05/09/2017 Breakfast


05/09/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:00:07.:00:09.

South Korea's Navy holds live-fire drills in a show

:00:10.:00:14.

It comes as the US and China fail to agree on a way to address

:00:15.:00:19.

the escalating crisis in North Korea.

:00:20.:00:33.

Good morning, it's Tuesday the 5th of September.

:00:34.:00:37.

Also this morning, the feelgood factor of our coasts.

:00:38.:00:42.

where researchers have been harnessing the power of the ocean

:00:43.:00:49.

to help people living with anxiety, depression and loneliness.

:00:50.:01:00.

It is back to business for MPs at Westminster, as David Davis faces

:01:01.:01:07.

questions about how his Brexit negotiations are going.

:01:08.:01:12.

Good morning. I will be falling -- are we falling out of love with the

:01:13.:01:18.

humble cup of tea? Studies show that we are buying fewer teabags and more

:01:19.:01:22.

speciality and organic teas. I am in Yorkshire to find out why.

:01:23.:01:23.

And in sport, World Cup qualifying wins last night for England,

:01:24.:01:26.

Michael O'Neill's side beat the Czech Republic 2-0 in Belfast,

:01:27.:01:30.

which should guarantee them a play-off spot.

:01:31.:01:32.

It is a very mild start to the day, with temperatures as the sunrises in

:01:33.:01:44.

the high teens. Lots of cloud and drizzle about, but we should see

:01:45.:01:48.

some sunshine later. I will have the details in about 15 minutes.

:01:49.:01:49.

In the last few hours, South Korea's Navy has held major

:01:50.:01:54.

live-fire drills, in the latest show of force to North Korea.

:01:55.:01:57.

A South Korean commander said Pyonyang's forces would be "buried

:01:58.:02:00.

at sea" in the event of a further provocation.

:02:01.:02:02.

Meanwhile, international pressure continues to build against the North

:02:03.:02:05.

following its largest nuclear bomb test to date.

:02:06.:02:07.

Yesterday, the South staged a simulated attack on the North's

:02:08.:02:09.

nuclear test site involving land-based missile launchers

:02:10.:02:11.

While in New York, the United States warned the UN Security Council that

:02:12.:02:16.

Kim Jong-Un was "begging for war" and that although Washington does

:02:17.:02:21.

not want conflict, its patience was "not unlimited.

:02:22.:02:37.

Nuclear powers understand their responsibilities. Kim Jong-un shows

:02:38.:02:43.

no such understanding. His abusive use of missiles and his nuclear

:02:44.:02:47.

threats show that he is begging for war. Robin Brandt is in Seoul. We

:02:48.:02:54.

were speaking to you at this time yesterday. What has happened

:02:55.:02:57.

overnight in South Korea? More evidence of South Korea's

:02:58.:03:02.

reparations to defend this country, or maybe even to attack North Korea

:03:03.:03:06.

if they see fit. -- preparations. Yesterday the army and the air Force

:03:07.:03:10.

drop launched missiles to simulate an attack on North Korea's nuclear

:03:11.:03:16.

test site. Today we had what officials described as a massive

:03:17.:03:19.

live fire exercise carried out by the Navy. This is to reassure people

:03:20.:03:24.

hear about the high state of alert and preparedness that this country

:03:25.:03:28.

is on, and also assigned to those in North Korea and beyond about the

:03:29.:03:31.

capabilities that South Korea has. -- also a sign. Remember, this

:03:32.:03:37.

country is led by President Moon Jae-in, who wants to extend an olive

:03:38.:03:41.

branch to the north. It is a bit of a rebuke to comments by Donald Trump

:03:42.:03:44.

yesterday when he said that appeasement wasn't working. This

:03:45.:03:48.

government has restated its -- its position that it wants to see

:03:49.:03:52.

further sanctions, tougher sanctions, to try to tighten the

:03:53.:03:56.

noose around the neck of the north. But it also wants to hold out for

:03:57.:04:00.

the prospect of some kind of peace talks, certainly made comes to

:04:01.:04:02.

things like reunifying families who were split so many years ago when

:04:03.:04:06.

these countries went to war. -- certainly when it comes to things.

:04:07.:04:08.

Later on, we'll be speaking to a leading academic about China's

:04:09.:04:11.

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis, will face questions in the Commons

:04:12.:04:19.

this afternoon as MPs return to Westminster

:04:20.:04:20.

Mr Davis will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations

:04:21.:04:25.

with the European Union as Downing Street promises

:04:26.:04:27.

to "intensify" its approach to the talks.

:04:28.:04:29.

Our political correspondent Iain Watson joins us from

:04:30.:04:31.

Is David Davis likely to get a grilling? I think he probably will.

:04:32.:04:45.

It is the first opportunity for MPs returning from the summer break to

:04:46.:04:49.

ask about the progress, or lack of it, in negotiations with the EU and

:04:50.:04:53.

chief negotiator Michel Barnier. As you have said, the government has

:04:54.:04:57.

suggested they are willing to increase the pace of talks and

:04:58.:04:59.

intensify the negotiations because they are concerned they will not get

:05:00.:05:03.

on to discussing what they really want to talk about, wider trade

:05:04.:05:06.

talks with the European Union, this autumn, as originally anticipated.

:05:07.:05:10.

MPs will be concerned about that in particular. There will also be an

:05:11.:05:14.

opportunity on Thursday to discuss legislation on Brexit, what is known

:05:15.:05:18.

as the great repeal bill, the EU withdrawal bill, and MPs will again

:05:19.:05:22.

be pressing the government to say more about their vision for Brexit.

:05:23.:05:26.

This morning, the Shadow Cabinet, under Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour

:05:27.:05:29.

frontbench, will be meeting to discuss what kind of changes they

:05:30.:05:33.

want to push to that legislation. Their biggest argument is that they

:05:34.:05:36.

are suggesting the government wants to board power in Westminster when

:05:37.:05:39.

they return from Brussels after Brexit, rather than going on and in

:05:40.:05:44.

devolved to Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast. -- hoard powers. So they

:05:45.:05:49.

will be drawing up that the plan this morning and they are likely to

:05:50.:05:51.

oppose the government pretty robustly. Nonetheless, they probably

:05:52.:05:55.

don't have the votes to derail the legislation at this stage. I suspect

:05:56.:05:59.

the government will get through it, but it will be a tough first week

:06:00.:06:01.

back. Will be speaking to somebody from

:06:02.:06:06.

the SNP bit later as well. -- we will be speaking.

:06:07.:06:08.

A search is resuming this morning for a man who was swept out to sea

:06:09.:06:12.

He was knocked off rocks by a wave while he was fishing at Treyarnon

:06:13.:06:17.

Another man who also fell into the water was rescued.

:06:18.:06:20.

A report into whether social services failed a young girl

:06:21.:06:24.

who was murdered by her mother will be published today.

:06:25.:06:27.

Ayeeshia Smith died in 2014, aged 21 months.

:06:28.:06:30.

She had been left in the care of her mother, Kathryn Smith,

:06:31.:06:33.

despite concerns raised by other relatives.

:06:34.:06:35.

The findings of a serious case review will be published

:06:36.:06:38.

Islands in the Caribbean and the US state of Florida are preparing

:06:39.:06:44.

for Hurricane Irma, which is due to make landfall tomorrow morning.

:06:45.:06:47.

It's a bigger storm, both in size and wind speed,

:06:48.:06:50.

than Hurricane Harvey, which devastated the states of Texas

:06:51.:06:52.

The governor of Florida has declared a state of emergency to give local

:06:53.:06:57.

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, will set

:06:58.:07:07.

out her government's legislative programme this afternoon,

:07:08.:07:08.

pledging a "bold" and "ambitious" plan for the coming year.

:07:09.:07:11.

She is expected to focus on health, the economy and, principally,

:07:12.:07:14.

education, an area where opposition parties say the SNP should be

:07:15.:07:17.

Bangladeshi officials say they are running out of space

:07:18.:07:25.

to accommodate the growing number of Rohingya Muslims

:07:26.:07:27.

Nearly 90,000 people have left Myanmar since the Army there began

:07:28.:07:33.

Many say they were attacked by troops and Buddhist mobs.

:07:34.:07:44.

The BBC's India correspondent, Sanjoy Majumder, is in a refugee

:07:45.:07:46.

Well, there are two main refugee camps organised by the government

:07:47.:08:04.

and the aid agencies here. They are completely filled to capacity. What

:08:05.:08:09.

is happening with the fresh arrivals, the tens of thousands of

:08:10.:08:12.

other Rohingya Muslims who have been coming over the past few days, if

:08:13.:08:15.

they are simply building new camps. They are either coming into areas

:08:16.:08:19.

where they are just pitching tents on their own, or moving into any

:08:20.:08:22.

kind of Eldon, any kind of shelter they can find. -- any kind of

:08:23.:08:31.

holding. -- building. This morning I have seen people trying to take

:08:32.:08:35.

bamboo poles and tarpaulins and plastic sheeting to try to build

:08:36.:08:39.

some kind of shelter to protect them. The other big concern is

:08:40.:08:42.

making sure they have enough food to eat. Many of them are exhausted.

:08:43.:08:46.

They have spent several days on the road trying to get to Bangladesh

:08:47.:08:49.

from Myanmar, which is not far from where I am, and aid agencies say

:08:50.:08:54.

that it is very difficult to provide enough supplies for everybody.

:08:55.:09:01.

Sanjoy, thank you for updating us on the situation.

:09:02.:09:02.

A French court is expected to deliver verdicts today

:09:03.:09:04.

in a privacy case involving topless photographs

:09:05.:09:06.

The pictures were taken while the Duchess and her husband

:09:07.:09:10.

were on holiday in Provence five years ago, and published

:09:11.:09:13.

Four people are on trial, along with two photographers who've

:09:14.:09:17.

been charged in connection with separate pictures published

:09:18.:09:19.

And completely different photos of the Duchess on the front pages. They

:09:20.:09:31.

are expecting their third child. Yes, baby number three. Because she

:09:32.:09:36.

was feeling unwell. She has an extreme form of morning sickness.

:09:37.:09:41.

That is why they announced it now. They will have to switch to a zonal

:09:42.:09:44.

marking system now. Once you have more than two. You run out of hands,

:09:45.:09:47.

right? Yes. Congratulations to them. Large solar storms in space may have

:09:48.:09:50.

played a role in the fatal stranding of sperm whales last year

:09:51.:09:54.

on the coasts of Britain, Scientists say the 29 whales

:09:55.:09:57.

were young, well fed and free of disease, but their navigational

:09:58.:10:01.

abilities may have been disrupted Our environment correspondent,

:10:02.:10:04.

Matt McGrath, reports. Just a warning - you may find

:10:05.:10:06.

some of the pictures Crowds gathered at Hunstanton on the

:10:07.:10:19.

coast of Norfolk in February 2016 to see this ocean giant washed up on a

:10:20.:10:22.

pop your tourist beach. All around the North Sea, more than 2000 sperm

:10:23.:10:28.

whales were found stranded in the first two months of last year.

:10:29.:10:33.

Scientists were puzzled. The creatures were young, healthy and

:10:34.:10:37.

generally disease-free. Now it is thought the northern light might

:10:38.:10:41.

have played a role in their losses. The aurora are the evidences of

:10:42.:10:45.

large solar storms which distort the Earth's magnetic field. This can

:10:46.:10:50.

cause species which rely on that field for navigation, like sperm

:10:51.:10:55.

whales, to lose their way. After big solar storms in December 2015,

:10:56.:10:58.

scientists say the confused creatures swam into the shallow

:10:59.:11:01.

North Sea and beached themselves trying to find a way out. Other

:11:02.:11:06.

researchers say the theory is plausible, but argue it is

:11:07.:11:08.

impossible to prove. This time of year, many of us dread

:11:09.:11:10.

coming across a spider that's snuck into the house, but a family

:11:11.:11:14.

in Southend had a more exotic A 5-year-old boy got a bit of shock

:11:15.:11:17.

when he found a python I am not having this. Sorry, if you

:11:18.:11:30.

don't like snakes, we should have given you a warning.

:11:31.:11:32.

His mum Laura called in a reptile specialist after using a broom

:11:33.:11:36.

handle to lift the lid and seeing the creature's head pop out

:11:37.:11:39.

According to its rescuer the snake it most likely arrived

:11:40.:11:42.

via the U-bend, and is expected to make a full recovery.

:11:43.:11:49.

What about the five-year-old! That could happen to any of us. Honestly,

:11:50.:11:58.

I am never going to... Well, I am, but I never want to go to the toilet

:11:59.:12:02.

again. That is an actual fear of mind. Is it! Forget snakes on a

:12:03.:12:08.

plane, snakes in the U bend. What if you get bitten in the bits and bobs.

:12:09.:12:13.

I am with you, I understand. Just check every time. For ever. With a

:12:14.:12:23.

massive room. -- broom. We really should put a warning up that if we

:12:24.:12:28.

show it again, people do have phobias. I can't believe they have

:12:29.:12:32.

the presence of mind to take a picture. I would have screamed and

:12:33.:12:36.

Rahmat of the house. Yes, not been dramatic at all. My favourite thing

:12:37.:12:40.

from last night as the Northern Ireland fans. A brilliant result. It

:12:41.:12:46.

is just like watching Brazil. A great result. The home nations last

:12:47.:12:48.

night. The result of the evening came

:12:49.:12:50.

from Northern Ireland, who will finish second in Group C

:12:51.:12:54.

after beating the Czech Republic Jonny Evans and Chris Brunt scoring

:12:55.:12:57.

the goals for Michael O'Neill's side that should see them

:12:58.:13:01.

secure a play-off spot. England came from behind to beat

:13:02.:13:03.

Slovakia 2-1 at Wembley. Eric Dier and Marcus Rashford scored

:13:04.:13:06.

as England recovered from going a goal down

:13:07.:13:08.

after just three minutes. They will reach next year's finals

:13:09.:13:11.

if they beat Slovenia next month. It was a good night

:13:12.:13:14.

for Scotland at Hampden Park. They won 2-0 at home to Malta,

:13:15.:13:17.

which means if they can win their last two games

:13:18.:13:20.

against Slovakia and Slovenia they can qualify for

:13:21.:13:23.

the World Cup via the play-offs. Russia's Andrei Rublev has become

:13:24.:13:25.

the first teenager since 2001 to reach the quarter-finals

:13:26.:13:28.

of the US Open after he beat He now faces his childhood

:13:29.:13:31.

hero, Rafa Nadal. I mean, his proper hero. One of the

:13:32.:13:48.

reasons he wanted to play tennis, one of the people who made him want

:13:49.:13:53.

to start tennis. He has to play him next. Just get out there and beat

:13:54.:13:59.

him. That's the way to do it. Yes, easy! Let's catch up with the

:14:00.:14:05.

weather. Sarah, it feels warm, but we already have rain?

:14:06.:14:10.

Yes, that's right. A mild start to the day, but it is quite damp out

:14:11.:14:15.

there. Lots of cloud about despite the muggy field to the weather.

:14:16.:14:19.

Through the day, things should improve. Look at the temperatures at

:14:20.:14:24.

the moment. 16 or 17 before the sun comes up. So it should feel pretty

:14:25.:14:29.

warm out there. To compensate, we have quite a bit of rain. At eight

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o'clock this morning that rain was across the south-west of England, up

:14:34.:14:39.

into Wales as well. Cloudy and great further east. A few spots of drizzle

:14:40.:14:42.

towards London and Sussex. Further north, more persistent rain. This is

:14:43.:14:47.

down to a slow-moving weather front crossing northern England. Quite a

:14:48.:14:50.

damp day here. And improving picture in Northern Ireland. Drizzly rain

:14:51.:14:54.

this morning, but brighter conditions coming. Brighter skies

:14:55.:14:58.

arriving from the north-west in Scotland. Still grey and murky with

:14:59.:15:02.

outbreaks of rain first thing this morning. Through the day, this front

:15:03.:15:06.

producing that rain goes through the country. It is slow-moving but is

:15:07.:15:10.

pushing towards the south and the east. We will still see rain in

:15:11.:15:14.

parts of northern England and the odd rumble of thunder. To the

:15:15.:15:17.

north-west, in Scotland and Northern Ireland, clear and fresh with some

:15:18.:15:21.

showers. Still mild in the south-east, 22 or 23, and where we

:15:22.:15:26.

see the sunny spells it will be quite pleasant. In the evening

:15:27.:15:29.

hours, that rain eventually clears the east coast and we are all in

:15:30.:15:33.

that cool, fresh regime. First thing tomorrow, temperatures will be

:15:34.:15:37.

cooler than they are outside at the moment. So Wednesday should shape up

:15:38.:15:42.

fine. Once the front clears towards the east we have fresher weather

:15:43.:15:46.

moving in from the Atlantic, and although it will not be as warm, it

:15:47.:15:50.

will be much sunnier through the day tomorrow. So tomorrow is probably

:15:51.:15:54.

the best day of the week in terms of sunshine. For many of us it will be

:15:55.:15:57.

dry, just a few showers in north-west Scotland and north-west

:15:58.:16:00.

England. But with light winds across the south of the country, it should

:16:01.:16:04.

feel pleasant enough, with temperatures around 16- 19 on

:16:05.:16:07.

Wednesday. Things turn more unsettled towards the end of the

:16:08.:16:11.

week. By Thursday we see the next area of low pressure bringing rain

:16:12.:16:14.

initially to Scotland and Northern Ireland, with quite risk winds. That

:16:15.:16:19.

will slowly sinks south later in the day. Further south, still 20 degrees

:16:20.:16:24.

or so, with some sunny spells. We will continue to see low pressure

:16:25.:16:28.

dominating things through to the end of the week. It will really be quite

:16:29.:16:33.

windy in the north. There is a mix of sunshine, but with scattered

:16:34.:16:36.

showers as well, and temperatures more typical of the time of year.

:16:37.:16:42.

Around 14- 19. Certainly today, despite the muggy and cloudy start

:16:43.:16:46.

to things, many of us will see a bit of sunshine later on.

:16:47.:16:55.

Let's look at the front pages. I have plenty of lovely things to tell

:16:56.:17:18.

you. Lots of them have got pictures of the Duchess of Cambridge. She is

:17:19.:17:24.

expecting their third child. Lots of discussion in the papers about that.

:17:25.:17:30.

There is a lot of discussion about academics. This is Oxford

:17:31.:17:34.

University. The head of Oxford University is accusing ministers of

:17:35.:17:39.

behaviour. There is a crackdown on their pay packets. Also the pictures

:17:40.:17:44.

on the front page of many pages this morning. The sun are speculating on

:17:45.:17:49.

when the child was conceived. Lovely, isn't it? Probably best to

:17:50.:17:57.

move away from that. How many more girls are there, Wayne? A picture of

:17:58.:18:08.

Kim Jong-un on the front pages well. The North Korean leader again for

:18:09.:18:13.

war. That is America talking to the UN yesterday. Criminals launching

:18:14.:18:20.

hundreds of successful cyber attacks on British universities targeting

:18:21.:18:26.

science, and medical research. Research into missiles as well.

:18:27.:18:32.

Sally, lovely Sally. What have you got for us today? Plenty of lovely

:18:33.:18:38.

things. We talk about broadcasting legends. Here is one. Henry blow

:18:39.:18:46.

felled is due to retire this week at the end of this week. I say retire

:18:47.:18:50.

but he won't retire completely. He is retiring from cricket

:18:51.:18:59.

commentating. There is too many good stories but I want to share this

:19:00.:19:04.

with you for the first time on air. He was terrified. -- came in

:19:05.:19:10.

Blofeld. He took over from Brian Johnston and spoke for ten minutes

:19:11.:19:14.

without taking a breath. He looked to his right and there was no one

:19:15.:19:23.

there. Just a piece of paper that said keep going until six. -- Henry

:19:24.:19:29.

Blofeld. They were all outside laughing at him. What an amazing

:19:30.:19:30.

story. A top man. This is not quite lovely. See what

:19:31.:19:47.

he did? He made not a particularly good gesture with his middle finger

:19:48.:19:51.

last night which could potentially get him banned for England. He said

:19:52.:19:56.

it was not targeted at the rapper rebut it was some kind of

:19:57.:20:00.

communication with his friend Carl Walker. He said it was maybe a joke.

:20:01.:20:09.

It wasn't the wisest thing to do. There are cameras everywhere, the

:20:10.:20:13.

world is watching, just be aware of that, maybe. See you a little bit

:20:14.:20:15.

later. Whether it's the soothing sound

:20:16.:20:16.

of the waves or the sand between your toes, a trip

:20:17.:20:19.

to the seaside can lift the spirits. Now researchers are investigating

:20:20.:20:23.

whether so-called "blue health" could be used to help people

:20:24.:20:25.

living with anxiety, depression and loneliness -

:20:26.:20:27.

even if they can't get to the coast. Breakfast's Graham Satchell has been

:20:28.:20:30.

looking into this and he's I then to really need to ask that.

