:18.

rattling from Pyongyang and trying to get negotiations back on to bring

:06:19.:06:22.

some lasting peace for the peninsula.

:06:23.:06:22.

Hundreds of people are going to be moved out of their high-rise flats

:06:23.:06:26.

after an investigation has revealed they are not safe.

:06:27.:06:28.

242 flats in south-east London are affected.

:06:29.:06:30.

The issue with the gas supply was discovered

:06:31.:06:32.

during an investigation into fire safety prompted

:06:33.:06:34.

Dan Johnson is there with the latest.

:06:35.:06:41.

I am assuming those ones behind you are the flats in question. Good

:06:42.:06:52.

morning. Yes. There are four blocks of them. More than 240 flats which

:06:53.:06:56.

have had gas cuts already and residents have been told they will

:06:57.:06:59.

have to move out so structural work can be done up it is not immediate

:07:00.:07:03.

evacuation. It is something that will take time to plan. The council

:07:04.:07:07.

says with the gas cut off people will be safe. They provided electric

:07:08.:07:11.

heaters so people can keep warm and get hot water. They will have to

:07:12.:07:16.

undertake serious structural work. This all goes back to a disaster at

:07:17.:07:21.

another tower block more than 45 years ago when a small gas explosion

:07:22.:07:25.

prompted a collapse that killed four people. Tower blocks like these were

:07:26.:07:28.

supposed to have been strengthened to guard against that sort of

:07:29.:07:31.

explosion causing a similar collapse. The investigations that

:07:32.:07:37.

took place here in the wake of the Grenfell Tower fire have revealed

:07:38.:07:40.

that strengthening work was never actually carried out. That is why

:07:41.:07:45.

the council is going to have to take action. We are seeing even more

:07:46.:07:48.

broad rough percussions from the Grenfell Tower fire rippling out.

:07:49.:07:55.

This does not involve the cladding. It is potentially a whole other

:07:56.:08:00.

issue that will have to be explored. OK. Thank you very much.

:08:01.:08:02.

Donations made to the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire are not

:08:03.:08:06.

reaching survivors fast enough, according to campaigners in West

:08:07.:08:08.

Figures from the Charity Commission show that less than 15% of the 18.9

:08:09.:08:12.

million raised has been given to people affected.

:08:13.:08:14.

They claim that early difficulties in identifying and contacting those

:08:15.:08:17.

CCTV cameras will be compulsory in all abattoirs in England, under new

:08:18.:08:26.

plans announced by the Environment Secretary, Michael Gove. Vets

:08:27.:08:31.

working for the Food Standards Agency will be given unrestricted

:08:32.:08:34.

access to footage from all areas containing livestock. Abattoirs with

:08:35.:08:39.

failing standards of care could face a criminal investigation or lose

:08:40.:08:42.

staff licences. A six-week consultation will now be held on how

:08:43.:08:44.

to implement the measures. I think this is a very important

:08:45.:08:56.

animal welfare measure and it gives even greater confidence to the

:08:57.:08:59.

consumer, both at home and abroad, that British produced reddish meat

:09:00.:09:06.

is at the highest possible standards during the life of the animal and

:09:07.:09:08.

that its death. -- British. The airports and airlines

:09:09.:09:13.

with the worst summer flight delays I will name and shame them. It is a

:09:14.:09:23.

BBC investigation. We are looking at delays from last summer and the one

:09:24.:09:27.

before. Those are the latest figures. There are some interesting

:09:28.:09:31.

findings. Some will come as a surprise. There have been record

:09:32.:09:35.

numbers of strikes for air-traffic patrol, especially in France, Spain,

:09:36.:09:41.

Italy, Greece. Lots of bad weather has affected air travel as well. And

:09:42.:09:44.

congested airspace, which makes it difficult. You might have to wait

:09:45.:09:51.

even longer. The numbers. One in five flights to and from the UK are

:09:52.:09:56.

now delayed by more than 30 minutes according to the BBC. You won't mind

:09:57.:10:03.

too much. But that is increasing in frequency. EasyJet was named and

:10:04.:10:06.

shamed as the worst offender. The average summer flights delayed by 24

:10:07.:10:11.

minutes. If you take one of those flights, expect that the late.

:10:12.:10:20.

Gatwick Airport is the one that has been noted as having the worst, with

:10:21.:10:25.

an average waiting time of 27 minutes. EasyJet operate the most

:10:26.:10:31.

flights in Gatwick Airport. They carry millions of passengers each

:10:32.:10:34.

year. They are congested and have many planes that go to Europe. That

:10:35.:10:38.

is why they have the most congested aerospace and they only have one

:10:39.:10:45.

runway. But if you are travelling from a small regional airport you

:10:46.:10:49.

will have less to late. Bradford is seeing the least delays. There are

:10:50.:10:55.

many reasons why it will not be welcome reading for those tried to

:10:56.:10:59.

get away this summer to be and now there are calls once again for

:11:00.:11:05.

compensation. We should not have to ask for compensation, they should

:11:06.:11:09.

offer it automatically. If you are trying to figure out what your area

:11:10.:11:17.

is like, go to the website. The addresses on your TV screen. You can

:11:18.:11:26.

find out where you are most likely to face a delay.

:11:27.:11:34.

There was a surprise result in the 200-metre men's

:11:35.:11:36.

Turkey's Ramil Guliyev won, dashing the hopes

:11:37.:11:40.

of Botswana's Isacc Makwala, who had run a solo time trial to get

:11:41.:11:44.

this far after his initial controversial exclusion

:11:45.:11:46.

British athletes failed to win any medals, but there were some

:11:47.:11:49.

promising performances in the London Stadium.

:11:50.:11:51.

Our sports news correspondent, Andy Swiss, reports.

:11:52.:11:56.

He urged to a hero's welcome. After beating illness, could Isacc Makwala

:11:57.:12:07.

beat his rivals? But his remarkable story did not have a happy ending.

:12:08.:12:10.

South Africa's Wayde van Niekerk looks on course for his second

:12:11.:12:16.

title. But it was an unheralded name that grabbed the headlines. Ramil

:12:17.:12:22.

Guliyev of Turkey grabbing gold. With Mitchell Blake forced and Isacc

:12:23.:12:29.

Makwala back in six. -- fourth. It was not meant to be. It was not

:12:30.:12:36.

meant to be. I had two trial runs yesterday. Earlier, there were hopes

:12:37.:12:43.

of success for a lay Doyle, but she finished last in her final, with

:12:44.:12:49.

America's Corey Carter taking gold. Today's hopes for Britain will be

:12:50.:12:56.

led by Dina Asher-Smith. After six days without a British medal, the

:12:57.:13:01.

fans will be crossing their fingers. Andy Swiss, BBC News, at the London

:13:02.:13:11.

Stadium. It's not unusual to find some flotsom or jetsom washed up on

:13:12.:13:14.

a beach in British summertime, but the coast of Norfolk has seen some

:13:15.:13:18.

unusually large debris make itself at home on the shore. I love those

:13:19.:13:27.

words. The Maritime and Coastguard Agency confirmed two large plastic

:13:28.:13:30.

pipes measuring eight feet in diameter have washed up on beaches

:13:31.:13:33.

at Winterton and Sea Pallling, with the largest segment reaching 1,500

:13:34.:13:46.

feet. You get a sense because you can see the person close by. They

:13:47.:13:51.

came loose while being towed to North Africa and another ten

:13:52.:14:06.

segments are still at sea. Of that size! They will pop-up! How will

:14:07.:14:16.

they deal with it? What do they do? They don't have holes in them. You

:14:17.:14:24.

can run through them. They are giant pipes to run liquid through. There

:14:25.:14:33.

is a hollow area in the centre. You can see it, that bit in the middle.

:14:34.:14:43.

That is the pipe bit where stuff goes through it and comes out the

:14:44.:14:47.

other end. But the other end? And red. And it was old... Look, I can't

:14:48.:14:56.

explain that. If you have seen something bigger than that washed up

:14:57.:15:05.

on a beach... If you have seen a bigger pipe than Charlie's... OK...

:15:06.:15:14.

Sarah is that the balloon Festival. It is the 39th Bristol balloon

:15:15.:15:22.

fiesta and the pilots are getting ready. Throughout the four days, we

:15:23.:15:39.

are set to see about 130 and it is a nice start to the day. , and we will

:15:40.:15:55.

see some rain at times today said this morning here in Bristol and

:15:56.:15:58.

across much of southern and central England, a fine start. Quite fresh.

:15:59.:16:07.

And the south-east, some more cloud and Mr Dennis. There is sunshine

:16:08.:16:13.

this morning across the Midlands. Some rain across parts of Cumbria

:16:14.:16:18.

and Northumberland. A better brightness for the east of Scotland.

:16:19.:16:24.

Rain in the West, which could be quite heavy. Also cloud in town. A

:16:25.:16:29.

blustery start to the morning of those outbreaks of rain. Some of

:16:30.:16:34.

that rain edging into the west of Wales but the Central and East

:16:35.:16:38.

Wales, fine and dry to start the day and some sunshine into the

:16:39.:16:44.

south-west of England. Rain across the Isles of Scilly. Through the

:16:45.:16:49.

course of the day, that rain, edging its way further eastwards. A spell

:16:50.:16:56.

of rain and some strong winds. The south of England and East Anglia

:16:57.:17:01.

should avoid the wet weather. Temperatures around 22 degrees.

:17:02.:17:07.

Moving through the course of this evening, that band of rain and brisk

:17:08.:17:12.

wind will move its way across the south-east of England and East

:17:13.:17:16.

Anglia and it will be followed by showers across the rest of the

:17:17.:17:20.

country. By Saturday morning, temperatures around 13- 15 degrees

:17:21.:17:27.

but most places are going to be dry. The weekend is not looking bad. A

:17:28.:17:38.

bit of breeze in the sunny spells Scilly should see fine weather.

:17:39.:17:44.

Those temperatures will range between 16 and 22 degrees. The high

:17:45.:17:50.

pressure stays with us into the second half of the weekend. It looks

:17:51.:17:58.

dry once again. Sunday to most of us is looking like a fine day. Still

:17:59.:18:04.

the chance of one or two showers. We should see the temperatures about

:18:05.:18:09.

16, 20 two degrees. Fairly fine weather on the cards. We are going

:18:10.:18:23.

to look at the papers. The scare over eggs is on the front pages.

:18:24.:18:36.

Our lead story this morning, we've been reassured there was almost no

:18:37.:18:43.

risk at all in terms of public health to people. We hope to get

:18:44.:18:52.

some more clarification. You would have to eat 10,000 of them to become

:18:53.:19:01.

ill, actually. Remarkable pictures here on the front page of the time.

:19:02.:19:07.

Holidaymakers were in southern Spain, in Cadiz, and this dinghy

:19:08.:19:11.

appeared on the beach carrying 30 African migrants, swept into shore

:19:12.:19:16.

and passengers leap off and sweep into the sand. On the front page of

:19:17.:19:24.

The Daily Telegraph, this is the image from the US Court, the case

:19:25.:19:30.

involving Taylor Swift and 's portrait in which she is accusing a

:19:31.:19:36.

radio DJ of groping her and the main story is harking back to the Asian

:19:37.:19:42.

sex gangs who have been targeting young women. The tension is

:19:43.:19:52.

ratcheting between North Korea and the United States. The US Defence

:19:53.:19:57.

Secretary James Mattis says diplomacy is going to be used but

:19:58.:20:01.

the Mirror says that British planes are going to be used to spy on North

:20:02.:20:13.

Korea. A fascinating story. And if you have ever applied for planning

:20:14.:20:18.

permission,, you know you have to go to local council. Your neighbours

:20:19.:20:25.

will decide whether or not you can get that planning permission to do

:20:26.:20:29.

whatever it is. They are suggesting it could boost the economy. About

:20:30.:20:36.

?10,000 better off. You could do all sorts of extensions. People will

:20:37.:20:47.

just agree to all sorts of things. There is a big question as well. May

:20:48.:20:58.

be happy for it to go elsewhere. But it's a brilliant story here on the

:20:59.:21:03.

times. I'm not sure which one I would move my desk next to. We love

:21:04.:21:09.

this story. This is a study in the times which says if you move your

:21:10.:21:13.

desk at work next to someone who is really good in the office, you would

:21:14.:21:21.

do well served by the halo effect. Why did think both of our -- both of

:21:22.:21:27.

us are sitting next to C? That is so not true. C, don't underestimate

:21:28.:21:35.

yourself. If you have office politics going on, who'd do you sit

:21:36.:21:41.

next to? It stands to reason. I think the logic works the other

:21:42.:21:46.

way... Least capable all the worst behaved. If you are sitting next to

:21:47.:21:57.

the swot... You got to think about these things. We gravitated towards

:21:58.:21:59.

you because you are the swot. The safety of the UK food chain is

:22:00.:22:15.

being questioned after eggs were found to be contaminated with the

:22:16.:22:22.

pesticide fipronil. But as the investigation in Europe spreads, the

:22:23.:22:26.

number of eggs affected could rise. Heather Hancock is the chairman of

:22:27.:22:29.

the Food Standards Agency. Good morning to you. I wanted of all ask

:22:30.:22:38.

what you can say to people who are concerned about the eggs they may be

:22:39.:22:46.

eating. Good morning, C. I want to reassure people about the eggs they

:22:47.:22:49.

might be eating. The risk to public health from this very small -- this

:22:50.:22:55.

very small proportion of eggs, the risk is very low. People do not need

:22:56.:23:01.

to worry about any impact on them from eating these eggs. Even though

:23:02.:23:09.

700,000 eggs, they sound like a lot. It's in the context of a seating

:23:10.:23:13.

more than 10 billion eggs per year so it helps to put that in

:23:14.:23:17.

proportion. This is a very low risk issue. When you say the risk, can

:23:18.:23:27.

you quantify? We are talking about a grown adult, someone like me would

:23:28.:23:31.

have to weed one of these eggs every day to the rest of our lives to face

:23:32.:23:39.

any serious potential health risk. The latest figures we are being

:23:40.:23:45.

told, some 700,000 eggs that were affected. Earlier, the first

:23:46.:23:51.

emerged, it was just 20 1000. Can you account for white rose so

:23:52.:23:55.

swiftly and why the initial figure was so wrong? -- why it rose. We

:23:56.:24:05.

were made aware that there were no known eggs that made it in but we

:24:06.:24:10.

all recognise this has been a fast-moving incident in Holland and

:24:11.:24:15.

Belgium. Over the weekend, our first notification that they thought

:24:16.:24:20.

21,000 eggs had got to the UK and that prompted us to launch our

:24:21.:24:24.

investigations and as a result, the industry coming forward, we've

:24:25.:24:29.

established the number is currently 700,000 eggs. That is the nature of

:24:30.:24:34.

these things. There are about 150 farms affected in the Netherlands.

:24:35.:24:39.

They are uncovering more evidence as time has gone on and we've been

:24:40.:24:47.

reacting to that. How confident are you the 700,000 figure is correct

:24:48.:24:51.

given what you said about the number escalating so quickly? New

:24:52.:24:57.

information may still come forward. We can't say that's it. There may

:24:58.:25:02.

well be more eggs. The risk issue will remain the same. A lifetime

:25:03.:25:17.

consumption is needed. We are still expecting a very small proportion of

:25:18.:25:21.

the total number of eggs in the UK. We produce something like 85% of the

:25:22.:25:27.

eggs we eat here in the UK and there is no evidence that substance has

:25:28.:25:38.

been wrongly used in the UK. With the agency, giving what you said

:25:39.:25:45.

about this being imported, would you recommend, seeing as there are a

:25:46.:25:50.

number of supermarkets, should they only be using UK eggs in all

:25:51.:25:55.

products? There is nothing to suggest that eggs from elsewhere

:25:56.:25:58.

have the same problems. We would not say that. The reason we've asked the

:25:59.:26:04.

supermarkets to withdraw from the shelves is not because they are a

:26:05.:26:08.

risk to public health, it's more an issue of trusting food. These eggs

:26:09.:26:12.

have something in them which should not be there and that is why we are

:26:13.:26:17.

asking for the eggs be withdrawn. Heather Hancock, thank you for your

:26:18.:26:19.

time. Now, it's the time of year

:26:20.:26:23.

when lots of us will be heading It's the perfect location to take

:26:24.:26:27.

lots of photos as we lounge around Well, earlier this week,

:26:28.:26:40.

the now ex-editor of Vogue published this photo

:26:41.:26:44.

on social media, sparking a frenzy of

:26:45.:26:47.

debate about selfies. And do summer selfies lead

:26:48.:26:50.

to increasing body anxiety? We asked a group of young

:26:51.:26:54.

people what they thought. Test is a filter, clean your skin.

:26:55.:27:10.

You just do little filters on Instagram. Would you put in

:27:11.:27:14.

unfiltered picture up? Yes. If I take it picture, as long as I'm

:27:15.:27:20.

comfortable, I don't care what anybody things. Is there pressure to

:27:21.:27:25.

always be edited and looking your best? Sometimes it makes you look

:27:26.:27:29.

nicer and are not really self-conscious if I'm using a

:27:30.:27:33.

filter. It makes you feel better that you can have a picture that

:27:34.:27:37.

everyone else can, not appreciate, but like as well as you do. And

:27:38.:27:42.

celebrities, when you see them, do you presume they are filtered?

:27:43.:27:46.

Sometimes you hope they are because they look that good and you don't

:27:47.:27:50.

look like that sometimes so it gives you a bit of relief to note that is

:27:51.:27:55.

not real. I like it when they do natural photos but then again, you

:27:56.:27:59.

know they have make-up, it's not a surprise. I'm going to make your

:28:00.:28:05.

legs a bit longer. A lot longer. Skinnier waists? Yes. I will put

:28:06.:28:11.

some make up on you. Wow, I look so much better in the fake me. I could

:28:12.:28:23.

get used to that. I do think she should have changed a

:28:24.:28:28.

single thing. She looks fabulous. I find this quite bizarre, quite

:28:29.:28:33.

worrying. I don't know if you adjust your settings when you take a photo.

:28:34.:28:39.

I just try to make my face bigger. Everybody is doing it all the time.

:28:40.:28:45.

What do you think? Do you prefer being enhanced by a filter? Should

:28:46.:28:50.

we stay natural? We would love to hear your thoughts and see your

:28:51.:28:59.

pictures. Send us an email. After 730, we will be joined by reality

:29:00.:29:06.

television star Cady McDermott. She tells us how she uses social media

:29:07.:29:09.

to promote her business and brands at how much enhancement she uses.

:29:10.:32:29.

This is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty.

:32:30.:32:43.

We'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment.

:32:44.:32:46.

In his first interview since the death of six-year-old,

:32:47.:32:50.

Bradley Lowery, from a rare form of cancer, footballer,

:32:51.:32:52.

Jermain Defoe, tells us about the impact their friendship

:32:53.:32:55.

Also this morning, badly injured in the Manchester bombing,

:32:56.:33:02.

Robbie Potter and his partner were waiting to collect

:33:03.:33:04.

their daughters from the Ariana Grande concert

:33:05.:33:06.

He'll be here to tell us about his long road to recovery.

:33:07.:33:18.

And heavier than ten adult African elephants and longer than three

:33:19.:33:21.

Could this dinosaur be the biggest creature ever to have

:33:22.:33:30.

But now, a summary of this morning's main news.

:33:31.:33:35.

Police investigating the European egg contamination scandal have

:33:36.:33:37.

arrested two company directors following raids in the Netherlands.

:33:38.:33:39.

Here, the Food Standards Agency has revealed that 700,000 contaminated

:33:40.:33:42.

eggs have been imported from Dutch farms, but it insists it is "highly

:33:43.:33:46.

unlikely" they pose any risk to human health.

:33:47.:33:48.

Sandwiches and salads are among the foods that have now been removed

:33:49.:33:51.

