08/09/2017 Breakfast


08/09/2017

The latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC's Breakfast team.


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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Naga

:00:00.:00:08.

More than one million people have been hit by Hurricane Irma

:00:09.:00:14.

The British Virgin Islands are the latest to report major

:00:15.:00:18.

The Governor declares a state of emergency.

:00:19.:00:25.

All of us have been afflicted by Hurricane Irma, some more mothers.

:00:26.:00:32.

Apart from the structural damage there have been reports of

:00:33.:00:33.

casualties and fatalities. It's predicted another 26 million

:00:34.:00:34.

people are at risk from the giant Major tourism areas in Cuba

:00:35.:00:38.

and Florida are being evacuated. The UK government promises ?32

:00:39.:00:42.

million to help with the clean-up operation and deploys troops

:00:43.:00:45.

and ships to the area. Also this morning: a warning of race

:00:46.:01:01.

bias in the British justice system. A government-backed report says

:01:02.:01:12.

prosecution against some offenders In the last few hours pilots working

:01:13.:01:14.

for Thomas Cook Airlines have It's the first industrial action

:01:15.:01:18.

by UK pilots in 40 years. I'll be asking the airline's boss

:01:19.:01:22.

and the pilot's union In sport, Big Ben is still striking,

:01:23.:01:25.

at Lord's at least. Ben Stokes takes six wickets

:01:26.:01:30.

on a crazy day at Lord's, with both the West Indies and then

:01:31.:01:36.

England suffering batting collapses, Hello from marvellous Morecambe.

:01:37.:01:50.

Once the daylight arrives, you will see that the breakfast chair is here

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for its final hurrah after the tour around it and's coasts. We will be

:01:55.:01:59.

looking back, Peter Thomson forward, to the future of our seaside towns.

:02:00.:02:02.

And Sarah has the weather. And unsettled day today with lots of

:02:03.:02:08.

lost three showers around. I will bring you all the details of the

:02:09.:02:14.

forecast here in the UK, as well as Hurricane Irma and where it is

:02:15.:02:15.

heading next, in about 15 minutes. The path of destruction brought

:02:16.:02:17.

by Hurricane Irma has now affected more than 1 million people

:02:18.:02:22.

across the Caribbean. At least 14 people have been killed,

:02:23.:02:24.

and a state of emergency has been declared on the British

:02:25.:02:28.

Virgin Islands. Overnight, the British Overseas

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Territory of Turks and Caicos has been pummelled by the storm,

:02:38.:02:40.

leaving tourists and residents The hurricane is projected to move

:02:41.:02:42.

across to the Bahamas and Cuba where mass evacuations are underway,

:02:43.:02:47.

before it reaches Florida This is what it is like to look out

:02:48.:02:56.

of your hotel room in the Turks and K course, knowing that one of the

:02:57.:03:00.

strongest storms in recent memory is coming your way. -- Caicos. We could

:03:01.:03:03.

start to hear the noise all around us. We are not even close to the

:03:04.:03:11.

worst bits yet, which is a bit scary. On the British Virgin Islands

:03:12.:03:17.

there have been an unknown number of deaths, with Communications severely

:03:18.:03:20.

disrupted, the governor issued this audio message declaring a state of

:03:21.:03:25.

emergency. All of us have been afflicted by Hurricane Irma, some

:03:26.:03:30.

more than others. Apart from the structural damage they have sadly

:03:31.:03:32.

been reports of casualties and fatalities. I am truly heartbroken

:03:33.:03:37.

by this news. My thoughts and prayers are with each and every one

:03:38.:03:42.

of you. At least one person is believed to have died on the British

:03:43.:03:46.

territory of Anguilla, where residents sheltered in the strongest

:03:47.:03:49.

parts of their homes for safety. We were in the bath with a mattress

:03:50.:03:54.

above us. That is how we managed to keep safe and dry. I think a lot of

:03:55.:04:02.

people were in a similar situation. We have seen houses with cars that

:04:03.:04:07.

have been just picked up and thrown through the house. Barbuda was one

:04:08.:04:12.

of the first items to be hit by Hurricane Irma. It is now less than

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48 hours away from the impact of a second hurricane. Hurricane Jose has

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sustained wind speeds of 120 mph and it looks likely to gain industry

:04:22.:04:27.

over the next day or two. -- gain in strength.

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Let's find out more about the impact the hurricane is having.

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We can now speak to Simon Cross, who moved to the British Virgin

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Islands two years ago from Essex, and is in Tortola this morning.

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Hello, good morning. Obviously it is the early hours of the morning at

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the moment. It is pretty quiet. You can hear the odd tractor in the

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distance, hopefully performing the function of clearing the roads.

:04:57.:05:02.

There is plenty of debris and trees and really the only method of

:05:03.:05:07.

getting around anyway here is by car, it is a mountainous island and

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you can't really do anything without a car. So it is important to us that

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the roads are clear and the place is safe. Earlier today when we manage

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to go to town to try to check up on things, it is not great, the

:05:22.:05:27.

properties are in a terrible state at the moment. Just hoping someone

:05:28.:05:38.

be done overnight. In truth, it feels like the islanders on its to

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be honest. The last thing we want is any sort of doubt whether, let alone

:05:45.:05:48.

a category three or whatever Hurricane Jose is supposed to be.

:05:49.:05:53.

Can you tell us what it was like when Hurricane Irma hit? We are

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seeing pictures of rulings devastated and we have heard

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horrific stories of people holding onto doors as the doors are being

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blown through. Can you tell us what it was like, the ferocity as it hit

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the buildings? Yeah, in our house it started, the major warning was when

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a skylight was blown off the roof. You could hear the wind blasting

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through the upstairs of the house, and at that point we thought maybe

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the roof was going to go. That was our main indicator to get downstairs

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into the basement, the most secure part of the building. We have a

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metal shutters that had been secured, and I had been pulling them

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around and had a lot of confidence they would protect the building, but

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the next thing you know they were ripped off the French doors which

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were project in us -- protecting us. Ten minutes later the other one went

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off the other set of doors. So it was completely exposed. There were

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missiles from three or debris or whatever, just penetrating through

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there, and fortunately nothing happened. They held firm. But when

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the eye came its sort of gave us a half-time to re-evaluate and see

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what we could do in the meantime. So myself and the family rushed

:07:20.:07:25.

upstairs and did our best to put some timber over the skylights to

:07:26.:07:28.

try to prevent the wind from getting under the roof. We just about

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managed to do that and complete that before the second half came, at

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which point we rushed back downstairs to our original position

:07:37.:07:45.

in the basement. The wind was scary, we all ended up of link together in

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the adjoining bathroom. -- huddling together. It had a small window but

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that was protected by metal shutters, so that was the safest

:07:57.:07:59.

spot. Fortunately the mahogany French doors managed to hold. The

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wind was like nothing I have ever known in my life. It was crazy. It

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sounds absolutely terrifying. Simon, we wish you and your family well.

:08:08.:08:11.

Thank you for the time you have taken to speak to us.

:08:12.:08:13.

The government has come in for criticism for its response

:08:14.:08:16.

to the disaster, with it labelled "inadequate" by islanders.

:08:17.:08:18.

Let's get more detail now from our news correspondent

:08:19.:08:21.

Andy Moore, who is outside the Foreign Office for

:08:22.:08:23.

What picture is emerging from what has been done, or maybe what has not

:08:24.:08:33.

been done? First of all, the government has earmarked ?32 million

:08:34.:08:37.

in disaster relief. Then there are the military assets which are either

:08:38.:08:41.

in the region or on their way. There is a royal Fleet auxiliary ship,

:08:42.:08:48.

Mounts Bay, which is off Anguilla. That has a helicopter on-board,

:08:49.:08:51.

earthmoving equipment, release supplies. Then we have the first

:08:52.:08:56.

element task group heading out from RAF rise Norton this morning. --

:08:57.:09:04.

Brize Norton. Apple engineers, Doctors, soldiers. Then we have a

:09:05.:09:09.

helicopter carrier on the way from the Mediterranean to the Caribbean.

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The critics are saying this is too little, too late, especially compare

:09:14.:09:18.

to the relief efforts mounted by France, the Netherlands and United

:09:19.:09:20.

States, which also have territories and the Caribbean. Andy, thank you.

:09:21.:09:31.

Young offenders from ethnic minority backgrounds will become the next

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generation of criminals unless the justice system is reformed,

:09:35.:09:37.

according to a review by David Lammy.

:09:38.:09:39.

The inquiry commissioned by the Government, makes

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These include allowing some prosecutions to be deferred,

:09:41.:09:44.

or even dropped, if suspects get treatment for issues such as drug

:09:45.:09:47.

Noel Williams was 11 years old when he first got involved in gangs. By

:09:48.:09:55.

the age of 13 he was imprisoned for robberies and drug dealing. I am in

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and out of the system. I was in there three times. Lots of lingos

:10:00.:10:04.

on, and there is a lack of prison staff, so they don't pick up on

:10:05.:10:08.

certain things. People are self harming. If they aren't cutting

:10:09.:10:11.

their arms they are trying to kill themselves. He has turned his life

:10:12.:10:14.

around, but he believes that race and ethnicity plays a part in how

:10:15.:10:18.

you are treated and punished within the criminal justice system. It is

:10:19.:10:22.

unjust, of course it is. If you look at the sentence as we get, they are

:10:23.:10:27.

longer, they are harsher. People are coming out not rehabilitated.

:10:28.:10:31.

Sometimes they are coming out and reoffending at an accelerated rate

:10:32.:10:34.

than their counterparts. The David Lammy review makes a number of key

:10:35.:10:38.

recommendations, such as removing identifying information about

:10:39.:10:42.

ethnicity when cases are passed from police to prosecutors, so that

:10:43.:10:45.

racial bias doesn't influence charging decisions. I am very

:10:46.:10:51.

worried about our prison system, where I do think that there are

:10:52.:10:55.

still prisons where it is clear there is overt discrimination going

:10:56.:10:59.

on, and some of the treatment is just unacceptable. It is one of the

:11:00.:11:03.

largest reviews of its kind, and highlights that radical reform is

:11:04.:11:06.

urgently needed to bring fairness to the justice system. And after seven

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o'clock we will be speaking to the report author, David Lammy.

:11:17.:11:18.

The government is accusing Labour of a "cynical" attempt to block

:11:19.:11:21.

The bill paves the way for leaving the European Union in March 2019.

:11:22.:11:26.

Labour and other opposition parties have promised to vote against it

:11:27.:11:29.

next week, insisting it gives sweeping powers to ministers

:11:30.:11:31.

Our political correspondent Chris Mason joins us from

:11:32.:11:35.

Chris, what can we expect from today?

:11:36.:11:42.

Good morning. They really are. We have seen a summer of disagreements

:11:43.:11:49.

between the government and Brussels. What we are now seeing is

:11:50.:11:54.

disagreement bubbling up here in Westminster between different groups

:11:55.:11:58.

of MPs, sometimes between the parties and sometimes within the

:11:59.:12:02.

parties, over the flavour of Brexit, if you like, that we should end up

:12:03.:12:06.

with, and how the whole process of delivering it should be scrutinised.

:12:07.:12:11.

Labour said that the government's plans amounted to an unprecedented

:12:12.:12:15.

power grab. Yesterday we were speaking about Henry VIII and those

:12:16.:12:22.

Henry VIII powers to stop sufficient scrutiny, as some see it, of the

:12:23.:12:27.

finer details. The government says that Labour are simply getting in

:12:28.:12:31.

the way and are picking away at a rule that has existed for many

:12:32.:12:34.

years, and was used for European legislation up until now anyway, in

:12:35.:12:38.

terms of turning it into UK law. As I say, you have little breakout of

:12:39.:12:44.

disagreement within parties, so yesterday, some Conservative MPs

:12:45.:12:47.

wrote a letter they were planning to give to a Sunday newspaper, which

:12:48.:12:50.

was leaked to the BBC, saying they didn't want to see the UK staying in

:12:51.:12:55.

the EU by stealth. Then there was a response to that by some other malt

:12:56.:12:58.

pro- European Conservatives, suggesting that letter was not

:12:59.:13:01.

particularly helpful in negotiations. So the politics is

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very much alive and well between the UK and Brussels, and now, once

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again, unsurprisingly, it is alive and well here at Westminster as

:13:10.:13:12.

well. The big vote comes up on Monday. I am sure we will talk about

:13:13.:13:18.

that on Monday. Chris, thank you. We are just getting news of an

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earthquake with a magnitude of 8.0 shaking southern Mexico. It is

:13:24.:13:29.

struck off the Pacific coast of the country, rustling buildings in

:13:30.:13:32.

Mexico City, which is hundreds of kilometres away. No reports so far

:13:33.:13:35.

of damage or casualties. The Nobel prize winner,

:13:36.:13:36.

Malala Yousafzai, has called on the leader of Myanamar,

:13:37.:13:38.

Aung San Suu Kyi, to protect the country's Rohingya

:13:39.:13:41.

Muslim minority. More than 160,000 Rohingyas have

:13:42.:13:43.

fled to Bangladesh since unrest Ms Suu Kyi has been widely

:13:44.:13:45.

criticised for failing to condemn A 13-year-old girl from Somerset

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whose organs were donated after her death has saved

:13:50.:13:56.

or transformed the lives of eight patients - a record

:13:57.:13:59.

for a single donor in the UK. Jemima Layzell collapsed

:14:00.:14:02.

with a brain aneurysm and died four Five of the patients who received

:14:03.:14:05.

life-saving transplants Jemima's story is part of an NHS

:14:06.:14:11.

campaign appealing for more donors. There are thousands of people

:14:12.:14:22.

waiting for a transplant. Three people a day die. If you would be

:14:23.:14:28.

willing to accept an organ you should be willing to donate an

:14:29.:14:32.

organ, and that is what we are asking people to consider, and make

:14:33.:14:35.

a decision that they will support organ donation. An amazing story.

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Absolutely incredible. And some comfort for her family, after losing

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her. And now Mike has the sport. Good morning. Reflecting on a crazy

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day at Lord's, 14 wickets fell under darkening skies. This test series

:14:50.:14:52.

between England and the West Indies has been such a rollercoaster, who

:14:53.:14:56.

knows what will happen in the remaining few days. Big Ben, Ben

:14:57.:15:01.

Stokes, he did the damage for England, but then England themselves

:15:02.:15:05.

suffered a batting collapse. Let's toast Ben Stokes, first of all,

:15:06.:15:07.

taking his career best tally. He helped dismiss the the Windies,

:15:08.:15:12.

for just 123 in their first innings, but poor batting from his team-mates

:15:13.:15:16.

means England have it all to do, There will be two new faces

:15:17.:15:19.

in the women's US Open final. Unseeded Sloane Stephens

:15:20.:15:24.

held her nerve to beat Venus Williams in three sets

:15:25.:15:28.

and sets up a final against fellow We've seen the last of players

:15:29.:15:31.

like Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain moving between Premier League clubs

:15:32.:15:38.

once the season starts. Clubs have voted to close next

:15:39.:15:40.

summer's transfer window It will close at 5pm

:15:41.:15:43.

on the Thursday evening Manchester United and Manchester

:15:44.:15:46.

City were among five clubs who voted Chris Froome has extended his lead

:15:47.:15:50.

over Vincenzo Nibali after stage 18 The Team Sky rider now leads

:15:51.:16:00.

by 1 minute, 37 seconds. There are two stages left before

:16:01.:16:05.

Sunday's parade into Madrid. More on that later and some papers

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in a moment. Will do that in a moment. Thanks, Mike.

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Here's Sarah with a look at this morning's weather.

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You're covering all sides of the Atlantic, we can't ignore what's

:16:26.:16:33.

going on with hurricane and also hurricane Jose behind it? -- Harry

:16:34.:16:41.

Kane Erma. It's not often we have three hurricanes. Hurricane catcher

:16:42.:16:52.

is sitting east of Mexico. Katie. Hurricane hoser... Here's the

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satellite image showing the well-defined eye as the storm goes

:17:03.:17:03.

north-west, passing across the Turks north-west, passing across the Turks

:17:04.:17:11.

Caicos Islands -- hurricane Jose. Still 165 mph winds, making it a

:17:12.:17:16.

strong category five. Looking at the forecast track, it's going to move

:17:17.:17:22.

further north-west in between Cuba and the Bahamas, again bringing

:17:23.:17:27.

heavy rain, up to half a metre of rain, catastrophic strong winds and

:17:28.:17:31.

a significant storm surge before it makes its way towards for that in

:17:32.:17:35.

time for the weekend. A very serious storm the other side of the

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Atlantic. Let's look at the forecast closer to home. Here's a picture we

:17:40.:17:44.

had taken by one of our Weather Watchers a few hours ago, the or

:17:45.:17:49.

Boriello is, a fantastic display last night and with clear spells

:17:50.:17:55.

many enjoyed the or borealis. For today it's an unsettled picture. It

:17:56.:18:04.

will feel breezy and windy with some showers. Low pressure dominating the

:18:05.:18:08.

weather and the winds will be Iraq telling around this area of low

:18:09.:18:12.

pressure and importing showers as we had through the day with a weather

:18:13.:18:16.

front in the southern part of the UK, more persistent rain at times.

:18:17.:18:21.

Here's how the day shapes up, sunny spells and scattered showers almost

:18:22.:18:24.

anywhere with heavier and more prolonged rainfall in parts of

:18:25.:18:28.

southern England but even further north some showers could bring

:18:29.:18:31.

thunder and lightning as well. Looking at this afternoon, plenty of

:18:32.:18:36.

showers rattling in across Scotland and Northern Ireland. To the east of

:18:37.:18:41.

higher ground you will see fewer showers but they will be slow-moving

:18:42.:18:45.

by the afternoon so there could be heavy and prolonged downpours. South

:18:46.:18:49.

across England and Wales you will see sunshine and heavy showers with

:18:50.:18:54.

more prolonged rainfall likely in central and southern England into

:18:55.:18:57.

the afternoon but some brighter skies Inbetweener showers and it

:18:58.:19:02.

will feel fairly cool, around 16-17. We stick with the showers overnight

:19:03.:19:11.

but some clear spells, as we start the weekend, temperatures around...

:19:12.:19:17.

Still windy towards the west. It looks like we will have a quiet

:19:18.:19:23.

quieter spell to stop the day on Sunday but things again staying

:19:24.:19:26.

unsettled with further rain -- to start the day.

:19:27.:19:29.

Them and Mike have joined us for a look at the papers. Some of the

:19:30.:19:40.

front pages -- Ben and Mike. The Sun are focusing on hurricane Erma. This

:19:41.:19:46.

is the number of Brits they think will be caught up. 30,000 people

:19:47.:19:55.

could be affected and we will get more on the latest in terms of the

:19:56.:19:59.

damage through the morning. We hope to speak to eyewitnesses and people

:20:00.:20:03.

from the islands affected. The Daily Star looking at a story of two

:20:04.:20:09.

daughters, two women, who may be among the victims of hurricane Erma.

:20:10.:20:14.

Claire Frank has said she has had no contact with her daughter, who is

:20:15.:20:20.

pregnant, and Asher as well, obviously very concerned. The front

:20:21.:20:26.

page of the times looking and Britain being criticised for

:20:27.:20:30.

delaying help. They promised ?32 million and they are sending a Royal

:20:31.:20:35.

Navy flagship with helicopters, Marines and engineers. The Daily

:20:36.:20:37.

Mail interested in the language being used between Brussels and

:20:38.:20:42.

David Davis personally. They are quoting Jean-Claude Juncker,

:20:43.:20:48.

suggesting the Brexit secretary was lazy and unstable, that's the quote

:20:49.:20:54.

that he's taken. The photo on most of the front pages is of Prince

:20:55.:20:58.

George, that is a very good representation of how most four

:20:59.:21:01.

-year-olds feel about starting school, slightly apprehensive but he

:21:02.:21:05.

held hands with his dad and the head of the lower school at Saint

:21:06.:21:09.

Thomases in Battersea, where he is beginning school. What have you got?

:21:10.:21:16.

A lot about Frankfurt defeating Paris in the EU bank battle. They

:21:17.:21:21.

are vying for a slice of the financial services market, up until

:21:22.:21:25.

now London has dominated. Questions about whether banks may move to if

:21:26.:21:30.

they do move. Paris has been vying for the top spot -- where the banks.

:21:31.:21:36.

Frankfurt is managing to do that, though. There are concerns about

:21:37.:21:40.

what that means for Germany's dominance as far as the use

:21:41.:21:45.

concerned. The story, we will deliver electric cars but what about

:21:46.:21:50.

the network. We spoke to the boss of Jaguar Land Rover, talking about the

:21:51.:21:54.

number of new carmakers coming up with electric vehicles but the

:21:55.:21:56.

question is where they will be charged. Did you shop in the Argos

:21:57.:22:01.

catalogue when you were younger? I browsed through it just for fun. To

:22:02.:22:06.

do your Christmas list for Father Christmas and you would circle

:22:07.:22:10.

things you wanted? I would fold the page is very neatly. Apparently the

:22:11.:22:15.

Argos catalogue could be going out of print, that's the story in the

:22:16.:22:19.