:20:31.:20:51.

Are you awake? I'm very relaxed in our ostentatiously oversized

:20:52.:20:59.

deckchair. It is a little dark this morning but over there in the

:21:00.:21:02.

estuary, one of the most beautiful places in the country. A trip to the

:21:03.:21:08.

seaside can lift the spirits and has a restorative quality. Mental health

:21:09.:21:11.

therapists are becoming more interested in what they are calling

:21:12.:21:15.

blue health, the therapeutic power of the sea. We have been looking at

:21:16.:21:20.

one project based down here which is using VR technology to try and

:21:21.:21:24.

capture that therapeutic qualities of people that cannot get to the

:21:25.:21:26.

coast themselves. We are off the coast on a vote owned

:21:27.:21:43.

by the -- charity. There are people here who are living with anxiety and

:21:44.:21:48.

depression. Something special about being on the water. It's such a

:21:49.:21:53.

calming place. You can leave whatever troubles you have got

:21:54.:21:56.

behind and you can escape. Close your eyes. There are group sessions

:21:57.:22:03.

on board and everyone works as part of the crew but the charity says the

:22:04.:22:06.

city itself has a therapeutic quality. Bello there is something

:22:07.:22:10.

going on that is quite hard to define. It is something to do with

:22:11.:22:13.

space, something to do with challenge, power. Ian started

:22:14.:22:19.

feeling depressed and withdrawn after retiring from the fire

:22:20.:22:23.

service. There is something eternal about the sea and water. I'm so

:22:24.:22:28.

lucky to be living in Cornwall. To have a pension and to be able to do

:22:29.:22:32.

this. What about people who don't live near the coast? A team of

:22:33.:22:40.

researchers from the University of Exeter, a 360 virtual reality camera

:22:41.:22:45.

and a drone. They are tried to capture the power of the coastal

:22:46.:22:48.

people who can't get that themselves. There is quite a lot of

:22:49.:22:52.

evidence now that suggests that having exposure to natural specs can

:22:53.:22:57.

be helpful in terms of stress reduction, combating depression,

:22:58.:23:02.

psychological well-being, bringing that in four people who cannot

:23:03.:23:05.

access it themselves. In our projects, it is for people who are

:23:06.:23:11.

living in care homes who can't get outside easily. The project is part

:23:12.:23:15.

of much larger European research into so-called blue health. Will it

:23:16.:23:21.

work? Irra I will pop the earphones down. --I will pop the earphones

:23:22.:23:30.

down. Dicky is trying it on volunteers. It is beautiful,

:23:31.:23:36.

amazing. Some of the pictures are calm and relaxing. Others are more

:23:37.:23:45.

into rap is and stimulating. Oh! The turtle is coming behind me! I

:23:46.:23:51.

thought it was a really interesting experience. It's not something I had

:23:52.:23:56.

done before. It feels like you are there. Where did you come from?

:23:57.:24:04.

Anything connected with the sea or rivers or water, it certainly takes

:24:05.:24:08.

away some of the day-to-day drudgery of life. What we wanted to do was

:24:09.:24:13.

test whether these environment really were relaxing and stimulating

:24:14.:24:16.

and today we found that actually, where people reacted to them was the

:24:17.:24:21.

way we hoped. We will definitely be taking those videos forward now into

:24:22.:24:27.

our care homes project. Nicky will take a headset into care homes next

:24:28.:24:32.

year to bring blue health to those who can't access themselves. Really

:24:33.:24:37.

interesting thing those people with those headsets.

:24:38.:24:41.

A bit alienating that stuff but I tried one of myself and it's amazing

:24:42.:24:46.

how quickly you immerse yourself in the blue environment. They hope to

:24:47.:24:50.

take it into care homes sometime next you. Later in the programme,

:24:51.:24:54.

will be talking some people down here who have been through trauma

:24:55.:24:58.

and depression and say that the sea and being on the sea helps them

:24:59.:25:02.

through that experience but that is it from us here in Falmouth.

:25:03.:25:13.

I genuinely missed the sea when I haven't been there. It is the walk

:25:14.:25:22.

there and the expectation that if you go over the dunes and then it is

:25:23.:25:26.

there. It is peaceful, the noise, the smell. Tell us what you think

:25:27.:25:32.

about that idea called blue health. We will talk about it throughout the

:25:33.:25:34.

programme. Are we falling out of love

:25:35.:25:34.

with the humble cuppa? Sean's in Harrogate this morning

:25:35.:25:39.

to find out why we are trading in builders tea for something

:25:40.:25:42.

a little more fancy. It cannot be true. Good morning to

:25:43.:25:53.

you and your hair net. It is controversial to call its builders

:25:54.:25:59.

tea. We are talking tea all morning and particularly what goes inside

:26:00.:26:03.

that. That is a real of teabag paper. Not often you get a glimpse

:26:04.:26:09.

of that. They make 5 billion in the whole factory here in Harrowgate. We

:26:10.:26:14.

will take you to the factory where they are dealing with the

:26:15.:26:18.

statistics. Sales of tea are down by 5%. We have 5% fewer teabag than

:26:19.:26:26.

before. We are seeing more speciality teas, more herbal teas,

:26:27.:26:34.

more decaf, being put in. It is more than the traditional black tea than

:26:35.:26:39.

we are used to. By the time you look at these boxes going off, about one

:26:40.:26:43.

third of the market is made up of speciality teas in some way. We are

:26:44.:26:50.

looking at what the Yorkshire owners are doing to adapt to that and why

:26:51.:26:54.

our tastes are changing. But first, before all of that, I will have a

:26:55.:26:57.

cup of Hello, this is Breakfast,

:26:58.:30:16.

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. We'll bring you all the latest news

:30:17.:30:29.

and sport in a moment, but also on Breakfast

:30:30.:30:33.

this morning... Get me out of this vote! It is

:30:34.:30:37.

utterly horrible. Horrible. He's endured icy waters

:30:38.:30:43.

and being stranded on a remote Norwegian island, but double Olympic

:30:44.:30:45.

gold medallist Alex Gregory has We'll catch up with

:30:46.:30:48.

the rower, just after 8:00. Also this morning, how can a trip

:30:49.:30:58.

to the coast affect your mood? We've sent our deckchair

:30:59.:31:01.

across Britain to find out why And after 9:00, from cooking

:31:02.:31:04.

the perfect boiled egg to the truth behind being a chocoholic -

:31:05.:31:09.

author Marty Jopson will be revealing the science behind

:31:10.:31:12.

some of our food myths. Apparently you need quite a bit of

:31:13.:31:25.

time to cook the perfect boiled egg. Over half an hour. We don't have

:31:26.:31:27.

time for that! In the last few hours,

:31:28.:31:30.

South Korea's Navy has held major live-fire drills in the latest show

:31:31.:31:33.

of force to North Korea. A South Korean commander said

:31:34.:31:36.

the North's forces would be "buried at sea" in the event

:31:37.:31:39.

of a further provocation. Meanwhile international

:31:40.:31:41.

pressure continues to build against the regime following its

:31:42.:31:43.

largest nuclear bomb test to date. Yesterday the United States warned

:31:44.:31:46.

the UN Security Council that Robin Brandt is in Seoul. We spoke

:31:47.:32:03.

to you at this time yesterday, and again, more military activity

:32:04.:32:08.

overnight? Yeah. What we have today is the two tracks that rape resent

:32:09.:32:14.

where this dispute is going. -- represent. We have the South Korean

:32:15.:32:21.

navy launching what they described as a massive live exercise drill in

:32:22.:32:25.

the last 12 hours or so. Yesterday it was the turn of the air force and

:32:26.:32:29.

the Army to carry out what was essentially a dummy on the run. --

:32:30.:32:37.

bombing run. It was meant to replicate an attack on North Korea's

:32:38.:32:44.

nuclear site. This was designed to reassure South Koreans and remind

:32:45.:32:48.

them of their high state of alert, and show North Korea, as well, the

:32:49.:32:52.

capabilities this country has to defend itself and to attack. At the

:32:53.:32:56.

same time, we are next. At the United Nations yesterday, it is

:32:57.:32:59.

clear there were stark divisions between those key players, the US

:33:00.:33:04.

and China, about what to do next. China said yet again it would not

:33:05.:33:08.

allow war to happen on the Korean peninsula, but Nikki Haley, the UN

:33:09.:33:12.

ambassador from the United States, says she does not think Ossetians

:33:13.:33:17.

regime can go much further. I think the US effort in New York is aimed

:33:18.:33:21.

at one last-ditch effort to try to force North Korea to change its mind

:33:22.:33:24.

with an even tougher sanctions regime. Robin Brandt, thank you.

:33:25.:33:28.

Later in the programme we will be speaking about China and what role

:33:29.:33:32.

it might play in what is going on at the moment.

:33:33.:33:33.

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis, will face questions in the Commons

:33:34.:33:35.

this afternoon as MPs return to Westminster

:33:36.:33:37.

Mr Davis will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations

:33:38.:33:42.

with the European Union as Downing Street promises

:33:43.:33:44.

to "intensify" its approach to the talks.

:33:45.:33:46.

A search is resuming this morning for a man who was swept out to sea

:33:47.:33:50.

He was knocked off rocks by a wave while he was fishing at Treyarnon

:33:51.:33:55.

Another man who also fell into the water was rescued.

:33:56.:33:59.

A report into whether social services failed a young girl

:34:00.:34:02.

who was murdered by her mother will be published today.

:34:03.:34:06.

Ayeeshia Smith died in 2014 aged 21 months.

:34:07.:34:08.

She had been left in the care of her mother, Kathryn Smith,

:34:09.:34:11.

despite concerns raised by other relatives.

:34:12.:34:13.

The findings of a serious case review will be published

:34:14.:34:15.

A French court is expected to deliver verdicts today in the Percy

:34:16.:34:31.

case involving topless photographs of the Duchess of Cambridge. The

:34:32.:34:34.

pictures were taken while the Duchess and her husband were on

:34:35.:34:38.

holiday in province five years ago and then published in the magazine

:34:39.:34:39.

Closer. -- Provence. It was five years ago,

:34:40.:34:43.

while the royal couple were staying at this mansion in the south

:34:44.:34:46.

of France, that the secret The topless images of the Duchess

:34:47.:34:49.

of Cambridge were published in a French celebrity magazine

:34:50.:34:52.

but they were quickly withdrawn from circulation after the couple

:34:53.:34:55.

obtained an injunction. Separately, though, criminal charges

:34:56.:34:57.

were brought against the magazine and, last May, two of the editorial

:34:58.:35:00.

staff and two photographers With the 20th anniversary just past

:35:01.:35:03.

on the death of Prince William's mother in Paris, inevitably it

:35:04.:35:08.

evokes memories of the role paparazzi played in pursuing

:35:09.:35:11.

Princess Diana's Limousine. A coroner's court in the UK said

:35:12.:35:13.

photographers were part-responsible Today, after they announced the good

:35:14.:35:16.

news of their third expected baby, for the Duke and Duchess,

:35:17.:35:22.

the verdict in Paris may bring back memories they'd much rather forget

:35:23.:35:25.

but by pushing from the start for record damages,

:35:26.:35:28.

they have made their point. The right to privacy is not

:35:29.:35:31.

something the UK royals will give up An artist has used 20,000 party

:35:32.:35:34.

balloons to lift herself off the ground as part of a 9-hour art

:35:35.:35:52.

installation at the Sydney Opera Noemi Lakmaier was suspended

:35:53.:35:55.

from the multi-coloured helium balloons as part of her

:35:56.:35:57.

Cherophobia exhibit. The title means a fear of happiness,

:35:58.:35:59.

and the installation explores the Vienna-born artist's

:36:00.:36:02.

experience of disability. I have always wondered if you could

:36:03.:36:17.

do that, and it turns out you can, but you need an awful lot of

:36:18.:36:21.

balloons. You can see how many there are there. Good morning, Sally. Good

:36:22.:36:27.

morning. I am slightly amazed by that. I love watching your faces as

:36:28.:36:33.

those words appeared before you and you thought, what's this? Is she

:36:34.:36:38.

really? Yes, she is. Obviously I read that previously. Obviously,

:36:39.:36:39.

yes. It was a great night

:36:40.:36:42.

for the Home Nations Northern Ireland secured second

:36:43.:36:44.

place in Group C with a 2-0 win over They'll have to wait and see

:36:45.:36:51.

if they'll get a spot in the play-offs but manager Michael

:36:52.:37:03.

O'Neill is confident they will. With Germany coming here it would

:37:04.:37:17.

nice to take the extra point. -- it would be nice. If we need something

:37:18.:37:21.

in the final two games we will have to go and get it, simple as that. We

:37:22.:37:26.

are in a very strong position and if you look at this campaign it has

:37:27.:37:29.

almost been flawless, to be honest. Seven clean sheets, the only defeat

:37:30.:37:33.

away to Germany. As a coach or a manager there is very little more

:37:34.:37:37.

you can ask your players -- from your players, and they have just

:37:38.:37:38.

kept the withering. -- delivering. England need just two points

:37:39.:37:41.

from their final two games to qualify after they came

:37:42.:37:43.

from behind to beat Slovakia Goals from Eric Dier and this

:37:44.:37:46.

from Marcus Rashford gave England the win after the Slovaks

:37:47.:37:50.

took the lead with just England will qualify if they beat

:37:51.:37:52.

Slovenia at home next month. He is maturing he is excellent. You

:37:53.:38:01.

don't look at him, well, you look at him and he is never in awe of the

:38:02.:38:06.

occasion. He doesn't have fear of anything. To be fair, I don't think

:38:07.:38:10.

the team did, I think they responded well. His impact in taking people on

:38:11.:38:15.

and hitting us up the pitch in counter-attack is not only huge for

:38:16.:38:18.

the team but for the cloud as well. -- getting us up.

:38:19.:38:20.

It was a great night for Scotland - they took advantage of the chance

:38:21.:38:24.

to make up some ground on Slovakia in second.

:38:25.:38:26.

Christophe Berra gave them an early lead against Malta,

:38:27.:38:29.

Leigh Griffiths made it two after half time.

:38:30.:38:31.

If they can win their last two games than they can qualify

:38:32.:38:34.

for the play-offs despite a slow start to their campaign.

:38:35.:38:37.

I am all right without. I think when you get to that stage and the

:38:38.:38:43.

tournament is in your hands, that is all you can ask. We can look back on

:38:44.:38:47.

the tournament and say, we could have done better here, here and

:38:48.:38:51.

here. But we try to make up for the bad performances, all the low-key

:38:52.:38:54.

performances, by doing the best we can.

:38:55.:38:54.

Juan Martin Del Potro produced an incredible comeback overnight

:38:55.:38:57.

to reach the quarter-finals of the US Open.

:38:58.:38:59.

The Argentine fought back from two sets down and match point down

:39:00.:39:02.

That despite saying that he couldn't breathe properly at times

:39:03.:39:08.

His reward is a meeting with Roger Federer.

:39:09.:39:12.

Meanwhile teenager Andrei Rublev will play Rafa Nadal in the last

:39:13.:39:15.

eight after the Russian beat ninth seed David Goffin in straight sets.

:39:16.:39:18.

The 19-year-old is the first teenager since Andy Roddick in 2001

:39:19.:39:21.

to reach this stage of the men's draw.

:39:22.:39:23.

He says Nadal was one of his childhood idols.

:39:24.:39:32.

Who will be the UK's candidate city for the 2022 Commonwealth Games?

:39:33.:39:35.

Well, we should find out in the next week or so.

:39:36.:39:38.

Liverpool and Birmingham are the two vying for the award,

:39:39.:39:40.

and Birmingham's bid team have released a list of 22 reasons why it

:39:41.:39:44.

They include leaving an athletics legacy by refurishing

:39:45.:39:47.

the Alexander Stadium, home of the British trials,

:39:48.:39:49.

increasing the capacity to 45,000 for the Commonwealth Games.

:39:50.:40:00.

22 is an odd number, isn't it? Yes. You would think 20, 25... It is an

:40:01.:40:09.

odd number. Maybe they just had so many. I have been looking,

:40:10.:40:14.

Liverpool, if you are watching, I have been looking for your

:40:15.:40:17.

reasons... That is what I was going to ask you. Send me some, and I will

:40:18.:40:23.

say them. I was going to say, maybe they went for 20 -- went for 22 is

:40:24.:40:29.

it will be in 2022. Exactly, that is why you get paid the big rocks. --

:40:30.:40:38.

bucks. Yes, I love it when we do topical stories. Excellent. Let's

:40:39.:40:40.

move on. Brexit, education and the economy

:40:41.:40:41.

are expected to dominate Scotland's First Minister Nicola

:40:42.:40:44.

Sturgeon's legislative programme She has promised her "most ambitious

:40:45.:40:46.

plan ever" but opposition parties have criticised the SNP,

:40:47.:40:50.

saying the party has "delivered Shirley-Anne Somerville,

:40:51.:40:52.

Minister for Further and Higher Education,

:40:53.:40:55.

and Science, joins us now. Good morning. Thank you for joining

:40:56.:41:15.

us. We are expect in Nicola Sturgeon to talk about scrapping the 1%

:41:16.:41:20.

public pay sector cap. Is that a U-turn from your party? Well, the

:41:21.:41:25.

Scottish government to lead its position out on the cap sometime

:41:26.:41:30.

ago. At this time of continuing austerity given to us by the

:41:31.:41:34.

Westminster government, the Scottish government does recognise that

:41:35.:41:38.

workers are under increasing strain with inflation, so we have made our

:41:39.:41:42.

position quite clear on the cap, that we would look to review that.

:41:43.:41:47.

We are already speaking to trade unions to ensure that when we

:41:48.:41:50.

deliver our budget later this year that we will be able to work with

:41:51.:41:54.

them to ensure that is workers see some relief from the austerity we

:41:55.:41:58.

are receiving from Westminster. So it it a U-turn, then? It is a

:41:59.:42:03.

development in our policy, much to the programme for government we will

:42:04.:42:07.

see today, responding to the changing needs of the Scottish

:42:08.:42:09.

people and the unprecedented challenges which the Scottish

:42:10.:42:12.

economy faces, whether that is through Brexit or new technology,

:42:13.:42:17.

our programme for government and our following budget is to deal with

:42:18.:42:21.

that, not just to face up to it but to respond to those challenges in a

:42:22.:42:25.

positive manner so that we can seize the opportunity wherever possible to

:42:26.:42:28.

work with unions and others to deliver for the people of Scotland.

:42:29.:42:32.

We will be speaking with Ian Watson today in Westminster about how David

:42:33.:42:35.

Davies will be facing questions today about Brexit negotiations.

:42:36.:42:38.

What is your take on what you have heard and seen so far off what he

:42:39.:42:42.

has been doing in Brussels? It is desperately disappointing that it is

:42:43.:42:46.

now some time since the vote on Brexit, a vote which Scotland didn't

:42:47.:42:49.

want to see and which we didn't vote for Brexit in, but we are where we

:42:50.:42:55.

are, and by this time we would have expected the UK government to at

:42:56.:42:58.

least have a plan, to be detailing that plan, not just to colleagues in

:42:59.:43:02.

Brussels but to the devolved administrations. That is why the

:43:03.:43:06.

First Minister here in Scotland has been working with the Welsh First

:43:07.:43:10.

Minister to ensure that we are making our case to Westminster, to

:43:11.:43:14.

Brussels, because Scotland cannot afford to wait for the Westminster

:43:15.:43:17.

government to come up with a plan. That is what the Scottish government

:43:18.:43:21.

is doing, based on our retention in the single market and the customs

:43:22.:43:25.

union. We heard Carwyn Jones seeing yesterday there is a fundamental

:43:26.:43:28.

disagreement with the government over Brexit. You still think you are

:43:29.:43:31.

not getting enough information from Westminster about devolved

:43:32.:43:36.

government? Devolved nations, sorry. I don't think anybody is getting

:43:37.:43:39.

enough information from the Westminster government when it comes

:43:40.:43:42.

to Brexit. The concern of the Scottish government is that because

:43:43.:43:46.

there is no plan, whether it is behind the scenes, it is not that

:43:47.:43:49.

they are keeping their cards close to their chest, they haven't decided

:43:50.:43:53.

what the plan is yet. That is hugely concerning. In Scotland we see a

:43:54.:43:58.

great impact on our economy, whether it is the European Union workers who

:43:59.:44:01.

are already concerned about their futures, or whether it is other

:44:02.:44:05.

aspects of Brexit. The impact is real at the moment. That is why the

:44:06.:44:09.

