06/09/2017 Breakfast


06/09/2017

The latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC's Breakfast team.


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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:00:00.:00:00.

A drastic plan to curb the number of EU migrants living

:00:00.:00:08.

A leaked Home Office document says the free movement of people will be

:00:09.:00:17.

banned after Brexit, but the government says nothing's

:00:18.:00:19.

Good morning, it's Wednesday the 6th of September.

:00:20.:00:37.

Hurricane Irma, one of the most powerful Atlantic

:00:38.:00:43.

storms ever recorded, has begun lashing islands

:00:44.:00:44.

Just half of dentists in England are accepting new NHS patients,

:00:45.:00:50.

Good morning. As part of our Coastal series I'm at Grimsby Fish market at

:00:51.:01:06.

one of the world's busiest ports looking at how the industry has

:01:07.:01:09.

changed for the UK and what Brexit will mean for its workers.

:01:10.:01:11.

Wales manager Chris Coleman says bring it on after a late

:01:12.:01:14.

victory over Moldova in their World Cup qualifier.

:01:15.:01:16.

Two more wins and they should be in Russia next year.

:01:17.:01:20.

What a goal! What a goal! Radford has scored. Ronnie Radford Odd Box.

:01:21.:01:26.

After 10 World Cups and more than 200 England games,

:01:27.:01:29.

the legendary commentator John Motson is hanging

:01:30.:01:31.

up his sheepskin coat and calling time on his 50-year career

:01:32.:01:34.

We've got an interview with him later.

:01:35.:01:39.

Hurricane Irma continues to produce dangerous winds and heavy rain and a

:01:40.:01:48.

storm surge. I'll update you on the latest in a few minutes and a full

:01:49.:01:51.

UK forecast through the programme. Thanks very much, see you later in

:01:52.:01:53.

the programme. A leaked Home Office document has

:01:54.:01:56.

set out plans for how the UK immigration system

:01:57.:02:01.

could work after Brexit. by the Guardian newspaper,

:02:02.:02:03.

considers how the Government could dramatically reduce the number

:02:04.:02:07.

number of low-skilled EU migrants. It also proposes time limits on how

:02:08.:02:09.

long EU nationals could stay Let's get more from our political

:02:10.:02:13.

correspondent Iain Watson Ian, tell us, what more can you tell

:02:14.:02:30.

us about the document, what does it say? It's an 82 page document so not

:02:31.:02:34.

much in the time available but I'll do my best, you will notice it says

:02:35.:02:39.

official, sensitive and it certainly is a sensitive topic. There's

:02:40.:02:42.

caveats from the government, it hasn't been signed off by ministers

:02:43.:02:46.

and the contents will be subject to negotiation with the EU but it gives

:02:47.:02:50.

us the clearest indication of thinking about the immigration

:02:51.:02:53.

system inside the Home Office and in essence the document says there will

:02:54.:02:58.

be a three stage approach taken to immigration, people already here

:02:59.:03:01.

from the EU can apply for settled status with more less the same

:03:02.:03:05.

rights as British citizens and then there will be a transition period of

:03:06.:03:09.

at least two years where people can come here relatively freely to live

:03:10.:03:13.

and work but if they want to work for any length of time they will

:03:14.:03:16.

have to register and then beyond that there will be a new immigration

:03:17.:03:20.

system and that system would put restrictions on low skilled

:03:21.:03:25.

migrants, people here only very temporarily, if you have higher

:03:26.:03:29.

skills you might get leave to stay in Britain for between three and

:03:30.:03:32.

five years but only if you've been here for five years would you then

:03:33.:03:36.

have the right to settle permanently so a much more restrictive system

:03:37.:03:39.

than at the moment. There will be new restrictions including family

:03:40.:03:44.

members during that phase as well. Thanks are much. We will be talking

:03:45.:03:46.

about in through the morning. We will be speaking to

:03:47.:03:47.

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon just after 7:30am about

:03:48.:03:53.

the government's plans post-Brexit. Islands in the Caribbean are making

:03:54.:03:55.

last-minute preparations for Hurricane Irma, one of the most

:03:56.:03:57.

powerful Atlantic storms on record, with officials warning of its

:03:58.:04:01.

potentially catastrophic effects. It's already lashing the British

:04:02.:04:07.

territory of Anguilla where residents say the powerful

:04:08.:04:09.

waves and high winds have been Our correspondent Sarah

:04:10.:04:12.

Corker has the latest. This is the eye of the storm from

:04:13.:04:24.

space. Dramatic images from Nasa capture the sheer scale and

:04:25.:04:28.

magnitude of hurricane earner. The category five storm is on a

:04:29.:04:31.

collision course with several Caribbean islands. Popular holiday

:04:32.:04:40.

destinations like Antigua and Saint Martin are preparing for

:04:41.:04:42.

life-threatening winds and torrential rains. Storm surges of up

:04:43.:04:48.

to 12 feet are forecast and overnight some islands have started

:04:49.:04:54.

to flood. Hurricane Irma's path may change but at the moment it looks

:04:55.:04:58.

set to head towards the British Berlin islands, Puerto Rico, Cuba

:04:59.:05:02.

and by the weekend, the Florida keys. In Miami they are stocking up

:05:03.:05:08.

on sandbags and preparing for the worst. The storm surge is massive

:05:09.:05:11.

and the storm surge predicted will go for miles and miles. Why now it

:05:12.:05:16.

is travelling at 15 mph and it is tracked to move south of the Florida

:05:17.:05:20.

Keys on a westerly path with a slight north turn -- right now. It's

:05:21.:05:24.

incredibly important that all Florida Jens keep a close eye on

:05:25.:05:28.

this incredibly dangerous storm. Do not sit and wait and prepare, get

:05:29.:05:35.

prepared now. This monster hurricane comes on the heels of Harvey, which

:05:36.:05:39.

struck Texas and Louisiana last month. Irma is forecast to be even

:05:40.:05:44.

more dangerous. Now millions of people across the Caribbean are

:05:45.:05:49.

bracing themselves for one of the most powerful hurricanes ever

:05:50.:05:52.

recorded in the Atlantic basin. Sarah Corker, BBC News.

:05:53.:05:55.

Let's get the latest now from Sarah, who's been tracking the storm

:05:56.:05:58.

Sarah, what more can you tell us? This is a really powerful storm

:05:59.:06:07.

moving through the Caribbean and potentially towards Florida as well.

:06:08.:06:12.

That's right, Dan. I'll show you the satellite image, it's a huge

:06:13.:06:17.

hurricane. You can see that really well-defined I. That's an indication

:06:18.:06:21.

of the strength of the storm, it has really been strengthening over the

:06:22.:06:25.

past 24 hour is, reaching category five status and it's rare we CA a

:06:26.:06:30.

category five hurricane. -- 24 hours. Exceptionally strong winds --

:06:31.:06:36.

we see a category five. We have seen gusts in excess of 200 mph and winds

:06:37.:06:43.

of 185 mph. Dangerous conditions. It's not just the wind, it will be

:06:44.:06:48.

the exceptionally heavy rainfall as well as the storm surge. As it

:06:49.:06:52.

passes its way close to the Virgin Isles and then towards this spaniel,

:06:53.:06:58.

over the next 24 hours, before then heading to Cuba and then Florida.

:06:59.:07:03.

Dangerous conditions, the storm is exceptionally strong. We will keep

:07:04.:07:07.

you posted on the forecast through the morning. More on that and the UK

:07:08.:07:12.

weather through the morning. And we'll be speaking to some

:07:13.:07:15.

holiday makers and residents who are making preparations

:07:16.:07:18.

for the worst of the storm Just half of dentists in England

:07:19.:07:21.

are accepting new NHS patients, The British Dental

:07:22.:07:25.

Association said the figure was a disgrace and evidence

:07:26.:07:31.

of an emerging crisis But the NHS says 95% of patients do

:07:32.:07:33.

manage to get an appointment. This is a familiar sight for Fozia,

:07:34.:07:49.

who has been fined rash trying to find an NHS dentist in Bradford. I

:07:50.:07:55.

was devastated there wasn't anyone locally. She needs a local NHS

:07:56.:08:00.

dentist for her sun, who has an overcrowded mouth and a mineral

:08:01.:08:04.

deficiency with this teeth. I tried going through the LO pages and using

:08:05.:08:10.

the Internet and then I used the 101 where they find you the nearest NHS

:08:11.:08:15.

dentist and they said there wasn't one in Bradford -- the yellow Pages.

:08:16.:08:21.

The BBC has analysed the day of two and a half thousand dental practices

:08:22.:08:24.

in England that provided information about weather they were except in

:08:25.:08:29.

new patients. 48% said they were not accepting new adult patients and 40%

:08:30.:08:32.

said they weren't excepting new child patients. There's a emerging

:08:33.:08:38.

crisis about more dentist not accepting new patients simply

:08:39.:08:41.

because they are not allowed to see more patients, the government has

:08:42.:08:45.

only commissioned enough to treat half the adult population and it's a

:08:46.:08:50.

disgrace. People that need an NHS dentist should get one. NHS England

:08:51.:08:55.

said the latest patient survey found 95% of people seeking a dental

:08:56.:08:59.

appointment were able to get one and overall the number of dentists

:09:00.:09:04.

offered NHS care is 3800 higher than a decade ago. David Rhodes, BBC

:09:05.:09:06.

News. The Indian Prime Minister,

:09:07.:09:07.

Narendra Modi, is shortly to meet Aung San Suu Kyi, as the country

:09:08.:09:11.

faces diplomatic pressure to end the violence its security forces

:09:12.:09:16.

are reportedly inflicting Tens of thousands of

:09:17.:09:19.

Rohingya Muslims have fled The UN Secretary General,

:09:20.:09:22.

Antonio Guterres, called on the state to end

:09:23.:09:25.

to what he called the vicious after a double shooting in East

:09:26.:09:28.

London. Corey Junior Davis and

:09:29.:09:35.

another boy, who's 17, were found with gunshot injuries

:09:36.:09:37.

in Forest Gate on Monday afternoon. The second victim is said to have

:09:38.:09:40.

life-changing injuries. Police have launched

:09:41.:09:42.

a murder investigation. The Archbishop of Canterbury has

:09:43.:09:44.

warned that the UK's economic model Justin Welby is a member

:09:45.:09:47.

of the commission behind a report published today by the Institute

:09:48.:09:51.

for Public Policy Research. It says the country faces

:09:52.:09:54.

the longest period of stagnating North Korea has warned it

:09:55.:09:56.

will take counter-measures called the heinous sanctions

:09:57.:10:17.

called for by the US following the regime's nuclear

:10:18.:10:20.

bomb test this weekend. The state news agency said

:10:21.:10:22.

North Korea would not be frightened or persuaded by the White House's

:10:23.:10:25.

promises to explore all options on the table and said America

:10:26.:10:28.

would be responsible for any

:10:29.:10:31.

catastrophic consequences caused 13 people have been rescued

:10:32.:10:32.

after becoming trapped in a 53 11 members of the public and two

:10:33.:10:36.

staff members were winched to safety from the Jurassic Skyline

:10:37.:10:41.

tower in Weymouth by a Coastguard A full investigation

:10:42.:10:44.

into the incident is under way. I once got stuck on the London Eye.

:10:45.:11:04.

It just stopped. At the top? At the top, it stopped. They did an

:11:05.:11:07.

announcement and they said to stay where you are, someone will come to

:11:08.:11:12.

rescue you. But then you get more for your muggy! We got about an hour

:11:13.:11:16.

more, but eventually it started working. Did you have a packed

:11:17.:11:23.

lunch? I'm not going to say -- money. You get inside information

:11:24.:11:27.

that are not going to pass on. What do you mean? I can't say. We weren't

:11:28.:11:33.

rescued. I'll get to the bottom of this!

:11:34.:11:33.

The commentator John Motson is calling time on his BBC career

:11:34.:11:36.

10 European Championships and thousands of domestic matches

:11:37.:11:46.

during his 50 years with the corporation.

:11:47.:11:48.

His final BBC commentary will be the FA Cup final in May.

:11:49.:11:52.

I was going to say it was like being paid for your hobby, that's what

:11:53.:11:58.

people always say to me but there is a little bit of hard work involved.

:11:59.:12:03.

The preparation and the homework and watching players and going to see

:12:04.:12:07.

games so that you could do the one you were doing next a bit better. It

:12:08.:12:11.

was a challenge, but it was a challenge that I always enjoyed.

:12:12.:12:14.

I'm sure he will still be around but it will be strange not to hear his

:12:15.:12:21.

voice all the time. On those big occasions, those big moments when we

:12:22.:12:25.

see the national team particularly playing, we are really very used to

:12:26.:12:29.

hearing his voice. Ivanov the last few years Guy Mowbray has taken over

:12:30.:12:34.

but you still associate Mommsen with major tournaments -- even though

:12:35.:12:41.

over. I will talk about John Moore during the papers because we can't

:12:42.:12:46.

not mention the coats, can we? -- John Moore. Let's start with the

:12:47.:12:50.

actual football because Wales have gone and done it, they have ruined

:12:51.:12:54.

the surprise, everyone now knows that Wales are really quite good!

:12:55.:13:00.

They let the cat out of the bag last year at the Euros but now everyone

:13:01.:13:04.

is aware that they are a really strong side.

:13:05.:13:04.

Wales left it late in Moldova, but their hopes of qualifying

:13:05.:13:07.

for next year's World Cup remain in tact

:13:08.:13:10.

Teenager Ben Woodburn was inspirational again,

:13:11.:13:12.

setting up one of the goals that moved Wales up to second

:13:13.:13:15.

England women's boss Mark Sampson says his conscience is clear

:13:16.:13:20.

after being accused of discriminating against one

:13:21.:13:22.

Two investigations cleared Sampson of any wrongdoing.

:13:23.:13:28.

Chris Froome has nearly doubled his lead in the Tour of Spain.

:13:29.:13:31.

Victory in the individual time trial has pushed his advantage up

:13:32.:13:34.

to almost two minutes, with the race hitting the mountains

:13:35.:13:37.

And Venus Williams' remarkable eason continues, she's

:13:38.:13:42.

through to the semi-finals of the US Open for the first time in seven

:13:43.:13:45.

Obviously not been spending too many nights out with her sister's new

:13:46.:13:57.

baby. Not been doing that yet, she's been concentrating on the day job.

:13:58.:14:01.

Are you going to hang around for the papers in a moment? I am.

:14:02.:14:03.

Let's find out what's happening with the weather.

:14:04.:14:05.

It is beautiful. Pretty quiet conditions across much of the

:14:06.:14:18.

country through the day. Sunny spells and it is feeling fresher

:14:19.:14:24.

than recent days. Less sticky and certainly more dry than yesterday.

:14:25.:14:28.

Today we've got a westerly influence. The wind coming in from

:14:29.:14:32.

the Atlantic. It would be dry everywhere. A few showers. With the

:14:33.:14:38.

clear spells it's a cool start, so temperatures at the moment down in

:14:39.:14:42.

single figures fairly widely. Especially chilly first thing in

:14:43.:14:46.

rural spots, but we have sunshine pretty much from the word go. The

:14:47.:14:53.

areas most likely to see showers are northern and western Scotland, a

:14:54.:14:56.

couple for Northern Ireland and a few into the west of England.

:14:57.:14:59.

Elsewhere you will avoid the showers and have decent sunshine. Cumulus

:15:00.:15:03.

cloud building in the afternoon and temperatures doing reasonably well.

:15:04.:15:09.

It will feel fresh, but there will be dry and bright weather. The

:15:10.:15:13.

isolated showers his way through this evening and overnight. Into the

:15:14.:15:19.

early hours of Thursday, a bit of a change from the west as we have more

:15:20.:15:24.

cloud bringing some rain. So things will change on Thursday. Further

:15:25.:15:30.

south we hold on to the fresher feel, with sunshine. Southern and

:15:31.:15:33.

eastern England staying dry, but you will notice further north the

:15:34.:15:36.

arrival of the wet and windy weather. Tomorrow afternoon in more

:15:37.:15:42.

detail now. The heavy rain across much of Scotland. Quite windy. And

:15:43.:15:47.

across Northern Ireland a bit of a damp story by the afternoon. Heading

:15:48.:15:52.

south across England and Wales you can see the heavy burst into north

:15:53.:15:56.

Wales and Manchester. Further south across England it's a bit of a dry

:15:57.:16:01.

story. Still the odd shower and 90 degrees. Pleasant enough for much of

:16:02.:16:08.

southern and south-west England. -- 90 degrees. Then we have the arrival

:16:09.:16:14.

of the low pressure which will push eastwards into Friday and it could

:16:15.:16:17.

be bringing some pretty unsettled weather as we head towards the end

:16:18.:16:23.

of the week. This is Friday. Wendy blustery showers. Longer spells of

:16:24.:16:26.

rain likely in southern England by the time we get to Friday. Cooler

:16:27.:16:33.

and windy. That's setting us up for an unsettled weekend. Saturday, some

:16:34.:16:37.

sunshine and showers around. If you avoid the showers, 19 degrees or

:16:38.:16:43.

should feel pleasant. Unsettled again by Sunday. I know we will see

:16:44.:16:51.

you later to tell us Hurricane Irma. You're watching

:16:52.:16:57.

Breakfast from BBC News. The main stories this morning:

:16:58.:16:58.

Proposals aimed at cutting the numbers of low-skilled migrants

:16:59.:17:01.

from Europe following Brexit have Winds of 180mph from Hurricane Irma

:17:02.:17:04.

have begun lashing islands in the Caribbean, where people have

:17:05.:17:09.

been told to evacuate their homes. Let's have a look at some of the

:17:10.:17:23.

front pages. Most of them have a picture of Meghan Markle, who has

:17:24.:17:27.

given her first interview, saying how much she is in love with Prince

:17:28.:17:35.

Harry. She spoke to Vanity Fair magazine. Lots of papers speculating

:17:36.:17:38.

on how to win the engagement might if the that's one of the main

:17:39.:17:40.

stories. This headline: Of different stories on the

:17:41.:17:50.

Telegraph. They've also got this leaked document about Brexit. A

:17:51.:17:55.

story about BBC launching a review into salaries. The director-general

:17:56.:18:01.

will give information about the today. -- that today. And natural

:18:02.:18:05.

selection is weeding out Alzheimer's and asthma from the human gene pool,

:18:06.:18:14.

according to a major study. The front page of the Times. We will

:18:15.:18:20.

speak to Michael Fallon about that later on. This is an android named

:18:21.:18:25.

Erica. It's a picture of her in a portrait

:18:26.:18:30.

competition and they're discussing whether that breaks rules because

:18:31.:18:35.

she is actually an android, but you wouldn't be able to tell.

:18:36.:18:39.

And there's an interesting story. Dog walkers told to carry two Pasig

:18:40.:18:47.

bags. -- two as the bags. Even before your dog has done a poo, if

:18:48.:18:52.

you don't have two bags ready to go you could be fined. You have to have

:18:53.:18:57.

a backup. Police can't search you, they can say, can you produce two

:18:58.:19:02.

bags? If you can't, you could be fined.

:19:03.:19:07.

You don't need two bags. I don't carry two, but I will from now on.

:19:08.:19:12.

One in each pocket! Have you got some now?

:19:13.:19:21.

The Mall, it's funny. We've had a few weeks whether papers have had

:19:22.:19:25.

lots of different stories. Mostly they talk about Brexit and Meghan

:19:26.:19:32.

Markle. Eddie Jones was talking yesterday

:19:33.:19:39.

about a foot or Convention. He is talking about fear of failure in the

:19:40.:19:43.

England football team. He said traders have to get over the fear of

:19:44.:19:47.

failure and have to get over the target of getting to a

:19:48.:19:51.

quarter-final. He also says life is too comfortable. They get their big

:19:52.:19:56.

car, their big house, they do the same thing at training, someone else

:19:57.:20:00.

tells them what to eat. He says you have to give people a little bit of

:20:01.:20:05.

autonomy. You have to give them the responsibility for running their

:20:06.:20:08.

life and that way you will develop and get more confident. I mentioned

:20:09.:20:17.

Don Watson. A great picture. -- Johnb Motson. This was in 1990.

:20:18.:20:25.

Confirming that their match with Peterborough was off because it was

:20:26.:20:33.

snowing. There is another story which are not allowed to give you

:20:34.:20:37.

full details. Not necessarily for breakfast!

:20:38.:20:42.

It is about a day that went horribly wrong. If you would like to know the

:20:43.:20:47.

details, you can go on the website. It is hard to imagine a worse first

:20:48.:20:52.

date. When you started saying that, there

:20:53.:20:58.

were cries in the gallery of people saying, "No!"