Mirror. We had the yellow Pages earlier in the week. They have said

:22:20.:22:24.

they are going to try it in some stores because some either use

:22:25.:22:28.

tablets or browse online. They said it is a trial at the moment but it

:22:29.:22:32.

could disappear in print if the trial is successful. The Argos

:22:33.:22:38.

catalogue, what's interesting, they have records of past catalogues at

:22:39.:22:41.

the British library because they are quite a record of our history. You

:22:42.:22:45.

can see what people were buying and if you think it was all clock radios

:22:46.:22:50.

and kettles and other things and they tell us a story of the time. We

:22:51.:22:56.

do really still buy kettles and toasters. The error, though. An

:22:57.:23:03.

alarm clock with a... A Wallace and Gromit alarm clock. The one that

:23:04.:23:08.

folded into three parts into a case. And Furbies as well. Sorry to

:23:09.:23:15.

interrupt, there's a brilliant ad that says all these things you can

:23:16.:23:20.

buy at stores like that, alarm clock radio, calculator, torch, you can

:23:21.:23:24.

buy them as individual items, now they are all in a smart phone. It

:23:25.:23:34.

just ruins it. That's no fun, is it? Turkeyturkeys voting for Christmas

:23:35.:23:37.

is the decision by the Premier League too closed the transfer

:23:38.:23:44.

window before the transfer -- season starts. The clubs opposed to this

:23:45.:23:51.

change -- to close. In Europe it stays the same. Barcelona could come

:23:52.:23:57.

in and cherry pick. Can you backtrack, what is the problem? They

:23:58.:24:01.

voted to close the transfer window before the season starts next summer

:24:02.:24:05.

so there's no distractions but that doesn't apply to the rest of Europe

:24:06.:24:10.

so European clubs can come in and by the Premier League players from

:24:11.:24:13.

Premier League clubs and then you've lost your top striker and you can't

:24:14.:24:18.

replace him. The Spanish deadline is later than ours anyway. This time it

:24:19.:24:22.

will be by a month. They need to be better organised. If you haven't

:24:23.:24:27.

switched on to TMS for the final game between the West Indies and

:24:28.:24:32.

England, the final commentary from Henry Blofeld, he was talking about

:24:33.:24:36.

sausages, cranes and pigeons, it reminded us of some of his greats,

:24:37.:24:41.

he is hanging up the Mike. Flintoff starts his run, his shadow behind

:24:42.:24:45.

him, where else would it be. What was the sausage reference? A butcher

:24:46.:24:50.

sent him the sausages but he said that's rather tactless of the

:24:51.:24:53.

Father, I don't know the background of that bit. Sausages, pigeons and

:24:54.:24:57.

cranes. More than half a million people have

:24:58.:25:09.

been ordered to leave their homes in Florida before hurricane Erma hits

:25:10.:25:12.

the US on Sunday and many tourists are stranded at Miami airport with

:25:13.:25:18.

no seats left to come home. Tens of thousands have been told to evacuate

:25:19.:25:21.

their homes on the northern coast of Cuba. Red cross is estimating up to

:25:22.:25:27.

26 million people in total could be exposed to the destructive winds and

:25:28.:25:35.

heavy rains. The BBC's will grant is in Havana.

:25:36.:25:43.

Cubans have spent the past few days watching as nearby islands

:25:44.:25:46.

were devastated by this vast storm as it ploughed

:25:47.:25:49.

Now they know their country's next on its path.

:25:50.:25:52.

The pace of preparations has picked up significantly,

:25:53.:25:54.

with residents on the eastern end of the island taking steps

:25:55.:25:57.

to secure their homes and stock up on basic goods.

:25:58.:26:00.

Fresh drinking water and fuel for generators top of their lists.

:26:01.:26:03.

Cuba is now also a hugely popular tourist destination and the island

:26:04.:26:06.

was busy with holidaymakers when Irma began to form.

:26:07.:26:09.

Now many of those visitors find themselves trapped in a situation

:26:10.:26:22.

they never expected and have never experienced before.

:26:23.:26:24.

Countries with large numbers of citizens in Cuba

:26:25.:26:26.

are co-ordinating with the Cuban authorities to get them out.

:26:27.:26:29.

Assuming the hurricane doesn't change course at the last-minute,

:26:30.:26:31.

it's expected to barrel around the Cuban coastline,

:26:32.:26:33.

dumping large amounts of rain on the island as it passes.

:26:34.:26:37.

Then it should begin to move up to the United States

:26:38.:26:39.

There a state of emergency is already in place and even the man

:26:40.:26:44.

who approved it is having to take measures against Irma.

:26:45.:26:46.

President Trump's Mar-a-Lago golf resort boarding up

:26:47.:26:48.

Many have tried to leave before it makes landfall.

:26:49.:26:52.

I just came here for a couple of weeks, I'm supposed to fly out

:26:53.:26:56.

There's some for Saturday but pretty much they're going to be cancelled

:26:57.:27:02.

so I'm just going to stay in, get waters, canned foods,

:27:03.:27:05.

snack bars, enough for, like, a week or two and pray and hope

:27:06.:27:09.

I don't know, I'm going to go to the airport and just figure out

:27:10.:27:14.

People across the Caribbean are used to dealing with hurricanes,

:27:15.:27:18.

they're an annual part of life in this region,

:27:19.:27:20.

however many have never seen anything quite like Hurricane Irma

:27:21.:27:23.

in their lifetime and fear the worst.

:27:24.:27:25.

Cubans are well aware these are the final few hours of calm

:27:26.:27:28.

before the devastating force of Irma reaches the island,

:27:29.:27:30.

and having seen exactly what it's capable of elsewhere

:27:31.:27:33.

in the Caribbean, many are just hoping the storm is a little kinder

:27:34.:27:37.

Throughout the morning we will be checking in on various locations

:27:38.:27:57.

where they think the storm is hitting, we will keep you're up to

:27:58.:28:01.

date with any developments and Sarah will keep you across how it is

:28:02.:28:03.

travelling as well. Time now to get the news,

:28:04.:28:04.

travel and weather where you are. I'm back with the latest

:28:05.:28:05.

from the BBC London newsroom Plenty more on our website

:28:06.:31:27.

at the usual address. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:31:28.:31:31.

with Charlie Stayt and Naga We'll have the latest news

:31:32.:31:33.

and sport in just a moment. Coming up, pilots for

:31:34.:31:36.

Thomas Cook Airlines are on strike We'll find out what that means

:31:37.:31:39.

for passengers at home and abroad. Rick Astley joins us ahead

:31:40.:31:50.

of performing at a benefit concert for those affected by May's

:31:51.:31:56.

Manchester Arena terror attack. We've shed a tear with her

:31:57.:32:00.

as she reunited siblings on Long Lost Family,

:32:01.:32:03.

and now Davina McCall is tackling the issues of mental health,

:32:04.:32:06.

stress and parenting - she'll be on the sofa

:32:07.:32:08.

to tell us why. But now a summary of this

:32:09.:32:14.

morning's main news. 1.2 million people have now been

:32:15.:32:26.

affected by the destructive trail of Hurricane Irma, according to the

:32:27.:32:29.

international Red Cross. Millions more are in danger, as the storm

:32:30.:32:36.

progressed into Haiti and the Turks and Caicos Islands overnight. The

:32:37.:32:39.

British Virgin Islands are the latest report damage and deaths,

:32:40.:32:42.

where the governor has declared a state of emergency. It is predicted

:32:43.:32:47.

another 26 million people are at risk from the storm in the coming

:32:48.:32:51.

days, with major areas in Florida and Cuba being evacuated. Foreign

:32:52.:32:54.

Secretary Boris Johnson says the U.K.'s acting swiftly in response

:32:55.:33:02.

the devastation. The Royal Navy ship the RFA Mounts Bay has arrived in

:33:03.:33:06.

the region, and a second ship is en route. We can now speak to Fergus

:33:07.:33:10.

Thomas, a human caring adviser working with the Caribbean disaster

:33:11.:33:13.

emergency management agency, and he is in Antigua this morning. Thank

:33:14.:33:19.

you for your time. Could you give us your summary of how the Caribbean

:33:20.:33:23.

and those areas you are looking to have infected? It has been a really

:33:24.:33:34.

split story. Many islands were virtually untouched. This is the

:33:35.:33:37.

biggest storm to hit the Caribbean since the beginning of storm is

:33:38.:33:43.

being recorded, so this is enormous. Unfortunately, as you know, some of

:33:44.:33:48.

the islands on the Northern leeward side have been really badly hit,

:33:49.:33:53.

like Anguilla, Barbuda, and as far as we know, the British Virgin

:33:54.:33:56.

Islands have also been really badly hit. There have been committed

:33:57.:34:02.

issues of those places. -- communication issues in those

:34:03.:34:07.

places. We are hoping to be on the ground in the British Virgin Islands

:34:08.:34:11.

tomorrow morning. The ship, the Mounts Bay, was in Anguilla this

:34:12.:34:15.

morning and delivered the first assistance. They will be moving to

:34:16.:34:18.

the British Virgin Islands to get a better picture of the needs there.

:34:19.:34:24.

So I think we have got our systems... (INAUDIBLE). We should be

:34:25.:34:30.

able to make clear decisions about how to best assist in the coming

:34:31.:34:34.

hours and days. Yes, obviously there are some immediate problems to be

:34:35.:34:39.

communications issues, that would be one of the big ones, but also

:34:40.:34:42.

accessing some of these places initially? Exactly. What you have is

:34:43.:34:53.

atolls, these communities are often not very big. There are some islands

:34:54.:34:58.

with only a few thousand people. They are incredibly difficult to get

:34:59.:35:05.

to, similar to our response in the Philippines, in 2014. Logistically,

:35:06.:35:14.

that was very difficult, we had to send planes out on the first

:35:15.:35:18.

assessment. That is why working with the military air assets is really

:35:19.:35:25.

important. It is a good example of how the Ministry of Defence and the

:35:26.:35:32.

Foreign Office... (INAUDIBLE). Fergus, thank you very much for your

:35:33.:35:36.

time this morning. That was Fergus Thomas speaking to us, a human

:35:37.:35:40.

caring adviser speaking to us from Antigua. Apologies for the

:35:41.:35:45.

communications problem there, he was its planning that is one of the

:35:46.:35:48.

issues they are facing. We will be speaking to some of the other people

:35:49.:35:52.

who have seen first hand the damage from hurricane later in the

:35:53.:35:54.

programme. Young offenders from ethnic minority

:35:55.:35:55.

backgrounds will become "the next generation" of adult criminals

:35:56.:35:58.

unless the justice system is reformed, according to a review

:35:59.:36:00.

led by the MP David Lammy. The report makes more than 30

:36:01.:36:03.

recommendations including allowing some prosecutions to be deferred

:36:04.:36:06.

or even dropped if suspects get treatment for issues such as drug

:36:07.:36:09.

or alcohol problems. What struck me about the report,

:36:10.:36:23.

two, was the reality that a very large numbers of British people,

:36:24.:36:28.

from our black and ethnic minority communities, lack confidence in the

:36:29.:36:32.

criminal justice system. No minister, no government of any

:36:33.:36:35.

political colour, can be happy with that state of affairs. We need to

:36:36.:36:40.

address that Roblin. David Lammy's recommendations offer a possible

:36:41.:36:44.

route for doing some of that, and we will be responding in details of

:36:45.:36:45.

every item in his report. An earthquake with a magnitude

:36:46.:36:49.

of eight has shaken southern Mexico. The quake struck just off

:36:50.:36:52.

the Pacific coast of the country, rattling buildings in Mexico City

:36:53.:36:55.

hundreds of kilometres away. There are no reports so far of any

:36:56.:36:58.

major damage or casualties. The government is accusing Labour

:36:59.:37:07.

of a "cynical" attempt to block The bill paves the way for leaving

:37:08.:37:10.

the European Union in March 2019. Labour and other opposition parties

:37:11.:37:14.

have promised to vote against it next week insisting it gives

:37:15.:37:17.

sweeping powers to ministers The Brexit secretary David Davis

:37:18.:37:20.

claimed Britons will not forgive Labour if they try to "delay

:37:21.:37:24.

or destroy" the process A 13-year-old girl from Somerset,

:37:25.:37:27.

whose organs were donated after her death, has saved

:37:28.:37:34.

or transformed the lives That's a record for

:37:35.:37:37.

a single donor in the UK. Jemima Layzell collapsed

:37:38.:37:47.

with a brain aneurysm and died four Five of the patients who received

:37:48.:37:50.

life-saving transplants Jemima's story is part of an NHS

:37:51.:37:54.

campaign appealing for more donors. Time to talk about sport with Mike.

:37:55.:38:09.

Good morning. The cricket is going well? It is exciting. It went very

:38:10.:38:16.

well for the Ben, striking again in London, but at Lord's. He took six

:38:17.:38:20.

wickets. England really up against it against this West Indies team

:38:21.:38:24.

which they were supposed to thrash in this series. The West Indies now

:38:25.:38:27.

have the initiative in the deciding test.

:38:28.:38:28.

England's Ben Stokes took a career best 6 wickets for just 22 runs

:38:29.:38:31.

on the first day of the third and deciding test against

:38:32.:38:35.

He took apart the Windies middle order, restricting them to a total

:38:36.:38:39.

of 123, but poor batting from his team-mates has

:38:40.:38:41.

Obviously we still have to score runs to try to get ahead, but I

:38:42.:39:00.

think it will be one of those wickets where they will be that

:39:01.:39:05.

period of ways and Mrs and not being able to score too much. If we can

:39:06.:39:09.

get up to their score, and get past it, we will fancy ourselves.

:39:10.:39:10.

There will be two new faces in the women's US Open final.

:39:11.:39:13.

Unseeded Sloane Stephens held her nerve overnight to beat

:39:14.:39:16.

Venus Williams in three sets in New York.

:39:17.:39:18.

And waiting for her in the final will be fellow American Madison

:39:19.:39:21.

She beat Coco Vandeweghe in just over an hour in straight sets.

:39:22.:39:30.

I wasn't playing well, just wasn't playing well. There were moments

:39:31.:39:36.

when you have to dig deep and figure out how to get the ball on the court

:39:37.:39:41.

and have a big name. I can't be tentative in figuring out how to get

:39:42.:39:45.

that all in. She played great defence. I haven't played her in a

:39:46.:39:50.

long time, clearly she has seen me playing many, many times, but I

:39:51.:39:55.

haven't seen her play as much. I'm super happy to be in a Grand Slam

:39:56.:39:59.

final, and to do it here, obviously my home slam, it is even more

:40:00.:40:02.

special. I think this is what every player dreams about. And

:40:03.:40:07.

unfortunately, fortunately but unfortunately, I had to play Venus.

:40:08.:40:12.

But having four Americans in the semifinals, I think that says able

:40:13.:40:15.

to about American tennis and where we are right now.

:40:16.:40:18.

And waiting for her in the final will be fellow American Madison

:40:19.:40:22.

She beat Coco Vandeweghe in just over an hour in straight sets.

:40:23.:40:29.

We've seen the last of players like Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain moving

:40:30.:40:32.

between Premier League clubs once the season starts.

:40:33.:40:34.

Clubs have voted to close next summer's transfer window

:40:35.:40:36.

It will close at 5:00 on the Thursday evening

:40:37.:40:43.

Manchester United and Manchester City were among five clubs who voted

:40:44.:40:49.

The window overseas will remain the same, so players

:40:50.:40:53.

could still leave their clubs after the deadline in England closes.

:40:54.:40:59.

Everton manager Ronald Koeman said he is "very disappointed"

:41:00.:41:01.

at Wayne Rooney's drink-driving charge and the player will be "dealt

:41:02.:41:04.

with internally at the appropriate time."

:41:05.:41:08.

Rooney is currently on bail ahead of a hearing on September 18th.

:41:09.:41:11.

Koeman also confirmed that the former England captain

:41:12.:41:14.

will play for Everton against Tottenham on Saturday.

:41:15.:41:20.

I am very disappointed that this situation regarding Wayne Rooney. We

:41:21.:41:31.

have spoken, that was last Tuesday, and the chairman, Bill Kenwright,

:41:32.:41:36.

spoke also to wane about this situation. -- Wayne. In line with

:41:37.:41:46.

any disciplinary matter, this will be dealt with internally by the

:41:47.:41:47.

club. Britain's Chris Froome has

:41:48.:41:48.

extended his overall lead The Tour de France winner attacked

:41:49.:41:50.

inside the final mile of stage eighteen to claw back twenty seconds

:41:51.:41:55.

on his nearest rival Vincenzo He now leads the Italian by more

:41:56.:41:58.

than a minute and a half. Meanwhile, things aren't

:41:59.:42:10.

going so well on the Tour of Britain Geraint Thomas could only finish

:42:11.:42:12.

eighth on the 10-mile individual That leaves him ninth overall,

:42:13.:42:16.

19 seconds behind Lars Boom, who won the stage to take

:42:17.:42:22.

the overall lead from Sky's Elia That is just about it. But how about

:42:23.:42:35.

this? He has walked away unscathed from motorbike crashes at over 100

:42:36.:42:39.

miles an hour, we are talking about Cal Critchlow, written's leading

:42:40.:42:48.

motor GP rider. -- Britain's leading motor GP rider. Now he is in doubt

:42:49.:42:51.

this weekend because of a dangerous piece of cheese. He was cutting

:42:52.:42:55.

palms and cheese. He says it is a very dangerous activity. He says the

:42:56.:43:01.

cheese was too hard. So he has had surgery on his finger. Of course,

:43:02.:43:05.

that is pretty vital when you are riding a motorbike. So the night has

:43:06.:43:12.

slipped? Yeah. It reminds me of other bizarre sporting injuries, so

:43:13.:43:15.

if you have any, get in touch. There was Dave present, who dropped a

:43:16.:43:19.

bottle of cream on his foot, and broke his toe. I had a friend who

:43:20.:43:31.

broke his arm playing sabutio. There are many more bizarre ones which I

:43:32.:43:35.

will keep coming. Use vegetable peel, that is my tip for Parmesan

:43:36.:43:43.

cheese. Somebody put his back out, typing a letter. Anything can

:43:44.:43:48.

happen. Dangerous business, being in the kitchen ahead of sporting

:43:49.:43:49.

events. The first strike by UK pilots

:43:50.:43:52.

in 40 years has started Thomas Cook Airline pilots

:43:53.:43:55.

are unhappy over pay. Yes, the 12-hour strike started

:43:56.:43:58.

at 3:00 this morning and will last The pilots at Thomas Cook Airlines

:43:59.:44:02.

are unhappy over low pay rises The airline says it's still planning

:44:03.:44:10.

to operate all scheduled flights today, but it has changed

:44:11.:44:14.

some departure times. We can speak to Brian Strutton,

:44:15.:44:24.

General Secretary of the union, the British Airline Pilots

:44:25.:44:27.

Association, or Balpa. Good morning, Brian. Just explain to

:44:28.:44:38.

us, if you will, what is it you are calling for?

:44:39.:44:43.

We have been in pain negotiations with Thomas Cook since the start of

:44:44.:44:49.

this year and we are asking for a substantial playwright in excess of

:44:50.:44:53.

inflation -- pay negotiations. We want to catch up with past losses

:44:54.:44:57.

were Thomas Cook pilots have fallen behind other pilots in the industry

:44:58.:45:01.

and we're asking for better arrangements when Thomas Cook move

:45:02.:45:04.

pilots around between flights. What the company have offered is a 4% pay

:45:05.:45:09.

rise over two years, which just isn't good enough. We've had many

:45:10.:45:14.

days of discussions at ACAS. Unfortunately the company instead

:45:15.:45:21.

chose to take us to court last week, so we lost a bit of potential

:45:22.:45:24.

negotiating time and that's why we've ended up on strike today. We

:45:25.:45:29.

regret the disruption to passengers but we think we've pitched this

:45:30.:45:33.

action at a very responsible level. Why is 4% over two years not good

:45:34.:45:39.

enough? I've just looked at the latest figures, wages are increasing

:45:40.:45:44.

foremost by 2.1%. If you work in the public sector your pay doesn't go up

:45:45.:45:49.

1%. Inflation is just over 2%. You're getting 4% over two years,

:45:50.:45:55.

why isn't that enough? Because 4% over two years is a real terms pay

:45:56.:46:01.

cut of at least 2%. We're not going to tolerate bad for our members.

:46:02.:46:04.

Thomas Cook pilots have fallen behind other similar pilots in the

:46:05.:46:09.

industry -- tolerate that. They want to recover some of that ground. That

:46:10.:46:14.

is not unreasonable. Thomas Cook made profit of ?172 million, they

:46:15.:46:20.

can afford a decent pilot pay rise. Will they get much Abadi from your

:46:21.:46:24.

passengers? It's a tough time for airlines. -- much sympathy. Airlines

:46:25.:46:31.

are struggling with the terrorist threat and volatile oil prices and

:46:32.:46:35.

people are feeling more squeezed so they aren't travelling as much and

:46:36.:46:39.

there is the uncertainty around Brexit. All airlines are saying we

:46:40.:46:45.

have to cut costs, why can't Thomas Cook do that as far as staffing is

:46:46.:46:50.

concerned? We are happy for them to cut costs and be more efficient and

:46:51.:46:55.

offer brilliant holidays at a good price but that doesn't mean pilots

:46:56.:46:59.

have to suffer real terms pay cuts. We can do all the things we need, we

:47:00.:47:04.

can come to a reasonable deal for the pilots and we can get all those

:47:05.:47:08.

customers and those passengers flying to their holidays. That's why

:47:09.:47:14.

we pitched today's action at a very responsible level. We've now... I

:47:15.:47:18.

can report we've now agreed five days of talks at ACAS over the next

:47:19.:47:22.

two weeks and we hope that will result in a better offer coming

:47:23.:47:27.

along the table. Thanks, the general secretary of the pilots Association.

