02/12/2017 - Part 1 Breakfast


02/12/2017 - Part 1

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LineFromTo

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

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Stayt.

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The investigation into

Russian meddling in the US

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election closes in on President

Trump's inner circle.

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His former National Security

Advisor Michael Flynn

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admits lying to the FBI,

as US media reports that he's

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prepared to implicate

the president's son-in-law,

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Jared Kushner.

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Good morning, it's Saturday

the 2nd of December.

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I've been so much better than

recently. We are actually in with a

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chance.

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The excitement builds

in Brisbane, as England's Rugby

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League team faces hosts Australia

in the World Cup final.

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England face Australia, who they

haven't beaten since 1995, the last

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time England played in a World Cup

final.

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Cyber security experts warn

government departments

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against using Russian

anti-virus software,

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saying it could be exploited.

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England's untold history: The public

is asked to nominate places that

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deserve to be part of

a new national memorial scheme.

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And we'll have your full

weekend weather forecast

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in about 15 minutes.

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Good morning.

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First our main story.

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US media reports say Donald Trump's

former national security adviser,

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Michael Flynn, who has admitted

lying to the FBI about his contacts

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with Russia, is prepared to give

testimony that implicates

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the President's son-in-law,

Jared Kushner.

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Mr Flynn has agreed to co-operate

with an investigation

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into Russian meddling in the US

Presidential election.

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It's thought he'll tell

investigators he was taking

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directions from senior members

of Donald Trump's campaign team.

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The White House says Mr Flynn has

implicated nobody but himself

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in the investigation.

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Our Washington correspondent,

Laura Bicker has more.

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Michael Flynn, a retired three star

general, left the court in

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Washington to a familiar chant. Lock

him up. He once encouraged Donald

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Trump supporters to use a similar

version against rival Hillary

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Clinton. The 58-year-old played a

key party Mr Trump's campaign and

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often travelled with him.

If I did

attempt, a 10th of what she did, I

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would be in jail today.

She was

reported with the post of national

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security adviser -- he was. What was

forced to resign after just 23 days

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when his contacts with Russia to

discuss US actions were disclosed.

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On the 29th of December he spoke to

the Russian Ambassador on the phone

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in the first of a series of calls.

On the 15th of January Vice

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President Mike Pence said sanctions

were not discussed in those calls.

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Only after the ninth of February,

when a newspaper revealed he did

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discuss sanctions, did pressure

increase and Michael Flynn lost his

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job. As part of his guilty plea,

prosecutors said Mr Flynn is now

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cooperating with the investigation.

US media claims he will testify that

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senior members of the Trump team,

including his son-in-law Jared

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Kushner, encouraged him to make

contact with Russian officials. The

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White House is now trying to

distance himself with his actions,

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but having reached a plea bargain to

co-operate what else has Mr Flynn

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told the enquiry and what further

revelations are to come?

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In around ten minutes we will get

more on this story and speak to a

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political analyst.

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All government departments

have been advised by

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The National Cyber Security Centre

not to use Russian anti-virus

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software on systems containing

sensitive information.

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Kaspersky Lab, which has 400 million

customers world-wide,

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was banned from US

government networks earlier this

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year but the company denies

links to the Kremlin.

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Our reporter Jon Donnison has more.

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Cyber security software like that

provided by this lab requires

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extensive access to the files on a

computer phone or network to look

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for viruses.

Our mission has always

been to protect...

Kaspersky is used

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by consumers and businesses as well

as parts of government to protect

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systems from criminals and hackers.

Now a new warning about Russian

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anti-virus software, amid fears it

could be used for spying. At

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Britain's national-security centre

they say they've not seen actual

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proof of such espionage, but they've

told government departments not to

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use Kaspersky for systems containing

sensitive data.

This is specifically

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about entities that may be of

interest to the Russian government

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and so for us that's about national

security systems in government of

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which there are very small number.

Kaspersky has already denied

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allegations that it has been used

for espionage in America.

We don't

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do anything like that. They are just

speculating about some rumours,

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opinions and there is zero hard

data.

400 million people use

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Kaspersky products around the world,

but officials say they are not

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telling the general public to stop

using it. Kaspersky Lab denies any

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wrongdoing, but today's warning is

another sign of our growing fears

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over the risk by Russia.

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Two former police officers

who leaked allegations that

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pornographic images

had been found on the computer

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of the now First Secretary

of State Damian Green

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were in "flagrant breach"

of their own code of conducthat's

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according to Dominic Grieve,

the former atorney general.

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Our political correspondent,

Eleanor Garnier, has this analysis.

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When these latest allegations

emerged yesterday, Damian Green

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repeated that he hadn't downloaded

are looked at pornography on his

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work computer. We saw allies of

Damian Green rallying behind him and

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coming to his defence. Even a

cabinet minister, although publicly,

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came forward to defend him. Sources

close to the Brexit secretary David

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Davis said Mr Davies warned Downing

Street not to sack Damian Green over

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this latest allegations. Allies also

tried to shift the focus on to

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weather any of this information

should have ended up in the public

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domain anyway. We heard from the

former attorney general Dominic

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Ring, another Tory MP, saying this

had the smack of the police stake

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about it. In terms of the eager

picture for Theresa May, she is

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already lost two Cabinet ministers

in the last two weeks over unrelated

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and separate matters, but she

certainly won't want to lose another

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and such a close and important ally.

And of course she's got an extremely

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busy month ahead with the Brexit

negotiations, so it goes without

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saying that Theresa May and Downing

Street will certainly not have

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welcomed this allegations as a

distraction to what is an important

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month ahead.

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White House officials say the White

House will recognise Jerusalem as

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the state of Israel.

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The status of Jerusalem

is highly contentious,

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with both Israelis and Palestinians

claiming all or part of the city

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as their capital.

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Critics have warned

that the decision by Donald Trump

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could jeopardise peace negotiations.

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It is feared there could be hundreds

of job losses are Toys 'R' Us after

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it said it would close about a

quarter of its UK stores. The move

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would see the closure of 25 shops as

part of the deal to renegotiate

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debts with its landlords. It is

thought Christmas trading in gift

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vouchers will not be affected by the

move.

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People are being asked to nominate

events and people they feel should

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be nominated as part of a new

national memorial scheme.

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The heritage group

Historic England has already

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received a wealth of nominations

from battle sites to birthplaces,

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as David Sillito reports.

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The site of the presentation of

Magna Carta. The place where the

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Pilgrim Fathers settle for America.

And here the memorial to the landing

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at Bracks and the glorious

revolution. There are some monuments

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to great moment in history, at

historic England once more. There

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are many parks to where people were

born or lived. It now wants

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suggestions about events and have

already received a -- received a

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few.

We've done our research and

spoken to people across the country

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and found passionate enthusiasts who

want to see history marked out.

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We've had people wanting to mark out

where the Pilgrim Fathers set out

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effort to make that more well-known.

We've had people wanting to mark out

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the birthplace of growing music in

east London, music in Coventry, all

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sorts of people with different

passions and interests who want to

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share their knowledge of the history

that happened on their doorstep.

It

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doesn't have to be just the famous

places in the history books, they

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are looking for sites that capture

the whole of British life. Quite

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what the memorials will look like a

city at the end decided. The meat --

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the immediate job is to find the

people who have the passion to

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honour the places where history was

made.

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Pope Francis is spending his

final day in Bangladesh,

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after using his highly-anticipated

Asia trip to express support

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for the Rohingya Muslims.

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Yesterday, the Pope met a group

of refugees and referred

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to them using the word

"Rohingya" for the first time.

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Myanmar does not regard them as an

ethnic group.

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Let's return to our top

story this morning.

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Reports from the United States

suggest the President's former

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national security adviser,

Michael Flynn, who yesterday

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pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI

about his contacts with Russia,

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is prepared to testify

against Donald Trump's son-in-law,

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Jared Kushner.

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It's thought Mr Flynn will say that

senior members of the Trump team,

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including Mr Kushner,

directed him to make contact

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with the Russians.

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Let's speak to Eric Ham,

a political analyst who's been

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following the story

from Washington DC.

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Good to speak to you again. Let's

cut to the chase here. We know that

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Michael Flynn has pleaded guilty.

The assumption is he's come to some

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kind of deal. The big question is

what is the deal?

Well, the deal is

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going to include I think all things

related to the campaign and actually

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there was no one more connect it,

more intertwined, more integral to

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the Trump campaign than the former

national security adviser Michael

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Flynn. So what is key about this

deal is it does not go into effect

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for at least three months, so Bob

Miller is looking to extract

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everything Michael Flynn has not

just the campaign itself but on the

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people involved in the campaign --

Robert Mueller. Typically when you

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strike a deal like that that Robert

Mueller has just done, he is

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considering bigger fish. When you

consider someone like Michael Flynn

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in the campaign and the

administration, who hire? Are we

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talking perhaps current senior

adviser and son-in-law Jared

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Kushner? And quite possibly Donald

Trump.

What do you make of the White

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House statement that was released

immediately after the announcement

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that was made, about him admitting

to this offence? The White House

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saying very categorically this is

about one man and his actions and

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has no bearing on anyone else in the

White House?

What I say to that is I

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think it's time for the Trump

administration to get a different

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playbook. For so long the

conversation has been this is fake

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news, there's nothing here to see.

But you don't actually... You don't

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get a guilty plea from the former

national security adviser if there

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is no "their" there. And clearly

there is. So now not only is the

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administration running as fast as it

can from Michael Flynn, but if you

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read the statement closely you can

see that they've actually considered

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Michael Flynn to be a member of the

Obama administration and that's so

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striking because not only did

President Obama fire Michael Flynn

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as director of national intelligence

at the Pentagon, but he specifically

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warns Donald Trump about ringing

Michael Flynn into his

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administration and as we can see he

disregarded that information. Not

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only did President Obama clearly

warn him about Michael Flynn, but

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Sally Yates, the first high-profile

person fired from this

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administration and serving as active

attorney general, she warned the

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administration that Michael Flynn

could be compromised. Fast forward

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to today and now we have a guilty

plea from one of the highest

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officials in this administration.

Just help us with one thing. For

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those of us watching this from a

distance, we often think that

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commentators have their own

political agenda sometimes about

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where they sit and what they believe

in. Right now it's one of those

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moments where some people are

telling us this is the big one. This

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is the moment when everything

changes and potentially leads

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directly to the president. And

others are saying, as the White

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House has said, this is one man who

lied.

Well, this is one man who

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served as the national security

adviser. You can't deny that. This

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is an individual who had access to

all of the national security

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apparatus and the date and not only

that was the year of the president

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on all matters national security. --

the ear. So he was a high-profile

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official not only in a campaign by

tinny administration. For so long

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this Administration have spoken

about how many of the people who

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have been targeted at people who

didn't have influenced in the Trump

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administration, on the campaign,

that simply wasn't the case. Again,

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this is someone who as a former

general is someone who I guess

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served at the Pentagon in the

highest echelon of the military or

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national security -- national

security and military and he served

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as a senior member of this

administration. Regardless of what

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your political party, you can't deny

that and you can't deny the fact

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that today he is entering a guilty

plea and will expect to be... To

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serve time for lying to the FBI.

That's something that has political

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persuasion and something that the

Trump administration simply can't

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run away from.

And you so much for

your time this morning.

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That story playing very much in the

papers this morning. Front page of

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the FT, they have what Charlie has

been discussing there, Flynn pleads

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guilty to lying over Russian ties.

It's all so on the front of the

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Daily Telegraph. You will see this

picture on many of the front pages

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today, Meghan Markle, as she

accompanied Prince Harry to

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Nottingham yesterday on their first

outing together since their

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engagement was announced earlier

this week. Also, Charlie, it's that

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time of year when we start getting

coughs and colds start coming

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through and I was always told hot

honey and lemon, still do that, but

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medical advice is telling us to

avoid giving children cough syrup.

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There's lots of cases of

unintentionally overdosing toddlers

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and causing toxic problems. Hot

honey and lemon is the trick. Now

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you know! The front page of the Sun,

they are fun with the name. We will

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be talking more about that event

yesterday. -- having fun. It was

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everyone's first chance to see the

new new royal couple out and about

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together. Many people were asked

what she said to them, she really

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just said hello, I'm Megan. A story

we have been talking about this

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week, Damian Green, his computer in

his office has been taken a look at.

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There are allegations there's porn

on that computer, which he has

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denied accessing. Now Theresa May's

team appears split after a Cabinet

0:16:520:16:57

minister push for him to be sacked

but equally David Davis, the Brexit

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secretary, said he would resign if

Mr Green was forced out over claims

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made by retired police officers

about that pornography on his

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computer.

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We will have a full look through the

papers later this morning.

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Here's Sarah Keith-Lucas

with the weather

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After a fairly chilly, wintry

feeling weak, temperatures gradually

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on the rise through the course of

the weekend. Still a chilly start to

0:17:230:17:27

Saturday with some frost and some

icy patches. Through the day some

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rain showers down the east coast and

some filtering into north-west

0:17:310:17:35

England, Wales and the south-west

but many places staying dry with

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some sunshine with the best further

south and east. More cloud across

0:17:390:17:43

Scotland, the breeze picking up

without breaks of rain here and for

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most places temperatures five to

eight degrees but on Saturday night

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and into Sunday that milder air

moves its way in from the

0:17:500:17:54

north-west. By the time we get to

the early hours of Sunday, most

0:17:540:17:57

places looking frost so

significantly milder overnight than

0:17:570:18:01

it has been. Still quite cloudy to

start the day in the south with a

0:18:010:18:05

bit of rain which should clear away

through the south steadily through

0:18:050:18:09

the day and it should brighten up.

Rain in the north and east and the

0:18:090:18:15

south and west but temperatures in

double figures, something we haven't

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seen for a while.

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Now it's time for this week's

Film Review, with Jane Hill

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and Mark Kermode.

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Hello and welcome to

The Film Review on BBC News.