:20:59.:21:02.

There are some things that are not to be talked about first thing in

:21:03.:21:06.

the morning. I like how you have moved on.

:21:07.:21:11.

Fishing is one of the oldest industries in the world but it has

:21:12.:21:14.

faced tough times in Britain in recent years, bringing challenges

:21:15.:21:17.

The fishing industry voted overwhelming to leave the EU,

:21:18.:21:21.

and as part of our series looking at coastal communities,

:21:22.:21:24.

we've sent Sean to Grimsby to find out how it is preparing for Brexit.

:21:25.:21:28.

Good morning. Preparing for Brexit and the sale of all of this fish

:21:29.:21:41.

this morning in Grimsby. We spent the last day also speaking to a lot

:21:42.:21:45.

of people around here about what this industry means to them now and

:21:46.:21:48.

it's a pretty big deal. Across the UK there are only about 12,000

:21:49.:21:53.

fishermen getting these kinds of fish in. In the mid- 90s, that was

:21:54.:21:59.

about 20,000. So quite a drop even in the last 20 years. But as a

:22:00.:22:03.

proportion of our entire economy you are only talking about 0.1%,

:22:04.:22:08.

including all of the fish processing stuff that goes on in places like

:22:09.:22:12.

rooms be. In terms of the amount, in this entire room with got about 50

:22:13.:22:19.

tons of cod and haddock but we fish about 400,000 tons of fish every

:22:20.:22:23.

year in the UK, but we import loads as well, just so you can get your

:22:24.:22:30.

fish and chips, an -- another ?1 billion also is imported. Just to

:22:31.:22:34.

give you an idea of how people are feeling, and the collapse of the

:22:35.:22:38.

industry here, I went around Grimsby and I kicked it off by speaking to

:22:39.:22:44.

Darren, one of the few fishermen left ear.

:22:45.:22:46.

Darren is now one of the last fishermen working in Grimsby. We've

:22:47.:22:55.

got crabs. The lad sort them out. We get a good price for the hen crabs.

:22:56.:22:59.

They go to the Chinese market. What's it like being a fishermen

:23:00.:23:02.

here in Grimsby these days? Card with the prices. They go up every

:23:03.:23:08.

year and it's getting bad. -- it is hard with the prices. Before it was

:23:09.:23:13.

working 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Dennis remembers those days

:23:14.:23:18.

vividly. He started on the boats back in the boomtime, in 1959. So

:23:19.:23:22.

you were skipper of this boat. I certainly was. Decades ago. And in

:23:23.:23:29.

the heyday, even before you were skipper, how many of these kind of

:23:30.:23:33.

boats would there have been around Grimsby? There were actually 12 of

:23:34.:23:37.

these. All of the other companies had a similar size of ship. This

:23:38.:23:43.

type of ship, you are talking a couple of 100. A few hundred of

:23:44.:23:49.

these? But 700 trawlers altogether in Revesby. These are known as the

:23:50.:23:54.

biggest port in the world. -- Grimsby. They have been reduced to a

:23:55.:23:59.

handful of trawlers, partly because the UK lost a battle with Iceland

:24:00.:24:04.

over fish. And new real pinballs came on in the 1980s that left many

:24:05.:24:07.

people here feeling like they didn't have as much access to fish as they

:24:08.:24:12.

did before -- new European rules. So Grimsby has had to reinvent itself

:24:13.:24:16.

as a fish processing hub and many small businesses still running

:24:17.:24:20.

buildings like this. There are lots of food places in Grimsby, right

:24:21.:24:24.

from the really high technical end, with lots of innovation and lots of

:24:25.:24:28.

modern facilities, taking care of modern needs, to this. To what

:24:29.:24:33.

you've got. And what have we got here? This is traditional coal

:24:34.:24:39.

smoking, smokehouse. Smoking salmon and haddock. We do that in a

:24:40.:24:44.

traditional way. This is one of the smokehouse is. You talk about trade

:24:45.:24:49.

barriers, future negotiations that the UK might have with the EU and

:24:50.:24:53.

other countries. How important to you is it that there aren't any more

:24:54.:24:59.

barriers? Really important. Grimsby in particular, which is a fabulous

:25:00.:25:06.

food-processing town, the supply of fish, the timely supply of fish, is

:25:07.:25:11.

really crucial. So let's not hold it up on the way here.

:25:12.:25:16.

That was a variety of the folks we spoke to. A couple of them set up

:25:17.:25:22.

around the docks here. They are trying to regenerate it. But what

:25:23.:25:27.

will Brexit mean? Let's have a chat to Mike, from the fishing industry.

:25:28.:25:32.

Good morning. It is beautiful here. We've heard a few people say there

:25:33.:25:38.

are opportunities, but also uncertainty around Brexit. A lot of

:25:39.:25:41.

people in your industry voted to leave the EU. How are they feeling

:25:42.:25:45.

now? Uncertainty and opportunity very much sums up the mood in the

:25:46.:25:49.

industry. We have a huge opportunity with the change, hopefully fishing

:25:50.:25:55.

opportunities will come our way post Brexit when we see fishing

:25:56.:25:58.

opportunities across Europe we figured, so that within the UK we

:25:59.:26:02.

have a better share of the fish that are found in our waters. That's a

:26:03.:26:05.

big opportunity for the UK industry to hopefully grow. We will see some

:26:06.:26:09.

regeneration in some of the coastal towns you are talking about. But

:26:10.:26:14.

there is also uncertainty. If you are an importer of all of these fish

:26:15.:26:18.

or the shellfish that a lot of business is like yourself import,

:26:19.:26:27.

the trade barriers that might, after the European Union, what effect

:26:28.:26:30.

could that have on your business? Trade relations reaching a state

:26:31.:26:36.

where we can still trade freely with Europe on good terms is very

:26:37.:26:40.

important. Importers in Grimsby need to bring catchier to sell to UK

:26:41.:26:44.

consumers. Are you hearing things to reassure you? We are still waiting

:26:45.:26:49.

to hear from the government. We exported a lot to Europe so we have

:26:50.:26:52.

a strong interest within the catching sector to keep the free

:26:53.:26:55.

trading relationship going. Thank you very much. The weaker pound will

:26:56.:27:00.

have helped him a bit. So many things to take into account. We will

:27:01.:27:03.

look at what wrecks at might mean for the future of the industry and

:27:04.:27:07.

what they're doing here now -- Raqqa. They have

:27:08.:30:26.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:30:27.:30:39.

We'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment,

:30:40.:30:42.

but also on Breakfast this morning:

:30:43.:30:44.

As tensions increase over North Korea, we'll be asking

:30:45.:30:46.

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon about the government's plans

:30:47.:30:48.

to modernise and expand the Royal Navy fleet.

:30:49.:30:58.

Also this morning, the Cromer crab has been caught off

:30:59.:31:01.

the Norfolk coast for centuries but could its future be under threat

:31:02.:31:04.

And, is Life is a Cabaret for singers Louise Redknapp

:31:05.:31:21.

They'll be here to tell us about dusting off their dance shoes

:31:22.:31:25.

for their new production of the smash hit musical.

:31:26.:31:27.

But now a summary of this morning's main news.

:31:28.:31:31.

A leaked Home Office document has set out plans for how the UK

:31:32.:31:34.

immigration system could work after Brexit.

:31:35.:31:38.

The paper, which has been published by the Guardian newspaper,

:31:39.:31:41.

considers how the Government could dramatically reduce the number

:31:42.:31:44.

It also proposes time limits on how long EU nationals could stay

:31:45.:31:52.

The BBC understands the document, which was produced last month,

:31:53.:31:56.

Let's speak to Iain Watson about it. You've got the document, what is in

:31:57.:32:09.

it? A risk of a new world record, summarising and 82 page document in

:32:10.:32:13.

a minute but there are several things we should concentrate on, you

:32:14.:32:16.

can go online if you want more detail but effectively this gives an

:32:17.:32:19.

insight into the Home Office thinking about what will happen with

:32:20.:32:24.

immigration after Brexit. It's not been signed off by ministers, it's a

:32:25.:32:28.

discussion document. The suggestion is there will be a transition period

:32:29.:32:33.

after Brexit of at least two years and during that time not that much

:32:34.:32:36.

would change with the system, EU nationals could still work here or

:32:37.:32:40.

study here but if they here for three or six months they would have

:32:41.:32:44.

to register to state. If you're a jobseeker trying to find work then

:32:45.:32:48.

you wouldn't be able to register, you would have to have at least a

:32:49.:32:52.

guarantee of employment before doing so -- state. Beyond that there would

:32:53.:32:57.

be a restrictive system -- state. If you are unskilled or low skilled as

:32:58.:33:02.

a worker -- stay. You might only be allowed to stay for one or two years

:33:03.:33:07.

and then you would have to go home but if you are highly skilled you

:33:08.:33:11.

could go for three or five years and then apply for permanent residency

:33:12.:33:14.

and all EU migrants will find new restrictions on bringing in family

:33:15.:33:15.

members. Thanks very much, Iain, we will

:33:16.:33:16.

speak to you later. We will be speaking to

:33:17.:33:22.

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon just after 7:30am about

:33:23.:33:25.

the government's plans post-Brexit. Winds from Hurricane Irma have begun

:33:26.:33:27.

lashing islands in the Caribbean, where people have been told

:33:28.:33:30.

to evacuate their homes. Officials are warning

:33:31.:33:32.

of the potentially catastrophic effects of the Category Five

:33:33.:33:34.

hurricane which has already It's starting to hit

:33:35.:33:37.

the Leeward Islands and will move on towards Puerto Rico

:33:38.:33:41.

and the Dominican Republic. It's projected to reach the US state

:33:42.:33:43.

of Florida on Saturday. Let's speak now to Genevieve Stewart

:33:44.:33:51.

Smith, who's currently on holiday Good morning, Genevieve. What are

:33:52.:34:03.

the conditions like at the moment? Good morning. It's 1:30am

:34:04.:34:11.

approximately here. Yes, it's getting very gusty. Nothing too

:34:12.:34:18.

Savea at the moment. Lots of palm trees are waving terrifically --

:34:19.:34:25.

Savea. Where I am standing from my apartment window, the sea breakers

:34:26.:34:29.

are coming over the sea wall into the lower parts of the houses that I

:34:30.:34:35.

can see. We still have power although we have been warned it may

:34:36.:34:40.

get turned off, they are expecting it to fail. Water was turned off

:34:41.:34:47.

earlier today, and the desalination plants. The hotel itself has been

:34:48.:34:52.

reasonably good at updating us, mostly telling people to get plenty

:34:53.:34:57.

of supplies of water and tinned food into their apartments. But all in

:34:58.:35:05.

all, at the moment we are doing OK. We have been told that the worst is

:35:06.:35:12.

going to be between 1am and 5am today. I understand that they've

:35:13.:35:16.

tried to move the boats away and put them to safety, what's going on?

:35:17.:35:22.

There's a lagoon at the back of Simpson Bay and boats have been

:35:23.:35:26.

queueing up for the last two days to go in. There's a road bridge that

:35:27.:35:32.

has to be raised several times during the day and they have all

:35:33.:35:37.

scurried into the lagoon at the back of Simpson Bay for safety.

:35:38.:35:41.

Genevieve, very good luck to you and I hope you stay safe. Thanks for

:35:42.:35:44.

talking to us on Breakfast. after a double shooting in East

:35:45.:35:46.

London. Corey Junior Davis and

:35:47.:35:49.

another boy, who's 17, were found with gunshot injuries

:35:50.:35:51.

in Forest Gate on Monday afternoon. The second victim is said to have

:35:52.:35:54.

life-changing injuries. Police have launched

:35:55.:35:56.

a murder investigation. Just half of dentists in England

:35:57.:36:04.

are accepting new NHS patients, The British Dental

:36:05.:36:07.

Association said the figure was a disgrace and evidence

:36:08.:36:12.

of an emerging crisis But the NHS says 95%

:36:13.:36:14.

of patients do manage The Archbishop of Canterbury has

:36:15.:36:19.

warned that the UK's economic model Justin Welby is a member

:36:20.:36:25.

of the commission behind a report published today by the Institute

:36:26.:36:30.

for Public Policy Research. It says the country faces

:36:31.:36:32.

the longest period of stagnating 13 people have been rescued

:36:33.:36:35.

after becoming trapped in a 53 11 members of the public and two

:36:36.:36:48.

staff members were winched to safety from the Jurassic Skyline

:36:49.:36:52.

tower in Weymouth by a Coastguard A full investigation

:36:53.:36:56.

into the incident is under way. There's been a huge demand... It's

:36:57.:37:13.

interesting there are no stairs, are there no stairs? I don't know. Why

:37:14.:37:18.

don't you know? In terms of what we need to know, big demand from our

:37:19.:37:24.

viewers about what's going on on the London Eye, you can't say that

:37:25.:37:27.

there's something you can't tell us about. We were on the London Eye and

:37:28.:37:32.

it stopped at the top and an emergency voice came the tannoy and

:37:33.:37:36.

said you are safe, your rescuers will be on the way. That's kind of

:37:37.:37:41.

alarming when you are at the top. We waited and waited and then they said

:37:42.:37:46.

there is a emergency supplies in the pod. We never cracked open them. We

:37:47.:37:51.

should have gone for it. Where are they? They didn't tell us that

:37:52.:37:57.

because it didn't get to that stage. Biscuits? I don't know, I would

:37:58.:38:02.

probably put in some gin. I'm is sure it's something more sensible

:38:03.:38:06.

like water. Probably use something like water. After an hour it

:38:07.:38:12.

eventually moved but I was more than slightly out of breath. You didn't

:38:13.:38:17.

need to break out the gin all get winched down? Thank you for an

:38:18.:38:23.

unveiling that. There are supplies? I don't ever want to test that

:38:24.:38:29.

theory! Shall we not do that? Probably a good idea. Ben Woodburn,

:38:30.:38:34.

how good is he, played for Wales last night, he's had the most

:38:35.:38:39.

fantastic week. Interestingly he's been very well looked after at

:38:40.:38:42.

Liverpool by Jurgen Klopp and Chris Coleman also has a similar theory to

:38:43.:38:46.

Klopp, they are going to try to protect him a bit, how long for,

:38:47.:38:49.

we're not sure. Wales are still on track to qualify

:38:50.:38:50.

for next year's World Cup It was another great

:38:51.:38:53.

night for Ben Woodburn, who set up al Robson-Kanu

:38:54.:38:57.

ten minutes from time. Woodburn scored the winner

:38:58.:39:00.

against Austria at the weekend. And in injury time,

:39:01.:39:02.

Aaron Ramsey sealed the win that

:39:03.:39:05.

leaves them second in their group. Serbia are top after they beat

:39:06.:39:07.

the Republic of Ireland in Dublin. Former Manchester City player

:39:08.:39:10.

Aleksander Kolarov scored the only England women's manager Mark Sampson

:39:11.:39:12.

says he has a clear conscience and discrimination by striker Eni

:39:13.:39:17.

Aluko. Sampson led England

:39:18.:39:22.

to the semi-finals of the last

:39:23.:39:24.

World Cup and European Championship and he was cleared of any wrongdoing

:39:25.:39:26.

by two investigations. He insists he is happy to meet

:39:27.:39:29.

with Aluko to discuss any differences since he dropped

:39:30.:39:32.

her from the squad. I've heard the specifics of the

:39:33.:39:45.

allegation and at the time we released a statement and we were

:39:46.:39:50.

very clear that I didn't say that. I'm very disappointed the

:39:51.:39:53.

allegation's come out but I understand it and all I can say is I

:39:54.:40:02.

didn't say that to Eni. With any of my communication my intention is to

:40:03.:40:05.

support the players, give them confidence and give them chance to

:40:06.:40:06.

be successful on the field. At the age of 37, Venus

:40:07.:40:08.

Williams is two wins away

:40:09.:40:11.

from another grand slam title. She beat Petra Kvitova

:40:12.:40:12.

in a real thriller to reach her

:40:13.:40:15.

first US Open semi-final It took over two and a half hours

:40:16.:40:16.

and the deciding set went to a tie-break, Williams said it

:40:17.:40:21.

felt like a special match. Her last grand slam triumph

:40:22.:40:24.

was nine years ago. Jamie Murray picked himself up

:40:25.:40:36.

to partner Martina Hingis to victory in the quarter-finals

:40:37.:40:39.

of the mixed doubles, that after he and Bruno Suarez,

:40:40.:40:42.

the defending champions, were knocked out of

:40:43.:40:45.

the men's doubles. Chris Froome heads into another day

:40:46.:40:47.

in the hills on the Tour of Spain today and he's nearly

:40:48.:40:50.

two minutes in front. Froome won his fourth Tour de France

:40:51.:40:53.

in July but he's never taken the Vuelta before,

:40:54.:40:56.

he dominated yesterday's time trial the sign of a good sportsman

:40:57.:40:58.

is being able to take advice. Rarely more important than in golf

:40:59.:41:08.

where Phil Mickelson sought some help during the final

:41:09.:41:11.

round of a tournament in Boston. Would you go for here out of the

:41:12.:41:21.

rough or would you lay up? If I could hit my three wood to hundreds

:41:22.:41:25.

60 I would probably go for it. LAUGHTER

:41:26.:41:30.

that would be wryly, I'm not sure how old he is but I'm guessing... --

:41:31.:41:40.

Riley. I'm guessing around seven. Extremely informed. Phil said, would

:41:41.:41:46.

you like a job as my caddie? He's one of the great chapters in the

:41:47.:41:50.

game. Lovely. You would be a proud parent. To come back with something

:41:51.:41:55.

so specific and right as well, clever boy. Well done, Riley.

:41:56.:41:58.

From reaching Mars to developing nuclear power, British scientists

:41:59.:42:00.

must continue to work in collaboration with their European

:42:01.:42:03.

That's the message from the government as it sets out

:42:04.:42:06.

a position paper on leaving the European Union.

:42:07.:42:09.

In a moment we'll get reaction from two people who work

:42:10.:42:12.

First, here's our science correspondent Pallab Ghosh

:42:13.:42:14.

British science is one of the biggest winners of membership of the

:42:15.:42:26.

European Union. Between 2007 and 2013, the UK received ?8 billion

:42:27.:42:32.

from the EU. That's ?3 billion more than it put into the research

:42:33.:42:38.

budget. Its membership of the main European research programme enables

:42:39.:42:42.

UK researchers and businesses to develop collaborations with leading

:42:43.:42:46.

European research labs and industrial partners. Researcher

:42:47.:42:49.

leaders have argued that withdrawal would be a body blow for British

:42:50.:42:53.

science. The government it seems has listened. I understand it's expected

:42:54.:42:59.

to say all options for research with EU partners are on the table,

:43:00.:43:04.

including a special status for the UK that would allow continued close

:43:05.:43:05.

collaboration. Nick Wright is an astronomer

:43:06.:43:09.

at Keele University, whose research relies

:43:10.:43:12.

heavily on EU funding. for Science and Engineering,

:43:13.:43:14.

is in our London newsroom. Good morning. Sara Conor how

:43:15.:43:24.

important is it that we keep collaborating with our European

:43:25.:43:32.

partners on science? -- Sarah,. It's one of the most aspects of science

:43:33.:43:37.

and innovation in the UK. We have survey scientists before and they

:43:38.:43:42.

tell us in the vast majority of responses, over 90%, they really

:43:43.:43:47.

value highly the collaborative networks with other researchers in

:43:48.:43:51.

the European Union as well as access to important facilities that allow

:43:52.:43:54.

research to go on across many countries. Nick, for you, as EU

:43:55.:43:59.

funding affected your research and what are your concerns going

:44:00.:44:05.

forward? I'm not directly funded by the EU but I've looked at it in the

:44:06.:44:09.

future and knowing that could be taken away is worrying for my future

:44:10.:44:13.

research career and what I may be able to achieve. The collaborations

:44:14.:44:17.

that are beginning to fray at the edges because of Brexit are quite

:44:18.:44:23.

worrying. I have been told by a collaborator that I wouldn't be

:44:24.:44:26.

included in a potential project because I was in the UK and

:44:27.:44:30.

therefore there could be a risk to the funding proposal because of my

:44:31.:44:34.

involvement, and I know examples of this beginning to appear. In that

:44:35.:44:39.

conversation, was there anything you could do to dissuade them? I kind of

:44:40.:44:44.

understood the point that he was making. He has to apply for research

:44:45.:44:48.

funds to support his research career. If he felt there was a risk,

:44:49.:44:53.

