07/09/2017 Breakfast


07/09/2017

The latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC's Breakfast team.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 07/09/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

This is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

:00:00.:00:07.

Death and destruction in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

:00:08.:00:11.

At least seven people have died in the Caribbean's fiercest storm

:00:12.:00:14.

One island, Barbuda, is described as barely habitable.

:00:15.:00:40.

A row over using laws first introduced by Henry VIII

:00:41.:00:45.

is at the centre of a two-day debate on Brexit.

:00:46.:00:51.

For the latest in the season on Britain's coast, we are on a

:00:52.:00:58.

scientific research vessel trying to establish the exact levels of

:00:59.:01:06.

looting plastics in the oceans. -- polluting.

:01:07.:01:07.

Jaguar Land Rover announces big plans for new electric cars.

:01:08.:01:10.

I'll ask the boss if companies and drivers a ready

:01:11.:01:12.

In sport, there'll be no Federer-Nadal showdown at the US

:01:13.:01:17.

Roger Federer is knocked out by Juan Martin del Potro,

:01:18.:01:19.

so he will take on world number one Rafael Nadal,

:01:20.:01:22.

Businesses are told to stop pushing unhealthy food and larger

:01:23.:01:28.

Shoppers risk eating an extra 17,000 calories a year

:01:29.:01:31.

And Matt is also on the coast today with the weather.

:01:32.:01:43.

Good morning. I have dragged the deckchair to Sussex. We are looking

:01:44.:01:54.

at the effects erosion are having on the coast. Details on that and they

:01:55.:01:58.

forecast starting off dry but with wet weather coming later up next. --

:01:59.:02:06.

and a forecast. Hurricane Irma has caused

:02:07.:02:11.

devastation across the Caribbean The small island of Barbuda

:02:12.:02:15.

has been severely hit, making it, in the words

:02:16.:02:19.

of its Prime Minister, Authorities in the French island

:02:20.:02:22.

territory of Saint Martin say it has been reduced to rubble and its

:02:23.:02:25.

airport is virtually destroyed. The island of Barbuda, home to 1600

:02:26.:02:33.

people, was one of the first places to be hit by Hurricane Irma with

:02:34.:02:38.

full brunt. It is estimated 95% of homes have been damaged.

:02:39.:02:42.

Communications were destroyed, cutting it off from the outside

:02:43.:02:46.

world. The Prime Minister said the island was barely habitable. What I

:02:47.:02:50.

saw was heart-wrenching, absolutely devastating. In fact, I believe the

:02:51.:02:57.

extent of the destruction is unprecedented. A two-year-old

:02:58.:03:03.

toddler was killed. There were many lucky escapes. We had containers, 40

:03:04.:03:10.

foot containers, flying left and right, and tons of debris. The story

:03:11.:03:15.

you are getting from most of the residents here is the eye of the

:03:16.:03:19.

storm came just in time. People were literally tying themselves to their

:03:20.:03:28.

roofs with ropes to keep them down. In the French territory of San

:03:29.:03:35.

Martin, six people were killed. Authorities said the island had been

:03:36.:03:39.

reduced to rubble. This is Hurricane Irma seen from space. It is now

:03:40.:03:44.

heading north of Puerto Rico, and could hit Florida at the weekend. It

:03:45.:03:49.

is one of three hurricanes in the Atlantic. There are particular fears

:03:50.:03:54.

for Hurricane Jose, following close behind Hurricane Irma on a similar

:03:55.:03:59.

path. With most people homeless, officials say Barbuda cannot survive

:04:00.:04:05.

another storm. They may have to be entirely evacuated. Andy Moore, BBC

:04:06.:04:09.

News. We can now speak to the Prime

:04:10.:04:10.

Minister of Antigua and Barbuda, Good morning to you. Thank you very

:04:11.:04:21.

much for talking to us on Breakfast. You are back on Antigua is that

:04:22.:04:28.

correct? Yes. Good morning to you and your viewers. Good morning. Tell

:04:29.:04:35.

us where you are in Antigua. We saw the devastation hit Barbuda. Yes.

:04:36.:04:50.

The extent of the damage was minimal in Antigua. It is back up and

:04:51.:04:55.

running, actually. The airport opens tomorrow morning. We will be

:04:56.:05:01.

undertaking national flights again. And most of the electricity has been

:05:02.:05:07.

restored. But Barbuda is completely different, a complete contrast. In

:05:08.:05:13.

Antigua we can see there has been significant resilience, we can

:05:14.:05:22.

celebrate surviving. Barbuda is devastated. Yesterday when I

:05:23.:05:30.

travelled and circumnavigated the island, it was emotionally painful

:05:31.:05:34.

to see such a beautiful island totally destroyed to the extent

:05:35.:05:41.

about 90% of the country is damaged, totally demolished. We have

:05:42.:05:48.

significant homeless people now in a bid. We have efforts to make sure we

:05:49.:06:02.

can help them tomorrow. -- in Barbuda. We have seen you helping.

:06:03.:06:10.

What can be done to help accommodate and rehouse tomorrow? Tomorrow we

:06:11.:06:17.

have several helicopters and a number of boats travelling to

:06:18.:06:24.

Barbuda to take supplies. Luckily we ordered supplies out of Miami. We

:06:25.:06:31.

will deliver them tomorrow almost exclusively to Barbuda. We will take

:06:32.:06:38.

significant building material as well to restore things that were

:06:39.:06:47.

partially destroyed. We are also sending over tarpaulin as well. It

:06:48.:06:55.

will start tomorrow morning in earnest. There will be water and

:06:56.:07:02.

supplies to make sure they have clean water. Apologies for

:07:03.:07:07.

interrupting. Prime Minister Brown, how much aid do you need from other

:07:08.:07:14.

countries? Are you asking for help? Yeah. We estimate to restore Barbuda

:07:15.:07:23.

runs in excess of 100 million US dollars. That is definitely beyond

:07:24.:07:28.

the means of our government. Clearly we need some help. We need external

:07:29.:07:39.

resources to supplement the efforts. The entire infrastructure, the

:07:40.:07:45.

schools, hospitals, they are damaged. Patella communications

:07:46.:07:52.

infrastructure as well was actually destroyed -- the communications in

:07:53.:08:18.

the structure. Another hurricane is on its way. How will people prepare?

:08:19.:08:23.

We are watching that storm closely. We have no choice but to take

:08:24.:08:34.

immediate steps in Barbuda because we are already very holeable. To

:08:35.:08:41.

have another one is dangerous. -- vulnerable. Prime Minister Gaston

:08:42.:09:03.

Brown, thank you very much for your time. We wish you and your citizens

:09:04.:09:05.

well. Many thanks. The country takes another step

:09:06.:09:06.

towards Brexit today as MPs debate the European Union Withdrawal Bill

:09:07.:09:10.

before a vote takes place on Monday. Our political correspondent,

:09:11.:09:14.

Chris Mason, is in Westminster. Chris, what are they key

:09:15.:09:16.

issues up for discussion? It is such an important piece of

:09:17.:09:23.

legislation, this. And there is a big row developing around it.

:09:24.:09:26.

Definitely. When people like me stand on grass like this and talk

:09:27.:09:30.

about constitutional change, it can be quite dull. But this is

:09:31.:09:34.

significant. The biggest constitutional change, the way we

:09:35.:09:40.

are governed, since October, 1972, when we signed up to what is now the

:09:41.:09:45.

European Union in the first place. The challenge the government now

:09:46.:09:50.

faces is unravelling that. Essentially in 1972 a pipe was built

:09:51.:09:58.

from here to Brussels and laws flowed through them. 433 regulations

:09:59.:10:04.

in total. The government has to work out what it is going to do. It is

:10:05.:10:09.

concluded everything changes but nothing changes. Everything will be

:10:10.:10:13.

copied over in one go. The challenge in the government is it does not

:10:14.:10:19.

give a chance for scrutiny of what they are doing. That is why Labour

:10:20.:10:24.

does not like it. The use of what is known as Henry VIII powers, dating

:10:25.:10:31.

back to 1539. This has nothing to do with his love of going down the

:10:32.:10:40.

aisle, it was the power to make law without being challenged. The

:10:41.:10:45.

government says they will not abuse the power and they will have a two

:10:46.:10:48.

year limit which will expire at around March, 2021. It is a key

:10:49.:10:53.

reason opposition parties will vote against it. The government is not

:10:54.:10:59.

likely to struggle at this stage of the bill's passage through

:11:00.:11:02.

Parliament to be there will be a vote today and Monday. But it will

:11:03.:11:08.

dominate Westminster for months to come. Thank you so much. And just to

:11:09.:11:18.

remind you. In just over half an hour, we'll be speaking about this

:11:19.:11:21.

with the Shadow Brexit Secretary, Matthew Pennycook.

:11:22.:11:22.

Universities in England could face fines if they pay their leaders more

:11:23.:11:25.

than the Prime Minister, unless they can convince a regulator

:11:26.:11:28.

Dozens of university heads currently earn more than twice the PM's annual

:11:29.:11:33.

The Universities Minister, Jo Johnson, says urgent measures

:11:34.:11:36.

are needed to ensure a good deal for both students and taxpayers.

:11:37.:11:40.

West Midlands Police, the second biggest force in England

:11:41.:11:42.

and Wales, has been accused of failing to record thousands

:11:43.:11:45.

These included sexual offences, domestic abuse and rape.

:11:46.:11:48.

The Inspectorate of Constabulary graded its performance on crime

:11:49.:11:51.

recording as "inadequate," the lowest rating possible.

:11:52.:12:01.

Facebook says it has discovered a Russian-funded campaign to promote

:12:02.:12:03.

divisive social and political messages on its network

:12:04.:12:06.

The company said $77,000 was spent on about 3,000

:12:07.:12:14.

ads over a two-year period, ending in May this year.

:12:15.:12:17.

The ads did not back any specific political figures,

:12:18.:12:19.

but instead posted on topics including immigration,

:12:20.:12:21.

Asking if you would rather go large for a little bit extra is something

:12:22.:12:33.

we are used to hearing from food and drink retailers.

:12:34.:12:36.

But according to a new report from the Royal Society

:12:37.:12:38.

for Public Health this "upselling" is fuelling the obesity crisis

:12:39.:12:41.

We have been confused about that phrase. Small is not big enough.

:12:42.:12:52.

Our reporter, Alice Hutton, has more.

:12:53.:12:57.

It is a familiar sound of the high street, whether you are in a

:12:58.:13:03.

newsagent, fast food outlets, coffee shop, we have all been asked if we

:13:04.:13:07.

want to treat ourselves to something extra. But pushing larger portions

:13:08.:13:13.

on customers, up selling, is not just taking a toll on wallets. New

:13:14.:13:18.

research shows it is fuelling the obesity crisis in the UK. One in

:13:19.:13:23.

three are accepting this temptation. We can put on between five lbs a

:13:24.:13:30.

year to 11 lbs a year depending on your age group. That is fairly

:13:31.:13:36.

significant to quantify the damage we are doing to ourselves. If the

:13:37.:13:40.

public are aware, they may think twice. Shoppers face more than 100

:13:41.:13:50.

attempts every year. 78% have been asked to upgrade in the last week.

:13:51.:13:54.

The report is calling for businesses to take responsibility for their

:13:55.:13:59.

part in keeping the public healthy. The responsibility does not just lie

:14:00.:14:04.

with retailers. They also want us to shop more smartly and resist

:14:05.:14:14.

temptation will be get to the till. -- when we get to the.

:14:15.:14:15.

Prince George is to begin his first day at school today.

:14:16.:14:18.

The four-year-old will attend Thomas's Battersea in South London,

:14:19.:14:21.

where the fees are more than ?16,000 a year.

:14:22.:14:23.

His uniform includes navy shorts and jacket,

:14:24.:14:25.

There's a slam-dunking bunny, the world's longest legs

:14:26.:14:29.

It can only mean one thing, the latest edition

:14:30.:14:32.

This year's entries include Biff Hutchison from Idaho,

:14:33.:14:36.

who's the first person to clear 11 feet on a pogo stick.

:14:37.:14:39.

And this is "Bini the Bunny" from California who holds the record

:14:40.:14:42.

for the most basketball slam-dunks in one minute by a rabbit.

:14:43.:14:46.

She managed a grand total of Seven slam-dunks.

:14:47.:14:47.

It is quite a specific category. And that is him celebrating. Her? Him.

:14:48.:15:19.

There was some debate this morning but it is official. Him. And now you

:15:20.:15:23.

know. Let's talk about record-breaking

:15:24.:15:32.

tennis players. Roger Federer is out of the US Open, beaten by Warren

:15:33.:15:36.

Martin Del pop show in New York. He has been giving his postmatch press

:15:37.:15:42.

conference, and he said he isn't good enough to be in the tournament

:15:43.:15:46.

at the moment, it is better that he is out on somebody else gets the

:15:47.:15:50.

chance. So dignified! It also means that match, the semifinal they

:15:51.:15:54.

wanted to in Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer will not happen in New York.

:15:55.:15:58.

It has never happened to there. That dream is over, Juan Martin Del Potro

:15:59.:16:05.

is through, and will be facing the world number one, Rafael Nadal, in

:16:06.:16:08.

the semifinals. He lost only five games as he sailed past Andrei

:16:09.:16:13.

Rublev yesterday. Andy Murray says he will probably miss the rest of

:16:14.:16:16.

the season because of his ongoing hip injury. He hasn't played since

:16:17.:16:20.

Wimbledon. He says he is protecting his long-term future. The deciding

:16:21.:16:24.

test between England and West Indies begins at Lord's this morning. Toby

:16:25.:16:28.

Rowland Jones has been on his home ground. And Chris Froome says he is

:16:29.:16:32.

still confident of winning the tour the Spaniard despite his league

:16:33.:16:37.

being cut. -- leader. He is now just four minutes ahead. Lots of climbing

:16:38.:16:43.

yesterday, as you can see. Very good. We will talk lots more about

:16:44.:16:47.

the tennis later. And the cricket, as well. Can we talk about big

:16:48.:16:53.

deckchairs? I love big deckchairs. We sat in it last week when it was

:16:54.:16:57.

here, it was massive. You have trouble getting out of it. Matthew

:16:58.:17:02.

isn't really that small. Honestly, he is about eight feet tall. Good

:17:03.:17:09.

morning! Good morning. Yes, the deckchair dwarfs me somewhat. Good

:17:10.:17:14.

morning from memory in Sussex on the coast here. This morning we are

:17:15.:17:18.

talking about the impact the changing climate is having on some

:17:19.:17:23.

of our coastlines. Increases in global air temperatures, sea

:17:24.:17:25.

temperatures and global sea levels is having a great impact on the risk

:17:26.:17:29.

of flooding and erosion around written's coast. We are looking at

:17:30.:17:33.

some of the schemes that are in case -- in place and a scheme to try to

:17:34.:17:38.

put that more at ease. To speak about it we have come to Medmerry in

:17:39.:17:43.

Sussex. There is an innovative scheme by the environment agency,

:17:44.:17:48.

called Managed Realignment. The existing defences behind me were

:17:49.:17:52.

breached and in doing so it created a brand-new habitat here and also

:17:53.:17:56.

saved the prospect of flooding, or at least help the prospect of

:17:57.:18:02.

flooding, for 350 properties, for holiday Park, and various other

:18:03.:18:05.

pieces of infrastructure in the area. We will be looking at it more

:18:06.:18:10.

this morning. It is fairly calm here this morning. The winds will be

:18:11.:18:15.

picking up today. We will take a look at the forecast across the

:18:16.:18:18.

country. We can start with a look at what is happening. A dry start for

:18:19.:18:22.

many, but rain is on the way for most parts of the country and the

:18:23.:18:26.

wind will pick up as well. Now, the prospects this morning showed that

:18:27.:18:30.

there are a few showers across the English Channel affecting parts of

:18:31.:18:33.

Sussex, Kent and Hampshire in particular, and there are showers in

:18:34.:18:37.

western Scotland, Northern Ireland and the north-west of England. There

:18:38.:18:42.

will be longer spells of rain through the day for the northern

:18:43.:18:45.

half of the country but further south will stay largely dry. A few

:18:46.:18:49.

showers in the south-east and East Anglia, developing in the afternoon.

:18:50.:18:52.

The odd heavy shower cannot be ruled out. Temperatures generally in the

:18:53.:18:56.

high teens. The further north, the pick of the cloud. The skies across

:18:57.:19:01.

northern England, Scotland and Northern Ireland will be rather

:19:02.:19:04.

grey. Outbreaks of rain coming and going. Heaviest on the hills in the

:19:05.:19:08.

west throughout, and the breeze picking up as well. Temperatures

:19:09.:19:12.

stuck in the midteens but many. We will gradually see that rain pushing

:19:13.:19:17.

across parts of north Wales as well. For the northern half of the

:19:18.:19:20.

country, the day finishes on a slightly wetter note. Maybe staying

:19:21.:19:24.

dry for a good part of the Dave or southern England and Wales, but even

:19:25.:19:28.

here, we could be prone to one ultimate showers. Into tonight,

:19:29.:19:32.

showers will come and go across all parts of the country. We will see

:19:33.:19:36.

the breeze picking up quite drastically. Quite a blustery night.

:19:37.:19:39.

Even though the wind is there, with cloud and outbreaks of rain, it will

:19:40.:19:43.

be cooler than last night. Temperatures OK in the towns and

:19:44.:19:46.

cities, but down into single figures in some areas of the countryside.

:19:47.:19:51.

The wind will add to the chill. A slightly cooler spell to end the

:19:52.:19:54.

weekend going to be weakened. Friday for me will be a mixture of sunshine

:19:55.:20:01.

and showers. -- for many. They will be some thunder, the further north

:20:02.:20:05.

you are. A complication in the English Channel. More cloud through

:20:06.:20:08.

the day, outbreaks of rain, that rank could become heavy and

:20:09.:20:10.

persistent and move towards Wales and the Midlands at times in the

:20:11.:20:14.

afternoon as well. Not a particularly pleasant day, it must

:20:15.:20:17.

be said. Cooler tomorrow than today, and cooler still on Saturday. We

:20:18.:20:22.

will clear away the rain from the south coast. Sunshine and showers

:20:23.:20:25.

across much of the country. Showers always heaviest towards the western

:20:26.:20:29.

half of the UK, but as I said, the wind becomes more of a feature. As

:20:30.:20:33.

we going to the weekend we could see our first winter storm of the autumn

:20:34.:20:37.

heading in, especially as we go through Sunday into Monday. That

:20:38.:20:41.

could of course have an impact on the coast. As I said, we will be

:20:42.:20:45.

taking a closer look at the impacts of flooding and erosion on the coast

:20:46.:20:49.

through this morning as part of our Coastal written season. -- Britain.

:20:50.:20:58.

It looks like it could be a lovely morning of our, Matthew. Now we are

:20:59.:21:02.

going to a boat in Plymouth. More than eight million tonnes

:21:03.:21:06.

of plastic are dumped every year in our oceans and it's predicted

:21:07.:21:09.

that by 2050 99% of seabirds As part of our Coastal Britain

:21:10.:21:12.

series, Breakfast's John Maguire is in Plymouth for us looking

:21:13.:21:16.

at the problems posed by plastic. You can see morning breaking there.

:21:17.:21:25.

A cloudy sky, perhaps a hint of some sunshine breaking through. John is

:21:26.:21:29.

looking at the problems posed by plastic. Good morning, John. Good

:21:30.:21:34.

morning. I hope you are well in the studio. As you say, we are in

:21:35.:21:40.

Plymouth Sound, aboard the Fork and Spirit, a marine research vessel

:21:41.:21:43.

which belongs to the University of them. -- Falcon Spirit. Have a look

:21:44.:21:49.

here at the end of this line. This is a dragnet. That has been trawling

:21:50.:21:56.

through the see this morning. -- sea. They are bringing it in, we

:21:57.:22:02.

will look at what it contains. We know that there are lots of

:22:03.:22:05.

plastics, big ones, but even more dangerous are the smaller ones in

:22:06.:22:09.

our oceans. It is a major problem, not only for us, but also for the

:22:10.:22:11.

natural world. Nestled at the bottom of cliffs on

:22:12.:22:18.

the North Yorkshire coast is a colony of grey seals. As the tide

:22:19.:22:22.

comes in they wriggle and bounced their way up onto dry land, but

:22:23.:22:27.

increasingly, they are at risk when they are back in the water, from

:22:28.:22:31.

threats that are man-made. -- bounce their way. As the tide comes in the

:22:32.:22:36.

seals will haul themselves up onto the shore. The sea, of course, is

:22:37.:22:41.

where they do most of there eating. It is troubling to think that is

:22:42.:22:44.

also somewhere particularly hazardous to them, because of the

:22:45.:22:48.

amount of Sussex that are now in our oceans. It is a problem. There is

:22:49.:22:54.

litter in the sea that is washing in on every tide, it is coming in and

:22:55.:23:00.

out, and people do not realise that it doesn't necessarily float, it

:23:01.:23:05.

doesn't decompose. Sometimes this is household litter. People don't think

:23:06.:23:11.

it can end up in the sea. Look at that! You superstar. Down the coast

:23:12.:23:17.

in Scarborough, the seal hospital looks after the rescued animals

:23:18.:23:20.

before releasing them once they are healthy. Plastics are a constant

:23:21.:23:26.

problem. We attended a seal recently that was caught in a frisbee, and

:23:27.:23:32.

that frisbee must have been on him for months, and it had cut into

:23:33.:23:35.

about six centimetres of flesh. It had been floating in the ocean and

:23:36.:23:39.

out of curiosity, no doubt, the seal popped his head through it, and

:23:40.:23:44.

obviously couldn't get it. -- get it off. To discover more about how

:23:45.:23:51.

plastics behave in the ocean, that Imperial College London are taking

:23:52.:23:55.

part in a major European study. This wave machine will help them to model

:23:56.:23:59.

the track of the pollution. The aim is to try to understand how plastics

:24:00.:24:04.

move through the ocean. We want to understand how currents can move

:24:05.:24:10.

past six, how it accumulates and how it affects the environment. -- can

:24:11.:24:19.

move plastics. We only know about 1% of the plastic that we fell into the

:24:20.:24:23.

ocean, so we want to understand what is happening. I love paddle boarding

:24:24.:24:28.

and when I first started doing it in London on the canals and rivers, I

:24:29.:24:32.

realise how bad the problem was with a stick illusion. -- plastic

:24:33.:24:37.

pollution. Trying to stop it getting into the sea in the first place is

:24:38.:24:42.