0:18:340:18:45

To take us through this week's

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cinema releases as ever is Mark

Kermode.

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So, Mark, what do we have this week?

0:18:480:18:51

We have the Disaster Artist

which is the story making

0:18:510:18:53

of the best worst movie ever.

0:18:530:18:59

Happy End, the new film

by Michael Hanneke.

0:18:590:19:01

And Wonder, a very touching drama

starring Jacob Tremblay.

0:19:010:19:04

The Disaster Artist.

0:19:040:19:05

Even watching the trailer

many times, you are

0:19:050:19:07

sitting there like this.

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Have you seen The Room?

0:19:170:19:20

You need to explain this.

0:19:200:19:22

It is the dramatised retelling

of the making of the room

0:19:220:19:33

which Tommy Wiser made in 2003.

0:19:330:19:34

It has spawned a whole cult

following and they come along

0:19:340:19:37

to enjoy the industry.

0:19:370:19:39

He basically wrote and directed

and starred and financed it.

0:19:390:19:41

It is based on a book by the co-star

in the room who is now played

0:19:410:19:45

by James Franco's brother Dave.

0:19:450:19:47

Essentially Greg is a model

and wannabe actor and you first

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meet him in a theatre

and he is doing a film

0:19:500:19:53

and Tommy takes one word

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from a Streetcar

Named Desire, Stella!

0:19:540:20:03

Greg is completely entranced.

0:20:030:20:06

You are so uninhibited.

0:20:060:20:08

How do you do it?

0:20:080:20:09

He just believes in himself.

0:20:090:20:11

Together they go to Los Angeles

and decide they will make it

0:20:110:20:14

and become stars but Hollywood

rejects them and so Tommy

0:20:140:20:17

who appears to have no fixed age,

no fixed accent, and untold wealth,

0:20:170:20:20

no one knows what he comes from,

he writes his own movie.

0:20:200:20:24

Here's a clip.

0:20:240:20:27

The Room?

The Room?

0:20:290:20:37

Nobody write it yet,

0:20:370:20:39

today you will be the first one.

0:20:390:20:41

You did this.

0:20:410:20:44

You play Mark.

It's a big role.

0:20:440:20:47

It's a huge role.

Are you sure?

0:20:470:20:49

If you don't want to do it, fine.

0:20:490:20:52

I will get Johnny Depp.

0:20:520:20:54

I want the role.

I will take it.

0:20:540:21:09

Hollywood rejects us,

we do it on our own.

0:21:090:21:12

Do you have they managed to do this?

0:21:120:21:15

It is no problem.

0:21:150:21:16

You with the going

to make this thing?

0:21:160:21:19

No we are going to make it.

0:21:190:21:20

Mark has just like 20 times.

0:21:200:21:22

I have seen that film twice.

0:21:220:21:24

Firstly Tommy is such

a strange character,

0:21:240:21:26

he says he is from New Orleans

but his accent sounds

0:21:260:21:29

he is from cyberspace.

0:21:290:21:30

It is a film by Tim Burton called

Edward, the reason the film work

0:21:300:21:33

is you didn't just think

it was a terrible film-maker

0:21:330:21:36

but you thought he was a visionary

and you believed in the film.

0:21:360:21:40

In the case of this,

Tommy appears to actually believe

0:21:400:21:42

in the film he is making.

0:21:420:21:48

He really thinks he is making

an incredible piece of art

0:21:480:21:51

and the recently Disaster Artist

works is the film-making is terrible

0:21:510:21:54

and the endless takes of the same

lines and the awful script and bad

0:21:540:21:58

directing, although things

are there but it only works

0:21:580:22:00

because you also believe that

beyond it there is something

0:22:000:22:03

of pathos, tragedy, something

of the dream about Tommy that

0:22:030:22:06

makes him acceptable and we see him

behaving appallingly onset

0:22:060:22:08

of the film doesn't shy away

from the fact that Tom said he did

0:22:080:22:12

behave really badly.

0:22:120:22:16

Do you need to have seen

the room to get the joke?

0:22:160:22:19

Don't think so.

0:22:190:22:30

For a start if you see The Room it

makes no sense anyway

0:22:300:22:33

and when you see the individual

scenes that are recreating, it makes

0:22:330:22:36

sense because you understand that

basically Tommy at one point,

0:22:360:22:39

Greg Sestero who plays

descriptive adviser,

0:22:390:22:41

as he even seen a movie?

0:22:410:22:46

He genuinely has no

idea what to do this.

0:22:460:22:48

I thought it was dark

when it needed to be dark.

0:22:480:22:51

It had a strange dreaming charm

about it that in the end

0:22:510:22:54

it is a story of Triumph over

adversity by making something

0:22:540:22:57

that is so catastrophically terrible

that it ends up getting celebrated.

0:22:570:23:00

And it made me live twice

all the way through.

0:23:000:23:03

Well, I am intrigued.

0:23:030:23:04

At the end, is that an ironic title?

0:23:040:23:11

It is a Michael Hammock of film.

0:23:110:23:21

This is a Michael Haneke film

about a bourgeois family

0:23:210:23:29

who behind the facade,

foul lurking secrets.

0:23:290:23:31

Toby Jones is in it.

0:23:310:23:32

As with all his work

it is engrossing and unsettling

0:23:320:23:35

but there is also a strange sense

of deja vu.

0:23:350:23:38

There is video phone footage that

reminds me of an early film of his.

0:23:380:23:41

There is surveillance footage.

0:23:410:23:42

That is a strange kind of luck can

refer back to a more.

0:23:420:23:46

The weird thing about all those

films is that when we first saw them

0:23:460:23:50

they were original and surprising.

0:23:500:23:51

This isn't.

0:23:510:23:52

This is well made.

0:23:520:24:01

Haneke knows that to get brilliant

performances and make something

0:24:010:24:04

feel creepy and strange,

but without telling you what it is.

0:24:040:24:07

It did feel like we were

retreading old ground.

0:24:070:24:09

I think he is a great film-maker

and this is the weird thing,

0:24:090:24:13

to me this felt an incidental

Haneke film.

0:24:130:24:15

It felt like, OK, there we go.

0:24:150:24:20

We will move on.

0:24:200:24:21

And it like that element.

0:24:210:24:23

I remember when I saw and more,

can't believe he just made that

0:24:230:24:26

movie because it is so breathtaking

and this isn't.

0:24:260:24:28

What did you make of Wonder?

0:24:280:24:30

I have read such dividing

things about this.

0:24:300:24:38

I haven't read other reviews.

0:24:380:24:44

I liked it.

0:24:440:24:45

It is adapted from a novel.

0:24:450:24:48

The story is Jacob Tremblay

is a young kid who is really

0:24:480:24:51

interested in science and space

and has spent most of his childhood

0:24:510:24:55

being home-schooled because he has

had a series of facial operations

0:24:550:24:58

that have resulted in a rare

genetic conditions.

0:24:580:25:00

As he goes into that great

he is going to school

0:25:000:25:03

but the first time.

0:25:030:25:09

It is going to school

which is difficult enough.

0:25:090:25:11

Also made more difficult by the fact

that he understands he is different

0:25:110:25:15

to the people that he has

to interact with and it

0:25:150:25:18

is about that journey.

0:25:180:25:19

Here is a clip.

0:25:190:25:20

I have to stop here because past

this point is a no doubt

0:25:200:25:23

some, but is not cool.

0:25:230:25:29

Technically most dads aren't cool,

neither are these helmets.

0:25:290:25:38

Hey, two rules.

0:25:380:25:46

First, only raise your hand once

the matter how answers you know

0:25:460:25:50

except for science, crush them.

0:25:500:25:53

Check.

0:25:530:26:00

You're going to feel like you're all

alone but

0:26:000:26:03

You're going to feel like you're all

alone but you're not.

Check.

0:26:030:26:09

Costumes are for Halloween, prepare

for blast of.

-- blastoff.

0:26:090:26:18

I love you.

I love you too.

0:26:180:26:20

Have fun.

Bye.

0:26:200:26:27

Owen Wilson, Julia Roberts

and Jacob Tremblay.

0:26:270:26:29

Lots of laughs in that clip but it

also tugs at the heartstrings.

0:26:290:26:32

It is also more complicated

than it looks like.

0:26:320:26:35

The beginning.

0:26:350:26:37

What happens been ordered

to fractures and you see the story

0:26:370:26:40

from lots of different characters

point of view, his sister feels

0:26:400:26:43

like he has been neglected

because all the attention has gone

0:26:430:26:47

to her brother.

0:26:470:26:47

The sister brother no

longer a friend and you

0:26:470:26:50

Benneteau back story.

0:26:500:26:51

Even bullies in the film are given

context with a bullying.

0:26:510:26:54

From a start it is a much more

complex narrative than people

0:26:540:26:57

would give it credit for.

0:26:570:26:58

Also the film made me laugh and cry.

0:26:580:27:00

Those are difficult things to do.

0:27:000:27:02

People take them for granted

and think it is very easy to do.

0:27:020:27:06

It is not easy.

0:27:060:27:06

It works because the

performances are good.

0:27:060:27:08

The script is well honed.

0:27:080:27:10

It felt to me like a film

that was made with that and care.

0:27:100:27:14

I people who were telling the story

and they really cared

0:27:140:27:17

about the way the story was told.

0:27:170:27:19

The resentment that the tenant

but it is earned.

0:27:190:27:21

-- there is sentimentality.

0:27:210:27:29

I cried a lot and laugh a lot.

0:27:290:27:32

I went in slightly suspicious

because I had seen the trailer

0:27:320:27:35

and you didn't know it was going

to go but I thought

0:27:350:27:38

it was a terrific piece of work

and Jacob Tremblay is a really

0:27:380:27:41

talented young actor.

0:27:410:27:42

I thought the director handled it

with exactly the right degree

0:27:420:27:45

of schmaltz and seriousness.

0:27:450:27:46

I laughed and cried.

0:27:460:27:47

It worked.

0:27:470:27:48

Best at this week.

0:27:480:27:55

Battle of the sexes came out last

week and it is the dramatised

0:27:550:27:58

story of the tennis match

between Billie Jean King

0:27:580:28:01

and Bobby Riggs, had a documentary

about this, in 2013.

0:28:010:28:04

Again going in to see

the drama I thought

0:28:040:28:06

the documentary was so great,

can capture the spirit?

0:28:060:28:08

They do.

0:28:080:28:15

I'm a stone is great,

as Billie Jean King.

0:28:150:28:18

Steve Carell inhabits this clown

male chauvinist buffoon

0:28:180:28:20

role of Bobby Riggs,

the texture of the film

0:28:200:28:23

is great and it feels

like it was made in the 1970s.

0:28:230:28:26

It has the LGBT story

at the centre of it.

0:28:260:28:29

Political relevance and personal.

0:28:290:28:45

It is funny.

0:28:450:28:46

It is a commie Dick drama.

0:28:460:28:47

And it is all true.

0:28:470:28:51

Quick thoughts about DVDs.

0:28:510:28:52

This was a great indie film.

0:28:520:28:53

He is trying to find

his place in the world.

0:28:530:28:56

It did brilliantly with

the are a scream programme,

0:28:560:28:59

and it found its audience.

0:28:590:29:00

It had a low budget.

0:29:000:29:01

It had an enormous amount of heart

and it is called my Feral Heart

0:29:010:29:05

and I defy anybody not to be won

over by it.

0:29:050:29:08

Thank you.

0:29:080:29:09

It is a really interesting week.

0:29:090:29:10

Just a reminder that you can find

all film news and reviews

0:29:100:29:13

from across the BBC online.

0:29:130:29:15

There is the address.

0:29:150:29:16

All our previous programmes

are on the iPlayer as well.

0:29:160:29:19

That is at this week.

0:29:190:29:20

Enjoy your cinema going.

0:29:200:29:34

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

0:30:090:30:12

Stayt.

0:30:120:30:14

Good morning.

0:30:140:30:15

Here's a summary of today's main

stories from BBC News.

0:30:150:30:19

Donald Trump's former national

security advisor Michael Flynn

0:30:190:30:22

is prepared to testify

against the President's

0:30:220:30:23

son-in-law, Jared Kushner,

according to US media reports.

0:30:230:30:28

It's thought Mr Flynn,

who pleaded guilty to making false

0:30:280:30:31

statements to the FBI,

will say he was directed to hold

0:30:310:30:34

discussions with Kremlin officials

by senior members of Trump's

0:30:340:30:36

campaign team, including Mr Kushner.

0:30:360:30:39

The White House says Mr Flynn has

implicated no-one but himself.

0:30:390:30:43

The UK National Cyber Security

Centre has warned government

0:30:440:30:46

departments not to use

Russian anti-virus software

0:30:460:30:48

if their computers contain

sensitive information.

0:30:480:30:50

The Russian company Kaspersky Lab

was banned from US government

0:30:500:30:53

networks earlier this year,

because of concerns it had ties

0:30:530:30:56

to intelligence agencies in Moscow.

0:30:560:31:02

The company denies having

links to the Kremlin.

0:31:020:31:07

Despite its warning,

the National Cyber Security Centre

0:31:070:31:09

says the general public shouldn't be

concerned about using the software.

0:31:090:31:13

Our guidance is to choose an

anti-virus product that meets your

0:31:130:31:19

needs and does well industry

standard tests. We are not saying,

0:31:190:31:23

and we specifically say in our

guidance on the blog, that we are

0:31:230:31:27

not telling people to rip out

Kaspersky willy-nilly because that

0:31:270:31:33

makes no sense. This is about

entities that may be of interest to

0:31:330:31:37

the Russian government, so for us

that's about national security

0:31:370:31:40

systems in government of which there

are very small number and for

0:31:400:31:44

example if you have a business

negotiation that the Russian

0:31:440:31:48

government may be interested in.

0:31:480:31:49

Two former police officers

who leaked allegations that

0:31:490:31:51

pornographic images had been found

on the Tory minister

0:31:510:31:54

Damian Green's computer

were in "flagrant breach"

0:31:540:31:56

of their own code of conduct,

according to the former

0:31:560:31:58

Attorney General Dominic Grieve.