I personally didn't, I try to persuade him of that, if he feels

:44:54.:44:56.

there's a risk then you can't encourage somebody to put you on a

:44:57.:45:10.

proposal which could their chances. Others from outside the UK might say

:45:11.:45:13.

they aren't willing to partner up because they are buoyed about what

:45:14.:45:17.

would happen post- Brexit? That has been a really worrying feature of

:45:18.:45:21.

the uncertainty caused with the transition process, I suppose, of

:45:22.:45:25.

moving from the referendum vote into a new scenario. I think I would

:45:26.:45:30.

never underestimate the challenge that Brexit poses to science. It is

:45:31.:45:34.

a very significant challenge. A positive thing about it is it shows

:45:35.:45:41.

the government making an overdue to the EU and saying these are the ways

:45:42.:45:46.

in which we currently collaborate on science with the EU and we want to

:45:47.:45:51.

discuss how to keep this going in the future. So I see it as the UK

:45:52.:45:56.

government being quite positive and say that all options are still on

:45:57.:46:01.

the table and we want to negotiate perhaps closer ways that can work

:46:02.:46:04.

with the EU particularly on science. Give us an idea, Nick, how much do

:46:05.:46:13.

you talk to European colleagues at how important is that relationship

:46:14.:46:16.

between scientists here and European scientists? I've had many

:46:17.:46:20.

conversations in a typical day with astronomers across Europe, as well

:46:21.:46:25.

as in other countries. We discuss the scientific research projects,

:46:26.:46:30.

proposals we will put forward for funding, to build projects or to

:46:31.:46:37.

move projects forward or to bring a project to publication. It sort of a

:46:38.:46:42.

continual process. Are there other countries that you could be doing

:46:43.:46:46.

this with? There are other countries I can collaborate with and I

:46:47.:46:49.

collaborate with people in a number of countries, but it is difficult to

:46:50.:46:53.

have the funding and collaborative framework that the EU has set up

:46:54.:46:57.

that allows us to apply for a large pot of money that could be shared

:46:58.:47:00.

between multiple countries. Individual governments can't really

:47:01.:47:05.

do that. I know there are positives in what the government is saying,

:47:06.:47:09.

but surely you can understand the genuine concerns of people like Nick

:47:10.:47:14.

and many others? Absolutely. I really wouldn't underestimate that

:47:15.:47:18.

at all. The situation at the moment, the way in which we collaborate with

:47:19.:47:24.

the EU, it works very well because the structures and processes are

:47:25.:47:28.

already in place and there are funding programmes bear and

:47:29.:47:31.

collaborative programmes which make it easy for researchers in the UK to

:47:32.:47:36.

work with counterparts across Europe. There are important global

:47:37.:47:41.

challenges on health and space and the environment, all kinds of

:47:42.:47:45.

things, where you really need people to work together across countries in

:47:46.:47:49.

order to tackle these problems. The weight ins are set up, it works well

:47:50.:47:54.

for signs at the moment -- the way things are set up. I hope through

:47:55.:47:58.

this starting paper, the starting position of the UK government, we

:47:59.:48:02.

can work towards keeping this going beyond Brexit. Thanks very much for

:48:03.:48:07.

your time this morning. It's very interesting. And David

:48:08.:48:12.

Davis says about the paper that it sends a clear message to the

:48:13.:48:15.

research and innovation community, that we value their work and feel it

:48:16.:48:19.

is crucial to maintain collaboration with our European partners. Thanks

:48:20.:48:22.

very much. Let's find out what's happening with

:48:23.:48:24.

the weather. We will be concentrating a lot for

:48:25.:48:33.

-- on Hurricane Irma. A much quieter story this side of the Atlantic. It

:48:34.:48:38.

is all eyes on Hurricane Irma at the moment, with its potentially

:48:39.:48:41.

catastrophic impacts. We will keep you up-to-date through the morning.

:48:42.:48:46.

The weather here is pretty quiet. This is sunrise, taken recently by

:48:47.:48:49.

one of our Weather Watchers. Clear skies around and with those clear

:48:50.:48:54.

skies it is quite chilly start the day. We've lost the weather front

:48:55.:48:57.

that brought the rain over the past few days. That's clear to the east

:48:58.:49:02.

and we have more of a westerly influence as we head the day. To

:49:03.:49:06.

start things off with a clear skies temperatures widely done in single

:49:07.:49:10.

figures, so a fresh start. Less muggy and humid than recently.

:49:11.:49:15.

Through the day we have a lot of dry weather on the cards across much of

:49:16.:49:19.

the country. A few showers propping up in Northern Ireland in the

:49:20.:49:22.

north-west Scotland and a few perhaps for Cumbria and Lancashire.

:49:23.:49:27.

But most of us avoiding the showers. It will be breezy, with some fair

:49:28.:49:30.

weather cloud. It feel pleasant -- feels pleasant, with temperatures

:49:31.:49:36.

about 50- 20. We will see a few showers for the north-west of

:49:37.:49:40.

Scotland, but then most of us are looking dry, with clear skies again.

:49:41.:49:44.

As the recipe for a chilly night again. During the second half of the

:49:45.:49:48.

night we have more cloud moving on from the north and west, bringing

:49:49.:49:53.

outbreaks of rain. So not as chilly tomorrow morning as it is outside at

:49:54.:49:56.

the moment. Across Scotland and Northern Ireland we have the rain

:49:57.:50:01.

and wind picking up through the morning. Further south across

:50:02.:50:04.

England and Wales it will cloud over from the north-west, but towards the

:50:05.:50:07.

south and east you should stay mostly dry. Tomorrow afternoon we

:50:08.:50:12.

see more heavy rain setting in marking the start of an unsettled

:50:13.:50:17.

spell of weather. Across much of Scotland and Northern Ireland we

:50:18.:50:20.

have a wet and breezy afternoon. Feeling cool. There could be a bit

:50:21.:50:25.

of surface water lying around, with heavy rain in the north-west England

:50:26.:50:30.

and Wales. In the north-east you are likely to stay mostly dry.

:50:31.:50:35.

Temperatures about 90 degrees. And a few showers across the south-west of

:50:36.:50:39.

England, with the breeze picking up later. This is the culprit bringing

:50:40.:50:42.

us the unsettled weather. Low pressure moving in. On Friday that

:50:43.:50:48.

sits to the north of the UK. It will be a windy day on Friday, with some

:50:49.:50:53.

sunshine but also plenty of showers and perhaps longer spells of rain

:50:54.:50:56.

around parts of southern England on Friday. Quite cool and showery and

:50:57.:51:02.

that will continue into the weekend, with low pressure staying not far

:51:03.:51:05.

away. Some showers around on Saturday. It could turn the key wet

:51:06.:51:09.

and windy by Sunday. Back to you both. Thank you.

:51:10.:51:11.

The crabbing industry is to Cromer what sticks of rock

:51:12.:51:14.

Tourists flock to the North Norfolk coast just to sample

:51:15.:51:19.

But according to the charity Seafarers UK, towns like Cromer

:51:20.:51:25.

or Aldeburgh in Suffolk, which were built on traditional

:51:26.:51:28.

fishing methods, are in decline and need more support.

:51:29.:51:30.

Breakfast's Jayne McCubbin is in Aldeburgh for us this

:51:31.:51:33.

It looks like a lovely day. Good morning.

:51:34.:51:39.

Good morning! It has been the most amazing sunrise down here. Just

:51:40.:51:47.

absolutely gorgeous. No wonder so many people want to live in places

:51:48.:51:52.

like this. It is picturesque. This is Aldeburgh on the Suffolk coast at

:51:53.:51:56.

an amazing place. People have been selling their wares from places like

:51:57.:52:02.

this all along the coast here for the best part of 100 years. But

:52:03.:52:08.

numbers of fishermen are declining. Back in the 1600 there were about

:52:09.:52:12.

1500 fishermen based here in Aldeburgh. In the 1800 that halved

:52:13.:52:18.

to about 700. If the news ago there were just 35 and today only three

:52:19.:52:22.

fishermen are left. So what happens in cases like this when the

:52:23.:52:27.

fishermen leave and the tourists, the second home owners, movie and?

:52:28.:52:32.

We went about two hours further up the coast that way to Cromer, famous

:52:33.:52:37.

for its crap, to find out the answer to that question.

:52:38.:52:39.

Fishing is so a part of the fabric of Cromer that if you stop someone

:52:40.:52:45.

on the shore and ask their name... Johnny. Surname? Seibu. People think

:52:46.:52:56.

it's a fake name. Jonny first went to see here at five, full-time as

:52:57.:53:01.

soon as he could skip school. What makes Cromer Cromer? Virtually

:53:02.:53:08.

untouched. No big roads, it hasn't got the mass tourism, we don't need

:53:09.:53:12.

the hotels, and the fast food chains and stuff like that. Special? Very

:53:13.:53:18.

special. Special, but it is changing. You are obviously a lot

:53:19.:53:24.

faster than me. I've been doing this since I was about eight, nine years

:53:25.:53:32.

old. He does what his parents did and what his grandparents did before

:53:33.:53:35.

them, at the next-generation... Never. No, it's not... No. He is

:53:36.:53:45.

only a boy, he might change his mind. You never know. Is this

:53:46.:53:49.

emotional blackmail? Is tried to emotionally but they'll be in the

:53:50.:53:53.

past but failed miserably. The number of cramming both you has

:53:54.:53:58.

fallen from 150 30 years ago to about a dozen today -- crabbing.

:53:59.:54:02.

Plastic battery now stands where a crabbing back we once stood. -- a

:54:03.:54:08.

plastic factory. Could this be the last generation in Cromer? Obviously

:54:09.:54:13.

it would be very sad. It would be heartbreaking. The old Fishermans

:54:14.:54:19.

cottages are being snapped up as holiday rentals and second homes by

:54:20.:54:23.

people like Mark. A very sweet little cottage. Mark tells me change

:54:24.:54:28.

is good. It's starting to go slightly more upmarket. Are you

:54:29.:54:32.

worried at all about the fishing industry here? Not really, but I'm

:54:33.:54:38.

not a fishermen, so the town needs were at -- needs tourists. I think

:54:39.:54:45.

what we can do to encourage that is good. But Sarah who served as a

:54:46.:54:50.

crowd is less certain that change serves everyone well. You were here

:54:51.:54:56.

wigging them, were due? I was. Are you cross? I am. It easy and almost

:54:57.:55:02.

trite for property developers to say it is progress, but it's got to be

:55:03.:55:08.

done in a measured way. We have four children of our own and they are

:55:09.:55:12.

young adults now and I doubt very much that they would be able to buy

:55:13.:55:20.

a property in this area. On the high these shops are closing down to make

:55:21.:55:24.

way for the first big-name coffee shop. A petition was taken to the

:55:25.:55:27.

council to try to stop the Korean crabbing tractors on the beach, they

:55:28.:55:32.

were disturbing some of the new arrivals. When people don't leave

:55:33.:55:42.

here all year round there's no incentive to invest essential

:55:43.:55:47.

services, so transport, education, health, all of these things suffer

:55:48.:55:50.

and comes somewhere where people to live if people don't live in it

:55:51.:55:55.

loses its identity. The very thing that brought the second homeowners

:55:56.:55:59.

in the first place? Yes. So you think it's worth fighting for? I

:56:00.:56:05.

certainly do. Many of these traditional communities are

:56:06.:56:09.

changing. What is progress the sum is not to all.

:56:10.:56:12.

This is a dilemma. They are just bringing in their wall. People love

:56:13.:56:24.

seeing this. What do you keep this place is as real living, breathing,

:56:25.:56:30.

dynamic areas, where real people live, or do they become a museum

:56:31.:56:36.

piece for tourists? This is the problem. Seafarers UK, a charity

:56:37.:56:39.

that supported fishermen for 100 years, say there is more need today

:56:40.:56:43.

and ever before to support this fishing communities.

:56:44.:56:46.

Back to you. It is wonderful scene that go on behind you. They you so

:56:47.:56:51.

much. Back with you later. Much better weather than yesterday.

:56:52.:56:53.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:56:54.:00:13.

Expect a spell of wet and windy weather.

:00:14.:00:15.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:00:16.:00:19.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:00:20.:00:22.

This is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:00:23.:00:27.

Plans to curb the number of EU migrants living and working

:00:28.:00:30.

in the UK are set out in a leaked Home Office document.

:00:31.:00:33.

It suggests the free movement of people will be

:00:34.:00:36.

But the government says nothing's been signed off yet.

:00:37.:00:52.

Hurricane Irma, one of the most powerful Atlantic storms ever

:00:53.:00:58.

recorded, has begun lashing islands in the Caribbean.

:00:59.:01:06.

News this morning that just half of dentists in England are accepting

:01:07.:01:09.

We are flogging fish this morning, the latest in our coastal series to

:01:10.:01:31.

see how Brexit is affecting the industry.

:01:32.:01:31.

In sport, Wales manager, Chris Coleman, says "bring it on,"

:01:32.:01:34.

after a late victory over Moldova in their World Cup qualifier.

:01:35.:01:37.

Two more wins and they should be in Russia next year.

:01:38.:01:40.

We'll look at the award that celebrates those making a difference

:01:41.:01:47.

Good morning. Good morning. A bright and breezy day today. Dry for most

:01:48.:02:01.

of us. A few showers in the north-west. I will bring you all the

:02:02.:02:05.

details in 15 minutes. Thank you. A leaked Home Office document has

:02:06.:02:11.

set out plans for how the UK immigration system

:02:12.:02:16.

could work after Brexit. The proposal, which has been

:02:17.:02:17.

published by the Guardian newspaper, considers how the Government

:02:18.:02:20.

could dramatically reduce the number It also proposes time limits on how

:02:21.:02:23.

long EU nationals could stay The BBC understands the document has

:02:24.:02:27.

not been approved by ministers. Let's get more from our political

:02:28.:02:31.

correspondent Iain Watson Is this a damaging document? What is

:02:32.:02:43.

in it? I don't know if it will be damaging the PE depends on your

:02:44.:02:48.

political point of view. This is it. It is sensitive. It suggests after

:02:49.:02:55.

Brexit there will be a transition period of at least two years in

:02:56.:02:59.

which immigration from the EU does not change much. EU migrants wanting

:03:00.:03:07.

to stay for six months would have to register for the first time. Beyond

:03:08.:03:11.

that, radical suggestions are being suggested. Low-skilled workers could

:03:12.:03:19.

only stay here for two years. Highly skilled workers may not even be able

:03:20.:03:24.

to stay permanently at all. 3-5 years. Family members, if you want

:03:25.:03:28.

to bring them, that will face new restrictions as well. Is

:03:29.:03:34.

implemented, and it has not been decided yet, it could be a radical

:03:35.:03:42.

change. -- if. We will speak to the Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon

:03:43.:03:47.

just after 730 about the government's plans post-Brexit.

:03:48.:03:52.

Islands in the Caribbean are making last-minute preparations

:03:53.:03:54.

for Hurricane Irma, one of the most powerful Atlantic storms on record,

:03:55.:03:57.

with officials warning of its "potentially catastrophic" effects.

:03:58.:04:00.

It's already lashing the British territory of Anguilla

:04:01.:04:02.

where residents say the powerful waves and high winds have been

:04:03.:04:05.

Our correspondent, Sarah Corker, reports.

:04:06.:04:12.

This is the eye of the storm from space.

:04:13.:04:15.

Dramatic images from Nasa capture the sheer scale and magnitude

:04:16.:04:18.

The category five storm is on a collision course

:04:19.:04:21.

Popular holiday destinations like Antigua and Saint Martin

:04:22.:04:24.

are preparing for life-threatening winds and torrential rains.

:04:25.:04:26.

Storm surges of up to 12 feet are forecast and overnight some

:04:27.:04:29.

Irma's path may change but at the moment it looks set

:04:30.:04:40.

to head towards the British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico,

:04:41.:04:43.

Cuba and by the weekend, the Florida Keys.

:04:44.:04:45.

In Miami they are stocking up on sandbags and preparing

:04:46.:04:48.

The storm surge is massive and the storm surge is predicted

:04:49.:05:02.

Right now it is travelling at 15 mph and it is tracked to move south

:05:03.:05:07.

of the Florida Keys on a westerly path with a slight north turn.

:05:08.:05:11.

It's incredibly important that all Floridians keep a close eye

:05:12.:05:14.

Do not sit and wait to prepare, get prepared now.

:05:15.:05:32.

This monster hurricane comes on the heels of Harvey,

:05:33.:05:34.

which struck Texas and Louisiana last month.

:05:35.:05:36.

Irma is forecast to be even more dangerous.

:05:37.:05:38.

Now millions of people across the Caribbean are bracing

:05:39.:05:41.

themselves for one of the most powerful hurricanes ever recorded

:05:42.:05:44.

We can speak now to Carolyne Coleby who's been preparing

:05:45.:05:52.

Just tell us where you are and what conditions are like at the moment. I

:05:53.:06:10.

think the main impact will be tomorrow. Since yesterday afternoon,

:06:11.:06:26.

the wind's been increasing. And over the last few hours it's gotten

:06:27.:06:29.

louder. What preparations have you been making? We are in our house.

:06:30.:06:40.

Others went to shelters. I have livestock, so I have moved to a

:06:41.:06:47.

friend's house. They are at the back of the property. The goats don't do

:06:48.:07:05.

well in water and I had to get them out of the water, basically, out of

:07:06.:07:10.

the rain. Right. It is the middle of the night, actually, and I have been

:07:11.:07:14.

asleep. It is pretty loud so I have not had much sleep yet. The place

:07:15.:07:22.

you are in, do you know if it is safe and secure? It should be. The

:07:23.:07:31.

house is very, very solid. We just had a new roof put on. I am hoping

:07:32.:07:38.

we will not lose it. So far, so good. OK. Good luck with that. I

:07:39.:07:45.

hope your livestock are OK as well. Good luck as the storm passes. Thank

:07:46.:07:52.

you. We will get more information soon on where it is, where it is

:07:53.:07:59.

passing, and where it will go. Now for some other news this morning.

:08:00.:08:00.

A 14-year-old boy has died after a double shooting in East

:08:01.:08:03.

Corey Junior Davis and another boy, who's 17, were found with gunshot

:08:04.:08:07.

injuries in Forest Gate on Monday afternoon.

:08:08.:08:09.

The second victim is said to have "life-changing injuries."

:08:10.:08:11.

Police have launched a murder investigation.

:08:12.:08:15.

Just half of dentists in England are accepting new NHS patients,

:08:16.:08:18.

The British Dental Association said the figure was a "disgrace"

:08:19.:08:22.

and evidence of an "emerging crisis" in dental care.

:08:23.:08:25.

But the NHS says 95% of patients do manage to get an appointment.

:08:26.:08:28.

This is a familiar sight for Fozia, who's been trying to find an NHS

:08:29.:08:33.

I was absolutley gobsmacked and in a sense quite devastated

:08:34.:08:49.

A mum of two on benefits, Fozia needs a local NHS dentist

:08:50.:08:58.

for her son, Mansur, who has an overcrowded mouth

:08:59.:09:01.

and a mineral deficiency with this teeth.

:09:02.:09:03.

I tried going through the Yellow Pages and using the Internet

:09:04.:09:06.

and then I used the 101 where they find you the nearest NHS

:09:07.:09:09.

dentist, and they said there wasn't one in Bradford.

:09:10.:09:15.

The BBC has analysed the data of two and a half thousand dental practices

:09:16.:09:19.

across England that provided information

:09:20.:09:20.

about whether they were accepting new NHS patients.

:09:21.:09:23.

48% said they were not accepting new adult patients while 40% said

:09:24.:09:26.

they weren't accepting new child patients.

:09:27.:09:28.

There's an emerging crisis about more dentists not accepting

:09:29.:09:30.

new patients simply because they are not allowed to see

:09:31.:09:33.

more patients, the government has only commissioned enough dentistry

:09:34.:09:35.

to treat half the adult population and it's a disgrace.

:09:36.:09:38.

People that need an NHS dentist should get one.

:09:39.:09:40.

NHS England says the latest patient survey found 95% of people seeking

:09:41.:09:44.

a dental appointment were able to get one and overall the number

:09:45.:09:47.

of dentists offering NHS care is 3,800 higher than a decade ago.

:09:48.:09:50.

The Archbishop of Canterbury has warned that Britain's economic model

:09:51.:10:01.

is "broken" as the gap between the richest and poorest

:10:02.:10:03.