:47:28.:47:34.

Were going to speak to the chief executive of Thomas Cook airlines in

:47:35.:47:38.

an hour so we will put some of those thoughts to him and we've had a

:47:39.:47:41.

statement from Thomas Cook, apologising for any disruption to

:47:42.:47:44.

the passengers but they are hoping to operate all flights scheduled

:47:45.:47:48.

today but some of the times may have changed so it is worth checking if

:47:49.:47:53.

you are due to fly with Thomas Cook before 3pm today. More from me after

:47:54.:47:55.

7am. Here's Sarah with a look

:47:56.:47:57.

at this morning's weather. Good morning, Charlie and Naga. I

:47:58.:48:08.

will start with a picture sent in by a Weather Watcher of the or

:48:09.:48:12.

Borealis. A fantastic display last night of the Northern Lights large

:48:13.:48:17.

down to a large solar flare. Beautiful scenes, clear skies and

:48:18.:48:21.

clear spells through the day but plenty of showers around. That

:48:22.:48:25.

really sums up the day, very changeable. Sunny spells, heavy

:48:26.:48:29.

showers and for some it will feel quite breezy so low pressure

:48:30.:48:33.

dominating the weather. At the moment it is sitting to the

:48:34.:48:36.

north-west so the winds will be rattling around the area of low

:48:37.:48:40.

pressure through the day, drawing in the showers and in the south maybe

:48:41.:48:44.

longer spells rain later on so showers could be almost anywhere.

:48:45.:48:49.

Some drier interludes, especially in eastern Scotland and parts of

:48:50.:48:52.

north-east England through the morning but showers become more

:48:53.:48:55.

widespread through the afternoon with heavy rain in the south. In

:48:56.:49:00.

eastern Scotland in the shelter you should see some brighter spells but

:49:01.:49:03.

these showers will become heavier and more persistent at times during

:49:04.:49:07.

the afternoon, slow-moving with the odd rumble of thunder and similar in

:49:08.:49:11.

Northern Ireland so heavy showers, you could see thunderstorms here and

:49:12.:49:15.

there. Of the south in northern England and Wales, is sunny spells

:49:16.:49:20.

and blustery showers, especially the further west you are and in southern

:49:21.:49:26.

England the rain is heavier, the odd rumble of thunder likely here,

:49:27.:49:29.

brighter skies developing later in the Southend West but the wind

:49:30.:49:34.

arrows continue on the map, blowing showers further east this evening

:49:35.:49:39.

and overnight. For many, clear skills tonight and chilly in the

:49:40.:49:43.

early hours of Saturday. -- clear skies. Cold in the countryside,

:49:44.:49:49.

especially in sheltered eastern areas. Through the day tomorrow it

:49:50.:49:53.

is the east and south that start with the best of the sunshine.

:49:54.:49:57.

Already showers in the north and west. Through the day these showers

:49:58.:50:01.

become more widespread so developing across much of the country. A day of

:50:02.:50:05.

sunny intervals and scattered blustery showers and temperatures

:50:06.:50:08.

not doing too badly for the time of year, 15 to 19 degrees. As we work

:50:09.:50:14.

through into the second half of the weekend, a small ridge of high

:50:15.:50:17.

pressure overnight and into the first half of Sunday and the next

:50:18.:50:20.

weather front approaches from the Atlantic. With that ridge of high

:50:21.:50:25.

pressure, for many Sunday will start on a dry and quieter note. Some

:50:26.:50:30.

sunshine in eastern parts in particular and later in the day the

:50:31.:50:34.

wind picks up and this wet and windy weather starts to move from west to

:50:35.:50:38.

east across the country. Saturday will be the better day in terms of

:50:39.:50:43.

sunny spells. Things turning wetter and windier in the Western during

:50:44.:50:44.

Sunday. Sarah, thanks very much. The smell of the sea,

:50:45.:50:49.

the taste of fish and chips, and breathtaking views,

:50:50.:50:52.

there's always been something What takes you back, deckchairs,

:50:53.:50:54.

many of us to the coast. What takes you back, deckchairs,

:50:55.:51:01.

seagulls, ice creams? No. You will never guess it. A frisbee, a bucket

:51:02.:51:07.

and spade? And old bicycle you can't ride on the sand. I give up. Walking

:51:08.:51:14.

through the sea and feeling there was squelchy oil between my feet. It

:51:15.:51:19.

felt awful so I never went into the sea for years. Where were you?

:51:20.:51:26.

Hastings. Was it oil? It wasn't but it felt like it so I didn't go in

:51:27.:51:29.

the sea for years. And it turns out those happy

:51:30.:51:31.

memories can be good for us. As part of our Coastal Britain

:51:32.:51:34.

series, Breakfast's John Maguire is taking a trip down memory lane

:51:35.:51:37.

in Morecambe for us this morning. I'm sure you have some lovely

:51:38.:51:45.

memories? I do. I'm worried about you, shall we build you in for a

:51:46.:51:50.

therapy session? Sounds terrible. Many of us have wonderful memories,

:51:51.:51:54.

you mention things like the smell of fish and chips, the call of the

:51:55.:51:59.

goals, the sound of the waves on the beach and the feel of the sound, as

:52:00.:52:05.

long as it not too oily, there's something about the seaside and

:52:06.:52:09.

we've heard it all week in our series, something that excites

:52:10.:52:12.

people and draws them back to the coast every time. We often say

:52:13.:52:16.

nostalgia isn't what it used to be but can it be useful looking back

:52:17.:52:21.

and can we take lessons from the past to take them forward to the

:52:22.:52:26.

future? We brought Daphne with us, I thought it was a lot bigger on TV

:52:27.:52:31.

when I've been seeing it in the next couple of days but I'm surprised how

:52:32.:52:35.

small it is. She is here, as is the team, looking back but also forward.

:52:36.:52:43.

The past, not a different country but a British seaside town.

:52:44.:52:51.

Morecambe in fact. It's 1901 and just look at how busy it is. This

:52:52.:52:57.

footage has recently been released online by the British film

:52:58.:53:01.

Institute, one of 160 films from around the British coastline. It

:53:02.:53:05.

shows hordes of holidaymakers and daytrippers. These are the early

:53:06.:53:11.

days of mass tourism. Jacqueline and Derek Osborne have made the long

:53:12.:53:16.

drive north from their home in Essex each summer for the past 30 years.

:53:17.:53:21.

The feeling we had then, it wasn't brilliant, was it? It wasn't. It

:53:22.:53:25.

always looked like it had seen better days but in subsequent years

:53:26.:53:30.

we have come it has improved a lot. Certainly over the last ten to 15

:53:31.:53:34.

years it's improved. You quite like the shopping? I love the shopping, I

:53:35.:53:39.

like the scenery as well. The lakes I think our lovely. Your sister,

:53:40.:53:45.

Doris, she is 90 now and she likes the seafront because it's lovely and

:53:46.:53:49.

flat and it's easy for me to push the wheelchair along. Looking back

:53:50.:53:54.

when Lee and Andrew used to come along the rock pools with us on

:53:55.:53:59.

holiday, he like to climb on the rock pools and falling over and

:54:00.:54:03.

cutting himself badly that time, took him to hospital. And what is it

:54:04.:54:10.

about the seaside that draws people back, that evokes such happy

:54:11.:54:14.

memories? Researchers at the university of Central Lancashire are

:54:15.:54:17.

trying to find out. Now we're suddenly starting to get data in

:54:18.:54:22.

that nostalgia is good for us, it makes us feel better, it's a great

:54:23.:54:25.

antidote to the stress of everyday life so we want to say to what

:54:26.:54:29.

extent it does impact upon peoples well-being and potentially to their

:54:30.:54:33.

health. The seaside is a perfect place for that because the seaside

:54:34.:54:37.

is something that doesn't change and can trigger nostalgic memories. Last

:54:38.:54:45.

weekend, Morecambe was packed to the gunwales with around 40,000 people

:54:46.:54:48.

here for the vintage by the sea festival. A modern take on an old

:54:49.:54:56.

theme. The designer Wayne Hemingway, born and bred here, is one of the

:54:57.:55:02.

organisers. There's a massive movement for British people

:55:03.:55:06.

especially the young to rediscover the British seaside, it's four of

:55:07.:55:09.

them forward thinking, people want to come here and it to be busy. All

:55:10.:55:13.

round the country there are coastal events springing up. Nostalgia is

:55:14.:55:18.

part of it because it brings the intergenerational thing and to bring

:55:19.:55:22.

that kind of busy feeling back to a coastal town, we can start to bring

:55:23.:55:28.

the coastline back again. So the big challenge for many hours seaside

:55:29.:55:32.

towns is to find a way to celebrate and conserve the best of the past

:55:33.:55:34.

while also looking to the future. Morecambe Bay looking after us this

:55:35.:55:42.

morning, wonderful vistas here although we've had some wind and

:55:43.:55:46.

rain but it has sorted itself out. We can speak to Doctor David from

:55:47.:55:51.

the university of Central Lancashire, an expert in tourism. It

:55:52.:55:56.

is that magic silver bullet, isn't it? How do we revitalise and fall in

:55:57.:56:01.

love with our seaside towns again? We need to repackage the traditions

:56:02.:56:06.

of the seaside town, Seaside Heritage, places like the Midland

:56:07.:56:11.

hotel behind us, keep those traditions and heritage but make

:56:12.:56:15.

them fit for the 21st-century. It is a case of being influenced by the

:56:16.:56:20.

past and developing that and making it fit for the consumers. Who does

:56:21.:56:25.

that, where do the ideas come from? And crucially, where does the money

:56:26.:56:29.

come from? The government has started to recognise the importance

:56:30.:56:34.

of investing in the coast because I think it has been underinvested in

:56:35.:56:38.

for a while now with the coastal communities fund. There are various

:56:39.:56:42.

projects around the country. There are companies that are now brave

:56:43.:56:46.

enough and have the confidence to invest in the coast, urban Splash

:56:47.:56:50.

have invested in the Midland hotel here. We have companies like travel

:56:51.:56:56.

lodge investing in coastal locations and Butlins has basically sold out

:56:57.:56:59.

because they have recognised the value of the coast, they kept the

:57:00.:57:04.

traditions and realised people want seaside holidays like their

:57:05.:57:07.

grandparents had but better. Good stuff. Doctor David Jarrett, thanks

:57:08.:57:13.

very much. The message from David and all seaside towns we feature

:57:14.:57:17.

this week and anyone's around the British coast will say the classic,

:57:18.:57:23.

water's lovely, come on in! Speak to you later. Looks marvellous but

:57:24.:57:28.

cold. Has the bracing feel to it this morning. Lovely!

:57:29.:57:29.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:57:30.:00:48.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:00:49.:00:52.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Naga

:00:53.:00:56.

More than one million people have been hit by Hurricane Irma

:00:57.:00:59.

The British Virgin Islands are the latest to report major

:01:00.:01:03.

The Governor declares a state of emergency.

:01:04.:01:07.

All of us have been afflicted by Hurricane Irma, some

:01:08.:01:10.

Apart from the structural damage there have sadly been reports

:01:11.:01:18.

It's predicted another 26 million people are at risk from the giant

:01:19.:01:23.

Major tourism areas in Cuba and Florida are being evacuated.

:01:24.:01:42.

Also today, a warning of race bias in the British justice system -

:01:43.:01:49.

a government-backed report says prosecution against some offenders

:01:50.:01:52.

In the last few hours pilots working for Thomas Cook Airlines have gone

:01:53.:02:04.

on strike, the first industrial action by UK pilots in 40 years.

:02:05.:02:07.

I'll be asking the airline's boss what's gone wrong.

:02:08.:02:09.

In sport, Big Ben is still striking, at Lord's at least.

:02:10.:02:14.

Ben Stokes takes six wickets on a crazy day at Lords,

:02:15.:02:17.

with both the West Indies and then England suffering batting collapses

:02:18.:02:20.

And our BBC Breakfast chat has made it right around the British

:02:21.:02:35.

coastline to hear. -- deckchair. We are in Morecambe, talking about the

:02:36.:02:38.

soldier. What draws people back to the early and British seaside year

:02:39.:02:40.

after year? -- brilliant. An autumnal feeling to the forecast.

:02:41.:02:51.

Some sunshine, but also plenty of showers. I will bring you all the

:02:52.:02:55.

details for the UK forecast, as well as a look at Hurricane Irma and

:02:56.:02:59.

where it is going next in the next 15 minutes.

:03:00.:03:01.

The path of destruction brought by Hurricane Irma has now affected

:03:02.:03:04.

more than one million people across the Caribbean.

:03:05.:03:07.

At least 14 people have been killed and a state of emergency has been

:03:08.:03:10.

declared at the British Virgin Islands.

:03:11.:03:12.

Overnight, the British Overseas Territory of Turks and Caicos has

:03:13.:03:15.

been pummelled by the storm, leaving tourists and residents

:03:16.:03:17.

The hurricane is projected to move to the Bahamas and Cuba,

:03:18.:03:22.

evacuations are underway, before it reaches Florida

:03:23.:03:24.

This is what it's like to look out of your hotel room in the Turks

:03:25.:03:34.

Caicos, knowing one of the strongest storms in recent memory

:03:35.:03:37.

Starting to hear the noise of the wind as well

:03:38.:03:41.

But we're not even close to the worst bit yet,

:03:42.:03:47.

On the British Virgin Islands, there have been an unknown

:03:48.:03:57.

With communications severely disrupted, the governor issued this

:03:58.:04:00.

audio message, declaring a state of emergency.

:04:01.:04:03.

All of us have been affected by Irma, and some more than others.

:04:04.:04:09.

Apart from the structural damage, there have been reports

:04:10.:04:11.

Our thoughts and prayers are with each and every one of you.

:04:12.:04:19.

At least one person is known to have died in the British territory

:04:20.:04:23.

of Anguilla where residents sheltered in their homes for safety.

:04:24.:04:25.

We were in the bath with a mattress above us, that's how we managed

:04:26.:04:29.

I think a lot of people were in a similar situation.

:04:30.:04:33.

We've seen houses with cars that have been picked up and thrown

:04:34.:04:37.

Barbuda was one of the first islands to be hit by Irma.

:04:38.:04:50.

It's now less than 48 hours away from the impact

:04:51.:04:52.

Jose has sustained wind speeds of 120 mph and it looks likely

:04:53.:04:57.

to gain in strength over the next day or two.

:04:58.:05:00.

With the hurricane moving towards Cuba and Florida, holidaymakers in

:05:01.:05:16.

the region are being told to follow local advice. Andy Moore is outside

:05:17.:05:20.

the Foreign Office this morning. Give us a sense of what is being

:05:21.:05:24.

said about what people can do, those people who are in those places, in

:05:25.:05:29.

the firing line? Well, we understand there are something like 10,000

:05:30.:05:33.

richest tourists on the island of Cuba. -- British. Some have been

:05:34.:05:40.

moved to other areas. The advice now from the travel companies is to stay

:05:41.:05:44.

inside your hotel, that is the safest place, because these

:05:45.:05:47.

buildings are designed to withstand hurricanes. Some tourists in Florida

:05:48.:05:51.

are being flown home early. There are no tourist is going out to

:05:52.:05:54.

Florida, or there won't be, because all the international airports there

:05:55.:05:59.

are shutting down on the weekend. There was some criticism of the

:06:00.:06:03.

government response in connection to aid getting there, equipment and

:06:04.:06:06.

help and supplies, coming out to some of those very badly affected

:06:07.:06:12.

areas. What is happening now? First of all, there are ?32 million

:06:13.:06:16.

earmarked in disaster relief, and then there is the military assets

:06:17.:06:20.

either in the regional rhomb away there. We have a royal Fleet

:06:21.:06:24.

auxiliary ship, Mounts Bay, that is off Anguilla. That is already

:06:25.:06:29.

delivering aid to the island. It has helicopters aboard. The first

:06:30.:06:35.

element task group will set out from RAF Brize Norton today. These are

:06:36.:06:40.

gigantic loadmaster transport aircraft, some of those will have

:06:41.:06:48.

helicopters aboard. -- Globemaster. And then we have the flagship of the

:06:49.:06:52.

Royal Navy with helicopters aboard, setting out from the Mediterranean

:06:53.:06:55.

and heading towards the Caribbean, although it will take about ten days

:06:56.:06:58.

or two weeks to arrive in the affected area. Andy, thank you.

:06:59.:07:01.

Young offenders from ethnic minority backgrounds will become "the next

:07:02.:07:03.

generation of adult criminals" unless the justice system

:07:04.:07:06.

is reformed, according to a review led by the MP David Lammy.

:07:07.:07:09.

The inquiry makes a series of recommendations.

:07:10.:07:11.

These include allowing some prosecutions to be deferred,

:07:12.:07:13.

or even dropped, if suspects get treatment for issues such as drug

:07:14.:07:16.

In 80 minutes we will be speaking to the author of that report, the MP

:07:17.:07:27.

David Lammy. An earthquake with a magnitude

:07:28.:07:28.

of 8.0 has hit southern Mexico. The quake struck 75 miles

:07:29.:07:31.

off the Pacific coast, southwest of the town of Tres Picos,

:07:32.:07:33.

but buildings shook in Mexico City There are no reports so far of any

:07:34.:07:37.

major damage or casualties. The government is accusing Labour

:07:38.:07:45.

of a "cynical" attempt to block The bill paves the way for leaving

:07:46.:07:48.

the European Union in March 2019. Labour and other opposition parties

:07:49.:07:55.

have promised to vote against it next week, insisting that it gives

:07:56.:07:58.

sweeping powers to ministers Our political correspondent

:07:59.:08:00.

Chris Mason joins us from Chris, how do you think

:08:01.:08:04.

this might be resolved? You have been looking not just at

:08:05.:08:13.

the intricacies of the bill, but the tension is building up a twin the

:08:14.:08:17.

parties? Yes, good morning. Antioch intricacies and plenty of tensions.

:08:18.:08:22.

What this boils down to is what kind of flavour of Brexit the different

:08:23.:08:27.

MPs want to try to reflect the will of the country. And how that should

:08:28.:08:33.

be delivered. So, there was a lot of concern articulated by Labour MPs.

:08:34.:08:37.

We spoke about this yesterday, the so-called Henry VIII powers. This is

:08:38.:08:43.

not MPs forming a judgement on the former monarch's less than good

:08:44.:08:46.

approach to long-term relationships. Instead, the use of ancient powers

:08:47.:08:53.

which critics say isn't allowing its Brexit plans to be adequately

:08:54.:08:57.

scrutinised. Government argues it is no different than the mechanism by

:08:58.:09:00.

which EU law has become UK law for the last generation. The other thing

:09:01.:09:05.

that is at the heart of all of this, as I say, is what Brexit looks like

:09:06.:09:10.

when it actually happens. We saw disagreement yesterday within the

:09:11.:09:13.

Conservative Party, and that carries on this morning, with a letter from

:09:14.:09:17.

some Conservative MPs saying they do not want to be kept in the EU by

:09:18.:09:22.

stealth. Other, more pro- European Conservatives, it responded it was

:09:23.:09:24.

inappropriate of some of their colleagues to be undermining the

:09:25.:09:27.

government, something those letter writers dispute. So politics existed

:09:28.:09:32.

all some along with Brexit, between Brussels and London. Now it exists

:09:33.:09:36.

and it is backing turbocharge here at Westminster. -- back in. We will

:09:37.:09:43.

be speaking a lot more about this, I'm sure. Thank you, Chris.

:09:44.:09:45.

The Nobel prize winner, Malala Yousafzai, has called

:09:46.:09:47.

on the leader of Myanamar, Aung San Suu Kyi, to protect

:09:48.:09:50.

the country's Rohingya Muslim minority.

:09:51.:09:51.

More than 160,000 Rohingyas have fled to Bangladesh since unrest

:09:52.:09:54.

Ms Suu Kyi has been widely criticised for failing to condemn

:09:55.:10:05.

A 13-year-old girl from Somerset, whose organs were donated

:10:06.:10:08.

after her death, has saved or transformed the lives

:10:09.:10:10.

That's a record for a single donor in the UK.

:10:11.:10:14.

Jemima Layzell collapsed with a brain aneurysm and died four

:10:15.:10:16.

Five of the patients who received life-saving transplants

:10:17.:10:26.

Jemima's story is part of an NHS campaign appealing for more donors.

:10:27.:10:30.

There are thousands of people waiting for a transplant.

:10:31.:10:33.

If you would be willing to accept an organ you should be willing

:10:34.:10:38.

to donate an organ, and that is what we are asking

:10:39.:10:41.

people to consider, and make a decision that they will

:10:42.:10:44.

It is amazing, isn't it? For her family, it must be some comfort, it

:10:45.:10:53.

is extraordinary, or those people who have benefited. We have one more

:10:54.:10:58.

story to bring you. For the second time this week, you may remember

:10:59.:11:02.

that we showed you pictures of bats the inevitably nuisance, perhaps.

:11:03.:11:07.