0:31:580:32:02

Mr Green, now First Secretary

of State, repeated his insistence

0:32:020:32:05

that he didn't view pornographic

material on the computer.

0:32:050:32:07

The former attorney general said

he found the behaviour

0:32:070:32:09

of the ex-officers

behaviour troubling.

0:32:090:32:11

White House officials have indicated

that President Trump is likely

0:32:110:32:14

to announce next week

that the United States

0:32:140:32:16

will recognise Jerusalem

as the capital of Israel.

0:32:160:32:21

The status of Jerusalem

is highly contentious,

0:32:210:32:23

with both Israelis and Palestinians

claiming all or part of the city

0:32:230:32:26

as their capital.

0:32:260:32:27

Critics have warned

that the decision by Donald Trump

0:32:270:32:29

could jeopardise peace negotiations.

0:32:290:32:34

It's feared there could be hundreds

of job losses at Toys 'R' Us,

0:32:340:32:37

after the retailer announced it

would close around a quarter

0:32:370:32:40

of its UK stores.

0:32:400:32:41

The move, which would see

the closure of 25 shops,

0:32:410:32:44

is part of a deal by the owners

to renegotiate debts

0:32:440:32:47

with its landlords.

0:32:470:32:48

It's thought Christmas trading

and gift vouchers will not be

0:32:480:32:51

affected by the move.

0:32:510:32:52

The British Red Cross is calling

for rules to be relaxed

0:32:520:32:55

to automatically allow

Syrian refugee families,

0:32:550:32:58

being resettled in the UK,

to bring their young,

0:32:580:33:01

adult children with them.

0:33:010:33:03

Over the past two years,

around 9,000 Syrians have entered

0:33:030:33:05

the UK under the Vulnerable Person

Resettlement Scheme.

0:33:050:33:07

But the Red Cross says refugees

shouldn't have to leave behind

0:33:070:33:12

family members because they

are over 18-years-old.

0:33:120:33:19

Let's be clear. We are talking about

children who are part of the family

0:33:190:33:24

unit. People watching this now,

think of your family, the children

0:33:240:33:28

who still live at home, who may be

away studying. That's what we are

0:33:280:33:32

talking about. Let's bring those

families back together. Families

0:33:320:33:34

belong together.

0:33:340:33:37

Pope Francis is spending his

final day in Bangladesh,

0:33:370:33:39

after using his highly-anticipated

Asia trip to express support

0:33:390:33:42

for the Rohingya Muslims.

0:33:420:33:43

Yesterday, the Pope met a group

of refugees and referred to them

0:33:430:33:46

using the word "Rohingya"

for the first time.

0:33:460:33:48

He was criticised for not

using the term on his earlier visit

0:33:480:33:51

to Myanmar, which does not regard

them as an ethnic group.

0:33:510:33:54

A new scheme, which aims

to recognise more places and people

0:33:540:33:57

with historic importance,

is set to be launched by Historic

0:33:570:34:00

England.

0:34:000:34:02

The heritage body wants people

to suggest sites that deserve to be

0:34:020:34:05

permanently acknowledged,

but aren't already marked

0:34:050:34:07

with a plaque.

0:34:070:34:08

The campaign will be

piloted over three years.

0:34:080:34:15

One other story this morning.

0:34:150:34:18

A huge waterspout has

formed off Italy.

0:34:180:34:22

Oh, this is a water spout!

0:34:220:34:25

It is huge, isn't it?

0:34:250:34:26

It was spotted off the coast

of Sanremo, before moving inland

0:34:260:34:29

as a kind of tornado.

0:34:290:34:30

The weather phenomenon caused

significant damage to the city,

0:34:300:34:33

but luckily no-one was hurt.

0:34:330:34:37

It is quite hard to get an idea of

the scale.

0:34:370:34:40

When I thought of a waterspout, I

hadn't heard that was the term.

0:34:400:34:45

You were thinking of a teapot? Yes.

So on first glance it looked like

0:34:450:34:50

the water was coming out of the sea.

Look at the sky, incredible.

0:34:500:34:54

It's like something from another

world.

0:34:540:34:58

And this is obviously what it's like

to be in it, or close to it.

0:34:580:35:02

Scary! It is a big day for sport

Down Under?

0:35:020:35:07

Amazing. We will talk about the

Ashes in a moment, which is back on

0:35:070:35:12

after the rain in Adelaide. First,

the rugby World Cup. The first time

0:35:120:35:18

England are in the final since 1995.

Someone asked me how much England

0:35:180:35:23

are the underdogs and it's like a

Chihuahua compared to a great Dane.

0:35:230:35:28

7:1 to the bookies.

But Australia can go fast and can

0:35:280:35:34

bite ankles.

I know someone who does know how to

0:35:340:35:41

beat Australia, the last man to do

it. He is Ryan -- macro tree and he

0:35:410:35:50

joins us now. -- Brian Noble. Good

morning!

0:35:500:35:57

Good morning. How are you doing? Not

quite a Chihuahua but a Jack

0:35:570:36:03

Russell! If the big dog drives do it

it it'll get caught in its throat!

0:36:030:36:10

Sometimes being an underdog can be

an advantage if you use it right.

0:36:100:36:16

You beat Australia as the code of

great written. How do England do

0:36:160:36:19

that today? -- coach of Great

Britain.

This is a good England

0:36:190:36:25

side. They've lost their captain

Sean McLauchlan yesterday, which is

0:36:250:36:28

a blow, but they are tight group and

they've gotten better and better as

0:36:280:36:34

the tournament has gone on. I think

they are better this tournament than

0:36:340:36:38

people are giving them credit for.

They have to look after the ball.

0:36:380:36:42

They may get for opportunities to

score tries and in my mind they have

0:36:420:36:46

to execute at least three of those

are caused this Australian team,

0:36:460:36:49

with people like Slater, Smith and

Cronk, have been together for 15

0:36:490:36:56

years in the Queensland and

Australian side and they haven't

0:36:560:36:58

been beaten since 2013. But I have

an element of confidence with this

0:36:580:37:03

English team and I think they can

get the job done this afternoon.

How

0:37:030:37:07

much have they grown since that

opening game defeat to Australia in

0:37:070:37:10

the tournament?

My goodness, they've

been sketchy and clunky, are the

0:37:100:37:18

words I used. They hadn't stitched

the whole performance together. But

0:37:180:37:23

for 70 minutes last week in the

semi-final against Tonga they were

0:37:230:37:27

fantastic. The last seven minutes

were heart stopping. We don't want

0:37:270:37:31

any of that. If they can play with

that style, this Australian team

0:37:310:37:35

hasn't been under pressure at all

throughout this World Cup and I just

0:37:350:37:39

think we need to ask a few questions

of some of their bigger players in

0:37:390:37:43

relation to whether they can stand

up to the task. But to do that

0:37:430:37:47

they've got to really control the

ball well and give themselves the

0:37:470:37:50

best opportunity that they can.

It's

Charlie here. When you are clear

0:37:500:37:58

favourite, as Australia are, and the

home fans will be bad for this game

0:37:580:38:02

and expecting a great deal,

sometimes the opposing team can use

0:38:020:38:05

that sort of psychology, especially

at the beginning of the game. Will

0:38:050:38:10

that be crucial, if England can get

a look in early on?

I think you've

0:38:100:38:15

nailed it. I think the start is very

important for this England team. I

0:38:150:38:21

don't think they will come from

behind to beat Australia, they've

0:38:210:38:25

got to get their noses in front and

the belief they can get on with the

0:38:250:38:30

game. There is a pocket of about

5000 or 6000 English fans here, he

0:38:300:38:35

will be very noisy. But I'm with

you. The start is massively

0:38:350:38:40

important and if they get a good

start I think we will see more

0:38:400:38:44

nervous Australians and they might

make a few more errors than they are

0:38:440:38:49

used to.

What's the mood like

amongst the English fans and how

0:38:490:38:52

much baiting have you had to put up

the last week after the thrashing in

0:38:520:38:56

the cricket and all of that pom

dating since that? -- baiting.

I'm

0:38:560:39:03

sure I'm not the first Englishman on

Australian soil to copper flogging

0:39:030:39:07

over the years. It's a great rivalry

and a great sporting rivalry between

0:39:070:39:12

England and Australia and its good

and -- good humour and banter.

0:39:120:39:18

Sometimes it boils over in cricket

matches and test matches. But that

0:39:180:39:23

is all about the psychology of

sport. The friendship amongst the

0:39:230:39:32

fans here is superb and while

Australia is a long way away there

0:39:320:39:36

are many connections between English

and Australian fans that they can

0:39:360:39:39

still share a beer after the game.

Wonderful. Totally agree and thanks

0:39:390:39:42

for keeping fee dog theme going.

Jack Russell. It could be a border

0:39:420:39:49

Collie by the time kick-off comes

around! The buildup is from 8:30am,

0:39:490:39:55

as well as Radio 5 Live. It's about

building the confidence. The -- no

0:39:550:40:05

longer a Chihuahua, a bulldog.

0:40:050:40:13

We've had two rain interruptions

on day one of the second Ashes Test,

0:40:130:40:17

but play is under way

again in Adelaide.

0:40:170:40:19

And England have made

the breakthrough, after some

0:40:190:40:21

confusion between the

Australian openers.

0:40:210:40:23

They tried to take advantage

of a miss-field from England,

0:40:230:40:25

but it backfired.

0:40:250:40:26

Cameron Bankcroft run

out by Chris Woakes.

0:40:260:40:28

Australia now 36-1.

0:40:280:40:31

That was extraordinary!

0:40:310:40:33

Pub landlords have been toasting

England's World Cup draw,

0:40:330:40:39

because all of their games in Russia

will be played at 7pm in the evening

0:40:390:40:43

or Sunday afternoon,

so people don't have

0:40:430:40:45

to take time off work.

0:40:450:40:46

Diego Maradona was the man

who pulled England's name out

0:40:460:40:49

of the pot in the Kremlin.

0:40:490:40:51

Gareth Southgate's side

are in a group with Belgium,

0:40:510:40:54

who are difficult opponents,

Tunisia and Panama, but he says

0:40:540:40:57

a good draw on paper

doesn't mean a jot,

0:40:570:40:59

given England's recent World Cup

record.

0:40:590:41:01

We've been good at writing teams off

and then getting beaten, so we have

0:41:010:41:07

to make sure that we are prepared

for all of those games. It's

0:41:070:41:10

fantastically exciting to be here

for the draw with every other coat.

0:41:100:41:15

It's been a great experience and

really looking forward to getting on

0:41:150:41:19

with it.

0:41:190:41:19

The big game in the Premier League

today is the evening kick-off

0:41:190:41:22

between Arsenal and

Manchester United.

0:41:220:41:24

Celtic play Motherwell in Scotland

and the FA Cup continues.

0:41:240:41:27

Last night, non-league AFC Fylde

earned a replay with Wigan Athletic

0:41:270:41:29

of League One.

0:41:290:41:30

Danny Rowe's penalty

giving them a 1-1 draw.

0:41:300:41:33

So both sides will be

in Monday's third-round draw.

0:41:330:41:39

Newcastle snatched a very late

victory at Northampton,

0:41:390:41:42

in rugby union's Premiership.

0:41:420:41:44

After a scrappy try from the final

play of the game, Tarney Takula

0:41:440:41:48

kicked the crucial conversion

to give them victory by 24-22.

0:41:480:41:52

And Glasgow Warriors'

great run continues.

0:41:520:41:56

They made it ten wins

from ten in the Pro 14,

0:41:560:41:59

with a bonus point victory

over Cardiff Blues.

0:41:590:42:01

40-16 the score.

0:42:010:42:05

Tiger Woods said he's

proved his latest back operation

0:42:050:42:11

has been a success,

after he shot another under-par

0:42:110:42:14

round at the Hero World

Challenge in the Bahamas.

0:42:140:42:24

It's his first tournament for almost

a year, but he's now seven under

0:42:240:42:27

at the half-way stage,

tied for fifth place.

0:42:270:42:30

Charley Hoffman is the leader.

0:42:300:42:31

England's Tommy Fleetwood

who was leading is three shots

0:42:310:42:33

back.

0:42:330:42:34

Still in contention. It's been a

great year for Tommy Fleetwood.

0:42:340:42:37

He is not quite my mate. I've played

with him once. But I like him! I

0:42:370:42:42

think he is a lovely guy.

You got a special mention for

0:42:420:42:46

Maradona's yellow bowtie.

Because all of the ex-players are

0:42:460:42:56

all very smart. And he had a black

shirt and a yellow bow tie.

0:42:560:43:00

It was wonderful entertainment. I

thought Gary Lineker was very funny

0:43:000:43:04

when he mentioned Maradona's hands.

That's right. Then he had a go at

0:43:040:43:12

Italy for not qualifying. By the

way, no challenge this week because

0:43:120:43:15

of all of the rugby building up to

the final. So in the New Year I will

0:43:150:43:21

become a professional ninja.

Should we be worried? About you on

0:43:210:43:26

our? Because you are professional

ninja?

0:43:260:43:28

Are not professional. I didn't make

the grade.

0:43:280:43:31

Thanks.

0:43:310:43:39

This is Breakfast. Donald Trump's

former security adviser says Michael

0:43:390:43:45

Flynn could testify against his

son-in-law of contacts with Russia.

0:43:450:43:49

Government departments are being

advised not to use anti-viral

0:43:490:43:52

software from a Russian company

because of concerns it has links to

0:43:520:43:57

the Kremlin.

0:43:570:44:07

Meteorological winter has started

with a bit of an upturn in

0:44:070:44:11

temperatures. Things are going to be

gradually turning a bit milder

0:44:110:44:14

through the course of the weekend.