The US Defence Secretary James Mattis says America is still trying

:33:52.:33:56.

to use diplomacy to resolve the growing tension with North Korea

:33:57.:33:59.

He said diplomatic efforts were yielding results,

:34:00.:34:02.

though military options were ready if needed.

:34:03.:34:04.

He made his remarks shortly after President Trump had stepped

:34:05.:34:07.

up his rhetoric, saying his threat to unleash "fire and fury"

:34:08.:34:10.

on North Korea might not have been tough enough.

:34:11.:34:22.

My portfolio, my mission, my responsibility, is to have

:34:23.:34:24.

military options should they be needed.

:34:25.:34:29.

However, right now, Secretary Rex Tillerson

:34:30.:34:37.

and Ambassador Haley, you can see the American effort

:34:38.:34:44.

is diplomatically led, it has diplomatic traction

:34:45.:34:46.

and is gaining diplomatic results.

:34:47.:34:49.

And I want to stay right there right now.

:34:50.:34:51.

The tragedy of war is well enough known

:34:52.:34:54.

and does not need another characterisation beyond the fact

:34:55.:34:56.

Donations made to the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire are not

:34:57.:35:01.

reaching survivors quickly enough, according to campaigners in West

:35:02.:35:03.

Figures from the Charity Commission show that less than 15% of the ?18.9

:35:04.:35:07.

million raised has been given to people affected almost two months

:35:08.:35:10.

after the tragedy, but it says that early difficulties in identifying

:35:11.:35:13.

and contacting those who need help are being overcome.

:35:14.:35:20.

American singer, Taylor Swift, has told a US court how

:35:21.:35:23.

she was sexually assaulted by a radio DJ four years ago,

:35:24.:35:26.

Yesterday, the singer took the stand in the trial,

:35:27.:35:30.

which began in Denver earlier this week.

:35:31.:35:32.

The 27-year-old, who is suing DJ, David Mueller, over the incident,

:35:33.:35:34.

told the court he had grabbed her as she met fans ahead

:35:35.:35:38.

We will get the weather a little later on. Now for the sport. There

:35:39.:35:55.

were some shocks last night at the Athletic Championships. Jessica is

:35:56.:36:02.

at the stadium in London. Good morning. We will have a morning

:36:03.:36:09.

session today. Finally. The last few days we have not had anything. I

:36:10.:36:14.

want to show you that the engineers have done everything for us this

:36:15.:36:19.

morning. Let me tell you about one of the stars of the championships,

:36:20.:36:25.

Isaac. There is talk from politicians in Botswana there may be

:36:26.:36:29.

a national holiday in his honour. Can you imagine? Settler, there was

:36:30.:36:34.

no fairy tale ending for him last night.

:36:35.:36:34.

It's been an incredible few days for Isaac Makwala

:36:35.:36:37.

but there was to be no fairy tale ending for him in the final

:36:38.:36:41.

of the 200-metres last night, as he finished 6th.

:36:42.:36:43.

You'll remember Makwala was forced to miss the final of the 400-metres

:36:44.:36:46.

due to illness and had to run a time trial just to get

:36:47.:36:50.

Having made the final he was in contention around the bend

:36:51.:36:54.

Turkey's Ramil Gulyev won the race ahead of Wayde Van Niekerk.

:36:55.:36:58.

Great Britain's Nathaneel Mitchel Blake finished fourth.

:36:59.:37:00.

Makwala blamed his performance on having to run two races

:37:01.:37:02.

200 yesterday. It has cost me a lot. It took it out of you. It took

:37:03.:37:14.

everything out of me. Running alone in the semi-final. Running in the

:37:15.:37:19.

rain. It took all of my energy. So I can hear... But I am happy that I

:37:20.:37:21.

ran and I did my best. Dina Asher-Smith will be the sole

:37:22.:37:22.

British runner in tonight's final She was an automatic qualifier

:37:23.:37:26.

after she finished second I completely broke my third read. I

:37:27.:37:43.

had to spend six weeks not doing anything. Putting weight on it. And

:37:44.:37:48.

then gradually putting weight on it for the next six weeks. I was out of

:37:49.:37:53.

walking. Then I learned how to walk. And then I am here. It was not that

:37:54.:37:58.

bad. I am joking, I would not recommend it. It was not that fun.

:37:59.:38:04.

There was disappointment for the British team captain

:38:05.:38:06.

Eilidh Doyle in the 400-metres hurdles.

:38:07.:38:07.

She came last in the final which was won by the American Kori

:38:08.:38:11.

There will be three British women in the semi-finals of the women's

:38:12.:38:18.

Lynsey Sharp, Adelle Tracy, and Shelayna Oskan-Clarke,

:38:19.:38:21.

And there will be two British men in tonight's

:38:22.:38:24.

Meanwhile, an exhausted Laura Muir qualified for the final

:38:25.:38:27.

She was one of the fastest losers in her semi-final,

:38:28.:38:31.

with the exertions of finishing fourth in the 1,500 metres

:38:32.:38:34.

earlier this week looking like they've taken their toll on her.

:38:35.:38:37.

Eilish McColgan looked impressive as she also made it through,

:38:38.:38:40.

I came into this really positive. I felt like I recovered from the 1500.

:38:41.:38:59.

But last night the legs just went. I have not run a 5000 since January.

:39:00.:39:06.

It is just getting used to it. I know what to expect now more for the

:39:07.:39:09.

final. Katarina Johnson-Thompson has made

:39:10.:39:10.

it the final of the high jump after failing in that

:39:11.:39:13.

event in the heptathlon. She will be joined by

:39:14.:39:15.

Morgan Lake who also cleared There was talk the American

:39:16.:39:33.

Christian Taylor could rake Jonathan Edwards' 22-year-old record. --

:39:34.:39:43.

break. He did not. But he still got 17.6 metres. Let's have a quick look

:39:44.:39:51.

at what's been going on away from the athletics.

:39:52.:39:52.

Rory McIlroy said "the course played tricky,"

:39:53.:39:53.

after his opening round at the USPGA Championship.

:39:54.:39:56.

He dropped three shots in two holes to finish the day five shots

:39:57.:39:59.

And the Premier League returns tonight with Arsenal playing host

:40:00.:40:03.

Arsenal haven't won their opening game since 2014 and manager

:40:04.:40:06.

Arsene Wenger knows they need to change that.

:40:07.:40:14.

The squad looks good. We need to transform the quality of the

:40:15.:40:24.

preparation in the points. That is a pragmatic view, of course. What

:40:25.:40:30.

matters is the next game and winning it and starting in a strong way

:40:31.:40:35.

which we did not do last year. That is what we want to achieve this

:40:36.:40:37.

year. The start of the Premier League

:40:38.:40:44.

season is coming along quick. Mo Farah and Usain Bolt will be back on

:40:45.:40:49.

the track this weekend. It will be action packed! We will be looking

:40:50.:40:53.

forward to that. It always looks magnificent over there. That track.

:40:54.:40:57.

The grass looks great! The British Athletics team are back

:40:58.:40:59.

in action on day eight of the World Here's a quick look ahead

:41:00.:41:03.

to some of the moments There is a morning session today. So

:41:04.:41:18.

the ones to watch starts with Tiffany Porter. And bronze medallist

:41:19.:41:24.

in 2013. She wants to make it to the semi-final. Robbie Grabarz should

:41:25.:41:30.

breeze through this preliminary stage. He wants to replicate London

:41:31.:41:36.

2012 when he got bronze only one British woman made it through to the

:41:37.:41:39.

final. Lorraine Ugen. She hopes to back up her European indoor medal in

:41:40.:41:47.

March with a podium place. Next up, Britain's Lynsey Sharp. She competed

:41:48.:42:00.

in 2016 in Rio when she came sixth. Nick Miller qualified automatically

:42:01.:42:03.

for the final. The gold-medallist made it with his first throw. Dina

:42:04.:42:11.

Asher-Smith made it into the 200 metre final. She broke her foot in

:42:12.:42:16.

February and the prognosis was grim. But her comeback has been

:42:17.:42:23.

incredible. Can she get a medal? She goes at 9:50. If you want to keep up

:42:24.:42:28.

with the action, tune in to BBC Two at 9:30am this morning. And then hop

:42:29.:42:35.

over to BBC One until 10pm. And finally, BBC Two four the last hour

:42:36.:42:39.

of coverage. -- for. Hundreds of flights will be

:42:40.:42:50.

evacuated after structural problems were found in four tower blocks were

:42:51.:43:04.

. They had their gas cut off with immediate effect.

:43:05.:43:12.

Yesterday, the gas supply to 242 flats in Ledbury Towers,

:43:13.:43:15.

south London was cut off with immediate effect.

:43:16.:43:17.

A letter was sent to residents saying officials would distribute

:43:18.:43:19.

electric hotplates and that residents could take showers

:43:20.:43:22.

Councillor Stephanie Cryan is Deputy Leader and Cabinet member

:43:23.:43:25.

for Housing at Southwark Council, she joins us from our

:43:26.:43:28.

Thank you very much for talking to us this morning. Good morning. Good

:43:29.:43:34.

morning. Can you tell us, we have explained the number of flats in the

:43:35.:43:38.

process, how long has it taken to get to this point? What was found in

:43:39.:43:42.

terms of what was structurally wrong with these flats? After the

:43:43.:43:45.

aftermath of Grenfell Tower, we had a resident come to us worried about

:43:46.:43:49.

cracks in the properties. We did a full structural report on the state

:43:50.:43:52.

of the properties. And yesterday we heard that actually there was a

:43:53.:43:56.

potential issue with the gas supply and we made the decision to cut it

:43:57.:44:00.

off immediately. Just to be clear, we spoke a lot about cladding and

:44:01.:44:04.

fire risks. This is not an issue with cladding. This is an issue with

:44:05.:44:11.

gas. What are the risks posed by the gas? The structure of the tower

:44:12.:44:21.

block are similar to Rogue Point. If there was a gas explosion that could

:44:22.:44:25.

be in locations. That is why we took this decision when we found out to

:44:26.:44:33.

cut it off. As a member of Suffolk Council, you will be familiar with

:44:34.:44:36.

the criticism in terms of organisation of residence. What can

:44:37.:44:40.

you do to make the lives of those who live there easier and as little

:44:41.:44:45.

inconvenienced as possible? There will be some inconvenience but we

:44:46.:44:49.

want to minimise it as much as possible. We want people to stay in

:44:50.:44:53.

their flats. We cut the gas supply off but we are giving hotplates to

:44:54.:44:59.

those who need them. There was some protesting when we found out there

:45:00.:45:03.

was an issue with the cracks in the building. Anyone who wants to move

:45:04.:45:06.

out, we will get them accommodation. They can bid on the top band of

:45:07.:45:10.

housing if they want to move. We will find accommodation for those

:45:11.:45:15.

who want to. We also understand some will want to stay in their homes.

:45:16.:45:19.

Therefore, we want to make sure we offer hotplates for cooking. The

:45:20.:45:24.

situation will last until we can make the electrical switch over.

:45:25.:45:30.

They can have hot water and cooking facilities. All of the leisure

:45:31.:45:35.

centres are available for anyone who needs to show as well. Can you

:45:36.:45:42.

guarantee that they will be safe if they stay? -- shower. Because the

:45:43.:45:46.

gas has been switched off, the risk of gas has been taken away from

:45:47.:45:52.

them. We have a fire safety issue, but there are wardens on every

:45:53.:45:56.

floor. We have talked to the London Fire Brigade to make sure people can

:45:57.:46:00.

stay safe in their homes. Tell me, do you think that the examinations

:46:01.:46:08.

of these powers would have happened without the Grenfell Tower issue? --

:46:09.:46:13.

towerds. We will we were looking at the

:46:14.:46:26.

cracks. The residents have flagged that up. People need to look around

:46:27.:46:30.

and take things more seriously. Grenfell Tower is the catalyst.

:46:31.:46:35.

However, if the cracks -- cracks have been reported, we would have

:46:36.:46:40.

looked into them. I could not say one way or the other but I think

:46:41.:46:44.

Grenfell Tower has put things into the spotlight. I tell you what has

:46:45.:46:49.

come to mind is that if residents are not flagging up these things

:46:50.:46:54.

they have flagged the past and have not been followed up, it feels like

:46:55.:46:57.

it is up to them to push councils like yours to check on safety and

:46:58.:47:02.

without that, these checks would not take place. Is that fair? We took

:47:03.:47:10.

the decision after Grenfell Tower, we have 174 sour -- tower blocks in

:47:11.:47:18.

Southwark and we have made the highest level of fire risk

:47:19.:47:24.

assessment. For residents in Southwark, I want to reassure them,

:47:25.:47:28.

we are working to make sure residents are safe as possible.

:47:29.:47:41.

Thank you very much for your time. Sarah is bringing us the weather.

:47:42.:47:45.

She has the Bristol International balloon Festival. Has something

:47:46.:47:51.

blown up behind you? Good morning. We have a window of

:47:52.:47:56.

fine weather in Bristol for the 39th International balloon Fiesta and

:47:57.:48:00.

it's quite some spectacle this morning. Lots of balloons have

:48:01.:48:11.

already taken off. Slowly drifting off into the distance. This is

:48:12.:48:19.

Europe's largest annual gathering. The balloon fiesta runs over four

:48:20.:48:25.

days. There will be about half a million visitors. Watching 130

:48:26.:48:31.

balloons taking part in this incredible event. It is quite a

:48:32.:48:41.

tranquil start to the day. Elsewhere across the country, it will be

:48:42.:48:44.

changing a bit today. Outbreaks of rain at times. This morning, across

:48:45.:48:53.

Bristol, Sunshine, fairly light. Quite fresh. A bit more cloud in the

:48:54.:49:01.

south-east of England. As we had our way northwards, Sunshine across the

:49:02.:49:08.

morning. A bit of rain for the likes of Cumbria, Northumberland. Quite

:49:09.:49:13.

windy with the outbreaks of rain. A bitter brightness across the east of

:49:14.:49:19.

Scotland. Cloudy, windy, with rain over the higher ground. For Northern

:49:20.:49:23.

Ireland, some clouds and outbreaks of mainly light and patchy rain. The

:49:24.:49:29.

rain pushing into western parts of Wales. Relatively light wind. Some

:49:30.:49:37.

rain into the far south-west of England. As we head through the

:49:38.:49:45.

course of the day, that rain, strong wind, will move its way slowly

:49:46.:49:51.

further south-east. Showers to the south-east of England. Yet,

:49:52.:49:57.

temperatures will reach around 22 degrees. Elsewhere, around 17- 19

:49:58.:50:04.

Celsius. Into the evening hours, that rain through south-east

:50:05.:50:10.

England. Clear spells and showers across much of the country and

:50:11.:50:15.

overnight, those showers ease away. The wind will fall as well. By the

:50:16.:50:20.

time we get to Saturday morning, temperatures around 13, 15 degrees.

:50:21.:50:24.

Saturday shaping up to be mainly fine day. Some sunshine on offer.

:50:25.:50:32.

Showers lingering. Many of us will avoid any of those showers. Lighter

:50:33.:50:38.

winds then we will see today. We will see those temperatures about

:50:39.:50:41.

16, 20 two degrees. But high-pressure nudging in through the

:50:42.:50:45.

course of the weekend, another largely dry day on Sunday. The

:50:46.:50:52.

charts of a few showers here and there. The most of us, and other dry

:50:53.:50:59.

day with lighter winds and temperatures around 16, 20 two

:51:00.:51:03.

degrees. And improving picture through the weekend.

:51:04.:51:06.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:51:07.:51:11.

Ben is go to talk to us about what happens if you are going to change

:51:12.:51:20.

your house. Many people have been through this know it is tedious.

:51:21.:51:23.

We've talked about the housing shortage.

:51:24.:51:29.

The government says 250,000 new homes need to be built

:51:30.:51:32.

in England every year to meet demand.

:51:33.:51:34.

But last year, the figure was nowhere near that.

:51:35.:51:36.

Just 150,000 new homes were actually built.

:51:37.:51:46.

But there were nearly half a million planning applications

:51:47.:51:49.

in England last year - which suggests there is demand

:51:50.:51:52.

to build and extend homes, but the process can be

:51:53.:51:55.

So today - the free-market think tank

:51:56.:52:08.

the Adam Smith Institute has a radical solution.

:52:09.:52:10.

He says you and your neighbours should decide on planning

:52:11.:52:13.

John Myers is one of the lead campaigners and wrote this report.

:52:14.:52:18.

Nice to see you. I said that you and your neighbours will be able to

:52:19.:52:27.

decide on planning permission. It's not quite as simple as that but

:52:28.:52:31.

nonetheless, it would be quite a departure from the current system.

:52:32.:52:36.

We set out to create an effective reform that is really just a tweak

:52:37.:52:41.

to the existing system. It makes life easier for councils and

:52:42.:52:45.

planners. That is what they care about. Where a whole street is in

:52:46.:52:50.

favour of a proposal, why shouldn't they be able to let that go through?

:52:51.:52:59.

If I want to extend the council says no, what can I do? The proposal is

:53:00.:53:04.

not aimed at individual applications. If the street would

:53:05.:53:10.

like to add a story or an extension, why not give them a vote? What

:53:11.:53:15.

concerns the neighbours is, what is going to look like at the end? With

:53:16.:53:20.

two thirds of the would like to do that, and they should have the

:53:21.:53:26.

ability to do it. Let us say the entire street would get a blanket

:53:27.:53:29.

permission to build that extra story. Or more ambitious, if they

:53:30.:53:34.

want to. They don't have to do. They can just sit on it. In peak demand,

:53:35.:53:43.

often a homeowner could be better off so there is a powerful

:53:44.:53:48.

incentive. Adding value to the house, so it would make homeowners

:53:49.:53:52.

better off. How is it solve the housing crisis? It doesn't mean

:53:53.:53:59.

there are more homes to solve it? In many cities, a lot of homes have

:54:00.:54:04.

been created by splitting houses into flats. That is one easy way. If

:54:05.:54:11.

the street wants to give them permission to knock down basic

:54:12.:54:15.

terraces. They should be allowed to do that. And people agreeing.

:54:16.:54:22.

Getting neighbours to agree on anything is difficult. We share it

:54:23.:54:27.

should require a two thirds majority. Really good to talk to

:54:28.:54:34.

you. After seven o'clock, I will talk more about the airport delays.

:54:35.:54:36.

More on that later. It's just over a month

:54:37.:54:37.

since six-year-old Bradley Lowery died after battling

:54:38.:54:40.

a rare form of cancer. The Sunderland fan won

:54:41.:54:42.

a legion of supporters across the country, including

:54:43.:54:44.

footballer Jermain Defoe. Now, in his first interview

:54:45.:54:50.

since Bradley's death, Jermain told the BBC how he's been

:54:51.:54:56.

inspired by his best mate. They were best friends and it was a

:54:57.:55:04.

friendship which captured the hearts of everyone. Have a nice picture in

:55:05.:55:08.

the house of me and Bradley at the England game. It's a special story.

:55:09.:55:18.

My best friend, he was genuine. He was a kid who knew... He just loved

:55:19.:55:29.

his football. He loved me, I loved him and after seeing his eyes, it

:55:30.:55:32.

was genuine because he was a child. There was nothing I could give him

:55:33.:55:39.

apart from just being a friend. It was an instant connection. Even

:55:40.:55:45.

towards the end, when he was really struggling and you couldn't really

:55:46.:55:48.

move, I would walk into the move anti- fashion the room and he would

:55:49.:55:52.

just jump up and his mum said, he hasn't moved all day certainly, it

:55:53.:55:58.

was a special feeling. The emotion is still raw but the impact the

:55:59.:56:06.

little boy has had on Dafoe has been striking. The Bournemouth striker

:56:07.:56:10.

says it is a gift and he will be forever grateful. I always wake up

:56:11.:56:14.

thinking, you know, if you don't feel well, you feel tired, snap out

:56:15.:56:19.

of it. Because I can see little kids suffer like that and still fight, to

:56:20.:56:26.

me, there is no bigger motivation. I could go through anything. You

:56:27.:56:38.

walked out within 70 times. It was the best. He was looking down the

:56:39.:56:42.

tunnel. I came down the tunnel, gave him a cuddle. For him to do that,

:56:43.:56:52.

that was special. And we walked out, standing now, singing the national

:56:53.:57:00.

anthem. Being involved in the squad and actually playing, and scoring...