Scottish government is determined to work with other devolved

:44:10.:44:13.

administrations wherever possible to ensure that our voices being heard

:44:14.:44:17.

not just by Westminster but by Brussels, because it is simply

:44:18.:44:21.

unacceptable that so far into the supposed negotiations with simply

:44:22.:44:24.

haven't got anywhere at all. Brexit will be high on the agenda. Will the

:44:25.:44:29.

First Minister ask anything about North Korea this afternoon, given

:44:30.:44:32.

the SNP's stance on Trident? What might she say about that? I will not

:44:33.:44:37.

go into detail about what the First Minister is going to say in the

:44:38.:44:40.

programme for government. She obviously has to respond to

:44:41.:44:44.

Parliament directly. But the Scottish government and the Scottish

:44:45.:44:47.

National Party has a proud record of union antinuclear party. This is

:44:48.:44:52.

something that we hold dear. It is simply unacceptable that we have

:44:53.:44:54.

nuclear weapons based here in Scotland. Now, whether that will be

:44:55.:44:58.

something that the First Minister will mention today will be up to the

:44:59.:45:02.

First Minister to discuss directly. Thank you, good to talk to you.

:45:03.:45:08.

This is Breakfast on BBC News. The main stories: following military

:45:09.:45:17.

exercises, South Korea's navy holds live fire drills in a show of force

:45:18.:45:21.

to North Korea after its latest nuclear tests. Evening

:45:22.:45:33.

from what I saw a way to work this morning, it was miserable hours.

:45:34.:45:38.

Wasn't it? Here's Sarah with a look

:45:39.:45:38.

at this morning's weather. Miserable is the word. It will be an

:45:39.:45:49.

improving picture later on. It is quite damp this morning. Muggy out

:45:50.:45:53.

there as well, quite humid. Temperatures above what we would

:45:54.:46:02.

expect, around 16 or 17 degrees. A bit fresher for Scotland and

:46:03.:46:05.

Northern Ireland. Much of the country, we are sitting under a

:46:06.:46:09.

front, bringing us cloud and outbreaks of rain. Heavier outbreaks

:46:10.:46:13.

across the south-west of England and Wales. Further west, we are a bit

:46:14.:46:20.

more dry. -- further east. A bit of drizzle but certainly mild, 17

:46:21.:46:23.

degrees. Heavier burst of rain across parts of North Wales and

:46:24.:46:28.

England but it will clear out of Northern Ireland and Scotland.

:46:29.:46:31.

Clearer conditions are moving into the north-west with a few showers

:46:32.:46:35.

but still damp and drizzly across southern and eastern Scotland this

:46:36.:46:38.

morning. The band of rain will slowly edge eastwards through the

:46:39.:46:42.

day. Some areas will continue to see wet weather, critically for parts of

:46:43.:46:47.

Wales and the Midlands. Elsewhere, we all likely to see brighter

:46:48.:46:53.

weather developing. Temperatures 22 and possibly 23 degrees towards the

:46:54.:46:59.

south-east. The rest chance of a few showers. One or two showers

:47:00.:47:02.

continuing this evening overnight in the north-west but most of us

:47:03.:47:08.

becoming dry. It will feel different by this time tomorrow morning,

:47:09.:47:11.

temperatures are much lower and a different air mass so it is cool and

:47:12.:47:15.

fresh start of the day. Tomorrow will be probably the best day of the

:47:16.:47:19.

week in terms of sunshine amounts. That is because once we get weather

:47:20.:47:25.

of the front to the east, the westerly breeze will bring sunshine.

:47:26.:47:32.

-- once we get rid of the front. The areas of Scotland and north-west

:47:33.:47:36.

England will have some showers but lighter winds further south. It will

:47:37.:47:41.

feel quite pleasant and even the north, extend or 17. The fresher

:47:42.:47:47.

feel continues first thing into Thursday, too. But you will notice

:47:48.:47:51.

on Thursday, the bulk of rain working into the north-west.

:47:52.:47:54.

Eventually, Northern Ireland and Scotland will see the wet and windy

:47:55.:47:57.

weather and battle think south of the -- later in the day. Parts of

:47:58.:48:01.

Wales and England remained dry and bright. The slightly more autumnal

:48:02.:48:08.

scene continues for the end of the week. For Friday, low pressure is

:48:09.:48:12.

established north of the UK and that will draw in westerly winds and

:48:13.:48:16.

windy conditions. We will see outbreaks of rain and it could be

:48:17.:48:20.

heavy around southern England for a time. Elsewhere, sunshine and

:48:21.:48:24.

scattered showers and that sets us up for us -- for a possibly stormy

:48:25.:48:27.

weekend. Most of us need a morning cuppa

:48:28.:48:32.

but what's in your mug today? Sales of traditional black tea

:48:33.:48:41.

are falling but fruit and herbal Sean's at a tea factory

:48:42.:48:48.

in North Yorkshire to tell us more. Good morning. I have already caused

:48:49.:49:11.

some controversy by telling folks here that some people make their tea

:49:12.:49:15.

by putting their teabag in the milk first. I don't agree with that and

:49:16.:49:21.

they don't hear either, I have to say. I am in Harrowgate this morning

:49:22.:49:25.

and that is where the tea is coming in. That is ordinary black tea. We

:49:26.:49:30.

have exclusive figures on Breakfast this morning showing that we are

:49:31.:49:35.

buying more speciality and herbal teas, as you were saying. Richard is

:49:36.:49:44.

here. A bit of an ongoing story that difficulty that black tea has been

:49:45.:49:47.

having but overall, have things been picking up or are we just not into

:49:48.:49:52.

our tea. It is a long-term decline that has been going on for a long

:49:53.:49:58.

time. There is no rhyme or reason. It is lots of competition from other

:49:59.:50:04.

drinks, coffee but also soft drinks. I think sales have picked up a bit

:50:05.:50:10.

this year. Volume sales have picked up because prices have gone up due

:50:11.:50:15.

to prices in the currency. -- changes in the currency. All much

:50:16.:50:23.

more have we been willing to pay for our tea? I think the changes have

:50:24.:50:30.

been particularly since the referendum decision last year

:50:31.:50:34.

meaning that prices for buying in ports of tea have gone up by 10-

:50:35.:50:41.

15%. The company is trying not to pass it on to customers as much as

:50:42.:50:48.

they can. Some of it has to get passed on. Richard, we will talk

:50:49.:50:53.

moreover the morning about what the change is exactly that let's have a

:50:54.:50:58.

look at what Yorkshire tea is doing. Kevin, if I can grab you. You are in

:50:59.:51:04.

the marketing area. Do we need to get the button pressed to get it

:51:05.:51:12.

going again? What a relief. Kevin, you have a huge factory here and we

:51:13.:51:17.

were just talking from Richard about how much tastes have changed, buying

:51:18.:51:23.

less black tea on a whole. What about people who own it? I guess the

:51:24.:51:27.

key growth engine for our business over the last few years has still

:51:28.:51:32.

been Yorkshire tea. We are not giving up hope on the black tea

:51:33.:51:36.

market and we are continuing to grow and our volumes have been bucking

:51:37.:51:41.

the trend. We are also acknowledging that consumer tastes have changed

:51:42.:51:44.

changing and we are looking at other areas of tree. Meaning -- mainly to

:51:45.:51:50.

leverage our Taylor's brand rather than Yorkshire. Import prices, fall

:51:51.:51:56.

in the pound, have you had to make efficiencies so that you don't pass

:51:57.:52:02.

on the increasing costs to the consumers as much? You are spending

:52:03.:52:07.

a lot of money on this machinery. There has been some price inflation

:52:08.:52:10.

within the market but I guess as a business and a brand, we believe in

:52:11.:52:15.

doing things cost -- properly. Making sure we don't cut corners,

:52:16.:52:19.

compromise. We have been blending to the same taste profile for 40 years

:52:20.:52:23.

and we believe that it is the consistent quality that sees

:52:24.:52:29.

consumers pay a bit more. On these boxes as they are going through,

:52:30.:52:34.

that blend has not changed for that length of time. But, if your costs

:52:35.:52:39.

are changing, most manufacturers would maybe a just the product. If

:52:40.:52:45.

costs are increased for you, what do you do? It is a debate that it had a

:52:46.:52:54.

lot. Do you change the leaf? We really respect the relationships we

:52:55.:52:58.

have got with suppliers and we value those relationships and believe

:52:59.:53:01.

above everything else that maintaining the product quality of

:53:02.:53:05.

Yorkshire tea is incredibly important to this business. And

:53:06.:53:09.

whatever brand of tea we are using, you teabag in the milk and then pour

:53:10.:53:16.

the water in or water first? Never teabag in the milk, I can't believe

:53:17.:53:22.

you mentioned it. I'm sorry. I am sorry. We will be looking at not how

:53:23.:53:26.

you just make a decent cuppa tea but how the changes to people 's tastes.

:53:27.:53:34.

How we can spot the difference to the black tea and what they are

:53:35.:53:36.

developing these days. Teabag first, milk in, teabag in the

:53:37.:53:44.

milk. I don't think there is any debate about it. For me, there is

:53:45.:53:47.

definitely not milk first. Anyway. If I made either of you, one way or

:53:48.:53:59.

the other, I'm not sure you would tell the difference. Oh. Let's be

:54:00.:54:03.

calm and relaxed. Does go into the sea affect your

:54:04.:54:09.

mood? From calm and relaxed

:54:10.:54:12.

to energised and happy, how can a trip to the coast

:54:13.:54:14.

affect your mood? We've sent our deckchair

:54:15.:54:17.

across Britain to find out why Be in by the sea makes me feel

:54:18.:54:36.

happy. Happy because I like to swim. Being by the sea always makes me

:54:37.:54:41.

feel refreshed, I had a really hard time about 15 years ago and spent a

:54:42.:54:45.

couple of months living on the coast and it really put the wind back into

:54:46.:54:51.

my sales. It makes me feel really happy. Being by the sea is, I think

:54:52.:54:56.

it is the best. Even on a rainy day, you can come up here with, you know,

:54:57.:55:01.

you're walking boots on or an umbra la and you still have the

:55:02.:55:05.

magnificent view, you can still go and have fish and chips even if it

:55:06.:55:12.

is raining. -- umbrella. It takes me back home. It is peaceful and quiet.

:55:13.:55:18.

It is away from my daily routine. I like being Bihar -- beside the sea,

:55:19.:55:26.

nice, relaxing family time. About 2000 likes. Very relaxed and I love

:55:27.:55:34.

watching him because he loves watching the waves. Being by the sea

:55:35.:55:38.

makes him very happy and makes him smile. It makes me feel like nice

:55:39.:55:45.

and the sand in between our feet makes it feel like it's all, like,

:55:46.:55:49.

lovely. I couldn't agree with him more. It

:55:50.:55:55.

is all, like, lovely. We will be live in Falmouth

:55:56.:56:01.

in Cornwall all morning, looking at how we can use the way

:56:02.:56:04.

the seaside makes us It is a bit murky affair at the

:56:05.:56:14.

moment. My favourite days at the sea is when it is not sunny.

:56:15.:56:17.

Katie agrees 100% with blue health. She has a photo of the coast when

:56:18.:56:33.

she looks at we -- when she is stressed. Jacka says he is one

:56:34.:56:39.

minute walk from the sea as an twice as relaxed. Natural therapy. Getting

:56:40.:56:40.

contact with us. You can e-mail us at

:56:41.:56:42.

bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk - or share your thoughts with other

:56:43.:56:44.

viewers on our Facebook page. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:56:45.:00:07.

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. South Korea's navy holds live-fire

:00:08.:00:44.

drills, in a show of force. It comes as the US and China fail

:00:45.:00:47.

to agree on a way to address the escalating crisis

:00:48.:00:51.

in North Korea. Good morning, it is

:00:52.:01:09.

Tuesday 5 September. Also this morning: The feel-good

:01:10.:01:13.

factor of our coasts. We have brought the Breakfast

:01:14.:01:27.

deckchair to the Cornish coast to look at Looe health. Researchers are

:01:28.:01:32.

using virtual reality technology to harness the therapeutic power of the

:01:33.:01:33.

sea. It is back to business

:01:34.:01:34.

for MPs in Westminster, as David Davis faces

:01:35.:01:36.

questions over how his Brexit Are we falling out of love with the

:01:37.:01:51.

humble cup of tea? We are spending less on the bags but more on

:01:52.:01:56.

speciality and herbal teas. I am at Harrowgate to find out why.

:01:57.:01:58.

And in sport: World Cup qualifying wins last night for England,

:01:59.:02:00.

Michael O'Neill's side beat the Czech Republic 2-0 in Belfast,

:02:01.:02:04.

which should guarantee them a play-off spot.

:02:05.:02:06.

Good morning. Good morning. If you are waking up to a bit of a gloomy

:02:07.:02:18.

start to the day, with some rain around, bear with the weather. For

:02:19.:02:22.

many of us there will be a bit of sunshine later on. And it will feel

:02:23.:02:26.

a bit humid today as well. I will have all the details a bit later on.

:02:27.:02:28.

First, our main story: South Korea's navy has held major live-fire

:02:29.:02:32.

drills, in the latest show of force to North Korea.

:02:33.:02:35.

A South Korean commander said the North's forces would be buried

:02:36.:02:38.

at sea in the event of a further provocation.

:02:39.:02:40.

Meanwhile, international pressure continues to build

:02:41.:02:42.

against the regime following its largest nuclear bomb test to date.

:02:43.:02:45.

Yesterday the South staged a simulated attack on the North's

:02:46.:02:48.

nuclear test site, involving land-based missile launchers

:02:49.:02:49.

and aircraft, while in New York, the United States warned the UN

:02:50.:02:53.

Security Council that Kim Jong-un was begging for war,

:02:54.:02:55.

and that although Washington does not want conflict,

:02:56.:02:57.

Nuclear powers understand their responsibilities. Kim Jong-un shows

:02:58.:03:19.

no such understanding. His abusive use of missiles and his nuclear

:03:20.:03:23.

threats show that he is begging for war.

:03:24.:03:27.

John Sudworth is in Dandong, on the border between China

:03:28.:03:30.

John, China is still urging caution in dealing with North Korea.

:03:31.:03:35.

What can they do about what is going on at the moment? Good morning. The

:03:36.:03:44.

Chinese city of Dandong is a very good place to contemplate China's

:03:45.:03:49.

position in the North Korean nuclear crisis. If we pan across the river

:03:50.:03:53.

you can see just how close the two countries are at this point. They

:03:54.:03:57.

are connected by the iron bridge behind me, and almost all of North

:03:58.:04:02.

Korea's trade in goods, as well as its vital crude oil supply, flows

:04:03.:04:08.

across this border. You can see an antiquated North Korean powerstation

:04:09.:04:13.

on the other side, a sign of just how dilapidated it energy

:04:14.:04:16.

infrastructure is. Donald Trump's argument, of course, is that China

:04:17.:04:21.

could, if it wanted to, simply force North Korea into submission by

:04:22.:04:26.

turning off this lifeline. But when you look at this proximity, you can

:04:27.:04:31.

see why the Chinese leadership see things very differently indeed.

:04:32.:04:37.

Their fear is that pushing North Korea towards regime collapse will

:04:38.:04:41.

bring chaos and instability, factional infighting, possibly even

:04:42.:04:46.

war, right up against this border. And that is why Beijing is insisting

:04:47.:04:50.

that it will not contemplate a total trade embargo. It will not

:04:51.:04:55.

contemplate talk of military options. All it wants to see is a

:04:56.:04:59.

return to dialogue, and that has been its position all along.

:05:00.:05:04.

Absolutely fascinating to see the point of view from so close to the

:05:05.:05:06.

border. We will be speaking to a leading

:05:07.:05:06.

academic about China's response The Brexit Secretary, David Davis,

:05:07.:05:09.

will face questions in the Commons this afternoon, as MPs

:05:10.:05:17.

return to Westminster He will give an update on last

:05:18.:05:18.

week's third round of negotiations with the European Union,

:05:19.:05:23.

as Downing Street promises to intensify its

:05:24.:05:25.

approach to the talks. Our political correspondent

:05:26.:05:27.

Iain Watson joins us from Good morning to you. You will have

:05:28.:05:38.

quite a few questions to answer later. That's right. It is the first

:05:39.:05:43.

opportunity, of course, for MPs to question David Davis on the progress

:05:44.:05:49.

or lack of it in Brexit negotiations with the EU's chief negotiator,

:05:50.:05:52.

Michel Barnier. The government had been hoping to move on to wider

:05:53.:05:56.

talks with the EU. EU negotiators are less keen. MPs from right across

:05:57.:06:00.

the House of Commons will be keen to get an update on progress on what

:06:01.:06:04.

the government is going to be doing about that. We may even get a major

:06:05.:06:08.

speech from the Prime Minister on that topic later this month. But

:06:09.:06:12.

also this week, of course, it is the EU withdrawal bill, the bill that

:06:13.:06:15.

effectively will take is out of the European Community. And again, MPs

:06:16.:06:19.

will have an opportunity to push their own particular visions of

:06:20.:06:24.

Brexit. We expect strong opposition from the Labour Party in some areas.

:06:25.:06:27.

The Shadow Cabinet under Jeremy Corbyn are meeting this morning to

:06:28.:06:31.

draw up their battle plan for the protection of workers' rights, and

:06:32.:06:35.

for greater Parliamentary scrutiny of the whole process. I think the

:06:36.:06:39.

government will initially get the legislation through, and David

:06:40.:06:42.

Davis, I am sure, will survive his grilling later today. It will be a

:06:43.:06:46.

tough week backed the government, and it will underline just how much

:06:47.:06:49.

this Parliamentary session is going to be dominated by Brexit.

:06:50.:06:52.

A report into whether social services failed a young girl

:06:53.:06:54.

who was murdered by her mother will be published today.

:06:55.:06:57.

Ayeeshia Smith died in 2014, aged 21 months.

:06:58.:06:59.

She had been left in the care of her mother, Kathryn Smith,

:07:00.:07:03.

despite concerns raised by other relatives.

:07:04.:07:04.

The findings of a serious case review will be published

:07:05.:07:07.

A search is resuming this morning for a man who was swept out to sea

:07:08.:07:16.

He was knocked off rocks by a wave while he was fishing at Treyarnon

:07:17.:07:21.

Another man who also fell into the water was rescued.

:07:22.:07:26.

Islands in the Caribbean and the US state of Florida are preparing

:07:27.:07:29.

for hurricane Irma, which is due to make landfall tomorrow morning.

:07:30.:07:33.

It is a bigger storm, both in size and wind speed,

:07:34.:07:35.

than hurricane Harvey, which devastated the states of Texas

:07:36.:07:38.

The Governor of Florida has declared a state of emergency,

:07:39.:07:45.

to give local government enough time to prepare.

:07:46.:07:48.

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, will set

:07:49.:07:50.

out her Government's legislative programme this afternoon,

:07:51.:07:52.

pledging a bold and ambitious plan for the coming year.

:07:53.:07:55.

She is expected to focus on health, the economy

:07:56.:07:57.

Our Scotland correspondent Lorna Gordon joins us from Holyrood.

:07:58.:08:05.

Lorna, what can we expect from the First Minister this afternoon?

:08:06.:08:09.

Good morning to you. What can we expect to hear today? Good morning.

:08:10.:08:17.

It is thought 16 bills will be set out today, to add to the 11 already

:08:18.:08:21.

in progress here at the Scottish Parliament, and I think they will be

:08:22.:08:25.

policy announcements touching on pretty much every area of public

:08:26.:08:29.

life. But in terms of legislation, expect details of bills in areas

:08:30.:08:35.

like health, in areas like education and finance. Some of that has

:08:36.:08:39.

already been heavily trailed. Expect perhaps an announcement to lift that

:08:40.:08:45.

1% cap on public sector pay. In the area of justice there is expected to

:08:46.:08:49.

be a bill to pardon gay men convicted of same sex offences

:08:50.:08:53.

before laws against homosexuality were dropped. And in the area of the

:08:54.:08:57.

environment expect some bold announcements as well. This is being

:08:58.:09:01.

described as the greenest programme for government ever seen. Perhaps

:09:02.:09:04.

there will be announcements for investments in what Nicola Sturgeon

:09:05.:09:08.

would like to call the hi-tech economy, perhaps on electric cars.

:09:09.:09:13.

Her government the challenge is to be seen, after ten years in power,

:09:14.:09:18.

to govern and govern well, and counter accusations from the

:09:19.:09:21.

opposition that they have neglected the day job. Thank you very much,

:09:22.:09:23.

thank you. Large solar storms in space... We

:09:24.:09:32.

are not going to do that? We were going to talk about how it did a

:09:33.:09:36.

group of Wales, but I think we will return to that later.

:09:37.:09:43.

This time of year, many of us dread coming across a spider that has

:09:44.:09:46.

snuck into the house, but a family in Southend had a more

:09:47.:09:50.