Some sunny spells on offer and also

0:44:140:44:19

a few rain showers, not everyone

seeing them and we will have lost

0:44:190:44:23

the snow showers earlier in the

week. As we start Saturday morning

0:44:230:44:26

you can see where the showers will

be falling for parts of west

0:44:260:44:30

Scotland, Wales and south-west

England, one or two lingering around

0:44:300:44:33

the east coast but many other places

dry and sunny and cloud increasing

0:44:330:44:37

with windy and wet conditions for

the north of Scotland. A few showers

0:44:370:44:41

dotted around across Wales, down to

Cornwall, further east across

0:44:410:44:46

England and more sunshine for the

likes of Kent, Norfolk, temperatures

0:44:460:44:50

only five or six. The odd shower for

the West Midlands but much of

0:44:500:44:55

northern England having a sunny and

decent afternoon, milder than it has

0:44:550:44:58

been here. Northern Ireland, central

and Northern Scotland turning quite

0:44:580:45:02

breezy and cloudy with the arrival

of rain later, southern Scotland

0:45:020:45:06

should stay dry and bright for a

good part of the date. Through

0:45:060:45:10

Saturday evening, windy in the

north, a band of cloud with patchy

0:45:100:45:13

outbreaks sinking south. That will

introduce some milder air gradually.

0:45:130:45:18

By the time we get to the early

hours of Sunday, frost free largely,

0:45:180:45:24

the mildest night in some time we've

seen. Through the day on Sunday we

0:45:240:45:28

start with quite a lot of cloud in

the south courtesy of this weather

0:45:280:45:32

front, which will be edging further

south through the day, then brighter

0:45:320:45:36

conditions as high pressure tries to

topple in from the Atlantic and as

0:45:360:45:40

it does so it will dry in that

milder air so cold air squeezed away

0:45:400:45:44

to the near continent. Milder air

coming in from a more north-westerly

0:45:440:45:48

direction gradually through the

course of Sunday. Cloud and

0:45:480:45:53

outbreaks of pantry raider clear

link so slowly to the south on

0:45:530:45:57

Sunday and then dry conditions,

sunny spells especially for parts of

0:45:570:46:00

northern England and Scotland, a bit

more cloud for western Scotland and

0:46:000:46:05

Northern Ireland. Temperatures back

into double figures, ten or 11 in

0:46:050:46:11

the south later on Sunday. The

fairly mild and settled spell

0:46:110:46:15

continues on Monday and onto

Tuesday, but it looks like things

0:46:150:46:19

will be an settled and then colder

later in the week. That's it for

0:46:190:46:23

now, have a good weekend.

0:46:230:46:25

Now it's time for Click

with Spencer Kelly and this week

0:46:250:46:28

they're investigation how technology

is being developed to support people

0:46:280:46:31

with disabilities.

0:46:310:46:50

Over the past few years,

some of the most fascinating

0:47:100:47:13

technologies we've featured

on the show have been the ones that

0:47:130:47:16

help people with disabilities.

0:47:160:47:17

As the world's first

bionic games proved,

0:47:170:47:19

the possibilities now emerging

offer so much potential,

0:47:190:47:21

whether it be in mobility,

sight or hearing, we've seen how

0:47:210:47:24

life-changing technology

is tantalisingly close.

0:47:240:47:25

But how long before it really starts

to impact people's lives for real?

0:47:250:47:29

This weekend sees the international

day of people with disabilities

0:47:290:47:31

and that's a great chance for us

to devote a whole programme

0:47:310:47:35

to the latest tech

developments in the area.

0:47:350:47:37

Now, in the UK, around 5%

of all rail journeys are made

0:47:370:47:40

by those with a disability

or a long-term illness.

0:47:400:47:42

A quarter have reported problems

with using public transport.

0:47:420:47:45

The rail company London Midland

is hoping to improve accessibility

0:47:450:47:48

for its disabled passengers

with a new app, Passenger Assist,

0:47:480:47:50

and we asked Emily Yates

to try it out for us.

0:47:500:47:53

I'm Emily Yates and I'm

just planning my train

0:47:530:47:56

journey to Birmingham.

0:47:560:47:57

It requires a fair bit

of advanced booking.

0:47:570:47:59

I'm confident travelling by myself,

but I'm not a huge fan of the train,

0:47:590:48:03

which is actually why I'm

making this journey.

0:48:030:48:05

I've heard about an app

in development called

0:48:050:48:07

Passenger Assist that

could be a game-changer

0:48:070:48:09

for disabled travellers.

0:48:090:48:10

Thank you!

0:48:100:48:15

I think anybody watching this who's

disabled will probably agree with me

0:48:150:48:19

that you can have some pretty

horrific travel journeys

0:48:190:48:21

if you're disabled.

0:48:210:48:25

I've been left on the train before,

I've booked assistance and somebody

0:48:250:48:29

has said, "Yeah, we're going to come

and meet you," and I've been left

0:48:290:48:32

on the train unable to get off

and I've had to go four or five

0:48:320:48:36

stops down the line to be able

to come back again so I'm really

0:48:360:48:40

excited to see what this

app has to offer.

0:48:400:48:43

Thank you!

0:48:430:48:49

I've got this new app

which is currently in development

0:48:490:48:54

and I'm just about to

fill in my own profile.

0:48:540:48:57

What's brilliant about this app

is it asks things like,

0:48:570:48:59

"Do you need room for a guide dog,

do you have a hearing impairment,

0:48:590:49:03

do you need a ramp, do you need

help buying a ticket?"

0:49:030:49:06

So, Roxanne, I've added my profile

details and now I've just

0:49:060:49:09

planned a journey.

0:49:090:49:14

This is obviously in development

but this is how it would work.

0:49:140:49:17

I've put in my journey

and now it should come up

0:49:170:49:20

on your phone any minute.

0:49:200:49:21

Here you are.

0:49:210:49:22

You've got my picture

and everything so you know exactly

0:49:220:49:25

what I'll look like.

0:49:250:49:26

I know what you look like,

know what to expect,

0:49:260:49:28

I press "I'm Here To Help."

0:49:280:49:30

Brilliant.

0:49:300:49:32

I can send you a message saying I'm

here, my name is Roxanne.

0:49:320:49:36

OK.

0:49:360:49:41

Back on the train for me

and now I have this.

0:49:410:49:45

Passenger Assist is being developed

by start-up Tranreport under

0:49:450:49:56

the guidance of

London Midland's lab.

0:49:560:49:57

We've brought a staff phone

on the train too so we can see how

0:49:570:50:01

the app works for them.

0:50:010:50:03

So right now the phone is tracking

both the staff member

0:50:030:50:06

and the passenger.

0:50:060:50:06

We're obviously in the same place

so you can see the two dots

0:50:060:50:10

are quite close together.

0:50:100:50:11

They're using the technology such

as Bluetooth beacons,

0:50:110:50:13

Wi-Fi, 4G, GPS, we can

use multiple tools.

0:50:130:50:16

You know exactly what

carriage I'm in even.

0:50:160:50:18

Yes, down to the carriage,

we can pinpoint less than one metre

0:50:180:50:21

to your location and find out

which carriage, which train

0:50:210:50:24

and the direction of travel

you're going in as well.

0:50:240:50:26

And it's not just about the app.

0:50:260:50:30

Transreport is also making trackable

wristbands and these key fobs,

0:50:300:50:33

they'll be available for those

unable to use phones as easily.

0:50:330:50:36

Let's face it, in a world

where we can now track our pizza

0:50:360:50:39

delivery by the minute,

having to book train assistance 24

0:50:390:50:42

hours in advance seems

a little old school,

0:50:420:50:44

and this way staff will have

information at their fingertips too.

0:50:440:51:00

Transreport hope to roll out the app

across the London Midland service

0:51:000:51:04

early next year and the plan

is for the entire UK rail network

0:51:040:51:07

to be able to access

it by June, 2018.

0:51:070:51:10

If there's one thing disabled

travellers need that the current

0:51:100:51:12

system doesn't provide

its the reassurance that someone

0:51:120:51:15

will be there to help and not leave

them stranded when getting

0:51:150:51:18

on or off the train.

0:51:180:51:21

AccessNow really began

with my own reality.

0:51:340:51:39

Someone using a wheelchair to get

around, I'm consistently frustrated

0:51:390:51:41

when I show up at places and I don't

know if they're accessible or not

0:51:410:51:45

until I get there.

0:51:450:51:47

Countless times I show up

and there are steps or other

0:51:470:51:50

barriers that prevent me from doing

the things that I want.

0:51:500:51:53

And so I was really motivated to try

and solve this problem and the way

0:51:530:51:57

that we've gone about doing

that is by creating a mobile app

0:51:570:52:00

that can simply allow people,

who've experienced accessibility

0:52:000:52:02

needs, to share information

about what is accessible

0:52:020:52:05

on their own communities

and around the world.

0:52:050:52:19

It starts by selecting a place,

then rating that place as accessible

0:52:190:52:22

or partially accessible.

0:52:220:52:23

Patio access only or not accessible.

0:52:230:52:25

You can go one step further

and add a description.

0:52:250:52:28

So you can say things like,

"I showed up at this place,

0:52:280:52:31

the customer service was fantastic."

0:52:310:52:32

So this cafe looks like

it's not accessible.

0:52:320:52:51

There's two steps

here at the entrance.

0:52:510:52:53

But when I look at my app,

I can see there's an alternative

0:52:530:52:56

entrance through the building here,

that will let me into the cafe.

0:52:560:52:59

So let's check it out.

0:52:590:53:01

I think for me the main magic,

the most exciting part

0:53:010:53:04

about AccessNow, is that

the information is all crowd sourced

0:53:040:53:07

from people who have

experienced accessibility needs

0:53:070:53:08

in their own life, or are just

motivated to get involved

0:53:080:53:11

and share information.

0:53:110:53:12

We started in Toronto,

with a couple hundred pins,

0:53:120:53:15

and now we've reached over 20,000

pins throughout the world.

0:53:150:53:17

But we really want to make

this a global movement.

0:53:170:53:20

There are many times where people

who have mobility needs,

0:53:200:53:23

they're isolated in many ways

and it's simply because,

0:53:230:53:25

you know, from the way I see it,

it's not people who are disabled

0:53:250:53:29

but it's our environments

that are disabling.

0:53:290:53:43

So if we can remove the barriers

that restrict people from engaging

0:53:430:53:47

with their communities,

with their workplaces,

0:53:470:53:48

with their lifestyles,

I think we can come to a much more

0:53:480:53:52

inclusive world for everyone.

0:53:520:53:53

I've come to Dorset Orthopaedic,

a private company that fits amputees

0:53:530:53:56

with prosthetic legs,

from running blades

0:53:560:53:57

to hyperrealistic looking limbs.

0:53:570:53:58

One sport that's always been very

hard for me is snowboarding,

0:53:580:54:01

because my normal feet are designed

specifically for walking.

0:54:010:54:04

But here, they've got some feet that

could make that easier.

0:54:040:54:10

The requirements of a foot are quite

different with skiing

0:54:100:54:13

compared to walking.

0:54:130:54:14

With normal walking,

you need a foot that has a fairly

0:54:140:54:17

small range of movement that

gives you energy back,

0:54:170:54:19

so as you roll over the foot you get

some push off at the end

0:54:190:54:23

to help your walking.

0:54:230:54:25

With skiing you need more movement

in the foot to compensate

0:54:250:54:27

for the uneven surface and you also

need some shock absorption,

0:54:270:54:31

so when you go over a bump

or you land on the ski you need some

0:54:310:54:35

of that shock taken out

and that's what this does.

0:54:350:54:38

While I'm left to my own devices,

Kevin agrees to fit my legs

0:54:380:54:42

with some of these feet

so I can give them a go.

0:54:420:54:45

This requires a lot of honing

and alignment to make sure I'm not

0:54:450:54:49

pushed too far

forwards or backwards.

0:54:490:54:50

Ta-da!

My legs!

0:54:500:54:51

So I'm quite intrigued as to how

these are going to feel.

0:54:510:54:54

I actually have no idea.

0:54:540:54:56

Oh, wow.

0:54:560:55:01

If you push your weight forwards,

you should be able to feel

0:55:010:55:04

the movement in the ankle.

0:55:040:55:06

Oh, wow.

0:55:060:55:06

Oh, yeah, there!

0:55:060:55:07

That sensation I've not

felt in the ten years

0:55:070:55:09

since being an amputee.

0:55:090:55:11

These feet work by putting air

into an adjustable cylinder,

0:55:110:55:13

which controls the amount

of resistance in the foot.

0:55:130:55:16

More air and more resistance.

0:55:160:55:17

As well as giving this movement,

shock absorption in the foot means

0:55:170:55:20

that going over rocks

or bumps is easier.

0:55:200:55:23

But they're not cheap.

0:55:230:55:25

With the price of £2,500 each,

it means only some people can get

0:55:250:55:29

access to them.

0:55:290:55:29

It's clear that they're

not for walking.

0:55:290:55:31

They're very, very rigid,

very square and very hard.

0:55:310:55:34

But if I let my mind go and imagine

myself snowboarding,

0:55:340:55:37

which I've done badly in the past,

I can feel that and they move

0:55:370:55:40

and that's weird, because I have not

felt my feet move in that way

0:55:400:55:44

for ten years.

0:55:440:55:45

There's only one thing left to do

and it's try the feet out

0:55:450:55:49

on some proper snow.

0:55:490:56:11

I've come to an indoor slope,

but I've got to admit I'm

0:56:110:56:14

feeling very nervous.

0:56:140:56:15

This is Emma Gillespie,

a prosthetist who's agreed to come

0:56:150:56:18

with me to fit the feet

and help me try them out.

0:56:180:56:21

So you've boarded on these before.

0:56:210:56:22

Yeah.

And how was that?

0:56:220:56:24

Hard.

0:56:240:56:24

But you did it.

Yeah.

0:56:240:56:26

So, one leg.

0:56:260:56:26

This is what you don't see

about being an amputee.