Justin Welby is a member of the commission behind a report

:10:04.:10:08.

published today by the centre-left think tank, the Institute

:10:09.:10:10.

It says the country faces the longest period of stagnating

:10:11.:10:14.

The Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, is shortly to meet

:10:15.:10:26.

the de-facto leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi.

:10:27.:10:29.

Myanmar is currently under intense diplomatic pressure to end

:10:30.:10:31.

the violence its security forces are reportedly inflicting

:10:32.:10:33.

Tens of thousands have fled into neighbouring Bangladesh.

:10:34.:10:40.

13 people have been rescued after becoming trapped in a 53-metre

:10:41.:10:43.

11 members of the public and two staff members were winched to safety

:10:44.:10:48.

from the Jurassic Skyline tower in Weymouth by a Coastguard

:10:49.:10:50.

A full investigation into the incident is under way.

:10:51.:10:56.

Look at that. There are no stairs apparently. You were saying you got

:10:57.:11:17.

stuck at the top of the London Eye. Apparently there is an emergency

:11:18.:11:27.

box. They told me that rescuers are on the way. Then they said there

:11:28.:11:31.

were emergency supplies. And this is what is in it. Foil jackets for

:11:32.:11:44.

shock purposes, cups and water, a first aid kit, glucose tablets, a

:11:45.:11:54.

bag, and what everyone needs, wet wipes. And chocolate? None of that.

:11:55.:12:07.

Thankfully after an hour it moved and we were safe.

:12:08.:12:12.

And now we go back to the main story.

:12:13.:12:15.

It's a tense time for those in the path of Hurricane Irma

:12:16.:12:18.

as they try and protect themselves from the most powerful Atlantic

:12:19.:12:21.

The Category Five hurricane has already sustained wind speeds of 185

:12:22.:12:25.

miles per hour and there is no sign that it will let up

:12:26.:12:29.

Weather presenter, Simon King, joins us.

:12:30.:12:34.

In a lot about this. You made a documentary about chasing

:12:35.:12:48.

hurricanes. I made a programme for Radio5Live. I went to Miami to talk

:12:49.:12:55.

about the forecast of Hurricane Katrina. I went to the Weather

:12:56.:13:16.

Centre and spent time with the Hurricane Hunters, fascinating

:13:17.:13:18.

people, who fly into hurricanes to take measurements. This is a video

:13:19.:13:23.

of them in Irma. It seems crazy you would want to fly into or around

:13:24.:13:30.

one. It is safe to do. They can see the turbulence, the up and down

:13:31.:13:41.

drafts, which can cause damage to planes. They can cope with the high

:13:42.:13:45.

winds and punch through into the eye of the hurricane. And this is from

:13:46.:13:53.

Irma? Yes. On Monday night there were three aircrafts in Hurricane

:13:54.:14:03.

Irma. How bad is this one? Think about the size of Irma. If you can

:14:04.:14:11.

imagine France, Irma is the same size. Gosh. It is absolutely huge.

:14:12.:14:19.

Think about the tiny islands in the Caribbean it is going over, it

:14:20.:14:34.

engulfs them. We mention hurricane categories of one to five, with one

:14:35.:14:38.

the weakest. It is five. That is rare. 185 miles per hour. What is

:14:39.:14:47.

the most dangerous part of this storm, wind, waves?

:14:48.:14:55.

A lot of people think it's the winds but it is actually the storm surge

:14:56.:15:02.

that can kill more people. A massive from the national hurricane centre

:15:03.:15:08.

to me and to everyone is that it is the floodwaters that can actually

:15:09.:15:14.

cause more harm. It is hard to predict the path of the storm

:15:15.:15:19.

perfectly. What affects that and where might it go? Because Florida

:15:20.:15:23.

and a number of other places are on high alert. This is the key thing.

:15:24.:15:30.

Hurricane hunters are crucial in the forecasting. They measure within and

:15:31.:15:38.

around the hurricane. That helps to get an idea of the flow, where it

:15:39.:15:44.

will go. All of that data they collect and send back to the

:15:45.:15:49.

national hurricane centre. It is a category four hurricane, or five,

:15:50.:15:54.

for quite a time and will move towards the Virgin Islands next,

:15:55.:16:00.

then towards Puerto Rico, towards Cuba and beyond that there is

:16:01.:16:04.

uncertainty but it is becoming increasingly likely that it will hit

:16:05.:16:08.

parts of Florida, southern Florida. So we've seen parts of Florida have

:16:09.:16:14.

been under an evacuation notice. So that will be the weekend. We will be

:16:15.:16:20.

keeping a very close eye on the situation. No sign of it dying out.

:16:21.:16:26.

We haven't had a major hurricane hit the US for 12 years. After Harvey,

:16:27.:16:34.

this will be the second one and that in itself is the wreck. You've given

:16:35.:16:42.

us an idea of what might be to come. Thank you very much.

:16:43.:16:49.

The size of France, that gives you the picture of how huge it is.

:16:50.:16:52.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:16:53.:16:54.

The main stories this morning: Proposals aimed at cutting

:16:55.:16:57.

the numbers of low-skilled migrants from Europe following Brexit have

:16:58.:17:00.

Winds of 180 miles per hour from Hurricane Irma have begun

:17:01.:17:09.

lashing islands in the Caribbean where people have been told

:17:10.:17:12.

Let's find out what's happening with the weather.

:17:13.:17:21.

Good morning. All lies on the Caribbean, but here on our shores

:17:22.:17:34.

it's a very quiet day weatherwise. Calm, a serene start. We have some

:17:35.:17:39.

breezy weather developing. Winds coming in from the Atlantic. They

:17:40.:17:43.

are pushing away this cold front that brought us rain over the past

:17:44.:17:49.

day. A fresher feel. The temperatures are fairly widely in

:17:50.:17:52.

single figures. Just one degree above freezing in some parts of the

:17:53.:17:57.

rural sheltered glens of Scotland. It will be chilly, with a lot of

:17:58.:18:01.

sunshine. For most of us it looks like a bright day. We will have a

:18:02.:18:05.

few showers across parts of the north-west of England and the north

:18:06.:18:09.

and west of Scotland. But for the bulk of the country a dry day ahead,

:18:10.:18:14.

with fair weather cloud bubbling up through the afternoon. Temperatures

:18:15.:18:18.

between 15- 20 degrees. So in a shelter it should feel pleasant.

:18:19.:18:24.

Breezy further north of the country. Into the evening it is looking

:18:25.:18:27.

bright, and temperatures will fall quite quickly again. Turning chilly.

:18:28.:18:33.

But during the second half of the night of the cloud builds from the

:18:34.:18:36.

north and west, bringing outbreaks of rain through the early hours of

:18:37.:18:40.

Thursday. So it won't be quite as chilly as it is first thing. Through

:18:41.:18:43.

the day things are on the change. The wet and windy weather is working

:18:44.:18:48.

through Scotland and Northern Ireland further south and east. It

:18:49.:18:52.

should stay dry for a good part of the day. Tomorrow afternoon is when

:18:53.:18:56.

we have some fairly heavy bursts of rain across Scotland and into

:18:57.:19:01.

Northern Ireland. There could be supplying water into the north-west

:19:02.:19:05.

of England too. Heading south across England and Wales the wet weather

:19:06.:19:09.

had seen and it is quite easy. Further south-east it's a dry a

:19:10.:19:15.

picture, with perhaps a few showers. Temperatures again of 19- 20. The

:19:16.:19:21.

cloud is building into the south-west, bringing rain later in

:19:22.:19:25.

the day. And then things are looking unsettled towards the end of the

:19:26.:19:28.

week. The low pressure through Thursday night and into Friday

:19:29.:19:31.

becomes well-established across the north of the UK. Quite a breezy

:19:32.:19:36.

picture on Friday. Those winds are circulating around, bringing some

:19:37.:19:41.

showers or perhaps longer spells of rain, especially across parts of

:19:42.:19:43.

southern England. Temperature is typical of the time of year. But

:19:44.:19:49.

that low pressure stays with us through the weekend. So showers

:19:50.:19:53.

around on Saturday and things could turn quite wet and windy by Sunday.

:19:54.:19:57.

Back to you. Thanks very much!

:19:58.:20:00.

Fishing is one of the oldest industries in the world but it has

:20:01.:20:03.

faced tough times in Britain in recent years, bringing challenges

:20:04.:20:06.

All this week we are talking about coastal Britain.

:20:07.:20:12.

The fishing industry voted overwhelming to leave the EU,

:20:13.:20:18.

and as part of our series we're looking at coastal communities,

:20:19.:20:21.

and we've sent Sean to Grimsby to find out how it is preparing

:20:22.:20:25.

I reckon there is an auction about to start! It is getting under way

:20:26.:20:32.

right now. We are right in the middle of the auction. A lot of this

:20:33.:20:37.

stuff that we eat in the UK comes from abroad. So they are doing a

:20:38.:20:44.

good job and a lot of this fish... Can I ask you, where has this fish

:20:45.:20:51.

come from? This is fresh Icelandic fish. This is fresh in last night.

:20:52.:20:57.

Weirdly, we actually import a lot of the fish we eat... Sorry. A lot of

:20:58.:21:03.

the fish we catch ourselves we export. So it is complicated what

:21:04.:21:07.

happens. Over the last day or so I've been looking around Grimsby to

:21:08.:21:12.

try to find what the workers around here think might happen. Darren

:21:13.:21:16.

works on the other side of the ports and I asked what he thinks the

:21:17.:21:18.

future might hold. Darren is now one of the last

:21:19.:21:22.

fishermen working in Grimsby. We get a good price

:21:23.:21:25.

for the hen crabs. What's it like being a fisherman

:21:26.:21:33.

here in Grimsby these days? It's hard in Grimsby,

:21:34.:21:38.

with the prices. The prices go up every year

:21:39.:21:39.

and it's getting bad. This port was working 24 hours

:21:40.:21:45.

a day, seven days a week. He started on the boats back

:21:46.:21:48.

in the boomtime, in 1959. And in the heyday,

:21:49.:21:53.

even before you were skipper, I guess, how

:21:54.:22:06.

many of these kinds of boats would there have

:22:07.:22:08.

been around Grimsby? There were actually

:22:09.:22:12.

12 of these boats. But all of the other companies had

:22:13.:22:16.

a similar size of ship. This type of ship, you are talking

:22:17.:22:19.

a couple of hundred. But 700 trawlers

:22:20.:22:22.

altogether in Grimsby. These were once known

:22:23.:22:27.

as the biggest ports in the world, but have been reduced

:22:28.:22:32.

since to a handful of trawlers. That's partly because the UK lost

:22:33.:22:35.

a battle with Iceland over fish. And also new European rules came

:22:36.:22:43.

in in the early '80s that left many people here feeling like they didn't

:22:44.:22:47.

have as much access to fish So Grimsby has had to reinvent

:22:48.:22:50.

itself as a fish processing hub and many small businesses still run

:22:51.:22:54.

in buildings like this. There are lots of food

:22:55.:22:58.

processers in Grimsby, right from the really

:22:59.:23:00.

high technical end, with lots of innovation

:23:01.:23:07.

and lots of modern facilities, taking care of modern

:23:08.:23:09.

needs, to this. This is a traditional

:23:10.:23:12.

coal smoking smokehouse, We do that in a traditional way

:23:13.:23:16.

and this is one of the smokehouses. You talk about trade barriers,

:23:17.:23:23.

future negotiations that the UK might have with the EU

:23:24.:23:25.

and other countries. How important to you is it

:23:26.:23:31.

that there aren't any more Grimsby in particular,

:23:32.:23:34.

which is a fabulous food-processing town,

:23:35.:23:37.

the supply of fish, the timely So let's not hold it

:23:38.:23:40.

up on the way here. Right, they are nearly done. Just a

:23:41.:23:57.

few boxes left. You can see on here, the way it works is no money changes

:23:58.:24:07.

hands. So they say. That's how it should work in theory. When you get

:24:08.:24:12.

down to the last few boxes, does that mean they are the dregs? No,

:24:13.:24:20.

the fish is graded and this happen to be the last few boxes. Well, you

:24:21.:24:26.

might get that one if you put your bid in right. Richard is from the

:24:27.:24:30.

university of Hull. A busy time of the morning. Nothing like the smell

:24:31.:24:35.

of fish to wake you up! It is pretty strong here! We have talked a lot

:24:36.:24:41.

about Grimsby and how the fishing industry has collapsed a bit here

:24:42.:24:44.

and they are try to reinvent themselves, but with Brexit and if

:24:45.:24:48.

we get more access to our own waters, Scotland would be hugely

:24:49.:24:53.

affect it, wouldn't it? How much of a difference are we talking when we

:24:54.:24:57.

look at the Scottish economy? It's a massive issue the Scotland legally,

:24:58.:25:02.

politically, economically. Legally, they want more control over their

:25:03.:25:17.

own waters. Yeah, having control over Scottish waters for Scottish

:25:18.:25:20.

fishermen will be a big thing. It looks really hectic here. We've

:25:21.:25:24.

caught it at the peak time of the auction. But good Grimsby ever

:25:25.:25:31.

really get back to that biggest port in the world status, or is it all

:25:32.:25:37.

about food processing? I think it's about food processing. The days of

:25:38.:25:43.

fishing, lots of small vessels bringing their catch to Grimsby,

:25:44.:25:48.

it's just not going to happen again. Most fishing is industrial, large

:25:49.:25:52.

vessels, and economically this is a big earner betting they want to make

:25:53.:25:56.

sure they can retain control of this. Thank you very much. I think

:25:57.:26:01.

I've missed the boat in terms of getting one of these deals.

:26:02.:26:03.

Everything has been sold, which means it's a good morning. I'm not

:26:04.:26:11.

sure their day's work has done. -- has been done.

:26:12.:26:17.

What a flurry of activity! Thank you very much.

:26:18.:26:23.

I've never seen so many wellies. Look at this.

:26:24.:26:25.

And we are also in Aldeburgh in Suffolk this morning as part

:26:26.:26:28.

of our series looking at life in coastal Britain.

:26:29.:26:31.

It used to have over 1,500 fishermen in the 1600s.

:26:32.:26:41.

That figure fell to 35 twenty years ago.

:26:42.:26:44.

Today we're told there are just three left.

:26:45.:26:47.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:26:48.:26:50.

From keeping kids off the street by getting them into boxing,

:26:51.:26:56.

to helping champions of the future, we'll be finding out how you can

:26:57.:26:59.

nominate your local unsung heros for a BBC Sports Personality

:27:00.:27:02.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:27:03.:30:30.

Expect a spell of wet and windy weather.

:30:31.:30:33.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:30:34.:30:36.

This is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:30:37.:30:49.

A leaked Home Office document has set out plans for how the UK

:30:50.:30:53.

immigration system could work after Brexit.

:30:54.:30:55.

The paper, which has been published by the Guardian newspaper,

:30:56.:30:57.

considers how the Government could dramatically reduce the number

:30:58.:31:00.

It also proposes time limits on how long EU nationals could stay

:31:01.:31:14.

The BBC understands the document, which was produced last month,

:31:15.:31:17.

We will be speaking to Defence Secretary,

:31:18.:31:21.

Sir Michael Fallon, in a few minutes.

:31:22.:31:23.

Winds from Hurricane Irma have begun lashing islands in the Caribbean,

:31:24.:31:26.

where people have been told to evacuate their homes.

:31:27.:31:28.

Officials are warning of the "potentially catastrophic"

:31:29.:31:30.

effects of the Category Five hurricane which has already

:31:31.:31:32.

sustained winds of 180 miles per hour.

:31:33.:31:34.

It's starting to hit the Leeward Islands and will move

:31:35.:31:37.

on towards Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

:31:38.:31:39.

It's projected to reach the US State of Florida on Saturday.

:31:40.:31:54.

We were just told earlier it is the size of France. We will keep you

:31:55.:31:58.

up-to-date on that. A 14-year-old boy has died

:31:59.:31:59.

after a double shooting in East Corey Junior Davis, and another boy,

:32:00.:32:02.

who's 17, were found with gunshot injuries in Forest Gate

:32:03.:32:05.

on Monday afternoon. The second victim is said to have

:32:06.:32:07.

"life-changing injuries." Police have launched

:32:08.:32:10.

a murder investigation. Just half of dentists in England

:32:11.:32:12.

are accepting new NHS patients, The British Dental Association said

:32:13.:32:15.

the figure was a "disgrace" and evidence of an "emerging

:32:16.:32:19.

crisis" in dental care. But the NHS says 95% of patients do

:32:20.:32:22.

manage to get an appointment. We will talk about that with some

:32:23.:32:40.

guests later on. Let us know what you think about it as well.

:32:41.:32:41.

The Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, is shortly to meet

:32:42.:32:44.

the de-facto leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi.

:32:45.:32:47.

Myanmar is currently under intense diplomatic pressure to end

:32:48.:32:49.

the violence its security forces are reportedly inflicting

:32:50.:32:51.

Tens of thousands have fled into neighbouring Bangladesh.

:32:52.:32:55.

Aung San Suu Kyi says a huge amount of wrong information is floating

:32:56.:32:58.

around about it. The Archbishop of Canterbury has

:32:59.:33:04.

warned that Britain's economic model is "broken" as the gap

:33:05.:33:07.

between the richest and poorest Justin Welby is a member

:33:08.:33:10.

of the commission behind a report published today by the centre-left

:33:11.:33:14.

think tank, the Institute It says the country faces

:33:15.:33:16.

the longest period of stagnating John Watson is calling time on his

:33:17.:33:55.

BBC career. His final commentary will be the FA Cup final next May.

:33:56.:34:10.

His voice is so recognisable. Part of so many important matches, it

:34:11.:34:14.

stays with you. What would he make of Wales at the moment? He would be

:34:15.:34:21.

quite chuffed. Wales are still on track to qualify

:34:22.:34:24.

for next year's World Cup It was another great

:34:25.:34:27.

night for 17-year-old, Ben Woodburn, who set up al

:34:28.:34:31.

Robson-Kanu ten minutes from time. Woodburn scored the winner

:34:32.:34:34.

against Austria at the weekend, And in injury time, Aaron Ramsey

:34:35.:34:36.

sealed the win that leaves them It is all about the results. It is

:34:37.:34:56.

great. We have that victory and that mentality. I think the cameraman was

:34:57.:35:00.

standing on a ladder. Serbia are top after they beat

:35:01.:35:09.

the Republic of Ireland in Dublin. Former Manchester City player

:35:10.:35:13.

Aleksander Kolarov scored the only England women's manager Mark Sampson

:35:14.:35:15.

says he has a clear conscience after being accused of bullying

:35:16.:35:19.

and discrimination by striker Eni Sampson led England

:35:20.:35:22.

to the semi-finals of the last World Cup and European Championship

:35:23.:35:25.

and he was cleared of any wrongdoing He insists he is happy to meet

:35:26.:35:28.

with Aluko to discuss any differences since he dropped

:35:29.:35:32.

her from the squad. I've heard the specifics

:35:33.:35:34.

of the allegation and at the time we released a statement

:35:35.:35:37.

and we were very clear that I'm very disappointed

:35:38.:35:40.

the allegation's come out but I understand it and all I can

:35:41.:35:43.

say is I didn't say that to Eni. With any of my communication my

:35:44.:35:47.

intention is to support the players, give them confidence and give them

:35:48.:35:51.

chance to be successful At the age of 37, Venus Williams

:35:52.:35:53.

is two wins away from another grand slam title.She beat Petra Kvitova

:35:54.:36:03.

in a real thriller to reach the US It took over two and a half hours

:36:04.:36:07.

and the deciding set went Kvitova only returned to the tour

:36:08.:36:11.

three months ago after the knife attack that damaged her playing

:36:12.:36:15.

hand, and Williams said it felt This match meant a lot to me.

:36:16.:36:38.

Obviously, playing at home, in a Major. Petra coming back and being

:36:39.:36:42.

able to compete. Proving to herself she can do anything. It was amazing

:36:43.:36:44.

to see her shine today. Chris Froome heads into another day

:36:45.:36:45.

in the hills on the Tour of Spain today, and he's nearly

:36:46.:36:49.

two minutes in front. Froome won his fourth Tour de France

:36:50.:36:51.

in July but he's never taken He dominated yesterday's time trial

:36:52.:36:54.

to almost double his lead. Of course, he is trying to become

:36:55.:37:10.

the third man to do the Tour and Vuelta double. That takes some

:37:11.:37:12.

doing. That is an incredible achievement. He seems to have the

:37:13.:37:15.

energy to keep doing it. Thank you. It is a very glitzy night in the

:37:16.:37:31.

sporting calendar. Many world-famous stars and athletes. It goes in my

:37:32.:37:37.

diary very early. It is one of those nights I work until midnight and 1am

:37:38.:37:42.

and then work again in the morning. Most mornings. BBC's Sports

:37:43.:37:55.