Lizzie's passion and ambition. I saw a Coutts nest, one time, that was

:24:43.:24:46.

made almost entirely of plastics. It was this horrifying moment. And I

:24:47.:24:51.

thought, something needs to be done. I need to show people what I'm

:24:52.:24:55.

seeing every time I'm out paddling, just how about this problem is,

:24:56.:24:59.

inland as well is in the oceans. She has paddle board of the length of

:25:00.:25:03.

England's canals and rivers, recruiting volunteers in helping to

:25:04.:25:07.

clean up. Ultimately this is a man-made problem, and despite the

:25:08.:25:12.

resilience of the natural world, it is one that needs a man-made

:25:13.:25:14.

solution. So, back on board the Falcon Spirit.

:25:15.:25:28.

We had the Scottish government talking this morning about a drive

:25:29.:25:31.

towards recycling plastic and other types of pollutants. This is

:25:32.:25:37.

Professor Richard Thompson, from the University of Plymouth. We have only

:25:38.:25:41.

had a quick trawl this morning, but what do we have so far? We have some

:25:42.:25:45.

of the natural items we would expect to find, seaweed, seagrass. But in

:25:46.:25:51.

this sample we are also likely to find small pieces of plastic. I can

:25:52.:25:56.

already see a small piece that looks a bit suspicious. To completely

:25:57.:26:01.

identify what this is, we need to take a friend is a chemical

:26:02.:26:04.

approach, but to me, this very much looks like a small shard of pulsar

:26:05.:26:10.

in. -- forensic chemical approach. Plastic of this size can be eaten by

:26:11.:26:15.

a wide range of marine organisms, including commercially important

:26:16.:26:18.

fish and shellfish. When we looked at fish in the English Channel we

:26:19.:26:21.

found a third of them contained small pieces of plastic. That is

:26:22.:26:25.

potentially harmful to some of those marine organisms, and of course

:26:26.:26:28.

there is concern in the seafood industry, they don't want the fish

:26:29.:26:32.

to be contaminated. In my view there is no cause for concern for human

:26:33.:26:36.

health at the moment, but we need to recognise that plastics are

:26:37.:26:40.

persistent, so I must we change our ways and stop it in plastics in the

:26:41.:26:45.

oceans, we will see a lot more of this in the sea, in fish, in birds.

:26:46.:26:49.

Richard, thank you. We will speak to you again later. Emily, good

:26:50.:26:53.

morning. You have just sailed around the British Isles to highlight the

:26:54.:26:57.

problems of plastics. Did you discover it was worse than you might

:26:58.:27:01.

have expected? I know you have gone all around the world doing this.

:27:02.:27:05.

Yeah, we have done most of our research in the gyres, the big

:27:06.:27:10.

accumulation zones around the world. Because of the ocean currents that

:27:11.:27:13.

is where we expect the plastic to end up. It has been surprising that

:27:14.:27:17.

here in UK waters we have found a reasonable amount of plastic here as

:27:18.:27:21.

well. It just concludes that we know it is coming from land, it is coming

:27:22.:27:27.

from us. Using a lot of this plastic and hyperplasia areas, and getting

:27:28.:27:31.

out there. And you spoke to politicians as he went around, can

:27:32.:27:35.

you give us a couple of good solutions, a couple of workable,

:27:36.:27:39.

tangible solutions? The easiest thing is to just avoid using this

:27:40.:27:43.

single use plastic, this plastic that we have in our lives every day

:27:44.:27:47.

that we use to ten minutes or one hour and then we throw it away. That

:27:48.:27:51.

is the easiest thing we can do. But we need the bigger picture answers

:27:52.:27:56.

as well. We do. We will be speaking about that through the morning. I

:27:57.:28:00.

want to show you these later on as well, these micro beads. You get

:28:01.:28:03.

them in facial scrubs and things like that. These are about to be

:28:04.:28:06.

banned, thankfully. Lots more from us off Plymouth later in the

:28:07.:28:11.

programme. Fascinating. Thank you, John.

:28:12.:31:30.

programme. Fascinating. Thank you, heavy weather on Sunday.

:31:31.:31:31.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:31:32.:31:33.

This is Breakfast with Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt.

:31:34.:31:46.

It's on Thursday the 7th of September.

:31:47.:31:48.

New petrol and diesel cars are to be banned by 2040 but are we ready

:31:49.:31:53.

to go electric as another car manufacturer announces investment

:31:54.:31:56.

Tycoon, Michelle Mone, made a fortune selling underwear.

:31:57.:32:05.

She'll be here to discuss her career and tell us why she's now selling

:32:06.:32:09.

property with the virtual currency, Bitcoin.

:32:10.:32:11.

Before Prime Suspect, there was Tennison.

:32:12.:32:16.

The crime writer, Lynda La Plante, will be on the sofa to tell us

:32:17.:32:20.

why her famous character is front and centre of a 1970s IRA bombing.

:32:21.:32:24.

Now a summary of this morning's main news.

:32:25.:32:30.

Hurricanes Burma has caused devastation killing at least seven

:32:31.:32:36.

people. -- Hurricane Irma. At least seven people have died

:32:37.:32:41.

in the Caribbean's fiercest storm One island, Barbuda,

:32:42.:32:44.

is described as barely habitable. This is how Hurricane Irma looked

:32:45.:32:47.

from space last night as it headed towards Puerto Rico

:32:48.:32:51.

and the Dominican Republic. There's more concern as two further

:32:52.:32:53.

hurricanes develop in the region. The country takes another step

:32:54.:32:56.

towards Brexit today as MPs debate the European Union Withdrawal Bill

:32:57.:32:59.

before a vote takes place on Monday. The bill will mean that thousands

:33:00.:33:08.

of EU laws and regulations are transferred into British law

:33:09.:33:11.

but ministers will need more powers The debate will last two days

:33:12.:33:14.

before a vote on Monday. We will talk about this in a few

:33:15.:33:22.

minutes with the shadow Brexit Secretary.

:33:23.:33:25.

Universities in England could face fines if they pay their leaders more

:33:26.:33:28.

than the Prime Minister, unless they can convince a regulator

:33:29.:33:31.

Dozens of university heads currently earn more than twice the PM's annual

:33:32.:33:36.

There are calls for the city watchdog to fully publish a leaked

:33:37.:33:41.

report into the treatment of customers in RBS's

:33:42.:33:44.

The report, produced for the Financial Conduct Authority,

:33:45.:33:47.

suggested the group mistreated many of its clients.

:33:48.:33:49.

The FCA said it would respond to the calls for publication in due course.

:33:50.:34:05.

Asking if you would rather go large for a little bit extra is something

:34:06.:34:08.

we are used to hearing from food and drink retailers.

:34:09.:34:11.

But according to a new report from the Royal Society

:34:12.:34:14.

for Public Health this "upselling" is fuelling the obesity crisis

:34:15.:34:17.

As great escapes go, Houdini himself might have learned

:34:18.:34:33.

This is Toscha Sponsler who's been arrested

:34:34.:34:36.

After she was detained and placed in the back of a police vehicle,

:34:37.:34:41.

somehow she manages to slip out of her handcuffs,

:34:42.:34:43.

slide into the front seat and take off in the car.

:34:44.:34:46.

Eventually police forced her off the road when she lost control

:34:47.:34:50.

She was taken back incto custody, apparently unhurt.

:34:51.:34:54.

Local police say they're now fitting new security measure

:34:55.:34:56.

They are presumably asking questions about the handcuffs. Roger Federer

:34:57.:35:25.

was just been beaten as they came in by Potro. -- As I. We will not show

:35:26.:35:33.

you the picture is because of the rights. We cannot show them to you

:35:34.:35:42.

just eat. I can tell you what happened, though. -- yet.

:35:43.:35:48.

Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have never played each other at the US

:35:49.:35:51.

Open, and that's not going to change this year.

:35:52.:35:54.

Federer was beaten in four sets by Juan Martin del Potro,

:35:55.:35:57.

so it's the Argentinian, who'll take on Nadal in New York.

:35:58.:36:00.

Nadal, back in the world number one spot, was ruthless

:36:01.:36:02.

against the Russian teenager Andrey Rublev, dropping only five

:36:03.:36:05.

Karolina Pliskova will lose her world number one ranking

:36:06.:36:08.

after she lost to Coco Vanderweghe, who's part of an all-American

:36:09.:36:11.

That hasn't happened since 1981 and the days of Martina Navratilova

:36:12.:36:15.

Andy Murray says he is likely to miss the rest of the season because

:36:16.:36:22.

of his ongoing hip injury. He hasn't played since Wimbledon, and he says

:36:23.:36:25.

that after an extended period of rest and rehabilitation, he'll be

:36:26.:36:27.

fighting for grand slam titles again.

:36:28.:36:28.

Chris Froome said he was still confident of winning the Vuelta

:36:29.:36:31.

a Espana despite having his lead cut on stage 17.

:36:32.:36:33.

He said he'd struggled on the steep climbs,

:36:34.:36:36.

paying the price for winning Tuesday's time trial.

:36:37.:36:38.

His closest rival Vincenzo Nibali, in the gold helmet, is now only

:36:39.:36:41.

We kind of knew that was coming. It is going to be a tough few stages

:36:42.:36:54.

for him. The Tour of Britain

:36:55.:36:54.

heads to Clacton today. There were some strong words after

:36:55.:36:58.

this crash. Yesterday Fernando Gaviria, in blue,

:36:59.:37:01.

won the sprint into Newark. In the top right of your screen,

:37:02.:37:04.

you'll see a pile up where a load of riders crashed into a car parked

:37:05.:37:08.

on the side of the road. England's final home test match

:37:09.:37:12.

of the summer gets under way at Lords later this morning

:37:13.:37:15.

with the series decider against West Toby Roland-Jones returns

:37:16.:37:18.

to the side in place of Chris Woakes but it could be another fast

:37:19.:37:21.

bowler, James Anderson, England's all time leading wicket

:37:22.:37:23.

taker needs just three more to become the first

:37:24.:37:27.

Englishman to reach 500. It's currently one-match

:37:28.:37:29.

all after a rejuvinated West Indies side levelled the series

:37:30.:37:31.

at Headingley last week. You expect sides to respond well,

:37:32.:37:37.

just like the West Indies did. Part of being a successful side in this

:37:38.:37:41.

format is being able to deal with it, with difficult weeks like last

:37:42.:37:46.

week. So, we have a lot of experience in our dressing room and

:37:47.:37:50.

a lot of hungry guys desperate to come back from the way we played. We

:37:51.:37:54.

want to make sure we win this series.

:37:55.:37:58.

Obviously, we are making sure we come to this game with improvements.

:37:59.:38:08.

That is a big thing for us. Hopefully we can continue pressing

:38:09.:38:10.

forward here. That is all fair enough. But look at

:38:11.:38:20.

this picture. Fairy rings. Fungus! How is your lawn. You sound like you

:38:21.:38:29.

know it. Apparently it makes no difference whatsoever to pollute the

:38:30.:38:34.

surface has not changed. It just looks like it has Olympic rings over

:38:35.:38:45.

it. We will see you later on, Sally. Thank you.

:38:46.:38:46.

MPs begin two days of debate today over the European Union Withdrawal

:38:47.:38:49.

Bill, which seeks to largely copy and paste EU law

:38:50.:38:52.

Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, has ordered his MPs to vote

:38:53.:38:55.

Matthew Pennycook, is the Shadow Brexit Minister

:38:56.:38:58.

and he joins us now from Westminster.

:38:59.:39:04.

Thank you very much for your time this morning. Just explain to us

:39:05.:39:11.

first of all what will be happening today. Today we have normal Brexit

:39:12.:39:18.

questions in the morning. Around lunchtime, the first day of the

:39:19.:39:24.

second debate begins. That is a two-day debate, today and Monday, on

:39:25.:39:27.

the principles of this piece of legislation. What I jaw objections?

:39:28.:39:33.

They are not about the principle of copying and pasting EU law into

:39:34.:39:42.

British law. -- are your objections. It is vital to make sure there is no

:39:43.:39:46.

harming the statute book after leaving the EU. But this is a deeply

:39:47.:39:51.

flawed piece of legislation, even dangerous. It has government

:39:52.:39:56.

ministers, not ordinary MPs, government ministers getting powers

:39:57.:40:10.

that will allow them to change swathes of legislation, risking our

:40:11.:40:12.

protections. That is why we cannot support it. Brexit is bringing

:40:13.:40:20.

serious debates. There is the Henry VIII link about laws he brought in

:40:21.:40:24.

to give him powers in unusual circumstances. It is about

:40:25.:40:30.

parliamentary process, about how laws and regulations can be put onto

:40:31.:40:36.

the statute. We think up to 1000 EU directives could be modified or

:40:37.:40:41.

changed by ministers without parliamentary oversight and

:40:42.:40:45.

accountability by the provisions this bill provides. I find it

:40:46.:40:51.

interesting and curious. You said in your first answer the European

:40:52.:40:55.

withdrawal bill, it has to happen, part of the process that has to

:40:56.:40:59.

happen. You will vote against it? The process has to happen. Article

:41:00.:41:05.

50 has been triggered. Whether this bill survives or not, we will be

:41:06.:41:11.

leaving the EU. That is a fact because Article 50 has been

:41:12.:41:19.

triggered since March 19th. This is not about whether we will, it is

:41:20.:41:24.

about how. It is about safeguarding vital protections are currently

:41:25.:41:27.

enjoy from membership. I don't think anyone who voted Leave, I voted

:41:28.:41:36.

Remain, but anyone voting Leave, when they did that, they did not

:41:37.:41:40.

mean ministers could circumvent Parliament and have vast sweeping

:41:41.:41:44.

powers to change it will the rights we enjoy. As it stands, you and

:41:45.:41:50.

Labour will vote against this bill. What would the government have to do

:41:51.:41:56.

to get you to vote for it? We wrote to the government ministers before

:41:57.:41:59.

summer to look at concerns and think again. We have no indication they

:42:00.:42:05.

are willing to move at all. We hope the next stage, the committee stage,

:42:06.:42:11.

the ministers look again at concerns not just being raised via Labour MPs

:42:12.:42:20.

but Conservative MPs as well. We don't want to wreck this ill, we

:42:21.:42:26.

want to repair them. -- bill. We still think we can get consensus.

:42:27.:42:32.

There is an enormous amount of stuff to get heads around. Helped

:42:33.:42:37.

specifics. You say you are concerned about the way the government is

:42:38.:42:43.

doing this, using trickery to get things through that you don't like.

:42:44.:42:47.

Can you give us an example of something that you don't want to

:42:48.:42:51.

happen, a law that will be affected by this? It is not a law that we

:42:52.:42:57.

don't want happening. The principle of bringing all EU law onto our

:42:58.:43:00.

statute book at the point of departure is the right one, bringing

:43:01.:43:09.

certainty, continuity, and no hole in the book as it stands. In terms

:43:10.:43:16.

of the sweeping powers, ministers without due parliamentary oversight

:43:17.:43:21.

and scrutiny, they can modify current EU rights and protections we

:43:22.:43:27.

currently enjoy in the process of bringing it into our book. We need

:43:28.:43:35.

an enhanced form of oversight so the parliamentarians can look at this

:43:36.:43:40.

gestation as it is transposed and make sure the rights currently

:43:41.:43:43.

enjoyed by safeguarded as we bring them over the pipe thank you very

:43:44.:43:48.

much for your time this morning. -- over. This is Breakfast. The main

:43:49.:43:58.

stories. Hurricane Irma, one of the most powerful Atlantic storms ever,

:43:59.:44:03.

has hit the Caribbean. The first parliamentary test since Brexit.

:44:04.:44:11.

Parliament is debating plans to transfer thousands of EU rules into

:44:12.:44:12.

British law. That has travelled to West Sussex

:44:13.:44:25.

this morning. -- Matt. We are looking at how coastal communities

:44:26.:44:28.

are vulnerable to flooding and cliff erosion. Good morning. Yes, good

:44:29.:44:34.

morning, we certainly are. We have come to met Bury, where they have

:44:35.:44:38.

come up with an innovative scheme to tackle the risks of coastal flooding

:44:39.:44:41.

by actually letting the sea take over some parts of the land to save

:44:42.:44:46.

others. More on that in a minute. Certainly here in Medbery this

:44:47.:44:49.

morning we have some showers rattling through. Looking at the

:44:50.:44:53.

forecast across the UK there will be a few more of them in the next few

:44:54.:44:57.

days, and today we will see increasing rain at times, and it

:44:58.:45:00.

will be increasingly easy as well. This morning, plenty of cloud, not

:45:01.:45:03.

as much sunshine as we saw yesterday. The further south and

:45:04.:45:09.

east you are the more groups as of sunshine you will get, but the cloud

:45:10.:45:13.

thickens up over the northern half of the country, and the rain becomes

:45:14.:45:16.

more abundant. At the moment over the south coast there are one or two

:45:17.:45:20.

showers which will clear away from the likes of Essex and Kent in the

:45:21.:45:24.

next hour or two. More showers later on in the day, especially across the

:45:25.:45:27.

south-east of England and East Anglia. Very much isn't this. Some

:45:28.:45:31.

of you will stay dry, with a little bit of sunshine. Temperatures in the

:45:32.:45:35.

high teens, but a degree down on what we saw yesterday. Away from the

:45:36.:45:41.

south-east, the cloudy conditions will be. Aspects of rain more

:45:42.:45:45.

extensive in the afternoon. The heaviest bursts of rain will be on

:45:46.:45:48.

the western side of the hills, a little bit drier to the east. Even

:45:49.:45:52.

here we will see patchy rain and drizzle at times. Scotland will see

:45:53.:45:56.

rain becoming more abundant through the day. Outbreaks of rain just

:45:57.:45:59.

about anywhere. Heavy as to the west. Northern Ireland also seeing

:46:00.:46:03.

outbreaks of rain coming and going as well. Temperatures around the

:46:04.:46:08.

midteens. The rain edges into northern parts of Wales a bit more

:46:09.:46:11.

in the afternoon. The further south you are, into the south of Wales and

:46:12.:46:15.

south-east England, we cannot rule out showers through the day, but

:46:16.:46:19.

much of it will be dry. Increasingly breezy and cloudy in the south-west,

:46:20.:46:23.

where showers will get going by the end of the day to take us into the

:46:24.:46:26.

evening. Overnight, outbreak of rain possible just about anywhere,

:46:27.:46:30.

pushing through on that reason. Gaps in the cloud between the showers.

:46:31.:46:34.

There will be clear and try moments, it will not rain or might long, but

:46:35.:46:39.

even though temperatures will stay in double figures in most towns and

:46:40.:46:43.

cities, it will feel a bit fresher in the wind. Friday, sunshine and

:46:44.:46:47.

showers the name of the game for most. Best of the sunshine between

:46:48.:46:52.

the showers, the further north you are, wait on the south coast of

:46:53.:46:55.

England. In the south it will mostly be a gloomy day. We could see

:46:56.:46:59.

heavier bursts of rain further north into Wales, the Midlands and the

:47:00.:47:02.

south-east, as we go through the afternoon. Temperatures very

:47:03.:47:05.

disappointing for this time of year. That cool theme continues into

:47:06.:47:10.

Saturday. Still fairly blustery, as it will be on Friday. Sunshine and

:47:11.:47:14.

showers generally on Saturday. Showers most abundant across England

:47:15.:47:17.

and Wales, temperatures generally in the midteens. For the second half of

:47:18.:47:22.

the weekend, it does look like things could move even wetter and

:47:23.:47:27.

windy. Potentially our first autumn storm of the season. Storms could

:47:28.:47:31.

potentially cross the UK and become more of a feature as we go into the

:47:32.:47:35.

future. The climate is changing. The seat of richer is rising, the air

:47:36.:47:39.

temperature is rising, and sea levels are on the rise as well. --

:47:40.:47:45.

sea temperature. These places are lovely to live, but it comes at a

:47:46.:47:49.

price, and I have been finding out in one place in Devon what that

:47:50.:47:51.

price is. I heard a rumble, I came rushing

:47:52.:48:00.

out, and the whole shed was disappearing over the cliff.

:48:01.:48:07.