They are still making the headlines. Catch him, Derry! Catch him! In case

:11:08.:11:14.

you didn't see it, this is a video which has gone viral, really. We ran

:11:15.:11:19.

this last week. It was a family's attempt to remove that from its

:11:20.:11:23.

kitchen. Scientists have done some work and have discovered more about

:11:24.:11:26.

how I houses could actually harm bats. This is because they use a

:11:27.:11:31.

sonar system of clicks when they fly, to avoid bumping into things.

:11:32.:11:35.

But when you have smooth surfaces plateglass windows, they create a

:11:36.:11:39.

blind spot which causes them to crash. I'm sure the panic didn't

:11:40.:11:44.

help either. It is now seven in 11 a.m.. We have

:11:45.:11:48.

the weather coming up and the sports later on.

:11:49.:11:52.

A significant report today looks at whether the criminal justice system

:11:53.:11:55.

is biased against people from ethnic minority communities. The author is

:11:56.:12:01.

a labour MP, David Lammy, who joins us now. Thank you for your time.

:12:02.:12:07.

This is a significant report. Lots of people have been waiting a long

:12:08.:12:11.

time to see its results. It covers a bottle territory. One of the

:12:12.:12:14.

conclusions you have come to is that there is still overt racial

:12:15.:12:17.

prejudice in the criminal justice system. Can you help people with an

:12:18.:12:21.

example of how that is manifesting itself, in a practical sense?

:12:22.:12:26.

Something that is visible? As part of the review, I commissioned some

:12:27.:12:31.

work from a women's organisation called Agenda, and they went to a

:12:32.:12:36.

particular women's prison, they spoke to the ethnic minority women

:12:37.:12:42.

there, and there was a lot of evidence of overt discrimination,

:12:43.:12:46.

racial slurs, something you would want to associate with the past, and

:12:47.:12:49.

many of those women felt intimidated. So I did see examples,

:12:50.:12:55.

particularly within our prison system, of overt discrimination. I

:12:56.:13:00.

think it is right to say that there are good prisons and bad prisons,

:13:01.:13:03.

and there are parts of the criminal justice system which I didn't see

:13:04.:13:10.

any disproportionate treatment, and I would pick the Crown Prosecution

:13:11.:13:13.

Service as one of those institutions, and our jury system,

:13:14.:13:18.

also, has a system which felt there when I looked at the analysis. Help

:13:19.:13:22.

us with this one. You have to people, say. One is white, one is

:13:23.:13:28.

black or from and if it minority background. They have committed a

:13:29.:13:31.

crime. The problem you are addressing is what happens next to

:13:32.:13:34.

them in the criminal justice system. Give us a sense of where that

:13:35.:13:39.

disparity starts to emerge? I think the way to think about it is a young

:13:40.:13:44.

black or Muslim man sitting in a police cell had a bad experience

:13:45.:13:48.

with the police, obviously, we know the issues around stop-and-search

:13:49.:13:53.

and arrest rates for black and minority ethnic communities. The

:13:54.:13:57.

young man then gets a duty solicitor given to him by the state. He

:13:58.:14:01.

doesn't trust the individual very much, he has never met them before.

:14:02.:14:06.

He gives a no comment interview, very uncooperative in the police

:14:07.:14:11.

cell. He then goes, he then opts not to go through the magistracy Court.

:14:12.:14:15.

He wants a jury, because he thinks he will get a fairer treatment than

:14:16.:14:21.

having a single judge. Basically, it compounds a situation where you end

:14:22.:14:26.

up with a not guilty plea. It is painful for victims, especially

:14:27.:14:29.

victims of crime who have to go through a long trial. It costs a

:14:30.:14:34.

fortune in the system. And if he is found guilty he has a longer

:14:35.:14:37.

sentence. So I have been looking at the system right from that point of

:14:38.:14:42.

arrest, right through to the end, and we have now created a situation

:14:43.:14:47.

in our country where 41% of our youth prison system, that is young

:14:48.:14:51.

people, as young as ten and is all those 18, being from a black or

:14:52.:14:56.

minority ethnic background. I mean, that is more than double the amount

:14:57.:15:00.

of black and ethnic minority young people in our country. That is a

:15:01.:15:06.

significant issue and it suggests that our adult prison population

:15:07.:15:10.

will grow as well if we do not try to do something about this.

:15:11.:15:14.

Are looking at how the papers are reporting your report this morning,

:15:15.:15:23.

and I want some clarification, you say cases against some black

:15:24.:15:26.

defendants should be dropped -- I'm looking. What does that mean in

:15:27.:15:31.

relation to one defendant who is black or from an ethnic minority

:15:32.:15:35.

background or another who is white, what does that mean? I'm not

:15:36.:15:40.

suggesting anything for one group and not another. What I'm saying is

:15:41.:15:45.

that because of the issues of trust that exist, there is a tendency to

:15:46.:15:51.

plead not guilty whatever the circumstances. I looked at a pilot

:15:52.:16:01.

we've done in this country called Operation Turning Point in the West

:16:02.:16:05.

Midlands, I've looked at the systems in California and New Zealand and

:16:06.:16:09.

I'm suggesting deferred prosecution, not asking for first and second time

:16:10.:16:13.

offences for the individual to decide whether they are guilty or

:16:14.:16:16.

not but intervening with the problems, deal with the drugs, deal

:16:17.:16:21.

with the family background, deal with the anger management and

:16:22.:16:27.

education, intervene and save the system money, save the victims going

:16:28.:16:30.

through this lengthy trial and grip the problem such that you don't have

:16:31.:16:35.

the reoffending rates that we are seeing in first and second time

:16:36.:16:38.

offences. That's what I'm suggesting. That would work for

:16:39.:16:42.

everyone but it would have a particular effect on black and

:16:43.:16:46.

ethnic minority communities where there's a tendency because of low

:16:47.:16:51.

levels of to plead not guilty whatever the circumstances. Can I

:16:52.:16:55.

just ask, given the scale of your report and the scale of the problem,

:16:56.:16:59.

how deep-seated is it within the system? What confidence do you have

:17:00.:17:03.

your report will make a difference to anyone appearing in front of a

:17:04.:17:07.

court or going through the criminal justice system tomorrow, next week,

:17:08.:17:13.

next year or in five years time? This is a cross-party moment. In the

:17:14.:17:18.

end I have been asked by two Conservative prime ministers to lead

:17:19.:17:30.

this review. I'm a Labour MP. The review was welcomed by Jeremy Corbyn

:17:31.:17:33.

and my recommendations this morning I see walk and by the Labour Party

:17:34.:17:37.

as well so we've got a cross-party consensus that we've got a real

:17:38.:17:40.

problem. It's costing taxpayers a fortune. We can close 12 prisons if

:17:41.:17:43.

we didn't have this disproportionality so I hope there's

:17:44.:17:46.

a consensus to move forward, the government act on my

:17:47.:17:48.

recommendations. I'm not going anywhere, I'm a jobbing Member of

:17:49.:17:52.

Parliament and I will be making sure we see these recommendations

:17:53.:18:00.

implemented if we don't want to see the wasted lives we have at the

:18:01.:18:05.

moment. David Lammy, the author of the report into the criminal justice

:18:06.:18:08.

system as it is affecting black and ethnic minority groups.

:18:09.:18:12.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:18:13.:18:14.

destruction across the Caribbean as the British Virgin Islands

:18:15.:18:19.

UK government deploys more troops and pledges to increase its relief

:18:20.:18:29.

fund for the British territories affected to ?200 million.

:18:30.:18:33.

Here's Sarah with a look at this morning's weather.

:18:34.:18:37.

Sarah, we've been talking to eyewitnesses in the area in Antigua,

:18:38.:18:43.

in various islands who have been hit by these two hurricanes so far, Irma

:18:44.:18:52.

being very destructive but also the threat of Jose.

:18:53.:18:54.

We've got three hurricanes at the moment, an unusual situation. This

:18:55.:19:03.

one, Katia, is further west so that will impact eastern parts of Mexico

:19:04.:19:06.

bringing flooding and landslides but it isn't in the same region as these

:19:07.:19:11.

two. And Irma has been catastrophic so far. Jose is likely to follow but

:19:12.:19:17.

it won't affect the same regions, probably heading towards the Leeward

:19:18.:19:22.

Islands and four areas that really could do without another hurricane.

:19:23.:19:25.

Les concentrate on the major category five hurricane, Irma. You

:19:26.:19:30.

can see the central eye of the storm, a vast hurricane, still

:19:31.:19:36.

producing winds of 160 mph with higher gusts than that so it's not

:19:37.:19:40.

just the winds, it's the heavy rainfall and storm surge, could be

:19:41.:19:46.

as high as 15 to 20 feet. It's moving across the Turks Caicos

:19:47.:19:50.

Islands and it will head close to Cuba, to the south of the Bahamas,

:19:51.:19:54.

before pushing northwards towards the central Florida in time for the

:19:55.:19:58.

weekend. Probably still a major category four hurricane. Still

:19:59.:20:02.

catastrophic damage to come from Irma with Jose following on behind.

:20:03.:20:10.

In the UK, a much quieter picture. A day of sunshine and showers. Breezy,

:20:11.:20:15.

and of autumnal feel as we head over the next few days with low pressure

:20:16.:20:20.

in charge -- an autumnal. That is in the north-west and we see winds

:20:21.:20:24.

coming around the area of low pressure bringing us showers.

:20:25.:20:27.

Brighter weather to be enjoyed between the showers today for

:20:28.:20:30.

eastern Scotland this morning. In towards the southern England we

:20:31.:20:34.

likely to see heavier and more persistent rain developing as it

:20:35.:20:37.

goes east through the day and we could have some thunder around as

:20:38.:20:41.

well. This afternoon some showers in Scotland could be quite heavy and

:20:42.:20:44.

slow moving with thunderstorms mixed in. Could be some surface water

:20:45.:20:49.

lying around and for Northern Ireland, some heavy showers but not

:20:50.:20:52.

raining all the time. Some brightness to be enjoyed.

:20:53.:20:56.

Temperatures mainly in the mid teens for most and feeling cool with the

:20:57.:20:59.

breeze and showers. Sunshine for Northern England, the Midlands,

:21:00.:21:05.

heavy rain this afternoon towards the London region to the Isle of

:21:06.:21:08.

Wight. For the south-west of England, we should see some

:21:09.:21:11.

brightness breaking through later but we continue to see blustery

:21:12.:21:15.

showers this evening. They will ease away overnight so many become dry

:21:16.:21:19.

tonight with clear spells. Still quite windy and showery in the west

:21:20.:21:23.

but further east you have clearer temperatures just a about holding up

:21:24.:21:29.

in towns and cities but cold in the countryside. Saturday brings

:21:30.:21:33.

blustery showers across the west but drier weather in the east at first

:21:34.:21:37.

and three the day the showers become more widespread. Another day of

:21:38.:21:40.

sunshine and showers tomorrow and temperatures between 15 to 19. On

:21:41.:21:46.

Sunday we see the next area of low pressure and that will bring some

:21:47.:21:50.

wet and windy weather that spreads in from the west, especially later

:21:51.:21:55.

on on Sunday. Back to you both. Thanks very much, Sarah.

:21:56.:21:57.

If your baby or child was choking on a sweet,

:21:58.:22:00.

would you know what to do to help them?

:22:01.:22:02.

If the answer is no, then you aren't alone.

:22:03.:22:05.

New research suggests three out of four parents in the UK

:22:06.:22:08.

would not be able to save their baby, that's according

:22:09.:22:11.

James Beech is a first aid trainer and he joins us now.

:22:12.:22:20.

Good morning. Good morning. There is the point when you are dealing with

:22:21.:22:28.

a small person, a fragile body, and they are choking, you don't

:22:29.:22:33.

instinctively with an adult... You would be happy to slap them on the

:22:34.:22:37.

back hard but you don't want to shake or hurt a child, what should

:22:38.:22:41.

you do? I will talk you through it. The main point to get across is you

:22:42.:22:45.

should do something and your correct, you wouldn't want to hit

:22:46.:22:50.

them as hard as... If Charlie was choking now you would hit them hard,

:22:51.:22:54.

if the baby was, you would do it less hard. Let's do the scenario,

:22:55.:22:59.

you are having dinner and the baby is in the high chair and starts...

:23:00.:23:04.

Perhaps coughing initially and then you realise. When they are coughing

:23:05.:23:13.

you need to remember they can get it out themselves, when they stop its

:23:14.:23:17.

dangerous. You need to pick them up and we are looking at a child that

:23:18.:23:22.

is under the age of one here. We need to make sure we are supporting

:23:23.:23:25.

their heads. You need to support ahead and then you will pop them

:23:26.:23:30.

down like that and if you see, you've got ahead lower than their

:23:31.:23:34.

bottoms of gravity is on your side to help dislodge anything. Then you

:23:35.:23:38.

are going to do what Naga said, use the heel of your hand and hit them

:23:39.:23:43.

firmly on their back. Hopefully by doing that you are going to find the

:23:44.:23:51.

object comes away. People can hear that, that is a considerable impact

:23:52.:23:55.

you are making? It has to be firm. You're supporting the head but what

:23:56.:23:59.

you are trying to do is dislodge whatever is blocked to come out so

:24:00.:24:03.

your baby can breathe again. It could be quite scary but it's

:24:04.:24:09.

important people learn this skill because this is causing a little bit

:24:10.:24:12.

of bruising on their back potentially, that is a much lesser

:24:13.:24:18.

thing than the baby not breathing so this is a really important. What if

:24:19.:24:22.

that doesn't work? If it doesn't work, you try up to five times, you

:24:23.:24:27.

want to turn the baby the other way up, keep supporting ahead, keep it

:24:28.:24:31.

lower than their bottom but they are facing you and you will place two

:24:32.:24:35.

fingers in the centre of their chest. Between the ribs? Right in

:24:36.:24:40.

the centre of their chest, between their nipples is the best way to

:24:41.:24:44.

think of it and you are going to push firmly downwards and what you

:24:45.:24:49.

are trying to do here is to force air out of their lungs and again

:24:50.:24:53.

tried to dislodge whatever it is that is caught. A simple skill to

:24:54.:25:00.

learn and what we are encouraging people to do, it is world first a

:25:01.:25:04.

day tomorrow and we would like parents in particular to learn a

:25:05.:25:08.

first aid skills, why not start with this? At any stage do you check in

:25:09.:25:13.

the mouth to see if anything is stuck in the back of the throat? We

:25:14.:25:17.

wouldn't recommend putting your fingers in the mouth but if you can

:25:18.:25:20.

see something clearly and you can safely get it out with your fingers

:25:21.:25:24.

you could try that but the main message is to start with this

:25:25.:25:30.

effective technique. By doing the back blows there is strong evidence

:25:31.:25:34.

to suggest that should work. What happens if after both those methods

:25:35.:25:38.

the baby is still choking, or if something has come out and the baby

:25:39.:25:42.

is still distressed, what should you do then? Call 999 at that point, if

:25:43.:25:48.

you have tried five of each of those skills and you want to call 999 and

:25:49.:25:52.

you're going to carry on going between the back blows and the chest

:25:53.:25:55.

thrusts until help arrives. When you're in that position, all my

:25:56.:26:02.

instincts are that I... That movement you did before it is much

:26:03.:26:06.

firmer than I would have thought you were going to say. I'm going like

:26:07.:26:11.

that and you word... With the heel of your hand like that as well. That

:26:12.:26:18.

bit of your hand -- you would. Bit in between the shoulder blades at

:26:19.:26:22.

the top. In between the shoulder blades at the top and Inbetweener

:26:23.:26:28.

nipples on the front. Younger child? Leaning them forward, hitting them

:26:29.:26:34.

on the back or an ab thrust. If you want to learn the skill you can go

:26:35.:26:39.

on world first a day's website and you can see the videos and you can

:26:40.:26:44.

down a free first aid app from the Red Cross or you can come on one of

:26:45.:26:49.

our courses. I do wish your baby would cheer up a little bit. Has he

:26:50.:27:00.

got a name? Anne. This is Junior. Just been choking, can't be too

:27:01.:27:05.

happy! Lovely to see you. If you want to watch a demonstration on

:27:06.:27:09.

what to do if the baby is joking then we have the video on our

:27:10.:27:12.

Facebook and Twitter pages. The time is 7:30 a.m.. 1.2 million

:27:13.:30:54.

people have now been affected IV destructive trail of Hurricane Irma,

:30:55.:30:57.

according to the International Red Cross. Overnight the storm

:30:58.:31:01.

progressed into Haiti and the Turks and Caicos Islands. The British

:31:02.:31:04.

Virgin Islands are the latest to report major damage and death. The

:31:05.:31:09.

government there has reported a state of emergency. The government

:31:10.:31:13.

says the first military flight to the Caribbean will leave from RAF

:31:14.:31:16.

Brize Norton this morning with military personnel, Russians and

:31:17.:31:21.

water on board. Earlier On Breakfast, the department for

:31:22.:31:24.

international developer to set it was time to get a there is quickly

:31:25.:31:28.

as possible. Some of the islands on the northern leeward side were badly

:31:29.:31:31.

hit. That is Anguilla and Barbuda, and as far as we know, the British

:31:32.:31:35.

Virgin Islands have also been really badly hit. There has been to

:31:36.:31:40.

indicate and is issues with those places, and we are hoping to get in

:31:41.:31:45.

on to the ground tomorrow to the British Virgin Islands. The ship,

:31:46.:31:53.

the Mounts Bay, was in Anguilla today and delivered the first

:31:54.:31:57.

assistance. They are also moving to the research Virgin Islands to get a

:31:58.:31:58.

better picture of the need to there. An earthquake with a magnitude

:31:59.:32:01.

of eight has hit southern Mexico. The quake struck 75 miles

:32:02.:32:04.

off the Pacific coast, But buildings shook in Mexico City

:32:05.:32:06.

hundreds of miles away. There are no reports so far of any

:32:07.:32:11.

major damage or casualties. -- Reuters news is reporting that at

:32:12.:32:21.

least two people are dead. As an army warning centre said hazardous

:32:22.:32:24.

waves could be possible within the next three hours. -- The Tsunami

:32:25.:32:29.

Warning Centre. Young offenders from ethnic minority

:32:30.:32:36.

backgrounds will become "the next generation" of adult criminals

:32:37.:32:39.

unless the justice system is reformed, according to a review

:32:40.:32:41.

led by the MP David Lammy. The report makes more than 30

:32:42.:32:45.

recommendations including allowing some prosecutions to be deferred

:32:46.:32:47.

or even dropped if suspects get treatment for issues such as drug

:32:48.:32:50.

or alcohol problems. We have now created a situation in

:32:51.:33:04.

our country were 41% of our youth prison system, that is, young people

:33:05.:33:09.

as young as ten and as old as 18, is from a black or minority ethnic

:33:10.:33:13.

background. I mean, that is more than double the amount of black and

:33:14.:33:17.

ethnic minority young people in our country. That is a significant issue

:33:18.:33:23.

and it suggests that our adult prison population will grow as well

:33:24.:33:27.

if we do not try and do something about this.

:33:28.:33:29.

The government is accusing Labour of a "cynical" attempt to block

:33:30.:33:32.

The bill paves the way for leaving the European Union in March 2019.

:33:33.:33:37.

Labour and other opposition parties have promised to vote against it

:33:38.:33:40.

next week insisting it gives sweeping powers to ministers

:33:41.:33:42.

The Brexit secretary David Davis claimed Britons "will not forgive"

:33:43.:33:46.

Labour if they try to "delay or destroy" the process of leaving

:33:47.:33:50.

A 13-year-old girl from Somerset, whose organs were donated

:33:51.:33:55.

after her death, has saved or transformed the lives of eight

:33:56.:33:58.

patients - that's a record for a single donor in the UK.

:33:59.:34:02.

Jemima Layzell collapsed with a brain aneurysm and died four

:34:03.:34:04.

Five of the patients who received life-saving transplants

:34:05.:34:11.

Jemima's story is part of an NHS campaign appealing for more donors.

:34:12.:34:21.

There are thousands of people waiting for a transplant, three

:34:22.:34:27.

people per day dying. If you would be willing to accept an organ you

:34:28.:34:30.

should be willing to donate, and that is what we are asking people to

:34:31.:34:34.

consider, and make that decision that they will support organ

:34:35.:34:35.

donation. The Royal Navy's second aircraft

:34:36.:34:36.

carrier will be formally named Work on the ship has been halted

:34:37.:34:39.

for the naval tradition which dates back thousands of years

:34:40.:34:44.

and combines a celebration The naming will be carried out

:34:45.:34:46.

by the Duchess of Cornwall, with a bottle of whisky to be

:34:47.:34:50.

smashed against the carrier at the ceremony at

:34:51.:34:53.

Rosyth Dockyard in Fife. Now, I use a type of person who when

:34:54.:35:05.

you take the train to work, you are constantly on your phone or your

:35:06.:35:11.

tablet? -- are you the type. Or do you enjoy the view. These passages

:35:12.:35:19.

in Germany were treated to some initial -- passengers in Germany

:35:20.:35:22.

were treated to some unusual sites. What are they doing? It is all part

:35:23.:35:28.

of an artistic theatrical show called Moving Countryside, taking

:35:29.:35:34.

place alongside the tracks. You would look out the window to look

:35:35.:35:38.

out about, wouldn't you? That is wonderful, isn't it? That was a

:35:39.:35:43.

traffic light in the middle of a field, with somebody on a bicycle

:35:44.:35:47.

waiting for the lights to turn red. It is art. The moving shrubbery was

:35:48.:35:52.

my favourite. You would wonder whether it was just an optical

:35:53.:35:56.

illusion, or whether you had been up to late the night before. A bit like

:35:57.:36:00.