A five-year-old boy got a bit of shock when he found a python

:09:51.:09:55.

His mum, Laura, called in a reptile specialist,

:09:56.:10:01.

after using a broom handle to lift the lid and seeing the creature's

:10:02.:10:05.

According to its rescuer, the snake most likely arrived

:10:06.:10:09.

via the U-bend, and is expected to make a full recovery.

:10:10.:10:16.

I have a big snake issue. Obviously I don't want the snake to get hurt

:10:17.:10:23.

at all, but I am not that bothered. The body language tells you

:10:24.:10:27.

everything, doesn't it? From now on I am double pre- flushing. It

:10:28.:10:36.

doesn't make any difference! Everyone is all right.

:10:37.:10:39.

North Korea's nuclear bomb test attracted global condemnation,

:10:40.:10:41.

but notably its closest ally, China, stopped short of calling for tougher

:10:42.:10:44.

sanctions at the UN Security Council.

:10:45.:10:46.

It puts their position at odds with the US,

:10:47.:10:48.

who have accused Kim Jong-un of begging for war.

:10:49.:10:51.

So what influence could China wield, and why do they seem

:10:52.:10:54.

Professor Steve Tsang is director of the China Institute at SOAS,

:10:55.:11:01.

and joins us from our London newsroom.

:11:02.:11:06.

Good morning to you. Thank you so much for joining us. We have just

:11:07.:11:12.

been talking to one of our reporters who is right on the border between

:11:13.:11:18.

China and North Korea. How close are their relations? Well, historically,

:11:19.:11:25.

the relationship between North Korea and China, in terms of the

:11:26.:11:28.

relationship between the teeth and the lips, it is that close, but in

:11:29.:11:37.

the last three or four Mac years, after Kim Jong-un came to power, he

:11:38.:11:41.

basically purged all those senior advisers who had very close ties

:11:42.:11:47.

with the Chinese leaders. So at the moment they are not terribly --

:11:48.:11:52.

there are not terribly effective channels for communication between

:11:53.:11:56.

the two top leaders. And what is it that you think China would like to

:11:57.:12:02.

see happen? Well, the Chinese would ideally have preferred the North

:12:03.:12:04.

Korean is not to have developed a nuclear weapon. But now that the

:12:05.:12:09.

North Koreans have done so, I think all that the Chinese really want is

:12:10.:12:14.

to contain the problem, and not allow it to spread and destabilise

:12:15.:12:20.

the region. I don't think the Chinese are now really working to

:12:21.:12:24.

get rid of the nuclear weapons programme in North Korea. You talked

:12:25.:12:28.

about them not wanting to destabilise the region, but it seems

:12:29.:12:32.

to be having a kind of global impact, in some ways, doesn't it?

:12:33.:12:37.

Absolutely. But while the Chinese do not want to destabilise the region,

:12:38.:12:42.

their first and foremost consideration is the capacity of the

:12:43.:12:47.

Chinese Communist Party to stay in power in China. For that, they

:12:48.:12:51.

cannot afford to see the Communist regime in North Korea Tallat, --

:12:52.:13:00.

collapse, because the North Korean regime continues to survive by the

:13:01.:13:04.

subsidy and support of the Chinese Communist Party, and if the

:13:05.:13:07.

Communist Party in China allows the North Koreans to collapse, it could

:13:08.:13:12.

be seen as a signal by dissidents in China that the Communist Party of

:13:13.:13:16.

China no longer has the political will, determination, or capacity to

:13:17.:13:23.

do whatever it takes to stay in power. That is something that

:13:24.:13:27.

President Xi Jinping will not tolerate. That is very interesting.

:13:28.:13:32.

I understand as well that Kim Jong-un was due to go to China to

:13:33.:13:36.

have a visit, and didn't go. What does that tell you? Well, that

:13:37.:13:42.

clearly shows that Kim Jong-un really, deliberately sends a message

:13:43.:13:46.

to the Chinese that he is not going to go to Beijing and pay homage to

:13:47.:13:51.

President Xi Jinping, that North Korea is not a Chinese client state,

:13:52.:13:58.

that North Korea will do whatever it wants. So what we have seen, in the

:13:59.:14:02.

missile and nuclear test, essentially, is that Kim Jong-un

:14:03.:14:08.

poked Americans on the left eye and poked the Chinese in the right, and

:14:09.:14:13.

gets away with it. It is really fascinating, what you are telling

:14:14.:14:16.

us. As we say, we have seen how close their relationship is. Their

:14:17.:14:19.

borders are right next to each other. What about the possibility of

:14:20.:14:23.

Beijing supporting further UN sanctions? Might that be a way to

:14:24.:14:27.

deal with the situation, or are they unlikely to do that? Well, if the

:14:28.:14:32.

request is to have some very specific increase in the levels of

:14:33.:14:36.

sanctions, I think the Chinese government would probably consider

:14:37.:14:40.

that. But what the Americans are asking for, and potentially

:14:41.:14:44.

implying, is that the Americans might impose a trade war on China, a

:14:45.:14:52.

potential cut off of trade with countries that trade with North

:14:53.:14:57.

Korea. This is a very serious matter for the Chinese. If that should ever

:14:58.:15:01.

come to pass, it will devastate the Chinese economy. And the Chinese

:15:02.:15:05.

don't want to encourage the Americans to even think about that.

:15:06.:15:09.

And just very briefly, how serious and dangerous do you think the

:15:10.:15:14.

situation is right now? Well, it is serious, it is dangerous, as we have

:15:15.:15:24.

a leader in North Korea who is doing it almost by playing a game and

:15:25.:15:28.

seeing how far he can get away with it. And on the other side, in the

:15:29.:15:31.

United States, you have President Trump, who does not always follow

:15:32.:15:37.

the best professional advice that he receives. But in fact, nobody

:15:38.:15:43.

actually wants war. Absolutely fascinating to talk to you on

:15:44.:15:46.

Breakfast. Thank you very much indeed for your time.

:15:47.:15:54.

On the way to work this morning, I had to go for a double handed

:15:55.:15:58.

umbrella. Those words grim and miserable sums

:15:59.:16:08.

it up for some of us but not everywhere. It is mild outside. We

:16:09.:16:13.

have cloud a round but it is dry for some parts of the country. A lot of

:16:14.:16:23.

cloud around and some places, it is producing rain. A quite a muggy,

:16:24.:16:28.

humid feel. For some lucky places some sunshine. Some heavier birth

:16:29.:16:37.

across western Wales and the south-west of England. Further east,

:16:38.:16:44.

some dry weather -- heavier birth. Look at the temperatures. 17 degrees

:16:45.:16:51.

or so. Further north, heavier bursts across north-west England in

:16:52.:16:55.

particular. The rain is clearing and some brighter weather heading in.

:16:56.:16:59.

Sunshine and showers for north-western Scotland but further

:17:00.:17:03.

south and east, the cloud and drizzly rain. Fairly slow-moving

:17:04.:17:09.

weather front will bring some breezes along the south-west. Later

:17:10.:17:17.

on, some sunny and dry weather. Particular for Scotland and Northern

:17:18.:17:21.

Ireland. Across the country, some sunshine and the odd shower around.

:17:22.:17:27.

22 or 23 degrees in the brighter spells. Eventually, we lose the

:17:28.:17:30.

front from the east and the wet weather so it is clear and dry

:17:31.:17:35.

tonight and it will feel fresher. A much different feel to the weather

:17:36.:17:39.

tomorrow morning. Temperatures being in double figures that it will be

:17:40.:17:43.

colder in the countryside. It will feel different tomorrow with the

:17:44.:17:47.

fresh air that starts to pile in from the Atlantic. Also bringing

:17:48.:17:53.

with it, lots of sunshine. Different to today, losing the cloud. A few

:17:54.:17:58.

showers for the West of Scotland, north-west England, too, will be

:17:59.:18:02.

quite breezy in the north. Lighter winds and in the sunny spells,

:18:03.:18:08.

temperatures 16- 19 and less muddy and humid. We hold onto the fresh

:18:09.:18:16.

field to start the Day on Thursday but further north, the rain works in

:18:17.:18:22.

and the winds pick up. That is low pressure dominating the weather

:18:23.:18:25.

through the latter part of the week but still, further south, not a bad

:18:26.:18:31.

day. Heading through into Friday, that pressure stays with us. It will

:18:32.:18:36.

sit to the north of the UK, tightly packed isobars so it will be windy

:18:37.:18:43.

and it will be more showery. An unsettled and to the week. 14- 19

:18:44.:18:49.

degrees and that sets us up for a showery weekend but more on matters

:18:50.:18:53.

we had through the week. Today, muggy start, brighter later.

:18:54.:18:57.

Whether it's the soothing sound of the waves or the sand

:18:58.:19:04.

between your toes, a trip to the seaside can lift the spirits.

:19:05.:19:08.

Now researchers are investigating whether so-called "blue health"

:19:09.:19:10.

could be used to help people living with anxiety,

:19:11.:19:12.

depression and loneliness - even if they can't get to the coast.

:19:13.:19:16.

Breakfast's Graham Satchell has been looking into this and he's

:19:17.:19:18.

Good morning, Graham. I am feeling extraordinarily relaxed. We are in

:19:19.:19:43.

Falmouth on the Cornish coast and the estuary with here is grey but it

:19:44.:19:50.

is one of the most beautiful spots in the whole country. We have aerial

:19:51.:19:56.

pictures of this morning and it is a stunning view. Mental health experts

:19:57.:20:00.

have long known that visits to the coast can lift the spirits and they

:20:01.:20:05.

have become more interested in so-called blue health. What is it

:20:06.:20:11.

about the sea that can help people suffering with anxiety, depression

:20:12.:20:15.

and loneliness? We are looking at one technique which looks to use

:20:16.:20:20.

virtual reality technology to bring the seaside to people that can't get

:20:21.:20:21.

here themselves. We're off the coast of Falmouth

:20:22.:20:24.

on a boat owned by the charity, On board, a skipper,

:20:25.:20:29.

a therapist and two people, Susie and Ian, who are living

:20:30.:20:32.

with anxiety and depression. It's something very special

:20:33.:20:38.

about being on the water. It's such a calming place,

:20:39.:20:40.

you can leave whatever troubles you've got behind,

:20:41.:20:43.

and you can escape. There are group sessions on board

:20:44.:20:45.

and everyone works as part But the charity says the sea itself

:20:46.:20:53.

has a therapeutic quality. There's something going on,

:20:54.:20:57.

it's quite hard to define. But it's something to do

:20:58.:20:59.

with space, something to do Ian started feeling depressed

:21:00.:21:02.

and withdrawn after retiring There is something eternal

:21:03.:21:13.

about the sea, isn't I'm so lucky to be living

:21:14.:21:16.

in Cornwall, to have a pension So what about people who don't

:21:17.:21:20.

live near the coast? A team of researchers

:21:21.:21:25.

from the University of Exeter, a 360 virtual reality

:21:26.:21:28.

camera and a drone. They're trying to capture the power

:21:29.:21:36.

of the coast for people who can't There's quite a lot of evidence now

:21:37.:21:40.

to suggest that accessing and having exposure to natural spaces can be

:21:41.:21:45.

really beneficial for psychological well-being in terms

:21:46.:21:48.

of stress reduction, We're particularly trying to bring

:21:49.:21:50.

that therapeutic blue space in for people who can't

:21:51.:21:54.

access it themselves. So particularly, in our project,

:21:55.:21:56.

it's for people who are living in care homes who can't perhaps

:21:57.:21:59.

get outside so easily. Nicky's project is part of much

:22:00.:22:02.

larger European research Nicky is trying out her videos

:22:03.:22:04.

on a group of volunteers. Some of the pictures

:22:05.:22:19.

are calm and relaxing. Others, more interactive,

:22:20.:22:27.

stimulating. Well, I thought it was a really

:22:28.:22:33.

interesting experience. Anything, I think, connected

:22:34.:22:42.

with the sea or rivers, water, it certainly takes away some

:22:43.:22:54.

of the day-to-day drudgery of life. What we wanted to do was test

:22:55.:23:00.

whether these environments really were relaxing and stimulating,

:23:01.:23:03.

and today we found that actually, the way people reacted to them

:23:04.:23:11.

was the way wed hope that they would, and so we will

:23:12.:23:14.

definitely take those videos forward Nicky will take her headsets

:23:15.:23:17.

into care homes next year to bring blue health to those who can't

:23:18.:23:21.

access it themselves. It was amazing thing those people

:23:22.:23:39.

with those headsets on and I tried it myself. It is incredible how

:23:40.:23:43.

quickly you immerse yourself in the blue environment. Nicky will take

:23:44.:23:46.

those into care homes next year and see how they get on. With me this

:23:47.:24:00.

morning is Joe from the charity. For four days in total, starting on

:24:01.:24:09.

Monday and finishing on Thursday. It is about being part of a team and

:24:10.:24:13.

accrue as well as being out on the water, isn't it? Some of it is the

:24:14.:24:18.

attraction of sailing being at one with the sea and on the sailboat but

:24:19.:24:22.

a lot of it is around the education. A lot of it is about how we, as

:24:23.:24:27.

therapists, are saying it is about the relationship that develops over

:24:28.:24:32.

the four days and encourages people to open up and explore things that

:24:33.:24:36.

they haven't perhaps for many years. Do you think the sea in and of

:24:37.:24:41.

itself has a therapeutic quality? If you think about poetry and films and

:24:42.:24:47.

people will just stand and stare at the sea without question and without

:24:48.:24:51.

understanding why. There is real magic and we can't fully understand

:24:52.:24:58.

it. We know there are negative ions at some of it remains a mystery and

:24:59.:25:03.

that is some of the other work to the programme as well. People here

:25:04.:25:08.

at Exeter University are trying to capture that power in the virtual

:25:09.:25:12.

reality way. That is another step removed. What you think about it? I

:25:13.:25:17.

can see the benefit for people who cannot get to the sea although you

:25:18.:25:20.

are missing a lot of the vital ingredients. I think there is a

:25:21.:25:25.

formula. A sensory awareness, dealing with emotion, the smell of

:25:26.:25:28.

the sea and being at one with nature. I think the environment is

:25:29.:25:34.

incredibly powerful. I didn't think it will fully capture it that it is

:25:35.:25:39.

some start. There you go, blue health and its future here on a

:25:40.:25:44.

windy, starting to rain, Falmouth but still beautiful and calming as

:25:45.:25:47.

we sit in this massive breakfast deckchair.

:25:48.:25:56.

Looking at those pictures, Graham, any day by the seaside is a good

:25:57.:26:01.

day. Enjoy it. Thank you to everybody getting in touch. You said

:26:02.:26:06.

that during Graham's piece that you are going to go and live by the sea.

:26:07.:26:11.

Have you spoken to your family about it? They are away. Delia says being

:26:12.:26:20.

by the sea is the best medicine in the world. We are all Vikings and

:26:21.:26:27.

long for the freedom of the waves. Sao has moved to Morcombe. Wish I

:26:28.:26:36.

was there. It is the sound of the sea, isn't it? Get in touch with us.

:26:37.:26:42.

You can e-mail us at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk

:26:43.:26:44.

or share your thoughts with other viewers on our Facebook page.

:26:45.:26:47.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:26:48.:26:49.

Are we falling out of love with the humble cuppa?

:26:50.:26:53.

Sean's in Harrogate this morning to find out why we are trading

:26:54.:26:56.

in builders tea for something a little more fancy.

:26:57.:27:05.

There what kind of fancy stuff would you fancy? Raspberry and cranberry

:27:06.:27:12.

tea? I'm not sure how that works but companies like this one here,

:27:13.:27:16.

tailors in Harrogate, they make Yorkshire tea and they are having to

:27:17.:27:25.

adapt. This is their -- original tea they make. A lot of Kenyan tea

:27:26.:27:30.

leaves have rising cost. We are consuming a lot less black tea. The

:27:31.:27:39.

ingredients, the leaves they blend, more of that these days will be

:27:40.:27:43.

fruity or herbal. We are spending more in that area. And when you look

:27:44.:27:48.

at the date over the past year or so, that is alternative tea. These

:27:49.:27:54.

companies need to expand their manufacturing base in some way to

:27:55.:27:58.

account for those tastes. Over the morning, we will be looking at what

:27:59.:28:03.

type of herbal tea, how are our tastes changing exactly and moving

:28:04.:28:08.

away from this traditional blend in the

:28:09.:28:08.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:28:09.:31:28.

Now, though, it's back to Dan and Louise.

:31:29.:31:30.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:31:31.:31:39.

In the last few hours, South Korea's navy has held major

:31:40.:31:42.

live-fire drills in the latest show of force to North Korea.

:31:43.:31:45.

A South Korean commander said the North's forces would be buried

:31:46.:31:48.

at sea in the event of a further provocation.

:31:49.:31:50.

Meanwhile, international pressure continues to build

:31:51.:31:52.

against the regime, following its largest nuclear bomb

:31:53.:31:54.

Yesterday, the United States warned the UN Security Council that

:31:55.:32:06.

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis, will face questions in the Commons

:32:07.:32:10.

this afternoon, as MPs return to Westminster

:32:11.:32:12.

Mr Davis will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations

:32:13.:32:28.

with the European Union, as Downing Street promises

:32:29.:32:31.

to intensify its approach to the talks.

:32:32.:32:33.

A man who was swept to see yesterday has died, police have confirmed.

:32:34.:32:44.

He was knocked off rocks by a wave while he was fishing at Treyarnon

:32:45.:32:48.

Another man who also fell into the water was rescued.

:32:49.:32:51.

A report into whether social services failed a young girl

:32:52.:32:53.

who was murdered by her mother will be published today.

:32:54.:32:56.

Ayeeshia Smith died in 2014, aged 21 months.

:32:57.:32:58.

She had been left in the care of her mother, Kathryn Smith,

:32:59.:33:02.

despite concerns raised by other relatives.

:33:03.:33:03.

The findings of a serious case review will be published

:33:04.:33:06.

Islands in the Caribbean and the US state of Florida are preparing

:33:07.:33:10.

for hurricane Irma, which is due to make landfall tomorrow morning.

:33:11.:33:13.

It is a bigger storm both in size and wind speed than hurricane

:33:14.:33:16.

Harvey, which devastated the states of Texas and Louisiana last month.

:33:17.:33:20.

The Governor of Florida has declared a state of emergency,

:33:21.:33:22.

to give local government enough time to prepare.

:33:23.:33:30.

Bangladeshi officials say they are running out of space

:33:31.:33:32.

to accommodate the growing number of Rohingya Muslims

:33:33.:33:35.

Nearly 90,000 people have left Myanmar since the army there began

:33:36.:33:39.

Many say they were attacked by troops and Buddhist mobs.

:33:40.:33:49.

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, will set

:33:50.:33:51.

out her Government's legislative programme this afternoon,

:33:52.:33:53.

pledging a bold and ambitious plan for the coming year.

:33:54.:33:56.

She is expected to focus on health and education,

:33:57.:33:58.

and is also planning to scrap the 1% cap on public-sector pay rises,

:33:59.:34:02.

Speaking earlier on Breakfast, Shirley-Anne Somerville,

:34:03.:34:05.

Minister for Further and Higher Education and Science,

:34:06.:34:07.

Well, it is a development in our policy, much like the programme for

:34:08.:34:28.

government which we will see today, responding to the changing needs of

:34:29.:34:32.

the Scottish people, to the unprecedented challenges the

:34:33.:34:35.

Scottish economy is facing, whether that is through Brexit or new

:34:36.:34:38.

technology. The programme for our government and our following budget

:34:39.:34:42.

is to deal with that, to respond to those challenges in a positive

:34:43.:34:46.

manner and seize the opportunities wherever possible to work with trade

:34:47.:34:53.

unions and others to deliver for the people.

:34:54.:34:55.

Solar storms may have played a role in the fatal stranding of sperm

:34:56.:34:59.

whales last year on the coasts of Britain, Germany,

:35:00.:35:01.

Scientists say the 29 whales were young and free of disease,

:35:02.:35:05.

but their navigational abilities may have been disrupted by the storms,

:35:06.:35:08.

which distort the Earth's magnetic field.

:35:09.:35:10.

Other researchers say the theory is plausible,

:35:11.:35:24.

You were saying earlier you have often wondered how many balloons it

:35:25.:35:29.

would take to make you float. An artist has used 20,000 party

:35:30.:35:32.

balloons to lift herself off the ground, as part of a nine-hour

:35:33.:35:35.

art installation at the Sydney Opera Noemi Lakmaier was suspended

:35:36.:35:38.

from the multi-coloured helium balloons as part of her

:35:39.:35:41.

Cherophobia exhibit. The title means a fear of happiness,

:35:42.:35:44.

and the installation explores the Vienna-born artist's

:35:45.:35:46.

experience of disability. It is really rather lovely. At least

:35:47.:36:02.

she didn't have to blow all of those up, since they are helium. A lot of

:36:03.:36:04.

work. Coming up on the programme:

:36:05.:36:04.