Fortunately, I wasn't in it. It was six metres, altogether, born. Which

:48:08.:48:10.

is actually rather more than normally happens. Sidmouth, Devon.

:48:11.:48:16.

Some of the most sought-after homes in the country. But how much longer

:48:17.:48:21.

they will be here remains uncertain. In 15 years we have probably lost

:48:22.:48:25.

about 40 feet of garden. We knew that there was erosion, but at that

:48:26.:48:30.

time, the erosion rate was much less than it is now. The lifespan of

:48:31.:48:36.

these properties could in large part be determined by the council's next

:48:37.:48:40.

choice of sea defences, something currently in the process of

:48:41.:48:45.

consultation. The extreme winter of 2013-14 hit this stretch of coast

:48:46.:48:49.

with ferocity, bringing with it Rapid cliff erosion and flooding.

:48:50.:48:53.

Impacts we could see more of sea levels rise. Just down the coast in

:48:54.:48:57.

Dawlish, the storms and tides of thousands without power, and the

:48:58.:49:05.

railway line that hanging in midair. The environment agency estimates

:49:06.:49:09.

840,000 homes in England are in areas of risk at flooding from the

:49:10.:49:12.

sea, and over 700 properties could you lost to coastal erosion over the

:49:13.:49:16.

next decade. There is an acceptance that not all properties in the UK

:49:17.:49:20.

can be protected in the long-term. One could argue that as a society we

:49:21.:49:24.

may have a responsibility to at least provide some sort of

:49:25.:49:26.

compensation to those properties, and at the moment, there is nothing

:49:27.:49:31.

in place. You want to be fair to the people who will lose their property,

:49:32.:49:34.

but on the other hand, can you expect people who live in

:49:35.:49:37.

Huddersfield, their taxpayer money, to go into buying people out to live

:49:38.:49:43.

on the coast? I think all coastal properties are at risk, one way or

:49:44.:49:47.

another. But we are not moving anywhere. We are not moving! With

:49:48.:49:53.

budget is tight and our climate changing, will nature have the final

:49:54.:49:54.

say? -- budgets. So, difficult decisions and choice

:49:55.:50:03.

is to be made across the UK. It is a case of budgets, and a case of how

:50:04.:50:07.

the climate is changing. There are schemes in place to protect the

:50:08.:50:10.

nation's coast. In Sidmouth, perhaps, some of those schemes are

:50:11.:50:14.

helping erosion in other parts of the coast. Here, the environment

:50:15.:50:18.

agency has been harnessing the power of nature to a certain extent. It

:50:19.:50:21.

has taken on a more sustainable approach to protecting areas around

:50:22.:50:25.

parts of west Sussex. Behind me, the original sea defence was breached as

:50:26.:50:31.

part of managed realignment, the largest scheme in Europe, helping

:50:32.:50:34.

seawater flooding to this area of land. About 250 hackers of nature

:50:35.:50:40.

reserve created in response. -- hectares. By flooding this part of

:50:41.:50:46.

the land, it protects around 350 properties in other areas.

:50:47.:50:50.

Infrastructure, as well, in the area. And also a holiday park. They

:50:51.:50:54.

were all protected. Flooding has been decreased by something like

:50:55.:51:00.

1000% compare to what they had previously. When the scheme was

:51:01.:51:06.

introduced in 2013, we saw those big storms, offering instant protection.

:51:07.:51:10.

It is a case of, do we go down the road of doing the man-made

:51:11.:51:13.

protection across the UK? Or do use nature and help parts the coast go

:51:14.:51:18.

back to the sea in order to protect others? We will have more on that

:51:19.:51:23.

through the morning as part of our Coastal Britain series, but for now,

:51:24.:51:25.

back to you both. We will be sticking with the theme

:51:26.:51:31.

of the environment this morning. We have been talking about plastic in

:51:32.:51:35.

the ocean, polluting wildlife there, but also about how car companies are

:51:36.:51:39.

trying to make a difference in terms of the environment.

:51:40.:51:39.

This morning Jaguar Land Rover becomes the latest car manufacturer

:51:40.:51:42.

to announce a major investment in electric car technology.

:51:43.:51:45.

Yes, they are not the first, but more of them are getting on board to

:51:46.:51:52.

offer electric versions of their cars.

:51:53.:51:55.

Jaguar Land Rover says every new car they make

:51:56.:51:58.

after 2020 will also be available as an electric version.

:51:59.:52:01.

It comes a month after the government said it would ban

:52:02.:52:04.

the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2040.

:52:05.:52:06.

Hybrids that use traditional fuel and electric will still be allowed.

:52:07.:52:09.

The latest figures show just 1.6% of new car sales so far this year

:52:10.:52:15.

Yesterday Nissan announced its new electric car will be able

:52:16.:52:20.

to drive even further on one charge and Volvo says all of its new cars

:52:21.:52:25.

BMW's going to build a fully electric mini.

:52:26.:52:37.

And the market leader, Tesla, has cut its prices to encourage more

:52:38.:52:44.

Professor David Bailey is an expert on the car industry

:52:45.:52:53.

Good morning. Let's talk about this announcement from jaguar Land Rover.

:52:54.:53:02.

It is not the first to announce this, and they are not going all the

:53:03.:53:06.

way, they are saying they will still make the other cars, but they will

:53:07.:53:09.

be available in an electric version. How significant is that? Well,

:53:10.:53:15.

Jaguar Land had fallen behind, they had focused on making their cars

:53:16.:53:18.

lighter and improving petrol and diesel engines. They are now

:53:19.:53:21.

catching up and embracing the electrical revolution. It is not

:53:22.:53:25.

clear how ambitious this is, weather every model in the range will have

:53:26.:53:28.

an electric and hybrid version, or just one of them. Nevertheless, a

:53:29.:53:33.

welcome step. A sign that carmakers are embracing this electric

:53:34.:53:36.

transformation of the industry, and I think many more carmakers will

:53:37.:53:41.

follow suit. It is a very slow process. If you look at the sales

:53:42.:53:44.

figures, I touched on this in the introduction, just 1% of all new car

:53:45.:53:48.

sales last year were for electric equals. You can sort of see why the

:53:49.:53:52.

carmakers were a bit like to get into it? Yes, at the moment they are

:53:53.:53:56.

still expensive. I have been driving one for four years, I wouldn't go

:53:57.:54:00.

back to petrol. They are more expensive and their range is

:54:01.:54:03.

limited, but that is improving dramatically. Prices are coming

:54:04.:54:06.

down, range and performance are improving. At some point in the

:54:07.:54:10.

early to mid-20 20s, the electric car will outcompete the internal

:54:11.:54:14.

combustion engine, and will start to see our much wider switchover. We

:54:15.:54:18.

need to do that for environmental reasons, both in terms of greenhouse

:54:19.:54:21.

gases but also to improve urban air quality. So the technology is

:54:22.:54:25.

improving, and increasingly, governments are starting to restrict

:54:26.:54:28.

petrol and diesel engines, and I think that is starting to affect

:54:29.:54:32.

consumer behaviour. I wanted to ask you what that is tipping point might

:54:33.:54:35.

be. There are two things that spring to mind when we talk about electric

:54:36.:54:39.

cars. One is the availability of charging points. You don't want to

:54:40.:54:42.

get somewhere and the battery is flat and you cannot charge it. Also,

:54:43.:54:46.

how far you can go, the range, how far you can get on one charge. You

:54:47.:54:50.

say that is improving but it strikes me that certainly in terms of the

:54:51.:54:54.

charging points, it is chicken and egg. They will not put them in until

:54:55.:54:58.

more of us wants them, but until they are available, we are not going

:54:59.:55:01.

to buy the car. Exactly right. Charging infrastructure is actually

:55:02.:55:07.

falling behind. One year ago I could guarantee finding a charging point

:55:08.:55:10.

but these days I'm competing with many more electric car drivers and

:55:11.:55:13.

is becoming more difficult. We need to seem much more investment in

:55:14.:55:17.

infrastructure. In terms of range, the car that I drive, I could

:55:18.:55:22.

probably get 130 or 140 miles. The new cars are considerably more than

:55:23.:55:26.

that. That starts to improve the consumer experience and overcomes

:55:27.:55:30.

that range anxiety that some drivers will have an electric car.

:55:31.:55:35.

Eventually, I think batteries will be standardised. We can just drive

:55:36.:55:39.

in, swap the battery, and be off on our journey very quickly. There is a

:55:40.:55:43.

tendency to lump electric cars in with driverless cars. They are very

:55:44.:55:47.

different, but clearly we are seeing those technologies coming closer

:55:48.:55:50.

together? Yes, and they will reinforce each other. Increasingly

:55:51.:55:53.

we will see more autonomous features on cars. From the middle of the next

:55:54.:55:57.

decade we will see driverless cars in cities, and then becoming more

:55:58.:56:01.

widespread beyond that. In a few decades you will not need to own a

:56:02.:56:05.

car in a city. You will be able to summon an electric taxi on your

:56:06.:56:09.

smartphone to take you where you want to go. Absolutely fascinating

:56:10.:56:12.

stuff. Interesting how much it will change about how we use cars.

:56:13.:56:14.

Professor, thank you. I will be speaking to the boss of

:56:15.:56:22.

Jaguar Land Rover in an hour, and find out more about what they are

:56:23.:56:25.

announcing today. And whether, as which touched on this with David,

:56:26.:56:29.

whether they are behind the curve when it comes to introducing

:56:30.:56:31.

electric cars. Well, the demand is certainly being

:56:32.:56:34.

spoken about, but whether it is there is the question. Thank you.

:56:35.:56:40.

Well, we are very much out and about this morning, because of our Coast

:56:41.:56:45.

series. We are literally at sea. John Maguire is on-board that vote

:56:46.:56:52.

there. Wave to us, John. He is in Plymouth Sound, looking at the

:56:53.:56:57.

problem of pollution in our oceans. It is really fascinating, what they

:56:58.:57:00.

are doing. We will be back with John a little bit later on.

:57:01.:57:02.

Now it is time to Plenty more on our website

:57:03.:00:22.

at the usual address. This is Breakfast,

:00:23.:00:28.

with Naga Munchetty and Charlie Death and destruction

:00:29.:00:31.

in the wake of Hurricane Irma. At least seven people have died

:00:32.:00:34.

in the Caribbean's fiercest storm One island, Barbuda,

:00:35.:00:36.

is described as barely habitable. This is how Hurricane Irma looked

:00:37.:00:44.

from space last night as it headed towards Puerto Rico

:00:45.:00:47.

and the Dominican Republic. There's more concern as two further

:00:48.:00:49.

hurricanes develop in the region. A row over using laws first

:00:50.:01:11.

introduced by Henry VIII is at the centre of

:01:12.:01:16.

a two-day debate on Brexit. Opposition parties say

:01:17.:01:19.

they'll fight the move. We are live this morning on a boat

:01:20.:01:28.

in the south of Plymouth trying to establish just how much plastic air

:01:29.:01:29.

is in the ocean. Jaguar Land Rover announces big

:01:30.:01:35.

plans for new electric cars. I'll ask the boss if companies

:01:36.:01:38.

and drivers a ready In sport, there'll be no

:01:39.:01:41.

Federer-Nadal showdown at the US Roger Federer is knocked out

:01:42.:01:45.

by Juan Martin del Potro, so he will take on world

:01:46.:01:48.

number one Rafael Nadal, Businesses are told to stop pushing

:01:49.:01:51.

unhealthy food and larger Shoppers risk eating an extra

:01:52.:01:55.

17,000 calories a year And Matt is also on the coast today

:01:56.:02:14.

with the weather. Good morning. A changing climate and increasing the

:02:15.:02:19.

levels. The coast is at the greatest risk of flooding. We will look at

:02:20.:02:23.

the impact of that and schemes to help improve and defend the coast of

:02:24.:02:28.

the nation. The forecast is coming up in 15 minutes. Starting dry with

:02:29.:02:34.

wet weather coming by the end of the day. Thank you.

:02:35.:02:37.

Hurricane Irma has caused devastation across the Caribbean

:02:38.:02:40.

The small island of Barbuda has been severely hit,

:02:41.:02:44.

making it, in the words of its Prime Minister,

:02:45.:02:47.

Authorities in the French island territory of Saint Martin say it has

:02:48.:02:50.

been reduced to rubble and its airport is virtually destroyed.

:02:51.:02:53.

The island of Barbuda, home to 1600 people,

:02:54.:03:09.

was one of the first places to be hit by Hurricane Irma,

:03:10.:03:12.

It is estimated 90% of homes have been damaged.

:03:13.:03:16.

Communications were destroyed, cutting it off from the outside

:03:17.:03:18.

The Prime Minister said the island was barely habitable.

:03:19.:03:22.

What I saw was heart-wrenching, absolutely

:03:23.:03:23.

In fact, I believe on a per capita basis,

:03:24.:03:32.

the extent of the destruction is unprecedented.

:03:33.:03:34.

We had containers, 40 foot containers, flying left and right,

:03:35.:03:41.

The story you are getting from most of the residents here is the eye

:03:42.:03:48.

Persons were literally tying themselves to their

:03:49.:03:54.

In the French territory of San Martin, six people were killed.

:03:55.:04:07.

Authorities said the island had been reduced to rubble.

:04:08.:04:12.

This is Hurricane Irma seen from space.

:04:13.:04:14.

It's now heading north of Puerto Rico, and could hit

:04:15.:04:17.

It's one of three hurricanes in the Atlantic.

:04:18.:04:21.

There are particular fears for Hurricane Jose,

:04:22.:04:27.

following close behind Irma and on a similar path.

:04:28.:04:34.

Officials say with most people homeless, Barbuda cannot survive

:04:35.:04:36.

If more head their way, they may have to be entirely evacuated.

:04:37.:04:45.

The country takes another step towards Brexit today as MPs debate

:04:46.:04:50.

the European Union Withdrawal Bill before a vote takes place on Monday.

:04:51.:04:54.

The debate will last two days before a vote on Monday.

:04:55.:04:57.

Our political correspondent, Chris Mason, is in Westminster.

:04:58.:04:59.

How big is this there is a lot going on. People like me are saying it is

:05:00.:05:12.

a big day. Is it really? Constitutionally, it really matters.

:05:13.:05:19.

That is a way of saying where power lies. You will remember the slogan

:05:20.:05:27.

from Brexit, "Take Back Control." What happens today is central to

:05:28.:05:33.

that mission. The biggest change since 1972, the 15th of October,

:05:34.:05:38.

when we went into the EU. A pipe was built between Brussels and

:05:39.:05:48.

Westminster through which 12433 EU regulations flowed through. To make

:05:49.:05:52.

it as smooth as possible, those laws will be cut and paste from the EU

:05:53.:05:58.

into UK law. Here is the controversy. There is not time to

:05:59.:06:02.

scrutinise all of them in such a short period of time. The government

:06:03.:06:07.

is using what are known as Henry VIII powers to do so, a flashback to

:06:08.:06:16.

1539. Henry VIII, you can see him now, this is not about this

:06:17.:06:21.

matrimonial strife and the sticky end of a few of this exes, but

:06:22.:06:29.

instead, this desire at the time to ignore Parliament and bring law

:06:30.:06:35.

himself. This been the government is now not sufficiently consorting on

:06:36.:06:39.

and looking at the fine detail of some of the changes that are being

:06:40.:06:45.

made. Ministers say it is necessary because there is a short window to

:06:46.:06:49.

make the changes. They say there is a two year lag on them. That is

:06:50.:06:55.

until March, 2021, in all likelihood, and they will not abuse

:06:56.:07:00.

that power, they say. At this stage, the government is not likely to be

:07:01.:07:04.

defeated in the vote coming up on Monday. But this whole business,

:07:05.:07:09.

this whole bill, will dominate Parliament for months to come. Thank

:07:10.:07:17.

you. Just a reminder. We will speak to the First Minister of state in a

:07:18.:07:20.

few minutes. The BBC understands that

:07:21.:07:21.

Northern Ireland could be offered a different Brexit solution

:07:22.:07:24.

to the rest of the UK. Proposals due to publish later

:07:25.:07:26.

today by the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier,

:07:27.:07:29.

are expected to suggest special exceptions to allow people to work,

:07:30.:07:31.

go to school and receive medical treatment either side of the border

:07:32.:07:35.

with the Republic of Ireland. Universities in England could face

:07:36.:07:43.

fines if they pay their leaders more than the Prime Minister,

:07:44.:07:46.

unless they can convince a regulator Dozens of university heads currently

:07:47.:07:49.

earn more than twice the PM's annual The Universities Minister,

:07:50.:07:54.

Jo Johnson, says urgent measures are needed to ensure a good deal

:07:55.:07:57.

for both students and taxpayers. West Midlands Police,

:07:58.:08:02.

the second biggest force in England and Wales, has been accused

:08:03.:08:04.

of failing to record thousands These included sexual offences,

:08:05.:08:07.

domestic abuse and rape. The Inspectorate of Constabulary

:08:08.:08:10.

graded its performance on crime recording as "inadequate,"

:08:11.:08:13.

the lowest rating possible. Facebook says it has discovered

:08:14.:08:20.

a Russian-funded campaign to promote divisive social and political

:08:21.:08:23.

messages on its network The company said $77,000

:08:24.:08:25.

was spent on about 3,000 ads over a two-year period,

:08:26.:08:28.

ending in May this year. The ads did not back any

:08:29.:08:31.

specific political figures, but instead posted on topics

:08:32.:08:33.

including immigration, Asking if you would rather go large

:08:34.:08:35.

for a little bit extra is something we are used to hearing from food

:08:36.:08:54.

and drink retailers. But according to a new report

:08:55.:08:56.

from the Royal Society for Public Health this "upselling"

:08:57.:08:59.

is fuelling the obesity crisis Our reporter, Alice

:09:00.:09:02.

Hutton, has more. It is a familiar sound

:09:03.:09:09.

of the high street, whether you are in a newsagent,

:09:10.:09:11.

fast food outlets, coffee shop, we have all been asked

:09:12.:09:18.

if we want to treat ourselves But pushing larger portions

:09:19.:09:21.

on customers, known as up-selling, is not just taking

:09:22.:09:27.

a toll on wallets. New research shows it is fuelling

:09:28.:09:29.

the obesity crisis in the UK. One in three are accepting this

:09:30.:09:32.

temptation to go large. We can put on between five lbs

:09:33.:09:35.

a year to 11 lbs a year depending And that's fairly significant to be

:09:36.:09:39.

able to quantify the damage And I think when the public

:09:40.:09:45.

are aware, they may think The report says British

:09:46.:09:50.

shoppers face more than 100 attempts every

:09:51.:10:06.

year to upsize. 78% have been asked

:10:07.:10:07.

to upgrade in the last week. The report is calling for businesses

:10:08.:10:10.

to take responsibility for their part in keeping

:10:11.:10:12.

the public healthy. But the report says

:10:13.:10:15.

the responsibility does not just They also want us to shop

:10:16.:10:17.

more smartly and resist It will pave the way for thousands

:10:18.:10:38.

of new British laws. There is a debate for legal continuity when we

:10:39.:10:45.

leave the EU. We can talk to Damien Green. Thank you for your time this

:10:46.:10:52.

morning. Good morning. Let's explain why this debate today is important.

:10:53.:10:55.

We spoke about the first reading a few weeks ago. Why should we care

:10:56.:11:01.

about what is being debated today? There are two big issues in this

:11:02.:11:07.

debate. The first is this bill puts into effect the result of the

:11:08.:11:12.

referendum. This is the bill that withdraws us from the EU, respecting

:11:13.:11:18.

the will of the referendum vote. Secondly, equally importantly, it

:11:19.:11:24.

ensures that we will have functioning laws after we withdraw.

:11:25.:11:29.

We have been a member of the EU for more than 40 years. Many of our laws

:11:30.:11:35.

are effectively EU laws. They come from the EU directly, EU

:11:36.:11:38.

legislation. We have to make sure the day after we leave, all the many

:11:39.:11:44.

parts of EU institutions, EU regulations, in those laws, can

:11:45.:11:49.

continue, and they have to continue in a British way with a British

:11:50.:11:54.

regulator and power to do something to be that is why it is so long and

:11:55.:11:59.

complex. It means business can have certainty, we can all have

:12:00.:12:04.

certainty, we have a functioning statute book when we leave the EU.

:12:05.:12:09.

Is it as simple as copying and pasting the EU laws and replacing it

:12:10.:12:14.

with UK laws? If it were simple, it would not take so long. Definitely

:12:15.:12:20.

not. When we have been a member of the EU, a lot of the law will say

:12:21.:12:27.

this is to be determined by a particular European institution,

:12:28.:12:33.

European court, European regulator. All of those details of the laws

:12:34.:12:39.

have to be replaced by the relevant British institution. That is why it

:12:40.:12:45.

is complicated. That is why we need so much secondary legislation. It is

:12:46.:12:50.

not changing anything in the real world, but it is changing the law so

:12:51.:12:54.

that people have certainty. OK, one of the things that has been raised,

:12:55.:12:59.

we talked about it with Chris Mason, our correspondent, the Henry VIII

:13:00.:13:06.

clauses. This gives the power to change legislation without scrutiny.

:13:07.:13:11.