Lord of the rings. What do you have for us? Well, the cricket is a

:36:01.:36:08.

headline writer's dream. Big Ben still striking in London at Lord's.

:36:09.:36:12.

England's Ben Stokes, reached a new career high,

:36:13.:36:14.

taking 6 wickets for just 22 runs on the first day of the third

:36:15.:36:18.

and deciding test against West Indies at Lord's.

:36:19.:36:20.

He took apart the Windies' middle order, restricting them to a total

:36:21.:36:23.

of 123, but poor batting from his team-mates has

:36:24.:36:26.

England resume this morning on 46 for 4.

:36:27.:36:39.

Obviously we still have to score runs to try to get ahead of them,

:36:40.:36:45.

but I think it will be one of those wickets where there is a period of

:36:46.:36:50.

plays and is misses and not scoring too much, but if we can get 100 past

:36:51.:36:53.

their scoring we will fancy ourselves.

:36:54.:36:54.

There will be two new faces in the women's US Open final.

:36:55.:36:57.

Unseeded Sloane Stephens held her nerve overnight to beat

:36:58.:37:00.

Venus Williams in three sets in New York.

:37:01.:37:02.

The defeat means 37-year old Venus misses out on returning to the US

:37:03.:37:05.

Open final, 15 years after her last.

:37:06.:37:09.

I'm super happy to be in a Grand Slam final,

:37:10.:37:12.

I wasn't playing well, just wasn't playing well.

:37:13.:37:14.

There are moments when you have to dig deep and figure out how

:37:15.:37:18.

to get the ball on the court and have a big game.

:37:19.:37:21.

I can't be tentative in figuring out how to get that ball in.

:37:22.:37:24.

I haven't played her in a long time, clearly she's seen me playing many,

:37:25.:37:29.

many times, but I haven't seen her play as much.

:37:30.:37:32.

I'm super happy to be in a Grand Slam final,

:37:33.:37:35.

and to do it here, obviously my home slam, it's even more special.

:37:36.:37:39.

I think this is what every player dreams about.

:37:40.:37:41.

And unfortunately - fortunately but unfortunately -

:37:42.:37:43.

But having four Americans in the semifinals, I think that says

:37:44.:37:47.

a lot about American tennis and where we are right now.

:37:48.:37:57.

Waiting for Sloane Stephens in the final will be fellow

:37:58.:38:00.

American Madison Keys - she beat Coco Vandeweghe in just

:38:01.:38:02.

It means it will be the first time since the Williams sisters met

:38:03.:38:09.

in 2002 that Flushing Meadows has hosted a women's final featuring two

:38:10.:38:13.

We've seen the last of players like Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain moving

:38:14.:38:22.

between Premier League clubs once the season starts.

:38:23.:38:25.

Clubs have voted to close next summer's transfer window,

:38:26.:38:28.

It will close at 5:00 on the Thursday evening

:38:29.:38:32.

Manchester United and Manchester City were among five clubs who voted

:38:33.:38:36.

The window overseas will remain the same, so players

:38:37.:38:39.

could still leave their clubs, after the deadline in England

:38:40.:38:42.

Everton manager Ronald Koeman said he is very disappointed

:38:43.:38:51.

at Wayne Rooney's drink-driving charge and the player will be "dealt

:38:52.:38:54.

with internally at the appropriate time."

:38:55.:38:58.

Rooney is currently on bail ahead of a hearing on September 18th.

:38:59.:39:02.

Koeman also confirmed that the former England captain

:39:03.:39:04.

will play for Everton against Tottenham on Saturday.

:39:05.:39:08.

I am very disappointed at this situation regarding Wayne Rooney.

:39:09.:39:10.

We have spoken, that was last Tuesday, and the chairman,

:39:11.:39:13.

Bill Kenwright, spoke also to Wayne about this situation.

:39:14.:39:15.

In line with any disciplinary matter, this will be dealt

:39:16.:39:18.

Britain's Chris Froome has extended his overall lead

:39:19.:39:40.

The Tour de France winner attacked inside the final mile of Stage 18,

:39:41.:39:45.

to claw back 20 seconds on his nearest rival,

:39:46.:39:47.

He now leads the Italian by more than 90 seconds.

:39:48.:39:53.

Meanwhile, things aren't going so well on the Tour of Britain

:39:54.:39:56.

Geraint Thomas could only finish 8th on the 10-mile individual time

:39:57.:40:00.

That leaves him 9th overall, 19 seconds behind Lars Boom,

:40:01.:40:04.

who won the stage to take the overall lead from Sky's Elia

:40:05.:40:07.

In Super League, St Helens kept their top four hopes alive

:40:08.:40:15.

with a dramatic 18-16 late win at Wakefield.

:40:16.:40:18.

Jonnie Lomax with the winning try - with just three minutes remaining,

:40:19.:40:21.

Saints are up to fifth, one point behind Wakefield with two

:40:22.:40:25.

Now, he's walked away unscathed from motorbike crashes at 80 miles

:40:26.:40:35.

per hour, but Cal Crutchlow is a doubt for this weekend's

:40:36.:40:37.

Misano MotoGP because of a savage piece of cheese.

:40:38.:40:48.

The cheese! The Parmesan? You can demonstrate. He was cutting this

:40:49.:40:59.

earlier this week and he severed tendon, which is important when you

:41:00.:41:02.

are riding a motorbike. And you want Charlie to demonstrate! Have the

:41:03.:41:06.

health and safety people cleared this? I think so. Most people

:41:07.:41:14.

probably great they are Parmesan. I know that Dan Walker nearly lost a

:41:15.:41:17.

finger once when he was grating Parmesan. You can't grate it with a

:41:18.:41:21.

knife. That is a very blunt knife, too. People do slice it, and have

:41:22.:41:31.

shavings. I use a potato peeler. You don't want about, just a bit of

:41:32.:41:35.

cheese. In my experience, the problem with the Parmesan is this is

:41:36.:41:39.

when you have a big piece like this and you have a greater it is fine,

:41:40.:41:43.

because obviously your hands are some distance from the cheese. It is

:41:44.:41:47.

when you get down to the last little corner and then you get your finger.

:41:48.:41:51.

Absolutely. It is the latest in a long line of Czar sporting injuries

:41:52.:41:54.

in the kitchen. You remember Dave Beasant, he dropped a jar of salad

:41:55.:41:59.

cream in his foot. Ivan Letty got a fractured cheek and from chicken

:42:00.:42:07.

wings. Chicken wings? They were thrown at him. It was not his fault.

:42:08.:42:12.

Kurt Broadford was in hospital because of exploding poached eggs.

:42:13.:42:15.

You have to be careful in the kitchen.

:42:16.:42:25.

Well, he has learnt his lesson of the Parmesan. Very tasty, Parmesan.

:42:26.:42:32.

Let's hope Cal Crutchlow is OK on the weekend. Absolutely. Thank you.

:42:33.:42:35.

The first strike by UK pilots in 40 years has started a few hours ago.

:42:36.:42:39.

Thomas Cook Airline pilots are unhappy over pay.

:42:40.:42:41.

Yes, the 12-hour strike started at 3:00 this morning and will last

:42:42.:42:45.

The pilots at Thomas Cook Airlines are unhappy over low pay rises

:42:46.:42:53.

The airline says it's still planning to operate all scheduled flights

:42:54.:42:59.

today, but it has changed some departure times.

:43:00.:43:02.

Earlier we spoke to Brian Strutton, the General Secretary of the union,

:43:03.:43:05.

the British Airline Pilots Association, which has

:43:06.:43:07.

He said it was time for Thomas Cook to treat its members better.

:43:08.:43:24.

Thomas Cook pilots have fallen behind other similar pilots in the

:43:25.:43:32.

industry. They want to recover some of us lost ground. None of that is

:43:33.:43:36.

unreasonable. Thomas Cook airlines have made profits of ?172 million.

:43:37.:43:41.

They can afford a decent pay rise for their pilots.

:43:42.:43:43.

That is the view of the union. Let's speak to Christoph Debus, the chief

:43:44.:43:50.

executive of the airline. The union says you can afford it. And you?

:43:51.:43:54.

Affordability is always key if you are talking about pay rises. We work

:43:55.:43:59.

in an extremely competitive environment. Everybody knows that

:44:00.:44:03.

cost control with the rise of the low-cost carrier is key. We want to

:44:04.:44:07.

offer a great bike, which we do at Thomas Cook. We have to manage our

:44:08.:44:11.

costs. We have offered our pilots a pay rise, 1.75% in Year 1, two .25%

:44:12.:44:19.

in Year 2. On top of automatic increments of 1.8%. I think that

:44:20.:44:22.

shows that it is clearly above inflation. So I think this is a

:44:23.:44:27.

reasonable offer in very challenging times. It shows that we are willing

:44:28.:44:33.

to talk. We have moved three times in the negotiation. Balpa hasn't

:44:34.:44:40.

moved at all. We ask Balpa to come back in the best interests of our

:44:41.:44:44.

customers and the business to revolt -- resolve this dispute. If you look

:44:45.:44:48.

at public sector pay, rising but 1% and being capped at that, and if you

:44:49.:44:52.

look at everybody else's pay, capped at 2%, it seems like a good deal.

:44:53.:44:55.

Why are they not happy? It's an extremely fair deal, you

:44:56.:45:04.

mention the numbers and in comparison it's extremely fair. If

:45:05.:45:07.

you compare our pilot wages with other airlines, you have to compare

:45:08.:45:14.

it with the relevant ones. Most our flights... Low-cost carriers have

:45:15.:45:18.

lower levels than has. Our pay levels are very competitive in that

:45:19.:45:25.

regard and we pay the highest pension contribution. We have a good

:45:26.:45:29.

package for our pilots. We have been growing and creating new promotions

:45:30.:45:35.

and we are overall and attractive employer. What was your last pay

:45:36.:45:40.

rise? It was zero because I didn't get a pay rise this year. Let's talk

:45:41.:45:46.

about the industry, its important prices and costs are being kept low,

:45:47.:45:50.

you have to cut costs to compete, there's also saw challenges for the

:45:51.:45:54.

industry, is it fair you ask the pilots to pay for that? In our

:45:55.:45:58.

industry it's always a combination. We always want to provide affordable

:45:59.:46:04.

high-quality holidays for our customers. We live in a competitive

:46:05.:46:08.

environment, with the devaluation of the pound, we pay costs in US

:46:09.:46:12.

dollars like fuel. We have to be very careful. I totally respect our

:46:13.:46:19.

employees all our employees deserve a pay rise and I think you see from

:46:20.:46:24.

our offer we are willing to get a pay rise -- give a pay rise but it

:46:25.:46:28.

has to be appropriate, reasonable and affordable. I don't think if you

:46:29.:46:33.

stack everything up, this is 10%. It doesn't fit into the times which we

:46:34.:46:39.

are living in. It's the first pilots strike in 40 years, do you get a

:46:40.:46:43.

sense of the anger they feel? What happens if they don't come back to

:46:44.:46:47.

the negotiating table and they say we won't work for what you are

:46:48.:46:52.

offering? We are a group of 22,000 employees, I get so much feedback

:46:53.:46:57.

from other employees who said stay firm in this dispute because you are

:46:58.:47:01.

offering a reasonable offer. This morning all flights have departed on

:47:02.:47:05.

time, you can see there are also many pilots who love what they do,

:47:06.:47:11.

flying the aircraft, bringing our customers safely to their

:47:12.:47:15.

destination so I think it has to be affordable and fair for everyone. We

:47:16.:47:19.

want to resolve that and we hope they will come back to the table.

:47:20.:47:23.

You said you have had to change the flight times slightly but most if

:47:24.:47:26.

not all are leaving as planned. This morning all flights have left on

:47:27.:47:31.

time or even ahead of time. I want to talk about the hurricane, we've

:47:32.:47:35.

been talking about events in the Caribbean. What are your plans to

:47:36.:47:40.

get people back safely? I know you're not sending people over but

:47:41.:47:45.

what are your plans? The customer is our key principle. What we did on

:47:46.:47:51.

Wednesday, we have sent our specialist assistant team to the

:47:52.:47:54.

Dominican Republic and Cuba, which are the most impacted. We have got

:47:55.:48:01.

people in Cuba out of a dangerous area. It's not in the path of the

:48:02.:48:07.

hurricane. On the weekend we will send empty aircraft to bring

:48:08.:48:10.

customers back and we are currently in our crisis team, which is working

:48:11.:48:17.

on a 24-hour basis. We are monitoring the situation. It might

:48:18.:48:22.

be that we have to delay further flights, we delayed one from

:48:23.:48:26.

yesterday to today, we will delay one potentially. Good to talk to

:48:27.:48:32.

you. The Chief Executive of Thomas Cook airlines. Can I ask a question?

:48:33.:48:42.

The pilots strike has started? Yes. Who is buying the planes? Pilots are

:48:43.:48:47.

coming in, non-union members and other pilots who might be in the

:48:48.:48:51.

union but don't support the strike. Are they Thomas Cook pilots? Yes,

:48:52.:48:57.

they are the anyone's allowed to fly the planes. Thanks very much.

:48:58.:49:00.

Here's Sarah with a look at this morning's weather.

:49:01.:49:04.

Good morning. It is quite mixed at the moment, it feels like summer has

:49:05.:49:13.

gone and we are into autumn? That's right, we have some unsettled

:49:14.:49:16.

autumnal weather on the cards but it's not going to be a complete

:49:17.:49:20.

washout. Where you see the sun come through this time of year,

:49:21.:49:23.

temperatures doing reasonably well but through the course of today it's

:49:24.:49:27.

that real mix of sunshine, showers and it is quite blustery as well.

:49:28.:49:32.

Low pressure, certainly in charge at the moment, sitting out to the

:49:33.:49:36.

north-west of the UK, and we have the winds rattling around that area

:49:37.:49:40.

of low pressure so bringing scattered showers and some longer

:49:41.:49:44.

spells of rain, especially in parts of southern England through the day.

:49:45.:49:49.

Heading into the afternoon, scattered showers across Scotland

:49:50.:49:51.

and Northern Ireland, some will be quite heavy and slow moving. You

:49:52.:49:56.

could have the odd rumble of thunder around and temperatures generally in

:49:57.:50:00.

the mid-teens. Heading our way south across the country, again that mix

:50:01.:50:05.

of sun sunny spells, plenty of showers and in some parts of

:50:06.:50:09.

southern England could merge into longer spells of rain. Don't be

:50:10.:50:14.

surprised if you see some thunderstorms. Towards the

:50:15.:50:17.

south-west of England, you should see a bit of brightness breaking

:50:18.:50:21.

through in between the showers. Onto this evening, we're going to see the

:50:22.:50:25.

showers tending to ease away. They will continue in the north and west

:50:26.:50:30.

for a time but in eastern areas you will see clearer spells. By early

:50:31.:50:36.

Saturday, temperatures holding on in double figures in the towns and

:50:37.:50:39.

cities but colder than that in the countryside. On Saturday it is

:50:40.:50:43.

western parts continuing to see the breezy, showery weather but further

:50:44.:50:48.

east and you're more likely to stay dry. Having said that, during the

:50:49.:50:53.

afternoon showers become once again a bit more widespread. Another day

:50:54.:50:57.

of sunshine and showers and temperatures of between 15 and 18.

:50:58.:51:02.

Into the second half of the weekend, a small ridge of high pressure.

:51:03.:51:05.

Sunday for many of us should start on a dry note but it won't last all

:51:06.:51:10.

that long. The next area of low pressure brings wet and windy

:51:11.:51:13.

weather initially towards the north-west on Sunday, that will

:51:14.:51:17.

creep these words later in the day but I think probably towards the

:51:18.:51:20.

south-east you should have a relatively good deal of drier and

:51:21.:51:23.

slightly brighter weather but temperatures nothing to write home

:51:24.:51:27.

about and feeling chilly with the breeze and showers. A bit of an

:51:28.:51:32.

unsettled story over the next few days.

:51:33.:51:33.

Thanks very much. Let's see what the weather conditions are like. This is

:51:34.:51:41.

Morecambe. This week we have seen all types of weather, some days have

:51:42.:51:45.

been beautiful, today has a slightly more brisk look to it, a bit nippy

:51:46.:51:50.

in Morecambe Bay. Stunning nevertheless. John Maguire is there.

:51:51.:51:56.

With those views come great memories of taking lovely walks down the

:51:57.:52:00.

beach. John, that's what you're talking about today? That's right.

:52:01.:52:07.

We are calling this whether eclectic because we've had pretty much a bit

:52:08.:52:11.

of everything this morning. Wonderful views at Morecambe Bay and

:52:12.:52:15.

Steve, the cameraman, is giving you a panoramic view. Here's the Midland

:52:16.:52:21.

hotel, recently refurbished, looking up north to the Lake District, you

:52:22.:52:25.

get that thing in this country, mountains behind the seat. Out of

:52:26.:52:30.

the vast expanse of Morecambe Bay you could see wind farms in the

:52:31.:52:33.

distance. A lovely spot. The seaside is so magical. It's the boomerang

:52:34.:52:38.

effect, why do we keep coming back Chris when I we found out why you

:52:39.:52:41.

love the seaside. My favourite memory is jumping off

:52:42.:52:59.

the rocks. My favourite memory is watching the kids jumping off the

:53:00.:53:02.

rocks with my heart in my mouth knowing they're having fun.

:53:03.:53:07.

What was yours, love? Possibly being in South Shields a couple of weeks

:53:08.:53:14.

ago performing Beauty and the Beast. She's in character. It's good that,

:53:15.:53:16.

that, isn't it? The only thing I remember of the

:53:17.:53:22.

coast is having barbecues after getting results and stuff like that.

:53:23.:53:28.

To cheer you up after results. Whenever things gone wrong it's nice

:53:29.:53:32.

to go down to the water and just, sort of, chill.

:53:33.:53:37.

My favourite memory is when Leon took me to the coast in Devon for

:53:38.:53:49.

the first time. Within the UK. I've never been before so the coast is

:53:50.:53:53.

absolutely beautiful. I did and realise how gorgeous the coast

:53:54.:53:54.

actually is. Me and my sister making sandcastles

:53:55.:54:02.

and I knocked them all over. My favourite memory of being at the

:54:03.:54:11.

seaside was only a few weeks ago when I got engaged to my girlfriend

:54:12.:54:19.

in Devon and we swam out to a rock in the middle of the sea and I

:54:20.:54:23.

thought I'd like to marry this lady so

:54:24.:54:27.

hopefully you at home joined us in going, ah, when he told us about

:54:28.:54:35.

getting engaged. Morecambe Bay looking eclectic and lively, is it

:54:36.:54:41.

the sight, sound and smell that brings us back? What about the

:54:42.:54:45.

future? Matt Smith is from the centre for entrepreneurs. How do we

:54:46.:54:51.

regenerate our formerly beloved seaside towns and ensure they have a

:54:52.:54:56.

vibrant future? We think it's the entrepreneurs that help build the

:54:57.:54:59.

seaside towns in the Victorian era and they will help them revive by

:55:00.:55:05.

bringing ideas, investment and jobs. It sounds easy, one assumes it's

:55:06.:55:10.

not. What is the key, what is the secret? Every seaside town needs a

:55:11.:55:15.

unique selling point. What sets aside real from Llandudno, what sets

:55:16.:55:25.

aside Morecambe from other places. Padstow is known for food, Newquay

:55:26.:55:30.

for sport, Blackpool for its nightlife, what will attract people

:55:31.:55:33.

to every seaside town and how can the local authority and the

:55:34.:55:37.

businesses help build that? That's crucial, that council by in, making

:55:38.:55:42.

sure the cash is there but making sure the council will get on board

:55:43.:55:47.

as well? You need the entrepreneurial drive of the elected

:55:48.:55:51.

councillors and officials, they need to like saying yes to businesses and

:55:52.:55:54.

to entrepreneurs with their ideas. Thanks very much. Fascinating to

:55:55.:55:59.

hear your views this morning and to hear about the future of our once

:56:00.:56:04.

beloved now still very much appreciated coastal towns. We're

:56:05.:56:09.

going to come back later to talk more about the future of these

:56:10.:56:13.

places and we will also meet some of our coastal champions, you've been

:56:14.:56:17.

nominating them, some of the people that make a real difference around

:56:18.:56:20.

the fantastic British coastline. Talk later. Look forward to it.

:56:21.:56:26.

Thanks very much. This is the shot from the drone. Looks fantastic.

:56:27.:56:30.

Almost like the weather conditions up why look different to the ground

:56:31.:56:34.

because it looks much brighter. I wonder if it is as good where you

:56:35.:56:36.

are this morning. Time now to get the news,

:56:37.:56:37.

travel and weather where you are. Plenty more on our website

:56:38.:59:59.

at the usual address. Now, though, it's back

:00:00.:00:03.

to Charlie and Naga. This is Breakfast, with

:00:04.:00:05.

Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty. More than one million

:00:06.:00:09.

people have been hit The British Virgin Islands

:00:10.:00:10.

are the latest to report The governor declares

:00:11.:00:14.

a state of emergency. All of us have been affected by

:00:15.:00:23.