:57:01.:57:05.

For me, it's one of the best moments of my career. You can see the whole

:57:06.:57:15.

of that interval -- This is Breakfast,

:57:16.:00:43.

with Charlie Stayt and Naga Arrests as the contaminated egg

:00:44.:00:45.

scandal spreads to more It's now known that 700,000 eggs

:00:46.:00:48.

have been sent to the UK from farms Some processed foods have been

:00:49.:00:52.

pulled from supermarket shelves, but officials insist it's unlikely

:00:53.:00:56.

the public is at risk. Also this morning, the US defence

:00:57.:01:14.

secretary says war with North Korea James Mattis insists diplomacy

:01:15.:01:21.

is delivering results. A friendship forged

:01:22.:01:25.

through football. One month on from the death

:01:26.:01:27.

of Bradley Lowery, Jermain Defoe speaks for the first time

:01:28.:01:31.

about his best friend. He loved his football. He loved me.

:01:32.:01:45.

I loved him. For me, it was how I saw him, it was a special feeling.

:01:46.:01:51.

Good morning. I am live at the London Stadium, on day eight of the

:01:52.:01:56.

World Athletics Championship. Here on BBC Breakfast we are getting

:01:57.:01:59.

excited about one British athlete in particular. Six months ago she wrote

:02:00.:02:04.

her foot at the beaming smile said it all. Dina Asher-Smith is back and

:02:05.:02:09.

tonight she will line up against the world's vest in the 200 metres

:02:10.:02:14.

final. Good morning. Congestion, air traffic control strikes in bad

:02:15.:02:18.

weather or cause flight delays. But which airports and airlines are the

:02:19.:02:22.

worst offenders? I will have the details.

:02:23.:02:24.

Good morning. I am airborne at the balloon fiesta in Bristol. I will

:02:25.:02:33.

bring you the weather details in about 15 minutes.

:02:34.:02:34.

Police investigating the European egg contamination scandal have

:02:35.:02:38.

arrested two company directors following raids in the Netherlands.

:02:39.:02:40.

Here, the Food Standards Agency has revealed that 700,000 contaminated

:02:41.:02:43.

eggs have been imported from Dutch farms, but it insists it is "highly

:02:44.:02:47.

unlikely" they pose any risk to human health.

:02:48.:02:49.

Sandwiches and salads are among the foods that have now been removed

:02:50.:02:52.

from UK supermarket shelves, as Natasha Emerson reports.

:02:53.:03:05.

Millions of eggs destroyed, supermarkets scrambling

:03:06.:03:07.

Two men have been held by Dutch police over batches of poisonous

:03:08.:03:15.

Fipronil, a pesticide commonly used to kill lice and fleas on pets,

:03:16.:03:24.

has made its way into the food chain.

:03:25.:03:31.

Earlier this week, the Food Standards Agency said

:03:32.:03:36.

21,000 contaminated eggs had been imported to the UK.

:03:37.:03:39.

Now, it thinks it could be as many as 700,000.

:03:40.:03:42.

But that's still only a fraction of the 34 million we eat each day.

:03:43.:03:46.

And the agency said you would have to eat 10,000 contaminated eggs

:03:47.:03:49.

There's no reason people should avoid eating eggs.

:03:50.:03:52.

Our assessment is it is unlikely there is any public health risk.

:03:53.:03:56.

We think people deserve food they can trust.

:03:57.:03:58.

That means not having food that has a substance that should

:03:59.:04:01.

So far, some salads and sandwiches sold by these four supermarkets have

:04:02.:04:05.

been withdrawn from sale, but whole eggs are safe.

:04:06.:04:07.

Despite those reassurances, the scandal continues to spread

:04:08.:04:10.

through Europe, Millions of eggs will be destroyed,

:04:11.:04:12.

as will hundreds of thousands of hens.

:04:13.:04:16.

Four years ago, horsemeat was found in burgers and ready meals.

:04:17.:04:23.

Once again, questions are being raised about what goes

:04:24.:04:26.

in processed foods and where it comes from.

:04:27.:04:28.

Officials hope that the contaminated eggs will be out of the food chain

:04:29.:04:31.

soon, but the investigation into Europe's latest food scandal

:04:32.:04:34.

We will be speaking to a global food security expert about what can be

:04:35.:04:48.

done to protect the UK food chain from this kind of contamination in

:04:49.:04:49.

just under ten minutes. The US Defence Secretary James

:04:50.:04:52.

Mattis says America is still trying to use diplomacy to resolve

:04:53.:04:56.

the growing tension with North Korea He said diplomatic efforts

:04:57.:04:59.

were yielding results, though military options

:05:00.:05:02.

were ready if needed. He made his remarks shortly

:05:03.:05:05.

after President Trump had stepped up his rhetoric, saying his threat

:05:06.:05:07.

to unleash "fire and fury" on North Korea might not

:05:08.:05:11.

have been tough enough. My portfolio, my mission,

:05:12.:05:16.

my responsibility, is to have military options

:05:17.:05:19.

should they be needed. is diplomatically led,

:05:20.:05:22.

it has diplomatic traction And I want to stay

:05:23.:05:25.

right there right now. The tragedy of war is well enough

:05:26.:05:29.

known and does not need another characterisation beyond the fact

:05:30.:05:32.

that it would be catastrophic. Let's see what he does with Guam. He

:05:33.:05:46.

does something in Guam, it will be an event the likes of which nobody

:05:47.:05:50.

has seen before, what will happen in North Korea.

:05:51.:05:54.

Robin Brant is in Seoul for us this morning.

:05:55.:05:58.

You heard the President's reaction, pretty strong words. How are all

:05:59.:06:05.

there reacting to this escalating tension? -- how are people there

:06:06.:06:11.

reacting. What a contrast in tone from those two men. People in South

:06:12.:06:16.

Korea have lived with the prospect of conflict with their northern

:06:17.:06:19.

neighbour for decades. There has been no change in the alert here.

:06:20.:06:24.

We're not seeing more of military presence. They were prepared for

:06:25.:06:29.

swift action yesterday. In terms of people on the streets they would

:06:30.:06:34.

need more assurance to hear other comments coming from President Trump

:06:35.:06:38.

when he reminded North Korea that they cannot go around threatening

:06:39.:06:41.

the US, Japan and South Korea, because that military alliance

:06:42.:06:46.

between South Korea and the US is crucial diplomatically, but also in

:06:47.:06:48.

terms of protecting this country. South Koreans have elected a new

:06:49.:06:53.

president relatively recently, President Moon, who is more

:06:54.:06:58.

conciliatory in his tone. He wants Pyongyang back at the negotiating

:06:59.:07:01.

table to negotiate a lasting peace on the peninsula. I think that tally

:07:02.:07:05.

is much more with the tone of what James Mattis was seen, in terms of

:07:06.:07:09.

this primarily eating a diplomatic effort. -- tallies much more.

:07:10.:07:13.

Hundreds of people are going to be moved out of their high rise flats

:07:14.:07:17.

after an investigation has revealed they are not safe there.

:07:18.:07:20.

242 flats in South East London are affected.

:07:21.:07:22.

The issue with the gas supply was discovered

:07:23.:07:24.

during an investigation into fire safety prompted

:07:25.:07:26.

Dan Johnson is there with the latest.

:07:27.:07:34.

Dan, what is the nature of the problem? Quite complicated. Let's

:07:35.:07:45.

make it clear, this is not about cladding, although this

:07:46.:07:47.

investigation started after the Grenfell Tower. It is not even

:07:48.:07:51.

primarily about fire safety. This is about the structure of the towers

:07:52.:07:55.

and whether or not they are strong enough to endure something like a

:07:56.:07:58.

gas explosion. There was supposed to be worked on these towers in the

:07:59.:08:01.

1960s after a similar block collapsed when there was a gas

:08:02.:08:07.

explosion. But now the council has uncovered that it looks like that

:08:08.:08:10.

work was never done, so it cannot guarantee that those towers would

:08:11.:08:13.

the safe if there was a gas explosion. That is why they have

:08:14.:08:17.

called for the gas supply to be switched off immediately. Gas

:08:18.:08:21.

engineers have just arrived. It is not a problem with the gas supply

:08:22.:08:24.

itself, it is the structure of the building that they need to make

:08:25.:08:28.

safe. To do that work they will have to move residents out. They will

:08:29.:08:32.

have to reinforce the building and convert the heating and hot water to

:08:33.:08:36.

electric. So residents will have to be relocated at least temporarily.

:08:37.:08:40.

Lots of work to do here. This is potentially a big issue which could

:08:41.:08:43.

affect many other tower blocks constructed at the same time. It is

:08:44.:08:47.

another big issue that is developing, another worry for people

:08:48.:08:49.

living in high-rise blocks. The airports and airlines

:08:50.:08:53.

with the worst summer flight delays If they are on this list they might

:08:54.:09:02.

not want to listen to you now? No, we are going to name and shame them.

:09:03.:09:06.

This is a BBC investigation looking at the data, airports and airlines

:09:07.:09:12.

over the past two summers. It is interesting. It is caused by all

:09:13.:09:18.

sorts of things. Their congestion, obviously. Too many planes in the

:09:19.:09:23.

skies. What sort out traffic control strikes in France, Italy and Spain

:09:24.:09:27.

over the past few years. -- lots of air traffic control strikes. And bad

:09:28.:09:32.

weather. The investigation found one in five flights to and from the UK

:09:33.:09:37.

had a delay of more than 30 minutes. If it is just 30 minutes you don't

:09:38.:09:41.

mind too much. This evidence suggests it is becoming increasingly

:09:42.:09:45.

common. The worst airline, the worst offender, easyJet. An average flight

:09:46.:09:50.

delay in the summer of 24 minutes. EasyJet, for its part, it says that

:09:51.:09:55.

is because they carry more passengers. They are a bigger

:09:56.:09:57.

airline, they have 78 million passengers every year. The airport

:09:58.:10:01.

that is the worst offender is Gatwick. The average weight there is

:10:02.:10:06.

27 minutes after your scheduled departure time. -- wait. Gatwick

:10:07.:10:11.

says they only have one runway, they are very congested and they fly lots

:10:12.:10:15.

to Europe, which is most susceptible to congestion and air traffic

:10:16.:10:19.

strikes. There is good news. If you travel from a local, smaller,

:10:20.:10:23.

regional airport, they tend to do better. Leeds Bradford and Belfast

:10:24.:10:27.

airport hosted well. They had the shortest delays. If you are delayed,

:10:28.:10:35.

does it necessarily mean you arrive late? No, this is interesting. This

:10:36.:10:40.

is what the trains have been caught up on. They give themselves more

:10:41.:10:44.

time in the arrival time. They say that they will arrive a bit later

:10:45.:10:47.

than they do, which means they always arrive on time. So even if

:10:48.:10:52.

you take off late, you might make up that time in the air, all the

:10:53.:10:55.

scheduled arrival time is late anyway, so it looks like you arrive

:10:56.:10:59.

on time, they don't have to pay compensation and nobody is unhappy.

:11:00.:11:02.

But the train companies were caught up with that. One word on the

:11:03.:11:07.

airports, if you want to check where you regularly travel to and from you

:11:08.:11:08.

can check it out on our website. Thank you. Let's look at sport. And

:11:09.:11:18.

there were some shocks at the World Athletics Championship in London

:11:19.:11:24.

last night in the men's 200 metres. The favourites missed out but they

:11:25.:11:29.

were safe there is a lending for Botswana's Isaac McQualter, who ran

:11:30.:11:33.

a solo time trail just to get there. -- there was a fairytale ending for

:11:34.:11:36.

Botswana's Isaac McQualter. He emerged to a great crowd. After

:11:37.:11:46.

beating illness, could he beat his rivals? It did not have a happy

:11:47.:11:51.

ending. South Africa's Wade Vanni Kirk looked on course for his second

:11:52.:11:56.

title, but it was an heralded -- and unheralded name which grabbed the

:11:57.:12:00.

headlines. Ramil Guliyev taking gold, from Turkey, ahead of Wade

:12:01.:12:04.

Vanni Kirk and Isaac McQualter back in sixth. For the Botswanan it was

:12:05.:12:12.

not to be. It was not to be. I had a crazy day yesterday. 200 metres

:12:13.:12:17.

yesterday. Earlier, there were hopes of reduced success for Aily Doyle in

:12:18.:12:23.

the hurdles, but the team captain finished last in her finals, with

:12:24.:12:28.

America's Corey Carter taking gold. Today, the UK's hopes will be led by

:12:29.:12:32.

Dina Asher-Smith in the women's 200 metres and Lorraine Ugen in the long

:12:33.:12:36.

jump. After six days without a British medal, the fans will be

:12:37.:12:38.

crossing their fingers. There it is, the London Stadium,

:12:39.:12:48.

where all the action will take place through the programme. After eight

:12:49.:12:55.

o'clock we will be speaking to Colin Jackson, and he will tell us who he

:12:56.:13:00.

thinks he has his eye on for success later today.

:13:01.:13:02.

Everybody is fascinated by things that get washed up on the beach.

:13:03.:13:06.

Little things, big things. Look at this. This is the coast of Norfolk.

:13:07.:13:11.

You get a sense looking from a distance that there is some really

:13:12.:13:16.

big stuff that has washed up here. The Maritime and coastguard agency

:13:17.:13:19.

confirms two large plastic pipes, and when we say large, you can see

:13:20.:13:23.

those people near them. They are eight feet in diameter. I was

:13:24.:13:27.

concerned about this yellow and red thing on the end of the pipes. If

:13:28.:13:31.

they are eight feet in diameter you would think you would be able to run

:13:32.:13:35.

through them. They are, apparently, are the plug-ins. You could get an

:13:36.:13:41.

anchor on to that as well. You could tell it and link it to other pipes.

:13:42.:13:45.

I was concerned, because if you wait in a minute, you can see the other

:13:46.:13:49.

end of the pipe, which is hollow. Anyway, what we are asking you today

:13:50.:13:53.

is, have you seen things washed up on the beach that are unusual?

:13:54.:13:56.

Apparently there are ten more of these which are missing. They were

:13:57.:14:02.

being heard, and came loose, and they were just drifting around, and

:14:03.:14:06.

lo and behold they have ended up in Norfolk. -- they were being towed.

:14:07.:14:14.

If you have seen anything like that wash up on the beach, send us a

:14:15.:14:16.

picture. Now it Four years ago British shoppers

:14:17.:14:21.

were horrified to find there could be traces

:14:22.:14:24.

of horse meat in the food Now another food scandal has forced

:14:25.:14:26.

retailers to pull products This time it's eggs contaminated

:14:27.:14:30.

with the pesticide fipronil. Professor Chris Elliott is Director

:14:31.:14:34.

of the Institute for Global Food He led an investigation into the UK

:14:35.:14:37.

food industry after the horsemeat Thank you very much for joining us

:14:38.:14:52.

this morning. Good morning. What do you make of these eggs getting into

:14:53.:14:56.

the food chain, into the supermarkets - at one point they

:14:57.:15:03.

thought it was 21,000, now up to 700,000 contaminated eggs in our

:15:04.:15:07.

foodchain - how has this happened? The information points towards a

:15:08.:15:15.

legal practice that has happened -- illegal practice that has happened

:15:16.:15:18.

in Holland and further across Europe. The number of eggs that have

:15:19.:15:24.

come into the UK is not known for sure. Started with a small number,

:15:25.:15:30.

rose to 700,000, and I would not be surprised if it reaches several

:15:31.:15:36.

million by the end of next week. OK, several million contaminated eggs.

:15:37.:15:41.

Will they be in our system still? What about the extra eggs? What is

:15:42.:15:48.

emerging is this illegal practice and the use of this insecticide

:15:49.:15:53.

could have been going on for a considerable period of time. Most of

:15:54.:15:57.

those egg products have now been consumed. The products we know our

:15:58.:16:04.

contaminated in the UK, the retailer is selling the product are

:16:05.:16:08.

undertaking voluntary recall is as a precautionary measure at the moment.

:16:09.:16:14.

The implication is for many supermarkets that we buy and eat

:16:15.:16:23.

British eggs. How clear, how where are we as consumers as that non-

:16:24.:16:28.

British eggs are in sandwich fillings, which is what these eggs

:16:29.:16:33.

have been used for? On a broader context we don't know what we are

:16:34.:16:36.

eating and we don't know where it comes from. Specifically on eggs we

:16:37.:16:46.

are 85% self-sufficient. We import over 1 billion eggs per year, which

:16:47.:16:51.

end up in heavily processed foods like mayonnaise and Sam Burgess. You

:16:52.:16:55.

don't really know where the material comes from. Why do you think that

:16:56.:17:01.

is, whose fault is it, is that the supermarkets, the Food Standards

:17:02.:17:06.

Agency? I am not sure we blame anybody about this. It would be

:17:07.:17:11.

virtually impossible to name the country of origin of all of the

:17:12.:17:16.

ingredients in processed foods. You could have 25- 30 ingredients and it

:17:17.:17:20.

would be impossible to put those on labels. It is a clear message here

:17:21.:17:25.

that those people who have been implicated in this in the UK, that

:17:26.:17:29.

they are not involved in scandal in any way. The fact that they have

:17:30.:17:33.

imported materials from another part of Europe means that they have

:17:34.:17:38.

become vulnerable now. There is a clear message, purchase local when

:17:39.:17:42.

you can. We have a fantastic industry in the UK. We should

:17:43.:17:47.

support it much more. We are hearing that the European Commission has

:17:48.:17:52.

called an emergency meeting of ministers from the countries

:17:53.:17:57.

affected by this scandal. What are the key issues that they will

:17:58.:18:02.

discuss next? Action needs to be taken. Consumers need to be made

:18:03.:18:07.

safe. And this cannot happen again. Even more significant than the work

:18:08.:18:10.

of the European Commission is Europol and the police force. They

:18:11.:18:15.

are conducting a European wide investigation to see how far this

:18:16.:18:21.

illegal use has spread. There is the potential that other member states

:18:22.:18:24.

may become embroiled in this scandal over the next few days. What

:18:25.:18:30.

everyone is trying to do is find out the level of the amount of abuse

:18:31.:18:34.

that has gone on, where have the products, and, and can they be

:18:35.:18:39.

withdrawn from supermarket shelves? Not only across Europe, right across

:18:40.:18:44.

the world. Could this affect chicken flesh itself? The likelihood of that

:18:45.:18:52.

is not known. I am aware there is a government laboratory in the

:18:53.:18:57.

Netherlands testing the meat from the affected flocks. We should have

:18:58.:19:01.

the results of their testing at the end of today or tomorrow. Good to

:19:02.:19:06.

talk to you this morning. Thank you very much.

:19:07.:19:07.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:19:08.:19:12.

We are going to have a look at the weather. Is it rather forlorn,

:19:13.:19:20.

watching a balloon lying on its side? It will be pumped up soon.

:19:21.:19:27.

Pumped up? Well, air is going to be pumped into it, like a bicycle tyre.

:19:28.:19:32.

I am not sure that is the technical term. Good morning. Yes, the

:19:33.:19:39.

balloons will be inflated this morning. I want to show you this

:19:40.:19:45.

special balloon. This red and yellow striped balloon is known as the

:19:46.:19:50.