0:56:260:56:29

When I've snowboarded previously

on my normal walking feet,

0:56:290:56:32

it's been really difficult.

0:56:320:56:32

But these offer much more

and the way they're set up offers

0:56:320:56:36

a natural bend in my knees,

a stance that's almost impossible

0:56:360:56:39

on my usual legs.

0:56:390:56:40

OK, here we go.

Oh, she's going!

0:56:400:56:42

Try and think about

your posture a bit.

0:56:420:56:44

And a turn!

0:56:440:56:45

Woohoo!

0:56:450:56:56

OK, so it's been a while since

I boarded and expecting

0:57:040:57:07

an instant result is probably asking

a too much, but the best thing

0:57:070:57:13

for it is to keep throwing

myself down this slope

0:57:130:57:15

and see what happens.

0:57:150:57:16

Despite the technology of these

feet, there's only so much they can

0:57:160:57:20

do when it comes to

hitting the slopes.

0:57:200:57:22

The real work is definitely

still coming from the person.

0:57:220:57:25

And if you're not very good,

they're not going to stop

0:57:250:57:28

you from falling.

0:57:280:57:28

LAUGHS

0:57:280:57:34

I'm soaking wet.

0:57:340:57:35

That last fall has drenched me.

0:57:350:57:39

But it's amazing when you merge

technology and disability.

0:57:390:57:43

It's about giving people

independence and the feeling

0:57:430:57:45

that they can try things

that they perhaps thought weren't

0:57:450:57:47

there for them.

0:57:470:57:48

So it's fun, but now I want these

feet and they're expensive.

0:57:480:57:50

That's it for the shortcut of this

special version of Click

0:58:060:58:10

this

International Day

0:58:100:58:14

of People with Disabilities.

0:58:140:58:15

The full version is iPlayer

and you can keep an eye on the BBC's

0:58:150:58:18

disability stories throughout

the year on our website.

0:58:180:58:21

Thanks for watching,

we will see you soon.

0:58:210:58:22

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

0:59:380:59:41

Stayt.

0:59:410:59:44

The investigation into Russian

meddling in the US election closes

0:59:440:59:47

in on President Trump's

inner circle.

0:59:470:59:49

His former National Security Advisor

Michael Flynn admits lying

0:59:490:59:51

to the FBI, as US media reports that

he's prepared to implicate

0:59:510:59:54

the president's son-in-law,

Jared Kushner.

0:59:540:59:57

Good morning, it's Saturday

the 2nd of December.

1:00:081:00:11

Also this morning:

1:00:111:00:19

We need the England boys to win. 22

years. Come on!

1:00:191:00:24

The excitement builds

for England fans in Brisbane,

1:00:241:00:28

ahead of the Rugby

League World Cup final.

1:00:281:00:33

England face Australia. The Heath --

they haven't beaten them since 1995.

1:00:331:00:40

Cyber security experts warn

government departments

1:00:401:00:41

against using Russian

anti-virus software,

1:00:411:00:42

saying it could be exploited.

1:00:421:00:44

England's untold history: The public

is asked to nominate

1:00:441:00:46

places that deserve to be part

of a new national memorial scheme.

1:00:461:00:54

I am the real Santa! Can you see my

beard?

1:00:541:00:58

The Christmas Grotto

with a difference.

1:00:581:01:06

How one mum has created

a 'silent Santa' night,

1:01:061:01:08

to help children with autism

enjoy the festive season.

1:01:081:01:11

And we'll have your full

weekend weather forecast

1:01:111:01:13

in about 15 minutes.

1:01:131:01:14

Good morning.

First our main story.

1:01:141:01:16

US media reports say Donald Trump's

former national security adviser

1:01:161:01:18

Michael Flynn, who has admitted

lying to the FBI about his contacts

1:01:181:01:22

with Russia, is prepared to give

testimony that implicates

1:01:221:01:24

the President's son-in-law,

Jared Kushner.

1:01:241:01:26

Mr Flynn has agreed to co-operate

with an investigation

1:01:261:01:28

into Russian meddling in the US

Presidential election.

1:01:281:01:31

It's thought he'll tell

investigators he was taking

1:01:311:01:34

directions from senior members

of Donald Trump's campaign team.

1:01:341:01:38

The White House says Mr Flynn has

implicated no-one but himself

1:01:381:01:41

in the investigation.

1:01:411:01:42

Our Washington correspondent

Laura Bicker has more.

1:01:421:01:46

Michael Flynn, a retired three star

general, left the court

1:01:491:01:51

in Washington to a familiar chant.

1:01:511:01:54

"Lock him up."

1:01:541:01:58

He'd once encouraged Donald Trump

supporters to use a similar

1:01:581:02:01

version against rival

Hillary Clinton.

1:02:011:02:04

The 58-year-old played a key part

in Mr Trump's campaign and often

1:02:041:02:07

travelled with him.

1:02:071:02:09

If I did a tenth -

a tenth of what she did,

1:02:091:02:12

I would be in jail today.

1:02:121:02:15

He was rewarded with the post

of national security adviser,

1:02:151:02:18

but was forced to resign after just

23 days when his contacts

1:02:181:02:22

with Russia to discuss US

sanctions were disclosed.

1:02:221:02:29

On the 29th of December,

Michael Flynn spoke

1:02:291:02:31

to the Russian Ambassador

on the phone in the first

1:02:311:02:34

of a series of calls.

1:02:341:02:35

On the 15th of January,

Vice President Mike Pence said

1:02:351:02:38

that sanctions were not

discussed in those calls.

1:02:381:02:40

Only after the 9th of February,

when a newspaper revealed he did

1:02:401:02:43

discuss sanctions, did pressure

increase and Michael Flynn

1:02:431:02:45

lost his job.

1:02:451:02:50

As part of his guilty plea,

prosecutors said Mr Flynn is now

1:02:501:02:54

cooperating with the investigation.

1:02:541:02:55

US media claims he will testify that

senior members of the Trump team,

1:02:551:03:00

including Mr Trump's

son-in-law Jared Kushner,

1:03:001:03:02

encouraged Flynn to make contact

with Russian officials.

1:03:021:03:06

The White House is now trying

to distance himself from Flynn's

1:03:061:03:12

actions, and the lies he told

to the FBI, but having reached

1:03:121:03:15

a plea bargain to co-operate,

1:03:151:03:16

what else has Mr Flynn told

the enquiry and what further

1:03:161:03:19

revelations are to come?

1:03:191:03:20

All government departments

have been advised by

1:03:201:03:22

The National Cyber Security Centre

not to use Russian anti-virus

1:03:221:03:25

software on systems containing

sensitive information.

1:03:251:03:28

Kaspersky Lab, which has

400 million customers

1:03:281:03:30

world-wide, was banned

from US government networks

1:03:301:03:32

earlier this year.

1:03:321:03:33

The company denies any

links to the Kremlin.

1:03:331:03:35

Our reporter, Jon

Donnison, has more.

1:03:351:03:41

Cyber security software like that

provided by Kaspersky Lab requires

1:03:411:03:45

extensive access to the files

on a computer phone or network

1:03:451:03:48

to look for viruses.

1:03:481:03:51

Our mission has always

been to protect...

1:03:511:03:57

Kaspersky is used by consumers

and businesses as well as some parts

1:03:571:04:01

of government to protect systems

from criminals and hackers.

1:04:011:04:03

But now a new warning about Russian

anti-virus software,

1:04:031:04:05

amid fears it could

be used for spying.

1:04:051:04:13

At Britain's National

Cyber Security Centre,

1:04:131:04:17

they say they've not seen actual

proof of such espionage,

1:04:171:04:19

but they've told government

departments not to

1:04:191:04:21

use Kaspersky for systems

containing sensitive data.

1:04:211:04:23

This is specifically about entities

that may be of interest

1:04:231:04:27

to the Russian government

and so for us that's about national

1:04:271:04:34

security systems in government,

of which there are a very small

1:04:341:04:37

number.

1:04:371:04:39

Kaspersky Lab has already denied

allegations that it's been used

1:04:391:04:42

for espionage in America.

1:04:421:04:43

We don't do anything wrong.

1:04:431:04:45

They are just speculating

about some rumours,

1:04:451:04:49

opinions and there

is zero hard data.

1:04:491:04:54

400 million people use Kaspersky

products around the world,

1:04:541:04:59

but officials say they're not

telling the general public to stop

1:04:591:05:02

using it.

1:05:021:05:03

Kaspersky Lab denies any wrongdoing,

but today's warning is another sign

1:05:031:05:12

about growing fears over

the risk posed by Russia.

1:05:121:05:15

The conduct of two

former police officers,

1:05:151:05:18

who leaked allegations that

pornographic images had been found

1:05:181:05:20

on the computer of the now

First Secretary of State

1:05:201:05:24

Damian Green, have been criticised

by the former Attorney General,

1:05:241:05:27

Dominic Grieve.

1:05:271:05:27

Mr Green has repeated his

insistence that he didn't

1:05:271:05:29

view the material.

1:05:291:05:30

Our political correspondent,

Tom Barton, joins us now

1:05:301:05:33

from our London newsroom.

1:05:331:05:35

Good morning. There are reports on

the front pages that the Cabinet is

1:05:351:05:42

split over this. What exactly has

Dominic grieve taken issue with?

1:05:421:05:51

This all dates back to those further

allegations that were made yesterday

1:05:511:05:56

by a second Met police officer

around allegations that pornography

1:05:561:05:59

was found on Damian Green's

parliamentary computer, after a raid

1:05:591:06:04

in 2008. MPs have been rallying

around him. David Davis has warned

1:06:041:06:11

Downing Street not to sack him over

these claims, while the former

1:06:111:06:15

attorney general Dominic Grieve has

been questioning the conduct of

1:06:151:06:19

those officers involved.

They choose

to put material that an ordinary

1:06:191:06:24

citizen would be prohibited from

acquiring under data protection

1:06:241:06:27

rules into the public domain on

their own judgement. There is a way

1:06:271:06:33

of dealing with that. If you think

something is relevant you do it by

1:06:331:06:37

proper official means. You do not go

freelancing, as this officers have

1:06:371:06:42

done, and it has the smack of the

police state about it.

Damian Green

1:06:421:06:48

is Theresa May's closest ally, the

second most important person around

1:06:481:06:53

the Cabinet table, and this row

matters because it puts his word

1:06:531:06:57

against that of two former police

officers. A senior government

1:06:571:07:01

official is looking into these

allegations, as well as separate

1:07:011:07:04

allegations of inappropriate

behaviour towards a Conservative

1:07:041:07:07

activist. Those allegations are also

denied by Damian Green and her

1:07:071:07:13

report could well be on the desk of

the Prime Minister within days.

We

1:07:131:07:17

will keep across it, as will you,

I'm sure. Thank you.

1:07:171:07:26

Pope Francis is Bennet is final day

in Bangladesh, after rallying

1:07:261:07:30

support for the Rohingya Muslims --

is spending.

1:07:301:07:35

He used the word Rohingya for the

first time yesterday. Let's cross to

1:07:351:07:43

our correspondent. There's been so

much attention on the words the pope

1:07:431:07:46

has or hasn't used. Ring us up to

date.

That's right. Yesterday he

1:07:461:07:51

sent out a very strong message about

the Rohingya a crisis. He met with a

1:07:511:07:56

group of Rohingya refugees here in

Dhaka. About 16 of them. He touched

1:07:561:08:02

their hands. A little girl, an

orphan, was brought in front of him

1:08:021:08:08

and he placed his hand on her head.

He asked the Rohingyas for

1:08:081:08:15

forgiveness for the injustices of

the world. He asked how people

1:08:151:08:19

fleeing the Rakhine state identify

themselves. And it is also a word

1:08:191:08:25

Myanmar doesn't recognise. He says

he and being in Bangladesh could

1:08:251:08:30

upset the Myanmar government and

that's perhaps why he didn't say it

1:08:301:08:33

while he was in Myanmar. He faced

criticism for not sending a strong

1:08:331:08:37

message while he was in that country

and when he came to Bangladesh

1:08:371:08:40

everybody was waiting and listening

to every speech he made, to see if

1:08:401:08:44

he would send out a stronger

message. He seems to have done so

1:08:441:08:47

yesterday. Today he visited a church

in Dhaka and a cemetery. He will

1:08:471:08:54

also meet some students and then he

will be leaving this country.

Thanks

1:08:541:08:57

for the moment.

1:08:571:08:58

White House officials have indicated

that President Trump is likely

1:08:581:09:01

to announce next week

that the United States

1:09:011:09:03

will recognise Jerusalem

as the capital of Israel.

1:09:031:09:05

The status of Jerusalem

is highly contentious,

1:09:051:09:07

with both Israelis and Palestinians

claiming all or part of the city

1:09:071:09:10

as their capital.

1:09:101:09:11

Critics have warned

that the decision by Donald Trump

1:09:111:09:13

could jeopardise peace negotiations.

1:09:131:09:16

It's feared there could be hundreds

of job losses at Toys R Us,

1:09:161:09:19

after the retailer announced it

would close around a quarter

1:09:191:09:22

of its UK stores.

1:09:221:09:23

The move, which would see

the closure of 25 shops,

1:09:231:09:26

is part of a deal by the owners

to renegotiate debts

1:09:261:09:29

with its landlords.

1:09:291:09:30

It's thought Christmas trading

and gift vouchers will not be

1:09:301:09:33

affected by the move.

1:09:331:09:36

People are being asked to nominate

events and people they feel should

1:09:361:09:39

be commemorated as part

of a new national memorial scheme.

1:09:391:09:45

The heritage group Historic England

has already received a wealth

1:09:451:09:48

of nominations from battle

sites to birthplaces,

1:09:481:09:50

as David Sillito reports.

1:09:501:09:53

The site of the presentation

of Magna Carta.

1:09:531:09:56

The place where the Pilgrim Fathers

set off for America.

1:09:561:10:01

And here, the memorial

to the landing at Brixham

1:10:011:10:04

of the Glorious Revolution.