Personality of the Year. It is one of the great awards. Nominations for

:37:56.:38:05.

the Get Inspired Unsung Hero Award. Here are some of the heroes the

:38:06.:38:11.

winner was up against. Keep it going. I am a community cricket

:38:12.:38:19.

coach and play for my local club. 13s, 15s. I really enjoy coaching.

:38:20.:38:34.

It is a passion. She came to us and said if I get a table would you like

:38:35.:38:39.

it for the hall? Then she pointed out she was a coach and we said yes,

:38:40.:38:44.

yes, yes. So she bought us our first table and here we are. Nice and

:38:45.:38:53.

fast. Off we go! It is lovely. I really appreciate it. It is great

:38:54.:38:59.

that at the end of the session they always walk up and say thank you. So

:39:00.:39:05.

long as they are smiling and enjoying it, I don't care. That is

:39:06.:39:15.

one of my favourite awards of the night. Fantastic. The man who beat

:39:16.:39:21.

them to the prize is the winner from last year, Marsalis, along with

:39:22.:39:26.

Darren Campbell, a famous sprinter. An ambassador for the award. You

:39:27.:39:32.

told us you did not sleep last night. How has the last few months

:39:33.:39:37.

been since winning the award? It has just been surreal. It completely

:39:38.:39:42.

changed my life. It has been just non-stop now. Lots of things

:39:43.:39:48.

happened. Lots of people supported us and helped us and we have been

:39:49.:39:52.

more sustainable. Volunteers have been given more opportunity to

:39:53.:39:59.

volunteer. We basically, you know, have just taken the club to a

:40:00.:40:03.

completely different level. It has been an amazing experience to be the

:40:04.:40:08.

unsung hero of 2016. What strikes me is there are so many in sport across

:40:09.:40:15.

all sports, there are so many volunteers doing incredible work.

:40:16.:40:18.

How much difference did they make to your career? Umm, I think the

:40:19.:40:24.

highest accolade I could give is it saved my life. The guidance, I

:40:25.:40:35.

think, it has given me the belief that I was still important, I had

:40:36.:40:39.

value, I could achieve great things. Without backgrounding at an early

:40:40.:40:43.

age where I was able to see bad things in life, but then volunteers

:40:44.:40:49.

and good people were guiding me on a different path and giving me the

:40:50.:40:52.

belief that, look you want to go to the Olympic Games, it is possible,

:40:53.:40:59.

but you need to put in the work to Olympic gold. Without volunteers it

:41:00.:41:04.

does not happen. Boxing was your way out, wasn't it? Being involved in

:41:05.:41:09.

that is one thing. Wanting to reach out to other people is the next

:41:10.:41:15.

step. What was that journey for you? It was... The journey was up and

:41:16.:41:21.

down. Boxing gave me a safe environment. It helped channel my

:41:22.:41:26.

anger and aggression in a positive way. It gave me positive role models

:41:27.:41:31.

to be able to be around and look at and learn from. And gave me the

:41:32.:41:38.

perfect environment. Sport is the best place to give people a great

:41:39.:41:41.

environment to transform their lives. And, you know, coming from

:41:42.:41:46.

that to this is just, you know, it is just a completely different

:41:47.:41:51.

world. And is now helping other people change their lives is one of

:41:52.:41:55.

the best feelings that can happen. And sport can do that. It is not...

:41:56.:42:01.

They are changing it a bit this year. It is all of physical

:42:02.:42:05.

activity. What has changed? That is important. Sometimes sport scares

:42:06.:42:09.

people, especially traditional sports. We all cannot be great. It

:42:10.:42:18.

is great that it is other activities like dancing and yoga. However you

:42:19.:42:22.

can help somebody, giving someone five minutes over time, they could

:42:23.:42:26.

be the most valuable five minutes of that person 's life. It shows by

:42:27.:42:31.

opening up to other activities it gets more people involved in other

:42:32.:42:35.

activities that could potentially change their lives. Speaking with

:42:36.:42:41.

him, it is almost like sliding doors for me because I see a path that I

:42:42.:42:46.

could have ended up down but it doesn't matter ultimately, it is how

:42:47.:42:50.

you turn your life around and what you get back. You got invited to a

:42:51.:42:54.

really special party, didn't you? Yeah. It is an amazing story. This

:42:55.:43:01.

is what this award can do. Tell us about it. Yeah, I... Tell us about

:43:02.:43:08.

this party. Yes, Stevie Wonder, that is me and him. To have a chance to

:43:09.:43:16.

act to represent my country with this award and go over to America

:43:17.:43:20.

and get called over to Stevie Wonder's party... Anthony Joshua as

:43:21.:43:25.

well. It has been phenomenal. I have met really inspirational people who

:43:26.:43:30.

have turned me into a better person to enable other people to grow as

:43:31.:43:34.

well. A brilliant story. How do people nominate? The website? The

:43:35.:43:40.

website. The nomination is open today and ends on the 22nd of

:43:41.:43:44.

October. You will get many nominations. Thank you. And to all

:43:45.:43:50.

those volunteers as well. That is what keeps sport going. You are

:43:51.:43:53.

watching Breakfast on BBC News. The main stories this morning:

:43:54.:43:58.

Proposals aimed at cutting the numbers of low-skilled migrants

:43:59.:44:00.

from Europe following Brexit have Winds of 180mph from Hurricane Irma

:44:01.:44:03.

have begun lashing islands in the Caribbean where people have

:44:04.:44:07.

been told to evacuate their homes. Here's Sarah with a look

:44:08.:44:17.

at this morning's weather. Good morning.

:44:18.:44:27.

This side of the Atlantic things are looking pretty quiet. It is likely

:44:28.:44:30.

to be the best day of the week weatherwise. It's a beautiful

:44:31.:44:36.

picture with this sunrise, taken in Somerset in the last ten minutes or

:44:37.:44:40.

so. A gorgeous start in many parts of the country. We've lost the

:44:41.:44:44.

weather front that toured all the rain in the last few days. That's

:44:45.:44:48.

clear to the east and we have the wind is coming in from the Atlantic

:44:49.:44:52.

at the moment. A few showers on the cards, but with the clear skies to

:44:53.:44:56.

start things off it will be quite chilly first. A fresh feel stepping

:44:57.:44:59.

out this morning. Temperatures in rural spots chilly. Fair weather

:45:00.:45:08.

cloud bubbling up. Some showers around, perhaps in Cumbria,

:45:09.:45:12.

Lancashire and in northern and western Scotland, the future

:45:13.:45:16.

Northern Ireland but they should ease later in the day. Easy on the

:45:17.:45:21.

northern half of the UK. Less so further south. Temperatures between

:45:22.:45:26.

15- 20 degrees. Feeling pleasant and less humid than recently. In the

:45:27.:45:30.

this evening and showers towards the north-west is away. Most of us are

:45:31.:45:35.

dry and clear, especially in the first half of the night, and that's

:45:36.:45:39.

when temperatures drop again. Later in the early hours of Thursday more

:45:40.:45:44.

cloud builds. So tomorrow morning it would be as chilly first thing,

:45:45.:45:48.

although there is a fresh start towards the east. The day we are

:45:49.:45:52.

likely to see the arrival of the wet and windy weather for Scotland and

:45:53.:45:55.

Northern Ireland. Things quieter further south-east. Looking at

:45:56.:45:59.

tomorrow, that's when things turn more unsettled. At 4pm, heavy rain

:46:00.:46:05.

pushes on across much of Scotland and Northern Ireland. In the

:46:06.:46:09.

north-west England the rain can be heavy at times, bringing surface

:46:10.:46:14.

water and spray on the roads. In the south-east you are likely to stay

:46:15.:46:18.

dry for much of the day. 19- 20 degrees. Still the chance of the odd

:46:19.:46:23.

shower and still breezy. Towards south Wales the cloud builds on and

:46:24.:46:28.

the rain arrives later. That sets us up for an unsettled and to the week.

:46:29.:46:33.

This low pressure moves in on Thursday and into Friday. Sitting

:46:34.:46:36.

across the northern half of the UK. The winds will be rotating around

:46:37.:46:41.

the low pressure. Breezy feel to the weather on Friday. With some heavy

:46:42.:46:46.

showers. Perhaps longer spells around on Friday too, though it will

:46:47.:46:51.

feel cooler, about 14- 18. Low pressure stays nearby through the

:46:52.:46:57.

weekend. So there will be some sunshine on Saturday and scattered

:46:58.:47:00.

showers and into the second half of the weekend many of us will see the

:47:01.:47:04.

arrival of the wet and windy weather, a rather autumnal feel to

:47:05.:47:06.

the weekend. Thank you very much. More details on

:47:07.:47:12.

Hurricane Irma throughout the morning as well. Now back to one of

:47:13.:47:17.

our main stories. We now have the clearest indication yet of the

:47:18.:47:19.

likely shape of the immigration system in the UK after Brexit.

:47:20.:47:25.

It is suggested free movement will end the moment the UK leads the EU,

:47:26.:47:29.

although this hasn't yet been signed off by ministers, we understand.

:47:30.:47:33.

Let's talk to Defence Secretary Michael Fallon, good morning. Thank

:47:34.:47:40.

you very much for talking to us. Have you seen this document? I

:47:41.:47:44.

haven't and I'm not going to comment on elite document, but you will get

:47:45.:47:49.

the government's firm proposals. We have to sort out exactly what will

:47:50.:47:54.

happen after we leave the EU when freedom of movement ends and there

:47:55.:47:58.

is no longer a right for people from the EU to come to this country and

:47:59.:48:04.

expect us to -- and we will set out how that will be managed later in

:48:05.:48:08.

the year. Do you think it's good to restrict low skilled migrants to two

:48:09.:48:13.

years' residency in the future? I won't comment on that because we

:48:14.:48:17.

haven't finalised the policy, to be clear freedom of movement has to end

:48:18.:48:20.

because we are leaving the EU, that's what people voted for, and

:48:21.:48:24.

freedom of movement is part of membership. To finish. We don't want

:48:25.:48:30.

to shut the door on immigration, equally the public want to see

:48:31.:48:33.

immigration continued to come down. It is falling at the moment. We've

:48:34.:48:37.

always said we wanted to get it down from hundreds of thousands of -- per

:48:38.:48:44.

year down the tens of thousands, so we will set out the pros also as to

:48:45.:48:48.

who exactly can come here from the rest of the European Union, how long

:48:49.:48:53.

they can work here and what their various rights will be and all that

:48:54.:48:57.

will be set out by the Home Secretary later year. Would it be

:48:58.:49:01.

decided on whether they are skilled or unskilled? Icon set out that yet.

:49:02.:49:09.

It hasn't been finalised. They are being worked on at the moment.

:49:10.:49:13.

There's obviously a balance to be struck. We to shut the door. We are

:49:14.:49:18.

always welcoming people to the country those who can contribute to

:49:19.:49:24.

our economy and our society. On the other hand, we want British

:49:25.:49:27.

companies to do more to train up British workers to do more to

:49:28.:49:34.

improve skills. So there's always a balance to be struck. Where not

:49:35.:49:38.

closing the door on future immigration, but it has to be

:49:39.:49:43.

managed properly and people do expect numbers to come down. When

:49:44.:49:48.

will we know? This does breed uncertainty for businesses as well.

:49:49.:49:53.

We are publishing week by week a series of documents, setting out

:49:54.:49:57.

what the future partnership with the European Union will look like in

:49:58.:50:02.

each of the different areas. We are doing it this week for science, for

:50:03.:50:06.

example, so that universities are clear on what will happen to their

:50:07.:50:09.

funding and movement of scientists from Europe. We are doing it week by

:50:10.:50:14.

week and setting out specific proposals to the European Union of

:50:15.:50:17.

how we want this new partnership, after we've left, to work with

:50:18.:50:22.

Europe and you will see very specific proposals on how manage

:50:23.:50:29.

movement from the EU and India movement of British citizens to the

:50:30.:50:33.

rest of Europe. You will see that later this year. -- and indeed

:50:34.:50:36.

movement. Will there be a transition period? You are pressing me the

:50:37.:50:41.

details and as I said we haven't finalised the details yet, it is

:50:42.:50:45.

being worked on at the moment. There are going to be transitional periods

:50:46.:50:56.

involved in quite a lot of areas. Let's talk about ship building. It's

:50:57.:51:04.

a new national shipbuilding strategy, and there will be cuts

:51:05.:51:07.

made elsewhere. How are you balancing the books? We are

:51:08.:51:11.

increasing the defence budget. It goes up each year and it is

:51:12.:51:15.

important it does. There are growing threats to this country from Russian

:51:16.:51:21.

aggression, Daesh terrorism, using the instability with North Korea

:51:22.:51:24.

conducting nuclear tests. So we are building up our armed forces,

:51:25.:51:28.

investing in them, buying new aircraft, new armoured vehicles and

:51:29.:51:32.

we are growing the Royal Navy. You see the new Queen Elizabeth aircraft

:51:33.:51:39.

carrier arrived in Portsmouth on -- and we have cut steel on heavy duty

:51:40.:51:44.

submarine frigates, the first build on the Clyde at the moment. Today we

:51:45.:51:48.

are announcing the new lighter frigate that will build up the size

:51:49.:51:54.

of the Royal Navy and allow us to have presence across the world. As

:51:55.:51:58.

far as I understand the new frigate might be built in lots of different

:51:59.:52:02.

parts of the UK. Does it mean some job losses in other places? No, we

:52:03.:52:06.

are making it properly competitive, challenging all of the shipyards of

:52:07.:52:12.

Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Birkenhead, the shipyards in Devon

:52:13.:52:18.

and indeed in Belfast, as well as those in Scotland. Any of them will

:52:19.:52:22.

be able to bid. It competitive process. Shipyards are revising now,

:52:23.:52:29.

so there are a few -- huge opportunities for all companies in

:52:30.:52:32.

the supply chain and this week contracts for five new frigates for

:52:33.:52:37.

an expanding navy. It's a great day for the Royal Navy. Tell us about

:52:38.:52:40.

when they will be ready, Cosby would be pretty. Years. Does that leave us

:52:41.:52:45.

exposed until we are? -- because they won't be ready for some year.

:52:46.:52:49.

Our current frigates will be slowly phased out. The first of the new

:52:50.:52:54.

frigates we hope will join the Royal Navy in 2023. That's just six years

:52:55.:53:01.

away. We will run the tender competition next year and we hope to

:53:02.:53:04.

start building in 2019, in time to get this new ships in as the

:53:05.:53:11.

existing ships have to be replaced. You mentioned North Korea and the

:53:12.:53:17.

situation there at the moment. Do you think diplomacy can work at this

:53:18.:53:21.

stage? Diplomacy has to work. The alternative is far too grim and the

:53:22.:53:27.

Prime Minister spoke to President Trump yesterday. I reviewed the

:53:28.:53:30.

various options with the American Defence Secretary Jim matters --

:53:31.:53:37.

James Mattis yesterday. Although the US are making military preparations

:53:38.:53:41.

to defend their own homeland and defend their bases in Guam and

:53:42.:53:46.

Japan, we have to exhaust the diplomatic route first and we have

:53:47.:53:51.

assured the US that we will be working flat out to get a stronger

:53:52.:53:57.

diplomatic solution to this, a stronger resolution by the United

:53:58.:54:01.

Nations, enforcement of the sanctions against North Korea, to

:54:02.:54:06.

bring a freeze to their nuclear programme and to get China to

:54:07.:54:11.

understand that in the end it have to take responsibility for its

:54:12.:54:15.

neighbour and bring a halt to this programme. You said you had been

:54:16.:54:19.

discussing options. Did you discuss whether or not the UK might provide

:54:20.:54:23.

military support if it was asked by the US? We aren't at that stage yet.

:54:24.:54:29.

What is important is we intensified the diplomatic work that is needed.

:54:30.:54:34.

But it is serious. The tests continue, the nuclear programme has

:54:35.:54:38.

exhilarated, despite the resolutions of the United Nations --

:54:39.:54:45.

accelerated. Do we have to work hard at this and get a resolution with

:54:46.:54:51.

sanctions that we can properly enforced, to stop raw materials and

:54:52.:54:54.

finance get into the North Korean regime and to bring a halt to this

:54:55.:55:00.

programme. If we don't do that we face very severe consequences in the

:55:01.:55:04.

Asia-Pacific region. Michael Fallon, Defence Secretary, thank you for

:55:05.:55:06.

your time on Breakfast. Sailing, sand dunes and,

:55:07.:55:08.

of course, fresh seafood. These are only a handful reasons why

:55:09.:55:10.

we flock to the beach. All this week we've been looking

:55:11.:55:14.

at life in coastal communities and our deckchair has been

:55:15.:55:17.

travelling across Britain to find out why you like to be

:55:18.:55:19.

beside the seaside. The coast is really nice because

:55:20.:55:39.

it's so different. Sometimes the beaches are lawn and sometimes the

:55:40.:55:46.

same -- sand dunes and the sea comes in here. You get the day it's really

:55:47.:55:53.

nice and sunny. Every other day is really wet and windy. What's your

:55:54.:55:59.

favourite bit? Eating chips. Eating chips.

:56:00.:56:04.

I enjoy fishing, so this is wonderful. There are so many

:56:05.:56:12.

different spots I can go to and when I am fishing here an up close and

:56:13.:56:16.

seeing all that is happening, what's coming out of the dockyard. It's

:56:17.:56:21.

unreadable. It's quite nice to come down here as an escape from the

:56:22.:56:25.

city. Maybe living down here would take away from it little bit. I live

:56:26.:56:33.

on the coast and I can bring my boat in underneath. I really love the

:56:34.:56:39.

British coast because I'm coming from the Himalayas, in Nepal, and

:56:40.:56:45.

it's a landlocked country and we don't have any sea. So it is very

:56:46.:56:51.

fascinating Jews either C. -- fascinating country. So it is very

:56:52.:57:01.

fascinating to see the sea. We want a farm, with chickens!

:57:02.:57:07.

We do a good bit of jaunty holiday music!

:57:08.:57:17.

Where do we get the deckchair and can I take it home?

:57:18.:00:40.

Now, though, it's back to Louise and Dan.

:00:41.:00:42.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:00:43.:00:49.

Plans to curb the number of EU migrants living and working

:00:50.:00:52.

in the UK are set out in a leaked Home Office document.

:00:53.:00:55.

The Defence Secretary tells this programme that free movement

:00:56.:01:01.

will end after Brexit and the Government will set

:01:02.:01:04.

out its immigration strategy later this year.

:01:05.:01:08.

Let's be clear freedom of movement has toe end. It has to end because

:01:09.:01:12.

we are leaving the European Union. That's what people voted for last

:01:13.:01:14.

year. Good morning.

:01:15.:01:24.

It's Wednesday, 6th September. Hurricane Irma, one of the most

:01:25.:01:27.

powerful Atlantic storms ever recorded, has begun lashing islands

:01:28.:01:34.

in the Caribbean. Good morning. They are packing up

:01:35.:01:47.

the fish that's been sold at Grimsby fish market, going off to the

:01:48.:01:49.

processors. Lots of imports and exports in this industry. I will be

:01:50.:01:53.

looking at what Brexit might mean for the workers in it.

:01:54.:01:55.

And we're also live in Suffolk as part of our Coastal Britain series.

:01:56.:02:05.

Can we go there? Let's go there, now!

:02:06.:02:10.

In sport, Wales manager Chris Coleman says "bring it on",

:02:11.:02:13.

after a late victory over Moldova in their World Cup qualifier -

:02:14.:02:16.

two more wins and they should be in Russia next year.

:02:17.:02:19.

And Strictly stars Louise Redknapp and Will Young will explain how

:02:20.:02:22.

they're dusting off their dance shoes one more time

:02:23.:02:24.

Good morning. We have got a bright and a breezy day ahead today. Most

:02:25.:02:38.

places dry with sunshine. A few showers in the north-west. I'll

:02:39.:02:41.

bring you a full forecast in about 15 minutes. Thank you, Sarah. We

:02:42.:02:43.

will see you at 8.15am. The Defence Secretary Sir Michael

:02:44.:02:48.

Fallon has told BBC Breakfast the Government is not closing

:02:49.:02:51.

the door on all future immigration but insists migration

:02:52.:02:53.

numbers must come down. The comments come as a leaked

:02:54.:02:55.