Bristol Bell, and it was the first modern hot air balloon anywhere in

:19:51.:19:56.

Europe, designed and built by Don Cameron, the founder here. The

:19:57.:20:01.

Bristol Bell is one of 130 balloons taking part in the festival over the

:20:02.:20:07.

course of four days, it is a free event and we will see around 500,000

:20:08.:20:12.

people taking part, coming to spectate. It is really quite a

:20:13.:20:17.

spectacle, watching these balloons taking off and completely filling

:20:18.:20:22.

the sky. So, this morning it is fine and tranquil to start the day with

:20:23.:20:26.

some blue skies, relatively light wind, so ideal conditions for

:20:27.:20:30.

balloons. Elsewhere across the country, rain at times. A weather

:20:31.:20:34.

front is heading west to east across the country. This morning in Bristol

:20:35.:20:39.

and across central and southern England it is a fine morning and dry

:20:40.:20:44.

with sunshine. More cloud and misty weather in the south-east. As we

:20:45.:20:48.

head through the north, clear skies and sunshine through the Midlands

:20:49.:20:52.

and northern England. There is rain across Cumbria, Northumberland, into

:20:53.:20:56.

southern Scotland. For eastern Scotland around Murray first we will

:20:57.:21:01.

see brightness this morning. Western Scotland will stay cloudy with

:21:02.:21:05.

outbreaks of rain -- Firth. And also quite windy with the arrival of the

:21:06.:21:09.

rain. Northern Ireland is cloudy and breezy and some of the rain heading

:21:10.:21:14.

into the west of Wales. Central and east Wales remains fine and dry. It

:21:15.:21:19.

will be dry in the south-west. The rain across the Isles of Scilly into

:21:20.:21:22.

western parts of Cornwall. Through the course of the day the rain in

:21:23.:21:26.

northern and western parts of the UK, accompanied by the strong wind,

:21:27.:21:31.

moves further east. The south-east of England and East Anglia should be

:21:32.:21:36.

dry for a good part of the day. In the sunshine temperatures set to

:21:37.:21:42.

reach 22 degrees. Elsewhere, typically 17- 19 degrees. This

:21:43.:21:45.

evening and overnight, the rain will move across the south-east of

:21:46.:21:48.

England. It is followed by clear spells and showers across the

:21:49.:21:52.

country. Through the course of tonight most of the showers will

:21:53.:21:56.

ease and the wind wilful lighter. Heading through the second half of

:21:57.:22:00.

the night into the early hours of Saturday temperatures down to 13- 15

:22:01.:22:06.

to start the weekend. It is not looking too bad with high pressure

:22:07.:22:10.

in charge and some showers across Wales, northern England and

:22:11.:22:16.

Scotland. Elsewhere, most of us will avoid the showers. There will be

:22:17.:22:19.

spells of sunshine. The wind will ease through the day with

:22:20.:22:22.

temperatures around 16- 22 degrees and the high pressure will hold on

:22:23.:22:26.

through Saturday evening and overnight into Sunday. On onto the

:22:27.:22:30.

second half of the weekend, Sunday will be another largely dry day.

:22:31.:22:35.

Some spells of sunshine. It should be a little bit less breezy than

:22:36.:22:40.

Saturday. The chance of one or two rogue showers around but most of us

:22:41.:22:44.

will stay dry with temperatures around 16- 22 degrees. Rain today

:22:45.:22:49.

but the weather isn't looking decent through the weekend. Very good.

:22:50.:22:56.

Thank you. It looks magnificent. Lovely. Thank you.

:22:57.:22:59.

The number of primary school children in England being excluded

:23:00.:23:02.

and sent to specialist schools known as Pupil Referral Units

:23:03.:23:07.

Research by BBC Breakfast has found more than 1,300 young children

:23:08.:23:11.

are now being taught in this way, a rise of 66% in five years.

:23:12.:23:15.

Although overall pupil numbers have gone up,

:23:16.:23:17.

that doesn't account for the increase.

:23:18.:23:18.

Breakfast's John McGuire visited a specialist centre in Norfolk.

:23:19.:23:26.

Which surface will the car travel over. Engaging lessons, artwork on

:23:27.:23:36.

the wall and positive measures everywhere - typical of a school.

:23:37.:23:42.

But Brooklyn's is different, a Pupil Referral Unit, or a shortstay

:23:43.:23:46.

school, children in Norfolk come here if they have been excluded or

:23:47.:23:51.

are deemed to challenging to be taught by the original primary. We

:23:52.:23:55.

spoke to some of out why they left their old school and we are

:23:56.:23:58.

protecting their identity. It didn't make me comfortable. It was

:23:59.:24:03.

horrible. The teachers were not that nice. I like it here. The teachers

:24:04.:24:07.

are kind. I have been thought a lot about maths. It is really fun.

:24:08.:24:16.

Latest figures show 1306 E eight are being taught in similar schools in

:24:17.:24:22.

England, an increase of 66% over the last five years, although the number

:24:23.:24:27.

of children overall has risen. Here at Brooklands they believe one

:24:28.:24:31.

reason is the pressure on mainstream head teachers. You have a

:24:32.:24:37.

challenging young person. At the same time they have teachers told,

:24:38.:24:43.

we don't have the money to support the young person. I don't think any

:24:44.:24:47.

young teacher wants to do that. Faced with the culture that we have

:24:48.:24:51.

at the moment, many don't have any choice. Norfolk County Council says

:24:52.:24:56.

exclusions have dropped but are still too high and continue to

:24:57.:24:59.

create pressure locally and nationally. It is working with

:25:00.:25:04.

schools to address the issue. This parent is happy with the education

:25:05.:25:08.

and support her son receives at Brooklands but believes they should

:25:09.:25:12.

have been a better understanding of his condition at his old primary,

:25:13.:25:16.

and a place for him at a special school. He has autism and attention

:25:17.:25:21.

deficit hyperactivity disorder. I was upset because he was being

:25:22.:25:25.

classed as a naughty child. But he wasn't. He had learning

:25:26.:25:28.

difficulties. When they were restraining him he would have

:25:29.:25:31.

bruises on his arms when he finished school. Sometimes he would be locked

:25:32.:25:35.

in a room kicking the walls and head-butting. I felt like every day

:25:36.:25:40.

I was sending my child to a prison. Not school. Experts believe cuts in

:25:41.:25:44.

the help for families who need extra support is one of the reasons for an

:25:45.:25:48.

increase in the use of Pupil Referral Units. Those support

:25:49.:25:51.

services are not there either in helping teachers cope with some of

:25:52.:25:56.

those issues that exhibit themselves in the classroom, or some other

:25:57.:26:00.

feelings young people have about schools, or some feelings they about

:26:01.:26:05.

themselves, then I think we need to look at this quite seriously. The

:26:06.:26:09.

government says children in referral units represent 0.03% of the primary

:26:10.:26:17.

population. These schools ensure children receive a high quality

:26:18.:26:21.

education. As a shortstay school, Brooklyn's is designed to teach

:26:22.:26:25.

children from just two terms but now has some for up to two years. It is

:26:26.:26:31.

highly effective in returning pupils to mainstream or special schools and

:26:32.:26:35.

here they believe every child deserves a second chance and must be

:26:36.:26:37.

given every chance to succeed. Martin Thacker, is head

:26:38.:26:39.

teacher at Calow primary Good morning. Good morning. It is

:26:40.:26:55.

harrowing to hear those stories of a mother talking about the

:26:56.:26:58.

circumstances that her child found themselves in at a mainstream school

:26:59.:27:02.

that led to the exclusion. What is your experience from your school? I

:27:03.:27:08.

have been head teacher for 17 years. My experience is in that time I have

:27:09.:27:13.

permanently excluded three children. The number of children who have been

:27:14.:27:17.

excluded on a fixed term basis has increased over the last two or three

:27:18.:27:22.

years. And can you see a pattern - what have you put that down to?

:27:23.:27:28.

Budget cuts. The number of schools experiencing difficulties with

:27:29.:27:32.

managing budgets has led to issues like staffing, so the actual pupil -

:27:33.:27:39.

staff ratio has increased. The typical ratio is one teacher to

:27:40.:27:44.

every 35 students and we have had to put teaching assistants back and

:27:45.:27:49.

they are the members of staff to support students experiencing

:27:50.:27:53.

difficulties. The implication is you will be put in a situation where you

:27:54.:27:57.

need to exclude students more frequently? I predict that. When you

:27:58.:28:06.

exclude them, what do you think is the best... The best way to help

:28:07.:28:11.

them through this exclusion, is it to be sent home, or a PRU? In the

:28:12.:28:18.

first instance, every teacher tries their hardest not to exclude. You

:28:19.:28:22.

try to work with a range of agencies, behaviour support, teams

:28:23.:28:26.

and so on, to try to implement strategies to help children stay in

:28:27.:28:30.

mainstream education. When it comes to the point that the child is

:28:31.:28:35.

disruptive, maybe violent, putting safety at risk, and others, then you

:28:36.:28:40.

have to look at a fixed term exclusions and leading to permanent

:28:41.:28:46.

exclusions, and ideally into a pupil referral unit so they might as

:28:47.:28:52.

support, the staffing ratio is better, and working into the

:28:53.:28:55.

mainstream. They need to be new to the school, don't they, so you have

:28:56.:29:00.

to have a PRU close to the school so they can be put back into the

:29:01.:29:04.

mainstream? You would hope so, because a child moved by taxi miles

:29:05.:29:10.

away is not ideal for the child. The conclusions, when you look at the

:29:11.:29:14.

statistics, people might think behaviour is getting worse - the

:29:15.:29:18.

picture you are painting is much more nuanced, staffing levels are a

:29:19.:29:24.

huge part of what might in previous times have been something you could

:29:25.:29:29.

cope with? I see some types of assault which have increased and

:29:30.:29:32.

worsened over the years. I don't say that children are more badly

:29:33.:29:37.

behaved. You say assaults? On staff. In primary school? Yes in primary

:29:38.:29:42.

school. Throwing furniture deliberately towards a member of

:29:43.:29:45.

staff, and that is sold. Interesting to talk to you this morning. Thank

:29:46.:29:47.

you -- that is assault. Time now to get the news,

:29:48.:29:51.

travel and weather where you are. I'm back with the latest

:29:52.:33:10.

from the BBC London newsroom Hello, this is Breakfast

:33:11.:33:16.

with Charlie Stayt and Naga In the past half hour we've heard

:33:17.:33:21.

that an emergency meeting is being called of ministers

:33:22.:33:31.

from the key European countries affected by the egg

:33:32.:33:34.

contamination scandal. Here the Food Standards Agency has

:33:35.:33:35.

revealed that 700,000 contaminated eggs have been

:33:36.:33:38.

imported from Dutch farms, but it insists it is "highly

:33:39.:33:40.

unlikely" they pose any risk Sandwiches and salads are among

:33:41.:33:43.

the foods that have now been removed The US Defence Secretary James

:33:44.:33:49.

Mattis says America is still trying to use diplomacy to resolve

:33:50.:33:55.

the growing tension with North Korea - and that war would

:33:56.:33:58.

be catastrophic. He said diplomatic efforts

:33:59.:34:00.

were yielding results, though military options

:34:01.:34:02.

were ready if needed. He made his remarks shortly

:34:03.:34:04.

after President Trump had stepped up his rhetoric - saying his threat

:34:05.:34:06.

to unleash ' fire and fury ' on North Korea might not

:34:07.:34:10.

have been tough enough. Donations made to the victims

:34:11.:34:16.

of the Grenfell Tower fire are not reaching survivors quickly enough,

:34:17.:34:19.

according to campaigners in West Figures from the Charity Commission

:34:20.:34:21.

show that less than 15% of the ?18.9 million raised has been given

:34:22.:34:25.

to people affected almost two months after the tragedy, but it says

:34:26.:34:28.

that early difficulties in identifying and contacting those

:34:29.:34:31.

who need help are being overcome. Passengers flying from Gatwick

:34:32.:34:40.

during the last two summers experienced the longest average

:34:41.:34:43.

delays, according to flight data Among the ten biggest airlines,

:34:44.:34:45.

Easyjet travellers suffered the worst hold-ups with an average

:34:46.:34:55.

delay of 24 minutes. Both the airport and the airline say

:34:56.:34:58.

many of the problems Canada's foreign ministry

:34:59.:35:00.

is investigating why at least one of its diplomats stationed in Cuba

:35:01.:35:04.

has needed treatment for hearing Yesterday it emerged American

:35:05.:35:07.

diplomats in Havana have experienced Media reports suggest Cuban agents

:35:08.:35:10.

may have used a sonic device that Havana denies the allegation,

:35:11.:35:15.

but the US has removed two Cuban diplomats from Washington

:35:16.:35:23.

DC in retaliation. Coming up a little bit later on,

:35:24.:35:34.

Sarah will have the weather and some beautiful images from a balloon

:35:35.:35:38.

festival in Bristol. Blue skies and balloons. Very colourful ones, too.

:35:39.:35:44.

Let's go to Jessica, who is at the London Stadium covering the World

:35:45.:35:48.

Athletics Championship. It looks like a grey day from that camera

:35:49.:35:52.

angle, not at least we will not see the rain that we have had in the

:35:53.:35:57.

last couple of days? -- but at least. Yes, good morning. It is

:35:58.:36:03.

drier today. The sun is coming out. It is a very busy here with staff

:36:04.:36:07.

setting up events, but today we are looking forward to Dina Asher-Smith.

:36:08.:36:11.

She was actually in the stadium for the Olympics in 2012, but she was

:36:12.:36:18.

not competing. She was a kit carrier, and she was so inspired by

:36:19.:36:21.

the events that she took athletics more seriously, and five years later

:36:22.:36:25.

here she is racing against some of the rest in the world. -- best.

:36:26.:36:30.

It's been a difficult season for Dina Asher Smith.

:36:31.:36:33.

But she was in impressive form in the 200 metres heats

:36:34.:36:37.

and then last night she dazzled us all again.

:36:38.:36:40.

She finished second in her semi final going through to tonight's

:36:41.:36:43.

She's the only British woman in the showpiece.

:36:44.:36:46.

I had to spend six weeks not doing anything.

:36:47.:36:50.

And then gradually putting weight on it for the next six weeks.

:36:51.:36:59.

I am joking, I would not recommend it.

:37:00.:37:12.

Also in action in the 200 metres last night was Isaac Makwala.

:37:13.:37:17.

But there was no fairytale ending to an incredible few days for him,

:37:18.:37:21.

You'll remember Makwala was forced to miss the final of the 400 metres

:37:22.:37:26.

due to illness and had to run a time trial just to get

:37:27.:37:30.

Having made the final he was in contention around the bend

:37:31.:37:41.

Turkey's Ramil Gulyev won gold, ahead of Wayde Van Niekerk.

:37:42.:37:44.

Great Britain's Nathaneel Mitchel Blake finished fourth.

:37:45.:37:46.

Makwala blamed his performance on having to run two races the day

:37:47.:37:50.

And disappointment for A-League oil in the 200 metre hurdles. She came

:37:51.:38:00.

last in the finals, which was won by the American Corey Carter.

:38:01.:38:03.

There will be three British women in the semifinals of the women's

:38:04.:38:06.

Lynsey Sharp, Adelle Tracy and Shelayna Oskan Clarke all through.

:38:07.:38:10.

And there will be two British men into tonight's 1500 metres semi

:38:11.:38:13.

Meanwhile, an exhausted Laura Muir qualified for the final

:38:14.:38:16.

She was one of the fastest losers in her semi final,

:38:17.:38:20.

with the exertions of finishing fourth in the 1500 metres

:38:21.:38:23.

earlier this week looking like they've taken their toll on her.

:38:24.:38:26.

Eilish McColgan looked impressive as she also made it through,

:38:27.:38:29.

Katarina Johnson-Thompson has gone some way to making up

:38:30.:38:38.

for her disappointing performance in the heptathlon,

:38:39.:38:40.

she made the final of the individual high jump.

:38:41.:38:43.

Where she will be joined by Morgan Lake who also cleared

:38:44.:38:46.

Ahead of the men's triple jump final there had been talk

:38:47.:38:51.

that the American Christian Taylor could break Jonathan Edwards's

:38:52.:38:54.

He didn't - but still won gold with a jump of 17.68 metres.

:38:55.:39:06.

One other story for you away from the athletics.

:39:07.:39:12.

The Premier League returns tonight with Arsenal playing

:39:13.:39:14.

Arsenal haven't won their opening game since 2014 and manager

:39:15.:39:18.

Arsene Wenger knows they need to change that.

:39:19.:39:20.

We need to transform the quality of the preparation in the points.

:39:21.:39:28.

What matters is the next game and winning it and starting

:39:29.:39:34.

in a strong way which we did not do last year.

:39:35.:39:37.

That is what we want to achieve this year.

:39:38.:39:42.

That final with Dina Asher-Smith in the 200 metres is tonight at about

:39:43.:39:51.

950 p.m. . Also going for gold will be Lorraine Ugen in the women's long

:39:52.:39:57.

jump. And there is a morning session here today. Coverage begins on BBC

:39:58.:39:59.

Two at 930 a.m. . It's August, and for lots of us it

:40:00.:40:03.

means holiday time at the beach. Cue lots of selfies of people

:40:04.:40:07.

strutting about in their swimwear Earlier this week, former Vogue

:40:08.:40:10.

editor Alexandra Shulman posted one selfie that sparked lots of debate

:40:11.:40:14.

as to whether we should edit our pics,

:40:15.:40:16.

or leave them natural. Do you often take selfies? I very

:40:17.:40:25.

rarely take selfies. I don't think that I would. At some people do.

:40:26.:40:37.

The point being with her that she was wearing very little, and if she

:40:38.:40:45.

hadn't been the editor of Vogue, which is famous for taking pictures

:40:46.:40:47.

of a certain style. Now, the All Party Parliamentary

:40:48.:40:48.

Group on Body Image, has told BBC Breakfast

:40:49.:40:51.

it is particularly concerned about "body image anxiety" amongst

:40:52.:40:53.

young people at this time of year. Just do a filter, clear your skin. I

:40:54.:41:07.

do filters on Instagram. Would any of you put up a picture which was

:41:08.:41:13.

not filtered at all? Yeah. If I take a picture, as long as I am good with

:41:14.:41:17.

it, I don't care what anyone else thinks. Do you think there is

:41:18.:41:20.

pressure on you to always be edited, looking your best? I think sometimes

:41:21.:41:24.

it makes you look nicer, and I am not really self-conscious about not

:41:25.:41:28.

using a filter. It makes you look better, knowing that you can have a

:41:29.:41:32.

picture that everybody else will, not appreciate, but everybody else

:41:33.:41:37.

will like it like you do. What about celebrities? When you see their

:41:38.:41:40.

pictures to you presume they are filtered? You often hope they are,

:41:41.:41:45.

because they look that good, and you don't look like that. So it gives

:41:46.:41:49.

you a bit of relief to know that that is not real. I like it when

:41:50.:41:52.

celebrities do natural photos. Then again, you know they have make-up.

:41:53.:41:59.

It is not a surprise. I am going to make your tussle is longer, your

:42:00.:42:02.

waste skinnier. I can put some make-up on you. Wow! I would just

:42:03.:42:15.

say, I think that Hayley looked great before all the adjustments in

:42:16.:42:20.

that selfie. But some people do make adjustments.

:42:21.:42:23.

Joining us now is Natasha Devon, a former model and writer

:42:24.:42:26.

and Kady McDermott, a reality TV star who has almost one million

:42:27.:42:29.