1:10:041:10:07

There are some monuments

to great moments in history,

1:10:071:10:09

but Historic England wants more.

1:10:091:10:11

There are many plaques

to where people were born or lived.

1:10:111:10:15

It now wants suggestions

about events and have already

1:10:151:10:17

received a few.

1:10:171:10:19

We've done our research and spoken

to people across the country

1:10:191:10:23

and we've found really passionate

enthusiasts who want to see

1:10:231:10:29

unknown

histories marked out.

1:10:291:10:30

We've had people wanting to mark out

where the Pilgrim Fathers set out

1:10:301:10:35

to make that more well-known.

1:10:351:10:36

We've had people wanting to mark out

the birthplace of grime music

1:10:361:10:40

in east London, music in Coventry,

all sorts of people with different

1:10:401:10:43

passions and interests

who want to share their

1:10:431:10:45

knowledge of the history that

happened on their doorstep.

1:10:451:10:47

So it doesn't have to be just

the famous places in the history

1:10:471:10:51

books, they are looking for sites

that capture the whole

1:10:511:10:53

of British life.

1:10:531:10:55

Quite what the memorials will look

like hasn't yet been decided.

1:10:551:10:58

The immediate job is to find

the people who have a passion

1:10:581:11:01

to honour the places

where history was made.

1:11:011:11:04

Let's return to our top

story this morning.

1:11:041:11:06

Reports from the United States

suggest the President's former

1:11:061:11:09

national security adviser

Michael Flynn, who yesterday

1:11:091:11:11

pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI

about his contacts with Russia,

1:11:111:11:14

is prepared to testify

against Donald Trump's son-in-law,

1:11:141:11:16

Jared Kushner.

1:11:161:11:25

Mr Flynn is the most senior member

of the Trump administration to face

1:11:251:11:28

charges in the ongoing investigation

into Russian meddling

1:11:281:11:31

during the American election.

1:11:311:11:33

Let's speak to Dr Leslie Vinjamuri,

who's a US analyst at the foreign

1:11:331:11:36

affairs think tank Chatham House.

1:11:361:11:40

Thank you very much for joining us

this morning. What you make of this,

1:11:401:11:44

in terms where this takes trust, the

reputation of the Trump advice

1:11:441:11:53

committee, so to speak. What is this

moving us towards?

This is very

1:11:531:11:58

significant. This is the first

indictments towards an individual

1:11:581:12:01

who was actually in the Trump White

House. The others were people

1:12:011:12:04

involved in the campaign didn't

actually get in the White House.

1:12:041:12:09

Michael Flynn is a senior person,

the first national security adviser.

1:12:091:12:13

The shortest lived national security

adviser. He didn't last long because

1:12:131:12:18

of this conversation with the

ambassador from Russia, which he

1:12:181:12:22

lied about. At what the Vidic at

about this is that it's a short

1:12:221:12:26

charge, a single charge. -- what is

significant about this. In the

1:12:261:12:31

agreed statement of the fax between

the US government and Michael Flynn,

1:12:311:12:36

Michael Flynn says that he

communicated with senior members of

1:12:361:12:39

Trump's transition team before he

established contact with the Russian

1:12:391:12:43

Ambassador and he fed back to them.

So now the question is who he spoke

1:12:431:12:49

to, what they agreed and why was the

transition, why was Trump so

1:12:491:12:56

concerned, to try and persuade the

Russians not to respond to the

1:12:561:13:02

sanctions that President Obama had

issued in response to the report

1:13:021:13:06

from the intelligence agency, saying

that Russia had launched this

1:13:061:13:09

disinformation campaign, trying to

undermine your selection? Remember

1:13:091:13:15

there was a bipartisan consensus in

Washington really to take a hard

1:13:151:13:20

line on Russia for this question of

interfering in the election, so to

1:13:201:13:24

kind of approach the ambassador,

it's not clear why, there are a lot

1:13:241:13:30

of questions about how far this

goes.

And off course we are very

1:13:301:13:33

interested and asking questions.

You've been talking to people in the

1:13:331:13:37

US. There is a very divided opinion

when it comes to President Trump.

1:13:371:13:43

What are they saying about what this

investigation means?

I think

1:13:431:13:46

people... You know, some people

might if you look at it at first

1:13:461:13:52

glance say the violation right now

is something called the Logan Act.

1:13:521:13:58

That as a member of the transition

team you don't have the authority to

1:13:581:14:03

speak to a foreign official. Not

something that is taken very

1:14:031:14:06

seriously. But I think most people

see that there is a broader question

1:14:061:14:12

about why this communication was

going on, how far up it went and

1:14:121:14:15

what it had to do, if anything, with

this broader question of Russia's

1:14:151:14:20

interference in the campaign. And

right now what people are suggesting

1:14:201:14:26

is that it seems to be a few people

have said it is Jared Kushner, who

1:14:261:14:31

Michael Flynn was communicating

with, the president's son-in-law.

1:14:311:14:36

America is divided, but remember

that President Trump right now has

1:14:361:14:40

very low approval ratings. He is

down to 38%. We saw about 20 minutes

1:14:401:14:45

ago that the Senate has passed the

tax bill, so that could actually

1:14:451:14:51

change his approval. It's very

interesting timing right now. The

1:14:511:14:55

critique of this president has been

that he hasn't gotten any major

1:14:551:14:58

legislation through. That's just

changed.

Sorry, you will have to

1:14:581:15:04

briefly explain this tax bill.

The

tax bill has been tax cuts,

1:15:041:15:08

especially corporate tax cuts, have

been very high on this

1:15:081:15:12

administration's agenda and it's

been very hard to get any

1:15:121:15:15

legislation through. It hadn't

looked as recently as a week ago

1:15:151:15:19

that this would be necessarily

getting through the Senate and it

1:15:191:15:22

has a very major move... Sorry?

So

he is getting stuff done in terms of

1:15:221:15:33

this tax bill. This is the first one

he has pushed through, so to speak.

1:15:331:15:37

But still there are questions about

the son-in-law. If the president's

1:15:371:15:42

son-in-law is being implicated, this

is speculation, how does that affect

1:15:421:15:46

him?

1:15:461:15:51

When does that lead to him?

What we

know now, there have been some

1:15:511:15:55

people saying this will wrap up

soon, this clearly isn't going to

1:15:551:15:58

wrap up soon, it's now taken on an

entirely different level and scale.

1:15:581:16:03

Remember, Flynn is now cooperating

and if it is the President's

1:16:031:16:09

son-in-law and other senior members

of the transition team who are in

1:16:091:16:12

the administration, possibly in the

current administration, Flynn of

1:16:121:16:16

course is out... What does that lead

to in terms of the broader question

1:16:161:16:22

of Russia's interference and the

Trump administration's complicity?

1:16:221:16:26

These are the questions that are

clearly going to be things Robert

1:16:261:16:30

Mueller is pushing for, he is a very

assured investigator and this

1:16:301:16:35

investigation has tremendous

momentum and it's very grave...

1:16:351:16:39

There's nothing insignificant about

this charge and the fact that the

1:16:391:16:45

former National Security Adviser has

confessed to lying to the FBI, but

1:16:451:16:50

more significantly that he is

cooperating with a very significant

1:16:501:16:56

investigation that is really moving

right into the heart of the

1:16:561:17:00

President's inner circle.

Good for

you to explain that to us and give

1:17:001:17:04

us your views, doctor Leslie

Vinjamuri, associate fellow at

1:17:041:17:08

Chatham House, thank you very much.

Thank you.

1:17:081:17:13

Let's look ahead to the weekend

weather with Darren. Good morning.

1:17:131:17:17

Good morning. A different look to

the weather this weekend, couldn't

1:17:181:17:22

be more different to what we've seen

over the past week when we had the

1:17:221:17:26

cold northerly winds, sunshine and

wintry showers. This weekend the

1:17:261:17:30

wind is coming from the Atlantic and

slowly but surely temperatures will

1:17:301:17:33

be rising as it turns milder. Lots

of cloud around this weekend and it

1:17:331:17:38

will be thick enough to give us wind

and drizzle -- rain and drizzle now

1:17:381:17:42

and again. A different look, this is

the morning into the afternoon,

1:17:421:17:46

turning Dreier in East Anglia and

the south east. Not much sunshine

1:17:461:17:51

and some rain coming into Northern

Scotland into the afternoon and hear

1:17:511:17:55

the winds will be stronger. For

many, like winds, and still some

1:17:551:17:59

cold air in the south-east and East

Anglia, temperatures at the moment

1:17:591:18:03

not far from freezing and only

rising to five or six. Otherwise

1:18:031:18:07

five or six. Some sunshine in

north-east England for a while in

1:18:071:18:14

south-eastern Scotland, there's the

rain coming into northern Scotland,

1:18:141:18:18

wettest across the Highlands. That's

a weak weather front that will go

1:18:181:18:22

south overnight. You can see the

ragged rain moving southwards away

1:18:221:18:27

from Scotland and into Northern

Ireland and northern England and

1:18:271:18:29

eventually down towards Wales and

the Midlands and in this zone where

1:18:291:18:33

we have the cloud and rain, it will

be mild, but the cloud will break up

1:18:331:18:37

in Scotland after the rain moves

through so it could be a bit chilly

1:18:371:18:42

first thing here, otherwise pretty

mild. The really cold air is either

1:18:421:18:45

out in the North Sea all on the

continent and we're getting milder

1:18:451:18:50

air coming in on top of an area of

high pressure -- or on the

1:18:501:18:54

continent. That will bring drizzly

rain to Northern Ireland and western

1:18:541:18:57

Scotland through the day but ahead

of its some sunshine across

1:18:571:19:01

Scotland, brighter skies and

sunshine across northern England. Is

1:19:011:19:14

those temperatures rising even

across the south-east, could be up

1:19:141:19:16

to around ten or so. This is Monday,

it looks really dull, lots of cloud

1:19:161:19:22

again. A little sunshine here and

there in more sheltered eastern

1:19:221:19:25

areas but on the whole, cloudy with

light winds, quiet for the start of

1:19:251:19:30

the week and those temperatures on

the mild side, nine or ten. A quiet

1:19:301:19:35

start to next week, a lot of mild,

cloudy weather and the middle part

1:19:351:19:39

of the week looks like it could get

very wet and that will signal a

1:19:391:19:43

change after that. By the end of the

week we might see those cold

1:19:431:19:48

northerly winds returning an some

sunshine and eventually some wintry

1:19:481:19:51

showers. That's it, back to you two.

I can't help myself, I like to read

1:19:511:19:57

into what our team is wearing in the

morning, I notice you're tied.

I

1:19:571:20:03

haven't got glasses on so that's OK

-- trousers -- try.

Rainbows, is

1:20:031:20:09

there a clue in that one?

It was

very early this morning as you know

1:20:091:20:14

and this is the first thing that I

found.

No judgement, you look very

1:20:141:20:20

smart! If it was hinting towards

rainbows.

No, it's not.

I would make

1:20:201:20:27

the point Darren said he has he has

trousers on but we don't know. You

1:20:271:20:31

have ruined the illusion. See you

later, Darren!

1:20:311:20:36

The Christmas period can be

stressful and overbearing

1:20:361:20:38

at the best of times,

but it can be even more challenging

1:20:381:20:41

if you are a parent

of a child with autism.

1:20:411:20:44

The change of routine,

noise and unfamiliarity can

1:20:441:20:46

all combine to make the festive

season particularly difficult.

1:20:461:20:48

So Breakfast's John Maguire has been

to visit a Santa's grotto

1:20:491:20:52

with a difference, one

that's been adapted

1:20:521:20:53

to become autism-friendly.

1:20:531:20:58

to become autism-friendly.

1:20:581:21:01

As the song goes, it's the most

wonderful time of the year, but not

1:21:011:21:05

for everyone.

I used to hate

Christmas because you never got it,

1:21:051:21:11

you didn't want presence and I would

just wait until New Year's Day. You

1:21:111:21:15

missed out on everything.

Julie's

13-year-old sun Joe has autism and

1:21:151:21:22

in the past Christmas has been

difficult for the whole family.

We

1:21:221:21:26

couldn't wrap the presence for a few

years because he couldn't bear the

1:21:261:21:30

noise of them opening, the autism

affects the senses so you have to

1:21:301:21:36

reduce everything, so you can't have

a big celebration, everything is

1:21:361:21:41

kept on the down low, but as he's

got older it's expanded each year

1:21:411:21:45

and there's been an extra element

each Christmas, this year the

1:21:451:21:48

presence will be wrapped so an

looking forward to that.

Julie

1:21:481:21:52

approached her local garden centre

in Liverpool and suggested this,

1:21:521:21:57

silent Santa night, designed for

children with autism. The music is

1:21:571:22:01

wild, there are no views and Julie's

trained Father Christmas and her

1:22:011:22:07

pals what to say and crucially what

not to say to the children.

Have you

1:22:071:22:11

been a good boy, that could really

stress someone out and little tips

1:22:111:22:16

where they can say, just try to be

the best you can be, or have you

1:22:161:22:21

been the best you can be, rather

than challenging the child.

I had it

1:22:211:22:27

turned off.

Really quiet I like it.

A few weeks ago we met Oscar and

1:22:271:22:32

this family who told us about the

difficulties they face when going

1:22:321:22:36

shopping. Well, tonight a very

excited and a very happy is doing

1:22:361:22:41

this two something this parents say

would usually be just too much for

1:22:411:22:45

him.

I'll give it to the elves and

we'll see what we can do.

Are you

1:22:451:22:56

real?

Of course, feel my beard.

A

really nice experience, we've

1:22:561:23:02

normally avoided Santa grottos at

Christmas time because of Oscar's

1:23:021:23:06

condition. It can be the lights, it

can be sensory overload, but coming

1:23:061:23:11

here he's really excited and he's

able to engage and understand the

1:23:111:23:15

whole process, which is not what we

would experience in general. What

1:23:151:23:19

else did he tell you, what's he

going to do with your list?