The opposition has justifiably raised the point this now gives

:13:12.:13:16.

government the power to tinker with EU laws, not Parliament. I think

:13:17.:13:22.

there is a misunderstanding. Most of the change, the vast bulk, will be

:13:23.:13:29.

through what are called statutory instruments, instead of being

:13:30.:13:32.

debated and voted on in the chamber of the House of Commons, in

:13:33.:13:38.

committees. But there are still parliamentarians, ministers, they

:13:39.:13:42.

still have to justify any changes to those committees and the committee

:13:43.:13:46.

votes. They can be voted down. It is especially ironic that there is this

:13:47.:13:51.

much concern about the procedure in that most of the European law that

:13:52.:13:57.

we have will have been put into place through this mechanism, these

:13:58.:14:03.

committees. We have all got used to over the years a European directive

:14:04.:14:07.

happening and then being put into law by Parliament. A lot will have

:14:08.:14:12.

been put him through this process. Absolutely, Parliament needs to have

:14:13.:14:16.

time to debate. So we will listen to reasonable proposals about the

:14:17.:14:22.

process by which we do this essential work of making the statute

:14:23.:14:28.

book workable. Can I ask you about a piece in The Daily Telegraph today?

:14:29.:14:34.

It is taking a look at Theresa May's plans on curbing migration,

:14:35.:14:37.

including a two year maximum stay for low-skilled workers. It says you

:14:38.:14:41.

have distance yourself from those plans. Is that correct? Complete

:14:42.:14:48.

nonsense. First of all, the document on which it was based was a draft

:14:49.:14:52.

document that was leaked which I have not seen. First of all, for

:14:53.:14:56.

obvious reason, I never comment on those. And I never comment on draft

:14:57.:15:05.

because we will have those proposals in the coming months. We under 30 at

:15:06.:15:12.

the stage of publishing them yet. And it is especially wrong in that I

:15:13.:15:15.

used to be the Immigration Minister. To suggest I am in some way against

:15:16.:15:20.

properly controlled immigration, I spend a lot of time dealing with

:15:21.:15:25.

this issue. But we will have what will be sensible immigration

:15:26.:15:29.

proposals because obviously the rules will have to change after we

:15:30.:15:33.

leave in the next couple of months. Damien Green thank you. Thank you.

:15:34.:15:41.

You are watching Breakfast from BBC News. The main stories:

:15:42.:15:46.

Hurricane Irma, one of the most powerful Atlantic storms ever

:15:47.:15:49.

recorded, has caused devastation in the Caribbean.

:15:50.:15:51.

The Government's facing its first parliamentary test over Brexit

:15:52.:15:53.

since the General Election with MPs set to debate plans to transfer

:15:54.:15:56.

thousands of EU regulations into British law.

:15:57.:16:07.

This morning we are rather blessed with our cameras, which are on the

:16:08.:16:14.

coast. As part of our series we are looking at various bits of

:16:15.:16:17.

coastline. Look at these images. Matt is doing the weather this

:16:18.:16:21.

morning in Medmerry in West Sussex. You can see the drone pictures we

:16:22.:16:25.

have, just spectacular. Even though the sun is not shining and the skies

:16:26.:16:29.

is not blue, it still looks stunning. But however stunning this

:16:30.:16:33.

is, there are people who live there who have real concerns about the

:16:34.:16:39.

impact to see has on their homes. -- the sea. That is some ring that is

:16:40.:16:46.

Matt has been looking at. Yes, a beautiful coastline, but like many

:16:47.:16:50.

parts of the country, the coast here is that trapped by rising sea

:16:51.:16:56.

levels. -- at threat. Akin to thousand and eight, millions of

:16:57.:16:59.

pounds of damage was done by local flooding here, and after that the

:17:00.:17:02.

environment agency embarked upon an innovative scheme called coastal

:17:03.:17:07.

management realignment. Existing coastal defences, the ones behind

:17:08.:17:11.

me, were breached. That allows this area just behind me to be flooded,

:17:12.:17:19.

as the tide rises in, the area just inland starts to flood quite

:17:20.:17:23.

markedly. It sets up a nature reserve here, it used by the RSPB.

:17:24.:17:31.

For local properties, what was a once in a year flood likelihood has

:17:32.:17:35.

now changed into a once in a 100 year likelihood. So it is an

:17:36.:17:39.

innovative scheme which is quite sustainable as well, using the power

:17:40.:17:43.

of nature to try to protect other properties. We will be chatting to

:17:44.:17:48.

somebody from the Environment Agency in the next half-hour, to see if

:17:49.:17:52.

this scheme could be rolled out elsewhere, how much it costs, and if

:17:53.:17:55.

it has a future in protecting our coastline from advancing sea levels.

:17:56.:18:01.

Let's look at the weather. Not a bad start today. A few showers going

:18:02.:18:05.

through, as in other parts of south England. The general forecast today

:18:06.:18:09.

is one of increasing cloud and outbreaks of rain at times. A

:18:10.:18:16.

strengthening breeze as well. Showers in the English Channel will

:18:17.:18:20.

clear. It will be dry in the south and east of the country before more

:18:21.:18:23.

showers develop later. Rain already in the north and west of Scotland,

:18:24.:18:27.

developing more widely later in the day, pushing into Northern Ireland

:18:28.:18:30.

and northern England as well. We will still see some breaks in the

:18:31.:18:34.

cloud in southern counties of East Anglia and the Midlands. Grab

:18:35.:18:39.

something waterproof if you are going out, because there will be odd

:18:40.:18:43.

showers throughout the day. Overall, still much more dry here than

:18:44.:18:47.

further north. Rain will come and go for northern England and northern

:18:48.:18:50.

Scotland in the day. The heaviest rain will be to the west of the

:18:51.:18:56.

hills. For Northern Ireland, patchy rain and a drizzle, becoming more

:18:57.:18:59.

extensive into the afternoon. Temperatures nothing spectacular. As

:19:00.:19:06.

the breeze picks up it will only be around 15 or 17 in the northern half

:19:07.:19:10.

of the country, maybe 17 or 20 in the southern half of the UK. Quite a

:19:11.:19:15.

windy night to come. Lots of showers around. Just about anybody could see

:19:16.:19:22.

rain at times through the night. While the breeze keeps the

:19:23.:19:25.

temperatures on the face of it up in the towns and cities, it will

:19:26.:19:28.

actually feel very cold. It will feel more fresh than the breezes we

:19:29.:19:35.

have had in the last few days. Some sunshine around for people through

:19:36.:19:40.

the day. The best of the sunshine will be between the showers, the

:19:41.:19:43.

further away from the south coast you are tomorrow. Around the south

:19:44.:19:47.

coast and the English Channel we will see cloud and outbreaks of rain

:19:48.:19:50.

through the day, and quite likely heavier burst of rain pushing in

:19:51.:19:53.

through South Wales, south-west England during the afternoon. So it

:19:54.:19:59.

could be quite soggy for many here. In the wind will be quite strong as

:20:00.:20:04.

well, so it will feel very cool. A cool start to the weekend as well.

:20:05.:20:07.

Blustery winds coming in from the north and north-west. Sunshine and

:20:08.:20:12.

showers on Saturday. Showers most frequent across England and Wales.

:20:13.:20:17.

Temperatures nothing to write home about. Still only in the mid teens

:20:18.:20:22.

at best. By the end of the weekend, things could turn to simply windy

:20:23.:20:24.

across northern and western areas. We could see the first autumn storm

:20:25.:20:29.

of the season, all of which will have a big impact on our coastline.

:20:30.:20:32.

I will have more through the morning.

:20:33.:20:36.

Matt, thank you. We are enjoying that landscape kind you. Look at

:20:37.:20:44.

this one. We are down in Plymouth Sound this morning. That little

:20:45.:20:47.

vessel that you can see in the foreground, our reporter, John

:20:48.:20:50.

Maguire, is on-board that. We are looking at the problem of pollution

:20:51.:20:59.

in our oceans. Good morning, John. Good morning. You are right. It is

:21:00.:21:03.

not just the stuff that you can see. I am a board to be Falcon Spirit, a

:21:04.:21:13.

research vessel from the University of Plymouth. They are looking for

:21:14.:21:17.

micro- plastics, really small ones. They have just been trawling this

:21:18.:21:20.

morning, for the last couple of hours. They will take the end of the

:21:21.:21:25.

netting and take a look through what it has picked up and see what we can

:21:26.:21:30.

find. We have already found some plastics this morning so we are down

:21:31.:21:33.

is to find some more, because what the scientists here know, and what

:21:34.:21:37.

increasingly scientists around the world know, is that there is a huge

:21:38.:21:41.

amount of high sticks in the ocean, and it is very damaging. -- huge

:21:42.:21:44.

amount of plastics. Nestled at the bottom of cliffs

:21:45.:21:46.

on the North Yorkshire coast As the tide comes in they wriggle

:21:47.:21:49.

and bounce their way up onto dry land, but increasingly,

:21:50.:21:55.

they're at risk when they're back in the water, from threats

:21:56.:21:57.

that are man-made. As the tide comes in the seals

:21:58.:22:00.

will haul themselves up The sea, of course, is where they do

:22:01.:22:02.

most of their hunting and eating. It's troubling to think that it's

:22:03.:22:07.

also somewhere particularly hazardous to them,

:22:08.:22:10.

because of the amount of plastics There is litter in the sea

:22:11.:22:12.

that is washing in on every tide, it is coming in and out,

:22:13.:22:19.

and people do not realise that it doesn't necessarily float,

:22:20.:22:25.

it doesn't decompose. People don't think it

:22:26.:22:28.

can end up in the sea. Down the coast in Scarborough,

:22:29.:22:37.

the seal hospital looks after the rescued animals

:22:38.:22:50.

before releasing them once We attended a seal recently

:22:51.:22:52.

that was caught in a frisbee, and that frisbee must have

:22:53.:22:57.

been on him for months, and it had cut into about six

:22:58.:23:00.

centimetres of flesh. It had been floating in the ocean

:23:01.:23:03.

and out of curiosity, no doubt, the seal popped his head

:23:04.:23:06.

through it, and obviously couldn't To discover more about how plastics

:23:07.:23:09.

behave in the ocean, scientists that at Imperial College

:23:10.:23:16.

London are taking part in a major This enormous wave machine will help

:23:17.:23:19.

them to model the track The aim is to try to understand how

:23:20.:23:23.

plastics move through the ocean. We want to understand how

:23:24.:23:31.

currents can move plastics, how it accumulates and how it

:23:32.:23:34.

affects the environment. We only know the course of about 1%

:23:35.:23:36.

of the plastic that we put into the ocean, so we want

:23:37.:23:40.

to understand what is happening. I love paddleboarding

:23:41.:23:49.

and when I first started doing it in London on the canals and rivers,

:23:50.:23:52.

I realise how bad the problem Trying to stop it getting

:23:53.:24:01.

into the sea in the first place I saw a bird's nest, one time,

:24:02.:24:05.

that was made almost And I thought, something

:24:06.:24:11.

needs to be done. I need to show people what I'm

:24:12.:24:25.

seeing every time I'm out paddling, just how bad this problem is,

:24:26.:24:29.

inland as well as in the oceans. She has paddleboarded of the length

:24:30.:24:32.

of England's canals and rivers, recruiting volunteers

:24:33.:24:35.

in helping to clean up. Ultimately this is a man-made

:24:36.:24:37.

problem, and despite the resilience of the natural world,

:24:38.:24:40.

it is one that needs Those solutions include changes in

:24:41.:24:54.

manufacturing technology, government action, and of course changes in

:24:55.:24:59.

consumer behaviour. We are on the Falcon Spirit, a research vessel

:25:00.:25:03.

from the University of Plymouth. Professor Richard Thompson, what

:25:04.:25:07.

have we found? Well, of course we have natural items in here, things

:25:08.:25:11.

we would expect to find in the ocean. It's of seaweed, leaves, a

:25:12.:25:17.

feather. Unfortunately, we are also starting to see small pieces of

:25:18.:25:21.

plastic. There is a fragment of Plymouth -- fragment of line there

:25:22.:25:31.

of some sort. But there are small pieces of plastic in here, they

:25:32.:25:34.

certainly do not look natural in origin. That small black thing, this

:25:35.:25:39.

little blue thing. This potentially looks like a piece of packaging of

:25:40.:25:44.

some sort. What sort of problems, I mean, they are tiny bits to be human

:25:45.:25:50.

eye. What sort of problems can they cause? They present different

:25:51.:25:55.

problems. They can be ingested by a wide range of marine organisms. We

:25:56.:25:59.

have looked at fish in the English Channel, 500 specimens, and we found

:26:00.:26:03.

small pieces of plastic like this in one third of them. Let's speak to

:26:04.:26:09.

Emily. You have just sailed around the British Isles to highlight this

:26:10.:26:13.

issue. What sort of things did you find? We found plastic. Up until now

:26:14.:26:18.

we have been looking in the accumulation zones where the plastic

:26:19.:26:21.

ends up, because of the ocean currents. But even here in UK

:26:22.:26:25.

waters, not in one of those accumulation zones, we are still

:26:26.:26:30.

finding microfibres, micro- plastics, these small plastics, and

:26:31.:26:35.

also preproduction palates of plastic as a raw material. Those are

:26:36.:26:44.

the pellets that manufacturers use common to knock them down and form

:26:45.:26:47.

plastics. You are even finding those, how is that happening? They

:26:48.:26:50.

might come off a container ship, they might be in -- they might be a

:26:51.:26:56.

leak from an industry place. There could be many sources. We will have

:26:57.:27:00.

much more from the Falcon Spirit later in the programme. We spoke

:27:01.:27:03.

earlier about micro beads. The government is banning these. These

:27:04.:27:09.

are the sort of things that come in facial scrubs. Look at that. 3

:27:10.:27:13.

million micro beads come in just one packet of facial scrub. You can just

:27:14.:27:19.

imagine that that will remain in the atmosphere, in the ocean, wherever

:27:20.:27:23.

it ends up, basically forever. That kind of thing is now about to be

:27:24.:27:28.

banned by the British government. Absolutely fascinating. John, thank

:27:29.:27:31.

you. We will be back with you later on. Nice calm waters at the moment

:27:32.:27:34.

for John. Shame they are sunshine on Saturday,

:27:35.:30:54.

may one or two heavy showers. A spell of wet and heavy

:30:55.:30:57.

weather on Sunday. This is Breakfast with

:30:58.:31:07.

Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt. Hurricane Irma has caused

:31:08.:31:12.

devastation across the Caribbean Authorities in the French island

:31:13.:31:14.

territory of Saint Martin say it has been reduced

:31:15.:31:19.

to rubble and its airport has The storm is now

:31:20.:31:22.

battering Puerto Rico. And in a few minutes we'll speak

:31:23.:31:25.

to the President of the Red Cross in Antigua and Barbuda

:31:26.:31:29.

about the impact on the islands. The UK takes another step

:31:30.:31:32.

towards Brexit today as MPs debate the European Union Withdrawal Bill

:31:33.:31:35.

before a vote takes place on Monday. The bill will mean that thousands

:31:36.:31:38.

of EU laws and regulations are transferred into British law

:31:39.:31:41.

but ministers will need more powers The debate will last two days

:31:42.:31:44.

before a vote on Monday. The shadow Brexit Minister earlier

:31:45.:31:59.

told us it was flawed and dangerous. It is deeply flawed legislation and

:32:00.:32:06.

dangerous. It gives ministers, government ministers, sweeping

:32:07.:32:14.

powers that will allow them to change much legislation, putting

:32:15.:32:17.

rights and protections we currently enjoy as members of the EU at risk

:32:18.:32:22.

after we have left. That is why we cannot support it.

:32:23.:32:36.

The BBC understands that Northern Ireland could be offered

:32:37.:32:39.

a different Brexit solution to the rest of the UK.

:32:40.:32:41.

Proposals due to publish later today by the EU's chief

:32:42.:32:44.

negotiator, Michel Barnier, are expected to suggest special

:32:45.:32:46.

exceptions to allow people to work, go to school and receive medical

:32:47.:32:49.

treatment either side of the border with the Republic of Ireland.

:32:50.:32:52.

Universities in England could face fines if they pay their leaders more

:32:53.:32:56.

than the Prime Minister, unless they can convince a regulator

:32:57.:32:59.

Dozens of university heads currently earn more than twice the PM's annual

:33:00.:33:03.

The Universities Minister, Jo Johnson, says urgent measures

:33:04.:33:07.

are needed to ensure a good deal for both students and taxpayers.

:33:08.:33:10.

There are calls for the city watchdog to fully publish a leaked

:33:11.:33:14.

report into the treatment of customers in RBS's

:33:15.:33:15.

The report, produced for the Financial Conduct Authority,

:33:16.:33:19.

suggested the group mistreated many of its clients.

:33:20.:33:21.

The FCA said it would respond to the calls for publication

:33:22.:33:25.

Asking if you would rather go large for a little bit extra is something

:33:26.:33:35.

we are used to hearing from food and drink retailers.

:33:36.:33:38.

But according to a new report from the Royal Society

:33:39.:33:40.

for Public Health this "upselling" is fuelling the obesity crisis

:33:41.:33:43.

There's a slam-dunking bunny, the world's longest legs

:33:44.:33:56.

Would you like to see that? Maybe just the bunny. Why are we seeing

:33:57.:34:10.

this? It can only mean one

:34:11.:34:11.

thing, the latest edition This year's entries include

:34:12.:34:13.

Biff Hutchison from Idaho, who's the first person to clear 11

:34:14.:34:17.

feet on a pogo stick. That's very hard to do, you know? I

:34:18.:34:25.

have never done that before. And this is "Bini the Bunny"

:34:26.:34:29.

from California who holds the record for the most basketball slam-dunks

:34:30.:34:32.

in one minute by a rabbit. She managed a grand total

:34:33.:34:35.

of seven slam-dunks. That is the crucial element. When I

:34:36.:35:00.

had not read that, I thought the bunny was actually just doing that,

:35:01.:35:03.

like... Throwing it properly. Perhaps with it's back legs. I had a

:35:04.:35:07.

picture of it... You know, really leaping up. You have been watching

:35:08.:35:17.

too many cartoons. Perhaps. Take us back to the real world. In the real

:35:18.:35:20.

world, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have never played each other

:35:21.:35:24.

at the US Open. Roger Federer was knocked out of the US Open in the

:35:25.:35:32.

last few hours by Juan. He said he was suffering with back pain and was

:35:33.:35:36.

not doing well enough. He said it was better to give someone else a

:35:37.:35:40.

chance. I knew it would be tough. I struggled too much through the

:35:41.:35:47.

tournament. In some ways, I am happy I made the quarters. I am not

:35:48.:35:56.

disappointed. It has been a good run this year already. Unfortunately

:35:57.:35:57.

they did better on the day. Tennis fans have been denied

:35:58.:36:00.

the showdown they were hoping for, after Roger Federer was knocked out

:36:01.:36:03.

of the US Open by Juan Martin del So it's the Argentinian who'll

:36:04.:36:07.

face world number one, He only lost five games

:36:08.:36:10.

as he sailed past Andrey Rublev. Karolina Pliskova will lose her

:36:11.:36:22.

world number one ranking after she lost to Coco Vanderweghe,

:36:23.:36:24.

who's part of an all-American That hasn't happened since 1981

:36:25.:36:27.

and the days of Martina Navratilova Andy Murray says he is likely

:36:28.:36:31.

to miss the rest of the season He hasn't played since Wimbledon,

:36:32.:36:36.

and he says that after an extended period of rest and rehabilitation,

:36:37.:36:41.

he'll be fighting for grand Chris Froome said he was still

:36:42.:36:44.

confident of winning the Vuelta a Espana despite having his

:36:45.:36:48.

lead cut on stage 17. He said he'd struggled

:36:49.:36:50.

on the steep climbs, paying the price for winning

:36:51.:36:52.

Tuesday's time trial. His closest rival Vincenzo Nibali,

:36:53.:36:55.

in the gold helmet, is now only Look at the top right of your

:36:56.:36:58.

screen. The Tour of Britain

:36:59.:37:11.

heads to Clacton today. There was an unusual crash earlier

:37:12.:37:13.

on in the race in Retford. They had strong words to say to race

:37:14.:37:26.

organisers. That is real damage. Going into that at speed. The car

:37:27.:37:32.

was parked in a disabled space. They were not happy at all.

:37:33.:37:43.

England's Test series decider against West Indies begins

:37:44.:37:45.

Toby Roland-Jones returns to the side in place of Chris Woakes

:37:46.:37:49.

but it could be another fast bowler, James Anderson, making the headlines

:37:50.:37:52.

as he needs only three more wickets to become the first Englishman

:37:53.:37:55.

West Indies levelled the series with victory

:37:56.:37:58.

You expect sides to respond well, just like the West Indies did.

:37:59.:38:03.

Part of being a successful side in this format is being able to deal

:38:04.:38:07.

with it, with difficult weeks like last week.

:38:08.:38:09.

So, we have a lot of experience in our dressing room and a lot

:38:10.:38:13.

of hungry guys desperate to come back from the way we played.

:38:14.:38:16.

We want to make sure we win this series.

:38:17.:38:21.

Obviously, we are making sure we come to this

:38:22.:38:23.

Hopefully we can continue pressing forward here.

:38:24.:38:44.

Wayne Shaw was Sutton United's reserve goalkeeper in February's FA

:38:45.:38:48.

He ate a pie during the game, after a bookmaker had offered odds

:38:49.:38:52.

He said it was "just a bit of fun" but he resigned,

:38:53.:38:57.

and now he's been fined ?375 and banned for two months by the FA

:38:58.:39:01.