Good morning. Kady, we saw our reporter than having all her images

:42:30.:42:37.

tweaked with filters. I think she looks lovely, that she wouldn't need

:42:38.:42:41.

to change it. Why do people feel the need to tweak how they look? So that

:42:42.:42:47.

it is not a true image of themselves? Social media is massive

:42:48.:42:54.

nowadays. Girls feel very pressured, naturally, when they see all these

:42:55.:42:59.

perfect people. Maybe they are edited, so people do feel under

:43:00.:43:03.

pressure, but it is a very difficult subject. Some people do it and some

:43:04.:43:10.

people don't. Do you? I don't edit my photos but I do use filters, if

:43:11.:43:15.

only to brighten the image. I make sure my quality is good. I take them

:43:16.:43:18.

on a camera, so I tweak the contrast. But I do not edit or

:43:19.:43:23.

change the features on my body in any way. You are a stunning looking

:43:24.:43:30.

woman, but this, the first picture there, does not look like how you

:43:31.:43:34.

look here? Really? You don't think so? I think you look at in real

:43:35.:43:40.

life, personally. Really! Thank you. The point I am making is that people

:43:41.:43:45.

look at these images and see highly glamorised, perfect images, and they

:43:46.:43:48.

think they need to be like that. Do you know what, I get lots of people

:43:49.:43:53.

messaging me and saying, they want to look like me, and it does upset

:43:54.:43:58.

me. I try to respond to people and say they are beautiful the way they

:43:59.:44:02.

are. But on my Instagram I upload photos, I do Snapchat Sioux without

:44:03.:44:07.

a scrap one as well. I have got folder was from the age of 11

:44:08.:44:10.

following me so it is really important to me that I do not edit

:44:11.:44:15.

my photos. -- I have got followers on the age of 11. I would never edit

:44:16.:44:20.

a photo so that people think it does not look like me because that's is

:44:21.:44:24.

showing in 11-year-olds that they should edit their photos. They

:44:25.:44:25.

should be confident in themselves. There is evidence in the arena. For

:44:26.:44:39.

those prolific social media users, part of the brain in the frontal

:44:40.:44:43.

lobe responsible for understanding how you fit in the social hierarchy,

:44:44.:44:47.

which can become enlarged in adolescents who spend a lot of time

:44:48.:44:52.

online. That means they are obsessively concerned with how they

:44:53.:44:55.

compare with other people. That has an effect with everything. So the

:44:56.:45:02.

girl guide attitude survey found 52% of 12- 14-year-old girls avoid

:45:03.:45:06.

everyday school activities because they don't like the way that they

:45:07.:45:10.

look. You have to respect information like that. Maybe taking

:45:11.:45:15.

the focus away from individual social media users. That kind of

:45:16.:45:20.

blame is not useful. Looking at social media as an incredible tool

:45:21.:45:23.

to share information and ask ourselves if we are using it in the

:45:24.:45:28.

best way that we can. Help with that one - I am not quite clear what you

:45:29.:45:32.

are saying. Should we be more relaxed about the altering of images

:45:33.:45:37.

on social media - is that what you are saying? What Alexander has done

:45:38.:45:44.

is positive, someone who has... I work in the fashion industry 20

:45:45.:45:50.

years ago. Even then she was a name, she is a alpha female. For her to

:45:51.:45:55.

say, I didn't put my life on hold, I have achieved these things and I

:45:56.:45:58.

look normal underneath my clothes. The difference with Alexandra and

:45:59.:46:07.

Katie is age and who is more able to be related with an young people are

:46:08.:46:14.

likely to want to look like Katie's image and brand than Alexandra, even

:46:15.:46:20.

though she is successful and smart, she is from a different generation

:46:21.:46:24.

and she is not someone they can relate to. Perhaps not relate to,

:46:25.:46:29.

though she is aspirational in that she has achieved a lot. We do young

:46:30.:46:33.

people a disservice if we assume they are narcissistic or want to

:46:34.:46:37.

look at certain way. There are a lot of ambitious young women who need

:46:38.:46:41.

role models. What do you think when there is a parliamentary body that

:46:42.:46:45.

says it is the time of year to be much more concerned about how young

:46:46.:46:48.

people feel, and young people assessing their looks - who takes

:46:49.:46:53.

responsibility, as someone with influence over the generation, in

:46:54.:47:04.

influencing them? My following is 90% women. I have girls messaging me

:47:05.:47:09.

all the time and ladies up to 50- 60, they say that I give them

:47:10.:47:14.

motivation. I am a size six and very little, though I still have stretch

:47:15.:47:18.

marks, and I have uploaded straight from the beach, some might look more

:47:19.:47:22.

perfect, there are some on holiday with my boyfriend and people like

:47:23.:47:26.

that I could have easily downloaded an app, smoothed it over and said I

:47:27.:47:31.

don't have stretch marks. I am happy with myself. People have messaged me

:47:32.:47:36.

to say that I have helped them to give them confidence as well. People

:47:37.:47:40.

say that people look perfect on the outside, though you're not, always,

:47:41.:47:44.

everyone has flaws, and it is about embracing that. Thank you so much of

:47:45.:47:51.

this morning. Tell us what you think. Stay in touch. Whether or not

:47:52.:47:58.

you filter your selfies or not. I will tell you who needs no filter,

:47:59.:48:00.

Sarah. Sarah's bringing us the weather

:48:01.:48:00.

from the Bristol International The pictures are stunning. The

:48:01.:48:07.

balloons are impressive. I am loving your coat this morning. It is a

:48:08.:48:14.

gorgeous morning here. We have sunshine to start the day. We have

:48:15.:48:20.

had the mass ascent this morning, 104 balloons taken to the skies. You

:48:21.:48:26.

can see some small model hot air balloons. These are scale models of

:48:27.:48:32.

the bigger balloons as well. It is a Sareen morning. We have blue skies.

:48:33.:48:36.

Quite tranquil. There is some sunshine and light winds. -- serene.

:48:37.:48:42.

Elsewhere across the country, a front moving in.

:48:43.:48:44.

There will be outbreaks of rain at times. Across much of England it is

:48:45.:48:53.

a gorgeous morning with lots of sunshine, try it with light winds, a

:48:54.:48:58.

little cloud in parts of the south and west and south east of England.

:48:59.:49:02.

A little bit of mist and murk. Quite fresh feeling around 14- 15. Heading

:49:03.:49:09.

north across the country, blue skies and sunshine. Across northern

:49:10.:49:12.

England, there will be cloud and rain at 9am across Northumberland

:49:13.:49:18.

and Cumbria, and rain in Scotland. Sunshine for eastern Scotland around

:49:19.:49:22.

Aberdeenshire. For western Scotland we have cloud and outbreaks of rain.

:49:23.:49:26.

Continuing into Northern Ireland. It will be windy with the rain around

:49:27.:49:31.

as well. The rain moves in across the rest of Wales. Central and east

:49:32.:49:36.

Wales is fine and dry. Much of south-west England begins on a fine

:49:37.:49:41.

note, with a little rain in western Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

:49:42.:49:44.

The rain in the north and west, along with the strong wind, will

:49:45.:49:48.

shift south eastwards. Much of south-east England and south and

:49:49.:49:56.

East Anglia should be fine. 22 degrees. Elsewhere, typically 17-

:49:57.:50:02.

19. It will feel quite breezy. Through the evening the band of rain

:50:03.:50:06.

crosses through the south-east of England and East Anglia, followed by

:50:07.:50:10.

clear spells and showers across all of the country overnight. The

:50:11.:50:15.

showers will ease away and the wind will fall lighter, so temperatures

:50:16.:50:19.

fall overnight around 13- 15 degrees in towns and cities, and cold in the

:50:20.:50:25.

countryside. What about the weekend? High pressure is moving in. It is an

:50:26.:50:30.

improving picture. Plenty of sunshine on Saturday. Showers around

:50:31.:50:35.

parts of Scotland, northern England. Many avoiding those showers. And by

:50:36.:50:40.

the afternoon in the sunny spells we will see top temperatures between

:50:41.:50:44.

16- 22, so not bad, some showers and breezy. I pressure stays in charge

:50:45.:50:50.

as we look at the second half of the weekend. Another largely dry day on

:50:51.:50:54.

Sunday with the odd rogue shower around, though many of we the

:50:55.:50:58.

showers with temperatures between 16- 21 degrees or so. So, rain at

:50:59.:51:05.

times, but we will see a mainly fine weekend.

:51:06.:51:09.

Thanks very much. It really does look marvellous. We will speak to

:51:10.:51:13.

you later. So, Ben is talking to us this morning about women in

:51:14.:51:16.

business. Yes, fascinating stories. We often

:51:17.:51:27.

talk to people who are doing some quite cool things. We are going to

:51:28.:51:31.

talk about that this morning. Yes - this is the latest in our

:51:32.:51:34.

inspirational businesswoman series. Today's guest founded a tech company

:51:35.:51:37.

that works with big brands to make sure their adverts get

:51:38.:51:41.

seen and shared online. They use all sorts of data to work

:51:42.:51:43.

out how and why something Sarah's been involved in famous

:51:44.:51:46.

adverts like the Evian rollerskating babies ad and the Dove

:51:47.:51:50.

body sketches ad. # hip, hot. # the rhythm of the

:51:51.:52:23.

boogie. Today I am gonna ask you some questions about a person you

:52:24.:52:27.

met earlier, and I am gonna ask you some general questions about her

:52:28.:52:31.

face. She was thin, so you could see her cheekbones. And her chin was no

:52:32.:52:40.

sense in. She had nice eyes. -- her chin was nice and thin. She had nice

:52:41.:52:42.

blue eyes. Hi, ben. You don't make the ads.

:52:43.:52:56.

Crucially, you make viral. We make them famous, we are a technology

:52:57.:53:00.

platform, and the date we have been collecting over the last decade is

:53:01.:53:05.

what we use to connect 90% of the biggest brands with 1.4 billion

:53:06.:53:11.

consumers. You make it sound very easy - how do you do that? A lot

:53:12.:53:15.

goes into it, though essentially we collect data on why people connect

:53:16.:53:20.

with videos, what gets them sharing content and what gets them reacting

:53:21.:53:25.

to the content. We found a motion is key. Creating a stronger emotional

:53:26.:53:30.

impact is what makes all of the difference -- emotion. When we think

:53:31.:53:33.

about bringing emotional intelligence to digital advertising.

:53:34.:53:38.

We have a lot of connection with ads, thinking specifically about

:53:39.:53:41.

supermarkets at Christmas, the John Lewis ad, the Sainsbury is that,

:53:42.:53:45.

those are the ones we like and share and wait for. -- Sainsbury is ad.

:53:46.:53:52.

That has changed. We actively search out advertising in a way that we

:53:53.:53:56.

thought, you know, I want to avoid it. The best ads become content. You

:53:57.:54:01.

see this at moments such as the Super Bowl in the US and Christmas

:54:02.:54:05.

here. The feelings of anticipation and excitement gets people enjoying

:54:06.:54:09.

the content, remembering the ad and wanting to purchase from the brand.

:54:10.:54:14.

It has not always been about tech for you, has it? Let's go back a

:54:15.:54:19.

couple of years. You left a job as a history lecturer to start this firm.

:54:20.:54:25.

Why? I was lecturing American studies at Sussex University, I was

:54:26.:54:28.

an academic, in a job I loved with colleagues are loved, and I was

:54:29.:54:31.

teaching the American Revolution, and what I realised was there was a

:54:32.:54:36.

revolution going on outside the door, the Internet revolution and

:54:37.:54:40.

the social web is becoming huge. And I wanted to be part of that. Then

:54:41.:54:43.

there were personal reasons as well - I was a mother of two of doing the

:54:44.:54:48.

long commute from London into Sussex, and every week I left my son

:54:49.:54:52.

at the nursery and it broke my heart. It was difficult to change

:54:53.:54:58.

this. What is it that triggers this moment of change? It was 7/7. I was

:54:59.:55:03.

on the system when the bomb exploded. Luckily, was caught up. I

:55:04.:55:07.

was evacuated from the station. I went home feeling lucky and I

:55:08.:55:11.

thought, if it was my last day, am I making it count? That is when I made

:55:12.:55:16.

the change of. People for that you were mad to make the change, leaving

:55:17.:55:20.

a good job, you had a mortgage, you had kids, and you said, we're gonna

:55:21.:55:26.

start a business - how did you make the decision to take the gamble on

:55:27.:55:30.

it? Starting a business is like having kids - there is never the

:55:31.:55:34.

right time, there is always a reason not to do it. What I learned as an

:55:35.:55:38.

academic is it is great to be curious and those who succeed keep

:55:39.:55:42.

learning and exploring ideas and those who are prepared to take

:55:43.:55:45.

risks. So it felt like a good time because we could see this big

:55:46.:55:50.

opportunity in social media, Nvidia advertising. We take it for granted,

:55:51.:56:03.

although you were starting this business, there was no Twitter or

:56:04.:56:06.

Facebook -- video advertising. You spotted the trend. It was an

:56:07.:56:08.

incredibly disruptive business model. Web advertising was just

:56:09.:56:11.

becoming a thing. There was no advertising on YouTube. We took a

:56:12.:56:15.

risk on that. We could see huge interest. We do that by iteating. We

:56:16.:56:19.

had a comedy website first. What we saw was lots of people loved video

:56:20.:56:23.

-- iterating. So successful, Rupert Murdoch's approached you, news Corp

:56:24.:56:35.

now owns you. -- Newscorp. Is there a worry that you are selling at? We

:56:36.:56:41.

are autonomous. And Newscorp have purchased us because of our

:56:42.:56:45.

entrepreneurial culture. They have started up a lab that is about

:56:46.:56:49.

bringing on board six companies to incubate ideas to create the future

:56:50.:56:53.

of storytelling and journalism. I think Newscorp, like lots of others,

:56:54.:56:57.

understand the importance of innovative thinking. So much more I

:56:58.:57:04.

want to talk to you about, Sarah, and you are not going anywhere - we

:57:05.:57:10.

will continue this conversation on Facebook Live on the BBC Breakfast

:57:11.:57:16.

page at 8:15am, so send in your questions and I will put them to

:57:17.:57:19.

her, she is going to stick around. Thank you very much. I won't have

:57:20.:57:24.

you answer it now but I want to know your favourite advert of all-time.

:57:25.:57:28.

Put it on Facebook. Thank you. It is on.

:57:29.:57:29.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:57:30.:00:48.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:00:49.:00:52.

Hello this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty.

:00:53.:00:56.

An emergency meeting to discuss the Europe-wide egg

:00:57.:00:58.

contamination scandal is called by the EU.

:00:59.:01:00.

sent to the UK from European farms caught up in the scare.

:01:01.:01:06.

Some processed foods have been pulled from supermarket shelves,

:01:07.:01:09.

but officials insist it's unlikely the public is at risk.

:01:10.:01:27.

Good morning it's Friday 11th August.

:01:28.:01:28.

The US defence secretary says war with North Korea

:01:29.:01:33.

James Mattis insists diplomacy is delivering results.

:01:34.:01:40.

A friendship forged through football.

:01:41.:01:44.

One month on from the death of Bradley Lowery, Jermain Defoe

:01:45.:01:47.

speaks for the first time about his best friend.

:01:48.:01:51.

He loved his football, he loved me, I loved him, for me every time I saw

:01:52.:01:59.

him it was a special feeling. And I'm live here at

:02:00.:02:03.

the London Stadium. It's Day 8 of the World Athletics

:02:04.:02:06.

Championships and here on BBC Breakfast we're getting a little bit

:02:07.:02:09.

excited about one British Six months ago she broke her foot -

:02:10.:02:12.

but her beaming smile Dina Asher Smith is back

:02:13.:02:16.

and she will line up against the world's best

:02:17.:02:20.

in tonight's 200 metres final. Congestion, air traffic control

:02:21.:02:23.

strikes and bad weather cause flight delays but which airports airlines

:02:24.:02:28.

are the worst offenders? After being hit by the Manchester

:02:29.:02:30.

bomb, Robbie Potter was left Just days after leaving hospital

:02:31.:02:38.

he'll be here to tell us how doctors helped him to cheat death

:02:39.:02:45.

by a hair's breadth. Good morning, the weather this

:02:46.:02:59.

morning coming from the Bristol balloon Fiesta, we have watched 140

:03:00.:03:05.

King off this morning, quite a spectacle, I will bring you a full

:03:06.:03:06.

forecast in about 15 minutes. An emergency meeting is being called

:03:07.:03:16.

by the EU to discuss the Europe-wide egg contamination scandal.

:03:17.:03:22.

700,000 contaminated eggs have been imported from Dutch farms

:03:23.:03:24.

and in the past hour has told us that number could rise.

:03:25.:03:27.

The Agency insists it is "highly unlikely" the eggs pose any

:03:28.:03:29.

Sandwiches and salads are among the foods that have now been removed

:03:30.:03:33.

from UK supermarket shelves, as Natasha Emerson reports.

:03:34.:03:39.

Millions of eggs destroyed, supermarkets scrambling

:03:40.:03:40.

Two men have been held by Dutch police over batches of poisonous

:03:41.:03:49.

Fipronil, a pesticide commonly used to kill lice and fleas on pets,

:03:50.:03:55.

has made its way into the food chain.

:03:56.:03:58.

Earlier this week, the Food Standards Agency said

:03:59.:04:00.

21,000 contaminated eggs had been imported to the UK.

:04:01.:04:05.

Now, it thinks it could be as many as 700,000.

:04:06.:04:09.

But that's still only a fraction of the 34 million we eat each day.

:04:10.:04:16.

And the Agency said you would have to eat 10,000 contaminated eggs

:04:17.:04:18.

The reason we have asked to withdraw the product from the shelf is an

:04:19.:04:29.

issue of trust in food, these eggs have something in them which should

:04:30.:04:32.

not be there and that is why we are asking for the eggs to be withdrawn,

:04:33.:04:36.

not because of the public health risk.

:04:37.:04:39.

So far, some salads and sandwiches sold by these four supermarkets have

:04:40.:04:41.

been withdrawn from sale, but whole eggs are safe.

:04:42.:04:44.

Despite those reassurances, the scandal continues to spread

:04:45.:04:46.

through Europe, with 11 countries now thought to be affected.

:04:47.:04:49.

Millions of eggs will be destroyed, as will hundreds

:04:50.:04:51.

Four years ago, horsemeat was found in burgers and ready-meals.

:04:52.:04:55.

Once again, questions are being raised about what goes

:04:56.:04:57.

into our processed foods and where it comes from.

:04:58.:05:00.

Officials hope the contaminated eggs will be out of the food chain soon,

:05:01.:05:05.

but the investigation into Europe's latest food scandal is likely to go

:05:06.:05:07.

Hundreds of people are going to be moved out of their high rise flats -

:05:08.:05:23.

after an investigation has revealed they are not safe there.

:05:24.:05:25.

242 flats in South East London are affected.

:05:26.:05:27.

The issue with the gas supply was discovered

:05:28.:05:29.

during an investigation into fire safety prompted by the

:05:30.:05:31.

Dan Johnson is there with the latest.

:05:32.:05:35.

Explain the nature of the problem? Residents in these blocks are waking

:05:36.:05:44.

up to letters from the council which say the gas has been cut off with

:05:45.:05:48.

immediate effect and they are going to have to move out in the longer

:05:49.:05:53.

term so work can take place to make the tower blocks safe. This all

:05:54.:05:58.

started in the wake of the Grenfell Tower when extra examinations were

:05:59.:06:01.

carried out but this is not about the cladding, or primarily about

:06:02.:06:07.

fire safety, this is about whether the concrete structure could

:06:08.:06:11.

withstand a gas explosion and that all goes back to an explosion had

:06:12.:06:15.

another tower block in the late 60s here in London which led to a

:06:16.:06:20.

collapse and four debts. Work was supposed to have been carried out on

:06:21.:06:24.

blocks of a similar design to make sure they could withstand that sort

:06:25.:06:28.

of explosion so the council thought these were safe but during this

:06:29.:06:31.

latest inspection it has been revealed but the work probably

:06:32.:06:36.

wasn't actually carried out so an incident almost 50 years ago still

:06:37.:06:41.

having implications, another fine for people to worry about and

:06:42.:06:46.

something which might affect more buildings than just the four here.