Take it

1:23:191:23:23

to the elves stop white to the North

Pole? Yes, at the North Pole. It's a

1:23:231:23:29

long way!

It is a long way. It's

hoped these nights will become

1:23:291:23:35

commonplace, making Christmas as

special for as many people as

1:23:351:23:38

possible.

Bye-bye, John.

Bye-bye,

Oscar.

1:23:381:23:50

We will talk more about that later

in the programme.

1:23:501:23:53

Meghan Markle has had a taste

of her future royal life,

1:23:531:23:56

joining her fiance Prince Harry

on their first official public

1:23:561:23:58

engagement in Nottingham yesterday.

1:23:581:24:00

Crowds lined the streets to see

the couple who were visiting

1:24:001:24:02

a charity fair hosted

by the Terrence Higgins Trust

1:24:021:24:05

to mark World Aids Day.

1:24:051:24:06

The Royal commentator, James Brooks,

was at the event along

1:24:061:24:09

with Lizzie Jordan,

who's an HIV campaigner.

1:24:091:24:11

We can talk to them now.

1:24:111:24:19

We will talk more about the campaign

in a moment and the reason they were

1:24:191:24:23

there but you met both of them

yesterday?

Yes, with my son.

1:24:231:24:30

Described the scene, many people

were seeing the pictures from

1:24:301:24:33

outdoors when they first arrived

meeting and chatting with people and

1:24:331:24:37

you are inside, they walk in, what

was it like?

A fantastic room of

1:24:371:24:42

different organisations and

representatives, all there with

1:24:421:24:45

something to tell them. Around 50

people with some fantastic African

1:24:451:24:50

music playing, a great atmosphere

and vibe in the room. Of course they

1:24:501:24:55

entered and there was the buzzer,

everyone was so excited -- buzz. We

1:24:551:25:02

got some good time to talk to them

about what we had to speak about. It

1:25:021:25:07

was a phenomenal opportunity.

So

what did they say?

They recognise

1:25:071:25:10

me. Meghan had seen the documentary

Harry and myself were in earlier in

1:25:101:25:18

the summer.

Had you met Harry

before?

No, we were just in the same

1:25:181:25:24

programme. She said, we watched the

programme, I remember your story

1:25:241:25:28

from the documentary. After that it

was a bit of a blurred because the

1:25:281:25:34

fact she recognised me was just

amazing. -- lower.

In itself is one

1:25:341:25:40

thing but it's a very important

thing, those little moments when you

1:25:401:25:44

think someone does care, they've

gone to the trouble and she is new

1:25:441:25:48

to this game that she's involved in

now.

And they chose to do it for a

1:25:481:25:53

highly stigmatised condition on

world AIDS day for their first

1:25:531:25:58

public engagement as the new royal

couple. There was the Terence

1:25:581:26:07

Higgins Trust and other

organisations, we couldn't have

1:26:071:26:10

asked for a better day and the

spotlight that was shone on these

1:26:101:26:13

organisations and what they are

doing.

As down-to-earth as the image

1:26:131:26:17

of this couple is at the moment,

this was still very thought about in

1:26:171:26:22

terms of what... As their first

engagement, considering Princess

1:26:221:26:27

Diana's legacy with HIV, the Terence

Higgins Trust as well, this was

1:26:271:26:34

planned quite carefully, wasn't it?

It was. You see from the way Harry

1:26:341:26:40

is and what he's involved in now, it

is a reflection of carrying on that

1:26:401:26:46

legacy that he wants to carry on

from his mother, but also I think

1:26:461:26:51

you've got him wanting to bring

Meghan into the fold and get hurt

1:26:511:26:57

involved in the interests they do

share.

What do you make of what

1:26:571:27:03

Lizzie said, she said Meghan tapped

Harry on the arm and said, we

1:27:031:27:08

watched this. In itself that is

quite casual, she is bringing a

1:27:081:27:14

different tone, that that's what

people are fascinated by.

It will be

1:27:141:27:19

interesting over the next few years.

The next few months we will see more

1:27:191:27:23

of these visits during the lead up

to the wedding. But what is

1:27:231:27:28

interesting is that protocol

yesterday almost went out of the

1:27:281:27:31

window. Especially down in the city

centre, you saw Harry taking a back

1:27:311:27:37

step almost, Meghan was being

introduced to dignitaries before

1:27:371:27:41

him, she was walking in front of him

but he didn't seem to mind. That was

1:27:411:27:46

really nice, you're seeing a more

informal partnership and in that

1:27:461:27:50

interview they had when they

announced their engagement, they

1:27:501:27:54

really talked about being a team and

I think that's what's really

1:27:541:27:57

interesting now, they're almost

coming together. You saw a lot of

1:27:571:28:02

arm patting and kind of rubbing each

other's backs, it's quite tactile I

1:28:021:28:06

think was the word that was used.

That's what's going to be really

1:28:061:28:10

interesting over the next few months

to see if that carries on or whether

1:28:101:28:14

that takes a back step.

Lizzie,

you're in a good place to give us

1:28:141:28:18

some kind of sense of that, you were

at the event with your son, who is

1:28:181:28:26

12. People are saying this couple is

a couple for a different generation,

1:28:261:28:29

they are closer to your son's age

than certainly I am and for a lot of

1:28:291:28:33

people, do you get a different feel

about them and the way they're going

1:28:331:28:37

to operate?

It was very informal,

very relaxed and very casual and

1:28:371:28:40

they were very tactile with each

other and they were holding hands

1:28:401:28:44

the whole time. Talking about HIV,

they are bringing the focus to that,

1:28:441:28:49

to a new generation which don't

necessarily remember Diana and all

1:28:491:28:53

of her work and actually by bringing

that spotlight to a younger

1:28:531:28:57

generation, we couldn't ask for a

better couple to do that for us.

1:28:571:29:01

We're going to talk again with you

in about an hour and a half or so,

1:29:011:29:06

it will be interesting to see what

our viewers make of it. Harry and

1:29:061:29:12

Meghan, are they changing the face

of the Royal family and bringing

1:29:121:29:15

more interest to the Royal family?

Get in touch if you think so.

1:29:151:29:19

Still to come: It's been an

incredible run so far for England at

1:29:191:29:24

the Rugby League World Cup, will it

end in gory? England international

1:29:241:29:28

Sam Tomkins will be here looking

ahead to the final which takes place

1:29:281:29:32

later this morning.

Stay with us, headlines coming up.

1:29:321:29:38

See you soon.

1:29:381:29:39

Good morning.

1:30:101:30:15

Here's a summary of today's main

stories from BBC News:

1:30:151:30:18

Donald Trump's former national

security advisor Michael Flynn

1:30:181:30:21

is prepared to testify

against the President's

1:30:211:30:23

son-in-law, Jared Kushner,

according to US media reports.

1:30:231:30:28

It's thought Mr Flynn,

who pleaded guilty to making false

1:30:281:30:31

statements to the FBI,

will say he was directed to hold

1:30:311:30:33

discussions with Kremlin officials

by senior members of Trump's

1:30:331:30:36

campaign team, including Mr Kushner.

1:30:361:30:41

The White House says Mr Flynn has

implicated no-one but himself.

1:30:411:30:45

The UK National Cyber Security

Centre has warned government

1:30:451:30:48

departments not to use

Russian anti-virus software

1:30:481:30:52

if their computers contain

sensitive information.

1:30:521:30:54

The Russian company Kaspersky Lab

was banned from US government

1:30:541:30:57

networks earlier this year,

because of concerns it had ties

1:30:571:30:59

to intelligence agencies in Moscow.

1:30:591:31:07

The company denies having

links to the Kremlin.

1:31:071:31:09

Despite its warning,

the National Cyber Security Centre

1:31:091:31:12

says the general public shouldn't be

concerned about using the software.

1:31:121:31:14

Our guidance is to choose

an anti-virus product that

1:31:141:31:17

meets your needs and does well

in industry standard tests.

1:31:171:31:20

We're not saying, and we

specifically say this

1:31:201:31:22

in our guidance on the blog,

that we are not telling people

1:31:221:31:27

to rip out Kaspersky

willy-nilly because that

1:31:271:31:29

makes no sense.

1:31:291:31:39

This is about entities that may be

of interest to the Russian

1:31:391:31:42

government, so for us that's

about national security

1:31:421:31:44

systems in government,

of which there are very small

1:31:441:31:47

number, and for example

if you have a business negotiation

1:31:471:31:50

that the Russian government

may be interested in.

1:31:501:31:52

Two former police officers

who leaked allegations that

1:31:521:31:54

pornographic images had been found

on the Tory minister

1:31:541:31:58

Damian Green's computer

were in "flagrant breach"

1:31:581:32:00

of their own code of conduct,

according to the former

1:32:001:32:03

Attorney General Dominic Grieve.

1:32:031:32:04

Mr Green, now First Secretary

of State, repeated his insistence

1:32:041:32:07

that he didn't view pornographic

material on the computer.

1:32:071:32:09

The former attorney general said

he found the behaviour

1:32:091:32:11

of the ex-officers

behaviour troubling.

1:32:111:32:13

They choose to put material that an

ordinary citizen would he prohibited

1:32:131:32:16

from acquiring under data protection

laws, into the public domain, and

1:32:161:32:20

their own judgement. There's a way

of dealing with that. If you think

1:32:201:32:25

is relevant you do it by proper

official means. You do not go

1:32:251:32:30

freelancing as this two officers

have done and it has the smack of

1:32:301:32:34

the police state about it.

1:32:341:32:35

Pope Francis is spending his

final day in Bangladesh,

1:32:351:32:38

after using his highly-anticipated

Asia trip to express support

1:32:381:32:40

for the Rohingya Muslims.

1:32:401:32:42

Yesterday, the Pope met a group

of refugees and referred to them

1:32:421:32:45

using the word "Rohingya"

for the first time.

1:32:451:32:47

He was criticised for not

using the term on his earlier visit

1:32:471:32:50

to Myanmar, which does not regard

them as an ethnic group.

1:32:501:32:57

White House officials have indicated

that President Trump is likely

1:32:571:33:00

to announce next week

that the United States

1:33:001:33:02

will recognise Jerusalem

as the capital of Israel.

1:33:021:33:04

The status of Jerusalem

is highly contentious,

1:33:041:33:06

with both Israelis and Palestinians

claiming all or part of the city

1:33:061:33:09

as their capital.

1:33:091:33:18

It's feared there could be hundreds

of job losses at Toys 'R' Us,

1:33:181:33:21

after the retailer announced it

would close around a quarter

1:33:211:33:24

of its UK stores.

1:33:241:33:27

The move, which would see

the closure of 25 shops,

1:33:271:33:30

is part of a deal by the owners

to renegotiate debts

1:33:301:33:33

with its landlords.

1:33:331:33:34

It's thought Christmas trading

and gift vouchers will not be

1:33:341:33:36

affected by the move.

1:33:361:33:37

Refugee families who are being

resettled in the UK from Syria,

1:33:371:33:41

should not be forced to split up -

and be allowed to bring children,

1:33:411:33:44

up to the age of 25, with them.

1:33:441:33:48

The British Red Cross is calling

for current rules to be relaxed,

1:33:481:33:51

so that older family members are not

left behind in war zones.

1:33:511:33:55

This week, the Home Office announced

that over the past two years around

1:33:551:33:58

9,000 Syrians had been

allowed into the UK under

1:33:581:34:01

its Vulnerable Person

Resettlement Scheme.

1:34:011:34:03

Let's be clear.

1:34:031:34:04

We are talking about children

who are part of the family unit.

1:34:041:34:07

People watching this now,

think of your family,

1:34:071:34:09

the children who still live at home,

who may be away studying.

1:34:091:34:12

That's what we're talking about.

1:34:121:34:14

Let's bring those

families back together.

1:34:141:34:15

Families belong together.

1:34:151:34:16

A new scheme, which aims

to recognise more places and people

1:34:161:34:19

with historic importance,

is set to be launched by Historic

1:34:191:34:22

England.

1:34:221:34:25

The heritage body wants people

to suggest sites that deserve to be

1:34:251:34:28

permanently acknowledged,

but aren't already marked

1:34:281:34:30

with a plaque.

1:34:301:34:31

The campaign will be

piloted over three years.

1:34:311:34:36

One other story this morning.

1:34:361:34:38

A huge waterspout has

formed off Italy.

1:34:381:34:42

It is rather remarkable.

I originally thought that was a

1:34:421:34:47

tornado, but it sucks the water up

and that's how it becomes a

1:34:471:34:54

waterspout.

1:34:541:34:55

It was spotted off the coast

of Sanremo, before moving inland

1:34:551:34:58

as a tornado.

1:34:581:34:58

The weather phenomenon caused

significant damage to the city,

1:34:581:35:01

but luckily no-one was hurt.

1:35:011:35:09

You can see the violence as the

water was swept up.

1:35:091:35:20

All of the sport now. There is a lot

happening this morning, but a long

1:35:201:35:24

way away.

Focusing on Australia. In the rugby

1:35:241:35:29

league I can sense a bit of

overconfidence on Australia's part.

1:35:291:35:32

I've been looking at the Brisbane

Times and the rugby League Cup final

1:35:321:35:38

is the fourth sports story behind

football and cricket.

1:35:381:35:42

The draw?

That the top story on the Brisbane

1:35:421:35:47

Times website and the Rudd elite in

fourth. They are saying they hope

1:35:471:35:51

the crowd will be over 40,000, so

not fall at all because the stadium

1:35:511:35:57

holds 50 2000. So I suppose when

you've won three out of four World

1:35:571:36:04

Cups, are the Australians are bit

blase?

1:36:041:36:06

But it's still a World Cup!

The English can make the most of

1:36:061:36:14

this. Maybe we are clutching at

straws.

1:36:141:36:17

England are aiming for their first

win over Australia since 1995

1:36:171:36:20

in World Cup Final at nine 9am this

morning in Brisbane.