Home Office document appears to set out plans for how the UK immigration

:02:56.:03:01.

system could work after Brexit including dramatically

:03:02.:03:04.

reducing the number The BBC understands the document has

:03:05.:03:05.

not been approved by ministers. Let's get more from our political

:03:06.:03:10.

correspondent Iain Watson We just spoke to Michael Fallon.

:03:11.:03:19.

What do you make of what he said? That's right, Louise. This is the

:03:20.:03:24.

document. It's official. But it's sensitive as you can see and it is a

:03:25.:03:29.

sensitive topic. What the document itself sets out is what would happen

:03:30.:03:32.

to the immigration system after Brexit. So for example, there would

:03:33.:03:37.

be a two year or more period of transition during which not that

:03:38.:03:40.

much would change, but people coming from the EU to work here would have

:03:41.:03:46.

to register and then beyond that far more restrictions on immigration. So

:03:47.:03:50.

for example, people with lower level of skills might be restricted to two

:03:51.:03:53.

years in the country. People with high level of skills might be

:03:54.:03:57.

allowed to stay for three to five years and possibly beyond that.

:03:58.:04:01.

There would be restrictions in bringing family members into the

:04:02.:04:05.

country too and what Sir Michael Fallon was saying was that he wasn't

:04:06.:04:09.

going to comment on a leaked document, but we were going to get

:04:10.:04:13.

the official position from the Government later this year, but

:04:14.:04:16.

freedom of movement had to end. We don't want to shut the door, of

:04:17.:04:20.

course, we have always welcomed to this country those who can make a

:04:21.:04:25.

contribution to our economy, to our society, people with high skills. On

:04:26.:04:28.

the other hand, we want British companies to do more to train up

:04:29.:04:33.

British workers, to do more to improve skills of those who leave

:04:34.:04:36.

our colleges. So, there is always a balance to be struck. We're not

:04:37.:04:40.

closing the door on all future immigration, but it has to be

:04:41.:04:43.

managed properly and people do expect to see the numbers coming

:04:44.:04:48.

down. Michael Fallon making it clear that

:04:49.:04:52.

he believes people voted in the referendum for Brexit want to see

:04:53.:04:55.

immigration numbers coming down and certainly the leaked document is

:04:56.:05:01.

suggesting ways to do that and it includes employers would be checking

:05:02.:05:05.

on the status of the people they employ as well. A balance has to be

:05:06.:05:10.

struck. This doesn't close the door entirely to EU my gration, but it

:05:11.:05:15.

restricts the levels of EU my gration beyond Brexit, but we'll get

:05:16.:05:18.

the Government's official position later in the year. Yes, as he said.

:05:19.:05:20.

Iain Watson, thank you very much. Hurricane Irma is battering

:05:21.:05:24.

the islands of Anguilla, Barbuda and Antigua as it

:05:25.:05:26.

makes its way through the Caribbean. Yes, in Antigua, the

:05:27.:05:29.

electricity grid has been The storm is projected to move west

:05:30.:05:31.

through the Leeward Islands, and on to Puerto Rico,

:05:32.:05:36.

Hispaniola, Cuba and Florida. Meteorologists warn it may have

:05:37.:05:38.

catastrophic consequences. Let's get the latest now from Sarah

:05:39.:05:45.

who's been tracking the storm This is a catastrophic storm. It's a

:05:46.:06:03.

Category 5. That's the strongest hurricane and it is producing winds

:06:04.:06:10.

of 185mph with gusts over 200mph. So certainly this storm is extremely

:06:11.:06:14.

dangerous. There has only been a handful of storms recorded with

:06:15.:06:25.

similar wind speeds to this. It is making its way across Caribbean. We

:06:26.:06:29.

were hearing from my colleague Simon King that the size of the storm is

:06:30.:06:34.

about the same size as France and the hurricane-force winds are

:06:35.:06:38.

extending more than 60mph from the eye of the storm. You can see that

:06:39.:06:41.

well defined eye. That shows how much it has been strengthening over

:06:42.:06:45.

the past 24 hours. Now here is where it is going to be heading. Making

:06:46.:06:52.

its way west regards past the virgin islands and Haiti and the Dominican

:06:53.:06:56.

Republic, before heading to Cuba and into Florida. It is not the

:06:57.:07:00.

devastating wind speeds, but it is the heavy rainfall and the

:07:01.:07:04.

significant storm surge. So we are expecting a storm surge in

:07:05.:07:06.

association with this hurricane of up to 11 feet and that could cause

:07:07.:07:11.

widespread flooding as well as the damage from the very strong winds

:07:12.:07:15.

widely across the Caribbean and heading up towards Florida.

:07:16.:07:22.

Thank you very much for that. It is a nice day in the UK today. We

:07:23.:07:26.

have seen beautiful pictures from the Suffolk coast this morning.

:07:27.:07:32.

Simon King was talking to us earlier and he said the storm is the size of

:07:33.:07:37.

France. When it comes to vast things we measure by the size of whales or

:07:38.:07:42.

the number of double-decker buses. That gives you a scale of how big it

:07:43.:07:46.

is and the tiny islands that are caught in the path of the storm.

:07:47.:07:53.

Sarah Corker reports. This is the eye of

:07:54.:08:02.

the storm from space. Dramatic images from Nasa

:08:03.:08:05.

capture the sheer scale The category five storm

:08:06.:08:06.

is on a collision course Popular holiday destinations

:08:07.:08:10.

like Antigua and Saint Martin are preparing for life-threatening

:08:11.:08:13.

winds and torrential rains. Storm surges of up to 12-feet

:08:14.:08:18.

are forecast and overnight some Irma's path may change but at

:08:19.:08:21.

the moment it looks set to head towards the British Virgin Islands,

:08:22.:08:29.

Puerto Rico, Cuba and by In Miami they are stocking

:08:30.:08:31.

up on sandbags and The storm surge is massive

:08:32.:08:39.

and the storm surge is predicted Right now Irma is travelling at 15

:08:40.:08:43.

mph and it is tracked to move south of the Florida Keys on a westerly

:08:44.:08:51.

path with a slight north turn. It's incredibly important that

:08:52.:08:54.

all Floridians keep a close eye Do not sit and wait

:08:55.:08:56.

to prepare, get prepared now. This monster hurricane comes

:08:57.:09:07.

on the heels of Harvey, which struck Irma is forecast to be

:09:08.:09:09.

even more dangerous. Now millions of people

:09:10.:09:15.

across the Caribbean are bracing themselves for one of the most

:09:16.:09:17.

powerful hurricanes ever recorded We can speak now to Alison Strand

:09:18.:09:20.

who lives in Anguilla and is waiting Good morning to you. What are

:09:21.:09:42.

conditions like at the moment? Quite horrific actually. I think the eye

:09:43.:09:47.

of the storm is probably about 15 to 20 minutes out now. We lost power

:09:48.:09:51.

about two minutes ago. I know they lost power on the other side of the

:09:52.:09:57.

island about an hour ago. You can hear the winds picking up. There is

:09:58.:10:02.

a lot of stuff flying about in the air. It's quite dangerous out there

:10:03.:10:06.

now. What kind of preparations did you make ahead of the storm? We

:10:07.:10:14.

shored up the house with big pieces of wood that protect your windows

:10:15.:10:17.

and help to stop the flooding come in. We've done sandbagging as well

:10:18.:10:23.

and we've dug trenches in the garden to help draw the water away from the

:10:24.:10:28.

house and into the ocean and then obviously preparations for the

:10:29.:10:32.

family, getting some medical supplies, getting emergency food and

:10:33.:10:35.

water supplies as well. Making sure that we have enough to keep going

:10:36.:10:39.

more about three weeks if we have to. That's an awful lot of

:10:40.:10:43.

preparations. What are you doing about, you know, presumably because

:10:44.:10:46.

it is quite a scary position to be in too. What are you doing about

:10:47.:10:51.

that? It's not too bad actually. We have four children and they are all

:10:52.:10:56.

fast asleep. What we did was just sort of make more noise than the

:10:57.:11:00.

storm. We had a little dance party earlier on this evening and just

:11:01.:11:04.

danced the night away and got the kids tired and now they're all in

:11:05.:11:07.

the room with me. They are all fast asleep. Alison, good luck, thank you

:11:08.:11:11.

very much indeed for talking to us and good luck as the storm passes. A

:11:12.:11:18.

great idea having a hurricane party, turning the music up and dancing

:11:19.:11:22.

away while the noise is battering the house outside!

:11:23.:11:25.

A 14-year-old boy has died after a double

:11:26.:11:27.

Corey Junior Davis and another boy, who's 17,

:11:28.:11:32.

were found with gunshot injuries in Forest Gate on Monday afternoon.

:11:33.:11:35.

The second victim is said to have "life-changing injuries".

:11:36.:11:37.

Police have launched a murder investigation.

:11:38.:11:39.

Just half of dentists in England are accepting new NHS patients,

:11:40.:11:43.

The British Dental Association said the figure was a "disgrace"

:11:44.:11:51.

and evidence of an "emerging crisis" in dental care.

:11:52.:11:53.

But the NHS says 95% of patients do manage to get an appointment.

:11:54.:12:01.

The Archbishop of Canterbury has warned that Britain's economic model

:12:02.:12:03.

is "broken" as the gap between the richest and poorest

:12:04.:12:06.

Justin Welby is a member of the commission behind a report

:12:07.:12:10.

published today by the centre-left think-tank, the Institute

:12:11.:12:12.

It says the country faces the longest period of stagnating

:12:13.:12:15.

This is a video of a family that's trying to catch a bat that's flying

:12:16.:12:38.

around their home. Daddy, catch him. Daddy catch him. There's a bat.

:12:39.:12:45.

There's a bat. Get it out of the house. Mam, will you get out? Daddy,

:12:46.:12:54.

will you catch him? Have you tried to catch a bat? No. I

:12:55.:13:00.

have. Were you successful. There is a brilliant bit where the mother is

:13:01.:13:04.

hiding behind a glass door and the dad is left in there just trying to

:13:05.:13:09.

attack this bat with a towel. It comes out, but in the excitement the

:13:10.:13:13.

dog wees on the floor! There are so many levels of magic. Can we listen

:13:14.:13:17.

to a bit? There is the mum hiding behind the door. You can hear the

:13:18.:13:26.

son trying to encourage his dad to catch the bat. You're doing great.

:13:27.:13:33.

The Bat Conservation Trust said we should dim the lights and open a

:13:34.:13:38.

window. The poor bat that was in our house, we did try and catch it, but

:13:39.:13:42.

it's very difficult. We just opened a window. My favourite bit is when

:13:43.:13:47.

he shouts at his dad, "He's taking the mickey out of you. He's taking

:13:48.:13:53.

the mickey out of you." The bat has not harmed. Right at the end they

:13:54.:13:58.

get the bat in the towel and then you see the dad flick it out of the

:13:59.:14:03.

window. All is safe and fine. It is well worth a bit of your time.

:14:04.:14:08.

Five million children and 21 million adults in England haven't seen

:14:09.:14:11.

And now, research by the BBC suggests half of dental practices

:14:12.:14:16.

are no longer accepting new NHS patients.

:14:17.:14:17.

The NHS says 95% of people who need an appointment do get one,

:14:18.:14:21.

but patients have reported long waiting lists and in some cases

:14:22.:14:23.

a need to travel for miles to find a surgery that will accept them.

:14:24.:14:27.

Here's what people in Leeds had to say.

:14:28.:14:30.

We're joined now by the dentist Dr Angela Ly.

:14:31.:14:33.

Thank you very much for joining us. Do you still accept, do you know

:14:34.:14:40.

people who are still accepting NHS patients? Well, I have actually left

:14:41.:14:46.

the NHS now, but when I did work in NHS practise, we did accept NHS

:14:47.:14:50.

patients, but we were one of the few practises in the local area who did

:14:51.:14:55.

so we did have people travelling 20, 25 miles to see us. What is the

:14:56.:15:00.

cause of the problem for you? Just not enough dentists out there? Or

:15:01.:15:04.

not enough people know where to go to get dental care? Is there a

:15:05.:15:06.

shortage in the system? The problem is, funding for dental

:15:07.:15:20.

practices hasn't increased by more than 1% each year, and the cost of

:15:21.:15:29.

rising a practice has increased by more than 50%. Practices are

:15:30.:15:32.

squeezed and dentists are under a lot of pressure, so it is hard for

:15:33.:15:38.

practices to see a lot of new patients because the way the funding

:15:39.:15:43.

works is that dentists receive the same feed to provide 20 fillings as

:15:44.:15:50.

they would to do one filling, so practices like to keep their stable

:15:51.:15:59.

list of patients who attend regularly so they can meet those

:16:00.:16:03.

targets. And presumably, if they attend regularly, they don't get

:16:04.:16:07.

into the position of needing 20 fillings - is that also the case?

:16:08.:16:13.

Some people haven't been for years, so they me die -- so they may need a

:16:14.:16:23.

lot of work doing. If you spend a lot of time on those patients, you

:16:24.:16:28.

can't see as many people. So you are always fighting fires, because you

:16:29.:16:32.

can't do the pro active that the dentist might do with regular

:16:33.:16:36.

appointments. Exactly. There's not enough focus on prevention at all,

:16:37.:16:43.

and dentists aren't remunerated for that. Each day, you will see up to

:16:44.:16:50.

25 patients, and in that time, you have to give advice, do your

:16:51.:16:54.

treatment, and it's not very manageable. In your view, I'm sure

:16:55.:17:01.

money is part of this, so what would be the solution? We need to focus

:17:02.:17:06.

more on prevention and education. Most of these dental problems are

:17:07.:17:11.

preventable. All these children going to hospital with extractions

:17:12.:17:17.

is preventable. There is not enough focus on education, and dentists

:17:18.:17:21.

aren't remunerated to do that. If you could tell people, what would

:17:22.:17:26.

you be telling them, then? About their diet, how to prevent dental

:17:27.:17:31.

decay, how to look after their teeth, and how often they need to

:17:32.:17:39.

see the dentist. Angela, thank you. The latest NHS patient survey found

:17:40.:17:43.

that 95% of people seeking a dental appointment were able to get one.

:17:44.:17:50.

And there are 3800 more dentists offering NHS care than there were a

:17:51.:17:56.

decade ago. As you were putting out, Angela, still problems in the

:17:57.:18:01.

system. A lot of people are missing appointments as well, which adds to

:18:02.:18:05.

the problem. There is time allocated to patients, and a lot of people

:18:06.:18:08.

don't turn up, which means we can't see as many patients.

:18:09.:18:11.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:18:12.:18:12.

The Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon says the UK will not close

:18:13.:18:22.

the door on immigrants. Winds of 180 miles per hour

:18:23.:18:30.

from Hurricane Irma have begun lashing islands in the Caribbean,

:18:31.:18:33.

where people have been told Let's find out what's

:18:34.:18:35.

happening with the weather. Today is probably the best day of

:18:36.:18:53.

the week, in terms of weather. This is Broadway in Somerset - lovely

:18:54.:19:00.

skies. We have lost the wet weather that has been around in the last few

:19:01.:19:04.

days as this frontal system is cleared to the east, leaving us with

:19:05.:19:08.

more of an Atlantic influence to the weather. With those clear skies, it

:19:09.:19:15.

is chilly out there this morning. A fresh morning if you are stepping

:19:16.:19:22.

out, but there is a good deal of sunshine. There will be some showers

:19:23.:19:26.

in north-west England, into north-west Scotland as well,

:19:27.:19:29.

possibly some for Northern Ireland. Elsewhere, you will avoid those

:19:30.:19:34.

altogether. Lots of dry and bright weather. Some cloud this afternoon.

:19:35.:19:42.

Temperatures 15-20dC. A bit breezy out there, and definitely fresher

:19:43.:19:46.

than it has been recently. The shower was in the north-west ease

:19:47.:19:49.

away this evening, so things become dry and clear for a time tonight.

:19:50.:19:54.

The temperatures will dip down quickly, but we will see a change

:19:55.:19:58.

from the north and west overnight, with cloud building in, bringing

:19:59.:20:02.

outbreaks of rain at the start of the day tomorrow. Southend East,

:20:03.:20:15.

you're likely to stay dry tomorrow. Showers in Scotland and Ireland.

:20:16.:20:20.

Across much of Scotland, outbreaks of rain, low cloud, breezy too.

:20:21.:20:24.

Northern Ireland looks pretty wet through the course of the afternoon.

:20:25.:20:29.

Some of the rain is quite heavy in the north-west of England, so a lot

:20:30.:20:39.

of surface water on the roads. The Southeast will be mostly dry, 19, 20

:20:40.:20:47.

Celsius. Thing is set to change through the day tomorrow. And on

:20:48.:20:51.

Friday, this area of low pressure takes charge, sitting to the north

:20:52.:20:55.

of the UK, but the winds rotating around that area of low pressure, so

:20:56.:21:09.

a breezy, showery picture. 14-18dC. The unsettled spell continues into

:21:10.:21:13.

the weekend. Low pressure still around through Saturday and Sunday.

:21:14.:21:19.

Still some sunshine and showers on the cards on Saturday, but on

:21:20.:21:22.

Sunday, things will be wet and windy. If you get a chance to head

:21:23.:21:28.

out and about, today will probably be the best day of the week.

:21:29.:21:33.

The crabbing industry is to Cromer what sticks

:21:34.:21:35.

Tourists flock to the north Norfolk coast just to sample

:21:36.:21:39.

But according to the charity Seafarers UK, towns like Cromer

:21:40.:21:44.

or Aldeburgh in Suffolk, which were built on traditional

:21:45.:21:46.

fishing methods, are in decline and need more support.

:21:47.:21:48.

Breakfast's Jayne McCubbin is in Aldeburgh for us this morning.

:21:49.:21:59.

Jane is in the lovely seaside town of Aldeburgh. It is absolutely

:22:00.:22:11.

stunning down here, however you pronounce it! We have had the most

:22:12.:22:17.

amazing sunrise this morning. Duncan has just arrived to open up one of

:22:18.:22:23.

the shacks that line the seafront. He has been selling fish straight

:22:24.:22:27.

out of the sea for the best part of 100 years. -- they have been. Today,

:22:28.:22:35.

there are only three fisher men left, so what happens when the

:22:36.:22:39.

fisher men move out and the tourists moving? We went to Cromer, about two

:22:40.:22:43.

powers up that way. Fishing is so a part of the fabric

:22:44.:22:51.

of Cromer that if you stop someone Jonny first went to sea

:22:52.:22:58.

here at five, full-time as soon No big roads, it hasn't

:22:59.:23:07.

got the mass tourism, we don't need the hotels,

:23:08.:23:13.

and the fast food chains You are obviously

:23:14.:23:16.

a lot faster than me. I've been doing this since

:23:17.:23:27.

I was about eight, nine years old. He does what his parents did

:23:28.:23:35.

and what his grandparents did before He is only a boy, he

:23:36.:23:39.

might change his mind. He tried to emotionally

:23:40.:23:49.

blackmail me in the past, The number of crabbing boats

:23:50.:23:53.

here has fallen from 150 30 years A plastics factory now stands

:23:54.:24:00.

where a crabbing plant once stood. Could this be the last

:24:01.:24:15.

generation in Cromer? The old fishermen's cottages

:24:16.:24:17.

are being snapped up as holiday rentals and second homes

:24:18.:24:31.

by people like Mark. It's starting to go

:24:32.:24:33.

slightly more upmarket. Are you worried at all

:24:34.:24:37.

about the fishing industry here? I think what we can do

:24:38.:24:40.

to encourage that is good. But Sarah, who served us,

:24:41.:24:51.

is less certain that change You were earwigging

:24:52.:24:54.

then, weren't you? It's easy and almost trite

:24:55.:24:56.

for property developers to say it's progress,

:24:57.:25:06.

but it's got to be done We have four children

:25:07.:25:09.

of our own and they're young adults now and I doubt very much

:25:10.:25:15.

that they would be able to buy On the high street, these shops

:25:16.:25:18.

are closing down to make way A petition was taken to the council

:25:19.:25:23.

to try to stop the crabbing tractors on the beach,

:25:24.:25:32.

as they were said to be disturbing When people don't live

:25:33.:25:34.

here all year round there's no incentive to invest essential

:25:35.:25:48.

services, so transport, education, health, all of these things suffer

:25:49.:25:50.

and it becomes somewhere If people don't live here,

:25:51.:25:52.

it loses its identity. The very thing that brought

:25:53.:25:59.

the second homeowners So you think it's

:26:00.:26:01.

worth fighting for? Many of these traditional

:26:02.:26:05.

communities are changing. What is progress to

:26:06.:26:10.

some is not to all. There can be conflict, but he was a

:26:11.:26:27.

fact - this is where Benjamin Britten spent most of his life, and

:26:28.:26:32.

it is where he based his opera Peter Grimes. The fisher men I spoke to

:26:33.:26:38.

hear tell me that there aren't enough apprentices coming in behind

:26:39.:26:41.

them. In fact, they don't know of anybody here who will replace them.