Sarah has the weather. I think it is pretty miserable out,

:36:05.:36:18.

that is a fair summary. Not at all miserable in Northern Ireland, but I

:36:19.:36:22.

don't mean the weather. They are not quite guaranteed a place in Russia

:36:23.:36:26.

next summer, not quite guaranteed their play-off place just yet, but

:36:27.:36:28.

they are so nearly there. It was a great night

:36:29.:36:30.

for the Home Nations in their World Cup

:36:31.:36:32.

qualifying matches. News of England and Scotland

:36:33.:36:33.

in a moment, but the result of the night came from

:36:34.:36:36.

Northern Ireland, who secured second place in Group C with a 2-0 win

:36:37.:36:39.

over the Czech Republic. Jonny Evans scored the first,

:36:40.:36:42.

his first goal for his country Evans's West Brom team-mate

:36:43.:36:46.

Chris Brunt scored the second. Northern Ireland aren't quite

:36:47.:36:49.

certain yet of a spot in the play-offs, but manager

:36:50.:36:51.

Michael O'Neill is confident With Germany coming here it would be

:36:52.:36:54.

nice to take the extra point. If we need something in the final

:36:55.:36:58.

two games we will have to go and get We are in a very strong position

:36:59.:37:03.

and if you look at this campaign it has almost been

:37:04.:37:08.

flawless, to be honest. Seven clean sheets, the only

:37:09.:37:10.

defeat away to Germany. As a coach or a manager

:37:11.:37:12.

there is very little more you can ask of your players,

:37:13.:37:16.

and they have just kept delivering. England need just two points

:37:17.:37:18.

from their final two games to qualify, after they came

:37:19.:37:21.

from behind to beat Slovakia Goals from Eric Dier

:37:22.:37:24.

and Marcus Rashford gave England the win, after the Slovaks

:37:25.:37:27.

took the lead with just England will qualify if they beat

:37:28.:37:30.

Slovenia at home next month, but it was Rashford

:37:31.:37:33.

who was the match-winner last night. You don't look at him -

:37:34.:37:36.

well, you look at him and he's never To be fair, I don't think the team

:37:37.:37:41.

did, I think they responded well. His impact in taking people

:37:42.:37:48.

on and getting us up the pitch in counter-attack is not

:37:49.:37:51.

only huge for the team Scotland took advantage

:37:52.:37:54.

of the chance to make up some ground Christophe Berra gave them

:37:55.:38:00.

an early lead against Malta. Leigh Griffiths made it

:38:01.:38:04.

two after half-time. If they can win their last two

:38:05.:38:06.

games, then they can qualify for the play-offs, despite a slow

:38:07.:38:09.

start to their campaign. I think when you get to that stage

:38:10.:38:13.

and the tournament is in your hands, We can look back on the tournament

:38:14.:38:19.

and say, we could have done better But we try to make up

:38:20.:38:25.

for the bad performances, or the low-key performances,

:38:26.:38:28.

by doing the best we can. Tonight, Wales are in Moldova,

:38:29.:38:34.

looking to keep their hopes Juan Martin del Potro produced

:38:35.:38:36.

an incredible comeback overnight to reach the quarter-finals

:38:37.:38:43.

of the US Open. He fought back from two sets down

:38:44.:38:45.

and match point down to beat Dominic Thiem of Austria,

:38:46.:38:48.

that despite saying that he couldn't breathe properly at

:38:49.:38:51.

times during the match. His reward is a meeting

:38:52.:38:53.

with Roger Federer. Meanwhile, teenager Andrey Rublev

:38:54.:38:55.

will play Rafa Nadal in the last eight, after he beat ninth seed

:38:56.:38:58.

David Goffin in straight sets. Rublev is the first teenager

:38:59.:39:01.

since Andy Roddick, in 2001, to reach this stage

:39:02.:39:04.

of the men's draw. He says Nadal was one

:39:05.:39:06.

of his childhood idols. Women's world number one

:39:07.:39:13.

Karolina Pliskova dropped just one game against American Jennifer Brady

:39:14.:39:15.

on her way to the quarter-finals. Who will be the UK's candidate city

:39:16.:39:18.

for the 2022 Commonwealth Games? Well, we should find out

:39:19.:39:29.

in the next week or so. Liverpool and Birmingham are the two

:39:30.:39:32.

vying for the award, and Birmingham's bid team have

:39:33.:39:35.

released a list of 22 reasons why it They include leaving an athletics

:39:36.:39:38.

legacy by refurbishing the Alexander Stadium,

:39:39.:39:45.

home of the British trials, increasing the capacity to 45,000

:39:46.:39:47.

for the Commonwealth Games. Liverpool say they could host the

:39:48.:40:09.

ceremony at Anfield. Rugby sevens, and swimming in the docks. A

:40:10.:40:15.

floating swimming pool in the docks. It is a fabulous place to swim, I am

:40:16.:40:20.

not meant to be biased but it is a great place to swim. And archery at

:40:21.:40:24.

entry. Along straight. -- Aintree. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

:40:25.:40:29.

are expecting their third child, but once again, Catherine

:40:30.:40:32.

is suffering from severe morning Hyperemesis gravidarum affects

:40:33.:40:35.

around one in 100 pregnant women. So what is it, and what can

:40:36.:40:37.

be done to treat it? Dr Yusra Khan is a GP

:40:38.:40:41.

who is pregnant with her second child, and suffers

:40:42.:40:44.

from the condition. Very good morning to you. Have I

:40:45.:41:00.

pronounced it right? Absolutely, that was spot on. So you suffer from

:41:01.:41:05.

it yourself, and to call it a severe form of morning sickness is probably

:41:06.:41:09.

an understatement. Tell us what it is like. Absolutely, so as you save

:41:10.:41:16.

hyperemesis effects one in 100 pregnancies, and I would say this

:41:17.:41:20.

torturous and soul snatching. I am 24 weeks pregnant, this is my second

:41:21.:41:23.

pregnancy. I fell pregnant two years ago and this was an unplanned

:41:24.:41:28.

pregnancy, and it did come as a bit of a shock and it came with the

:41:29.:41:31.

severe symptoms of hyperemesis The main thing to say is that

:41:32.:41:35.

morning sickness is an underestimation. It is a spectrum,

:41:36.:41:39.

and hyperemesis gravidarum is at the severe end. Metaphorically I would

:41:40.:41:45.

say that morning sickness is unpleasant, and it is something that

:41:46.:41:51.

is like walking on Lego, I suppose, but hyperemesis gravidarum is like

:41:52.:41:54.

walking on fire. So both is unpleasant but one is severely more

:41:55.:41:58.

unpleasant than the other, and in this case it is hyperemesis

:41:59.:42:01.

gravidarum. Morning sickness is something that you expect in

:42:02.:42:05.

pregnancy. Pygott women like to feel nauseous, because it shows them that

:42:06.:42:09.

they are pregnant, their hormones are active, and the foetus is

:42:10.:42:12.

developing well -- pregnant women. Mild nausea may improve by rest, by

:42:13.:42:19.

that gingered biscuit cure that everyone goes on about. But

:42:20.:42:22.

hyperemesis gravidarum, on the other hand, is the complete opposite --

:42:23.:42:30.

ginger biscuit. It is severely the -- debilitating, I have passed the

:42:31.:42:36.

acute phase of hyperemesis. For me that was from five to 18 weeks, and

:42:37.:42:41.

I can... What sort of things? Because people can be sick 60, 70

:42:42.:42:47.

times a day? So for me sickness was about ten times a day. The main

:42:48.:42:51.

symptom was the crippling nausea. I was unable to eat and drink, I was

:42:52.:42:56.

unable to set up in bed. My mother and my husband had to lift me up to

:42:57.:43:00.

drink. Without them, I wouldn't have been able to function. I still can't

:43:01.:43:04.

look after my two-year-old child, which obviously is extremely

:43:05.:43:08.

upsetting. I lost weight, my prepregnancy weight back at five

:43:09.:43:15.

weeks was 52 kg, and it went down to 42 kg. And that can be... You talked

:43:16.:43:23.

about feeling awful, but actually it can be dangerous as well. Because I

:43:24.:43:28.

think the Duchess was in hospital ones with it. You also have ended up

:43:29.:43:32.

in hospital. His dehydration the problem? I ended up in hospital

:43:33.:43:37.

three times on this occasion, and it was severe dehydration. I felt

:43:38.:43:41.

dizzy, I wasn't urinating, I was unable to keep anything down for

:43:42.:43:45.

weeks on end. I had lost so much weight. My antenatal consultant

:43:46.:43:50.

described me, with all due respect to those people, described me as an

:43:51.:43:53.

African child who looked extremely malnourished when I fainted on her

:43:54.:44:00.

own clinic, at the time she admitted meet for IV steroids, which was the

:44:01.:44:04.

life changing treatment which I didn't access in my last pregnancy.

:44:05.:44:08.

We talked about the programme yesterday about the difference

:44:09.:44:12.

between a headache and a migraine, and the sufferer said if you haven't

:44:13.:44:16.

had it you don't know how bad it is. This sounds pretty similar. I

:44:17.:44:20.

wonder, is there support from GPs? To GPs understand? And if someone

:44:21.:44:25.

goes to the GP and says this is not morning sickness, this is worse, is

:44:26.:44:29.

that support network out there? I would say there is a growing support

:44:30.:44:33.

network out there. I think some GPs may not be aware of what hyperemesis

:44:34.:44:36.

gravidarum is, but they will certainly be willing to find out,

:44:37.:44:40.

look it up, and I would advise GPs at the moment to look up the RCOG

:44:41.:44:48.

guidelines. There is also a conference taking place in Windsor,

:44:49.:44:52.

in October, so midwives and GPs, go to that if you can. Send your team

:44:53.:44:58.

members. Hyperemesis is... Not a lot of people suffer from it. Most

:44:59.:45:03.

people suffer from mild to moderate end of nausea and vomiting, and a

:45:04.:45:07.

lot of GPs, for example myself, when I was a GP training, I was doing

:45:08.:45:11.

might have Citrix and Gynaecology in the first year of my GT --

:45:12.:45:22.

obstetrics and Gynaecology in the first year of my GP training, and

:45:23.:45:27.

there is a lot of support out there from GPs. And they are willing to

:45:28.:45:30.

work and established that doctor-patient relationship, to

:45:31.:45:36.

improve that. The second thing is a support charity which I am a trustee

:45:37.:45:40.

for have helpline which runs from 9am to 4:30pm and they can give you

:45:41.:45:44.

advice if you are facing barriers with mid midwives, with GPs, or

:45:45.:45:49.

getting into hospital to dehydration. They also have a

:45:50.:45:54.

volunteer support. So 1-to-1 Tech support, and that is why I am a

:45:55.:45:59.

trustee on this charity. And how are you today? Just briefly, are you OK?

:46:00.:46:04.

Yes, so I have passed my acute illness phase, or I wouldn't be

:46:05.:46:09.

here. Today is a massive step for me. It is the first four our

:46:10.:46:13.

journey, my brave sister brought me up here, my mum is looking after my

:46:14.:46:17.

little boy and she has been fantastic. My husband is extremely

:46:18.:46:20.

supportive. The full family involved.

:46:21.:46:26.

Here's Sarah with a look at this morning's weather.

:46:27.:46:30.

It is miserable in some places. We have cloud and rain around this

:46:31.:46:40.

morning but not everywhere. A bit of brightness. More of us will see the

:46:41.:46:44.

brightness later in the day. This morning, things are looking like

:46:45.:46:49.

this. A lot of cloud and missed. Across many parts of the country, a

:46:50.:46:57.

similar story. Mist. Mild and muggy from the word go but the skies will

:46:58.:47:01.

brighten up for many of us. Here is the rain it draped across the

:47:02.:47:05.

country. Some heavier birth down towards the south-west. Further

:47:06.:47:10.

east, less rain but still the odd drizzly shower around. 17 degrees.

:47:11.:47:16.

Quite a bit of a fog around the hills with the low cloud, too.

:47:17.:47:20.

Outbreaks of rain continue across northern England. Also, clearer

:47:21.:47:31.

conditions with some sunshine and also showers are around, too. This

:47:32.:47:36.

rain we have this morning will edge its way eastwards. Some parts down

:47:37.:47:48.

towards the Midlands will stay cloudy. Some brighter spells further

:47:49.:47:55.

south. It will feel warm. The chance of continuing showers. Into this

:47:56.:48:02.

morning and overnight, we say goodbye to them and we are in the

:48:03.:48:11.

clear, fresh weather. Still, a few showers it will feel different

:48:12.:48:17.

today. A touch of grass frost to the north. The fresh conditions continue

:48:18.:48:21.

on Wednesday and the winds coming from Atlantic. The best day of the

:48:22.:48:27.

week in terms of Sunshine tomorrow. A few showers for western Scotland,

:48:28.:48:32.

north-west England, too. With the light winds of further south,

:48:33.:48:38.

present temperatures, 19 degrees or so. Further north, 16 or 17. Less

:48:39.:48:44.

humid. The fresh, dry weather continues across the southern half

:48:45.:48:48.

of the country, lasting on Thursday. Further north, things are changing,

:48:49.:48:53.

bringing wet and windy weather. Particularly for Scotland, Northern

:48:54.:48:57.

Ireland and North of England. Late on Thursday and into Friday. We will

:48:58.:49:04.

see this area of low pressure. It is fitting to the north of the UK,

:49:05.:49:15.

bringing windy conditions. It could set us up for a fairly unsettled,

:49:16.:49:18.

windy and at times wet weekend. Now, cup of tea. A on my number

:49:19.:49:33.

three today. In terms of brewing, you have to go tag in first and then

:49:34.:49:41.

milk. Without question, Dan. We will put it to the test. I will surprise

:49:42.:49:47.

you and ask you afterwards. We are talking about this because the sales

:49:48.:49:50.

of traditional black tea are falling but fruit and herbal teas are on the

:49:51.:49:53.

rise. Sean's at a tea factory

:49:54.:49:53.

in North Yorkshire to tell us more. I don't think you put milk in any

:49:54.:50:07.

fruity or herbal teas either. This is the factory in Harrogate where

:50:08.:50:10.

they make Yorkshire tea. That is what is going on there. Sales are

:50:11.:50:24.

down. Rest assured, that is not the tea over there that will be going in

:50:25.:50:30.

your tea bags. Ian has the great job title as head of tea. You have

:50:31.:50:38.

thousands of these big bags out the back and you are basically in charge

:50:39.:50:42.

of bringing this stuff in. What is the biggest change you have seen in

:50:43.:50:49.

the market? A shift into African tea. There wasn't much tea growing

:50:50.:50:54.

in Africa in the 1950s. It was India and China. We are seeing a big shift

:50:55.:50:59.

in tea production in Africa so a lot of the tea is coming in from Africa.

:51:00.:51:04.

Most of the Tiwi buyer is from Kenya and Rwanda where we buy a lot. --

:51:05.:51:15.

most of the Tiwi buyer. -- most of the tea we buy. There has been

:51:16.:51:22.

criticism of the industry globally. On the whole, the way it has been

:51:23.:51:27.

treated. Tailors have said they are worried about the conditions they

:51:28.:51:32.

have been working in. What changes have inmates? We were founding

:51:33.:51:35.

members of the ethical tea partnership. The consortium of tea

:51:36.:51:41.

packers around the world working to improve standards globally. We add

:51:42.:51:50.

tailors are also helping to work. We are doing work within the

:51:51.:51:53.

communities of farmers to raise standards and bring water to

:51:54.:52:02.

schools. -- Taylors. We are building relationships. We have contracts in

:52:03.:52:08.

place so we know we are with them buying tea every week. Left just

:52:09.:52:12.

come around here for a second. When you look at the traditional tea bag,

:52:13.:52:18.

how do you know what flavours people want? We have talked about raspberry

:52:19.:52:24.

and cranberry. You have been used to lack of tea. Yeah, black tea is

:52:25.:52:30.

still so popular. -- lakh. Even my children drink it. They like green

:52:31.:52:37.

tea as well so they are trying different labour 's. We have

:52:38.:52:42.

research and developing team. -- research and development --

:52:43.:52:47.

flavours. I'm not surprised your children are drinking it if you're

:52:48.:52:52.

in dad is head of tea at Taylors. Let's look at how manufacturing is

:52:53.:52:58.

check -- changing. It is not a cotton mill. This is because they

:52:59.:53:03.

are making these sachets for all the new types of tea. This is a green

:53:04.:53:08.

tea line. This is a whole different type of production that tailors have

:53:09.:53:17.

had to invest in. -- Taylors. Good morning, Richard. How much of the

:53:18.:53:21.

change has the industry had to deal with when it comes to it? Are they

:53:22.:53:29.

spending lots of money? There has been a change in the tea market in

:53:30.:53:33.

recent years in that we have seen sales of black tea declining for a

:53:34.:53:38.

long time by volume but other areas within the tea market such as green

:53:39.:53:41.

tea which we are seeing over here and also fruit and herbal teas and

:53:42.:53:46.

you're more speciality blends which have been doing very well. That is

:53:47.:53:52.

actually compensated us to a certain extent to the decline seen in

:53:53.:53:59.

traditional black tea. Simple answer, what is your favourite

:54:00.:54:03.

alternative flavour? I do like green tea. Nice little first step towards

:54:04.:54:13.

something a bit more funky. We will be looking at it later at tasting.

:54:14.:54:17.

We will have a taste test and see how we can tell the difference

:54:18.:54:21.

between a black tea and a rhubarb and custard tea. To be honest, most

:54:22.:54:28.

of us can probably tell. That's fair. What is wrong with the mango

:54:29.:54:39.

or something, I mean, come on. Not for me. Simple pleasures.

:54:40.:54:43.

From calm and relaxed to energised and happy,

:54:44.:54:45.

how can a trip to the coast affect your mood?

:54:46.:54:47.

We've sent our deckchair across Britain to find out why

:54:48.:54:50.

Being by the sea makes me feel happy.

:54:51.:55:05.

Happy because I like to swim in the sea.

:55:06.:55:08.

Being by the sea always makes me feel refreshed,

:55:09.:55:10.

I had a really hard time about 15 years ago and I spent a couple

:55:11.:55:14.

of months living on the coast and it really blew the wind through my soul

:55:15.:55:18.

Yeah, being by the sea is, I think it's the best.

:55:19.:55:31.

Even on a rainy day, you can come up here with,

:55:32.:55:34.

you know, you're waterproofs on or an umbrella

:55:35.:55:36.

but you still have the magnificent view, you can still go and have fish

:55:37.:55:40.

For me, it takes me back home as well.

:55:41.:55:48.

I like being beside the sea, it brings the family together,

:55:49.:55:57.

Very relaxed and I love watching him because he loves

:55:58.:56:09.

watching the waves so being by the sea makes him very happy

:56:10.:56:12.

It makes me feel like nice and all and the sand

:56:13.:56:21.

in between our feet makes it feel like it's

:56:22.:56:23.

Thank you so much for getting in touch. We will reel at -- readout

:56:24.:56:41.

your e-mail. Most of you making the gel is saying in our live by the

:56:42.:56:46.

sea, lucky you. 100% of people are saying that it does make a

:56:47.:56:50.

difference. Even the idea of going to the sea can lift your spirits.

:56:51.:56:54.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:56:55.:00:19.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:00:20.:00:25.

South Korea's Navy holds live fire drills in a show of force.

:00:26.:00:28.

It comes as the US and China fail to agree on a way to address

:00:29.:00:31.

the escalating crisis in North Korea.

:00:32.:00:46.

Good morning, it's Tuesday the 5th of September.

:00:47.:00:51.

Also this morning - the feel-good factor of our coasts.

:00:52.:01:00.

Good morning from Falmouth, we have brought a deck chair to look at the

:01:01.:01:07.

so-called blue health on the Cornish coast. Researchers are using virtual

:01:08.:01:12.

reality technology to try to harness the therapeutic power of the sea.

:01:13.:01:15.

It's back to business for MPs in Westminster as David Davis faces

:01:16.:01:17.

questions over how his Brexit negotiations are going.

:01:18.:01:22.

Good morning. Are we falling out of love with the humble cuppa? Vigurs

:01:23.:01:31.

seen by Breakfast show that we are buying fewer black tea bags but we

:01:32.:01:35.

are buying more things like green tea and decaf tea. I am at a tea

:01:36.:01:39.

factory in Harrogate to find out why.

:01:40.:01:42.

In sport, World Cup qualifying wins last night for England, Scotland and

:01:43.:01:46.

Northern Ireland. Michael O'Neill's side beat the Czech Republic 2-0 in

:01:47.:01:50.