I don't think you would have done it if you knew that was coming. How

:39:02.:39:12.

often do we have to see this picture is this morning? Quite a lot. I am

:39:13.:39:19.

not enjoying them. Not especially. OK. OK. I love that a pie. So do I,

:39:20.:39:28.

just not watching eating it. That is the point of the story. We all

:39:29.:39:34.

remember it very well. Thank you very much. We will see you later on.

:39:35.:39:40.

We will have the weather later. The main story. Ferocious winds.

:39:41.:39:46.

Hurricane Irma has caused devastation across the Caribbean

:39:47.:39:49.

Authorities in the French island territory of Saint Martin

:39:50.:39:54.

it has been reduced to rubble and its airport has

:39:55.:39:57.

The storm is now battering Puerto Rico.

:39:58.:40:00.

Earlier in the programme the Prime Minister of

:40:01.:40:02.

the Antigua Island group told this programme that the island of Barbuda

:40:03.:40:05.

has been totally destroyed and is 'barely habitable'.

:40:06.:40:07.

It is a complete contrast. In Antigua, they have been resilient.

:40:08.:40:15.

We can celebrate how prepared they were. Barbuda, it is just

:40:16.:40:22.

devastation. Yesterday when I travelled and circumnavigated the

:40:23.:40:29.

island, I was extremely saddened. It was emotionally painful to see such

:40:30.:40:32.

a beautiful island totally destroyed to the extent 90% of the country is

:40:33.:40:42.

damaged. Totally demolished. A significant amount of people are

:40:43.:40:48.

homeless in Barbuda. Tomorrow we want to start relief efforts in

:40:49.:40:53.

earnest. It has been really challenging. The Prime Minister

:40:54.:40:56.

speaking to us earlier. We can now speak to Michael Joseph

:40:57.:40:57.

who is the President of the Red Cross in

:40:58.:41:00.

Antigua and Barbuda. A very good morning to you. Thank

:41:01.:41:08.

you for your time. Tell us your assessment of the situation which is

:41:09.:41:13.

very bad apparently. Barbuda has been badly damaged. Thank you for

:41:14.:41:18.

having me. The Prime Minister will have indicated the damage in Barbuda

:41:19.:41:24.

is not like we have ever seen before. The catastrophe is just...

:41:25.:41:32.

Words cannot explain it. 90% of the country is demolished and in rubble.

:41:33.:41:40.

When we first lost communication with Barbuda, we never anticipated

:41:41.:41:43.

the next time we received any form of major communication from them it

:41:44.:41:48.

would be to such detriment. I think it has just shocked the entire

:41:49.:41:54.

Antigua community and the country as a whole. We are looking at the

:41:55.:42:00.

pictures as you are talking from Barbuda. We are getting a sense of

:42:01.:42:05.

the damage. Given what you are describing and the infrastructure

:42:06.:42:09.

damage, there has been some loss of life around the Caribbean. What do

:42:10.:42:13.

you know about injuries, people killed or injured. I know there has

:42:14.:42:20.

been one recorded fatality in Barbuda. A 2-year-old little girl.

:42:21.:42:27.

Injuries, we are not sure. There was not a proper assessment team that

:42:28.:42:32.

went in. As a matter of fact, in the morning, a full assessment team

:42:33.:42:35.

including medical doctors will be going into Barbuda to do a complete

:42:36.:42:41.

assessment of what the damages and needs are and what the human health

:42:42.:42:47.

capacity is and the challenges. We are not fully aware of the complete

:42:48.:42:57.

extant of how it is. -- extent. They have no power. They have lost

:42:58.:43:04.

schools and hospitals and have sustained infrastructure damage.

:43:05.:43:07.

That will be an issue as you move in. Yes. It goes even further than

:43:08.:43:12.

that. Everything has been completely destroyed. Electricity, roads,

:43:13.:43:20.

water, schools, churches, supermarkets, shops, everything!

:43:21.:43:24.

There is literally nothing that currently exists in Barbuda right

:43:25.:43:32.

now. The Prime Minister spoke earlier about the magnitude of what

:43:33.:43:35.

it would cost us in terms of rebuilding the country itself. From

:43:36.:43:42.

his indication, we are talking about 100 million US dollars in damages.

:43:43.:43:49.

Even if we are looking to get it to 25%, it is a significant amount of

:43:50.:43:54.

investment. If you are looking for the Red Cross perspective, dealing

:43:55.:44:01.

with immediate needs. A current thought. The area is used to extreme

:44:02.:44:08.

weather and hurricanes. Is just the intensity of this particular one

:44:09.:44:11.

that meant there is so much damage. Presumably people were warned it was

:44:12.:44:16.

coming but there was not much they could do. First and foremost we have

:44:17.:44:21.

to understand that what took place with Hurricane Irma was

:44:22.:44:28.

unparalleled. It has been like nothing experienced. 95 was the

:44:29.:44:37.

second-largest we had, a Category Four, Lewis. We have never

:44:38.:44:43.

experienced anything like this, 200 miles per hour with winds as high as

:44:44.:44:51.

225. People were prepared. Antigua and Barbuda were prepared as people.

:44:52.:44:55.

We were not prepared for infrastructure itself to have such a

:44:56.:45:02.

magnitude of wind speed we have never experienced. Thank you so much

:45:03.:45:06.

for your time this morning. Good luck to you and your team is. It

:45:07.:45:11.

will be challenging. -- teams. The images at the end, we will show you

:45:12.:45:19.

again, this is the image of the hurricane taken from space. An

:45:20.:45:26.

extraordinary image. We have had an update from the French interior

:45:27.:45:34.

minister on Hurricane Irma. He says for the record, eight people are now

:45:35.:45:40.

dead and 23 injured. He has indicated it is likely those numbers

:45:41.:45:45.

will increase as the recovery operation reaches Barbuda.

:45:46.:45:52.

We will be taking a look at the weather in a moment. West Sussex is

:45:53.:45:59.

the location, Matt is there today. Good morning. Yes, it good morning

:46:00.:46:08.

from Medmery in West Sussex. You have seen those horrible pictures

:46:09.:46:12.

from the Caribbean. We do not get storms like that here, at our own

:46:13.:46:16.

coast is under increasing threats from changing climates and rising

:46:17.:46:20.

sea levels. We will be looking at some of the schemes in place and

:46:21.:46:23.

things that you can do to safeguard parts of our coast. If you look

:46:24.:46:29.

around here at Medmery, there is a beautiful coastline here, with a

:46:30.:46:33.

shale beach. What the environment agency has done here as part of an

:46:34.:46:36.

innovative and sustainable scheme called Managed Realignment, it

:46:37.:46:41.

allows a break in the sea wall and then it allows the sea to naturally

:46:42.:46:45.

come in and out in this area, just inland, to create some lagoons. It

:46:46.:46:49.

is a nature reserve which ultimately helps protect properties in the

:46:50.:46:53.

local area. We will have more on that in a moment. Let's look at the

:46:54.:46:58.

weather. At long last we have blue skies overhead, and welcome change

:46:59.:47:02.

from this morning's showers. Enjoy the sunshine if you have any today,

:47:03.:47:06.

there will be lots of cloud around, thickening up through the day,

:47:07.:47:09.

especially in the northern half of the UK, bringing more extensive rain

:47:10.:47:14.

in the afternoon. A bit of rain around this morning, some showers in

:47:15.:47:18.

the far south-east corner. Outbreaks of rain across western Scotland,

:47:19.:47:20.

Northern Ireland and northern England as we go through the morning

:47:21.:47:26.

and into the afternoon. Many in the Midlands and East Anglia will be

:47:27.:47:30.

dry, but there are some showers possible. Some of those could be on

:47:31.:47:34.

the heavy side. There will still be some breaks in the cloud. Not quite

:47:35.:47:38.

as sunny as we saw yesterday, but there will be some sunshine. In the

:47:39.:47:41.

sunshine temperatures could reach 18, 19, maybe 20. Overall, a

:47:42.:47:47.

slightly cooler day than yesterday. Especially so as we had further

:47:48.:47:51.

north into thicker cloud. A grey afternoon across much of northern

:47:52.:47:57.

England. By the afternoon there will be rain possible just about anywhere

:47:58.:48:01.

in Scotland. It will not rain all day, it won't be thoroughly

:48:02.:48:04.

persistent, but the heaviest again is likely to be on western hills,

:48:05.:48:08.

and the same could be said in parts of Northern Ireland, the breeze

:48:09.:48:13.

freshening up as the cloud thickens. Across Wales it will turn damper

:48:14.:48:17.

towards the north and north-west later in the day, but further south,

:48:18.:48:21.

some parts of southern and eastern Wales should stay dry. A few showers

:48:22.:48:25.

into the south-west later on. The breeze picking up, rationing up

:48:26.:48:29.

quite substantially overnight. Quite a windy night. Clear spells and

:48:30.:48:34.

showers overnight will take us into a fresh start to Friday morning.

:48:35.:48:39.

Temperatures OK, in the low teens for one or two, the wind making it

:48:40.:48:42.

feel colder. Sunshine and showers for many. The exception is some

:48:43.:48:47.

southern coastal counties of England and the Channel Islands, where there

:48:48.:48:51.

will be lots of outbreaks of rain, becoming heavy and more persistent

:48:52.:48:55.

as we go into the afternoon. Not just in the south coast but even

:48:56.:48:58.

further inland into parts of south Wales and maybe as far north as the

:48:59.:49:02.

south Midlands and East Anglia in the day. That should all clear away

:49:03.:49:06.

as we go through the night and into Saturday. A rather cool start to

:49:07.:49:09.

Saturday. We continue with the breeze coming in from the north and

:49:10.:49:13.

north-west, bringing a mixture of sunshine and showers. Showers more

:49:14.:49:17.

likely to be abundant across England and Wales on Saturday. A bit of

:49:18.:49:21.

sunshine in between. Probably the best in some sheltered eastern

:49:22.:49:24.

areas, but the temperatures are rather disappointing for this time

:49:25.:49:28.

of year. As we go into Sunday, there could be windy weather on the way,

:49:29.:49:32.

especially in the north and west of the UK. Now, with windy weather on

:49:33.:49:36.

the way, that rings us back to our series on coastal Britain. The fact

:49:37.:49:42.

that our climate is changing will have an impact on the coast around

:49:43.:49:46.

the UK. To discuss more about that and what is being done here in

:49:47.:49:49.

Medmery, joining me is Alison Baptiste from the environment

:49:50.:49:55.

agency. Thank you for joining me. First of all, are our coasts under a

:49:56.:49:58.

greater risk now from the changing climate? Well, the coast is a

:49:59.:50:04.

dynamic thing. We are seeing sea level rise. What the environment

:50:05.:50:09.

agency is doing with local councils is planning how we can best manage

:50:10.:50:13.

the coast, and in places where there are communities, we look to protect

:50:14.:50:17.

those communities, and in places like Medmery we can allow space for

:50:18.:50:21.

the ocean to come in. We work with nature to do this managed

:50:22.:50:24.

realignment. Tell us more about what you have done here in Medmery, a

:50:25.:50:29.

fairly sustainable approach to the normal methods of protecting the

:50:30.:50:34.

coast? I love Medmery. It is a fantastic example of where we can

:50:35.:50:38.

reduce flood risk to the 300 properties. We have done that by

:50:39.:50:42.

letting the sea, through the original beach, we have put on earth

:50:43.:50:46.

embankment around the back, and we are using nature's and resources to

:50:47.:50:50.

slow down the energy of the waves, with the saltmarsh. We have that

:50:51.:50:55.

embankment at the back, it is much lower than we needed before. As a

:50:56.:50:58.

bonus, we have this beautiful 250 hectares of habitat, biodiversity

:50:59.:51:10.

that the RSPB is managing for us. It has been a big boost for the local

:51:11.:51:15.

economy and the Caravan sites here. We cannot protect all the coast, can

:51:16.:51:19.

we? It is a big challenge and we have difficult decisions to make

:51:20.:51:23.

stock but the violent agency works closely with local councils to make

:51:24.:51:26.

the best decisions for each community, and they can be different

:51:27.:51:32.

decisions. -- environment agency. An innovative scheme, and just one of

:51:33.:51:36.

many that are tackling problems that our coast will face in the future. I

:51:37.:51:40.

will have more on that through the morning.

:51:41.:51:40.

Glorious views, Matt. Thank you. Now, not many people at the moment

:51:41.:51:50.

own an electric car. But it is a hot topic at the moment. Lots of

:51:51.:51:54.

manufacturers are getting on board? Yes, we are in this grey area where

:51:55.:51:58.

you have hybrid cars, which are traditional fuel and electric, and

:51:59.:52:00.

there are some manufacturers which have committed to going completely

:52:01.:52:02.

electric. This morning Jaguar Land Rover

:52:03.:52:03.

becomes the latest car manufacturer to announce a major

:52:04.:52:05.

investment in electric car Jaguar Land Rover has announced this

:52:06.:52:07.

morning that every new car it makes after 2020 will also be available

:52:08.:52:11.

as an electric version. It follows a government announcement

:52:12.:52:14.

that it would ban the sale of new petrol and

:52:15.:52:17.

diesel cars by 2040. But there's a long way to go

:52:18.:52:19.

to an all-electric future. The latest figures show just 1.6%

:52:20.:52:22.

of all new car sales so far this Ralf Speth is the Chief Executive

:52:23.:52:26.

of Jaguar Land Rover and joins us Good morning. A big announcement for

:52:27.:52:42.

you today, but it is fair to say that you are not the first to make

:52:43.:52:46.

an announcement as far as electric cars are concerned. Why now? Jaguar

:52:47.:52:52.

Land Rover, from 2020 onwards, is going to deliver the choice for the

:52:53.:52:57.

customer. Electrified vehicles across the complete range. That

:52:58.:53:04.

means we are going to offer hybrid and better electric vehicles. In

:53:05.:53:10.

that sense Jarrod Lyle and Rover was first. We delivered the very first

:53:11.:53:18.

vehicle designed from scratch, in the absolute best way, research and

:53:19.:53:22.

engineered so that the customer can receive a vehicle and can drive a

:53:23.:53:28.

vehicle with a cleared DNA. Forgive my ignorance, it is the Tesla not

:53:29.:53:34.

the first car designed as a fully electric vehicle? You say you are

:53:35.:53:39.

doing it for JY, at Tesla has gone electric already, and others, such

:53:40.:53:44.

as the Nissan Leaf, other companies are already doing this. Yes, there

:53:45.:53:52.

are already electric vehicles on the market, but you will see that there

:53:53.:53:56.

is a vehicle using the Freedom of the technology, introducing a new

:53:57.:53:59.

design language, providing us with more of a package, more space, so

:54:00.:54:05.

that the customer gets additional value out of the technology. Let's

:54:06.:54:11.

talk about how mainstream this is. I touched on this in the introduction,

:54:12.:54:15.

just 1% of car sales so far this year have been electric. It is

:54:16.:54:20.

clearly a tiny market. Why do you think it is worth the investment? I

:54:21.:54:25.

think it is worth the investment because at the end of the day, the

:54:26.:54:29.

future of modern mobility will be electric. There is no other choice.

:54:30.:54:35.

If we all want to do something special for our society and our

:54:36.:54:38.

environment, at the end of the day, we want to have a safer, cleaner,

:54:39.:54:44.

more connected mobility. But that also means, quite clearly, that this

:54:45.:54:48.

kind of new technology needs the right environment. The right power,

:54:49.:54:56.

the right charging stations, so that at the end of the day, we need a

:54:57.:55:02.

collaboration. A collaboration across sectors to make this vision a

:55:03.:55:08.

reality. You talk about the importance of that infrastructure,

:55:09.:55:11.

one that would support electric vehicles. Lots of people getting in

:55:12.:55:15.

touch with me this morning have been saying, look, there simply isn't the

:55:16.:55:18.

places to charge these vehicles. Too few parking and charging stations.

:55:19.:55:24.

How confident are you that this infrastructure will be in place for

:55:25.:55:27.

the cars that you want people to buy? People can charge their

:55:28.:55:36.

vehicles at home. Filling stations will hire fast charging

:55:37.:55:42.

opportunities. Based on the demand, the industry will find a solution,

:55:43.:55:45.

to have all these charging stations in place. I am absolutely convinced

:55:46.:55:51.

this new technology can be introduced flawlessly. I want to ask

:55:52.:55:56.

you about a Brexit, it is clearly a big issue for all manufacturers,

:55:57.:56:00.

about whether we will have access to the single market. I know that a lot

:56:01.:56:04.

of what you produce around the world, but especially in the UK, is

:56:05.:56:08.

sold abroad. How worried are you about access to the single market

:56:09.:56:11.

and whether tariffs will be imposed on goods that you make? Continental

:56:12.:56:17.

Europe is the biggest market for Jaguar Land Rover. Therefore we are

:56:18.:56:23.

very interested that in the future we can sell finished goods, but

:56:24.:56:27.

also, import all the parts and components that we need out of

:56:28.:56:36.

Europe. We rely on free and fair trade. We rely on access to skills,

:56:37.:56:47.

to all, and we rely on the opportunity to move across borders.

:56:48.:56:54.

That is important for Jaguar Land Rover, but also for the entire

:56:55.:56:58.

export industry in the United Kingdom. Ralf Speth, good to speak

:56:59.:57:04.

to you. The chief executive of Jaguar Land Rover. I will be back

:57:05.:57:08.

after eight o'clock with a full look at the business news.

:57:09.:00:27.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:00:28.:00:30.

This is Breakfast, with Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt.

:00:31.:00:40.

Death and destruction in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

:00:41.:00:43.

At least nine people have died in the Caribbean's

:00:44.:00:45.

One island, Barbuda, is described as totally destroyed.

:00:46.:00:49.

This is how Hurricane Irma looked from space last night as it

:00:50.:00:52.

headed towards Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

:00:53.:00:58.

There's more concern as two further hurricanes develop in the region.

:00:59.:01:13.

Also this morning: A row over using laws first introduced by Henry

:01:14.:01:21.

VIII is at the centre of a two-day debate on Brexit.

:01:22.:01:31.

For the latest round Britain's coastline, we are on board the

:01:32.:01:36.

search vessel in Plymouth sound, trying to establish just how much

:01:37.:01:39.

plastic pollution there is in our oceans. Good morning.

:01:40.:01:43.

She started her lingerie business without a penny,

:01:44.:01:48.

now she's a wealthy peer in the House of Lords.

:01:49.:01:51.

As part of our inspirational women series, I'll be meeting

:01:52.:01:53.

In sport, Juan Martin del Potro has upset hopes of a Nadal-Federer

:01:54.:01:57.

He's knocked out Roger Federer so he will take on world number one

:01:58.:02:01.

Businesses are told to stop pushing unhealthy food and larger

:02:02.:02:05.

Shoppers risk eating an extra 17,000 calories a year

:02:06.:02:12.

And Matt is also on the coast today with the weather.

:02:13.:02:20.

Looking lovely where you are. It certainly is. The beautiful

:02:21.:02:28.

coastline but many coastlines in the UK are under threat from rising sea

:02:29.:02:33.

levels and of course the changing climate. But the prospect of the sea

:02:34.:02:39.

coming in and help to protect other parts of the coastline? And the

:02:40.:02:44.

weather forecast starts off dry for money but turns wet throughout the

:02:45.:02:48.

day. See you in 15 minutes. Thank you.

:02:49.:02:50.

Hurricane Irma has caused devastation across the Caribbean

:02:51.:02:54.

The small island of Barbuda has been severely hit,

:02:55.:02:57.

making it, in the words of its Prime Minister,

:02:58.:03:00.

Authorities in the French island territory of Saint Martin say

:03:01.:03:06.

it has been reduced to rubble and its airport is

:03:07.:03:08.

The island of Barbuda, home to 1600 people,

:03:09.:03:16.

was one of the first places to be hit by Irma,

:03:17.:03:22.

It is estimated 95% of homes have been damaged.

:03:23.:03:28.

Communications were destroyed, cutting it off

:03:29.:03:30.

The Prime Minister said the island was barely habitable.

:03:31.:03:33.

What I saw was heart-wrenching, absolutely devastating.

:03:34.:03:37.

In fact, I believe on a per capita basis, the extent of

:03:38.:03:43.

the destruction in Barbuda is unprecedented.

:03:44.:03:45.

We had containers, 40 foot containers, flying left and right,

:03:46.:04:01.

The story you are getting from most of the residents here is the eye

:04:02.:04:05.

Persons were literally tying themselves to their roofs

:04:06.:04:08.

In the French territory of Saint-Martin, six

:04:09.:04:19.

Authorities said the island had been reduced to rubble.

:04:20.:04:24.

This is Hurricane Irma seen from space.

:04:25.:04:26.

It's now heading north of Puerto Rico, and could hit

:04:27.:04:29.

It's one of three hurricanes in the Atlantic.

:04:30.:04:35.

There are particular fears for Hurricane Jose,

:04:36.:04:37.

following close behind Irma and on a similar path.

:04:38.:04:40.

Officials say with most people homeless, Barbuda cannot

:04:41.:04:44.

If Jose does head their way, the island may have to be evacuated.

:04:45.:05:00.

The UK takes another step towards Brexit today as MPs debate

:05:01.:05:03.

the European Union Withdrawal Bill before a vote takes place on Monday.