:26:42.:26:46.

Seafarers UK tell me this is worth fighting for, and there was more

:26:47.:26:50.

need now than ever before to support these fishing communities and bring

:26:51.:26:55.

That is it for now, I will be back Thank you very much.

:26:56.:30:25.

That is it for now, I will be back with a final update in 30 minutes

:30:26.:30:27.

time. Plenty more online. Hello this is Breakfast,

:30:28.:30:32.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. The Defence Secretary Sir Michael

:30:33.:30:35.

Fallon has told BBC Breakfast the government is not closing

:30:36.:30:38.

the door on all future immigration but insists migration

:30:39.:30:40.

numbers must come down The comments come

:30:41.:30:44.

as a leaked Home Office document appears to set out plans for how

:30:45.:30:46.

the UK immigration system the number of low-skilled

:30:47.:30:48.

EU migrants. The BBC understands the document has

:30:49.:30:52.

not been approved by ministers. Let's be clear, freedom of movement

:30:53.:31:07.

has two end, it has two end because legally we are leaving the European

:31:08.:31:11.

Union, that is what people voted for, and freedom of movement is part

:31:12.:31:15.

of membership, so that has to finish. We do not want to shut the

:31:16.:31:20.

door on immigration but equally, the public want to see immigration to

:31:21.:31:23.

continue to come down. It is falling at the moment.

:31:24.:31:32.

Hurricane Irma is battering the islands of Anguilla,

:31:33.:31:34.

Barbuda and Antigua as it makes its way through the Caribbean.

:31:35.:31:36.

In Antigua, the electricity grid has been

:31:37.:31:38.

The storm is projected to move west through the Leeward Islands,

:31:39.:31:42.

and on to Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, Cuba and Florida.

:31:43.:31:44.

Meteorologists warn it may have catastrophic consequences.

:31:45.:31:45.

The independent's Travel Editor Simon Calder joins us.

:31:46.:31:50.

We really got a sense from one of the correspondence earlier, this is

:31:51.:31:55.

a hurricane the size of France, so what should people who are there

:31:56.:32:01.

right now be doing? Some of them have been brought back, which is

:32:02.:32:04.

airway sent in a special flight to bring people back from Antigua, due

:32:05.:32:10.

to arrive at 9am, they got in at 2am, instead, because they were

:32:11.:32:13.

flown out before the hurricane arrived. It is Airways has cancelled

:32:14.:32:17.

flights to Antigua today and furthermore says if you are aiming

:32:18.:32:22.

to go to Florida any time up until next Monday, you can postpone your

:32:23.:32:27.

trip. However, the Bill Kollar day destinations on the track, the

:32:28.:32:31.

Dominican Republic, Cuba and Florida, the big holiday companies,

:32:32.:32:35.

Thompson, are simply saying, normal terms and conditions apply. If we

:32:36.:32:38.

are obliged to cancel your holiday for some reason, we will let you

:32:39.:32:43.

know, otherwise, if you want to amend or change your trip, you will

:32:44.:32:48.

have to pay for it. Of the flight is still going, that means there is no

:32:49.:32:52.

way of recouping the money, even if you think, it is unsafe for my

:32:53.:32:56.

perspective, I don't want to go? You might think, the government of

:32:57.:33:01.

Florida -- governor of Florida has declared a state of emergency,

:33:02.:33:04.

national guard standing by, they have even abandoned tolls on

:33:05.:33:09.

freeways in Florida because they do not want to impede movement, and yet

:33:10.:33:12.

the holiday company still flying people in. If they believe they can

:33:13.:33:16.

deliver safely the holiday they booked -- you booked, they are at

:33:17.:33:21.

liberty to do that. If you go to your travel insurer and say, you do

:33:22.:33:25.

not want to go, you will get the same answer: unless your trip is

:33:26.:33:29.

unable to take place, you will be going on that holiday. So you are

:33:30.:33:33.

not insured against this kind of thing? If you are out there, some of

:33:34.:33:39.

the scenes you have seen, if you are caught up in that... Your travel

:33:40.:33:42.

insurance company will help but it seems that it is hurricane season,

:33:43.:33:46.

you knew that when you booked, there is a hurricane, that is your

:33:47.:33:49.

problem, that seems to be the opinion they are taking. It is an

:33:50.:33:54.

uncompromising attitude, they are saying, Thomas Cook and Thomson,

:33:55.:33:58.

they are saying, let us know if there are problems but this trip is

:33:59.:34:01.

going ahead. Some people saying, looks like a Caribbean holiday I am

:34:02.:34:04.

in to be going on is off. Small thing to talk about, people's lives

:34:05.:34:09.

are at risk and there is danger for those in the path of the storm but

:34:10.:34:13.

it affects holiday-makers from all over the world. It will do, US

:34:14.:34:18.

airlines are putting travel waivers, if you are booked to go to any

:34:19.:34:21.

islands, and Florida destinations, you can postpone the trip, amend

:34:22.:34:27.

your departure. So far, only British Airways are saying, if you have

:34:28.:34:30.

booked to go to Florida, you can go somewhere else. Everywhere else, if

:34:31.:34:36.

you are going next week, the hotel will have blown through, if the

:34:37.:34:39.

hotel is closed, that will obviously affect your holiday and your company

:34:40.:34:43.

will be in touch, otherwise, it is going ahead. Advice? Follow what the

:34:44.:34:48.

Foreign Office is saying, follow local advice, keep in tune with

:34:49.:34:54.

local media, and keep talking to your travel company, so you know if

:34:55.:34:58.

they are changing plans, as indeed, British Airways holiday-makers were

:34:59.:35:03.

this morning. Thank you very much and we will keep you up-to-date with

:35:04.:35:08.

the path of Irma bull in its two days. Hopefully that will answer

:35:09.:35:10.

some of the questions you have been asking us.

:35:11.:35:16.

A 14-year-old boy has died after a double

:35:17.:35:18.

Corey Junior Davis, and another boy, who's 17,

:35:19.:35:24.

were found with gunshot injuries in Forest Gate on Monday afternoon.

:35:25.:35:27.

The second victim is said to have "life-changing injuries".

:35:28.:35:29.

Police have launched a murder investigation.

:35:30.:35:31.

Just half of dentists in England are accepting new NHS patients,

:35:32.:35:33.

The British Dental Association said the figure

:35:34.:35:36.

was a "disgrace" and evidence of an "emerging crisis"

:35:37.:35:39.

But the NHS says 95-percent of patients do manage

:35:40.:35:42.

The Archbishop of Canterbury has warned that Britain's economic

:35:43.:35:48.

model is "broken" as the gap between the richest and poorest

:35:49.:35:51.

Justin Welby is a member of the commission behind a report

:35:52.:35:54.

published today by the centre-left think tank, the Institute

:35:55.:35:57.

It says the country faces the longest period of stagnating

:35:58.:36:00.

Thirteen people have been rescued after becoming trapped in a 53

:36:01.:36:10.

Eleven members of the public and two staff members

:36:11.:36:14.

were winched to safety from the the Jurassic Skyline tower

:36:15.:36:16.

in Weymouth by a Coastguard helicopter on Tuesday afternoon.

:36:17.:36:18.

A full investigation into the incident is underway.

:36:19.:36:32.

They could not walk down because there is no stairs. There you go, we

:36:33.:36:36.

learned that today. Here's something to brighten

:36:37.:36:39.

up your Wednesday morning. It's a video of a family

:36:40.:36:41.

desperately trying to catch a bat which was flying

:36:42.:36:43.

around their home in Ireland. The footage was uploaded

:36:44.:36:47.

by Tige Fleming, who can be heard encouraging his father, Derry,

:36:48.:37:07.

to capture the animal. I love the way that they are

:37:08.:37:14.

standing outside, shouting instructions, he is trying to catch

:37:15.:37:18.

him! E-zines in on his mother, face against the window, while his dad is

:37:19.:37:23.

trying to catch... Look at that! LAUGHTER

:37:24.:37:25.

No harm was caused to the bat, although the family dog does wet

:37:26.:37:28.

He nearly got it that time, nearly...

:37:29.:37:55.

Until dusk, the bat will just go away, you can try to catch it and

:37:56.:38:06.

make a Fiat forehand really funny video, but probably you should not.

:38:07.:38:11.

My achievement of the day, I really enjoyed that full.

:38:12.:38:18.

And coming up here on Breakfast this morning,

:38:19.:38:26.

he's the man in the sheepskin coat but after 50 years Motty

:38:27.:38:29.

We'll hear from the man himself about his incredible career.

:38:30.:38:33.

Also on Breakfast, "Life is a cabaret" for singers

:38:34.:38:35.

They'll be on the sofa to tell us about their new production

:38:36.:38:39.

Manchester's favourite crisis-prone friends are back on our screens.

:38:40.:38:44.

Actor Robert Bathurst will be here to tell us

:38:45.:38:46.

Can I just say, I love my job, what was his name, Derry? Catch him,

:38:47.:39:13.

Derry, catch him! Really well looked after at Liverpool and well looked

:39:14.:39:14.

after by Wales are still on track to qualify

:39:15.:39:26.

for next year's World Cup It was another great night

:39:27.:39:31.

for 17-year-old Ben Woodburn, who set up Hal Robson-Kanu

:39:32.:39:34.

10 minutes from time. Woodburn scored the winner

:39:35.:39:37.

against Austria at the weekend, And in injury time,

:39:38.:39:39.

Aaron Ramsey sealed the win that It has come down to the crunch time,

:39:40.:39:47.

it is all about results, two wins out of two, we have not done that in

:39:48.:39:50.

a long time. We have a winning mentality back and hopefully it is a

:39:51.:39:53.

snowball effect for the next two games.

:39:54.:39:53.

Serbia are top of that group after they beat the Republic

:39:54.:39:55.

Former Manchester City player Aleksander Kolarov scored

:39:56.:39:58.

And there was jubilation in Damascus when Syria scored an injury-time

:39:59.:40:03.

That put them through to a play-off against Australia next month,

:40:04.:40:07.

and then another another two-legged tie in November

:40:08.:40:08.

Venus Williams is two wins away from another grand slam title.

:40:09.:40:27.

She beat Petra Kvitova in a real thriller to reach

:40:28.:40:29.

It took over two-and-a-half hours and the deciding set

:40:30.:40:32.

Kvitova only returned to the tour three months ago after the knife

:40:33.:40:36.

attack that damaged her playing hand and Williams said it felt

:40:37.:40:39.

This match meant a lot to me, playing at home, of course, it being

:40:40.:40:52.

a major, means a lot to her, coming back, being able to repeat this

:40:53.:40:59.

major, and prove to herself that she could do any thing, no matter what

:41:00.:41:04.

is thrown at her. -- compete in this major. It was amazing to see her

:41:05.:41:05.

shine in this way. Chris Froome heads into

:41:06.:41:11.

another day in the hills and he's nearly two

:41:12.:41:14.

minutes in front. Froome won his fourth Tour de France

:41:15.:41:17.

in July but he's never He dominated yesterday's time trial

:41:18.:41:20.

to almost double his lead. Quite an achievement, but how is

:41:21.:41:23.

this for an achievement... After ten World Cups,

:41:24.:41:27.

29 FA Cup Finals, ten European Championships and more

:41:28.:41:29.

than 200 England games, football commentator John Motson

:41:30.:41:31.

is set to retire next summer. John Watson! Definitely not a

:41:32.:41:39.

player. He is going to announce that he will retire. -- John Motson. 50

:41:40.:41:41.

years with the BBC. He'll call it quits after 50 years

:41:42.:41:43.

with the BBC and he's been speaking to our Sports Editor Dan

:41:44.:41:46.

Roan. I'm sure nearly all of us can

:41:47.:41:51.

remember being taken to our first big football match. And there it is,

:41:52.:41:56.

the crazy gang have beaten the culture club! Her Royal Highness

:41:57.:41:58.

applauds. Goal! 3-3! I haven't seen a match

:41:59.:42:11.

like this in years. Is it over? It is! It is dramatic, it is

:42:12.:42:15.

delightful, it is Denmark! What was, for you, the secret, be able to call

:42:16.:42:21.

those moments in time so quickly? It is like saying to your postman, how

:42:22.:42:25.

do you prepare letters, people don't have do know that, and they didn't

:42:26.:42:28.

need to know that I was spending two days in this office, banging myself

:42:29.:42:32.

over the head with who the substitute was going to be for this

:42:33.:42:36.

team on a Saturday, they only were concerned with the end product. I

:42:37.:42:41.

had to make that as good as I could. That is John Watson, reporting for

:42:42.:42:44.

us tonight on the south against Liverpool match, looking rather like

:42:45.:42:52.

an orphan in the storm! The 1972 cup match... Ronnie's goal, that changed

:42:53.:42:57.

everything, that changed my life. Newcastle winning 1-0 with five

:42:58.:43:05.

minutes to go. -- Southend against Liverpool. Rashford again, what a

:43:06.:43:10.

goal, what a goal! When I think about that, when I see Ronnie, I

:43:11.:43:15.

say, you changed my life. And he says, it changed my career, which it

:43:16.:43:20.

did. -- Radford. When they drag it out on cup weekend, and I hear

:43:21.:43:25.

myself commentating on that goal and I remember when he hit it, and it

:43:26.:43:30.

was flying towards the top corner of the net and when I see it again, as

:43:31.:43:35.

I have, hundreds of times, I still think myself, please go in, don't

:43:36.:43:39.

hit the post, if that had not nestled in the Newcastle net, I

:43:40.:43:41.

would not be here now. Mark Weston and Martin O'Neill will

:43:42.:43:49.

have to wait a few days longer if they are to add to Wycombe

:43:50.:43:54.

Wanderers's famous FA Cup history. Seemed like such a normal thing to

:43:55.:43:58.

do... They warm overcoat, did you ever think it would be your trade

:43:59.:44:02.

card? I bought it for the warmth, you couldn't buy a sheepskin

:44:03.:44:06.

full-length coat, only a jacket in the shops, so I started having these

:44:07.:44:11.

made to measure. It started saying, you are the bloke in a sheepskin

:44:12.:44:14.

coat, where were you, when you were in the snow? That was how it grew, I

:44:15.:44:19.

didn't set out to make that a trademark, what it doesn't done me

:44:20.:44:23.

any harm. We cannot get down there to find out what has happened but

:44:24.:44:27.

Trevor Brooking is... Trevor Brooking is next to me. Did my first

:44:28.:44:32.

ever commentary for BBC television from this very gantry, in those

:44:33.:44:35.

days, nobody had heard of the Internet, although I can vouch for

:44:36.:44:40.

the fact that once upon a time I said it's in the net. You have got

:44:41.:44:46.

to be passionate about it. I think also... You have got to remember as

:44:47.:44:53.

well, it is only part of life, you know, while people are listening to

:44:54.:44:57.

football matches or commentating on them, people are going to the

:44:58.:44:59.

theatre, to the cinema, reading books. One or two people tend to

:45:00.:45:04.

forget that. I was going to say it was like being paid for your hobby,

:45:05.:45:08.

that is what people say, what there is hard work involved. The

:45:09.:45:13.

preparation, the homework... Watching players, going to see games

:45:14.:45:18.

so you could do the one you are doing next a bit better. It was a

:45:19.:45:21.

challenge but it was a challenge I always enjoyed.

:45:22.:45:28.

One of the things he talks about is how he put not so many statistics

:45:29.:45:34.

into his commentary, because he thinks people don't want to know so

:45:35.:45:40.

much, they can see and hear everything, so he is more sparing

:45:41.:45:44.

with his words. He is still unbelievably connected. If you go to

:45:45.:45:49.

any football ground, you knows everybody, he's got the contact

:45:50.:45:52.

details of every manager all that sort of stars. And I remember the

:45:53.:45:59.

first-ever BBC sport meeting I went to many moons ago, and he came in,

:46:00.:46:03.

greeted everybody, because he wanted to go to the production meeting

:46:04.:46:05.

because he wanted to know what was going on in the programme, and his

:46:06.:46:10.

phone would go off in every meeting and it would always be a classic

:46:11.:46:13.

Elvis track played at full volume and he would spend five minutes

:46:14.:46:17.

searching for the phone. Who doesn't love Elvis? A bit of Suspicious

:46:18.:46:24.

Minds always goes down well. We have been looking at what is going on

:46:25.:46:29.

with Hurricane Irma but we also have our own weather and Sarah can give

:46:30.:46:31.

us the details. It is much quieter this side of the

:46:32.:46:37.

Atlantic with a decent day out there across many parts of the country.

:46:38.:46:41.

This is how the morning looks in Twickenham, taken by one of the

:46:42.:46:45.

weather watchers. Blue skies around, some fair weather cloud, and for

:46:46.:46:48.

many of us we have to keep conditions like this through the

:46:49.:46:52.

day. We have lost all of the cloud and rain and the front has cleared

:46:53.:46:56.

towards the east so we are left with wins coming in from the West

:46:57.:47:07.

bringing much clearer skies and it's been a chilly start to the morning

:47:08.:47:10.

the clear skies and sunshine from the word go for most of us. A few

:47:11.:47:13.

showers for northern and western Scotland, one or two for Northern

:47:14.:47:15.

Ireland and West Wales, but further south and east across the country

:47:16.:47:17.

you are likely to stay dry through the day. Temperatures could reach

:47:18.:47:20.

around 20 degrees which will feel pleasant in the South and in the mid

:47:21.:47:24.

to high teens, so a good day for most of the country, but it will

:47:25.:47:27.

probably be the best day of the week with things going downhill as we

:47:28.:47:31.

head through Thursday. Tonight, showers clearer way then we have the

:47:32.:47:35.

temperatures falling quickly overnight, fairly chilly but through

:47:36.:47:38.

the early hours of Thursday the cloud builds from the north west

:47:39.:47:41.

bringing rain as well, so temperatures tomorrow morning not as

:47:42.:47:45.

chilly as they are out there. Through the day tomorrow things will

:47:46.:47:50.

turn increasingly wet and windy for Scotland, Northern Ireland and

:47:51.:47:53.

England and Wales are dry to start. Then the band of rain and brisk

:47:54.:47:57.

winds creep south and east but the far south-east should stay dry

:47:58.:48:02.

through the day. By tomorrow afternoon, four p:m., the rain

:48:03.:48:06.

settles on a course Scotland and it is quite breezy. Cool, breezy and

:48:07.:48:10.

damp through the day and some of the rain could be heavy in parts of

:48:11.:48:14.

north-west England and North Wales. A lot of surface water and spray on

:48:15.:48:18.

the motorways. Heading towards the south-east, not a bad day, 19 or 20

:48:19.:48:23.

degrees in London, one or two showers but a lot of dry weather.

:48:24.:48:27.

The cloud increases in the south-west of England and for much

:48:28.:48:31.

of Wales, bringing rain tomorrow afternoon. Low pressure stays with

:48:32.:48:34.

us at the end of the week. We will see the low pressure into Friday

:48:35.:48:40.

morning sitting and the Windies rotating around it, so windy feel on

:48:41.:48:46.

Friday and some heavy showers. Longer spells of rain in southern

:48:47.:48:51.

England with temperatures between 14 and 18 degrees but feeling cooler in

:48:52.:48:55.

the breeze. The low-pressure stays into the weekend, so through

:48:56.:48:58.

Saturday there will be some sunshine and dry weather but some blustery

:48:59.:49:02.

showers and by the time we get to Sunday we could see some more pretty

:49:03.:49:06.

wet and windy weather on the cards. Looking a bit mixed over the next

:49:07.:49:10.

few days, but today, many of us should enjoy a bit of sunshine.

:49:11.:49:16.

Thank you, Sarah. We are paying attention but we are having a chat

:49:17.:49:18.

with next guests about nicknames. It's a raucous story

:49:19.:49:21.

of romance and decadence set against the backdrop of 1930s

:49:22.:49:23.

Berlin, made famous on Broadway and by the 1972 film

:49:24.:49:26.

starring Liza Minnelli - and now the musical 'Cabaret'

:49:27.:49:28.

is headed back to stages around Set in the seedy Kit

:49:29.:49:31.