Belfast, which should guarantee them a play-off spot.

:01:51.:01:56.

Get me out of this boat! Utterly horrible.

:01:57.:02:01.

Horrible. He has endured arctic conditions and horrendous blisters.

:02:02.:02:04.

We will check in with a record-breaking rower who was back

:02:05.:02:09.

in the UK, look at those hands, after more than two weeks stranded

:02:10.:02:12.

on a remote Norwegian island. We will be finding out whether his

:02:13.:02:16.

hands have recovered. Sarah has the weather. Good morning,

:02:17.:02:21.

quite murky, Misty and drizzly firs thing but the weather will brighten

:02:22.:02:25.

up later and into tomorrow. All the details in around 15 minutes.

:02:26.:02:27.

Thank you very much, Sarah. South Korea's navy has held major

:02:28.:02:29.

live fire drills in the latest show A South Korean commander said

:02:30.:02:34.

the North's forces would be buried at sea in the event

:02:35.:02:38.

of a further provocation. Meanwhile international pressure

:02:39.:02:41.

continues to build against the regime following its largest

:02:42.:02:44.

nuclear bomb test to date. Yesterday the South staged

:02:45.:02:48.

a simulated attack on the North's nuclear test site involving

:02:49.:02:50.

land-based missile While in New York, the United States

:02:51.:02:54.

warned the UN Security Council that Kim Jong Un was begging for war

:02:55.:02:59.

and that although Washington does not want conflict,

:03:00.:03:02.

its patience was not unlimited. Nuclear powers understand their

:03:03.:03:18.

responsibilities. Kim Jong Un shows no such understanding. His abusive

:03:19.:03:23.

use of missiles and his nuclear threats show that he is begging for

:03:24.:03:24.

war. Earlier we spoke to our China

:03:25.:03:27.

correspondent John Sudworth, who is in Dangdong, on the border

:03:28.:03:29.

between China and North Korea. The Chinese city of Dangdong is a

:03:30.:03:44.

good place to contemplate China's position in this crisis. You can see

:03:45.:03:48.

how close the two countries are at this point, they are connected by

:03:49.:03:52.

that iron bridge behind me and almost all of North Korea's trade in

:03:53.:03:57.

goods and its vital crude oil supply flows across this border. You can

:03:58.:04:03.

see an antiquated North Korean power station on the other side, a sign of

:04:04.:04:08.

how dilapidated its energy infrastructure is. Donald Trump's

:04:09.:04:14.

argument is that China could, if it wanted to, simply force North Korea

:04:15.:04:20.

into submission by turning off this lifeline, but when you look at this

:04:21.:04:24.

proximity you can see why the Chinese leadership see things very

:04:25.:04:29.

differently indeed. Their fear is that pushing North Korea towards

:04:30.:04:37.

regime collapse would bring chaos and instability, fractional

:04:38.:04:39.

infighting, possibly even wore right up against the border. That is why

:04:40.:04:43.

Beijing insists it will not contemplate a total trade embargo,

:04:44.:04:48.

it will not contemplate talk of military options and all it wants to

:04:49.:04:52.

see is a return to dialogue. That has been its position all along.

:04:53.:04:53.

In just over 15 minutes we will be getting a view of what life

:04:54.:04:57.

We'll be speaking to a tour operator to the region.

:04:58.:05:01.

They have visited the country several times.

:05:02.:05:03.

The Brexit Secretary David Davis will face questions in the Commons

:05:04.:05:06.

this afternoon as MPs return to Westminster after

:05:07.:05:07.

He will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations

:05:08.:05:11.

with the European Union as Downing Street promises to

:05:12.:05:14.

Our political correspondent Iain Watson joins us from Westminster.

:05:15.:05:24.

Is he likely to get a bit of a grilling on the first day back? I

:05:25.:05:31.

think that is fair to say. Over the summer the Government set out in

:05:32.:05:37.

more detail its Brexit strategy in a different position paper, another is

:05:38.:05:41.

coming tomorrow. MPs will be keen to check the progress, or lack of it,

:05:42.:05:45.

on the negotiations with the EU Commission. The Government is very

:05:46.:05:48.

keen to move onto wider trade talks this autumn. The European Commission

:05:49.:05:54.

far less so. I think David Davis will get many questions about his

:05:55.:05:58.

negotiation strategy and whether he is adopting the right approach. I

:05:59.:06:01.

think an even bigger challenge for the Government will come later this

:06:02.:06:05.

week with the EU withdrawal bill, as it is called, the Great Repeal Bill,

:06:06.:06:09.

as the Government would like to call it, is debated. That would take us

:06:10.:06:14.

out of the EU but transfer lots of EU laws into British laws. The

:06:15.:06:17.

Labour Shadow Cabinet is meeting of the Jeremy Corbyn this morning and

:06:18.:06:21.

they will be pushing the Government to guarantee workers' writes. There

:06:22.:06:26.

will be also more Parliamentary scrutiny of the Brexit process. They

:06:27.:06:30.

say ministers want too much pressure for themselves. I think it will be a

:06:31.:06:36.

difficult first week back for the Government ministers. There could be

:06:37.:06:37.

a bit of a ding-dong. A man who was swept to sea off

:06:38.:06:39.

Cornwall yesterday afternoon has He was one of two men

:06:40.:06:42.

who were washed off rocks while fishing at Treyarnon Bay,

:06:43.:06:46.

near Padstow. A search for the second man

:06:47.:06:47.

is resuming this morning. A report into whether social

:06:48.:06:52.

services failed a young girl who was murdered by her mother

:06:53.:06:56.

will be published today. Ayeeshia Smith died

:06:57.:06:59.

in 2014 aged 21 months. She had been left in the care

:07:00.:07:01.

of her mother, Kathryn Smith, despite concerns raised

:07:02.:07:04.

by other relatives. The findings of a serious

:07:05.:07:05.

case review will be Islands in the Caribbean

:07:06.:07:07.

and the US state of Florida are preparing for Hurricane Irma,

:07:08.:07:13.

which is due to make It's a bigger storm -

:07:14.:07:16.

both in size and wind speed - than Hurricane Harvey,

:07:17.:07:22.

which devastated the states of Texas The Governor of Florida has declared

:07:23.:07:24.

a state of emergency to give local Scotland's First Minister,

:07:25.:07:31.

Nicola Sturgeon, will set out her Government's legislative

:07:32.:07:38.

programme this afternoon - pledging a bold and ambitious plan

:07:39.:07:40.

for the coming year. A deposit scheme is expected to be

:07:41.:07:51.

announced the return of plastic bottles. But the main focus of the

:07:52.:07:58.

programme will be on improving education and the economy.

:07:59.:08:00.

Our Scotland correspondent Lorna Gordon joins us from Holyrood.

:08:01.:08:05.

What do we expect? This is described as the green is

:08:06.:08:10.

programme for government ever seen, so there will be the deposit return

:08:11.:08:14.

scheme for plastic waste, expect more announcements to do with the

:08:15.:08:18.

environment. I think the challenge for Nicola Sturgeon and her

:08:19.:08:23.

Government is to counter accusations from the opposition in Scotland that

:08:24.:08:26.

they have neglected the day job, the domestic agenda, to focus on

:08:27.:08:32.

arguments for a second independence referendum. Before the summer she

:08:33.:08:35.

said she would take stock and refreshed and said that after ten

:08:36.:08:44.

years in power the SNP needed to set out what she called creative, bold

:08:45.:08:47.

and radical policy. I think it is fair to say we can expect lots of

:08:48.:08:49.

announcements today touching on every area of public life like

:08:50.:08:53.

health, education, handing more powers to head teachers. There will

:08:54.:08:56.

be announcements on the economy, a lifting of the controversial 1% cap

:08:57.:09:04.

on public sector pay as well. In total, we expect 16 pieces of

:09:05.:09:07.

legislation to be announced today. Thank you very much, Lorna.

:09:08.:09:09.

Bangladeshi officials say they are running out of space

:09:10.:09:11.

to accommodate the growing number of Rohingya Muslims fleeing

:09:12.:09:14.

Nearly 90,000 people have left Myanmar

:09:15.:09:17.

since the Army there began a campaign against extremist groups.

:09:18.:09:19.

Many say they were attacked by troops and Buddhist mobs.

:09:20.:09:24.

A French court is expected to deliver verdicts today

:09:25.:09:27.

in a privacy case involving topless photographs of the

:09:28.:09:29.

The pictures were taken while the Royal couple

:09:30.:09:33.

were on holiday in Provence five years ago, and published

:09:34.:09:35.

Four people are on trial, along with two photographers who've

:09:36.:09:40.

been charged in connection with separate pictures published

:09:41.:09:42.

It comes a day after the Duke and Duchess announced

:09:43.:09:47.

they are expecting their third child.

:09:48.:09:56.

That makes lots of front pages, as you can imagine.

:09:57.:10:02.

Including the times. Lots of different pictures. We were talking

:10:03.:10:06.

about that about half an hour ago, she suffers from this really extreme

:10:07.:10:10.

form of morning sickness. I think with her first child she was

:10:11.:10:12.

in hospital for quite some time. Solar storms may have played a role

:10:13.:10:13.

in the fatal stranding of sperm whales last year on the coasts

:10:14.:10:17.

of Britain, Germany, Scientists say the 29 whales

:10:18.:10:19.

were young and free of disease - but their navigational abilities may

:10:20.:10:23.

have been disrupted by the storms, which distort

:10:24.:10:26.

the Earth's magnetic field. Other researchers say the theory

:10:27.:10:31.

is plausible but argue it's If you have a fear of snakes

:10:32.:10:34.

this is not going to You might want to go and make a cup

:10:35.:10:40.

of tea! A family in Southend had

:10:41.:10:44.

an unwelcome visitor this week. A five-year-old boy got a bit

:10:45.:10:48.

of shock when he found His mum Laura called in a reptile

:10:49.:10:50.

specialist after using a broom handle to lift the lid and seeing

:10:51.:10:56.

the creature's head According to its rescuer the snake

:10:57.:10:59.

most likely arrived via the U-bend and is expected to

:11:00.:11:09.

make a full recovery. Interesting with your pronunciation

:11:10.:11:28.

of you bend. You bend?! I am really unhappy with that story. It is very

:11:29.:11:33.

seldom that you fold your arms like that. You are very unhappy. Snakes

:11:34.:11:38.

in a drain does not make me feel good! I am going fully prepared to

:11:39.:11:50.

the toilet today! Let's talk about an amazing

:11:51.:11:50.

adventure. They've broken 11 world records -

:11:51.:11:52.

the most for any ocean rowing expedition in history -

:11:53.:11:55.

but for the nine men crew of Polar Row, it hasn't

:11:56.:11:57.

all been smooth sailing. Forced to abandon the final

:11:58.:11:59.

leg of their journey from Norway to Iceland,

:12:00.:12:01.

the rowers became stranded on a remote volcanic

:12:02.:12:03.

island for over two weeks. Now safely back home,

:12:04.:12:06.

one of the crew - Olympic gold medallist Alex Gregory -

:12:07.:12:09.

will be telling us about his We talked to him when he was on the

:12:10.:12:11.

island. But first let's look back

:12:12.:12:17.

at their incredible journey. It's all going to be

:12:18.:12:21.

dependent on weather and ice. We don't know how long

:12:22.:12:24.

it's going to take. It might take 20 days, it might take

:12:25.:12:28.

more, it might take less. We've got enough food, we've got

:12:29.:12:31.

enough provisions, we're all set, We're on the beach here, scattered

:12:32.:12:35.

with driftwood and whale bones. There are a group of 18 Norwegian

:12:36.:13:24.

people who live here. We've probably overstayed our

:13:25.:13:29.

welcome by now, so we're really working hard on trying to flag down

:13:30.:13:31.

a boat, and we hear there's a boat coming past next week sometime,

:13:32.:13:34.

and so we're hoping It looked like a movie, but it was

:13:35.:13:37.

real life. And double Olympic champion

:13:38.:13:50.

Alex Gregory is safely back home in Oxfordshire this morning,

:13:51.:13:52.

and joins us now. Good morning. Those were your hands,

:13:53.:13:59.

can you show your hands to the camera to make sure they are back to

:14:00.:14:04.

normal, please? The hands are absolutely fine now. Just a little

:14:05.:14:09.

bit of peeling skin, that is all. How painful was that? We talk about

:14:10.:14:15.

the adventure, but what had happened, was the just water getting

:14:16.:14:23.

into the skin? That was just days and days, probably ten days, of

:14:24.:14:26.

wearing white gloves and never having the opportunity to dry out.

:14:27.:14:31.

We were wet in cold conditions for 12 days in total, really. There is

:14:32.:14:37.

no time or place to dry out. The hands just soaked up all the

:14:38.:14:41.

moisture. That was the result. My goodness. You got 11 world records,

:14:42.:14:49.

you just missed out on one, tell us about those last few days? The whole

:14:50.:14:58.

experience was incredible. I feel so lucky to have had the opportunity to

:14:59.:15:05.

do that. I started on Svalbard, the whole exhibition started in northern

:15:06.:15:10.

Norway and a fee -- a crew of five rotors Svalbard, that is the island

:15:11.:15:15.

's with the most continuously inhabited people... The most

:15:16.:15:19.

northerly town in the world that is continuously inhabited. I arrived on

:15:20.:15:24.

Svalbard on August the 2nd, on the 8th of August we pushed off land and

:15:25.:15:29.

headed north. We tried to roll as far north as we possibly could and

:15:30.:15:35.

so for four days in four nights we travelled north, got to the

:15:36.:15:40.

permanent ice, we got as far as we could possibly row and apply it was

:15:41.:15:45.

amazing, it was ice as far as you could see, Wales were popping up,

:15:46.:15:50.

seals were popping up and we turned south-west and headed for Iceland,

:15:51.:15:55.

that was the end destination, the ultimate goal. But on the way we

:15:56.:15:59.

encountered some pretty rough forever. Very rough weather, I would

:16:00.:16:05.

say. It was fairly horrendous for a number of days. I was scared.

:16:06.:16:16.

We saw in the video those dark times and how emotional you got. You

:16:17.:16:24.

genuinely felt this could be the end, that you might not have got

:16:25.:16:29.

back to see your family if you had carried on? Yes, at certain times I

:16:30.:16:34.

felt that and when you're tired and exhausted and in high waves and

:16:35.:16:39.

rough conditions, ah, it's scary and it want necessarily the size of the

:16:40.:16:43.

waves that worried me, it was the cold of the water and if, if by

:16:44.:16:48.

chance the boat had flipped which does happen ne ocean rowing, if that

:16:49.:16:53.

happened I believe one of us or some of us wouldn't have come home alive.

:16:54.:16:57.

You don't have much chance in that water to get warm and dry and

:16:58.:17:00.

particularly on that boat where there was no dry area and no warm

:17:01.:17:05.

area then I think it would have been the end. So we headed for, when our

:17:06.:17:12.

power supplies declined, were out of action, we headed for an island and

:17:13.:17:16.

we landed on the beach there and we were welcomed by the Norwegian

:17:17.:17:21.

people on that island. We spoke to you when you were on the island and

:17:22.:17:26.

you were just waiting for a ship to come past and it did? Yeah, that's

:17:27.:17:32.

right. We had been there more about a week, well just over a week, and

:17:33.:17:36.

it was, my decision not to continue to Iceland. We had maybe 300 miles

:17:37.:17:41.

left to go and as far as I was concerned the expedition was a

:17:42.:17:44.

massive success. We had achieved everything and more we wanted to

:17:45.:17:48.

achieve and I didn't want to take the risk because I wanted to come

:17:49.:17:53.

home to my family and see my family. I didn't want to take that risk. I

:17:54.:17:58.

didn't want to be an irresponsible parent so we decided to stay and it

:17:59.:18:03.

was just a case of waiting, waiting for a boat to come past. You can't

:18:04.:18:07.

have flights on the island. It's a military base. There is a

:18:08.:18:11.

meteorological station and there is 18 people station thered and there

:18:12.:18:14.

wasn't much chance of getting off the island. So we just had to wait

:18:15.:18:18.

and we were perfectly well looked after. It was an amazing place. We

:18:19.:18:22.

were fed so well. It was a beautiful island. A volcanic island covered in

:18:23.:18:29.

the black sands and the black rock were covered in green moss. It was

:18:30.:18:32.

an amazing place to live and we just had to wait and luckily the

:18:33.:18:36.

Norwegian coastguard was coming past a few days ago. We're thankful

:18:37.:18:41.

you're back home safely. You spoke about being a responsible parent. Is

:18:42.:18:46.

it right your little daughter Daisy, it is first day at school today, so

:18:47.:18:50.

you were desperate to get back to take Daisy to school? Is she there

:18:51.:18:56.

with you? Daisy is here. It is her first day. Daisy, your first day of

:18:57.:19:05.

school? She is very excited and Jasper is coming into Year 3. I got

:19:06.:19:09.

home yesterday afternoon and I'm glad to be back with them. How many

:19:10.:19:15.

have you got? Are you going to keep bringing children in from left,

:19:16.:19:19.

right and centre there, Alex. There is one more, but he's having his

:19:20.:19:22.

breakfast. He doesn't need to come. He's not going to school yet! I'm

:19:23.:19:29.

sure it's lovely to have dad back. Daisy, I hope you have a fantastic

:19:30.:19:36.

first day at school. Thank you very much. Thank you. It is lovely to see

:19:37.:19:41.

you home safe and well. Thank you very much indeed.

:19:42.:19:44.

There will be so many people out there starting their first day of

:19:45.:19:47.

school. Good luck to everybody. Good luck to all the mums and dads. That

:19:48.:19:51.

moment when you leave them. They have got a baby called Jessie as

:19:52.:19:56.

well. Here's Sarah with a look

:19:57.:19:57.

at this morning's weather. For all the children heading back to

:19:58.:20:08.

school today it is a soggy school run this morning.

:20:09.:20:13.

Bear with the weather, there will be brightness later on. By home time

:20:14.:20:19.

some of us will see sunshine. It is a damp start to the day. Muggy and

:20:20.:20:23.

humid out there with all the cloud and the drizzle and low cloud and

:20:24.:20:27.

hill fog, but it will turn brighter later because this slow moving

:20:28.:20:30.

weather front will ease its way towards the east. So parts of

:20:31.:20:33.

northern England and down towards the Midlands and Wales will stay

:20:34.:20:36.

quite soggy through the day, but towards the north and the west of

:20:37.:20:39.

the country here we will see the brighter, clearer conditions moving

:20:40.:20:43.

in and further towards the south and south-east, here we will see a few

:20:44.:20:46.

showers continuing on into the afternoon, but this is 4pm now. You

:20:47.:20:50.

will start to see a few glimmers of sunshine breaking through the cloud,

:20:51.:20:54.

but still the chance of showers into the afternoon and temperatures 20,

:20:55.:20:57.

perhaps as high as 22 Celsius in the sunnier spots. I think north of

:20:58.:21:01.

Birmingham probably staying damp through much of the day, up towards

:21:02.:21:05.

Lincolnshire, Northumberland too. To the north of that, for Cumbria and

:21:06.:21:08.

Northern Ireland and for much of Scotland it is a return to the

:21:09.:21:11.

clearer skies later on today. So sunshine, still a chance of a few

:21:12.:21:15.

showers and breezy here too. Into the evening hours, we will lose that

:21:16.:21:20.

slow moving front as it clears the East Coast and we are all in the

:21:21.:21:24.

different air mass. So clearer, fresher conditions and breezy with a

:21:25.:21:28.

few showers in the far north-west too, but temperatures this time

:21:29.:21:30.

tomorrow morning will be cooler than they are this morning. Colder in the

:21:31.:21:35.

countryside. So we've got the breeze coming in from the Atlantic

:21:36.:21:38.

tomorrow. That brings us a fresher feel and a breezy day as well with

:21:39.:21:43.

showers continuing across parts of Western Scotland and perhaps the odd

:21:44.:21:46.

one into north-west England, but for the majority of places tomorrow is

:21:47.:21:50.

looking like a dry day. Probably the best day of the week, Wednesday, if

:21:51.:21:55.

you like it sunny and dry too. It will feel less muggy and less humid

:21:56.:21:59.

with temperatures around 16 to 19 Celsius. And then it is likely to

:22:00.:22:03.

start Thursday on that fresher note. Mostly dry across the southern half

:22:04.:22:06.

of the country through the day, but further north you will notice this

:22:07.:22:11.

rain and the wind picking up too across Northern Ireland and Scotland

:22:12.:22:13.

and pushing further south later on in the day. I think we will hold on

:22:14.:22:18.

to the brighter skies across parts of southern England and South Wales

:22:19.:22:20.

where it could be 20 Celsius, but as we head towards the end of the week

:22:21.:22:25.

and into the weekend more of us will feel the influence of this area of

:22:26.:22:28.

low pressure. So that sits to the north of the UK. The winds rotating

:22:29.:22:32.

around the low pressure, a breezy feel by the time we get to Friday

:22:33.:22:36.

with sunshine and also a few heavy showers and that sets us up for a

:22:37.:22:40.

pretty unsettled weekend. Back to you both.