:05:04.:05:06.

Our political correspondent Chris Mason is in Westminster.

:05:07.:05:08.

We have been talking about this. We talked about the first reading, and

:05:09.:05:13.

why it was important, and why people were upset with the way that laws

:05:14.:05:17.

can change. Now Henry VIII is being involved in this conversation. Can

:05:18.:05:22.

you clear it all up, please? Yes, good morning. All sort of people

:05:23.:05:26.

have popped up in the Brexit debate over the last couple of years, but

:05:27.:05:30.

Henry VIII is not the first to make his argument and influence belt. He

:05:31.:05:35.

does feature in the discussion today. Why? Be constitutional change

:05:36.:05:40.

being told about. When people like me talk about what it changes on

:05:41.:05:44.

patches of grass like this, it might be tempting to change to BBC Two,

:05:45.:05:49.

but don't, this matters. It is the biggest change in how we are

:05:50.:05:52.

governed since we joined what is now the EU on the 17th of October 1972,

:05:53.:05:58.

with the passage of the European Communities Act. What is happening

:05:59.:06:02.

today is the start of the process of unravelling that. That act led to a

:06:03.:06:06.

pipe effectively being fitted between Brussels and Westminster and

:06:07.:06:15.

through it we shovelled lots of laws, 12,433 regulations in total.

:06:16.:06:17.

What the government is doing is working out what happened the day

:06:18.:06:19.

after Brexit. They have decided to do a cut and paste job. Everything

:06:20.:06:24.

changes but nothing changes. The EU laws become UK laws. This is the

:06:25.:06:29.

rub, where our old friend Henry makes an appearance. Government is

:06:30.:06:37.

going to use Henry VIII clauses, and I hope you like our cartoon attempt

:06:38.:06:42.

at Henry VIII. He is famous for his ensemble heading down the aisle and

:06:43.:06:46.

a sticky end of his exes, but this is nothing to do with that. It is

:06:47.:06:50.

more to do with the fact that he liked having power and bypassing

:06:51.:06:54.

Parliament. Henry VIII clauses nod to the fact that the government can

:06:55.:06:59.

tweak the law without that much parliamentary scrutiny, and the

:07:00.:07:02.

likes of Labour and others are not particularly keen on that. The

:07:03.:07:05.

government says they are necessary because of the amount of changes

:07:06.:07:08.

that have got to be done in a relatively short period of time.

:07:09.:07:13.

They also say it will just be active or two years, so roughly until March

:07:14.:07:19.

2021, in all likelihood, that they can make these tweaks to laws

:07:20.:07:25.

without too much scrutiny. Now what happens today? Big debate on the

:07:26.:07:29.

floor of the House of Commons. What happens on Monday? A vote on the

:07:30.:07:34.

first stage of this act. It is not expected that the government will be

:07:35.:07:37.

defeated them but there is a huge amount to come because there is so

:07:38.:07:41.

much to look at here. It will dominate the work of Parliament for

:07:42.:07:45.

many months to come. It certainly will. Thank you very much for

:07:46.:07:49.

explaining that. History and politics in a minute and a half!

:07:50.:07:54.

The BBC understands that the European Union wants

:07:55.:07:56.

Northern Ireland to have a different Brexit deal to the rest of the UK.

:07:57.:08:00.

Proposals due to be published later today by the EU's chief negotiator,

:08:01.:08:02.

Michel Barnier, are expected to suggest special exceptions

:08:03.:08:04.

to allow people to work, go to school and receive medical

:08:05.:08:07.

treatment either side of the border with the Republic of Ireland.

:08:08.:08:11.

Universities in England could face fines if they pay their heads more

:08:12.:08:14.

than the Prime Minister, unless they can convince a regulator

:08:15.:08:16.

Dozens of Vice-Chancellors currently earn more than twice

:08:17.:08:23.

the Prime Minister's annual salary of ?150,000.

:08:24.:08:25.

The Universities Minister, Jo Johnson, says urgent measures

:08:26.:08:27.

are needed to ensure a good deal for both students and taxpayers.

:08:28.:08:35.

Facebook says it has discovered a Russian-funded plot to promote

:08:36.:08:37.

divisive social and political messages on its network

:08:38.:08:39.

The social media network said ?77,000 was spent

:08:40.:08:51.

on about 3000 ads over a two-year period.

:08:52.:08:53.

The ads did not back any specific political figures,

:08:54.:08:55.

but instead posted on topics including immigration,

:08:56.:08:57.

There are calls for the City watchdog to fully publish a leaked

:08:58.:09:10.

report into the treatment of customers by RBS.

:09:11.:09:12.

The focus is on a department of the bank which was

:09:13.:09:15.

responsible for turning around businesses in trouble.

:09:16.:09:17.

The report, produced for the Financial Conduct Authority,

:09:18.:09:19.

suggested the group mistreated many of its clients.

:09:20.:09:21.

Here's our economics correspondent Andy Verity.

:09:22.:09:35.

That created conflicts of interest result in poor treatment of some

:09:36.:09:42.

business customers. A confidential report leaked to the BBC two weeks

:09:43.:09:49.

ago found 92% of viable businesses moved to GRG received some kind of

:09:50.:09:52.

inappropriate treatment but some key findings are still to come out. The

:09:53.:09:56.

new chair of the Treasury Select Committee wanted to be published in

:09:57.:10:00.

full. It has been devastating. Many people lost their businesses and

:10:01.:10:03.

others very nearly saw their businesses going under, so they will

:10:04.:10:06.

want to see the full facts that have been established in that report, we

:10:07.:10:11.

assume. The leaked report was commissioned by the Financial

:10:12.:10:13.

Conduct Authority more than three years ago at the request of the then

:10:14.:10:16.

Business Secretary Vince Cable, who found the bank had an intentional

:10:17.:10:27.

co-ordinated strategy to focus on its own commercial objectives,

:10:28.:10:28.

giving inadequate weight to the interests of business customers. We

:10:29.:10:30.

know that thousands and thousands of firms were very badly treated by the

:10:31.:10:35.

banks in the financial crisis and immediately afterwards. These things

:10:36.:10:38.

need to be properly investigated. The public need to see they have

:10:39.:10:41.

been investigated and that action has been taken so of course it

:10:42.:10:45.

should be public. The FCA say they will respond to the calls for

:10:46.:10:49.

publication in due course and the bank declined to comment. Andy

:10:50.:10:51.

Verity, BBC News. Prince George will

:10:52.:10:57.

start today school. The four-year-old will attend

:10:58.:10:59.

Thomas's Battersea in South London. Earlier this week it was announced

:11:00.:11:01.

that the Duchess of Cambridge And most parents will fondly

:11:02.:11:16.

remember taking their child for the first day of school. The Duchess of

:11:17.:11:20.

Cambridge is pregnant with her third child and spokesperson has said she

:11:21.:11:23.

will not be able to public Prince George for his first day of school

:11:24.:11:26.

and instead the Duke of Cambridge will drop Prince George of this

:11:27.:11:29.

morning which was always part of the plan.

:11:30.:11:35.

You are up-to-date. All the weather and sport coming up later.

:11:36.:11:41.

During the London and Manchester terror attacks earlier this year,

:11:42.:11:43.

accident and emergency services worked around the clock

:11:44.:11:45.

The way they dealt with casualties has been widely

:11:46.:11:48.

praised but according to the Royal Society of Medicine

:11:49.:11:50.

more can be done to prepare first responders for these situations.

:11:51.:11:53.

Let's speak to Professor Roger Kirby, who is in our London

:11:54.:11:55.

newsroom, and Dr Matt Davenport, an A consultant who was working

:11:56.:11:58.

the night of the Manchester Arena attack.

:11:59.:12:00.

Good morning and thank you very much for joining us. Roger, let's talk to

:12:01.:12:07.

you first about this meeting and what you hope to get out of it and

:12:08.:12:11.

to tackle next. Good morning. We are very excited about this meeting,

:12:12.:12:16.

which is planned for today at the royal society of medicine in Wim

:12:17.:12:19.

Bull Street. We are expecting about 300 people to come and we are

:12:20.:12:25.

expecting to hear not only from doctors involved in the terror

:12:26.:12:29.

incidents, London Bridge, Westminster Bridge and up in

:12:30.:12:33.

Manchester, but we are privileged to have Cressida Dick, the commissioner

:12:34.:12:37.

for the Met Police, and the head of the London Ambulance Service as

:12:38.:12:40.

well. When these terror events occurred, the police need to

:12:41.:12:44.

neutralise the terrorist. The ambulance drivers need to get these

:12:45.:12:47.

injured patients to hospital as quickly as possible. And then in

:12:48.:12:52.

Accident Emergency, of course you have the medical staff, nursing

:12:53.:12:57.

staff, paramedics and so one dealing with the emergencies, and time is of

:12:58.:13:04.

the essence with trauma, stab wounds, bomb wounds, vehicle

:13:05.:13:09.

injuries and so on. If you get the right doctors looking after the

:13:10.:13:12.

right patients at the right time and into the operating theatres quickly,

:13:13.:13:17.

you can save lives. All of those patients who got to A in London,

:13:18.:13:22.

who were transported there rapidly, had their lives saved. There is a

:13:23.:13:26.

lot to learn about how we can coordinate the emergency services

:13:27.:13:29.

and how we can train our young doctors to deal with these horrible

:13:30.:13:34.

terrorist events. Of course they occurred in Manchester and London

:13:35.:13:39.

recently, and more recently in Barcelona, but we don't know which

:13:40.:13:42.

town it happening. It could be leaked, Scotland, anywhere across

:13:43.:13:47.

the UK. Let's talk to one of those directly involved. Doctor Davenport,

:13:48.:13:52.

you were a consultant and you were working on a night of the Manchester

:13:53.:13:58.

bomb attack. That is right. A lot of people will thank you and your

:13:59.:14:01.

colleagues for the work you did at that time and I dare say you went

:14:02.:14:04.

through various processes. Firstly dealing with what is in front of you

:14:05.:14:08.

on the night. Afterwards, the shop, and we spoke to your colleagues at

:14:09.:14:11.

the time and it was very difficult and now you have had a chance to

:14:12.:14:16.

assess. What lessons have you learned? The lessons learned coming

:14:17.:14:19.

to two categories. The clinical lessons learned about how to deal

:14:20.:14:25.

with a patient, the rapid amounts of blood that we need for those

:14:26.:14:28.

injuries that we have never seen before. And lots of clinical lessons

:14:29.:14:35.

like that. The plans are very detailed and help us deal with these

:14:36.:14:39.

huge numbers of patients very quickly, but the plan stopped when

:14:40.:14:41.

the maid incident was over and at that point, we were left with staff

:14:42.:14:48.

who had been dealing with injuries that they have never seen before and

:14:49.:14:52.

that they never want to see again. The work we have got to do with

:14:53.:14:55.

those staff moving forward when the maid incident has finished it, that

:14:56.:15:00.

psychological first aid, that is one of the big lessons we are taking

:15:01.:15:04.

forward today. As Charlie said, we have spoken to your colleagues in

:15:05.:15:10.

the NHS who were treating survivors and victims. Can you tell us what

:15:11.:15:13.

happens on that night when you know what to do and there is almost a

:15:14.:15:17.

mental check list that you go through? And then emotion comes into

:15:18.:15:19.

it as well. I think for the first moment, like

:15:20.:15:28.

all of us when we of reading news streams newsreels, that something

:15:29.:15:30.

happened near you that you think will never happen, there is a moment

:15:31.:15:35.

of shock. But then there comes those medical things that must come and

:15:36.:15:38.

you have to park those things, like we do with the seriously ill

:15:39.:15:45.

patients we have day. It's only when you go home, you start to watch the

:15:46.:15:49.

rest of the news unfold on the details, that it starts to hit.

:15:50.:15:54.

Normally, without normal A patients who are ill, we leave

:15:55.:16:00.

behind, we don't find much out about them, the emotional story. The

:16:01.:16:04.

difference with these cases, there have been programmes and news

:16:05.:16:06.

programmes that have keyed you into who this person was, what happened

:16:07.:16:10.

to their story, their lives and how it changed. Is it something now that

:16:11.:16:14.

you think your colleagues, wherever you may be working in the NHS,

:16:15.:16:19.

whatever city, people in Manchester and London, do you think it is

:16:20.:16:22.

something you have to be psychologically prepared, for

:16:23.:16:26.

something just enormous and terrible happening because it might? Yes. And

:16:27.:16:31.

that is very difficult. Because although it might, most of the time

:16:32.:16:35.

it never does. The temptation is not to plan for that but we absolutely

:16:36.:16:40.

must plan for that because when it comes, not prepared for the

:16:41.:16:43.

psychological fallout and although the clinical fallout that might

:16:44.:16:47.

happen from that might. Does it help you personally talking about it? We

:16:48.:16:52.

have spoken to a few people on the emotions are still raw among those

:16:53.:16:55.

who have been near it, any involvement. I sense it is still a

:16:56.:17:02.

bit like? For certain. I think trying to draw everyone down the

:17:03.:17:04.

same path of trying to debrief them and talk about is not necessarily

:17:05.:17:07.

the right thing to do for that person. And with individuals it is

:17:08.:17:11.

different. Some people really wanted to talk about it all the time and

:17:12.:17:15.

debrief on it and some people wanted to park it and put it on a shelf and

:17:16.:17:19.

deal with it the same way we do normally with patients. Each person

:17:20.:17:22.

is different. We have to try and tailor all those things for all

:17:23.:17:25.

those different people. There is a lot of staff, so it is hard. Thank

:17:26.:17:30.

you for coming in to talk to ask Doctor Davenport. Professor Roger

:17:31.:17:34.

Kirby, good luck with your meeting today. Let us know what you will be

:17:35.:17:41.

looking at. It is 8:17am. We are blessed this morning. Our cameras

:17:42.:17:42.

all over coastlines. We can show you an image now from

:17:43.:17:50.

Medmerry in West Sussex. Can we get the camera there? Matt is the.

:17:51.:18:00.

What better view, big? You can almost hear Charlie's

:18:01.:18:04.

disappointment! I am never disappointed.

:18:05.:18:08.

A very good morning from West Sussex, by the coast of course in

:18:09.:18:13.

Medmerry. We are talking coastal defences, with the changing climate

:18:14.:18:17.

and rising sea levels, outpost are under threat around the UK. It was

:18:18.:18:21.

here in West Sussex, let me show you where we are. This is the shot

:18:22.:18:27.

Charlie wanted, a beautiful scene across that coastline. Extensive

:18:28.:18:31.

flooding in 2008 according ?5 million worth of damage. The

:18:32.:18:36.

Environment Agency has since undertaken an innovative and

:18:37.:18:39.

sustainable scheme in which the man-made sea defences were breached,

:18:40.:18:44.

allowing the sea to flood in inland to make lagoons and now a nature

:18:45.:18:49.

reserve, where the water floods in at high tide, flows back out again.

:18:50.:18:52.

You can see behind me, in a few hours' time that will be full of

:18:53.:18:56.

water. But in doing that it has helped protect properties around the

:18:57.:19:00.

area. Much better protection than they had under the old scheme. It is

:19:01.:19:03.

schemes like this that the Environment Agency are trying to

:19:04.:19:07.

replicate up and down the country where possible. This morning we have

:19:08.:19:10.

some blue skies behind me. Shaping up to be a pleasant start to the day

:19:11.:19:18.

after some early showers. Across much of England, Wales and the

:19:19.:19:20.

south-east of Scotland it is a largely dry start. A few showers in

:19:21.:19:23.

the south-west at the moment but rain will become more of a feature

:19:24.:19:26.

for some of you as we go through the day. You can see across Scotland,

:19:27.:19:29.

the rain is fairly extensive which becomes heavy at times, particularly

:19:30.:19:32.

over the hills on West. Can't guarantee anywhere will stay dry.

:19:33.:19:39.

Showers becoming a bit more longer lasting and spreading to northern

:19:40.:19:42.

England. The further south, the better chance of spending the bulk

:19:43.:19:46.

of the day dry. In the south coast some sunny spells into the afternoon

:19:47.:19:50.

but some showers developing across south-east England, the Midlands and

:19:51.:19:54.

East Anglia later but many will avoid them. Temperatures in the

:19:55.:19:58.

brightness around 19-20. Northern England Scotland, lots of cloud,

:19:59.:20:02.

outbreaks of Rincon heaviest in the hills on the west. In Northern

:20:03.:20:05.

Ireland cloud, occasional rain through the day, a bit more rain

:20:06.:20:09.

this afternoon and the breeze will freshen up. Turning right at a North

:20:10.:20:13.

Wales, further south across Wales in two south-west England. This is

:20:14.:20:17.

where we will see some dry weather continue into the afternoon, with a

:20:18.:20:20.

little bit of sunshine. The Northern Ireland down towards the south-west

:20:21.:20:24.

of England, this is where we will see the breeze start to freshen up

:20:25.:20:29.

on that breeze will become more of a feature not just by the end of the

:20:30.:20:32.

day but through tonight and into the following few days. Tonight, a fresh

:20:33.:20:36.

breeze rolling across the country first showers and outbreaks of rain

:20:37.:20:39.

just about anywhere across the UK tonight, even in the south where we

:20:40.:20:42.

finished the day largely dry. The breeze will keep temperatures up but

:20:43.:20:48.

believe me, the chill will be noticeable in the breeze. A cold

:20:49.:20:52.

breeze coming from a cold direction and leads us into a bit of a fresh

:20:53.:20:56.

start to Friday. A blustery day on Friday. The wind might ease down a

:20:57.:21:00.

little. Sunshine and showers the best way to sum up Friday for many

:21:01.:21:04.

of you, the showers could be on the heavy side, perhaps a rumble of

:21:05.:21:09.

thunder. On the south coast, this is where we will have cloud and rain

:21:10.:21:12.

coming and going all day, but it can Islands. Likely into the afternoon

:21:13.:21:17.

there will be an area of heavy rain pushing northwards through

:21:18.:21:20.

south-west England, South Wales, even as far north as the South

:21:21.:21:24.

Midlands and eventually East Anglia and the south-east later in the day.

:21:25.:21:28.

That clears up a way as we go into Saturday. Temperatures on Saturday

:21:29.:21:33.

fairly disappointing, like Friday, probably mid-teens. Sunshine and

:21:34.:21:35.

showers, showers most frequent across England and Wales. The

:21:36.:21:57.

further north, maybe fewer showers, a bit more in the way of sunshine

:21:58.:22:00.

but in that breeze where ever you are on Saturday, feeling chilly,

:22:01.:22:02.

which continues into Sunday. By which time the wind could get

:22:03.:22:05.

stronger across the western half of the UK. That's how it is looking

:22:06.:22:07.

from these glorious scenes in Medmerry. Back to you.

:22:08.:22:09.

Thank you. You see this mug, we don't get a choice over the size of

:22:10.:22:12.

it. You can't ask for a bigger coffee.

:22:13.:22:13.

Are you complaining? No, but it's a link to the story

:22:14.:22:17.

about if you are asked for something, small, medium, large,

:22:18.:22:20.

they always want you to have a bigger version.

:22:21.:22:26.

For 30p more, so why would you say no?

:22:27.:22:30.

Because you don't want a big portion!

:22:31.:22:33.

That would involve restraint, which not many of us have. We've been

:22:34.:22:37.

there, a fast food restaurant or that, or even the shops when you

:22:38.:22:40.

offered something bigger. Research suggests the technique

:22:41.:22:44.

of "upselling" is fuelling We'll discuss this more

:22:45.:22:46.

in a moment but first, We have Kate Hardcastle and Izzie

:22:47.:22:56.

Kennedy, who said her weight gain was partly due to upselling. Izzie,

:22:57.:23:02.

give an example, you go into a cafe or somewhere and they are offering

:23:03.:23:07.

you something bigger has to? Matter of course. The situation I used to

:23:08.:23:12.

do it in was a group of friends, I'm with 18 years old, at the beginning

:23:13.:23:17.

of my weightless journey I was almost 21 stone. I would go into

:23:18.:23:20.

fast food restaurants with friends and they would say things like,

:23:21.:23:23.

would you like to upgrade your milkshake to a large? At the time I

:23:24.:23:27.

found it really hard to say no. Why did you find it hard to say no?

:23:28.:23:31.

Because you are genuinely hungry, greedy or you thought it was only a

:23:32.:23:34.

few pence more so you were getting more value for money? I think it was

:23:35.:23:39.

a combination of all three, actually. I found it really hard. I

:23:40.:23:44.

think I struggled really badly with confidence. Saying no is not a

:23:45.:23:49.

British thing. We quite like to please people. I think that is

:23:50.:23:53.

another contributing factor as well. When you hear that 17,000 calories

:23:54.:23:59.

extra a year could be down to upsizing or upselling, ?5 of weight

:24:00.:24:06.

a year, you completely get that? -- five lb of weight? Absolutely. It

:24:07.:24:08.

wasn't the main thing that contributed to my weight gain,

:24:09.:24:11.

because there was a lot of other things but I would say it didn't

:24:12.:24:15.

help with the relationship I had with food, that guilt free healthy

:24:16.:24:18.

relationship I so desperately wanted. Quite often after upselling

:24:19.:24:23.

I was left feeling quite weak and guilty afterwards, which tends to

:24:24.:24:27.

spiral things like binge eating, which led to a spiral. Duncan, you

:24:28.:24:33.

have been looking into this. What is the picture emerging? It is endemic.