Kat Klub, Will Young reprises his Olivier Award-nominated

:49:32.:49:38.

role as the Emcee and he'll be joined by Louise Redknapp

:49:39.:49:40.

as dancer Sally Bowles. Lovely to see you both. Nominated

:49:41.:49:53.

again. Can you just say that I won it? Olivier award-winning chap. You

:49:54.:50:01.

are having another go. Yes, I have to go again. When you run up against

:50:02.:50:06.

Michael Ball, it has to happen. He wins everything? Es two talented.

:50:07.:50:11.

Lovely to see you both. Sure we do it again to make sure you can use

:50:12.:50:17.

it. The Olivier award-winning Willie Young is with us.

:50:18.:50:22.

Great to see you. How many times have you played this role? Twice.

:50:23.:50:32.

Why go back again? There are just not many roles like the Emcee in

:50:33.:50:38.

Cabaret and not many musicals like that show. I didn't think I could

:50:39.:50:42.

get into the corset again, to be honest and I thought I had hung up

:50:43.:50:45.

the corset and I thought, can I do it one more time? And then Bill

:50:46.:50:50.

Kenwright got in touch and asked me to do it one more time. How amazing.

:50:51.:50:55.

You have done it before, but Louise, this is new for you. People think

:50:56.:51:01.

you are a big-name so they just give it to you, but you had to work so

:51:02.:51:06.

hard to get the role. I had for auditions, and Sally Bowles is a big

:51:07.:51:09.

character and it's a big acting role and I'm not really known to acting.

:51:10.:51:14.

I went through a lot of auditions and really got put through the paces

:51:15.:51:18.

and even had to go to the national and do the acting scenes with Rufus

:51:19.:51:24.

Norris, head of the National, and they put me through my paces, but in

:51:25.:51:28.

a way I felt so happy when I finally got the role and now I feel I have

:51:29.:51:33.

got to know her while doing all of the auditions and understand what

:51:34.:51:39.

was expected of me. You can sing and dance, so you take most of the

:51:40.:51:45.

boxes. The Sally Bowles style is completely different. She is such a

:51:46.:51:50.

mad character, pretty unique. The famous Emcee. He is mental. We both

:51:51.:51:56.

basically have breakdowns on stage as characters, not as real people.

:51:57.:52:01.

For me, it's so nice to be doing it with a mate. I haven't done a

:52:02.:52:09.

theatre show with another friend, and it is just a laugh and there is

:52:10.:52:14.

that real trust thing. I am really chuffed we are doing it together. So

:52:15.:52:19.

am I. I am made up to have you there. Would you have done something

:52:20.:52:24.

like this if you had not done Strictly? Was it the whole

:52:25.:52:28.

performance side of things? Honestly I went to stage school so musical

:52:29.:52:32.

theatre is something I trained in, then I got into the pop industry and

:52:33.:52:35.

you almost take the opportunities that just come your way. I never

:52:36.:52:39.

fell out of love with singing and dancing, but I just had a family and

:52:40.:52:44.

it all gets on top of you and you put that first. Doing Strictly

:52:45.:52:48.

reminded me how much I love to perform and how much I missed it. I

:52:49.:52:52.

don't think I would have had the confidence to go over those

:52:53.:52:56.

auditions had I not gone through the stress of every Saturday, whether I

:52:57.:52:59.

was going to get kicked off or not. Stress does not even begin to

:53:00.:53:04.

describe it. Just standing there, a couple of seconds before you go on,

:53:05.:53:09.

is that the worst bit? For me. You are mesmerised. I didn't see you do

:53:10.:53:15.

this because I left the show early. You are amazing. In the little time

:53:16.:53:21.

I was there, seeing you grow was the lovely thing. We do talk about this,

:53:22.:53:27.

but you did seem genuinely to change. Everybody was laughing at me

:53:28.:53:31.

because I had the dress up to here and down there and it was like, what

:53:32.:53:36.

am I doing here? And everybody seemed super-confident. I managed to

:53:37.:53:40.

lose myself in the enjoyment of performing again and I think that is

:53:41.:53:46.

why Cabaret is a huge opportunity. Not only do I get to work with will

:53:47.:53:50.

and a great cast, but I get to do something I love every night. The

:53:51.:53:56.

negative side is when so many people talk about the programme, you do get

:53:57.:54:00.

that intrusion at the same time, for both of you. Is that a part of it

:54:01.:54:05.

that you have regretted, or is it something you accept? For me? I

:54:06.:54:12.

don't even feel famous. After Strictly, some people were outside

:54:13.:54:16.

my door and I was like, why are you here? I am being serious. I don't

:54:17.:54:24.

think about it at all. I just have friends and family and I do my job,

:54:25.:54:29.

and then I go home at the end of the day. And I ignore the rest. No one

:54:30.:54:35.

can tell me what I don't know about my life. You know what I mean? You

:54:36.:54:39.

know full well that people assume they know what is going on. There

:54:40.:54:45.

are two lines I always take, and you enter into this industry knowing

:54:46.:54:48.

full well that it does bring attention your way and we liked the

:54:49.:54:52.

attention when it is positive, so you have the kind of take the good

:54:53.:54:57.

with the bad. My priority will always be my children and keeping

:54:58.:55:02.

them away from negativity is what is important. I tried to accept that it

:55:03.:55:07.

is what it is, and I get on with my job and my life. Will they come and

:55:08.:55:16.

see Cabaret? This is the thing, they are nine and 13, so I think the

:55:17.:55:20.

13-year-old, I think he believes he is mature enough to come and watch

:55:21.:55:27.

it but there is a bit of nudity. I had it with my nephews and nieces,

:55:28.:55:31.

because one of my nieces is old enough to come and then I had to say

:55:32.:55:36.

to the other that you cannot come, and then it's hard to explain. It is

:55:37.:55:41.

not the show for you at the moment. There is such a lot in the show as

:55:42.:55:44.

far as the storyline and background with the Kitcat club, in Berlin, in

:55:45.:55:53.

the 30s, but it is quite raunchy. I think it defines Cabaret. Because I

:55:54.:56:00.

think Little Britain is like that because it dresses up the serious

:56:01.:56:04.

issues in comedy. That is what the show does, the audience gets a lot

:56:05.:56:08.

of comedy and fun and then the setting is this true historical

:56:09.:56:11.

story that happened. The difficult thing is that you cannot really take

:56:12.:56:16.

your mum along. I don't know what you could do. Even my outfits, I

:56:17.:56:22.

think the kids would be slightly mortified. The first day I went in

:56:23.:56:26.

for a costume fitting, there is one thing wearing a leotard and

:56:27.:56:29.

legwarmers, but it's another thing putting on suspenders and a tiny

:56:30.:56:36.

pair of pants onstage. Next level. The 13-year-old might see it. I will

:56:37.:56:41.

think he will sit there thinking, I can't believe that is my mum. Mum,

:56:42.:56:45.

what are you doing? Enjoy rehearsals. Where is Carol? When I

:56:46.:56:52.

was last year I kissed the screen when she came on. She is on holiday.

:56:53.:56:58.

There is Sarah. Sarah is done for the day now. We will pass on your

:56:59.:57:01.

love though. Thank you very much. Cabaret returns to the stage

:57:02.:57:04.

later this month at the New Wimbledon Theatre before

:57:05.:57:06.

beginning its tour. Fishing is one of the oldest

:57:07.:57:09.

industries in the world but it has faced tough times in Britain

:57:10.:57:13.

in recent years, bringing challenges The fishing industry voted

:57:14.:57:15.

overwhelming to leave the EU, and as part of our series looking

:57:16.:57:20.

at coastal communities, we've sent Sean to Grimsby to find

:57:21.:57:24.

out how it is preparing for Brexit. I won an Olivier! We have got a

:57:25.:57:42.

shanty singer coming up. There is the doctor now in the top that the

:57:43.:57:46.

fishermen would have used back in the day. One of the words -- world's

:57:47.:57:49.

busiest ports. There are only around 12,100 active

:57:50.:57:50.

fisherman in the UK now - that's down from around

:57:51.:57:53.

20,000 in the mid-1990s. It's a tiny industry in terms

:57:54.:58:00.

of GDP - less than 0.1%. Those UK vessels land around

:58:01.:58:08.

400,000 tonnes of fish each year in the UK,

:58:09.:58:15.

and between 200,000 As a nation we import more fish

:58:16.:58:17.

than we sell abroad. These last few boxes to go this

:58:18.:58:32.

morning. A lot of fish and chips to get the dinner on your table. I have

:58:33.:58:38.

spent some time chatting to workers around Grimsby divine power from the

:58:39.:58:43.

boomtime decades ago to the tough times of now, the food processing

:58:44.:58:47.

industry here as well, to see how his -- how it has affected people

:58:48.:58:48.

here. Darren is now one of the last

:58:49.:58:53.

fishermen working out of Grimsby. We get a good price

:58:54.:58:58.

for the hen crabs. What's it like being a fisherman

:58:59.:59:03.

here in Grimsby these days? It's hard in Grimsby,

:59:04.:59:07.

with the prices. The prices go up every year

:59:08.:59:09.

and it's getting bad. This port was working 24 hours

:59:10.:59:13.

a day, seven days a week. He started on the boats back

:59:14.:59:15.

in the boomtime, in 1959. And in the heyday, even before

:59:16.:59:25.

you were skipper, I guess, how many of these kinds of boats

:59:26.:59:35.

would there have been There were actually

:59:36.:59:37.

12 of these boats. But all of the other companies had

:59:38.:59:41.

a similar size of ship. This type of ship, you are talking

:59:42.:59:44.

a couple of hundred. A few hundred of these?

:59:45.:59:47.

Of this type. But 700 trawlers

:59:48.:59:48.

altogether in Grimsby. These were once known

:59:49.:59:55.

as the biggest ports in the world, but have been reduced

:59:56.:59:58.

since to a handful of trawlers. That's partly because the UK lost

:59:59.:00:00.

a battle with Iceland over fish. And also new European rules came

:00:01.:00:05.

in in the early '80s that left many people here feeling like they didn't

:00:06.:00:09.

have as much access to fish So Grimsby has had to reinvent

:00:10.:00:12.

itself as a fish processing hub and many small businesses still run

:00:13.:00:16.

in buildings like this. There are lots of food

:00:17.:00:23.

processers in Grimsby, right from the really high technical

:00:24.:00:25.

end, with lots of innovation and lots of modern

:00:26.:00:28.

facilities, taking care This is a traditional

:00:29.:00:30.

coal smoking smokehouse, We do that in a traditional way

:00:31.:00:39.

and this is one of the smokehouses. You talk about trade barriers,

:00:40.:00:49.

future negotiations that the UK might have with the EU

:00:50.:00:51.

and other countries. How important to you is it

:00:52.:00:53.

that there aren't any more barriers? which is a fabulous

:00:54.:00:56.

food-processing town, the supply of fish,

:00:57.:01:07.

the timely supply of fish, So let's not hold it

:01:08.:01:09.

up on the way here. Big discussion about what is going

:01:10.:01:29.

on, Patrick has joined us. We have Shanty Jack with us, and Richard,

:01:30.:01:38.

from the University of whole. These Brexit negotiations, import and

:01:39.:01:41.

export of fish processing, how important are they for towns like

:01:42.:01:45.

Grimsby across the UK? Hugely important, think about Grimsby,

:01:46.:01:51.

Hull, massive maritime heritage, by the sea, people have grown up here.

:01:52.:01:56.

-- University of Hull. We may not be able to go back to how things were

:01:57.:02:02.

in the past but with increasing opportunities to Brexit, wind

:02:03.:02:04.

opportunities, taking advantage of these things will be massive.

:02:05.:02:07.

Interesting, offshore energy, like wind power, that would not have been

:02:08.:02:13.

mentioned back in the 1970s when you first enter Grimsby, how big a

:02:14.:02:18.

difference is it from then to now? The difference is unbelievable, this

:02:19.:02:22.

end of the quayside was all stone flags, when I was a lad, and when

:02:23.:02:29.

they was landing, it was not fish boxes, two or three deep, they were

:02:30.:02:34.

piled high, four or five higher, as far as you could see, literally,

:02:35.:02:39.

huge amounts, vast amounts of fish. Perhaps not sustainable at that rate

:02:40.:02:43.

and you need to conserve it, but the difference is unbelievable. Shows

:02:44.:02:48.

how big a deal it was. Patrick, you are still in one of those buildings

:02:49.:02:54.

that we saw. Can Grimsby ever return to making the most out of those

:02:55.:02:58.

buildings? Lots of towns around the country will see a very familiar

:02:59.:03:07.

picture. Yes, we produce a high end quality, but we have the big

:03:08.:03:12.

industry here, we have lots of small buildings here that we could

:03:13.:03:14.

redevelop for other artisan producers like mine, Alfred Enderby,

:03:15.:03:19.

does not even necessarily have to be fish, but it can be and might as

:03:20.:03:24.

well be. Brand UK post-"Brexit" needs a push, we need to push the

:03:25.:03:28.

good quality we can produce a cross Europe. The Europeans get behind

:03:29.:03:34.

PGIs and so on, protected food names, we have a PGI for smoked fish

:03:35.:03:38.

in his bid, let's make the most of it, let's push it. Brand UK is

:03:39.:03:42.

great. A lot of people will be behind that, we have been talking to

:03:43.:03:47.

importers and exporters all over the last couple of days, whatever

:03:48.:03:51.

happens could affect your business. The best thing, the best thing the

:03:52.:03:55.

British government can do is do something, do something positive.

:03:56.:04:01.

After that, we will get on with it. Pretty certain, as long as the news

:04:02.:04:04.

is positive, we will get on with it and meet the challenge. We need to

:04:05.:04:10.

keep it as open as possible. We depend on Europe for manufacturing

:04:11.:04:16.

in UK, as well as import. It is a two-way gig. And currencies to take

:04:17.:04:21.

into account. Certainly. Thank you, Patrick, Richard, Shanty Jack, thank

:04:22.:04:28.

you, we will leave you to play as out. Grimsby lads, written by John

:04:29.:04:31.

Connelly and Bill Meek. STUDIO: I could listen to that for

:04:32.:05:13.

ages, thank you very much. I love a good shanty. What do we have next?

:05:14.:05:21.

The star of cold That is all from the breakfast in, I

:05:22.:07:03.

will be back with the lunchtime news at 1:30pm. Enjoy your day,

:07:04.:07:05.

They are the middle-aged squabbling mates from Manchester who burst back

:07:06.:07:19.

onto our screens last year after 13 years away.

:07:20.:07:21.

It was a risk, but one that paid off,

:07:22.:07:23.

and now Cold Feet is back for a seventh series.

:07:24.:07:26.

Robert Bathurst plays the hapless David who once again is getting

:07:27.:07:28.

Hapless, is that a fair assessment? I think so. LAUGHTER

:07:29.:07:31.

We'll speak to Robert in a moment but first here he is trying to get

:07:32.:07:35.

a new business venture off the ground.

:07:36.:07:37.

I've got to hand it to you, they usually only get this excited when

:07:38.:07:47.

the paparazzi are around. Rather alarming... Don't worry,

:07:48.:07:59.

unless you are worth 10 million, you are safe. If you would like more

:08:00.:08:03.

information on yourself...? Perhaps we could arrange to meet up another

:08:04.:08:07.

time, would you like your husband to be present, do you think? We don't

:08:08.:08:09.

need to involve them, do you think? Looks like things might be looking

:08:10.:08:24.

up! First of all, came back last year, and... Kind of a nerve-racking

:08:25.:08:28.

moment in some ways for all of you as actors. No one was sure if it was

:08:29.:08:33.

going to be a good idea or not but it has been like that every series

:08:34.:08:37.

we have made, we made five series many years ago and each year was the

:08:38.:08:41.

last one and each year we thought, that it, see how it goes, this year

:08:42.:08:45.

is no different. In terms of what is driving it on, you enjoy doing it

:08:46.:08:50.

but while the public still want to watch it, you will keep making it.

:08:51.:08:55.

While there is still juice in the characters, and the reboot has made

:08:56.:08:59.

it more rich in some ways, because you see them in 1996, originally, in

:09:00.:09:03.

the pilot, we have seen how they develop. We go on a journey with

:09:04.:09:11.

them. This is what friendships are like, people change, different

:09:12.:09:13.

circumstances, dealing with that, things we all know about as well.

:09:14.:09:17.

The warmth of shared experience, the history they have, and nature of the

:09:18.:09:23.

relationship changes, and the five of us left, since Rachel died, the

:09:24.:09:28.

golden thread running between us, looking after each other, even

:09:29.:09:31.

though we are growing apart. Is there a classic cold feet audience,

:09:32.:09:36.

have you added a new generation from the new film, 13 years on? I thought

:09:37.:09:41.

it would only be fans of the old one last year, all the babies are now

:09:42.:09:45.

grown up, so some great young actors doing it as well, and so, we had a

:09:46.:09:51.

huge 16 to 24... I don't know how they can these things but I believe

:09:52.:09:55.

them. There is a secret box, somewhere! Tell us a little bit

:09:56.:09:59.

about, if you can, where we are in the series with David, how is he

:10:00.:10:05.

doing? Last year he got into scrapes, and this year, gets into

:10:06.:10:08.

scrapes again, everything happens with the character, he never leads

:10:09.:10:13.

anything, he is always the victim of circumstance, things happen around

:10:14.:10:18.

him, things happen despite him, because he never steers where he is

:10:19.:10:22.

going. That is why he is hapless, I think! Gets into terrible scrapes.

:10:23.:10:26.

Let's have another look at one of these moments. This is when Pete

:10:27.:10:30.

tries to drum up some new business for him.

:10:31.:10:34.

Spend it? I don't need any help, my friends are worse than me. No,

:10:35.:10:40.

manage it, he is a financial adviser. They are all sharks. David

:10:41.:10:48.

is not typical. He is trustworthy? No, he did serve time for fraud. I'm

:10:49.:10:53.

joking, he got off. That's a recommendation(!) invite your

:10:54.:10:57.

friends, if they are anything like you. You mean, loaded? A lot of them

:10:58.:11:02.

don't trust their husbands. Perhaps I should invite the wives and

:11:03.:11:07.

girlfriends and the widows, do you think your friend would be

:11:08.:11:12.

interested? You are a star! And you won't have to be facing grannies

:11:13.:11:14.

anymore, will you. Rather wonderful, we are based up

:11:15.:11:24.

here now, it makes a lot of being filmed here, in Manchester,

:11:25.:11:31.

around... When we started in 1996, very few of those shows were done

:11:32.:11:36.

outside of the M25 and this was Granada's television, hardly a

:11:37.:11:39.

corner of Manchester we have not used. I'm sure most of the Castor

:11:40.:11:44.

get this, do people come up to you and say, I remind you of... A person

:11:45.:11:49.

in my family... Are you based on so and so? One of the great things

:11:50.:11:52.

about it, it is so relate a bull. I have had couples come up and say, we

:11:53.:12:00.

courted during the show. -- I'm sure most of the cast get this. People do

:12:01.:12:07.

relate, it strikes a chord with anybody who is rubbish at life!

:12:08.:12:12.

LAUGHTER Probably most of us. From what we

:12:13.:12:15.

have seen of the clips, there is romance in this series? For David,

:12:16.:12:23.

knee has still never really had a proper friend, he has always... And,

:12:24.:12:29.

it happens to them again, by accident, and what turns out to be a

:12:30.:12:33.

business contract, might possibly develop into something else. -- for

:12:34.:12:43.

David, he has still never had a friend. You have said it could go on

:12:44.:12:46.

as long as there is stories in the characters, what do the cast think?

:12:47.:12:51.

As I have said before, we play it series by series. I think, yeah,

:12:52.:12:57.

there is every possibility it might find some more juice in the

:12:58.:13:00.

characters, from the situation, as we get older. Have you spoken

:13:01.:13:06.

about... Are these his friends he is writing about? I think... I have not

:13:07.:13:10.

quizzed him about that too closely, I have come across people who say

:13:11.:13:15.

they are based on characters in the show, and they know him, in Bristol,

:13:16.:13:19.

hanging around he says, that is my life! Are they pleased about that? I

:13:20.:13:27.

think that they are now! Probably watching to see what happens. Thank

:13:28.:13:28.

you very much, lovely to see you. My parents both grew up on council

:13:29.:13:40.

estates and as a family, we understand the difference social

:13:41.:13:45.

housing can make to people's lives.

:13:46.:13:51.