Irma, some more than others. Apart from the structural damage, there

:00:24.:00:27.

have sadly been reports of casualties and fatalities.

:00:28.:00:31.

It's predicted another 26 million people are at risk from the giant

:00:32.:00:34.

storm in the coming days - major tourism areas in Cuba

:00:35.:00:37.

Good morning it's Friday, 8th September.

:00:38.:00:53.

A warning of race bias in the British justice system -

:00:54.:00:58.

a Government-backed report warns that young people

:00:59.:01:00.

Pilots working for Thomas Cook airlines have gone on strike. It is

:01:01.:01:13.

the first industrial action by UK pilots in 40 years. I've been

:01:14.:01:16.

hearing from the union and the airline's boss about what has gone

:01:17.:01:17.

wrong. In sport, Big Ben is still striking

:01:18.:01:18.

- at Lords, at least. Ben Stokes takes six wickets

:01:19.:01:22.

on a crazy day at Lords, with both the West Indies and then

:01:23.:01:24.

England suffering batting collapses From Big Brother to

:01:25.:01:27.

the Million Pound Drop, Davina McCall has fronted some

:01:28.:01:31.

of TV's biggest shows. Now, she's tackling some

:01:32.:01:33.

of life's biggest issues - We are at the beach this morning. It

:01:34.:01:49.

is the last day of our trip around the UK's coast. This is Morecambe

:01:50.:01:53.

Bay. It is cloudy at the moment, but what about the rest of the country?

:01:54.:01:58.

Sarah can tell us. Fairly similar skies across many parts of the

:01:59.:02:01.

country, quite a lot of cloud around bringing heavy showers today. There

:02:02.:02:05.

will be some balances of sunshine in between the showers. We will have a

:02:06.:02:10.

full round-up of the UK weather, as well as at Hurricane Irma.

:02:11.:02:14.

The path of destruction brought by Hurricane Irma has now affected

:02:15.:02:18.

more than one million people across the Caribbean.

:02:19.:02:20.

At least 14 people have been killed, and a state of emergency has been

:02:21.:02:24.

declared at the British Virgin Islands.

:02:25.:02:26.

Overnight, the British Overseas Territory of Turks and Caicos has

:02:27.:02:28.

The hurricane is projected to move to the Bahamas and Cuba where mass

:02:29.:02:34.

evacuations are underway, before it reaches

:02:35.:02:36.

This is what it's like to look out of your hotel room

:02:37.:02:43.

in the Turks and Caicos, knowing that one of the strongest

:02:44.:02:46.

storms in recent memory is heading your way.

:02:47.:02:49.

Starting to hear the noise of the wind as well,

:02:50.:02:52.

But we're not even close to the worst bit yet.

:02:53.:03:01.

On the British Virgin Islands there have been

:03:02.:03:06.

With communications severely disrupted, the governor issued this

:03:07.:03:10.

audio message declaring a state of emergency.

:03:11.:03:14.

All of us have been affected by Irma, and some more than others.

:03:15.:03:18.

Apart from the structural damage, the have sadly been reports

:03:19.:03:21.

My thoughts and prayers are with each and everyone of you.

:03:22.:03:33.

At least one person is believed to have died on the British

:03:34.:03:36.

territory of Anguilla, where residents sheltered

:03:37.:03:38.

in the strongest part of their homes for safety.

:03:39.:03:41.

We were in the bath with a mattress above us.

:03:42.:03:44.

That's how we sort of managed to keep safe and dry.

:03:45.:03:49.

I think a lot of people were in a similar situation.

:03:50.:03:53.

We've seen houses with cars that have been just picked up

:03:54.:03:56.

Barbuda was one of the first islands to be hit by Irma.

:03:57.:04:04.

It is now less than 48 hours away from the impact

:04:05.:04:07.

Jose has sustained wind speeds of 120 mph and it looks likely

:04:08.:04:12.

to gain in strength over the next day or two.

:04:13.:04:14.

Let's pick up on those people that are affected already, and the fact

:04:15.:04:37.

it has Florida and Cuba in its sights? There is estimated to be up

:04:38.:04:42.

to 10,000 British holiday-makers on Cuba. Some of them have been moved

:04:43.:04:47.

away from the coastal resorts. The advice for the others still in the

:04:48.:04:50.

resorts is to stay in their hotels, because those buildings are built to

:04:51.:04:55.

withstand hurricanes like this. As for Florida, not many people going

:04:56.:04:59.

there at the moment, nobody heading there for the weekend because

:05:00.:05:03.

international airports will be shut down. In terms of the British

:05:04.:05:07.

Government's aid operation, there had been some criticism that it was

:05:08.:05:10.

slow to get off the mark. What is happening now? Teams from the

:05:11.:05:15.

foreign office will be heading out to the region today and they will be

:05:16.:05:18.

offering consular assistance to those hit by the hurricane. They

:05:19.:05:23.

will be working in parallel with the military teams, who will be offering

:05:24.:05:27.

disaster relief. So, we have the Royal Fleet auxiliary ship already

:05:28.:05:33.

in the area. It is helping citizens of the British territory of

:05:34.:05:36.

Anguilla. It has helicopters on board, earth moving equipment and

:05:37.:05:40.

emergency rations. Today there will be the first elements of a task

:05:41.:05:45.

group heading out. They will be giant transport aircraft heading out

:05:46.:05:48.

from RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire. The first plane leaving

:05:49.:05:53.

this morning will have personnel on board. Again, relief supplies and

:05:54.:05:57.

water rations. Some of the aircraft later on will be carrying

:05:58.:06:01.

helicopters to the region. Finally, there is the flagship of the Royal

:06:02.:06:05.

Navy, HMS Ocean, which will be leaving the Mediterranean to head

:06:06.:06:08.

towards the Caribbean. That is carrying a lot of helicopters but it

:06:09.:06:13.

will take ten days, two weeks to reach the area. It will then be

:06:14.:06:15.

helping residents recover from not just one hurricane, but, by then,

:06:16.:06:18.

two. An earthquake with a magnitude

:06:19.:06:21.

of eight point four has The quake struck 75 miles

:06:22.:06:24.

off the Pacific coast, But buildings shook in Mexico City

:06:25.:06:27.

hundreds of miles away. Reuters news agency are reporting

:06:28.:06:36.

that at least two people are dead. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre

:06:37.:06:44.

said tsunami waves were hitting Mexico,

:06:45.:06:46.

the biggest being more than two feet, and more hazardous waves

:06:47.:06:48.

could be possible "within the next three hours" for the coasts

:06:49.:06:51.

of Mexico and surrounding countries. Young offenders from ethnic minority

:06:52.:06:59.

backgrounds will become the next generation of adult criminals unless

:07:00.:07:02.

the justice system is reformed, according to a review led by the MP

:07:03.:07:07.

David Lammy. The inquiry makes a series of recommendations. These

:07:08.:07:09.

include allowing some prosecutions to be deferred or even dropped if

:07:10.:07:14.

suspects receive treatment for issues such as drug or alcohol

:07:15.:07:15.

problems. Noel Williams was 11 when he first

:07:16.:07:16.

got involved in gangs. By the age of 13 he was imprisoned

:07:17.:07:19.

for robberies and drug dealing. I'm in and out of the system,

:07:20.:07:25.

been there three times. A lot of bullying goes

:07:26.:07:29.

on and as we say lack of prison staff so they don't pick up

:07:30.:07:32.

on certain things, people are self-harming,

:07:33.:07:34.

if they don't cut their arms He's now turned his life around

:07:35.:07:37.

but he believes race and ethnicity plays a part in how you're treated

:07:38.:07:42.

and punished within It's unjust, of course it's unjust,

:07:43.:07:44.

and if you look at the sentences we get, they're longer,

:07:45.:07:50.

sentences are harsher and people are coming out not rehabilitated,

:07:51.:07:53.

sometimes they come out and reoffend at an accelerated rate

:07:54.:07:55.

to their counterparts too. The Lammy Review makes a number

:07:56.:08:02.

of key recommendations, such as removing identifying

:08:03.:08:05.

information about ethnicity when cases are passed from police

:08:06.:08:08.

to prosecutors so racial bias doesn't influence

:08:09.:08:11.

charging decisions. I'm very worried about our

:08:12.:08:18.

prison system, I think where there's clearly overt

:08:19.:08:21.

discrimination going on and some of the treatment

:08:22.:08:25.

is just unacceptable. It's one of the largest reviews

:08:26.:08:29.

of its kind and highlights that radical reform is urgently needed

:08:30.:08:32.

to bring fairness to The government is accusing Labour

:08:33.:08:34.

of a "cynical" attempt to block The bill paves the way for leaving

:08:35.:08:43.

the European Union in March 2019. Labour and other opposition

:08:44.:08:49.

parties have promised to vote against it next week,

:08:50.:08:51.

insisting that it gives sweeping powers to ministers

:08:52.:08:53.

but reduces MPs to spectators. Brexit Secretary David Davis claimed

:08:54.:09:07.

Britain would not forgive Labour if it tries to delay or destroy the

:09:08.:09:08.

process of leaving the EU. More than 160,000 Rohingya have fled

:09:09.:09:24.

to Bangladesh since unrest erupted there two weeks ago. Aung San Suu

:09:25.:09:33.

Kyi has been widely criticised for failing to condemn the violence.

:09:34.:09:37.

A 13-year-old girl from Somerset, whose organs were donated

:09:38.:09:39.

after her death, has saved or transformed the lives

:09:40.:09:41.

of eight patients - that's a record for a single donor

:09:42.:09:44.

with a brain aneurysm and died four days later in hospital.

:09:45.:09:48.

Five of the patients who received life-saving transplants

:09:49.:09:50.

Jemima's story is part of an NHS campaign appealing for more donors.

:09:51.:09:55.

There are thousands of people waiting for a transplant.

:09:56.:09:57.

If you would be willing to accept an organ you should be

:09:58.:10:02.

willing to donate an organ, and that is what we are asking

:10:03.:10:04.

people to consider, and make a decision that they will

:10:05.:10:07.

The Royal Navy's second aircraft carrier will be formally named

:10:08.:10:11.

Work on the ship has been halted for the naval tradition which dates

:10:12.:10:18.

back thousands of years and combines a celebration with

:10:19.:10:20.

The naming will be carried out by the Duchess of Cornwall,

:10:21.:10:26.

with a bottle of whisky to be smashed against the carrier

:10:27.:10:29.

at the ceremony at Rosyth Dockyard in Fife.

:10:30.:10:37.

Is that a traditional, whiskey? I am sure it used to be champagne.

:10:38.:10:42.

Possibly because it is in Fife? The Ministry of Defence says that

:10:43.:10:58.

the first aid to the Caribbean will leave from RAF Brize Norton this

:10:59.:11:01.

morning. Duncan is there. Obviously this cannot get there quickly

:11:02.:11:07.

enough? Absolutely, those preparations are under way. As you

:11:08.:11:11.

say, they are urgently needed in the Caribbean. This flight will be

:11:12.:11:13.

taking off about 10am. It is what they call a C17 Globemaster. It is

:11:14.:11:25.

capable of carrying 80 tonnes of equipment. We are not sure what that

:11:26.:11:30.

equipment is yet. This is very last minute stuff. All they have loaded

:11:31.:11:34.

so far as some water. You might be able to see it there. 50 passengers,

:11:35.:11:39.

50 RAF personnel will be on the advance party flight. They are

:11:40.:11:42.

heading to Barbados first of all and then they are hoping to get into the

:11:43.:11:45.

British Virgin Islands after that. It all depends on what capacity they

:11:46.:11:50.

have on the ground to take big aircraft like this. They won't know

:11:51.:11:56.

this until they get into the region. Later this morning, a second RAF

:11:57.:12:01.

aircraft, Voyager, will be leaving at about 11:30am. That will have 180

:12:02.:12:08.

passengers on board, RAF experts used to tackling these issues in

:12:09.:12:11.

hurricane areas and earthquake areas and the like. People not carrying

:12:12.:12:17.

much kit, they are the experts, the physical comic human side of it.

:12:18.:12:20.

This is the advance flight with the kit. They will team up in the

:12:21.:12:25.

region. -- the physical, human side of it.

:12:26.:12:31.

Let's talk more about the relief effort. Gemma Su is from the

:12:32.:12:39.

University of Manchester. Simon Calder is our travel editor. First,

:12:40.:12:43.

we were seeing some of the early preparations. We have heard from

:12:44.:12:47.

people in the region this morning, major issues around communications.

:12:48.:12:52.

Really basic stuff, getting in and out, or knowing the scale of the

:12:53.:12:57.

problem? This is really the critical period. We have had a lot of talk

:12:58.:13:01.

about how much money has been pledged by the UK government. It

:13:02.:13:06.

really is a matter of when it is going to arrive. We have

:13:07.:13:09.

organisations, local organisations on the ground that need resources to

:13:10.:13:15.

meet immediate needs, water, food and shelter. It is a critical

:13:16.:13:19.

period, a life and death situation. Some of the islands we are talking

:13:20.:13:23.

about are bigger islands. We were hearing from one of the experts a

:13:24.:13:26.

little earlier on. Some of the island communities are tiny. It's

:13:27.:13:31.

just a few thousand people. They are very remote places. It could take

:13:32.:13:35.

some time to them? That is absolutely true. But it is important

:13:36.:13:39.

to remember that there are local populations. They are the first

:13:40.:13:46.

responders. There will be local organisations which have... Well,

:13:47.:13:49.

I'm not sure how much capacity, but there is often the capacity to

:13:50.:13:52.

respond, but it is a matter of getting there as quickly as possible

:13:53.:13:55.

to support and shoulder the burden of responsibility at this time,

:13:56.:14:00.

because it is such a devastating earthquake. Time is of the essence.

:14:01.:14:04.

Simon, what is happening in terms of flights out of the region, into the

:14:05.:14:09.

region? We are concerned about the people living there, obviously, but

:14:10.:14:13.

we need to talk about the tourist destinations, highly popular

:14:14.:14:18.

destinations and people are stranded there? There are about 10,000 people

:14:19.:14:23.

in Cuba, which is next in line. There have been many concerns,

:14:24.:14:31.

particularly about three islands, off the northern coast of Cuba.

:14:32.:14:35.

Talking to holiday-makers, they were very, very worried about what was

:14:36.:14:42.

going to happen. Late yesterday, Cuban authorities said, right,

:14:43.:14:47.

everybody out. They evacuated everybody out to a less vulnerable

:14:48.:14:54.

resort and to have an. There are some flights to the Dominican

:14:55.:14:58.

Republic today. They were delayed until the storm had passed. People

:14:59.:15:05.

will be coming back on those. British Airways, Thomas Cook

:15:06.:15:09.

airlines, sending out a aircraft to bring people back. But flights are

:15:10.:15:12.

still continuing. British Airways is flying out to Miami this morning.

:15:13.:15:16.

They have said, do not get on this aircraft unless you have somewhere

:15:17.:15:19.

to stay, because many of the hotels are closing down. The tour

:15:20.:15:24.

operators, they all have different policies, confusingly. It is well

:15:25.:15:27.

worth talking to your travel agent or tour operator. You can get your

:15:28.:15:31.

money back if you have a holiday booked? Some of them you can. Thomas

:15:32.:15:35.

Cook is basically saying if you are going to the region, up to and

:15:36.:15:39.

including the weekend, that includes Orlando in Florida, you can get a

:15:40.:15:43.

full refund or switch to an alternative destination. Thomson,

:15:44.:15:47.

the bigger tour operators not being that generous. It is partly because

:15:48.:15:52.

there is no overall government warning, from the foreign office,

:15:53.:15:56.

saying, everybody out of the areas. If there were, there might be a more

:15:57.:15:57.

co-ordinated approach. Looking particularly at Barbuda

:15:58.:16:08.

yesterday, they are looking at such levels of devastation, and loss of

:16:09.:16:11.

life is the first thing that people look at, but beyond that, this is a

:16:12.:16:16.

place that relies so much on tourism, and the notion of how

:16:17.:16:19.

quickly they could try and get things together is a real worry. It

:16:20.:16:23.

is awful, and we have seen in previous events like this on other

:16:24.:16:27.

islands, it can take a decade to rebuild the tourist industry. Of

:16:28.:16:33.

course, you are going well beyond the immediate human tragedies to a

:16:34.:16:39.

longer lasting issue of people's livelihoods. There has been much

:16:40.:16:44.

about the reaction from wealthier countries and how quickly eight has

:16:45.:16:49.

been given - do you have a view on this? Definitely. There is talk

:16:50.:16:52.

about how much has been pledged and how quickly, but I think there is an

:16:53.:16:57.

absolute responsibility of wealthier nations to step in and take the

:16:58.:17:02.

burden of responsibility. The UK and France in particular? Yes, but not

:17:03.:17:07.

just because of them being British and French territories, but a level

:17:08.:17:12.

of global social justice that wealthy nations should step in when

:17:13.:17:17.

there are countries that are so vulnerable and have been so

:17:18.:17:19.

devastated, there is a responsibility to help these

:17:20.:17:23.

nations. Simon and Gemma, thank you for your time this morning. The time

:17:24.:17:30.

is 17 minutes past eight. I'm sure Sarah will take a look at

:17:31.:17:35.

the intricacies of how these hurricanes are moving across. We

:17:36.:17:39.

have Hurricane Jose following Hurricane Irma.

:17:40.:17:51.

Katya is not such a big storm as Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Jose.

:17:52.:18:00.

It is the peak of the hurricane season in the moment.

:18:01.:18:09.

You can see the huge size of that hurricane here on the satellite

:18:10.:18:17.

image. It is about the same size of France -- the same size as France.

:18:18.:18:21.

It has already caused catastrophic damage, and every is more to come.

:18:22.:18:25.

Over the next 24 hours or so, the storm will move towards Kumar. The

:18:26.:18:33.

winds of up to 160 mph. The rainfall of half a metre or so, as well as a

:18:34.:18:40.

significant storm surge, so very dangerous conditions, particularly

:18:41.:18:44.

for the more low-lying islands. Hurricane Jose looks like it may

:18:45.:18:50.

stay out towards the north-east. But it could hit Barbuda and Anguilla.

:18:51.:18:58.

Lots going on the other side of Atlantic. Here, unsettled. Sunshine,

:18:59.:19:04.

showers and quite breezy out there today, with low pressure driving the

:19:05.:19:08.

weather and packing in no shower was from the West. There will be some

:19:09.:19:11.

sunshine between the showers today, but some of them could be quite

:19:12.:19:16.

heavy. Some prolonged rain across South Wales and southern England at

:19:17.:19:19.

times, particularly the afternoon. It will be a windy in the south.

:19:20.:19:24.

Slightly lighter winds for the North, across parts of Scotland. The

:19:25.:19:30.

showers will be slow-moving, and there could be some thunderstorms

:19:31.:19:33.

mixed in too, so don't be surprised that there is quite a bit of lying

:19:34.:19:37.

water on the roads. A similar picture across Northern Ireland and

:19:38.:19:42.

into northern England. A bit of brightness across Lincolnshire and

:19:43.:19:48.

the Midlands. Apart from that, you're likely to see cloudy, wintry

:19:49.:19:52.

conditions with outbreaks of rain. A bit of brightness in between the

:19:53.:19:57.

showers. Temperatures are nothing to write home about - mid-teens for

:19:58.:20:01.

most of us. This evening, we continue with the windy, showery

:20:02.:20:04.

picture across north-western parts of the country. Further east,

:20:05.:20:08.

clearer skies and less windy weather. A fresh start on Saturday,

:20:09.:20:14.

particularly towards the east, where we could see temperatures down into

:20:15.:20:19.

single figures. There will be some sunshine to start the day on

:20:20.:20:23.

Saturday. Showers in the west of the country will drift to the east

:20:24.:20:27.

through the day. Sunny spells in between, and temperatures by

:20:28.:20:30.

tomorrow of 15-19dC. These temperatures certainly aren't

:20:31.:20:39.

anything to write home about, but they haven't been for a while, they?

:20:40.:20:44.

There are a little below average, but not too bad. The wind chill

:20:45.:20:48.

makes things feel cooler with the shallows around too. Layers are

:20:49.:20:50.

needed! Let's go straight to Ben and News of

:20:51.:21:02.

the first pilots' strike in 40 years.

:21:03.:21:07.

It is usually cabin crew that walk out, this time it is pilots. Pilots

:21:08.:21:16.

at Thomas Cook started a strike this morning. They are unhappy over what

:21:17.:21:20.

they call low pay rises. We have spoken to the union this morning,

:21:21.:21:25.

and they said enough is enough. The airline says it plans to operate all

:21:26.:21:31.

of its scheduled flights using nonunion pilots, but it has had to

:21:32.:21:34.

change some departure times over the course of the day, so check before

:21:35.:21:38.

you fly. The owner of the daily and Sunday

:21:39.:21:47.

Mirror newspapers is selling the company. Trinity Mirror prints

:21:48.:21:53.

regional papers as well, but it is thought the deal will need to be

:21:54.:21:57.

signed off by the regulator before it goes ahead.

:21:58.:22:05.

Another cyber attack has targeted a credit agency. It is described as a

:22:06.:22:09.

colossal breach and it could affect nearly half the US population. It is

:22:10.:22:14.

huge. It could affect people in Britain and Canada too. More than

:22:15.:22:18.