:24:34.:24:40.

Our report Size Matters With Slimming World shows 120 year we are

:24:41.:24:48.

faced with a upselling. It is more for younger people, because properly

:24:49.:24:51.

younger people don't have the tools or the feeling of empowerment to say

:24:52.:24:56.

no. So it is a bit more of a challenge for younger people. What

:24:57.:25:00.

our research shows is it happens everywhere. Fast food outlets, one

:25:01.:25:06.

in three of us are up sold to in a fast food outlet or restaurant and

:25:07.:25:10.

it contributes to our waistline. Why isn't it younger people's fault? If

:25:11.:25:18.

you eat more, move more? I think the individual does have a part to play,

:25:19.:25:24.

but we do live in what we call on a piece of genital environment.

:25:25.:25:29.

Because it is contributing to the obesity crisis, not just down to the

:25:30.:25:32.

individual but the environment we are living in. It is the marketing

:25:33.:25:36.

and advertising we are surrounded with an bombarded with. There has

:25:37.:25:40.

been a lot of efforts to clamp down on the visual marketing, so things

:25:41.:25:43.

like the buy one and get one free deals, and some retailers have

:25:44.:25:48.

clamped down on what's called the pester power, sweet sap the till. Do

:25:49.:25:54.

you want to pick up on that? It is your area of expertise. If other

:25:55.:25:57.

people are doing on the high Street, then another shop will do it,

:25:58.:26:02.

because there is an offer next door, is it inevitable? It is about six

:26:03.:26:06.

times easier to sell something to an existing customer than it is to find

:26:07.:26:11.

a new customer. At times where retail this challenge, everyone will

:26:12.:26:15.

be doing everything they can to convert a bigger sale or order from

:26:16.:26:18.

the customer in front of them. Whilst I absolutely think guidelines

:26:19.:26:22.

and awareness are really good, I do think customers are really

:26:23.:26:26.

intelligent. You wouldn't have had them move into supermarket away from

:26:27.:26:30.

these packaged Bladon supermarket brands to more transparent

:26:31.:26:34.

supermarket brands like the discounters, if we didn't use our

:26:35.:26:37.

power as consumers to make good decisions. I think with a prompt

:26:38.:26:41.

like this and awareness that would probably be enough, but you won't

:26:42.:26:46.

get a retailer moving away from upselling, like upgrading your car

:26:47.:26:49.

like upgrading your coffee. I suppose it becomes habit. You might

:26:50.:26:52.

go and buy your paper in the morning or a magazine and you are a

:26:53.:26:57.

chocolate bar, a huge chocolate bar sometimes, it just becomes habit,

:26:58.:27:02.

doesn't it? The thing for retailers to become aware of is if it annoys

:27:03.:27:06.

you. If it gets under your skin as a consumer, you react badly to that

:27:07.:27:09.

and will choose an alternative. They need to be very careful, not just

:27:10.:27:13.

because of people's health but because of the brands and an

:27:14.:27:16.

petition out there for them, that is a bigger upset for them. Izzie, are

:27:17.:27:30.

you able now to say no? Have you got to that point where someone offers

:27:31.:27:33.

you something and you say, no, I want what I ask for? Absolutely. I

:27:34.:27:35.

think the tips and support I received from my slimming group

:27:36.:27:37.

helps me. Things like researching a menu before I go to a restaurant and

:27:38.:27:41.

going with an idea of what I will eat beforehand is a good tip I have

:27:42.:27:43.

found along my weight loss journey. That is a really good tip. Sometimes

:27:44.:27:46.

you get overwhelmed by the choices on the menu and don't think about

:27:47.:27:50.

it. Thank you all very much. Time to get the news and travel and weather

:27:51.:27:51.

where you are. See you shortly. Hello, this is Breakfast with

:27:52.:31:08.

Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty. Hurricane Irma has caused widespread

:31:09.:31:22.

destruction across the Caribbean, reducing buildings to rubble

:31:23.:31:24.

and leaving at least nine Officials say the island

:31:25.:31:29.

of St Martin has been reduced to rubble and its airport has almost

:31:30.:31:33.

entirely been destroyed. Emergency workers on the French-run

:31:34.:31:36.

side of the island said at least eight people were killed

:31:37.:31:40.

and another 21 wounded. The small island of Barbuda

:31:41.:31:45.

has been severely hit, with the death of a

:31:46.:32:00.

child, and about 95% of the buildings are reported

:32:01.:32:03.

to have suffered some damage. The prayer Minister of Barbuda said

:32:04.:32:11.

it was barely habitable. It is a complete contrast, in Antigua we can

:32:12.:32:15.

say there has been significant resilience and we can celebrate the

:32:16.:32:20.

level of preparedness, in the case of Barbuda it is one of devastation.

:32:21.:32:29.

Yesterday when I travelled, I had a circumnavigation of the island, I

:32:30.:32:32.

was extremely saddened, it was emotionally painful to see such a

:32:33.:32:36.

beautiful island totally destroyed to the extent of about 90% of the

:32:37.:32:42.

country would have been damaged, totally demolished.

:32:43.:32:45.

Florida is on high alert for the expected arrival of hurricane Irma

:32:46.:32:52.

and Britons in the region have been urged to follow evacuation orders

:32:53.:32:55.

while states of emergency have been declared in Puerto Rico and the

:32:56.:32:59.

river. These are images taken from space of the hurricane, there are

:33:00.:33:03.

fears that Miami could be struck directly by the hurricane.

:33:04.:33:05.

The UK takes another step towards Brexit today as MPs debate

:33:06.:33:08.

the European Union Withdrawal Bill before a vote takes place on Monday.

:33:09.:33:11.

The bill will mean that thousands of EU laws and regulations

:33:12.:33:15.

are transferred into British law but ministers will need more powers

:33:16.:33:20.

Earlier on Breakfast, the First Secretary of State,

:33:21.:33:23.

Damian Green, said concerns about the process are unfounded.

:33:24.:33:30.

It is particularly ironic that there is this much concern about the

:33:31.:33:36.

procedure, in that most of the European law that we have will have

:33:37.:33:41.

been put into place through this mechanism, through these committees,

:33:42.:33:45.

but absolutely parliament needs to have time to debate, so we will

:33:46.:33:51.

listen to a reasonable proposals about the process by which we do

:33:52.:33:56.

this essential work of making our statute workable.

:33:57.:33:57.

The BBC understands that the European Union wants

:33:58.:34:00.

Northern Ireland to have a different Brexit deal to the rest of the UK.

:34:01.:34:06.

Proposals due to be published later today by the EU's chief negotiator,

:34:07.:34:09.

Michel Barnier, are expected to suggest special exceptions

:34:10.:34:15.

to allow people to work, go to school and receive medical

:34:16.:34:18.

treatment either side of the border with the Republic of Ireland.

:34:19.:34:20.

Universities in England could face fines if they pay their heads more

:34:21.:34:23.

than the Prime Minister, unless they can convince a regulator

:34:24.:34:26.

Dozens of Vice Chancellors currently earn more than twice

:34:27.:34:29.

the Prime Minister's annual salary of ?150,000.

:34:30.:34:31.

The Universities Minister, Jo Johnson, says urgent measures

:34:32.:34:33.

are needed to ensure a good deal for both students and taxpayers.

:34:34.:34:38.

There are calls for the City watchdog to fully publish a leaked

:34:39.:34:42.

report into the treatment of customers by RBS.

:34:43.:34:43.

The focus is on a department of the bank which was

:34:44.:34:46.

responsible for turning around businesses in trouble.

:34:47.:34:48.

The report, produced for the Financial Conduct Authority

:34:49.:34:50.

suggested that many clients were mistreated -

:34:51.:34:53.

The FCA said it would respond to the calls

:34:54.:34:58.

Favourite story of the morning, A slam dunking Boni, the world's

:34:59.:35:16.

longest legs and an 83-year-old body-builder, it can only mean the

:35:17.:35:20.

latest edition of the Guinness World Record.

:35:21.:35:22.

The first contender, Biff Hutchinson, what a great name! He

:35:23.:35:27.

does this, basically, the first person to clear 11 feet... Look at

:35:28.:35:34.

that! On a pogo stick. If you have ever been on a pogo stick, that is

:35:35.:35:37.

not easy. Have you done a lot of it?

:35:38.:35:44.

A bit, yes. Binny the bunny is showing you how

:35:45.:35:49.

to slam dunk. He holds the record for the most basketball slam dunks

:35:50.:35:53.

in one minute. He managed a total of seven. He seems quite nonplussed

:35:54.:35:56.

about it but obviously enjoys doing it.

:35:57.:36:01.

I just wonder how the bunny before, which held the record for six, feels

:36:02.:36:06.

about Binny taking it away. Who knows? The bar is set high,

:36:07.:36:12.

anything could happen! Eight is beckoning!

:36:13.:36:15.

Victoria Derbyshire is on at 9am this morning on BBC Two.

:36:16.:36:17.

The Belgian Paralympic gold medallist with a crippling

:36:18.:36:24.

degenerative disease who wants to choose her time today. He meets a

:36:25.:36:32.

man who lives with chronic spinal pain but campaigns against

:36:33.:36:38.

euthanasia. When I say it is enough, I cannot live in this condition, I

:36:39.:36:46.

have the right to say I want to quit now. Join us after Breakfast on BBC

:36:47.:36:50.

Two, the BBC News Channel, and online.

:36:51.:36:58.

Matt will have the weather for us shortly.

:36:59.:36:58.

We'll get the lowdown on who'll score the touchdown as the NFL

:36:59.:37:02.

season gets under way when we're joined by former New York Giants

:37:03.:37:05.

star Jason Bell and two-time Super Bowl winner Osi Umenyiora.

:37:06.:37:08.

Tycoon Michelle Mone found success with her bra and underwear brand.

:37:09.:37:14.

She'll be here to discuss her career and her latest venture -

:37:15.:37:17.

selling property with the virtual currency bitcoin.

:37:18.:37:21.

Before Prime Suspect there was Tennison.

:37:22.:37:23.

Crime writer Lynda la Plante joins us to tell us

:37:24.:37:25.

what inspired her to put her famous character front and centre

:37:26.:37:28.

But first let's get the sport with Sally.

:37:29.:37:39.

Looking forward to the NFL chat, we have some NFL glamour on the way.

:37:40.:37:46.

Glamour?! You look surprised! It happens

:37:47.:37:50.

occasionally! But we will start with tennis glamour.

:37:51.:37:58.

Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have never played each

:37:59.:38:00.

other at the US Open - and that's not going

:38:01.:38:03.

That picture tells a lot, it is like, what is happening today?

:38:04.:38:14.

He says he was not playing well enough and that it is a good thing

:38:15.:38:19.

that he is out and somebody else can take the place.

:38:20.:38:20.

Federer was beaten in the quarter-finals

:38:21.:38:21.

He's been suffering with back pain and said the way he played wasn't

:38:22.:38:25.

good enough and it was better he was out to give

:38:26.:38:28.

I knew it was going to be a tough one, I had struggled too much

:38:29.:38:33.

throughout the tournament to think too far ahead. In some ways I'm

:38:34.:38:36.

actually happy I made the quarters, so I'm not that disappointed, it has

:38:37.:38:42.

been a good run this year already. Unfortunately I ran into a guy who

:38:43.:38:44.

was better on the day. So it's Del Potro who'll

:38:45.:38:45.

take on Rafael Nadal Nadal is back in the world number

:38:46.:38:47.

one spot and he was ruthless against Andrey Rublev, dropping only

:38:48.:38:55.

five games in the match. Karolina Pliskova will lose her

:38:56.:38:58.

world number one ranking after she lost to Coco Vanderway,

:38:59.:39:00.

who's part of an all-American That hasn't happened

:39:01.:39:03.

since 1981 and the days of Martina Navratilova and Chris

:39:04.:39:05.

Evert. And Andy Murray says he is likely

:39:06.:39:08.

to miss the rest of the season He hasn't played since Wimbledon

:39:09.:39:11.

and he says he needs an extended England's Test series decider

:39:12.:39:17.

against West Indies begins Toby Roland-Jones returns

:39:18.:39:28.

to the side but it could be another fast bowler,

:39:29.:39:34.

James Anderson, making the headlines - he needs only three more wickets

:39:35.:39:37.

to become the first Englishman West Indies levelled

:39:38.:39:40.

the series with victory You expect sides to respond well,

:39:41.:39:42.

just as the West Indies did. Part of being a successful side

:39:43.:39:48.

in this format is being able to deal with it, overcoming difficult

:39:49.:39:57.

weeks like last week. So, we have a lot of experience

:39:58.:40:00.

in our dressing room and a lot of hungry guys that are desperate

:40:01.:40:05.

to come back from the way we played. We want to make sure

:40:06.:40:08.

we win this series. Wayne Shaw was Sutton United's

:40:09.:40:10.

reserve goalkeeper in February's FA Charlie doesn't like seeing this

:40:11.:40:23.

story. Show us the pictures.

:40:24.:40:28.

Shall we just watch a man eating a pie? Why not.

:40:29.:40:30.

He ate a pie during the game, after a bookmaker had offered odds

:40:31.:40:33.

What is wrong with that? He is enjoying it.

:40:34.:40:36.

He said it was "just a bit of fun" but he resigned,

:40:37.:40:39.

and now he's been fined ?375 and banned for two months by the FA

:40:40.:40:42.

Was it the flavour of pie... I will tell you what it is, it is a

:40:43.:40:52.

thing I have, I am not overly keen on watching people eating on

:40:53.:40:56.

television. In a cookery programme they do the close-up...

:40:57.:41:00.

I just don't like watching it. What about when you go to a restaurant

:41:01.:41:04.

with your wife? That is different! I understand

:41:05.:41:08.

people have to eat! But it is the close-up of someone eating, the slow

:41:09.:41:11.

motion... Is it just me?! No, I get your

:41:12.:41:14.

point. I think you watch these programmes

:41:15.:41:20.

and grumble about people putting a fork of food in them out!

:41:21.:41:23.

Anyway, I am hungry for some more sport.

:41:24.:41:25.

The American Football season is set to get under way tomorrow,

:41:26.:41:27.

and next month, London will once again host two NFL fixtures.

:41:28.:41:30.

It starts with the New Orleans Saints against Miami Dolphins

:41:31.:41:33.

And we're about to find out who to look out for from former

:41:34.:41:41.

New York Giants star Jason Bell and two-time Super Bowl

:41:42.:41:43.

winner Osi Umenyiora, from the BBC's NFL Show.

:41:44.:41:45.

Here's some of their best bits from last seasons coverage.

:41:46.:41:47.

Are we going to have fun tonight?! We will have to send you to acting

:41:48.:41:55.

school! I just find myself always being right! The greatest sport has

:41:56.:42:04.

ever seen. This guy is humble! We lost! My back hurts! That was a

:42:05.:42:20.

great save! Squeeze it in tight. I would hit him there.

:42:21.:42:23.

Lovely to see you, you both look... I promised glamour, we have the most

:42:24.:42:38.

intricately folded handkerchief you will ever see.

:42:39.:42:43.

I have handkerchief envy now! You have to have good technique! A lot

:42:44.:42:47.

of Voges and preparation! You are back with us for another season but

:42:48.:42:53.

I want to talk about the end of the last season because even if you are

:42:54.:42:56.

not a massive NFL fan, most people will realise that Super Bowl was

:42:57.:43:01.

historic, why was it so important? The Atlanta Falcons, everybody

:43:02.:43:08.

thought the game was over and then you saw this incredible comeback by

:43:09.:43:12.

Tom Brady, scoring numerous touchdowns, winning in heartbreaking

:43:13.:43:16.

fashion for the Atlanta Falcons, so anything can happen in the NFL and

:43:17.:43:20.

that is why everybody enjoyed the game. Tom Brady is a name that we

:43:21.:43:25.

know, can you explain why he is such a big star? He is arguably the

:43:26.:43:32.

greatest NFL quarterback ever. Most championships, obviously an MVP

:43:33.:43:34.

performance last year. He is 40 years old and still winning. Osi's

:43:35.:43:43.

favourite player. And what makes him greater is that he does not eat the

:43:44.:43:49.

17,000 extra calories! There is something he doesn't eat, broccoli,

:43:50.:43:54.

beetroot? Parents are watching who are

:43:55.:43:58.

spending hours, days trying to get their children to eat vegetables and

:43:59.:44:02.

you to come on and say, no, you don't have to eat properly and

:44:03.:44:07.

beetroot if you want to be an NFL star! He eats avocado and things

:44:08.:44:11.

like that but not the extra 17,000 calories! You get brownie points!

:44:12.:44:19.

How significant is it that the NFL are bringing the road show to

:44:20.:44:25.

London? It is huge, when you talk about the NFL, it is trying to

:44:26.:44:30.

expand internationally and England would be the perfect place to do it.

:44:31.:44:34.

I think they had the NFL Europe back in the day but nobody was buying

:44:35.:44:38.

into that so people here deserve the best, they want to see the best, and

:44:39.:44:42.

these are regular season games being played here, they are meaningful

:44:43.:44:48.

games, it is a huge step for the NFL. I am going to display my

:44:49.:44:51.

instruments now, here is the bit where you tell me what things are.

:44:52.:44:55.

You know that bit where the ball is passed backwards and they make a

:44:56.:45:03.

noise? What are they saying? They are trying to get the defense to

:45:04.:45:07.

jump offside because once that happens it is a penalty. What are

:45:08.:45:18.

they saying? Hut, height, anything, you just want to be loud. They are

:45:19.:45:25.

all on a microphone, you can hear them talking to each other in the

:45:26.:45:28.

game saying, I caught that, you didn't, I did...

:45:29.:45:34.

So you have to mind your language?! No, you don't have to mind your

:45:35.:45:38.

language! Which is tougher, NFL or rugby? They

:45:39.:45:44.

are two different sports, rugby seems to be horizontal, they are

:45:45.:45:47.

pitching a ball, we are coming downhill at each other, a little bit

:45:48.:45:51.

more impact. Do you see how politically correct he is?! NFL

:45:52.:45:57.

hands down is the most physical, imposing sport. Rugby, anybody can

:45:58.:46:03.

play rugby. Statistically, who is the biggest feller on the pitch? The

:46:04.:46:10.

offensive lineman. Give us a sense of scale? Six foot six, maybe about

:46:11.:46:18.

140 kilograms. Do you remember last year when one of the teams came

:46:19.:46:22.

over, forgive me, I don't know which one, they had a cruise ship parked

:46:23.:46:26.

in the dock, they took an entire cruise ship. I think it was the

:46:27.:46:32.

Jaguars. They had special beds and their own chefs, everything was

:46:33.:46:35.

super-sized, a lot of effort goes into looking after those Giant

:46:36.:46:36.

players! Why should I watch? As someone who

:46:37.:46:47.

doesn't enjoy big sporting events... They are very lenient on the

:46:48.:46:52.

celebrations when players score touchdowns, that will be exciting.

:46:53.:46:58.

Dance routines? Yes, that will be fun. Do you approve of that?

:46:59.:47:05.

Definitely! I do not know how we top that! Big guys, big deckchair? Matt

:47:06.:47:13.

is in West Sussex. Have you still got your deckchair?

:47:14.:47:19.

Good morning. I have left the deckchair for other people! Another

:47:20.:47:22.

lovely view down on the coast. Let me show you exactly where we are.

:47:23.:47:28.

The bird's eye view. On the West Sussex coast. Beautiful area of

:47:29.:47:32.

coastline. Under threat from the sea. The Environment Agency done a

:47:33.:47:37.

programme in which the existing coastal defences were breached and

:47:38.:47:43.

allowed the flood the land behind to help to give a bit of additional

:47:44.:47:47.

protection to the properties and infrastructure in the local area. We

:47:48.:47:51.

will be talking more about coast or the defences and the effects of sea

:47:52.:47:55.

flooding and erosion across other parts of the UK in a moment. This

:47:56.:48:00.

morning, we have done all right with the weather. Many of you start the

:48:01.:48:05.

day OK, dry and fine, there are changes afoot, wetter weather across

:48:06.:48:10.

many parts of the country today and tonight and even into the weekend.

:48:11.:48:15.

At the moment, dry and brightest in southern parts of England, mittens,

:48:16.:48:19.

East Anglia. Eastern parts not faring too badly. -- the Midlands.

:48:20.:48:28.

Showers getting a bit more abundant in Northern Ireland and north-west

:48:29.:48:31.

England and across the northern half of the country, greyer and wetter

:48:32.:48:33.

through the day. There will be breaks in the rain. Towards the

:48:34.:48:39.

south, a few showers coming and going particularly in the afternoon

:48:40.:48:43.

in southern England, the Midlands, East Anglia. One or two could be on

:48:44.:48:48.

the heavy side. Still brightness but not as much as yesterday. When it

:48:49.:48:54.

does, temperatures 18-20. Further north, cool, blustery wind. Rain

:48:55.:48:58.

coming and going. Heaviest on the hills in the west of northern

:48:59.:49:02.

England. Damp in Scotland through much of the day. There will be drier

:49:03.:49:07.

moments in Northern Ireland. The breeze will pick up here, as it will

:49:08.:49:17.

do in Wales and the south-west of England. The northern half of Wales,

:49:18.:49:19.

could get wetter. The south-west of England, dry weather with showers.

:49:20.:49:24.