:22:41.:22:45.

A failed state, a rogue nation, led by the world's

:22:46.:22:47.

most dangerous man - North Korea has been

:22:48.:22:49.

described as many things, but few would consider it a holiday

:22:50.:22:52.

destination, especially in light of the regime's

:22:53.:22:54.

Our next guest, however, has not only travelled

:22:55.:22:59.

to the country but makes his living operating tours to the notoriously

:23:00.:23:02.

Good morning to you. You were last in North Korea in June. Back in

:23:03.:23:15.

June. Tell us what is it like? It is a parallel universe. From the moment

:23:16.:23:19.

you step off the plane it's like you're still in the Cold War. Like

:23:20.:23:25.

the 1950s James Bond world. It's something else. It's really

:23:26.:23:30.

impossible to describe. You first went there in 2004. 2004, yes. Was

:23:31.:23:35.

it anything like you expected it to be and maybe you could develop that

:23:36.:23:41.

by saying how it has changed in the 13 years since then? It blew me

:23:42.:23:47.

away. I travelled for leisure and work to over 60 countries and

:23:48.:23:50.

compared to North Korea, nothing can compare to the place. Back then, it

:23:51.:23:56.

was a lot stricter, a lot more controlled than it is now days and

:23:57.:24:00.

particularly in the last four or five years it is getting more

:24:01.:24:05.

relaxed and the locals are more of the outside world and the real world

:24:06.:24:11.

and less indoctrinated with the whole system that we know about.

:24:12.:24:14.

When you're there, you have to travel all the time with a State

:24:15.:24:19.

minder, do you? What's that like? From the moment you touch down, you

:24:20.:24:23.

have two minders looking after you. They stay in the hotel so they are

:24:24.:24:28.

with you 24/7. They are nice people with a good sense of humour. They

:24:29.:24:32.

are guides as opposed to guards. Generally nice people, but it can be

:24:33.:24:37.

overbearing for some. Can they let down their guard when they are

:24:38.:24:40.

talking to you? A little bit. Sometimes, because a lot of these

:24:41.:24:44.

people I've worked with for years and years. So over time you get to

:24:45.:24:47.

build up friendly relations and they do let down their guard a bit, but

:24:48.:24:53.

some things are never discussed. I can imagine. What is your view

:24:54.:24:58.

having been there many times and spoken to many North Korean

:24:59.:25:02.

residents what is your view of the recent posturing with missiles and

:25:03.:25:05.

tests? What is at play? In my opinion it is all about self

:25:06.:25:10.

preservation, the North Koreans know if they went to war with the USA or

:25:11.:25:15.

the south it would be total suicide. It is about trying to get talks back

:25:16.:25:21.

to the table to stop there being military games between the USA and

:25:22.:25:25.

South Korea and really want to be considered as a fully fledge nuclear

:25:26.:25:31.

state and treated on an equal playing field and about self

:25:32.:25:39.

preservation. They say looked what happened to Saddam Hussain and

:25:40.:25:44.

colonel ga tafy. Tell us about how much information is there? Do the

:25:45.:25:48.

North Koreans, they have ideas about what is going with the nuclear

:25:49.:25:51.

missiles, but what about outside information? Very little outside

:25:52.:25:58.

news. All the news for domestic consumption is districted by the

:25:59.:26:02.

State so it has a very positive North Korean spin on it. They don't

:26:03.:26:07.

have an accurate idea of how we will be reacting here in the west as to

:26:08.:26:10.

what has been going on over the last few weeks and months. We hear a lot

:26:11.:26:14.

being said about the economy and the way people are living and really

:26:15.:26:17.

terrible conditions. We have heard reports. What have you seen? The

:26:18.:26:23.

conditions in the 1990s the country went through a terrible decade and

:26:24.:26:28.

there was famine and very bleak era, but since I have been going there,

:26:29.:26:32.

the country seems year-on-year to be getting better and better and if you

:26:33.:26:37.

are a citizen of Pyongyang now, it's a relatively comfortable life. It's

:26:38.:26:41.

not, I think, as bad as we expect. When you compare it so South Korea,

:26:42.:26:47.

they are poles apart, but when you compare it to poorer parts of Asia

:26:48.:26:52.

or many countries in Africa, it is better. Are you going back next

:26:53.:26:56.

year? Yes, looking forward to it. Really interesting to talk to you.

:26:57.:26:59.

Thank you very much indeed. A really fascinating insight.

:27:00.:30:29.

This is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:30:30.:30:33.

South Korea's Navy has held major live-fire drills in the latest show

:30:34.:30:35.

A South Korean commander said the North's forces would be "buried

:30:36.:30:42.

at sea" in the event of a further provocation.

:30:43.:30:46.

Meanwhile, international pressure continues to build against

:30:47.:30:50.

the regime following its largest nuclear bomb test to date.

:30:51.:30:52.

Yesterday the United States warned the UN Security Council that

:30:53.:30:55.

Earlier, we spoke to our China correspondent at the border between

:30:56.:31:08.

China and North Korea. If we pan across the river, you can

:31:09.:31:21.

see just how close the two countries are at this point. They are

:31:22.:31:24.

connected by that iron bridge behind me, and almost all of North Korea's

:31:25.:31:34.

trade in goods flows across this border. You can see an antiquated

:31:35.:31:38.

North Korean power station on the other side, a sign of just how

:31:39.:31:43.

dilapidated its energy infrastructure is. Donald Trump's

:31:44.:31:48.

argument is that China could if it wanted to simply force North Korea

:31:49.:31:54.

into submission by turning off this lifeline. When you look at this

:31:55.:31:57.

proximity, you can see why the Chinese leadership see things very

:31:58.:32:03.

differently indeed. Their fear is that pushing North Korea towards

:32:04.:32:10.

regime collapse will bring chaos and instability, factional infighting,

:32:11.:32:14.

possibly even walk, right up against this border, and that is why Beijing

:32:15.:32:17.

is insisting that it will not contemplate a total trade embargo or

:32:18.:32:22.

talk of military options. All it wants to see is a return to

:32:23.:32:26.

dialogue, and that has been its position all along.

:32:27.:32:28.

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis, will face questions in the Commons

:32:29.:32:30.

this afternoon as MPs return to Westminster after

:32:31.:32:32.

Mr Davis will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations

:32:33.:32:37.

with the European Union as Downing Street

:32:38.:32:38.

promises to "intensify" its approach to the talks.

:32:39.:32:46.

A man who was swept to sea off Cornwall yesterday afternoon has

:32:47.:32:49.

He was one of two men who were washed off rocks

:32:50.:32:54.

while fishing at Treyarnon Bay, near Padstow.

:32:55.:32:56.

The coastguard says the search for the second man has resumed.

:32:57.:33:04.

A report into whether social services failed a young girl

:33:05.:33:06.

who was murdered by her mother will be published today.

:33:07.:33:13.

Ayeeshia Smith died in 2014, aged 21 months.

:33:14.:33:14.

She had been left in the care of her mother, Kathryn Smith,

:33:15.:33:17.

despite concerns raised by other relatives.

:33:18.:33:19.

The findings of a serious case review will be

:33:20.:33:21.

Islands in the Caribbean and the US state of Florida are preparing

:33:22.:33:29.

for Hurricane Irma - which is due to make

:33:30.:33:31.

It's a bigger storm, both in size and wind speed,

:33:32.:33:35.

than Hurricane Harvey, which devastated the states of Texas

:33:36.:33:37.

The governor of Florida has declared a state of emergency to give local

:33:38.:33:44.

Bangladeshi officials say they are running out of space

:33:45.:33:51.

to accommodate the growing number of Rohingya Muslims fleeing

:33:52.:33:58.

Nearly 90,000 people have left Myanmar

:33:59.:34:02.

since the Army there began a campaign against extremist groups.

:34:03.:34:04.

Many say they were attacked by troops and Buddhist mobs.

:34:05.:34:07.

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, will set

:34:08.:34:09.

out her government's legislative programme this afternoon -

:34:10.:34:11.

pledging a "bold" and "ambitious" plan for the coming year.

:34:12.:34:14.

A deposit scheme is expected to be announced for the return of plastic

:34:15.:34:18.

bottles, but the main focus of the programme will be

:34:19.:34:21.

The First Minister is also planning to scrap the one per cent cap

:34:22.:34:26.

on public sector pay rises despite the SNP voting

:34:27.:34:28.

Speaking earlier on Breakfast, Shirley-Anne Somerville,

:34:29.:34:35.

Minister for Further and Higher Education, and Science,

:34:36.:34:37.

Well, it's a development in our policy, very much like the programme

:34:38.:34:47.

for Government that we will see today, responding to the changing

:34:48.:34:51.

needs of the Scottish people, to the unprecedented challenges the

:34:52.:34:57.

Scottish economy is facing, whether through Brexit or new technology.

:34:58.:35:03.

Our programme Mr face that and respond to those challenges in a

:35:04.:35:06.

positive manner where we can seize opportunities wherever possible to

:35:07.:35:09.

work with trade unions and others to deliver for the people of Scotland.

:35:10.:35:15.

-- our programme is to face that. Solar storms may have played a role

:35:16.:35:21.

in the fatal stranding of sperm whales last year on the coasts

:35:22.:35:24.

of Britain, Germany, Everyone is talking about the royal

:35:25.:35:59.

baby that has been announced. We have been talking about an unwelcome

:36:00.:36:02.

visitor. For dozens of passengers on an easy

:36:03.:36:19.

night -- and easyJet flight to Glasgow, it was a scorpion. The

:36:20.:36:23.

plane is being fumigated before it continues on its journey. Are these

:36:24.:36:31.

generic plane shots? I don't think these are actual, real shots of the

:36:32.:36:36.

aeroplane. Or, to be honest, the actual scorpion. It was in a plane

:36:37.:36:42.

like this! Some lively pictures of planes, and no scorpion! I don't

:36:43.:36:49.

know, either, whether the scorpion was OK. Scorpions Monoplane. There

:36:50.:37:00.

is a thing on the internet - animals that can approach via the U bend.

:37:01.:37:14.

An alligator was one. I don't believe that. Have a look. It was a

:37:15.:37:18.

small one. We're going to go to Victoria

:37:19.:37:37.

Derbyshire. Inode... I didn't say Victoria Derbyshire. This is what is

:37:38.:37:41.

on her programme. Today, we will bring you an exclusive film by a

:37:42.:37:45.

former sex worker who is calling for the industry to be decriminalised.

:37:46.:37:53.

She says the current law puts women at risk. We work in an environment

:37:54.:38:00.

where many people are far too scared to go to the police. Join us after

:38:01.:38:07.

BBC Breakfast on BBC Two, the BBC News Channel and online. No more

:38:08.:38:08.

talk of U bends. And coming up here on Breakfast this

:38:09.:38:15.

morning: Do you prefer builder's Sean's looking at how our taste

:38:16.:38:18.

in tea is changing. From the classroom to the pitch -

:38:19.:38:21.

how a book about football could help children learn about science,

:38:22.:38:25.

geography and even Spanish. And after nine, we'll learn how

:38:26.:38:27.

to cook the perfect boiled egg, as author Marty Jopson reveals

:38:28.:38:29.

the science behind some Sally is here with the sport. Good

:38:30.:38:43.

news all round last night in the football? A perfect recipe for the

:38:44.:38:47.

build-up to the World Cup. It is simmering nicely.

:38:48.:38:52.

It was a great night for the Home Nations

:38:53.:38:54.

in their World Cup qualifying matches - news of England

:38:55.:38:56.

and Scotland in a moment but the result of the night came

:38:57.:38:59.

from Northern Ireland, who secured second place in Group C

:39:00.:39:03.

with a 2-0 win over the Czech Republic.

:39:04.:39:05.

Jonny Evans scored the first - his first goal for his

:39:06.:39:08.

Evans' West Brom team-mate Chris Brunt scored the second.

:39:09.:39:11.

Northern Ireland aren't quite certain yet of a spot

:39:12.:39:13.

in the play-offs but manager Michael O'Neill is confident

:39:14.:39:16.

With Germany coming here, it would be nice to take an extra point, and

:39:17.:39:24.

Norway away. If we need something in the final two games, we will have to

:39:25.:39:29.

go and get it - simple as that. We are in a strong position, and if you

:39:30.:39:33.

look at this campaign, it has almost been flawless, to be honest. Seven

:39:34.:39:37.

clean sheets out of eight games, and the only defeat away to Germany. As

:39:38.:39:41.

a manager, there is not much more you can ask for the players.

:39:42.:39:45.

England need just two points from their final two games

:39:46.:39:48.

to qualify after they came from behind to beat Slovakia 2-1

:39:49.:39:52.

at Wembley Goals from Eric Dier and Marcus Rashford gave England

:39:53.:39:54.

the win after the Slovaks took the lead with just

:39:55.:40:00.

He said it was directed at a team-mate, not the referee. You have

:40:01.:40:08.

to be so careful. England will qualify if they beat

:40:09.:40:18.

Slovenia at home next month but it was Rashford

:40:19.:40:22.

who was the match-winner last night Scotland took advantage

:40:23.:40:25.

of the chance to make up some ground Christophe Berra gave them

:40:26.:40:28.

an early lead against Malta, Leigh Griffiths made it two

:40:29.:40:33.

after half time. If they can win their last two games

:40:34.:40:35.

than they can qualify for the play-offs despite a slow

:40:36.:40:38.

start to their campaign. Juan Martin Del Potro produced

:40:39.:40:43.

an incredible comeback overnight to reach the quarter-finals

:40:44.:40:46.

of the US Open - he fought back from two sets down

:40:47.:40:50.

and match point down to beat That despite saying

:40:51.:40:52.

that he couldn't breathe properly His reward is a meeting

:40:53.:40:56.

with Roger Federer. Meanwhile teenager Andrei Rublev

:40:57.:40:59.

will play Rafa Nadal in the last eight....after he beat ninth seed

:41:00.:41:02.

David Goffin in straight sets. Rublev is the first teenager

:41:03.:41:04.

since Andy Roddick in 2001 to reach He says Nadal was one

:41:05.:41:07.

of his childhood idols. Women's World number one

:41:08.:41:13.

Karolina Pliskova dropped just one game against American Jennifer Brady

:41:14.:41:15.

on her way to the quarter-finals. That's efficient! Who will be the

:41:16.:41:30.

UK's candidate city for the 2022 Commonwealth Games? We should find

:41:31.:41:35.

out within the next week or so. Liverpool and Birmingham are vying

:41:36.:41:38.

for the award. Birmingham has released a list of 22 reasons why it

:41:39.:41:42.

should be them. They have mentioned a legacy including refurbishing the

:41:43.:41:58.

Alexander Stadium. Do that again for us, Dan. Archery will Beer Aintree,

:41:59.:42:07.

and Everton's not yet built stadium would be involved. And they were

:42:08.:42:17.

talking about -- archery will take place at Aintree. And they were

:42:18.:42:28.

talking about swimming in the dock. If you were wearing your wet suit it

:42:29.:42:39.

would be fine. Good luck to both cities.

:42:40.:42:43.

Most parents might feel football already takes up too much

:42:44.:42:45.

of their children's attention, but a new book is trying to make

:42:46.:42:48.

them spend a little more time on the beautiful game,

:42:49.:42:51.

It uses football to teach everything from science to geography,

:42:52.:42:54.

We caught up with the authors Alex Bellos and Ben Lyttleton yesterday.

:42:55.:42:59.

I began by asking them if teaching using football could really work?

:43:00.:43:06.

It totally works because children are passionate about football.

:43:07.:43:09.

You give them something they are passionate

:43:10.:43:11.

about, they're going to

:43:12.:43:12.

I also think that children are interested in

:43:13.:43:19.

information if you present it in an entertaining way.

:43:20.:43:22.

And our book is full of jokes, amazing facts.

:43:23.:43:23.

It's got loads of stuff that even the

:43:24.:43:27.

I like that you have the letters on your

:43:28.:43:31.

For this age group, boys between eight and 12 are

:43:32.:43:45.

dropping out of literacy, not engaged in Reading.

:43:46.:43:47.

And we know, as Alex said, they are passionate about

:43:48.:43:50.

football, and this is a way of getting them into football.

:43:51.:43:52.

The National Literacy Trust has released

:43:53.:43:54.

figures that show that only one boy out of four reads

:43:55.:43:57.

75% of schools are worried about this issue, so if we can

:43:58.:44:01.

engage them through the gateway of football into literacy, they will

:44:02.:44:03.

enjoy reading and writing and improve their performances at

:44:04.:44:06.

Suffice to say, you had one book already, and it seems to have

:44:07.:44:10.

It was short listed for the Blue Peter

:44:11.:44:19.

We had amazing response from teachers, children.

:44:20.:44:23.

And parents, who say to us my child wouldn't

:44:24.:44:25.

and now they are reading regularly because they got into it through

:44:26.:44:30.

If you look at the front cover, you think, it's another football

:44:31.:44:35.

book, but it's so much more than that.

:44:36.:44:37.

How do you teach something like geography, chemistry or biology?

:44:38.:44:39.

We think there is nothing you cannot explain through the prism of

:44:40.:44:42.

Why do Brazilians play the way they do?

:44:43.:44:49.

It's because of the geography of Brazil.

:44:50.:44:57.

It's because of the rainfall of Brazil, it's

:44:58.:44:59.

The cities and the urban sprawl of Brazil.

:45:00.:45:02.

So the geography explains why Brazilians

:45:03.:45:03.

Well, you could, but there are other things.

:45:04.:45:11.

You need to learn about gravity, about air resistance,

:45:12.:45:13.

I spoke to some children before we wrote the book and said,

:45:14.:45:21.

what are the things you want to know about football that your parents

:45:22.:45:24.

Why don't footballers ever need to stop their game and go

:45:25.:45:29.

We spoke to some top doctors at premiership clubs to find

:45:30.:45:35.

You need to know about nutrition, when to eat, what to eat.

:45:36.:45:39.

I think Gary Lineker did once, but he wasn't trying to at the time.

:45:40.:45:42.

We had a great response from someone who read that.

:45:43.:45:45.

Basically, footballers eat three hours before

:45:46.:45:46.

And you tell the story, Ben, it was a friend of yours.

:45:47.:45:51.

A parent of a reader came up and said,

:45:52.:45:54.

I'm so pleased because you told children what to eat before games -

:45:55.:45:56.

So this child went to her mother and said, I want fish

:45:57.:46:01.

Eight o'clock in the morning, three hours before kick-off.

:46:02.:46:05.

It's probably a sensible breakfast, isn't it?

:46:06.:46:08.

It's brilliant because the mother was so

:46:09.:46:10.

Unfortunately, for children, because they metabolise their food so

:46:11.:46:16.

quickly, the child was starving after two hours.

:46:17.:46:19.

So, for children, it's two hours before a game.

:46:20.:46:21.

Also, studies into penalties, for example,

:46:22.:46:26.

So, penalties is about not necessarily technique, as

:46:27.:46:38.

all fans of English football will know, it's

:46:39.:46:40.

It's about focus, preparation, learning to prepare well.

:46:41.:46:49.

And that can take children into exams and

:46:50.:46:51.

tests and help them in other areas of their lives.

:46:52.:46:53.

I think another thing about this book is that when

:46:54.:46:56.

we go to school, we're told, this is English, maths, geography.

:46:57.:46:58.

Actually, everything is connected, and through

:46:59.:47:00.

football, you can show how everything is connected and

:47:01.:47:02.

encourage a curiosity about the world.

:47:03.:47:03.

Psychology is this, you can apply it to that.

:47:04.:47:06.

Maths is this, you can apply it to that.

:47:07.:47:08.

I know you started this interview talking about

:47:09.:47:10.

the particular problem you had with boys reading,

:47:11.:47:12.

No, one of the key issues, the key messages of the

:47:13.:47:17.

book, is inclusivity, so we are really into girls' football.

:47:18.:47:19.

There are loads of examples of female

:47:20.:47:20.

players, female role models who play football

:47:21.:47:22.

In season two, we have a history chapter on the time when

:47:23.:47:27.

women's football was more popular than men's football.

:47:28.:47:29.

It's a really important period in English history, because it is

:47:30.:47:35.

pre-suffragettes, and so the children are learning about voting

:47:36.:47:37.

and women's voting rights, and all through football.

:47:38.:47:40.

It's a great way to talk about some of the great

:47:41.:47:42.

historical things that have happened in the last 150 years.

:47:43.:47:45.

In all honesty, fellas, I can't think of a

:47:46.:47:47.

book that wouldn't be made better by having a quiz at the end of every

:47:48.:47:50.