:06:47.:06:50.

It looks like there are 242 flights a year that will be affected, people

:06:51.:06:56.

have been given temporary heaters because they have no gas but it's

:06:57.:06:59.

going to need major structural work to make these tower blocks safe.

:07:00.:07:03.

Donations made to the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire are not

:07:04.:07:06.

reaching survivors quickly enough, according to campaigners

:07:07.:07:07.

Figures from the Charity Commission show that

:07:08.:07:15.

raised has been given to people affected almost two months

:07:16.:07:19.

after the tragedy - but it says that early difficulties

:07:20.:07:21.

in identifying and contacting those who need help are being overcome.

:07:22.:07:28.

There's been a sharp fall in the value of shares in the social

:07:29.:07:31.

They fell by nearly 17%, after the owners of the photo

:07:32.:07:35.

messaging app reported more than ?300 million

:07:36.:07:37.

The number of users was lower than expected and market analysts

:07:38.:07:40.

say the company has been struggling with fierce competition from rivals

:07:41.:07:43.

The airports and airlines with the worst summer flight

:07:44.:07:49.

I am sorry, I am always the bearer of bad news, we have been looking at

:07:50.:08:01.

data for airports and airlines over the last couple of summers, it's not

:08:02.:08:08.

good news. One in five flights to and from the UK now has the average

:08:09.:08:13.

delay of 30 minutes and that has been a real concern. 30 minutes in

:08:14.:08:17.

itself is nothing to worry about but it's becoming common. EasyJet is the

:08:18.:08:27.

worst, average delays of 24 minutes. Gatwick is the worst airport for

:08:28.:08:35.

delays, on average 27 minutes. The two things we should say, easyJet

:08:36.:08:40.

say we carry 78 million passengers a year so we are the biggest airlines

:08:41.:08:44.

so we will have more delays, Gatwick says we have one runway and face a

:08:45.:08:49.

lot of congestion when we fly predominantly to Europe and that is

:08:50.:08:53.

where police come into place. Some good news? Yes, if you are

:08:54.:08:58.

travelling from a regional airport chances are be West delayed, Belfast

:08:59.:09:05.

and Leeds Bradford had the least delays. So you might wonder why we

:09:06.:09:08.

still have so many delays well it's the usual combination of air traffic

:09:09.:09:15.

control strikes in France, Spain, Italy and Greece, lots of bad

:09:16.:09:20.

weather which can disrupt things and congestion in the air, we know there

:09:21.:09:24.

is debate about the extra runway at Heathrow and Gatwick just has one

:09:25.:09:28.

runway, so contending with all that airlines are inevitable but the

:09:29.:09:32.

airlines are trying to cut it down. There is also a claim for more

:09:33.:09:36.

compensation, that we should not have to ask for it when there are

:09:37.:09:39.

delays, that it should come automatically. I am sure many would

:09:40.:09:41.

agree. The US Defence Secretary James

:09:42.:09:45.

Mattis says America is still trying to use diplomacy to resolve

:09:46.:09:48.

the growing tension with North Korea -

:09:49.:09:50.

and that war would be catastrophic. He said diplomatic efforts

:09:51.:09:52.

were yielding results, though military options

:09:53.:09:54.

were ready if needed. He made his remarks shortly

:09:55.:09:55.

after President Trump had stepped up his rhetoric -

:09:56.:09:57.

saying his threat to unleash 'fire and fury' on North Korea might not

:09:58.:10:00.

have been tough enough. The American effort has

:10:01.:10:12.

diplomatically lead, it has diplomatic structure and, it is

:10:13.:10:18.

gaining diplomatic results and I want to stay right there, right now.

:10:19.:10:22.

The tragedy of war is well enough known, it does not need another

:10:23.:10:27.

characterisation beyond the fact it would be catastrophic. Lets see what

:10:28.:10:32.

he does with Guam. He does something in Guam it will be an event the

:10:33.:10:38.

likes of which nobody seen before, what will happen in North Korea.

:10:39.:10:40.

Robin Brant is in Seoul for us this morning -

:10:41.:10:47.

People are wondering, how are people they are reacting to this rise in

:10:48.:10:56.

quite aggressive rhetoric? What a contrast in tone, we have said it

:10:57.:11:01.

before and it will not surprise you but life goes on here. There is the

:11:02.:11:04.

potential of conflict with the neighbours to the north for decades

:11:05.:11:08.

and yes the rhetoric has got worse and the president and the White

:11:09.:11:12.

House who speaks like previous presidents have never spoken and a

:11:13.:11:15.

belligerent is coming from Pyongyang as well but nonetheless they face

:11:16.:11:20.

the prospect of a conventional conflict just 35 miles up the road.

:11:21.:11:27.

I think there will be those in South Korea who take some assurances from

:11:28.:11:32.

other words from Donald Trump overnight, he said he did not think

:11:33.:11:37.

North Korea could go around threatening North America but its

:11:38.:11:41.

allies South Korea and Japan which reminds people of the strong

:11:42.:11:44.

military alliance which is important to defend and protect. But this is a

:11:45.:11:50.

country which recently elected a president who is more consolatory in

:11:51.:11:54.

tone and he envisages hopefully bringing the North back to the

:11:55.:11:58.

negotiating table and trying to negotiate a lasting peace and

:11:59.:12:02.

perhaps that is more along the lines of what James Matthews is talking

:12:03.:12:08.

about in terms of their speeding up automatic effort. Banks were

:12:09.:12:12.

keeping. More than two months

:12:13.:12:24.

after the Manchester bombing, which left 22 people dead and more

:12:25.:12:26.

than 100 injured, nine people Robby Potter and his partner

:12:27.:12:29.

Leonora Ogerio were waiting to collect their daughters

:12:30.:12:35.

from the Ariana Grande concert. They were standing right next

:12:36.:12:38.

to the suicide bomber Robby has just been

:12:39.:12:40.

discharged from hospital, and we'll be speaking to him

:12:41.:12:47.

in a moment. First here's our correspondent

:12:48.:12:50.

Judith Moritz with his story. This was Robby Potter

:12:51.:12:53.

with his girlfriend Leonora after They stood next to the attacker

:12:54.:13:00.

and lived to tell the tale. I've never asked his name,

:13:01.:13:07.

I'll never ask his name. No point hating a man

:13:08.:13:18.

that's already dead. They'd gone to collect

:13:19.:13:23.

their kids from the concert. The children were safe inside,

:13:24.:13:30.

but their parents were in the lobby The brightest flash I've

:13:31.:13:32.

ever seen in my life. It was like a cloud of mercury

:13:33.:13:38.

exploding, you just seen bits of silver flying everywhere,

:13:39.:13:41.

which was obviously the bolts and nuts he'd packed

:13:42.:13:43.

into his bag and his body. Eventually just dived,

:13:44.:13:46.

just collapsed and fell on the floor but I found out I'd obviously

:13:47.:13:48.

punctured my lung and had a couple This bolt, fired from the bomb

:13:49.:13:51.

straight into Robbie's heart. He cheated death

:13:52.:13:58.

by a hair's breadth. You can see the two ribs here,

:13:59.:14:02.

that's the back of the ribs. The bolt was removed with incredible

:14:03.:14:06.

precision by this surgeon It was wedged between the back

:14:07.:14:08.

wall and the front wall of the two blood vessels,

:14:09.:14:13.

so a millimetre either way Thankfully it didn't,

:14:14.:14:16.

but we wouldn't be having this One, two, three, four,

:14:17.:14:20.

I declare a thumb war. Robbie's daughter Teagan

:14:21.:14:30.

was separated from her dad Next time she saw him,

:14:31.:14:33.

he was in a coma. She called him names

:14:34.:14:37.

to try and wake him up. It's just hard to see it,

:14:38.:14:40.

with him just lying there, not talking, having machines

:14:41.:14:44.

all over him. Teagan said "Come on,

:14:45.:14:50.

Fathead, it's Peahead." As soon as that happened, the eyes

:14:51.:14:55.

just lifted, and from that day, Robby's girlfriend Leonora was also

:14:56.:15:01.

badly hurt and sedated in hospital. She and Robby each face many

:15:02.:15:09.

months of rehabilitation. Before the blast,

:15:10.:15:13.

Robby played rugby. But he says he's determined that one

:15:14.:15:18.

day he'll play again. Good morning. Good morning. Quite

:15:19.:15:41.

tough watching that back? Big memories. You were discharged from

:15:42.:15:45.

hospital on Tuesday? You have been back home? How is it? To be honest,

:15:46.:15:52.

very strange. I have been used in hospital for almost three months, a

:15:53.:15:56.

shock but I am still getting around. My daughter and dad have been

:15:57.:16:00.

brilliant, the supporters of the rugby club, the whole rugby

:16:01.:16:04.

community. We will talk more about Teagan in a moment. We saw your

:16:05.:16:08.

surgeon, you said an amazing man. Torque is through the business of

:16:09.:16:13.

whether shrapnel was and how close you were to things being so much

:16:14.:16:19.

worse? He explained to me the main one went through my heart. 20

:16:20.:16:24.

millimetres from an artery, but the other bolt, the doctor told me a

:16:25.:16:29.

millimetre either side, as his words were, I would not be here. You said

:16:30.:16:34.

a moment or go that is the difference between new breeding in

:16:35.:16:38.

or breathing out. Whatever I was doing that night, breathing in or

:16:39.:16:42.

breathing out, I would have died, obviously. How is your heart? I went

:16:43.:16:47.

last Wednesday, he is fully impressed with my recovery, I have

:16:48.:16:55.

got my fitness back. I have never smoked, that has helped. The base

:16:56.:16:58.

and you played rugby. You talk about your family and your rugby friends.

:16:59.:17:03.

The rugby club have been brilliant, they have given me my extra

:17:04.:17:10.

strength. The team that I play for have a charity day for me. They have

:17:11.:17:14.

given me strength. So many people have wished me well. When I feel

:17:15.:17:19.

down I think I have to do it for them, they want to be back. It is

:17:20.:17:24.

amazing what family can do. My dad has been amazing, he is 75 and has

:17:25.:17:30.

become like a 25-year-old. He sorted out my bills, we had hassle from the

:17:31.:17:36.

paper press, he dealt with that. Antiguan. Teagan the tiger. She has

:17:37.:17:48.

been so mature, she had to walk through at the end, walking past her

:17:49.:17:51.

dad lying on the floor dead, she has walked through a battlefield. We

:17:52.:17:54.

heard reference to the time when you were in hospital and she was trying

:17:55.:17:57.

to help bring you around, talking to you. Presumably you remember

:17:58.:18:01.

nothing? For three weeks lots of people came and talked over me, I

:18:02.:18:05.

was completely out of it, I did not breathe when I was off the machines,

:18:06.:18:09.

I relied on the machines. When I was semi coming round my father tried

:18:10.:18:14.

talking to me, I did not respond, Teagan came in, she called me

:18:15.:18:21.

Fathead and said it was Peahead. Did it have an impact? It opened my

:18:22.:18:26.

eyes. In the first time for over three weeks I saw clear. And she was

:18:27.:18:31.

there? The little Tiger was there and asked me for a sum wrestle

:18:32.:18:38.

straightaway. It is ?1 a go! We can have a game but I will take your

:18:39.:18:43.

money. We saw a picture of your partner Leonora in hospital with

:18:44.:18:49.

you. What happened? You and Leonora were in the lobby? In the foyer

:18:50.:18:56.

area. Both your little girls were in the concert? Thankfully away from

:18:57.:19:00.

that part? She finished late, that probably saved hundreds of kids. How

:19:01.:19:07.

is Teagan and Leonora? She has been brilliant, never missed a day of

:19:08.:19:11.

school, she came to see me all the time, she helps me get around, she

:19:12.:19:15.

even pushed me in a wheelchair. She has good arms on her! She has been a

:19:16.:19:25.

star. Everybody listening to your story, I am getting a sense of your

:19:26.:19:28.

personality already. You are one of those people, you joke about

:19:29.:19:32.

things... You've got to a life, haven't you? How are you, I suppose

:19:33.:19:37.

there's what I am asking. People who have been through such a terrible

:19:38.:19:43.

event, your family as well, what has been the impact? I still think about

:19:44.:19:47.

all the time, sometimes I feel a bit guilty because my girlfriend is

:19:48.:19:51.

still in hospital, what I put Teagan through, having to walk through a

:19:52.:19:54.

minefield, it is something she always wanted to see, that concert.

:19:55.:20:03.

I can still see the blast in my head. I have had counselling, which

:20:04.:20:05.

is coming on pretty good. I still have lots of rehab to do with my

:20:06.:20:09.

nerves in my leg, the good thing is my heart is OK. The NHS have been

:20:10.:20:13.

brilliant, from the doctors to the cleaners, they would bring me a cup

:20:14.:20:18.

of tea every morning. The Porter used to sneak a few bets on because

:20:19.:20:23.

I could not get Sky Bet on, I should not mention not, sorry! They gave me

:20:24.:20:32.

strength. It is like the river, it is not the power of the river that

:20:33.:20:36.

breaks the rock down, it is the persistence of the river. My friends

:20:37.:20:39.

and family have give me that persistence. I've got to get back to

:20:40.:20:44.

work, I've got to play rugby again. They have taken nothing from me. The

:20:45.:20:48.

biggest thing is I have to get my confidence up to go to a concert

:20:49.:20:53.

again. It has been amazing talking to you this morning. Thank you so

:20:54.:20:57.

much. We met Teagan earlier and she looks like she is in great form and

:20:58.:21:02.

a great support, as is all your family, and we wish you all the best

:21:03.:21:12.

with your recovery. I am sure you will get to that concert. I hope so.

:21:13.:21:13.

Thank you very much. Sarah's bringing us the weather

:21:14.:21:16.

from the Bristol International This is the 39th International

:21:17.:21:26.

balloon Festival in Bristol, the largest annual gathering of hot air

:21:27.:21:31.

balloons in Europe. We have already seen 104 balloons taking off in the

:21:32.:21:35.

morning Mass ascent. Bullying is still behind me, tethered at the

:21:36.:21:38.

moment, we have some miniature model balloons. This event runs over four

:21:39.:21:45.

days, it is free to attend and we expect to see about half a million

:21:46.:21:48.

people visiting. It is a tranquil start to the day

:21:49.:21:53.

with sunshine and light winds. Elsewhere across the country we

:21:54.:21:58.

expect a bit of rain. There is a weather front moving from west to

:21:59.:22:02.

east. This morning's weather looks fine and dry across Bristol and much

:22:03.:22:06.

of southern and central England, with sunshine and light winds.

:22:07.:22:12.

A bit cloud, particularly across the south-east of England, temperatures

:22:13.:22:16.

warming into the mid teens. Northwards across the country,

:22:17.:22:20.

sunshine across much of the Midlands and into northern England, but some

:22:21.:22:23.

rain for parts of Cumbria and Northumberland through the morning.

:22:24.:22:28.

That continues into southern Scotland. Eastern Scotland should

:22:29.:22:33.

see brightness, heavy rain for the West of Scotland. Quite windy as

:22:34.:22:37.

well. For Northern Ireland, looking pretty cloudy with outbreaks of

:22:38.:22:41.

rain. Some of that will push into West and Wales, central and East

:22:42.:22:44.

Wales are fine and dry with sunshine across much of the West Country. We

:22:45.:22:48.

will see rain pushing and across parts of Corbel through the morning.

:22:49.:22:52.

This band of rain across the North and the West of the country edges

:22:53.:22:57.

slowly south eastwards through the course of the day. For the

:22:58.:23:02.

south-east of England and East Anglia you should avoid the wet

:23:03.:23:04.

weather through much of the day, staying dry with temperatures up to

:23:05.:23:07.

around 22 degrees in the south-east. Elsewhere typically 17 to 19 with

:23:08.:23:11.

cloud quite breezy with the outbreaks of rain. It will turn to

:23:12.:23:15.

showery weather from the north-west later in the day. Heading into the

:23:16.:23:19.

evening, that band of rain and strong winds pushes gradually

:23:20.:23:24.

towards the south-east and clearer skies with some showers as we head

:23:25.:23:28.

to the cause tonight. Most of those showers will ease away and the winds

:23:29.:23:32.

for lighter overnight, temperatures down to 13 to 15 in the towns and

:23:33.:23:37.

cities but a bit colder in the countryside. Saturday morning for

:23:38.:23:42.

many gets off to a fine start with sunshine, some showers on Saturday

:23:43.:23:45.

across parts of northern England, Wales and Scotland, many of us will

:23:46.:23:50.

avoid the showers altogether, so not a bad day. Winds easing and

:23:51.:23:56.

temperatures around 16 to 22 degrees on Saturday. High-pressure staying

:23:57.:24:00.

with us into the second half of the weekend. Sunday should be another

:24:01.:24:04.

mostly dry day, we could catch the odd rogue shower in the East but

:24:05.:24:11.

many places again avoiding the showers. Light winds, sunshine and

:24:12.:24:14.

temperatures around 16 to 22. The weekend looks fine and dry, but for

:24:15.:24:19.

many you will see rain and winds arriving later today. That is how it

:24:20.:24:23.

is looking, back to Charlie and Naga.

:24:24.:24:27.

STUDIO: We don't mind a little bit but it would be nice if we crept

:24:28.:24:30.

back into those temperatures, is there any hint of that in the

:24:31.:24:34.

long-term forecast at all? It is looking a bit better through next

:24:35.:24:38.

week, we have had some really unsettled conditions over the past

:24:39.:24:42.

three weeks, some optimism, particularly in the south the

:24:43.:24:45.

weather looks settled. I have been fascinated by the square

:24:46.:24:50.

hot-air balloon. How does it keep that shape?

:24:51.:24:56.

All I was thinking earlier is that regular blues that you blow up

:24:57.:25:01.

naturally, you can't buy a square one. Logic tells me that all

:25:02.:25:06.

balloons should be... Anyway, there will be an answer somewhere, it is

:25:07.:25:10.

me thinking out loud. I would think putting seems in a

:25:11.:25:14.

rubber balloon would be difficult. Sarah, will you get a ride? Will we

:25:15.:25:20.

get the forecast from the air? I have been up, only in a tethered

:25:21.:25:24.

balloon. About ten feet off the ground or so. I don't know if I will

:25:25.:25:28.

be lucky enough to take to the skies. We will be chatting to the

:25:29.:25:33.

festival's founder later in the morning, we will see what he says.

:25:34.:25:37.

Use your charm! Thank you, we will speak later. If

:25:38.:25:42.

the weather is nice and you by the seaside, may be looking for things

:25:43.:25:46.

on the beach, look at this in Norfolk. The wide shot does not do

:25:47.:25:53.

it justice, as it closes in, this is a gigantic pipe that has washed up

:25:54.:25:57.

on the shore. The Maritime and coastguard agency confirmed two

:25:58.:26:01.

other measuring eight feet in diameter, you can see a tiny person,

:26:02.:26:07.

get a sense of scale. This is the plugged end. They were

:26:08.:26:13.

being told, they untethered. They were around 1500 feet long, being

:26:14.:26:17.

towed to North Africa. Apparently there are another ten lots of these

:26:18.:26:22.

pipe segments still at sea. They pose no danger or risk of pollution

:26:23.:26:26.

or whatever, but they are impressive.

:26:27.:26:29.

As fines on the beach go, that is quite big!

:26:30.:26:34.

And 8-foot wide diameter, 1500 feet, perfect pipes for running through.

:26:35.:26:38.