Temperatures disappointing. A cool start to September. Tonight,

:49:25.:49:28.

blustery with occasional bursts of rain anywhere across the UK. The odd

:49:29.:49:33.

heavy burst too. Temperatures look like they are high enough but it

:49:34.:49:38.

will feel colder tonight and tomorrow. The air coming to the UK

:49:39.:49:42.

is from a slightly colder environment. Fresh start to Friday.

:49:43.:49:47.

Sunshine and showers. More sunshine between the showers and better day

:49:48.:49:52.

for Scotland, Northern Ireland compared to this afternoon. The

:49:53.:49:59.

south coast, outbreaks of rain coming and going, fairly cloudy.

:50:00.:50:03.

Heavy bursts of rain in the South West and Wales and other southern

:50:04.:50:06.

parts of England and towards East Anglia and maybe as far north as the

:50:07.:50:11.

South Midlands. A cool day and a cool day to take us into the

:50:12.:50:16.

weekend. Blustery wind on Saturday after easing on Friday night.

:50:17.:50:20.

Showers abundant in England and Wales. Temperatures generally in the

:50:21.:50:26.

teams. Sunday, looks like it will be wetter and windier, coming in from

:50:27.:50:30.

the West. Sitting here this morning, quite understandable why as a nation

:50:31.:50:36.

we are attracted to the coast, it is why so many of us want to live by

:50:37.:50:42.

it, but it comes with risks. We are at constant risk to see flooding

:50:43.:50:45.

here and in other parts of the country and I have been to another

:50:46.:50:47.

area to find out more in Devon. I came rushing out

:50:48.:50:57.

and the whole shed was It was six metres altogether gone

:50:58.:51:04.

which is actually very rather more Sidmouth, Devon, some of the most

:51:05.:51:09.

sought-after homes in the country. But how much longer they will be

:51:10.:51:15.

here remains uncertain. In 15 years, we have probably lost

:51:16.:51:18.

about 40 feet of garden. We knew there was erosion,

:51:19.:51:25.

but at that time, the erosion rate The life span of these properties

:51:26.:51:27.

could in large part be determined by the council's next choice of sea

:51:28.:51:35.

defences - something currently The extreme winter of 2013-14 hit

:51:36.:51:38.

this stretch of coast with ferocity, bringing with it rapid cliff erosion

:51:39.:51:48.

and flooding - impacts we may see Just on the coast from Sidmouth,

:51:49.:51:51.

in Dawlish, the storms and tides left thousands without power

:51:52.:51:56.

and the railway line The Environment Agency estimates

:51:57.:51:57.

around 840,000 homes in England are currently in areas at risk

:51:58.:52:04.

of flooding from the sea and over 700 properties could be lost

:52:05.:52:07.

to coastal erosion over But there is an acceptance that not

:52:08.:52:09.

all properties in the UK can be One could argue that, as a society,

:52:10.:52:14.

we may have a responsibility to at least provide some sort

:52:15.:52:19.

of compensation to those properties. At the moment, there

:52:20.:52:22.

is nothing in place. You want to be fair to the people

:52:23.:52:25.

who will lose their property. But on the other hand,

:52:26.:52:29.

can you expect people who live in Huddersfield,

:52:30.:52:32.

their taxpayers' money, to go into buying people out

:52:33.:52:35.

who live on the coast? I think all coastal properties are

:52:36.:52:46.

at risk one way or another. But we're not moving anywhere. We are

:52:47.:52:50.

not moving! With budgets tight and the climate changing, will nature

:52:51.:52:57.

have the final say? There are some tough choices to be made. Here, the

:52:58.:53:02.

Environment Agency have tried an indifferent, it is called managed

:53:03.:53:05.

realignment, the existing sea defences were broken down allowing

:53:06.:53:11.

to flood in at periods of the day in to land just inland from the coast

:53:12.:53:16.

which has helped to protect properties, protect properties, 350

:53:17.:53:19.

properties, infrastructure and roads in the region. It cannot be

:53:20.:53:22.

something that is transferred everywhere across the UK and coastal

:53:23.:53:27.

defences come at a price and it is an interesting topic, especially as

:53:28.:53:31.

the climate changes, and it will rear its head again and again. From

:53:32.:53:37.

the glorious sight here, it is a plan that has worked and it is

:53:38.:53:42.

attracting thousands of visitors each year to the nature reserved

:53:43.:53:46.

caused by the coastal flooding. A lovely sight to behold this morning.

:53:47.:53:51.

From here in West Sussex, back to the studio.

:53:52.:53:56.

Delightful scene reviews there. Glad you have enjoyed your morning. Thank

:53:57.:53:59.

you very much. From that wonderful scenery to another shot this

:54:00.:54:06.

morning, from Plymouth sound, watching the dawn unfolding this

:54:07.:54:10.

morning, across the bay, as the camera moves around, we will see a

:54:11.:54:18.

vessel moored in the sound. John is on board and he has been looking for

:54:19.:54:22.

as on the issue of pollution in the seas. But as the ship John is on

:54:23.:54:28.

board. Everyone has seen rubbish on the beach and plastic and pollution.

:54:29.:54:33.

It is a real problem. It really is a massive problem,

:54:34.:54:37.

Charlie. We are here with scientists from the University of Plymouth on

:54:38.:54:49.

board that Falcon Spirit the -- to discover how much plastic there is

:54:50.:54:53.

in the ocean. The guys are pouring out what they have found in the

:54:54.:54:56.

bottom of the net. Richard will have a look to see if you can find the

:54:57.:55:02.

smaller bits of plastic. We are used of seeing large amounts of detritus

:55:03.:55:06.

on beaches. What we are particularly concerned about our small particles

:55:07.:55:10.

that can be ingested by wildlife feeding in the seas.

:55:11.:55:18.

Nestled at the bottom of cliffs on the North Yorkshire coast

:55:19.:55:21.

As the tide comes in, they wriggle and bounce their way up

:55:22.:55:25.

onto dry land, but increasingly, they're at risk when they're

:55:26.:55:28.

back in the water, from threats that are man-made.

:55:29.:55:31.

As the tide comes in, the seals will haul

:55:32.:55:33.

Out at sea, of course, is where they do most

:55:34.:55:39.

It's troubling to think that it's also somewhere

:55:40.:55:45.

particularly hazardous to them because of the amount of plastics

:55:46.:55:47.

There is litter in the sea that is washing in on every tide,

:55:48.:55:54.

it is coming in and out, and people do not realise that it

:55:55.:56:02.

This is the feeding environment of the birds and the seals.

:56:03.:56:07.

People don't always think it can still end up in the sea.

:56:08.:56:11.

Down the coast in Scarborough, the seal hospital looks

:56:12.:56:15.

after the rescued animals, before releasing them

:56:16.:56:17.

We attended a seal just recently that was caught in a frisbee

:56:18.:56:27.

and that frisbee must have been on there for months and it had cut

:56:28.:56:32.

It had been floating in the ocean and the seal,

:56:33.:56:35.

out of curiosity, no doubt, just popped his head through it,

:56:36.:56:38.

and then, obviously, couldn't get it off.

:56:39.:56:45.

To discover more about how plastics behave in the ocean, scientists

:56:46.:56:48.

at Imperial College London are taking part in a

:56:49.:56:50.

This huge wave machine will help them to model

:56:51.:56:54.

The main aim is to try to understand how plastic moves through the ocean.

:56:55.:57:02.

We want to understand how waves and currents can move plastics,

:57:03.:57:08.

how it accumulates and how it affects the environment.

:57:09.:57:13.

We only know about 1% of the plastic that we put into the ocean,

:57:14.:57:17.

so we want to understand, for example, how much plastic

:57:18.:57:20.

I love paddleboarding and when I first started doing it

:57:21.:57:25.

in London on the canals and rivers, I realised how bad the problem

:57:26.:57:28.

Trying to stop plastic getting into the sea in the first place

:57:29.:57:35.

is both Lizzie Carr's passion and ambition.

:57:36.:57:37.

There were moments I would paddle and I would see things

:57:38.:57:40.

like a coot's nest, one time, that was made up almost

:57:41.:57:42.

And I thought, something needs to be done.

:57:43.:57:51.

I need to show people what I'm seeing every time I'm out paddling,

:57:52.:57:54.

just how bad this problem is, inland as well as in the oceans.

:57:55.:57:57.

She has paddleboarded the length of England's canals and rivers,

:57:58.:58:01.

recruiting volunteers and helping to clean up.

:58:02.:58:06.

Ultimately, this is a man-made problem and despite the resilience

:58:07.:58:08.

of the natural world, it is one that needs

:58:09.:58:11.

Solutions need to be found from government Plymouth, consumers,

:58:12.:58:27.

manufacturers, everyone. Back in Plymouth, on board the Falcon

:58:28.:58:35.

Spirit, We Are With a professor from the University. What are we finding?

:58:36.:58:42.

There is seaweed, seagrass, natural debris, but also, unfortunately,

:58:43.:58:46.

lots of plastic. We would need to take these back for forensic

:58:47.:58:49.

analysis to confirm the polymers but we have got a lot of polystyrene

:58:50.:58:56.

already. These are a couple of things we have found already. Very

:58:57.:59:02.

recognisable. Some of the small pieces of polystyrene, a piece of

:59:03.:59:08.

twine, a small plastic pellet, all very small pieces that are quite

:59:09.:59:12.

easy for marine life to ingest and that presents a range of problems.

:59:13.:59:16.

Just popped that back in the petri dish. Thank you, Richard. Let us

:59:17.:59:21.

introduce you to Emily again. Good morning. You have set sail around

:59:22.:59:26.

the world, the British Isles, to gauge the problem and also to try to

:59:27.:59:30.

find solutions. Absolutely. We have been looking closely at what is in

:59:31.:59:34.

the UK waters and asking the questions around the country, what

:59:35.:59:38.

is it we can do about it? We see things we can do every day, it is

:59:39.:59:48.

simply a case of not using so much of the single use plastic. We do not

:59:49.:59:51.

really need it in everyday lives. That will not completely solve the

:59:52.:59:53.

problem. We are looking to businesses, industry, and to

:59:54.:59:57.

government, to look at, what are the bigger, closer to the source

:59:58.:00:00.

problems we need to figure out? How can we put our heads together to

:00:01.:00:05.

solve it? Briefly tell us about some of the sites you have seen around

:00:06.:00:08.

the oceans, these are jars, are they? They are the accumulation

:00:09.:00:13.

zones were because of ocean currents, that is where all the

:00:14.:00:16.

plastic that leaves the shores in the UK and every other country, that

:00:17.:00:22.

is where it wants to end up. We have spent years studying the plastic and

:00:23.:00:27.

trying to quantify how much is out there and also looking at the

:00:28.:00:32.

different types, from the micro plastics to the microfibres, the

:00:33.:00:35.

preproduction pellets, trying to figure out where it is all coming

:00:36.:00:39.

from. Thank you very much indeed. Good luck. I know you have plans to

:00:40.:00:43.

continue campaigning and to try to solve this problem. Interesting that

:00:44.:00:49.

it is not about the big stuff, really, it is about the microfibres,

:00:50.:00:53.

micro beads, that we have been looking at this morning, and no one

:00:54.:00:57.

really knows the extent of the problem. Our expert at Imperial

:00:58.:01:03.

College telling is only 1% of the plastic pollution in the oceans

:01:04.:01:07.

scientists know about. It is a much bigger problem and of course it

:01:08.:01:10.

needs big solutions to solve the problem.

:01:11.:01:15.

It has been interesting on board with you, but I will just say one

:01:16.:01:20.

thing to you, John, wash your hands, I know you are big on cleanliness,

:01:21.:01:23.

but wash your hands. Always, Charlie!

:01:24.:01:29.

He will take the advice. Good advice.

:01:30.:01:32.

Over the last few weeks, we've been speaking to some of the UK's most

:01:33.:01:35.

Then have another story to look at and a new venture for a familiar

:01:36.:01:46.

face? Yes, Baroness Mone has

:01:47.:01:47.

had a remarkable rise We'll talk to her about the ups

:01:48.:01:49.

and the downs in a moment. But first, here's

:01:50.:01:54.

a look at her journey. I, Michelle Baroness Mone, do swear

:01:55.:02:45.

by Almighty God that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance.

:02:46.:02:56.

I am pleased to say Michelle joins us now. It is weird watching those

:02:57.:03:05.

pictures! Cringe! We will come onto those because we have been through a

:03:06.:03:08.

lot, but let's go back to the beginning, growing up in the East

:03:09.:03:12.

End of Glasgow. Just talk us through the beginning, because I know you

:03:13.:03:18.

have talked about life being over in East Glasgow before it even started.

:03:19.:03:21.

Tell me about those beginnings. I started my business at ten years

:03:22.:03:42.

old, just a paper round, but I always wanted to be a business

:03:43.:03:45.

person. People would say, you from the East End of Glasgow, and I would

:03:46.:03:48.

say, what is wrong with that? I am proud of where I am from. I don't

:03:49.:03:51.

think it matters when you are from all your education or the colour of

:03:52.:03:54.

your skin as long as you have the sheer determination and can-do

:03:55.:03:56.

attitude, you can achieve anything, and I suppose I have just been

:03:57.:03:58.

exceptionally determined by whole life to get to where I am now, it

:03:59.:04:01.

has never been put on a plate for me, put it that way. Let's go from

:04:02.:04:04.

those early days to 1996, when you found Altima, the underwear brand,

:04:05.:04:08.

and that was the making of you in many respects, the thing that put

:04:09.:04:12.

you in the public eye and the thing that really created your fortune?

:04:13.:04:19.

Absolutely, I sold Ultimo a few years ago but I created lots of

:04:20.:04:23.

inventions, had lots of registrations, took on some of the

:04:24.:04:27.

biggest bra companies in the world and we were amazing at what we did.

:04:28.:04:37.

Why underwear, why that business? I invented the gel filled bra, I am

:04:38.:04:41.

sure you have come across one of those yourself! It took the world by

:04:42.:04:48.

storm, I had to back the bank to give me money. You took on some

:04:49.:04:52.

established players in the market, what did that feel like? I think

:04:53.:04:55.

because I had nothing to lose, I didn't really care. I had three

:04:56.:04:59.

children and I had to but my house up to the bank for security four

:05:00.:05:04.

times but I just kept working, we were launching in Australia and in

:05:05.:05:08.

America, it was quite something, we had some of the biggest celebrities

:05:09.:05:12.

in the world and we kept the tabloids going for many years! One

:05:13.:05:16.

thing the tabloids have been obsessed with as well is your

:05:17.:05:19.

arrival in the House of Lords and you won't mind me saying, you were

:05:20.:05:22.

quoted at the time saying you had nothing to wear when you got to the

:05:23.:05:25.

House of Lords, explained that for us? I don't really know what the

:05:26.:05:30.

dress code was, I have certainly learned and my whole wardrobe has

:05:31.:05:36.

changed. You cannot wear a dress above the knee you cannot show your

:05:37.:05:40.

elbows, or your cleavage, so all my dresses had to go! The only thing...

:05:41.:05:46.

Whole new wardrobe for the House of Lords! The only thing I don't have

:05:47.:05:52.

is a set of pearls, so maybe you will want to buy me a set for

:05:53.:05:56.

Christmas! I think they are mandatory! You are never still for

:05:57.:06:01.

long and your latest venture is property in Dubai, and this is about

:06:02.:06:04.

a new property development in the city but you can only buy in

:06:05.:06:09.

bitcoin? You might have to explain a bit buggy was about what bitcoin

:06:10.:06:16.

is... This was a partnership with my life partner, Doug Barron, good

:06:17.:06:22.

morning! It is his idea so I am stealing his thunder, he got the

:06:23.:06:26.

development year ago, he asked me to be his partner, it is a quarter of

:06:27.:06:31.

?1 billion development, it is incredible, we are selling it in

:06:32.:06:34.

bitcoin for the first time ever around the world. You can go onto

:06:35.:06:41.

the website now and watch people buy apartments within minutes, it is

:06:42.:06:44.

phenomenal. When we talk about bitcoin the first thing that jumps

:06:45.:06:49.

out at me is that it has always been hard with the underworld brush, the

:06:50.:06:54.

fact that you cannot trace it and it has been notoriously used for

:06:55.:06:57.

trading drugs and illegal activity on the dark web. Add that to the

:06:58.:07:01.

Dubai property market, pretty difficult market to operate in

:07:02.:07:04.

anywhere, are you not asking for trouble? No, it has all changed now,

:07:05.:07:11.

the feds in America caught some people doing what he just said so

:07:12.:07:15.

everything now is transparent and I would not be getting involved in

:07:16.:07:18.

anything, being a Baroness in the House of Lords, if anything was

:07:19.:07:23.

dodgy. It has all changed now, the bitcoin world trade at half billion

:07:24.:07:26.

pounds a day, we cannot ignore it, it is the future digital currency

:07:27.:07:34.

and our apartments are starting at $130,000, which equates to 30

:07:35.:07:39.

bitcoin, so there is a massive community out there, there are 16

:07:40.:07:46.

million bitcoins and by the year 2040 there will be 21 million

:07:47.:07:48.

bitcoins, so it is a market you cannot ignore. Richard Branson is

:07:49.:07:56.

now a shareholder in bit pay, so I think you should go onto the website

:07:57.:08:01.

after we speak and buy an apartment! But bitcoin started $800 in January,

:08:02.:08:08.

well, started at nothing in 2009, and it is now sitting at $4500. It

:08:09.:08:14.

predicts by the end of the year it will be $10,000 and also a new

:08:15.:08:20.

company I launched two months ago, Michelle Mone Interiors, is doing

:08:21.:08:24.

all of the interiors in Dubai as well. Good drugs there! I cannot buy

:08:25.:08:29.

one, though, because you said I already have to buy you some polls.

:08:30.:08:32.

Michelle Mone, very nice to see you, I am off to earn some money.

:08:33.:08:41.

And Ben gets Mayite award for the best question of the day, why

:08:42.:08:47.

underwear? It is a good question, why

:08:48.:08:51.

underwear? Moving on!

:08:52.:08:53.

We'll be speaking to the crime writer,

:08:54.:08:54.

But first, a last brief look at the headlines

:08:55.:08:58.

She's responsible for some of Britain's best-loved TV

:08:59.:10:49.

dramas including Widows, Trial and Retribution,

:10:50.:10:50.

Away from the small screen, Lynda la Plante has also

:10:51.:10:55.

written more than 30 books and in her new novel,

:10:56.:10:57.

she's returned to one of her most famous characters -

:10:58.:11:00.

Good morning. Why did you feel the need to step back into the early

:11:01.:11:07.

days of Jane Tennison? I never had the need to, somebody at a book

:11:08.:11:13.

signing said, what was Jane Tennison like as a young woman? And I

:11:14.:11:19.

actually didn't have a clue. Because she is unrecognisable in this book,

:11:20.:11:22.

having watched the programmes, having read your latest book, she is

:11:23.:11:30.

one confident, unsure, completely new to the door, not really a

:11:31.:11:33.

character that many of your loyal viewers and readers would recognise?

:11:34.:11:39.

Helen Mirren, when she stepped on the screen in prime suspect, was

:11:40.:11:44.

already in her mid-40s. To get that kind of composure and strength and

:11:45.:11:50.

to deflate all the discrimination she had to cope with, you think,

:11:51.:11:56.

that is very interesting! How did that character grow? Because she was

:11:57.:12:03.

unusual, in plain clothes detective. That was the first time I thought...

:12:04.:12:10.

What was going? So Good Friday is set in the mid-70s, the early is

:12:11.:12:15.

fascinating because there is a sense of the time and place and culture

:12:16.:12:19.

around her being a young policewoman in a very different kind of police

:12:20.:12:25.

force? Yes, the discrimination is beyond belief! And the naivete of

:12:26.:12:34.

her, she is very naive. It was the time when you had The Sweetly on

:12:35.:12:42.

TV... Which was a boys club, and she wanted in on that. The robbery, the

:12:43.:12:51.

fast cars. So she asked the chief if she could be transferred to the

:12:52.:12:57.

flying squad, the Sweeney, not a hope in hell! Because they had no

:12:58.:13:03.

women. But then she is transferred, it is almost like she should have

:13:04.:13:06.

had a little tap on the shoulder or a warning and they say, you might be

:13:07.:13:12.

able to get in the dip squad, and not many people know what the dip

:13:13.:13:16.

squad is. Which is about pickpockets? Yes, they had this

:13:17.:13:22.

awful office in Victoria, they were all undercover officers, but their

:13:23.:13:28.

job was to pick out pickpockets is, mostly in the tube station, so they

:13:29.:13:33.

would hit Oxford Street and there you have got the big stores,

:13:34.:13:38.

liberties, all these things, and watch the gangs of pickpockets. Do

:13:39.:13:43.

you still enjoy writing... ? I love it. You have another one going at

:13:44.:13:51.

the moment? Just one? No, it is a machine! But truthfully I really

:13:52.:13:59.

love writing but I also love meeting people and learning every day

:14:00.:14:03.

something new. I think it shows. Really enjoyed the book, Lynda,

:14:04.:14:04.

lovely having you with us. We'll be here from 6am

:14:05.:14:06.

tomorrow morning. Now on BBC One, it's time

:14:07.:14:10.

for Council House Crackdown. My parents both grew up on

:14:11.:14:17.

council estates

:14:18.:14:21.