You get tested on what you just read, and you learn as you go.

:47:51.:47:56.

And with a quiz, you can put really funny answers there.

:47:57.:48:01.

It doesn't have to be too complicated.

:48:02.:48:03.

It's a way of learning without feeling that you

:48:04.:48:05.

You work it out yourself, and that's the great

:48:06.:48:08.

Do be prepared for Mr Dan Walker to nick some of your facts.

:48:09.:48:14.

That was Alex Bellow and Ben Lyttleton.

:48:15.:48:24.

Their book is called 'Football School Season Two -

:48:25.:48:27.

Here's Sarah with a look at this morning's weather.

:48:28.:48:39.

Irma, That picture sums it up? Yes, a bit damp and drizzly. But we are

:48:40.:48:47.

have been talking about the benefits of heading to the coast and our

:48:48.:48:50.

weather watchers have been heading to the coast. This is North

:48:51.:48:55.

Yorkshire taken by Alistair. A lot of cloud and some mist and murk and

:48:56.:49:00.

rain. But bear with the weather, for many of us after the damp start it

:49:01.:49:07.

will brighten up. It will feel muggy and humid, but many places should

:49:08.:49:13.

see some sunshine. By this morning, there is a weather front bringing

:49:14.:49:17.

cloud and rain through southern Scotland, northern England, Wales

:49:18.:49:22.

and the south-west. In the east things are brighter. But clearer

:49:23.:49:26.

conditions heading in from the north-west. In the afternoon some

:49:27.:49:30.

sunshine here and some brightness in western Wales and down to Devon and

:49:31.:49:34.

Cornwall. As we move further east still cloudy this afternoon with a

:49:35.:49:44.

few showers. Where we see sunnier nier spells in Essex. For the far

:49:45.:49:49.

north of England and Northern Ireland and Scotland you will see a

:49:50.:49:53.

return to brighter conditions, still a few showers, it will feel fresher

:49:54.:49:59.

and breezy in the north-west. Tonight eventually we wave goodbye

:50:00.:50:04.

to this weather front and we see the clearing skies and that means

:50:05.:50:09.

temperatures will dip down. It will feel much fresher. This time

:50:10.:50:14.

tomorrow 11 or 12 in towns and cities, but coulder in the

:50:15.:50:18.

countryside. A different feel with the air coming in from the Atlantic.

:50:19.:50:24.

It will feel fresher and it will be a brighter day. Wednesday will be

:50:25.:50:29.

the best day of the week and most places staying dry and bright. Some

:50:30.:50:34.

showers in north-west England and western Scotland. Elsewhere you will

:50:35.:50:39.

avoid the showers and light winds to the south. Breezy to the north.

:50:40.:50:45.

Temperatures 16 to 19. So down on today and it will feel fresher.

:50:46.:50:51.

Thursday in the south you hold on to brighter conditions and we could see

:50:52.:50:55.

20 degrees. To the north it is turning unseted with low pressure

:50:56.:51:00.

bringing wet and windy weather too Northern Ireland and Scotland and

:51:01.:51:03.

that weather sinks further south as we head into Friday. So we have low

:51:04.:51:07.

pressure sitting to the north of the UK as we look to the end of the week

:51:08.:51:12.

and that brings us a breezy day on Friday with a mixture of sunshine

:51:13.:51:16.

and showers and perhaps some longer spells of rain. That theme will

:51:17.:51:21.

continue to bring us an unsettled weekend. Thank you.

:51:22.:51:28.

Most of us need a morning cuppa but what's in your mug today?

:51:29.:51:31.

Sales of traditional black tea are falling but there's something

:51:32.:51:35.

brewing in the market for fruit and herbal beverages.

:51:36.:51:42.

Sean's at a tea factory in North Yorkshire to tell us more.

:51:43.:51:52.

Where's the hairnet? No need for this in the tasting room. You have

:51:53.:51:59.

enough cups of tea. These are double strength. That is what the standard

:52:00.:52:04.

is for tasting tea. We are in Harrogate at Taylor's tea factory.

:52:05.:52:07.

We have a lot of Indian teas that have been shipped in. This is where

:52:08.:52:13.

the tasting's done, either beforehand, they're doing some

:52:14.:52:17.

blending, but there is a bit of tasting done after as well. A lot of

:52:18.:52:23.

that is done by the senior buyer and PHACer, suz -- taster, Suzy.

:52:24.:52:28.

Morning. First, the key question, how you make a cup of tea properly.

:52:29.:52:35.

I don't know if you heard about tea bag in the milk thing. Can we make

:52:36.:52:42.

two different ways. One with... Tea bag and milk in that one. Explain

:52:43.:52:46.

the difference. How would you make a cup of tea? I would always use

:52:47.:52:56.

freshly drawn and boiled water. Take the tea bag out before I put the

:52:57.:53:01.

milk in. A bit of water in. Get these on the go and we will have a

:53:02.:53:05.

look at actually what you normally do in your job instead of making a

:53:06.:53:11.

couple of cups of tea the wrong way around. When you see other people

:53:12.:53:15.

making tea, do you think, what are you doing, you're ruining my

:53:16.:53:19.

efforts? Yes, one thing I love about tea is about how people have quirky

:53:20.:53:26.

ways of making it. There are a few gold p rules however. What I always

:53:27.:53:31.

say is we do the work here to make sure your tea tastes great. Richard

:53:32.:53:40.

join us. The key thing is tasting. We have been talking about how the

:53:41.:53:44.

industry has been developing, how do you taste, test taste a cup of tea?

:53:45.:53:53.

This looking strong. Tea has has some volatile aromas. Everyone know

:53:54.:53:57.

what is they like about a cup of tea, but they're subtle. So taste we

:53:58.:54:02.

need a double spoon and we taste at double strength. You have 9,000

:54:03.:54:09.

taste buds on your tongue. Some people have more. You need an idea

:54:10.:54:14.

of the body and the weight. Give us a go and I will have a practice.

:54:15.:54:20.

Impressive. Normally we would spit it out. I will have a taste to see

:54:21.:54:25.

how well I I do it. Richard, when you go around and see all the

:54:26.:54:29.

different varnts that are being -- varieties that are being sold, have

:54:30.:54:35.

you noticed major changes, would you see things here you wouldn't see

:54:36.:54:40.

before? The choice of teas has expanded enormously in recent years.

:54:41.:54:45.

Excuse me... That is important for the future of the tea market,

:54:46.:54:49.

particularly in terms of encouraging younger people to drink tea more,

:54:50.:54:54.

because we found in our research younger people are keener on trying

:54:55.:54:59.

tivent flavours. -- different flavours. I will have one more go.

:55:00.:55:04.

What did you think of that? It was not too bad. Spray your palette.

:55:05.:55:11.

Don't you find you're at the point of choking at that point? No, ten

:55:12.:55:17.

years in, we do it every day and we taste up to a thousand teas. Let's

:55:18.:55:26.

look at the multi-coloured variety, I mentioned rhubarb and custard. We

:55:27.:55:31.

have a whole host. One thing I love about tea everything fits into the

:55:32.:55:37.

umbrella of tea and that means extraordinary flavours and cups of

:55:38.:55:42.

standard tea. We have exciting flavours like green tea with mint,

:55:43.:55:48.

sweet rhubarb and Mandarin. You say exciting, that seems a step for me.

:55:49.:55:56.

That is a normal cup of tea, how do you know from knowing what customers

:55:57.:56:03.

want to lychee and lime? We work hard with our research team and

:56:04.:56:07.

marketing to make sure we are on trend and assessing what consumers

:56:08.:56:11.

want. We can develop extraordinary and exciting teas for the future. We

:56:12.:56:17.

are going to go back to this tea. What do we have here. We have been

:56:18.:56:21.

three minutes, how can you tell the difference between what has been a

:56:22.:56:31.

good cup of tea? The tea with the milk and tea back looks not right.

:56:32.:56:40.

If I add the milk. You will hopefully. I mean. Night and day. I

:56:41.:56:46.

see people give that a squeeze... And eventually it will come around.

:56:47.:56:53.

Put the tea bag in the sink. I know what I would rather drink. I think

:56:54.:57:01.

we have learned a big lesson. Without the milk at the beginning.

:57:02.:57:06.

That is the key lesson. Sean, thank you for doing that on BBC Breakfast

:57:07.:57:11.

and thank you to Suzy, she is brilliant. You just give it... A

:57:12.:57:16.

senior tea buyer. Give is an extra stir. No, you don't. And it is the

:57:17.:57:21.

same colour as before. Tea bag on the the work... Sean go away! You're

:57:22.:57:28.

a heathen. This what is I do when you're not looking in the office.

:57:29.:57:34.

Thank you to the senior tea buyer. You're very boasty about your tea.

:57:35.:57:40.

I'm not. That is a good cup of tea. I will taste test your tea now. That

:57:41.:57:45.

is a good cup of tea. That is all right actually. I approve. My

:57:46.:57:50.

goodness, I feel I have won a minor battle. A bit of an aftertaste.

:57:51.:57:59.

Thank you. Now something much more calming.

:58:00.:58:02.

Whether it's the soothing sound of the waves or the sand

:58:03.:58:04.

between your toes, a trip to the seaside can lift the spirits.

:58:05.:58:07.

Now researchers are investigating whether so-called "blue health"

:58:08.:58:09.

could be used to help people living with anxiety, depression

:58:10.:58:12.

and loneliness - even if they can't get

:58:13.:58:13.

Breakfast's Graham Satchell has been looking into this and he's

:58:14.:58:18.

It is not the most beautiful weather. Yes but it doesn't matter.

:58:19.:58:35.

We are on Falmouth harbour coast. It is a stunning view and there is

:58:36.:58:38.

always something special about being next to the sea and by the coast.

:58:39.:58:44.

Mental health experts are calling this blue health and say being next

:58:45.:58:51.

to the sea does help people with depression, anxiety, loneliness and

:58:52.:58:57.

we have been following two projects, o on the water and one with

:58:58.:59:04.

researchers using virtual reality to take the sea to people who can't get

:59:05.:59:06.

to the coast themselves. We're off the coast of Falmouth

:59:07.:59:11.

on a boat owned by the charity, On board, a skipper,

:59:12.:59:16.

a therapist and two people, Susie and Ian, who are living

:59:17.:59:22.

with anxiety and depression. It's something very special

:59:23.:59:26.

about being on the water. It's such a calming place,

:59:27.:59:30.

you can leave whatever troubles you've got behind,

:59:31.:59:32.

and you can escape. There are group sessions on board

:59:33.:59:35.

and everyone works as part But the charity says the sea itself

:59:36.:59:39.

has a therapeutic quality. There's something going on,

:59:40.:59:45.

it's quite hard to define. But it's something to do

:59:46.:59:48.

with space, something to do Ian started feeling depressed

:59:49.:59:51.

and withdrawn after retiring There is something eternal

:59:52.:59:57.

about the sea, isn't I'm so lucky to be living

:59:58.:00:02.

in Cornwall, to have a pension So what about people who don't

:00:03.:00:09.

live near the coast? A team of researchers

:00:10.:00:17.

from the University of Exeter, a 360 virtual reality

:00:18.:00:19.

camera and a drone. They're trying to capture the power

:00:20.:00:21.

of the coast for people who can't There's quite a lot of evidence now

:00:22.:00:24.

to suggest that accessing and having exposure to natural spaces can be

:00:25.:00:31.

really beneficial for psychological well-being in terms

:00:32.:00:34.

of stress reduction, We're particularly trying to bring

:00:35.:00:35.

that therapeutic blue space in for people who can't

:00:36.:00:40.

access it themselves. So particularly, in our project,

:00:41.:00:42.

it's for people who are living in care homes who can't perhaps

:00:43.:00:45.

get outside so easily. Nicky's project is part of much

:00:46.:00:49.

larger European research Nicky is trying out her videos

:00:50.:00:51.

on a group of volunteers. Some of the pictures

:00:52.:01:07.

are calm and relaxing. Others, more interactive,

:01:08.:01:16.

stimulating. Well, I thought it was a really

:01:17.:01:22.

interesting experience. Anything, I think, connected

:01:23.:01:29.

with the sea or rivers, water, it certainly takes away some

:01:30.:01:41.

of the day-to-day drudgery of life. What we wanted to do was test

:01:42.:01:48.

whether these environments really were relaxing and stimulating,

:01:49.:01:51.

and today we found that actually, the way people reacted to them

:01:52.:02:01.

was the way we'd hope that they would, and so we will

:02:02.:02:03.

definitely take those videos forward Nicky will take her headsets

:02:04.:02:12.

into care homes next year to bring blue health to those who can't

:02:13.:02:16.

access it themselves. I had a go with one of those

:02:17.:02:24.

headsets, and it is amazing how quickly you immerse yourself in that

:02:25.:02:28.

blue environment and the impact it can have. Let's have a chat with

:02:29.:02:32.

Stephen Price Brown who is with us. Good morning. Good morning. You were

:02:33.:02:38.

a soldier posted to Afghanistan with the Grenadier Guards, and you saw

:02:39.:02:42.

some pretty horrid stuff that had an impact on you. Definitely. Just

:02:43.:02:47.

because of the role I had in my platoon, I ended up at the centre of

:02:48.:02:50.

some of the more challenging situations. And then when I left the

:02:51.:02:56.

forces, they stayed with me. I was unable to process those memories.

:02:57.:03:04.

Diagnosed with PTSD? In 2015. You set off on a tall ship from here in

:03:05.:03:08.

Falmouth, around the country the wrong way, if I can put it that way,

:03:09.:03:16.

to Liverpool, to put yourself back together, can I put it that way?

:03:17.:03:24.

Yes. We had a schooner, with 35 veterans of various regiments and

:03:25.:03:26.

various conditions, we jumped on a boat and sailed round the UK. It was

:03:27.:03:34.

incredible, being out on the sea in such an old boat as well, really

:03:35.:03:38.

strong, and just experiencing the island we all live on. And which we

:03:39.:03:43.

were all sworn to protect, and seeing it from the sea, which was

:03:44.:03:48.

quite good. Would you say that the sea does have a therapeutic quality?

:03:49.:03:57.

Absolutely. It is a little bit of a mystery, and Mr Ray I don't really

:03:58.:04:02.

want to solve. I like the idea that I can come back to the sea and live

:04:03.:04:06.

by the sea and enjoy this restorative magic that it has. It

:04:07.:04:14.

has a real impact on people's mental state. Thanks for chatting to us.

:04:15.:04:18.

We're going to speak to Philip, who is an author and professor at

:04:19.:04:24.

Southampton University. You've written extensively about the sea.

:04:25.:04:29.

What is it about this see end our relationship with it, what is its

:04:30.:04:35.

magic quality? It's where we came from, isn't it? When you were born,

:04:36.:04:42.

you had already experienced this see in your mother's belly. So it's in

:04:43.:04:48.

our DNA? Absolutely, and there is something that attracts us to the

:04:49.:04:52.

water. I swim in the water every day. Everyday? Right through the

:04:53.:05:02.

year. The reboot -- eight reboots you. We are all focused on the blue

:05:03.:05:11.

screen on our desk or in our hand, but there is a blue screen out

:05:12.:05:16.

there. Lord Byron, who stayed here in the 19th century, he swam here.

:05:17.:05:22.

I'm just curating a festival in Torbay, which is a celebration of

:05:23.:05:28.

the sea. Agatha Christie swam there. Oscar Wilde swam there. When people

:05:29.:05:34.

talk about while swimming, I think about Oscar. So do you think there

:05:35.:05:38.

is a life to this aid that can bring us alive? I do. Most of the life on

:05:39.:05:46.

the planet lives in this see. Most of our oxygen comes from the sea. We

:05:47.:05:52.

are an island race in Britain. Nowhere in Britain argue more than

:05:53.:05:55.

70 miles from the sea. These days, we are made to feel fearful of the

:05:56.:06:00.

sea. It is a good thing to be afraid. You die out there. Lets not

:06:01.:06:13.

do that! Banchory much, Philip. We're getting pretty wet here, but

:06:14.:06:17.

we have loved being year by the coast. I think Philip is right - it

:06:18.:06:24.

does bring you to live and restore your mental health. From Falmouth,

:06:25.:06:29.

back to you. Everyday, even if it's raining, is a

:06:30.:06:33.

good day by the sea. Graham, enjoy the rest of it. And good guests on

:06:34.:06:37.

the deckchair. You have been sending

:06:38.:06:41.

us your seaside shots. When we come back, we will be

:06:42.:06:59.

finding out how to make the perfect cup of tea and

:07:00.:08:41.

Whether you grabbed a quick tea and toast this morning or sat down

:08:42.:08:45.

for a proper cooked breakfast, the chances are that you won't know

:08:46.:08:55.

... Slight camera issue there. Don't panic!

:08:56.:09:03.

Marty Jopson is hoping to change that.

:09:04.:09:05.

He's just written a book on the science of food, tackling

:09:06.:09:08.

everything from the addictive ingredient in chocolate to

:09:09.:09:10.

Milk in tea before... ? All wrong. Tell us about eggs. We all like it

:09:11.:09:37.

slightly differently. Some people like it hot, others soft. But if you

:09:38.:09:41.

apply science to the boiling of an egg, the egg white sets between 61

:09:42.:09:51.

and 65 Celsius, and the egg yolk will set between 66 and 70. If you

:09:52.:09:58.

have a water bath at 66 Celsius and you put an egg in it and leave it,

:09:59.:10:05.

it will gradually raise up to 66 Celsius, and all of the white

:10:06.:10:10.

Wilcock, and the egg yolk will still be completely runny. That is the way

:10:11.:10:14.

you like your eggs, it will be perfect every time. -- all of the

:10:15.:10:25.

white will cook. It is impractical, but that is the scientific way to

:10:26.:10:29.

cook eggs. You can tweak it by changing the temperature. If you

:10:30.:10:33.

like the egg more set, turn the water bath up to 68 Celsius and you

:10:34.:10:40.

will have a slightly set yolk. Is that how you cook your eggs? No.

:10:41.:10:46.

That is the scientific method to get the perfect one. Some people do do

:10:47.:10:57.

that, and you can use it for meat. Then you get the perfectly cooked

:10:58.:10:59.

piece of meat that is tender and just the way you want it. If you are

:11:00.:11:05.

on Masterchef, you would do that. Yes. Is their science behind the

:11:06.:11:17.

five second rule? There is, and people have studied this and

:11:18.:11:21.

received awards for it. The idea is that if you drop something on the

:11:22.:11:25.

floor, you can pick it up if it is under three seconds and still eat

:11:26.:11:28.

it. This is rubbish, complete nonsense. As soon as something

:11:29.:11:31.

touches the floor, if there are bacteria on the floor, it will now

:11:32.:11:35.

be on the food. Even if it is just... It takes no time at all.

:11:36.:11:43.

Clearly, it takes a fraction of a minute part of a second. The

:11:44.:11:50.

question is, how clean is your floor? Is your floor dangerous in

:11:51.:11:57.

terms of bacteria? If you are happy to drop a piece of toast on the

:11:58.:12:03.

floor and eat it, would you lick your floor? That is essentially what

:12:04.:12:09.

you're doing. You're not sure, are you? This surface is dry. Most

:12:10.:12:18.

bacteria, there will be less bacteria on that surface because it

:12:19.:12:25.

is dry. As long as the surface is dry, that is better. But it takes

:12:26.:12:28.

time for bacteria to drive. If you just mopped the floor, it is

:12:29.:12:33.

probably less good than if you mopped the floor two days ago. We

:12:34.:12:40.

were also talking about the best before date. Catherine says she has

:12:41.:12:45.

a bottle of soy sauce that went out of date in 1986. Claire says, the

:12:46.:12:53.

rule is, anything out of bed the day before goes in the bin. There are

:12:54.:12:58.

different rules and regulations around the world. We have best

:12:59.:13:05.

before and use by. Best before means, this product will be at its

:13:06.:13:09.

best before this date. And that is usually for dry things or tinned

:13:10.:13:15.

food, things that, quite frankly, aren't going to spoil because they

:13:16.:13:21.

have been preserved. Crackers or something like that. If you go after

:13:22.:13:25.

the best before, they will dry out and become stale, and they will be

:13:26.:13:28.

very nice, so why would you eat them as much use I is the one you have to

:13:29.:13:34.

watch out for, because manufacturers use that to say, this is the date at

:13:35.:13:38.

which we can guarantee you there will not be a dangerous number of

:13:39.:13:43.

bacteria in your food. So don't eat things after that date. Thank you.

:13:44.:13:52.

Find someone who has a water bath for your egg.

:13:53.:13:53.

Marty's book is called 'The Science Of Food'.

:13:54.:14:01.

My parents both grew up on council estates, and as a family

:14:02.:14:05.