140 million customers have had some information stolen in America alone.

:22:19.:22:23.

We are told it is one of the largest attacks on record. Interesting times

:22:24.:22:27.

as far as security is concerned. You are up-to-date. More from us later.

:22:28.:22:31.

We've been talking this morning about nostalgic

:22:32.:22:33.

trips to the seaside, and for people who visit Morecambe

:22:34.:22:35.

one of their memories may have involve one of our Coastal

:22:36.:22:38.

Since 1536, the monarch has appointed an official guide

:22:39.:22:48.

to the dangerous quick sands that divide Lancashire and Cumbria.

:22:49.:22:51.

Breakfast's John Maguire is there for us and can tell us more.

:22:52.:23:04.

John is in marvellous Morecambe this morning.

:23:05.:23:10.

Good morning to you, guys. It is getting warmer here. Charlie the dog

:23:11.:23:18.

has just barked his appreciation. We have been talking and learning over

:23:19.:23:23.

the last week about the sun, the C . But it is really about people's

:23:24.:23:27.

relationship with the coast. That is what makes it so special to all of

:23:28.:23:30.

us. We have brought along some of our coastal champions this morning.

:23:31.:23:37.

We have Dave and Jan, who have come up from the Wirral. We have Bob and

:23:38.:23:46.

Carol from Coastwatch. We have a villain, Lane, Bruce, Henry, Bernie

:23:47.:23:53.

and last but not least, Cedric. Let's watch the amazing work that

:23:54.:23:56.

Cedric does. I'm Cedric Robinson,

:23:57.:23:58.

the Queen's Guide to the Sands of Morecambe Bay and I've been doing

:23:59.:24:01.

that for 54 years this year. It's my job to get everyone

:24:02.:24:08.

across the bay safely. In all the years I've been doing it

:24:09.:24:11.

now, I reckon I've taken The problem is, these days,

:24:12.:24:14.

these walks are so popular that keeping the numbers down

:24:15.:24:19.

is getting more difficult. I was crossing the sands,

:24:20.:24:27.

sat alongside HRH His Royal Highness Prince Philip,

:24:28.:24:31.

with the Queen's horses. On the way, he said,

:24:32.:24:33.

how on earth do you keep I said, well, the only thing

:24:34.:24:37.

you can do is to live There are quicksands in the bay,

:24:38.:24:45.

those are the most dangerous things. But also, when the tide comes in,

:24:46.:24:51.

it has a saying, it can come in on the high tides as fast

:24:52.:24:55.

as a horse can gallop. I was bred and born to the sands

:24:56.:24:58.

from a very early age. I can read the sands

:24:59.:25:03.

like you can open a morning When I retire from the sands, that

:25:04.:25:08.

will be the worst day of my life. I just love the sands and...

:25:09.:25:12.

I just love the sands. And Cedric is with us in the flesh.

:25:13.:25:41.

I have been here all of my life come since the age of 14. I am now 84

:25:42.:25:46.

years young and I have been on those sands every day. I have learned to

:25:47.:25:51.

read the sands when you read a newspaper -- like you read a

:25:52.:25:55.

newspaper when you get up in the morning. It is a big responsibility,

:25:56.:25:58.

really, but I never look at it that way because I am so laid back. I

:25:59.:26:03.

never think of the danger out there, but it is out there for the unwary.

:26:04.:26:09.

The Bay is one of the most dangerous ones in the world. It is nice to

:26:10.:26:14.

know that you are here to keep us all safe and that nothing would faze

:26:15.:26:18.

you. Evelyn, you work at the Winter Gardens here. We had some footage

:26:19.:26:25.

earlier from 1901 which showed the Winter Gardens back then, and you

:26:26.:26:29.

hope it will return to be a jewel in the crown for this resort? We formed

:26:30.:26:36.

the friends in 1986, so we have been a pressure group trying to save the

:26:37.:26:41.

building for 31 years. Now we have bought the building and it belongs

:26:42.:26:47.

to the preservation trust. Why is it important to save a building like

:26:48.:26:51.

that? Because we need people to come back into Morecambe, and it's one of

:26:52.:26:55.

the things that will draw them in, like the Midland Hotel, the Winter

:26:56.:26:59.

Gardens. They are buildings from the past, but you have to use things

:27:00.:27:03.

like this. A building like that, built in 1897, you couldn't recreate

:27:04.:27:09.

it, you couldn't afford to. And people now are coming into the

:27:10.:27:13.

Winter Gardens more and more, so it is helping the town, helping the

:27:14.:27:19.

area. Thanks to all the coastal champions. We will hear from more of

:27:20.:27:23.

them later in the programme. As we have been saying all morning, not

:27:24.:27:26.

just about the past in the present, but important to link these

:27:27.:27:31.

wonderful assets to the seaside's future. Back to you.

:27:32.:27:36.

Ruffled hair there. A little bracing at the seaside, maybe. Sorry, we cut

:27:37.:27:45.

him off. You can't comment about a man's hair

:27:46.:27:49.

and not let him reply! We will be back later on, so we will

:27:50.:27:54.

have a chat with John then. It is time to get the news, travel and

:27:55.:27:57.

weather where you are this morning. Hopefully it looks

:27:58.:31:19.

I'm back with the latest in about half an hour.

:31:20.:31:26.

Hello this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty.

:31:27.:31:30.

1.2 million people have now been affected by the destructive

:31:31.:31:40.

trail of Hurricane Irma according to the International Red Cross.

:31:41.:31:42.

Overnight, the storm progressed into Haiti

:31:43.:31:44.

The British Virgin Islands are the latest to report

:31:45.:31:47.

major damage and deaths, where the Governor has declared

:31:48.:31:50.

The Ministry of Defence say the first military flight

:31:51.:31:53.

to the Caribbean will leave from RAF Brize Norton later this morning,

:31:54.:31:56.

with military personnel, rations and water on board.

:31:57.:31:58.

Earlier on BBC Breakfast, the Department for International

:31:59.:32:00.

Development told us they were trying to get aid there as quick

:32:01.:32:02.

Some of the islands on the north side have been badly hit. As far as

:32:03.:32:17.

we know the British Virgin Islands have been badly hit. There have been

:32:18.:32:23.

communication issues with those places. We are hoping to get onto

:32:24.:32:27.

the ground tomorrow to the British Virgin Islands. The first assistance

:32:28.:32:41.

was delivered. They will be moving to the British Virgin Islands to get

:32:42.:32:42.

a better picture of the needs there. Simon Cross, originally

:32:43.:32:52.

from Essex, has lived in the British Virgin Islands for two years. He's

:32:53.:32:55.

been talking to us this morning about the impact of hurricane Irma.

:32:56.:33:05.

It is the early hours of the morning at the moment. It is quiet. You can

:33:06.:33:12.

hear a chapter in the distance, hopefully clearing the roads. There

:33:13.:33:15.

is plenty of debris entries. The only method of getting around

:33:16.:33:21.

anywhere is by car. It's a mountainous place. You cannot do

:33:22.:33:23.

anything without a car. That's really important, that the roads are

:33:24.:33:30.

clear, that the place is completely safe. We managed to go into town

:33:31.:33:36.

today and check on properties. The state of the properties, they are in

:33:37.:33:43.

a terrible state at the moment. We just hope as much work can be done

:33:44.:33:49.

overnight. And some sort of preparation. But in truth it feels

:33:50.:33:53.

like the island is on its knees, to be honest. The last thing we want is

:33:54.:33:59.

any bad weather, let alone a category three or whatever it is

:34:00.:34:04.

proposed to be. Can you tell us what it was like when Irma hit? We've

:34:05.:34:13.

seen pictures of buildings hit. We've seen dramatic images of people

:34:14.:34:17.

hanging on the doors as they were being blown through. Tell us about

:34:18.:34:21.

the ferocity of it when it hit the buildings. In our house it started,

:34:22.:34:25.

the major warning was when the skylight was blown off our roof. You

:34:26.:34:31.

could just hear the wind blasting through the upstairs of the house.

:34:32.:34:35.

At that point we thought the roof was going to go. That was our main

:34:36.:34:41.

indicator just to get downstairs, into the basement, into the most

:34:42.:34:42.

secure part of the building. An earthquake with a magnitude

:34:43.:34:47.

of eight has hit southern Mexico. The quake struck 75 miles

:34:48.:34:50.

off the Pacific coast, But buildings shook in Mexico City

:34:51.:34:52.

hundreds of miles away. There are no reports so far of any

:34:53.:34:56.

major damage or casualties. At least two people are dead. The

:34:57.:35:09.

Pacific tsunami warning Centre said tsunami waves were hitting Mexico.

:35:10.:35:14.

The biggest being more than two feet and more hazardous waves could be

:35:15.:35:18.

possible within the next three hours. That is for the coast of

:35:19.:35:20.

Mexico and surrounding countries. Young offenders from ethnic

:35:21.:35:22.

minority backgrounds will become "the next generation" of adult

:35:23.:35:23.

criminals unless the justice system is reformed, according to a review

:35:24.:35:26.

led by the MP David Lammy. The report makes more

:35:27.:35:29.

than 30 recommendations including allowing some prosecutions to be

:35:30.:35:31.

deferred or even dropped if suspects get treatment for issues such

:35:32.:35:33.

as drug or alcohol problems. We have now created a situation in

:35:34.:35:50.

our country where 41% of our youth prison system, that's people as

:35:51.:35:55.

young as ten and as old as 18, is from a black or minority ethnic

:35:56.:35:59.

background. That's more than double the amount of black and ethnic

:36:00.:36:02.

minority young people in our country. That is a significant

:36:03.:36:09.

issue. It suggests our adult prison population will grow, as well, if we

:36:10.:36:13.

do not try and do something about it.

:36:14.:36:16.

The government is accusing Labour of a "cynical" attempt to block

:36:17.:36:19.

The bill paves the way for leaving the European Union in March 2019.

:36:20.:36:23.

Labour and other opposition parties have promised to vote

:36:24.:36:26.

against it next week insisting it gives sweeping powers to ministers

:36:27.:36:28.

The Brexit secretary David Davis claimed Britons "will not forgive"

:36:29.:36:32.

Labour if they try to "delay or destroy" the process

:36:33.:36:34.

A 13-year-old girl from Somerset, whose organs were donated

:36:35.:36:40.

after her death, has saved or transformed the lives

:36:41.:36:42.

of eight patients - that's a record for a single donor

:36:43.:36:45.

Jemima Layzell collapsed with a brain aneurysm and died four

:36:46.:36:50.

Five of the patients who received life-saving transplants

:36:51.:36:55.

Jemima's story is part of an NHS campaign appealing for more donors.

:36:56.:37:07.

The Royal Navy's second aircraft carrier will be formally named

:37:08.:37:09.

Work on the ship has been halted for the naval tradition

:37:10.:37:13.

which dates back thousands of years and combines a celebration

:37:14.:37:15.

The naming will be carried out by the Duchess of Cornwall,

:37:16.:37:19.

with a bottle of whisky to be smashed against the carrier at the

:37:20.:37:22.

If you're planning to take a train to work this morning,

:37:23.:37:30.

will you be looking out of the window?

:37:31.:37:34.

The passengers on board this journey in Germany were treated

:37:35.:37:36.

Men on ladders saluting the train, running trees in a nearby field

:37:37.:37:44.

It's all part of a theatrical show called 'Moving Countryside'

:37:45.:37:51.

They are doing stuff alongside the track to give people a bit of

:37:52.:38:04.

theatre, including releasing cars, and all sorts of mad stuff.

:38:05.:38:07.

The performances are designed to bring the city

:38:08.:38:09.

Think about that when you are travelling into work this morning.

:38:10.:38:13.

That would be all right. Sarah will have the weather

:38:14.:38:14.

in around 10 minutes' We've shed a tear with her

:38:15.:38:21.

as she reunited siblings on 'Long Lost Family' and now

:38:22.:38:26.

Davina McCall is tackling the issues of mental health,

:38:27.:38:28.

stress and parenting - she'll be on the sofa

:38:29.:38:30.

to tell us why. We're in Morecambe as part

:38:31.:38:33.

of our Coastal Britain series exploring why happy memories

:38:34.:38:35.

of childhood visits to the coast are good for us and why

:38:36.:38:37.

so many of us still like to be The Manchester Arena holds it's

:38:38.:38:41.

first concert since May's bomb Rick Astley's one of acts

:38:42.:38:57.

involved and is with us. The cricket could be over today if

:38:58.:39:22.

it continues like yesterday. He cannot take your attention of it for

:39:23.:39:28.

a second. This man was the star. Ben Stokes. Michael Vaughan has called

:39:29.:39:31.

him a freak because of the magic he can produce the turn a game around.

:39:32.:39:34.

Freak in a good way. England's Ben Stokes,

:39:35.:39:36.

reached a new career high, taking 6 wickets for just 22 runs

:39:37.:39:38.

on the first day of this deciding He took apart the Windies

:39:39.:39:41.

middle order, restricting them to a total of 123,

:39:42.:39:45.

but poor batting from his team mates England resume this

:39:46.:39:48.

morning on 46 for 4. There will be two new faces

:39:49.:39:55.

in the women's US Open final. Unseeded Sloane Stephens,

:39:56.:39:58.

held her nerve, overnight to beat Venus Williams,

:39:59.:40:00.

in three sets in New York. The defeat means 37-year old Venus,

:40:01.:40:02.

misses out, on returning, to the US Open final,

:40:03.:40:05.

15 years after her last. I was not playing well. Just wasn't

:40:06.:40:19.

playing well. There are moments when you have to dig deep, think about

:40:20.:40:23.

how to get the ball on the court. I have a big game. I can't be

:40:24.:40:27.

tentative and figure out how to put the ball in. I have figured a lot.

:40:28.:40:32.

She played great defence. I have not played in a long time. She has seen

:40:33.:40:36.

me play many times, but I have not seen her play as much. -- issue has

:40:37.:40:42.

not played in a long time. I'm super happy to be in a grand slam final.

:40:43.:40:46.

To do it in my home slam makes it more special. It's what every player

:40:47.:40:53.

dreams about. Fortunately but unfortunately I have to play Venus,

:40:54.:41:00.

but having four Americans in this position in the tournament says a

:41:01.:41:04.

lot about Americans and where we are now.

:41:05.:41:05.

Waiting for Sloane Stephens in the final, will be fellow

:41:06.:41:08.

American Madison Keys - she beat Coco Vandeweghe in just

:41:09.:41:10.

It means it will be the first time since the Williams sisters met

:41:11.:41:15.

in 2002 that Flushing Meadows has hosted a women's final featuring

:41:16.:41:17.

Britain's Chris Froome, is on the verge of another

:41:18.:41:23.

historic achievment - he's extended his overall lead

:41:24.:41:25.

at the Vuelta a Espana, as he tries to become,

:41:26.:41:28.

only the third man ever, and the first Briton,

:41:29.:41:30.

to win the Vuelta and Tour de France double, in the same year.

:41:31.:41:33.

With two more stages to go, he's increased his lead over rival,

:41:34.:41:36.

Vincenzo Nibali, to over, a minute and a half.

:41:37.:41:38.

Meanwhile, things aren't going so well on the Tour

:41:39.:41:40.

Geraint Thomas could only finish eighth, on the ten

:41:41.:41:43.

mile individual time trial, in Clacton.

:41:44.:41:45.

That leaves him ninth overall, nineteen seconds behind Lars Boom,

:41:46.:41:47.

who won the stage to take the overall lead from

:41:48.:41:50.

It is getting to crunch time in the super league.

:41:51.:42:03.

St Helens kept their top 4 hopes, alive with a dramatic 18-16

:42:04.:42:06.

Jonnie Lomax, with the winning try with just three minutes remaining,

:42:07.:42:09.

Saints are up to 5th, one point behind Wakefield with 2 to play.

:42:10.:42:13.

We have seen the last of players like Oxlade-Chamberlain moving

:42:14.:42:17.

between Premier League clubs once the season has started. Clubs have

:42:18.:42:19.

voted to close next summer's transfer window before the campaign.

:42:20.:42:24.

It will close at 5pm on a Thursday evening before the first match

:42:25.:42:28.

begins. Manchester United at Manchester City were among five

:42:29.:42:31.

clubs who voted against the proposal. They said the window

:42:32.:42:36.

overseas remains the same. So players could be poached by the big

:42:37.:42:40.

European clubs after deadline. The English clubs would not have

:42:41.:42:44.

anywhere to go, they would not be able to buy any players.

:42:45.:42:47.

The fans can just focus on the football. No more nonsense about who

:42:48.:42:54.

wants to beware. Davina has joined us to talk about

:42:55.:42:59.

the transfer window. I have. The curtains closing over the window.

:43:00.:43:05.

What do you think? It's a good idea. Most clubs agree with you. We've had

:43:06.:43:19.

a vote. We said no feet. Their clean!

:43:20.:43:24.

What are you doing? You take off your shoes and socks to

:43:25.:43:28.

inspire the next generation to take it up. Why are you doing that?

:43:29.:43:36.

To inspire a younger audience. Nice shoes.

:43:37.:43:40.

Some people don't like other people's feet.

:43:41.:43:46.

They are clean. I don't mind, it is just a bit

:43:47.:43:50.

early. People are eating breakfast. I will put them back on.

:43:51.:43:56.

Thanks. You did not come here to talk about his feet.

:43:57.:44:02.

He didn't. You are a professional TV presenter, you can deal with all

:44:03.:44:05.

sorts of live situations. That's right. Off he goes. Causing chaos.

:44:06.:44:14.

Some people get the jitters with live television. You probably feel

:44:15.:44:21.

at home. I feel weird recording now. It feels odd and it takes hours.

:44:22.:44:26.

With live TV, once it is done it is done. And when you record they want

:44:27.:44:31.

it to be absolutely perfect. Yes, you have to keep doing it again.

:44:32.:44:36.

When it is live it is done. Would you like an official introduction?

:44:37.:44:39.

Yes. A familiar face on the small screen,

:44:40.:44:42.

Davina McCall began her career on MTV before going on to present

:44:43.:44:45.

the cult hit Streetmate and then consoling and celebrating

:44:46.:44:48.

with the housemates of Big Brother. More recently we've seen her

:44:49.:44:51.

reuniting family members Now you have a new programme. I

:44:52.:45:03.

don't know how to describe it. It's weird. A discussion programme? It

:45:04.:45:10.

feels self-indulgent. I wanted to go for Arendse on various life topics.

:45:11.:45:15.

And get a mixture of people who were trying to deal with those topics and

:45:16.:45:20.

expert in that field. -- I wanted to go for a mixture on various life

:45:21.:45:25.

topics. Part of what you are trying to do is have enough time. There is

:45:26.:45:27.

no three-minute segments. It is a look at a topic for an hour.

:45:28.:45:42.

It was mental health on Monday, we had some amazing, jaw-dropping

:45:43.:45:45.

contributors. There was a man called Jake who had attempted to take his

:45:46.:45:51.

own life, and threw it had just learned so brilliantly and

:45:52.:45:54.

eloquently how to talk about his experience and is now going around

:45:55.:45:58.

the country sharing to try to help other people. It all sounds so

:45:59.:46:03.

worthy but he was such an amazing man. It is difficult to describe,

:46:04.:46:09.

but we can show. We will let the clip do the talking.

:46:10.:46:11.

These are stats on stigma and discrimination from

:46:12.:46:13.

the Annual British Social Attitudes Survey.

:46:14.:46:15.

44% of people would feel uncomfortable working with someone

:46:16.:46:18.

who's experienced symptoms of psychosis

:46:19.:46:19.

they wouldn't feel comfortable having someone with depression look

:46:20.:46:23.

And the only way you can get rid of ignorance,

:46:24.:46:36.

and the only way you can get rid of stigma, is by teaching

:46:37.:46:39.

Can I ask you something, do you go and talk places...?

:46:40.:46:44.

Don't you think it's like listening to the Dalai Lama of mental health?

:46:45.:46:48.

You obviously meet some great characters, but once you do really

:46:49.:47:14.

had to quit open up, and some familiar faces as well. Doctor

:47:15.:47:19.

Christian was on last week and we had such an amazing talk on Twitter

:47:20.:47:25.

afterwards and during the show about perfectionism, which is something

:47:26.:47:31.

that is really so raw at the moment with everybody on social media all

:47:32.:47:34.

the time posting pictures of themselves, which I am also

:47:35.:47:39.

extremely guilty of doing. Guilty, or do you just do? Is it something

:47:40.:47:44.

to be guilty about? On Instagram I will endlessly post pictures or

:47:45.:47:48.

films of myself with no make-up on after a run when I am sweating

:47:49.:47:53.

terribly or whatever, but I do take 30 pictures of myself sometimes then

:47:54.:47:57.

choose the best one before posting it, and do I say that? No. Should I

:47:58.:48:03.

start saying this is one of 30? Maybe.

:48:04.:48:08.