We have asked if you have had similar incidents happening to you,

:26:39.:26:43.

things you have found on the beach. Let us know, send them in. I don't

:26:44.:26:47.

think anyone else will have found a pipe like that! But you get some

:26:48.:26:52.

funny things washed up on the beach. We will show your pictures a little

:26:53.:26:54.

later. Time to get the news, travel and

:26:55.:26:56.

where you are. Now, though, it's back

:26:57.:30:17.

to Charlie and Naga. Hello this is Breakfast with

:30:18.:30:19.

Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty. It is 8:30am. The main stories this

:30:20.:30:30.

morning... An emergency meeting is being called

:30:31.:30:36.

by the EU to discuss the Europe-wide Here, the Food Standards Agency has

:30:37.:30:39.

revealed that 700,000 contaminated eggs have been imported

:30:40.:30:42.

from Dutch farms, but it insists it is "highly unlikely" they pose

:30:43.:30:45.

any risk to human health. Sandwiches and salads are among

:30:46.:30:48.

the foods that have now been removed The director of the Institute

:30:49.:30:51.

for Global Food Safety, Chris Elliott, told BBC Breakfast

:30:52.:30:58.

that the involvement of Europol I think even more significant than

:30:59.:31:01.

the work of the European Commission is the work of Europol,

:31:02.:31:08.

the European police force. So they're now conducting

:31:09.:31:10.

a European wide investigation, to see how far this illegal

:31:11.:31:13.

use has spread. There is a potential that other

:31:14.:31:17.

member states may become embroiled in this scandal over

:31:18.:31:20.

the next few days. So I guess what everybody is trying

:31:21.:31:25.

to do is to find out the level of the amount of abuse that

:31:26.:31:35.

has gone on, where have those products gone to,

:31:36.:31:37.

to and can they be withdrawn Not only across Europe,

:31:38.:31:40.

but right across the world. The US Defence Secretary James

:31:41.:31:43.

Mattis says America is still trying to use diplomacy to resolve

:31:44.:31:45.

the growing tension with North Korea, and that war

:31:46.:31:47.

would be catastrophic. He said diplomatic efforts

:31:48.:31:49.

were yielding results, though military options

:31:50.:31:51.

were ready if needed. He made his remarks shortly

:31:52.:31:54.

after President Trump had stepped up his rhetoric,

:31:55.:31:56.

saying his threat to unleash "fire and fury" on North Korea might not

:31:57.:31:58.

have been tough enough. Canada's foreign ministry

:31:59.:32:05.

is investigating why at least one of its diplomats stationed in Cuba

:32:06.:32:08.

has needed treatment Yesterday it emerged American

:32:09.:32:11.

diplomats in Havana have experienced Media reports suggest Cuban agents

:32:12.:32:14.

may have used a sonic device that Havana denies the allegation,

:32:15.:32:21.

but the US has expelled two Cuban diplomats from Washington DC

:32:22.:32:26.

in retaliation. American singer Taylor Swift

:32:27.:32:31.

has told a US court that she was sexually assaulted

:32:32.:32:34.

by a radio DJ four years ago, Yesterday the singer took

:32:35.:32:37.

the stand in the trial, which began in Denver

:32:38.:32:41.

earlier this week. The 27-year-old, who is suing DJ

:32:42.:32:46.

David Mueller over the incident, told the court he had

:32:47.:32:49.

grabbed her as she met fans ahead And coming up here

:32:50.:32:52.

on Breakfast this morning... 132 balloons have gathered and

:32:53.:33:16.

shooting off very fast. Inflating in a matter of seconds and tearing into

:33:17.:33:19.

the sky. Some incredible inflation.

:33:20.:33:21.

It was heavier than 10 adult African elephants and longer

:33:22.:33:23.

Could this dinosaur be the biggest creature ever

:33:24.:33:30.

And after 9, from winning elections to mapping our personalities,

:33:31.:33:35.

could Silicon Valley's promise to build a better world

:33:36.:33:37.

There were some shocks last night at the world athletics Championships.

:33:38.:33:53.

Jess is that the stadium. The sun is shining, morning session starting,

:33:54.:33:56.

not long now? Yes, final preparations getting on underway.

:33:57.:34:03.

One thing we are excited about is Dina Asher-Smith. She was at the

:34:04.:34:08.

London 2012 Olympics and here she is five years later, bracing against

:34:09.:34:12.

some of the world's best. She had a tough season and broke her foot in

:34:13.:34:16.

February but has been impressing in these championships. Once again, in

:34:17.:34:21.

the semifinals last night, she dazzled us again. She finished

:34:22.:34:24.

second in that semifinal and went through to deny's final as an

:34:25.:34:28.

automatic qualifier. She is the only British woman to be in that

:34:29.:34:29.

showpiece. I completely broke my foot, which

:34:30.:34:38.

was not great, I had had surgery to put two screws in there and spend

:34:39.:34:43.

six weeks putting no weight on it and gradually putting weight on it

:34:44.:34:46.

over the next six weeks. Three months I was completely out of

:34:47.:34:50.

pretty much walking. Then I learned to walk and here I am! So it wasn't

:34:51.:34:55.

that bad. I'm joking, I wouldn't recommend it, it was no fun!

:34:56.:35:02.

And also in action was Isaac Makwala. No fairy tale ending for

:35:03.:35:07.

him. He could only manage sixth place. You will remember Isaac

:35:08.:35:12.

Makwala was. Missed the final of the 400 metres because of illness and

:35:13.:35:16.

had to run a time trial just to get through in the 200. Having made the

:35:17.:35:19.

final he was in contention around the bend but couldn't hang on.

:35:20.:35:28.

Turkey won the race. Mitchell Blake from Britain finished fourth.

:35:29.:35:32.

Makwala blamed his performance on having had to run two braces the day

:35:33.:35:38.

before. Laura Muir qualified for the final of the 5000 metres, one of the

:35:39.:35:43.

fastest losers in her semifinal, after finishing fourth in the 1500

:35:44.:35:44.

metres. Katarina Johnson-Thompson has gone

:35:45.:35:53.

some way to making up for her disappointing performance

:35:54.:35:55.

in the heptathlon, she made the final of

:35:56.:35:57.

the individual high jump. Where she will be joined

:35:58.:35:59.

by Morgan Lake who also cleared Let's have a quick look

:36:00.:36:02.

at what's been going on away And the Premier League returns

:36:03.:36:07.

tonight with Arsenal playing Arsenal haven't won their opening

:36:08.:36:10.

game since 2014, and manager Arsene Wenger knows they need

:36:11.:36:17.

to change that. The preparation of

:36:18.:36:27.

the squad looks good. We need to transform the quality

:36:28.:36:35.

of the preparation into points. What matters is the next game

:36:36.:36:38.

and winning it and starting in a strong way, which we

:36:39.:36:42.

did not do last year. That is what we want

:36:43.:36:45.

to achieve this year. In golf, Rory McIlroy said

:36:46.:36:51.

"the course played tricky", after his opening round at the USPGA

:36:52.:36:54.

Championship. He dropped three shots in two holes,

:36:55.:36:56.

to finish the day five shots behind leaders Thorbjorn Olesen

:36:57.:37:00.

and Kevin Kisner. Back at the world athletics

:37:01.:37:08.

Championships, I'm delighted to say I am joined by the two time world

:37:09.:37:15.

Champion hurdle Colin Jackson. Thank you for joining us. British athletes

:37:16.:37:21.

in a moment, but Makwala, he has become one of the stars of these

:37:22.:37:24.

championships. It just seemed like it was a step too far for him. What

:37:25.:37:29.

did you make of his performance? I think it was an emotional

:37:30.:37:32.

roller-coaster, from his illness, being out of the event, but back in,

:37:33.:37:35.

running a time trial, it was something he wasn't really prepared

:37:36.:37:39.

for a diesel Championships to do. Of course, when you are physically

:37:40.:37:43.

tired anyway and emotionally drained, you end up with the

:37:44.:37:48.

performance he gave. The crowd appreciated it, gave a massive round

:37:49.:37:52.

of applause, and I hope he leaves with a better taste of athletics in

:37:53.:37:56.

his mouth. The British fans will be looking forward to Dina Asher-Smith.

:37:57.:38:00.

She has impressed in these championships, what have you made of

:38:01.:38:03.

Marcello inspirational. At the beginning of the year we thought her

:38:04.:38:06.

track season was over, we didn't expect to see her here, even in the

:38:07.:38:11.

relay squad. To make the relay tonight is phenomenal. I had she

:38:12.:38:15.

really appreciate what she has done. Making the final is pretty special,

:38:16.:38:25.

especially in her circumstances. Hopefully she will win a medal,

:38:26.:38:27.

British fans will be hoping for that. Last night in the 400 meter,

:38:28.:38:30.

the British team still only with one metal and the target was at least

:38:31.:38:34.

six. How worried should British fans be? I don't think we can make the

:38:35.:38:38.

target of six now, let's be realistic. I think sometimes you

:38:39.:38:43.

need a little luck on your side. We have had four fourth-places, which

:38:44.:38:51.

if you turned a flick could be four bronze medals. At the start of the

:38:52.:38:54.

championship I said we would have many fourth places and fifth places

:38:55.:38:57.

we should celebrate. It is still a developing team and with that in

:38:58.:39:00.

mind is developing and hungry team and we have more promise. Don't give

:39:01.:39:06.

up on them yet. You have won medals at this level, what is the British

:39:07.:39:10.

team missing Mark Gold sometimes you need a little luck as well. You need

:39:11.:39:14.

it all to go right. You need that spark of little luck which will make

:39:15.:39:19.

a difference. We know it is a transition in sport across the whole

:39:20.:39:22.

world but everybody, vertebrae, who is coming through, has performed.

:39:23.:39:26.

When you're not really in the top one or two, that's when it difficult

:39:27.:39:34.

to win those medals. The women's long jump final, any time of a

:39:35.:39:38.

podium finish, what is your prediction? Yes, there is a chance,

:39:39.:39:42.

absolutely. One of the best long jumpers in the world, not just

:39:43.:39:46.

because she has made final, but one of the best, she has potential. You

:39:47.:39:51.

only need one or two of the favourites to kick the plaster scene

:39:52.:39:54.

at the wrong time. What I was saying about luck, you just need that

:39:55.:39:58.

little bit on your side. Again, don't write her off. Colin, thank

:39:59.:40:05.

you for joining us on Breakfast. You heard it there, possibility of two

:40:06.:40:09.

British medals tonight with Dina Asher-Smith in the 200 and Lorraine

:40:10.:40:12.

going in the women's long jump. We have to keep our fingers crossed, I

:40:13.:40:16.

think. Absolutely, thank you, Jessica. Run

:40:17.:40:21.

fast and jump a long way. And win medals! It couldn't be more

:40:22.:40:22.

simple, could it? The British Athletics team are back

:40:23.:40:25.

in action on day eight of the World Athletics

:40:26.:40:27.

Championships. Here are some of the moments

:40:28.:40:28.

you might not want to miss. So our ones to watch starts

:40:29.:40:33.

with Tiffany Porter. A bronze medallist in 2013,the

:40:34.:40:46.

29-year-old wants to make it Robbie Grabarz should breeze

:40:47.:40:49.

through this preliminary stage. He wants to replicate London 2012,

:40:50.:40:55.

when he got bronze. Only one British woman made it

:40:56.:40:58.

through to the final. She hopes to back up her European

:40:59.:41:00.

indoor silver medal in March She competed in 2016 in Rio,

:41:01.:41:09.

when she came sixth. Nick Miller qualified

:41:10.:41:20.

automatically for the final. The silver-medallist made it

:41:21.:41:31.

with his first throw. Dina Asher-Smith made it

:41:32.:41:33.

into the 200 metre final. She broke her foot in February

:41:34.:41:35.

and the prognosis was grim. But her comeback has

:41:36.:41:38.

been incredible. If you want to keep up

:41:39.:41:42.

with the action, tune in to BBC Two And then hop over to

:41:43.:41:49.

BBC One until 10pm. And finally, BBC Two

:41:50.:41:57.

for the last hour of coverage. Could actually sit in all day

:41:58.:42:11.

watching the sport. It has been known before! It is 8:42am.

:42:12.:42:13.

The number of primary school children in England being excluded

:42:14.:42:16.

and sent to specialist schools known as Pupil Referral Units

:42:17.:42:18.

Research by BBC Breakfast has found more than 1,300 young children

:42:19.:42:22.

are now being taught in this way, a rise of 66-percent in five years.

:42:23.:42:26.

Although overall pupil numbers have gone up,

:42:27.:42:28.

that doesn't account for the increase.

:42:29.:42:31.

Breakfast's John Maguire visited a specialist centre in Norfolk.

:42:32.:42:40.

Which surface will the car travel over quickest...

:42:41.:42:42.

Engaging lessons, artwork on the wall and positive measures

:42:43.:42:49.

everywhere - all typical of a primary school.

:42:50.:42:51.

But Brooklands is different, a Pupil Referral Unit,

:42:52.:42:55.

Children in Norfolk come here if they have been excluded

:42:56.:43:03.

or are deemed too challenging to be taught by their original primary.

:43:04.:43:06.

We spoke to some about why they left their old school,

:43:07.:43:09.

and we are protecting their identity.

:43:10.:43:10.

I have been thought a lot about maths.

:43:11.:43:19.

Latest figures show 13,068 are being taught in similar schools

:43:20.:43:27.

in England, an increase of 66% over the last five years,

:43:28.:43:40.

although the number of primary aged children overall has risen.

:43:41.:43:43.

Here at Brooklands they believe one reason is the pressure

:43:44.:43:45.

At the same time they have teachers told, we don't have the money

:43:46.:43:51.

I don't think any head teacher wants to do that.

:43:52.:44:01.

Faced with the culture that we have at the moment,

:44:02.:44:03.

Norfolk County Council says exclusions have dropped,

:44:04.:44:06.

but are still too high, and continue to create pressure

:44:07.:44:09.

It is working with schools to address the issue.

:44:10.:44:14.

This parent is happy with the education and support her

:44:15.:44:22.

son receives at Brooklands, but believes there should have been

:44:23.:44:24.

a better understanding of his condition at his old primary,

:44:25.:44:27.

and a place for him at a special school.

:44:28.:44:29.

He has autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

:44:30.:44:31.

I was upset because he was being classed as a naughty child.

:44:32.:44:34.

When they were restraining him, he would have bruises on his arms

:44:35.:44:39.

Sometimes he would be locked in a room, kicking

:44:40.:44:43.

I felt like every day I was sending my child

:44:44.:44:48.

Some experts believe cuts in the help for families

:44:49.:44:54.

who need extra support is one of the reasons

:44:55.:44:56.

for an increase in the use of Pupil Referral Units.

:44:57.:44:59.

If those support services are not there, either in helping teachers

:45:00.:45:04.

cope with some of those issues that exhibit themselves in the classroom,

:45:05.:45:08.

or some other feelings young people have about schools,

:45:09.:45:11.

or some feelings they about themselves, then I think we need

:45:12.:45:14.

The Government says children in referral units represent 0.03%

:45:15.:45:20.

These schools ensure children receive a high quality education.

:45:21.:45:29.

As a shortstay school, Brooklands is designed to teach

:45:30.:45:31.

children for just two terms, but now has some for up

:45:32.:45:34.

It is highly effective in returning pupils to mainstream or special

:45:35.:45:41.

schools, and here they believe every child deserves a second chance

:45:42.:45:44.

and must be given every chance to succeed.

:45:45.:46:01.

We've been live all morning at the Bristol

:46:02.:46:03.

We have just recorded this very obviously it pleaded up. People are

:46:04.:46:19.

buzzing round -- speeded up. They pop up, and the they go, into the

:46:20.:46:26.

sky. It is quite sudden, they lay there, and then suddenly they go up

:46:27.:46:33.

quickly. That is what happens when a balloon pops up. That is exactly

:46:34.:46:39.

what happens. Lots of noises with the balloons, the fans, the burner

:46:40.:46:44.

and it's a gorgeous morning here at the 39th International Bristol

:46:45.:46:50.

balloon festival and I'm lucky to be joined by the founder of the Fiesta.

:46:51.:46:56.

This is the 39th year of the Fiesta. How much has it changed since you

:46:57.:47:05.

started? We just have to burn a bit to keep the balloon up. It certainly

:47:06.:47:09.

has changed. We started doing this in a pub and decided to run an event

:47:10.:47:19.

and we had about a dozen balloons and there was no showground at that

:47:20.:47:26.

time. I think we had one wagon which served some breakfast. Bristol is

:47:27.:47:31.

really known as the capital of ballooning in the UK. How important

:47:32.:47:35.

is it that we continue to see the Fiesta every year? I think it's very

:47:36.:47:40.

important. We have the biggest balloon factory in Bristol and this

:47:41.:47:46.

is not the world's biggest meeting, but it's one of the biggest. It's

:47:47.:47:53.

quite a interesting activity. Yes, great conditions this morning. Ideal

:47:54.:47:56.

ballooning weather? A bit too breezy? Light winds is what we need.

:47:57.:48:01.

Not too much. It's been perfect this morning and we have seen all the

:48:02.:48:07.

balloons taking off, a or so of them. A beautiful morning. -- 150 or

:48:08.:48:13.

so. Thanks for joining us. It is a gorgeous morning, and you might hear

:48:14.:48:17.

the burner going off from time to time but across the rest of the UK

:48:18.:48:21.

it's mostly a fine start for many of us across England and Wales that

:48:22.:48:27.

there will be some rain at times, so tranquil, Serena, but elsewhere the

:48:28.:48:32.

weather front will move in from west to east across the country. There

:48:33.:48:36.

will be spells of rain at times and some brisk winds around as well.

:48:37.:48:39.

This morning it is a beautiful morning across much of England and

:48:40.:48:45.

Wales and the south and east there will be more cloud drifting around

:48:46.:48:47.

here and there and temperatures in the mid teens. As we had further

:48:48.:48:53.

north and through the Midlands and in parts of England, some sunshine

:48:54.:48:59.

through the course of the morning but there will be rain for the likes

:49:00.:49:03.

of Cumbria and pushing into Scotland. A bit of brightness, and

:49:04.:49:10.

in western Scotland outbreaks of rain and in Northern Ireland we will

:49:11.:49:14.

seek cloud and ad breaks of rain. Pushing across the West of Wales,

:49:15.:49:19.

but in Central and East Wales we will start dry with blue skies. Rain

:49:20.:49:24.

pushing into parts of the Isles of Scilly, but elsewhere in the

:49:25.:49:26.

south-west it's a dry morning to come. As we move through the course

:49:27.:49:31.

of the day the front across North and west will shift further east,

:49:32.:49:37.

but for the far south-east of England you will likely stay dry for

:49:38.:49:42.

a good part of the day with temperatures at 22 degrees,

:49:43.:49:45.

elsewhere, 17 or 19 Celsius but quite breezy and windy at times with

:49:46.:49:51.

the rain around as well. Into the evening hours, we will see the front

:49:52.:49:55.

moving across the south-east and East Anglia as well. That will be

:49:56.:49:58.

followed by clearer spells and scattered showers heading in from

:49:59.:50:02.

the North West. Overnight most of the showers will die away and the

:50:03.:50:05.

winds will ease away as well with temperatures around 13 up to 15

:50:06.:50:10.

degrees. Through the courts on Saturday we are set to see a view

:50:11.:50:15.

showers across parts of northern England, Wales, and into Scotland,

:50:16.:50:18.

but most of us should avoid them. And we will see the temperatures by

:50:19.:50:24.

Saturday afternoon, in the sunny spells, between 16 or 22 degrees, so

:50:25.:50:29.

fairly decent conditions. The high pressure should stay with us until

:50:30.:50:33.

the second part of the weekend, so through Saturday and overnight and

:50:34.:50:37.

into Sunday, fairly fine weather on the cards and are mostly dry day to

:50:38.:50:41.

come on Sunday with sunshine, although we could catch the odd

:50:42.:50:45.

shower here and there. But lighter winds and in the sunny spells we

:50:46.:50:50.

will see the temperatures up to 16 or 22 degrees. Some fine weather to

:50:51.:50:54.

look forward to, and that is it from here at the Bristol balloon Fiesta.