You cover the quest for perfectionism and mental health, you

:48:09.:48:12.

look at self-esteem issues as well... Happiness. All issues you

:48:13.:48:17.

could quite justifiably say, I know about tackling these. It has been

:48:18.:48:21.

well documented and you have spoken about it before, your addictions,

:48:22.:48:25.

your difficulties and your transformation into being very

:48:26.:48:28.

focused on health and being fit. How much of this programme is about

:48:29.:48:35.

you...? All of it. It was my idea, my baby, and in a way, I guess it

:48:36.:48:39.

was slightly self-indulgent because I was thinking be fantastic for me

:48:40.:48:43.

because I will learn so much. But I hope that in the process of me

:48:44.:48:47.

having the best time ever making a TV show that everybody else will

:48:48.:48:52.

learn something. In recording it I learnt so much, but then in watching

:48:53.:48:57.

it back I have learned even more, it is one of those shows where you

:48:58.:49:00.

could have recorded an watch maybe three or four times and keep

:49:01.:49:04.

learning you take something away every time you see it.

:49:05.:49:09.

I have always called myself a work in progress, for anybody else on a

:49:10.:49:13.

journey of self-discovery, this will be the programme for you. And

:49:14.:49:17.

anybody that does not want to learn anything about yourselves, you might

:49:18.:49:20.

just pick something up. It is funny meeting you, Divina, I

:49:21.:49:25.

feel like I almost know you because you are on telly so much. You are a

:49:26.:49:30.

very good listener, I was watching you listening to Naga, you are one

:49:31.:49:35.

of those very positive listeners, that is a big thing, but also, are

:49:36.:49:41.

you a big... I think you wear your heart on your sleeve, how do you

:49:42.:49:44.

resist hugging all the people you speak to who have problems, are you

:49:45.:49:49.

the kind of person who normally instinctively does that? I do like

:49:50.:49:53.

hoax, but I have also tried to learn to ask if somebody wants one. -- I

:49:54.:50:01.

do like a serve. Sometimes I think I know if somebody wants a hug, but

:50:02.:50:05.

sometimes you need to feel what you are feeling without me making you

:50:06.:50:10.

feel better. In Long Lost Family there raw emotions. Occasionally I

:50:11.:50:19.

say, would you like a hug? Because I say I can't quite read this. If

:50:20.:50:25.

somebody goes, I'm OK, I'll go, OK. How much did your family history

:50:26.:50:29.

affect you on that job? It has been spoken about your history with your

:50:30.:50:35.

mum, your sister? My sister passing away, whenever I have a sister story

:50:36.:50:44.

on Long Lost Family I am so happy, I always think, what a gift to be

:50:45.:50:48.

given a sister out of the blue. Whenever somebody says to me would

:50:49.:50:52.

you change anything about your life, I really wouldn't, because all of my

:50:53.:50:56.

experiences in my life, I am definitely not a victim, I see

:50:57.:51:00.

myself as a very positive person who has used everything that has

:51:01.:51:03.

happened to me in a positive way, but that maybe makes me empathise

:51:04.:51:07.

with people, which is good for what I do.

:51:08.:51:15.

Are you going on a bit of a run this weekend? I am going on a run,

:51:16.:51:18.

people! I am doing the Great North Run on Sunday. I am really nervous,

:51:19.:51:21.

I had a calf injury about two weeks ago and I am praying it will hold

:51:22.:51:27.

out. Have you done before? No. Is this the longest you have done? I

:51:28.:51:32.

did a couple of marathons when I did the Sport Relief challenge, when I

:51:33.:51:36.

was on this programme daily sobbing, every day when I did that. Look at

:51:37.:51:45.

that! Every day I was on this show, weeping. The Great North Run is 13.1

:51:46.:51:50.

miles, a half marathon, it should be really good. Really good fun, I have

:51:51.:51:55.

heard Newcastle is amazing. Is your calf OK? I don't know. You are not

:51:56.:52:00.

training, you are giving it a rest. Sensible. Good luck. A lovely to see

:52:01.:52:02.

you. The Davina Hour is on the W channel

:52:03.:52:11.

on Monday at 9pm. Here's Sarah with a look

:52:12.:52:15.

at this morning's weather. Low pressure dominating things, this

:52:16.:52:24.

is the scene in Norfolk this morning, Gorleston on Sea, you can

:52:25.:52:29.

see lots of cloud. You will see brightness breaking through the

:52:30.:52:34.

clouds. Low pressure will sit to the North west of the UK. They will be

:52:35.:52:39.

drawing and plenty of shallots, these clouds, and longer spells of

:52:40.:52:43.

rain across parts of south Wales and southern England later. Further

:52:44.:52:47.

north, a little bit more brightness in between showers, particularly for

:52:48.:52:50.

eastern Scotland through the morning and sheltered easterly parts of

:52:51.:52:54.

Northern Ireland. Some of the showers could be slow moving through

:52:55.:52:58.

the afternoon, with the thunderstorm, particularly across

:52:59.:53:01.

central Scotland, where we are likely to see lying surface water

:53:02.:53:09.

with the heavy downpours and thunderstorms. A similar picture for

:53:10.:53:11.

Northern Ireland, fairly breezy with a mix of bright intervals and plenty

:53:12.:53:14.

of showers, a few showers creeping into northern England in the

:53:15.:53:17.

Midlands, some sunshine in between and temperatures around 16 or 17 at

:53:18.:53:21.

best, feeling cooler in the breeze and with the outbreaks of rain

:53:22.:53:25.

towards London, Sussex and the Isle of Wight.

:53:26.:53:28.

Perhaps a more brightness towards the south-west breaking through the

:53:29.:53:33.

afternoon, but still some showers and quite blustery.

:53:34.:53:36.

This evening and overnight, we will continue to see blustery showers for

:53:37.:53:40.

many northern and western parts, further east, slightly lighter winds

:53:41.:53:43.

and drier weather. It will turn chilly first thing on Saturday,

:53:44.:53:47.

still looking at double figures in the towns and cities but it could be

:53:48.:53:52.

a bit colder in the countryside. Many of us wake up to sunshine on

:53:53.:53:56.

Saturday, particularly central and eastern parts. Further west, we

:53:57.:54:00.

already have showers which become more bright -- widespread as they

:54:01.:54:04.

thought eastwards later in the day. Not a complete wash-out on Saturday,

:54:05.:54:09.

temperatures generally in the mid to high teens.

:54:10.:54:11.

Onto the second half of the weekend we start to see though showers ease

:54:12.:54:15.

away Saturday night, a small ridge of high pressure. It does not stick

:54:16.:54:20.

around too long on Sunday, the next weather system works in from the

:54:21.:54:24.

Atlantic. Sunday should start a dry and across

:54:25.:54:27.

parts of eastern England we could keep the sunshine for part of the

:54:28.:54:30.

day at least, but wet and windy weather moves on from the western

:54:31.:54:34.

spread eastwards through the day, bringing us, all in all, a fairly

:54:35.:54:40.

unsettled and autumnal weekend. Thank you very, very much.

:54:41.:54:44.

The smell of the sea, the taste of fish and chips,

:54:45.:54:46.

and breathtaking views, there's always been something

:54:47.:54:48.

about the seaside which has drawn many of us to the coast.

:54:49.:54:51.

When icy that beach, we're talking about things that make you feel

:54:52.:54:56.

good, I think sitting on a beach like that, cheese and pickle

:54:57.:55:02.

sandwich and a quality Scotch egg, it doesn't matter. It could rain,

:55:03.:55:08.

whatever. Scotch egg? I will go with you with this project, not the

:55:09.:55:12.

cheese and pickle sandwich. That would be a happy family. I would

:55:13.:55:19.

want something hot, fish and chips, why not?

:55:20.:55:21.

As part of our Coastal Britain series, Breakfast's John Maguire

:55:22.:55:23.

is taking a trip down memory lane in Morecambe for us this morning.

:55:24.:55:27.

It is absolutely lovely there this morning.

:55:28.:55:32.

Good morning, John. Good morning, Naga. Marvellous Morecambe really

:55:33.:55:36.

has looked after us, the weather has improved hugely. Cheese and pickle

:55:37.:55:40.

sandwiches, scotch eggs? Most people eat fish and chips on the beach,

:55:41.:55:44.

don't they, but each to their own. There is the nostalgic link with the

:55:45.:55:48.

past, something about the seaside, weather it takes us back to

:55:49.:55:52.

childhood innocent days, holidays, the feel of the sand between your

:55:53.:56:03.

toes, the call of the goals, the sound of the ocean. Something

:56:04.:56:05.

magical looking back. It is important for resorts to survive to

:56:06.:56:08.

look forward. We will start by looking back, way back.

:56:09.:56:10.

The past, not a different country but a British seaside town.

:56:11.:56:13.

It's 1901 and just look at how busy it is.

:56:14.:56:19.

This footage has recently been released online

:56:20.:56:22.

by the British Film Institute, one of 160 films from around

:56:23.:56:24.

It shows hordes of holiday-makers and day-trippers.

:56:25.:56:31.

These are the early days of mass tourism.

:56:32.:56:35.

Jacqueline and Derek Osborne have made the long drive north

:56:36.:56:37.

from their home in Essex each summer for the past 30 years.

:56:38.:56:46.

The feeling we had then, it wasn't brilliant, was it?

:56:47.:56:48.

It always looked like it had seen better days but in subsequent years

:56:49.:56:52.

Certainly over the last ten to 15 years it's improved.

:56:53.:56:59.

I love the shopping, I like the scenery as well.

:57:00.:57:05.

Your sister, Doris, she is 90 now and she likes the seafront

:57:06.:57:10.

because it's lovely and flat and it's easy for me to push

:57:11.:57:13.

Looking back when Lee and Andrew used to come along the rock

:57:14.:57:20.

pools with us on holiday, he liked to climb on the rock pools

:57:21.:57:23.

and falling over and cutting himself badly that time,

:57:24.:57:25.

And what is it about the seaside that draws people back,

:57:26.:57:33.

Researchers at the University of Central Lancashire

:57:34.:57:39.

Now we're suddenly starting to get data in that nostalgia is good

:57:40.:57:45.

for us, it makes us feel better, it's a great antidote to the stress

:57:46.:57:48.

of everyday life so we want to say to what extent it does impact

:57:49.:57:52.

upon people's well-being and potentially to their health.

:57:53.:57:58.

The seaside is a perfect place for that because the seaside

:57:59.:58:00.

is something that doesn't change and can trigger nostalgic memories.

:58:01.:58:06.

Last weekend, Morecambe was packed to the gunwales with around 40,000

:58:07.:58:09.

people here for the vintage by the sea festival.

:58:10.:58:14.

The designer Wayne Hemingway, born and bred here,

:58:15.:58:20.

There's a massive movement for British people especially

:58:21.:58:25.

the young to rediscover the British seaside, it's four of them forward

:58:26.:58:28.

thinking, people want to come here and it to be busy.

:58:29.:58:36.

All round the country there are coastal events springing up.

:58:37.:58:40.

Nostalgia is part of it because it brings the intergenerational thing

:58:41.:58:43.

and to bring that kind of busy feeling back to a coastal town,

:58:44.:58:47.

we can start to bring the coastline back again.

:58:48.:58:55.

So the big challenge for many of our seaside

:58:56.:58:58.

to celebrate and conserve the best of the past while also

:58:59.:59:02.

We will pick up on that point in a moment, but first let's say hello to

:59:03.:59:13.

some of your coastal champions. Good morning. We will talk to them in a

:59:14.:59:16.

second, but considering that themes you are talking about in the film,

:59:17.:59:21.

joined by Doctor David Gerrit from the University of Central Lancashire

:59:22.:59:26.

and Matt Smith from the Centre For Entrepreneurs. We have a street

:59:27.:59:29.

sweeper in the background, thanks to the Council for making sure it looks

:59:30.:59:34.

prim and proper. What is the secret to try and ensure there is a future

:59:35.:59:40.

for places like this? I think you need to retain what

:59:41.:59:43.

makes the seaside special, the sense of being like the seaside, heritage,

:59:44.:59:47.

places like the Winter Gardens which you can see in Morecambe, along with

:59:48.:59:54.

facilities which modern day consumers expect. You work with what

:59:55.:59:57.

you've got, you work with the Ukraine and bring it up to the

:59:58.:00:02.

standards of modern day. You retain your sense of place, your unique

:00:03.:00:08.

selling points. We like to think we are more discerning these days. What

:00:09.:00:16.

role still entrepreneurs play? About they will bring investment to the

:00:17.:00:23.

towns. They rely on investment from the public sector, the peers,

:00:24.:00:27.

promenades and Internet connections, but the entrepreneurs will create

:00:28.:00:33.

jobs and improve the area and attract tourists. Let's mix of our

:00:34.:00:38.

coastal champions, firstly fog, Carol and the dog. Charlie looks

:00:39.:00:49.

very happy. Fog is a national coast watch and... Volunteer, why did you

:00:50.:00:56.

nominate him? I was out walking Charlie, my sister's trained support

:00:57.:01:01.

dog. I collapsed and Charlie Bach for help, as support dogs are

:01:02.:01:07.

trained to do. Luckily the National coast watch institutions or what

:01:08.:01:10.

have happened because they keep an eye on a stammer and they came down

:01:11.:01:15.

to make sure I am OK, that I did not need any help and they helped me get

:01:16.:01:17.

home safely. Why do you do it? I retired early.

:01:18.:01:31.

After spending a year of playing golf and doing not a lot else I got

:01:32.:01:36.

bored and by chance I heard an advert on radio Lancaster for

:01:37.:01:40.

volunteers to join the national coast watch. I made enquiries. It

:01:41.:01:43.

looked like something I would enjoy and possibly would help me get back

:01:44.:01:48.

into the community. That is why I enjoy it. Thank you. We have

:01:49.:01:56.

volunteers from the Winter Gardens. It's one of the most iconic

:01:57.:02:03.

buildings in the town. We have Cedric here. As well as Dave and Jan

:02:04.:02:06.

who have just come up from the Wirral. You call yourself the New

:02:07.:02:16.

Brightoners. What do you do? With clear the beach of litter. We have

:02:17.:02:19.

over 1000 members on Facebook. It's brilliant. One of our members, Wayne

:02:20.:02:28.

Dixon and his dog, is cleaning around the coast of Britain. He is

:02:29.:02:34.

taking a few years to do that. We have the people who started it, the

:02:35.:02:41.

Roberts, they started it. You have lots of volunteers. Yes. And I

:02:42.:02:46.

imagine it is nice to get out and have a walk on the beach? We love

:02:47.:02:52.

the beach. We love that environment. We like to keep it clean. Trying to

:02:53.:02:57.

keep all of the rubbish out of the oceans, as well, because it can kill

:02:58.:03:02.

animals. Plastics can be eaten. It's a real problem. It would be great if

:03:03.:03:07.

people could stop dropping it, then we wouldn't have to keep going round

:03:08.:03:11.

picking it up. Absolutely. Good point. We like to keep it clean on

:03:12.:03:19.

Breakfast. Why is the title Michael Winter Gardens such an important

:03:20.:03:27.

building? -- why is the winter Gardens such an important building?

:03:28.:03:31.

I'm one of the volunteers. It's improving over time. The more

:03:32.:03:37.

publicity it gets, the more people use it, the better it will be,

:03:38.:03:40.

because then we get a bit of money, we spend a bit of money, and we can

:03:41.:03:45.

do the alterations. It's good for someone like me to work in a

:03:46.:03:54.

building like that and to work with retired professional builders. It's

:03:55.:03:59.

really good. It keeps you off the streets. Off the streets, keeps me

:04:00.:04:02.

busy, and I'm still learning. You and me both. Thanks everybody for

:04:03.:04:07.

talking. Thank you for your contributions. That is how they

:04:08.:04:12.

became our coastal champions here this morning. We had a wonderful

:04:13.:04:16.

morning. It's rounded up the series very nicely.

:04:17.:04:29.

From Morecambe, back to you guys in the studio.

:04:30.:04:35.

Some great champions. And Charlie the dog the star. Absolutely

:04:36.:04:39.

gorgeous. Thanks very much.

:04:40.:04:42.

We'll be speaking to Rick Astley in a moment but first a last,

:04:43.:04:46.

No, I'm not, that's it for this where you are this morning.

:04:47.:06:25.

No, I'm not, that's it for this morning.

:06:26.:06:26.

Now though it's back to Charlie and Naga.

:06:27.:06:28.

Tomorrow night the Manchester Arena, the site of the horrific terror

:06:29.:06:35.

attack in May which claimed 22 lives, will officially reopen.

:06:36.:06:37.

The venue will host a special benefit concert to honour those

:06:38.:06:40.

affected and will feature bands including Noel Gallagher's

:06:41.:06:42.

High Flying Birds, The Courteeners and Blossoms -

:06:43.:06:44.

along with our next guest, the singer Rick Astley.

:06:45.:07:03.

Good morning. How did you get involved? Like most people I got an

:07:04.:07:14.

e-mail. I instantly said yes when asked. I'm not from Manchester. But

:07:15.:07:20.

it's where I went to my first gig, it's where I bought my first record,

:07:21.:07:25.

I went to that town for everything. It is a place people have an

:07:26.:07:30.

affinity with, especially with music. Absolutely. It has a rich

:07:31.:07:35.

history of music. Just a great city. I still get excited about coming to

:07:36.:07:40.

Manchester. And the venue we will be in tomorrow night, I have sung there

:07:41.:07:45.

80 times normal circumstances. But I've also opened up for Peter Kay

:07:46.:07:55.

there. -- I have sung there a queue times in normal circumstances. Have

:07:56.:08:02.

you done concerts before? I've done a few.

:08:03.:08:07.

CHUCKLES What I meant was, you've done in

:08:08.:08:12.

events like this which are marking loss of life, and that is the reason

:08:13.:08:19.

people are there. At the same time, everybody wanted to be a

:08:20.:08:23.

celebration. You guys will still perform, the crowds will enjoy what

:08:24.:08:29.

they see. Absolutely. That the venue has had some amazing artists from

:08:30.:08:34.

all over the world, and play there. That has to keep going. It was

:08:35.:08:39.

absolutely terrible. There are no words for what happened. But

:08:40.:08:43.

positive light has to be shown sometimes for us to get through

:08:44.:08:48.

things. I think it's great that there will be an evening of

:08:49.:08:53.

fantastic music, hopefully, and, you know, to celebrate. To get people

:08:54.:08:58.

connected again. I was in Manchester the gig went on at the old -- Old

:08:59.:09:05.

Trafford Cricket ground. The atmosphere was amazing. I was

:09:06.:09:08.

worried about being in Manchester, not because of the reason, but

:09:09.:09:11.

because of the mood. But it was amazing. It was incredible. It's

:09:12.:09:19.

terrible things, you know, something like that brought everybody together

:09:20.:09:23.

in such a special way, but I do think people have the get together

:09:24.:09:27.

and figures positively. Have you done any rehearsals at the venue?

:09:28.:09:33.

No. He's done a few gigs before, you know?

:09:34.:09:39.

Has he really? I don't spend my days sitting on the beach eating cheese

:09:40.:09:43.

and pickle sandwiches and Scott X. Fish and chips, I said. -- and

:09:44.:09:58.

Scotch eggs. Isn't that what Alan Partridge eats? He comes here with

:09:59.:10:02.

his big ideas. Prawn sandwich, maybe. You have not rehearsed but

:10:03.:10:11.

you have been gigging. Yes. We have been gigging a lot. I'm comfortable

:10:12.:10:17.

that it's going to be a fun night and a great night. You mentioned

:10:18.:10:24.

some of the bands, it'll be a great line-up, great songs. Old and new

:10:25.:10:29.

from you? I have to do some old ones. One of the things which makes

:10:30.:10:35.

me realise I am getting older, I remember all of the music. Our

:10:36.:10:42.

producers don't. Wow. OK. They are quite young. But we can remind them

:10:43.:10:48.

and show them what they missed. # And if you ask me how I'm feeling

:10:49.:11:02.

# Never gonna give you up never gonna let you down

:11:03.:11:15.

# Never gonna make you cry #. You have not changed. You are a

:11:16.:11:20.

lovely woman. Nice clothes. People are wearing that now. The clothes

:11:21.:11:27.

then had their time. And the certain sounds in the music. You can hear

:11:28.:11:34.

the new bands zoning into them. Do you know any of the other bands who

:11:35.:11:39.

are playing? I don't. You know when bands do a song together? Yes. Are

:11:40.:11:45.

you backstage, do you ask each other, do you want to join me? That

:11:46.:11:50.

happens sometimes. I did a festival last week. Charlene from Texas sang

:11:51.:12:07.

Highway To Hell. She was amazing. I like doing covers. You got out with

:12:08.:12:18.

the -- you got up with the Foo Fighters. I did. We wanted to see

:12:19.:12:25.

them anyway. We were at the side of the stage. Lo and behold, David

:12:26.:12:36.

Grohl port Vale to the stage. I had never met them. It was amazing. I

:12:37.:12:48.

like their version of Never Gonna Give You Up. It was amazing. Maybe

:12:49.:12:57.

people who are going to turn up will hear something they never expected.

:12:58.:13:01.

I'm really looking forward to seeing Noel Gallagher. I like his new

:13:02.:13:09.

stuff. I liked Oasis, as well. It's a great line-up. There will be great

:13:10.:13:14.

bands. It'll be a terrific occasion. Will he rehearse at some point

:13:15.:13:19.

tomorrow? You've got to leave it for the stage. I will have a Scotch egg

:13:20.:13:28.

first. And prawn sandwich! I don't want to go overboard. It has been a

:13:29.:13:32.

pleasure having you. Thanks very much.

:13:33.:13:33.

Rick will be performing at the We Are Manchester concert

:13:34.:13:37.