:50:55.:50:58.

As more air is pumped into the balloon, it has been marvellous

:50:59.:51:04.

talking and seeing all the balloons. That is the only one near the

:51:05.:51:08.

ground. The rest are taken off, I think. Sarah, thank you very much.

:51:09.:51:11.

It's been just over a month since six-year-old Bradley Lowery

:51:12.:51:14.

died after battling a rare form of cancer.

:51:15.:51:19.

The Sunderland fan won a legion of supporters across the country,

:51:20.:51:22.

Now, in his first interview since Bradley's death,

:51:23.:51:25.

Jermain told the BBC how he's been inspired by his "best mate".

:51:26.:51:29.

They were best friends and it was a friendship

:51:30.:51:35.

which captured the hearts of everyone.

:51:36.:51:38.

I have a nice picture in the house of me and Bradley

:51:39.:51:40.

He loved me, I loved him and after seeing his eyes,

:51:41.:52:02.

it was genuine because he was a child.

:52:03.:52:11.

There was nothing I could give him apart from just being a friend.

:52:12.:52:15.

Even towards the end, when he was really struggling

:52:16.:52:19.

and he couldn't really move, I would walk into the room

:52:20.:52:21.

and he would just jump up and his mum said,

:52:22.:52:26.

"He hasn't moved all day," so yeah, it was a special feeling.

:52:27.:52:32.

The emotion is still raw but the impact the little boy has

:52:33.:52:34.

The Bournemouth striker says it is a gift and he will

:52:35.:52:40.

I always wake up thinking, you know, if you don't feel well,

:52:41.:52:49.

Because I can see little kids suffer like that and still fight,

:52:50.:52:54.

to me, there is no bigger motivation.

:52:55.:53:00.

You walked out with him so many times.

:53:01.:53:10.

Risley England the moment the best? -- was the England moment the best?

:53:11.:53:18.

I came down the tunnel, gave him a cuddle.

:53:19.:53:31.

For him to do that, that was special.

:53:32.:53:35.

And we walked out, standing there, singing the national anthem.

:53:36.:53:37.

Being involved in the squad and actually playing, and scoring...

:53:38.:53:40.

For me, it's one of the best moments of my career.

:53:41.:53:44.

Jermain Defoe was talking to Juliette Ferrington and you can

:53:45.:53:46.

see the whole of that interview on Football Focus,

:53:47.:53:48.

We've been talking about body image anxiety this morning.

:53:49.:53:57.

Apparently there's lots of it around in the summer as people

:53:58.:54:01.

post their holiday selfies from the beach.

:54:02.:54:04.

Earlier this week, former Vogue editor

:54:05.:54:07.

Alexandra Shulman posted one selfie that sparked lots of debate

:54:08.:54:11.

as to whether we should edit our pics, or leave them

:54:12.:54:13.

Now a Parliamentary Group on Body Image, has told Breakfast

:54:14.:54:21.

it is particularly concerned about 'body image anxiety' amongst young

:54:22.:54:24.

Joining us now is Natasha Devon, a writer and body image campaigner

:54:25.:54:30.

and Kady McDermott a reality TV star who has almost 1 million

:54:31.:54:33.

Good morning to you both. The reason we said how many Instagram followers

:54:34.:54:46.

you have, and you post pictures of yourself on the social media -based

:54:47.:54:50.

tool, and people look to you to either get ideas or for inspiration

:54:51.:54:54.

or in aspirational terms. We will show some of your pictures that are

:54:55.:54:59.

there at the moment. The question is, do you edit them? Do you feel to

:55:00.:55:06.

them? And if so, why? My work is through social media that is how I

:55:07.:55:13.

do my business, but I would be lying if I said I didn't put a filter on.

:55:14.:55:18.

I think we all like a filter that smooths you out. Newcombe play with

:55:19.:55:27.

the brightness and contrast. But I don't edit features or my body. You

:55:28.:55:32.

don't slim your waist or a accentuate your breasts or anything

:55:33.:55:40.

like that? No. Just a filter. Is there a real distinction between

:55:41.:55:43.

filtering and editing, because if you are filtering, it is the same

:55:44.:55:49.

thing? It is all on a spectrum. Things like angles and lighting can

:55:50.:55:52.

make a dramatic difference to the way you look, but when you get into

:55:53.:56:00.

the kind of territory that Kady is talking about, changing your

:56:01.:56:02.

physical features, that makes it more dramatic. It's important to

:56:03.:56:06.

bear in mind, because we are putting a lot of focus on Kady, and you are

:56:07.:56:11.

just one person, a doctor who is an expert in this field talks about how

:56:12.:56:15.

the impact of it is cumulative, how we are all a part of it and we all

:56:16.:56:20.

have a social responsibility. Young people, girls in particular, but

:56:21.:56:23.

children of all genders are growing up in a culture where they get the

:56:24.:56:26.

message that have a look is the most important thing about them but

:56:27.:56:29.

physical perfection is a necessity and that they are going to fail and

:56:30.:56:36.

that has an impact on all kinds of areas of their life, not just when

:56:37.:56:39.

they look in the mirror. We have had response from the viewers.

:56:40.:56:41.

No wrinkles and all, I post pictures as I am.

:56:42.:56:46.

Why can't women celebrate themselves as they are?"

:56:47.:56:53.

Kady, what do you think? If people want to post photos being natural, I

:56:54.:57:05.

was at 1am on snap chat and I'm comfortable both ways. But if

:57:06.:57:08.

someone makes them self feel better putting a filter on, if they feel

:57:09.:57:12.

more confident, why shouldn't they? Is the counterargument is the reason

:57:13.:57:15.

they need to make themselves feel better is because they look at

:57:16.:57:20.

people who look amazing and perhaps a bit unreal online, so they think

:57:21.:57:24.

they have to live up to that perfection? I think this is a

:57:25.:57:29.

conversation about what we value as a culture and society, but the most

:57:30.:57:34.

recent girl guide attitude survey found girls as young as five

:57:35.:57:38.

believed that society values them more on how they look than their

:57:39.:57:42.

achievements and I think that is a scary statistic. We need to start

:57:43.:57:47.

celebrating people what they do and say rather than more superficial

:57:48.:57:50.

concerns. It is fine to be proud of how you look and it's fine to use

:57:51.:57:54.

fitness, fashion and beauty for self-expression but it should not

:57:55.:57:57.

dictate how we are perceived. Years the equivalent, before social media

:57:58.:58:03.

and before you had digital cameras, you would self select pictures, and

:58:04.:58:10.

this was outdated, but pictures you put on your mantelpiece. You would

:58:11.:58:14.

pick the ones you liked most. And this is kind of the same thing and

:58:15.:58:21.

you would naturally choose pictures that reflects you the best. It is

:58:22.:58:27.

always about lighting and style as well. When I promote something on my

:58:28.:58:32.

social media or take a photo, I will take it from this site because I

:58:33.:58:42.

think it is my better side. It's so weird that you say that, because I

:58:43.:58:47.

am trying to angle it. Can you see any difference? People don't have to

:58:48.:58:53.

edit things. I don't believe in editing things. People ask if I edit

:58:54.:58:59.

my eyes? I have people accuse me of all sorts and I've had comments like

:59:00.:59:03.

that today, but it is about your angling and stuff. What is your best

:59:04.:59:10.

side? Turnaround that way, keep going, keep going. You want the back

:59:11.:59:18.

of my head? That one there. We have to show some selfies that people

:59:19.:59:19.

sent in. Georgie sent this selfie,

:59:20.:59:20.

which she hasn't done anything too, but she thinks it is up

:59:21.:59:23.

to the person what they want And James snapped this

:59:24.:59:25.

as he watched us - saying we should be comfortable

:59:26.:59:29.

with how we look without Going back to what you said about it

:59:30.:59:44.

being human nature, yes it is, but we need to ask if social media

:59:45.:59:49.

appeals to the better aspects of us. My favourite quote about social

:59:50.:59:53.

media is it allows you to compare your reality with others highlights

:59:54.:59:57.

reel. We will leave it on that thought, thank you very much.

:59:58.:00:03.

From hailing a minicab to sharing images and news stories with French

:00:04.:00:09.

club -- with friends, the modern world is about staying connected,

:00:10.:00:12.

but could the technology that allows us to do this have more sinister

:00:13.:00:14.

effect on our lives? A new documentary series questions

:00:15.:00:18.

the power Silicon Valley - home to some of the world's largest

:00:19.:00:20.

tech giants such as Facebook, We'll speak to the show's presenter,

:00:21.:00:23.

journalist Jamie Bartlett, in a moment but first let's take

:00:24.:00:26.

a look. Our time is the holy grail of

:00:27.:00:34.

Silicon Valley. Here's what my life looks like on a typical day. Can I

:00:35.:00:43.

have a flat white please? Like more and more of us, my phone

:00:44.:00:49.

is my gateway to the online world. It's how I check my social media

:00:50.:00:54.

accounts. An average Facebook users spend 15 minutes every day on the

:00:55.:00:56.

site. The longer we spend connected, the

:00:57.:01:07.

more silicon Valley can learn about us. And the more targeted and

:01:08.:01:10.

effective their advertising can be. So apparently today I have checked

:01:11.:01:36.

my phone 117 times. And I've been on this phone for nearly five and a

:01:37.:01:41.

half hours. I mean, that's a lot of hours!

:01:42.:01:42.

Good morning. Did you surprise yourself about how much time, how

:01:43.:01:51.

much time you spend on your phone, on social media? I did when I got

:01:52.:01:56.

the number and the amount of hours, it just seems like so much but when

:01:57.:02:01.

I thought about it and my typical day and how often I pull my phone

:02:02.:02:05.

out of my pocket and jacket without even thinking, I thought, you know

:02:06.:02:11.

what, that's about right. It's the modern epidemic, constantly checking

:02:12.:02:15.

all the time. A lot of people say, what's the problem? You have sought

:02:16.:02:19.

to follow the lines back to the big bosses at Silicon Valley and if it

:02:20.:02:26.

is healthy, what they are up to? At some -- in some senses the thing,

:02:27.:02:31.

what's wrong with it? We check it for information, check it for

:02:32.:02:35.

information, share our photos and stories but all the time we are

:02:36.:02:40.

using that we create a product for these companies. The model for

:02:41.:02:44.

Silicon Valley estate, the stuff we are sharing. Even if you don't use

:02:45.:02:50.

their products? Facebook, Snapchat, Uber, even if you don't use those,

:02:51.:02:54.

they can still influence, your usage can still be used? Yes, sometimes.

:02:55.:03:01.

It's a little complicated when you get into the long grass of how the

:03:02.:03:06.

data economy actually works. For example, when you are inside some of

:03:07.:03:11.

these apps using them but reading the story from another source, they

:03:12.:03:15.

can track you around the Internet and work out what you're doing off

:03:16.:03:19.

their sites as well. The key thing is, all that stuff we are producing

:03:20.:03:22.

is making those companies money, because they are using that data to

:03:23.:03:27.

target with adverts. There is a sinister side to your documentary, a

:03:28.:03:33.

little sinister look at these companies work. You spoke to a

:03:34.:03:38.

former Facebook employee. We have a sound bite of him saying how data is

:03:39.:03:43.

used by the site. Tell me a bit about your tie that

:03:44.:03:49.

Facebook. It was interesting, I was a product manager at advert

:03:50.:03:55.

targeting, seeing how you use your data. If you browse the Internet or

:03:56.:04:01.

by staff, you see ads related to that in Facebook, I created that.

:04:02.:04:09.

Facebook offers advertisers ways to target users specifically.

:04:10.:04:17.

Some examples of what is data for Facebook which is money, things you

:04:18.:04:21.

like, what few shared, do you happen to know on Facebook, or where you

:04:22.:04:27.

have used it, on what devices. In the case of Amazon, it's what you

:04:28.:04:32.

purchase and Google what you search for. At the top of the list of the

:04:33.:04:36.

scale of conspiracy theorists who think all these big bad companies

:04:37.:04:40.

are owning your soul gradually, to those that don't care, where did you

:04:41.:04:47.

end up, after your investigations? I isolated, I think, between it. I can

:04:48.:04:52.

see the great benefits of these platforms. The reason they have

:04:53.:04:54.

taken over the world is they offer so much to us. I think it is really

:04:55.:04:58.

important to bear in mind how the business model works. The fact this

:04:59.:05:04.

data is very valuable to them and they are becoming enormously

:05:05.:05:07.

important and powerful companies, not just in advertising but in

:05:08.:05:12.

politics, in the future of our economies and societies. These are

:05:13.:05:15.

some of the biggest companies the world has ever seen. And we haven't

:05:16.:05:19.

touched upon artificial intelligence and how these people involved in

:05:20.:05:24.

silicon Valley, where they see that going and influencing our lives.

:05:25.:05:30.

Exactly. Episode one of this series, there are two episodes, episode one,

:05:31.:05:35.

out last Sunday, is all about artificial intelligence, and where

:05:36.:05:40.

the terrifying in some ways but also exciting growth of artificial

:05:41.:05:43.

intelligence, for example machines being able to do things as well as

:05:44.:05:48.

humans can come is taking us. Silicon Valley, this is the big

:05:49.:05:52.

thing now. What is going to happen to our economy and society of

:05:53.:05:54.

machines can start doing things better than humans? I'm curious,

:05:55.:05:59.

after everything you have seen and learned after what you've looked at,

:06:00.:06:02.

do you use these things differently question mark in your own usage, do

:06:03.:06:06.

you think, I'm not doing that because they said that? No. You

:06:07.:06:13.

carry on anyway? That's the thing about these platforms, they are so

:06:14.:06:17.

addictive, useful and convenient. I use all of these platforms because

:06:18.:06:22.

they offer an incredible product, an incredible service to me. But yes...

:06:23.:06:26.

I think after you watch this series you can at least think, is this the

:06:27.:06:31.

right thing for me to be doing? Might not change your habits but at

:06:32.:06:34.

least you are aware of them. Jamie, thank you.

:06:35.:06:36.

The second episode of 'Secrets of Silicon Valley' is on BBC Two

:06:37.:06:39.

on Sunday at 8pm, and you can catch the first episode on BBC iPlayer.

:06:40.:06:46.

In a moment, finding out about the largest creature ever to have stuff

:06:47.:08:27.

In a moment, finding out about the top temperature of 22. That is it

:08:28.:08:29.

for now, I'm back at 1:30pm for the lunchtime news.

:08:30.:08:36.

Scientists examining the remains of six dinosaurs found in a quarry

:08:37.:08:41.

in Argentina say they could well be the biggest creatures

:08:42.:08:43.

The previously unknown species is called the Patagotitan

:08:44.:08:47.

mayorum and lived around 100-million years ago.

:08:48.:08:52.

It's thought they measured more than 35-metres head to tail -

:08:53.:08:55.

And they weighed in at more than 62-tonnes -

:08:56.:09:07.

that's heavier than The Space Shuttle or the combined

:09:08.:09:09.

Now researchers say the find has led them to form new theories

:09:10.:09:13.

about how dinosaurs interacted with each other.

:09:14.:09:15.

Here to explain is Professor William Sellers from

:09:16.:09:17.

Good morning. How excited are you buy these various discoveries? It's

:09:18.:09:27.

always amazing to find a new dinosaur and this is a monster, a

:09:28.:09:32.

really cute animal. It is quite funny because palaeontologists like

:09:33.:09:36.

fishermen, always claiming to have the biggest. So it's no surprise

:09:37.:09:39.

they are claiming it's larger than the others and is really huge.

:09:40.:09:47.

Bigger than the brontosaurus? Yes, those are the dinosaurs from the

:09:48.:09:52.

Jurassic got up to about 25 times. These are a little bit later and you

:09:53.:09:56.

get them in South America and they are much, much bigger, double the

:09:57.:10:01.

size, absolutely huge. These ones that were found, they were

:10:02.:10:08.

pubescent? Yes. How do you tell? It is very tricky to do, you slice the

:10:09.:10:13.

bones and look at them under a microscope, because using

:10:14.:10:17.

microscopic changes in the way the cells in the bones are arranged.

:10:18.:10:20.

It's difficult to tell if you have a juvenile dinosaur but these were

:10:21.:10:24.

still growing and 65 tonnes. We're seeing some of the excavation

:10:25.:10:29.

images. The previous biggest was also in Argentina? Why were the big

:10:30.:10:34.

dinosaurs in Argentina? A really good question and very curious. What

:10:35.:10:39.

happens, before this we have lots of big dinosaurs in North America. In

:10:40.:10:44.

this period, all the big dinosaurs seem to have moved to South America

:10:45.:10:47.

and got bigger. We don't actually know why. Obviously there was

:10:48.:10:51.

something about the ecology, maybe the availability of food that

:10:52.:10:53.

allowed them to grow to enormous sizes. So what does this find tell

:10:54.:11:01.

us about dinosaurs? You said these are after the brontosaurus,

:11:02.:11:07.

Tyrannosaurus rex? The T Rex is a little later, about 65 million, but

:11:08.:11:12.

a different part of the world. I'm sorry at... Slightly distracted by

:11:13.:11:18.

this nodding dinosaur! Something tells me in real life he

:11:19.:11:22.

didn't move like that. Can we confirm the new one, the

:11:23.:11:27.

Patagotitan mayorum didn't nod his head like this? One of the things

:11:28.:11:32.

people argue about is how they moved then next because the old idea was

:11:33.:11:37.

they had a long neck so they could eat things higher from the tree but

:11:38.:11:40.

people nowadays think maybe they moved their heads side to side like

:11:41.:11:44.

a sort of lawn mower and they could graze over a much larger areas. So

:11:45.:11:48.

it is one of those big debates, how these things actually moved around.

:11:49.:11:52.

How could it have eaten enough food to keep going? They were looking at

:11:53.:11:57.

how much food these things eight. This thing would eat about a cubic

:11:58.:12:01.

metre or so of vegetation. Is that all? The thing about animals,

:12:02.:12:06.

there's a scaling rule. If you are a tiny animal you have to eat your

:12:07.:12:10.

body weight every six hours. If you are a huge animal, the proportion of

:12:11.:12:14.

food you need is much lower. That's where I've been going wrong all

:12:15.:12:18.

these years! What happens now with this find? It was found in

:12:19.:12:22.

Argentina. What happens to the bones, where are they going to be

:12:23.:12:26.

taken, if anywhere? These bones will stay in Argentina. They have

:12:27.:12:30.

produced a really amazing exhibit at a local museum. Palaeontology in

:12:31.:12:36.

Argentina is quite regional, so everyone keeps these things very

:12:37.:12:40.

much locally. Competitive? More than a bit competitive. Is it right the

:12:41.:12:46.

person that originally found this is no longer alive and doesn't know the

:12:47.:12:48.

significance of the find? The original find was from a farmer,

:12:49.:12:57.

hence the name, and then excavated by scientists. In general,

:12:58.:13:01.

scientists don't find these things, it's people who live there see a

:13:02.:13:04.

huge bones sticking out of the ground and call a scientist because

:13:05.:13:08.

they think they have found something important. The farmer who found it

:13:09.:13:12.

is no longer alive? I don't actually know. You would love to be there?

:13:13.:13:20.

Yes, I have been to do some work in Argentina and it is an amazing part

:13:21.:13:25.

of the world. They named it after the country! Lovely to see you this

:13:26.:13:30.

morning, thank you. That is it for today, we will be

:13:31.:13:32.

back tomorrow from 6am. Time now for Animal Park

:13:33.:13:33.

Summer Special with Kate Behind us, as sure you'll recognise,

:13:34.:13:42.

is the magnificent Anne. She arrived here in 2011 after a

:13:43.:13:46.

lifetime in the circus

:13:47.:13:51.