1:36:201:36:23

The hosts are widely regarded

as the favourites to win,

1:36:231:36:26

having already beaten

England in the group stages

1:36:261:36:28

of the tournament.

1:36:281:36:29

However, these travelling fans

are confident the visitors can

1:36:291:36:31

provide an upset.

1:36:311:36:32

Yes, very hopeful.

Really good

atmosphere. I think the home of Rob

1:36:321:36:42

elite is back on in the UK. -- rugby

league.

22 years. Come on!

England

1:36:421:36:50

this year have been so much better

than recently. I think we have a

1:36:501:36:54

chance. We've been around all week

and it's been great all week.

1:36:541:37:02

With us on the sofa is Sam Tomkins,

of Wigan Warriors and England fame.

1:37:021:37:05

Thanks for coming in.

Can you

understand those fans thinking they

1:37:051:37:11

can smell an upset?

Definitely. It's

a two horse race. 80 minutes and

1:37:111:37:17

we've got a quality team and we've

been written off by pretty much

1:37:171:37:21

everyone, apart from the English

fans. I think it's a good place to

1:37:211:37:25

be as underdogs and we knew that

would be the case going into the

1:37:251:37:29

final.

How much does it help that

England lost the opening match

1:37:291:37:34

against Australia?

How much can they

learn? They can take massive

1:37:341:37:38

positives from it. They have been

beaten by two tries, but we were

1:37:381:37:44

competitive in that game for a long

time. When you play against the best

1:37:441:37:48

team in the world they have

individuals that can score for

1:37:481:37:51

nothing, but we can learn really

valuable lessons. I think we

1:37:511:37:57

probably turned the ball over too

much.

I don't understand what you

1:37:571:38:02

just said.

We were dropping the ball

and giving the Australians a chance

1:38:021:38:06

to come out us and score tries. They

are the best in the world and have

1:38:061:38:11

been for a long time is if you give

them the ball long enough they will

1:38:111:38:16

score points.

You've been in some of

these high-pressure situations. We

1:38:161:38:19

are now and quarter away from

kick-off. What's happening now?

1:38:191:38:23

What's the atmosphere?

What happens

in the moments before? In the

1:38:231:38:26

dressing room you get there are

about one hour or one and a half

1:38:261:38:33

hours before the game. They will be

getting ready. You start hearing the

1:38:331:38:36

fans coming through. There will be

between 40 and 50,000. That sound

1:38:361:38:41

gets through to the dressing room

and your excitement and nerves as

1:38:411:38:47

you come up to the game. Then in the

warm up the adrenaline comes in.

1:38:471:38:54

Some people are noisy as the nerves

kick in, others get more composed.

1:38:541:38:58

There's everything from some people

sit with headphones and not speak to

1:38:581:39:02

someone, then other guys will be

playing games on their phones and

1:39:021:39:05

joking around. It's a bit of a

different one with international

1:39:051:39:08

rugby. You only play with these guys

three or four times, but at club

1:39:081:39:15

level you play with these guys 30

times a week, so you know who not to

1:39:151:39:20

joke with. It can be sticky if you

get it wrong.

What's your routine?

I

1:39:201:39:24

don't take it too seriously in the

changing room. I'm one of the ones

1:39:241:39:31

annoying everyone.

Sam Burgess is

captain today and familiar to a lot

1:39:311:39:34

of people from rugby union of

course. What is his style? As a

1:39:341:39:38

leader.

What's he like? He is the

kind of coach who leads by example.

1:39:381:39:43

He can dish out a shout at someone

if he needs to, what he does all of

1:39:431:39:49

the little things. There are things

probably a lot of people don't

1:39:491:39:53

appreciate. A couple of metres he

makes up in the defensive line, or a

1:39:531:39:58

tough carry with the ball. He is a

leader in what he does when he's got

1:39:581:40:02

the ball. He is huge for us.

I'm

quite interested in the buildup.

1:40:021:40:07

When the warmup is taking place you

are in front of the fans. How will

1:40:071:40:11

the Australian fans react to the

England team? What do you hear?

A

1:40:111:40:16

lot of things I couldn't repeat.

So

it can be quite hostile even at that

1:40:161:40:21

point?

It's a very hostile

situation. When you are warming up

1:40:211:40:25

you are warming up at either end of

the field and you are right in front

1:40:251:40:31

of the opposition fans. That's what

gets you going for the game.

That's

1:40:311:40:35

when it puts a bit of fire in your

belly?

That's right.

Sometimes it

1:40:351:40:39

can work for you. I have to ask you.

What do you reckon? I think the

1:40:391:40:45

English will win. It will be close,

but I'm backing the boys. I believe

1:40:451:40:50

we can do it.

England by six points.

You are of course involved in the

1:40:501:40:56

semi-final team, the last-minute

defeat. That could be motivation! We

1:40:561:41:02

can look forward to watching you on

BBC One, the buildup from 8:30am. I

1:41:021:41:08

don't you've got to go to the other

studio. Radio 5 Live and the BBC

1:41:081:41:13

website as well. Staying in

Australia.

1:41:131:41:16

We've had two rain interruptions

on day one of the second Ashes Test,

1:41:161:41:19

but play is under way

again in Adelaide.

1:41:191:41:21

And England have made

the breakthrough, after some

1:41:211:41:24

confusion between the

Australian openers.

1:41:241:41:28

They tried to take advantage

of a miss-field from England,

1:41:281:41:30

but it backfired.

1:41:301:41:31

Cameron Bankcroft run

out by Chris Woakes.

1:41:311:41:36

Australia has since settled down.

Another wicket has gone. David

1:41:361:41:42

Warner is out, three runs short of

his half-century. Australia are now

1:41:421:41:48

91-2.

1:41:481:41:49

Pub landlords have been toasting

England's World Cup draw,

1:41:491:41:51

because all of their games in Russia

will be played at 7pm in the evening

1:41:511:41:56

or Sunday afternoon,

so people don't have

1:41:561:41:57

to take time off work.

1:41:571:42:00

They can all gathered together in a

big social occasion!

1:42:001:42:03

Diego Maradona was the man

who pulled England's name out

1:42:031:42:05

of the pot in the Kremlin.

1:42:051:42:08

Gareth Southgate's side

are in a group with Belgium,

1:42:081:42:12

Tunisia and Panama, but he says

a good draw on paper

1:42:121:42:15

doesn't mean a jot,

1:42:151:42:17

given England's recent

World Cup record.

1:42:171:42:18

We've been good at writing teams off

and then getting beaten,

1:42:181:42:21

so we have to make sure that we're

prepared for all of those games.

1:42:211:42:25

It's fantastically exciting

to be here for the draw

1:42:251:42:27

with every other coach.

1:42:271:42:29

It's been a great experience

and really looking forward

1:42:291:42:31

to getting on with it.

1:42:311:42:35

The big game in the Premier League

today is the evening kick-off

1:42:351:42:38

between Arsenal and

Manchester United.

1:42:381:42:41

Celtic play Motherwell in Scotland

and the FA Cup continues.

1:42:411:42:47

Last night, an upset -

non-league AFC Fylde earned a replay

1:42:471:42:50

with Wigan Athletic of League One.

1:42:501:42:52

Danny Rowe's penalty

giving them a 1-1 draw.

1:42:521:42:54

So both sides will be

in Monday's third-round draw.

1:42:541:43:01

Newcastle snatched a very late

victory at Northampton,

1:43:011:43:05

in rugby union's Premiership.

1:43:051:43:07

After a scrappy try from the final

play of the game, Tarney Takula

1:43:071:43:11

kicked the crucial conversion

to give them victory by 24-22.

1:43:111:43:16

And Glasgow Warriors'

great run continues.

1:43:161:43:19

They made it ten wins

from ten in the Pro 14,

1:43:191:43:22

with a bonus point victory

over Cardiff Blues.

1:43:221:43:24

40-16 the score.

1:43:241:43:26

Alfie Hewitt has joined

Gordon Reid in the semi-finals

1:43:261:43:29

of the Wheelchair Tennis Masters.

1:43:291:43:30

He came from a set down to beat

Stephane Houdet of France.

1:43:301:43:34

Reid and Hewitt are the reigning

Wimbledon doubles champions.

1:43:341:43:38

There's live coverage

from Loughborough on the BBC Sport

1:43:381:43:41

website and connected

televisions from 11 o'clock.

1:43:411:43:50

Tiger Woods said he'd

proved his latest back operation had

1:43:501:43:56

been a success.

1:43:561:44:01

He let his strokes do the talking,

after he shot another under-par

1:44:011:44:04

round at the Hero World Challenge

in the Bahamas.

1:44:041:44:07

It's his first tournament for almost

a year, but he's now seven under

1:44:071:44:10

at the half-way stage,

tied for fifth place.

1:44:101:44:13

Charley Hoffman is the leader.

1:44:131:44:14

England's Tommy Fleetwood

who was leading is three shots

1:44:141:44:16

back.

1:44:161:44:17

Tiger Woods, you reckon this will be

a longer spell back in the game?

1:44:171:44:20

He's not going to win, but it is

great for the younger players to

1:44:201:44:25

play alongside him.

You can't have a

character like that in a sport who

1:44:251:44:29

has left the game. Long, who made

such an impact and such a difference

1:44:291:44:33

to the game, to come back and ignore

him. Regardless, he brings good

1:44:331:44:37

things to the idea of greatness in

golf.

The likes of Tommy Fleetwood

1:44:371:44:45

can say they played alongside him.

He likes playing with them as well.

1:44:451:44:49

It's all been good. Thanks. Let's

talk to Darren, England in the

1:44:491:45:01

rugby, 22 years since they've been

in the final, let's talk about the

1:45:011:45:04

weather, what's going on?

1:45:041:45:06

About 25 at the moment in Brisbane

but look at the radar picture and

1:45:081:45:12

there are some showers heading

towards Brisbane, they may well

1:45:121:45:15

arrive during the match and if you

get a shower during the game it

1:45:151:45:19

could be heavy and accompanied by

gusty winds as well. At home we had

1:45:191:45:26

a lot of showery wintry showers but

this weekend the weather has changed

1:45:261:45:32

significantly with our winds coming

in more from the Atlantic and slowly

1:45:321:45:46

lifting the temperatures but

dragging in a lot of cloud this

1:45:461:45:48

weekend and that cloud thicken off

to give us rain and drizzle here and

1:45:481:45:52

there and this is how it looks this

morning, cloudy skies out there,

1:45:521:45:56

especially in Wales, and then in the

afternoon wet weather arrives in

1:45:561:45:59

Northern Scotland, a glimpse of

sunshine here and there but not much

1:45:591:46:02

for the south-east and Wales, still

drizzly showers. Cold air in the

1:46:021:46:06

south-east and East Anglia, the mild

air doesn't reach here today, a cold

1:46:061:46:09

start and those temperatures

reluctant to rise, only five or six

1:46:091:46:12

and eight or nine will be typical.

Sunshine to the east of the Pennines

1:46:121:46:16

and the south-east of Scotland for a

while ahead of this ragged patchy

1:46:161:46:20

rain heading into Northern Scotland

in the afternoon where we have

1:46:201:46:23

stronger winds but for many the

winds will be like overnight. The

1:46:231:46:28

patchy rain works south away from

Scotland into Northern Ireland and

1:46:281:46:31

northern England and down to Wales,

the Midlands and East Anglia and

1:46:311:46:35

underneath that there will be a lot

of cloud and it will be very mild

1:46:351:46:39

but as we see the wetter weather

move away from Scotland the cloud

1:46:391:46:43

will break and temperatures will

dip. Cold air is in the North Sea

1:46:431:46:49

and then a continent. High pressure

to the west but near the top of it

1:46:491:46:54

we draw in milder air and that

weather front responsible for this

1:46:541:46:57

rain in Northern Ireland, that will

go back towards western Scotland

1:46:571:47:00

through the day. A lot of the cloud

we have in the south, through the

1:47:001:47:04

Midlands and south east England and

East Anglia will break up and for

1:47:041:47:07

many eastern parts of the UK, a

better chance of seeing sunshine

1:47:071:47:11

tomorrow, still rather damp and

drizzly to the west but a milder

1:47:111:47:15

day, even in the south-east

temperatures getting to ten or so. A

1:47:151:47:18

quiet start to the new week, again

dominated by high pressure but

1:47:181:47:23

around it, a lot of cloudy mild air

to come with temperatures, nine or

1:47:231:47:27

ten, most of the rain in the

north-west of Scotland probably but

1:47:271:47:30

the middle part of the week may well

turn wet and also rather windy and

1:47:301:47:34

we could see cold air returning by

the end of next week. Sometime off,

1:47:341:47:39

though, milder the moment.

I like it

mild at the moment. I will take

1:47:391:47:45

that.

1:47:451:47:45

Now it's time for Newswatch

with Samira Ahmed.

1:47:451:47:47

Hello and welcome to Newswatch

with me, Samira Ahmed.

1:48:001:48:02

Everyone loves a wedding but did BBC

News go into overdrive

1:48:021:48:05

with Harry and Meghan?

1:48:051:48:06

And...

1:48:061:48:07

My congratulations

to Harry and Meghan.

1:48:071:48:08

I wish them well.

1:48:081:48:09

Jeremy Corbyn congratulates

the happy couple.

1:48:091:48:11

What could possibly go wrong

with BBC subtitling?

1:48:111:48:12

First, a row involving

Donald Trump's Twitter

1:48:141:48:16

account is not a new thing.

1:48:161:48:19

But this week was the first time

that Theresa May got

1:48:191:48:22

involved so directly.

1:48:221:48:24

The US President had

re-tweeted three videos

1:48:241:48:25

from the far right group,

Britain First, alleging to show

1:48:251:48:28

violent acts by Muslims.

1:48:281:48:30

Roger Watts felt the wide

coverage given to the story

1:48:301:48:33

was unhelpful, e-mailing...

1:48:331:48:34

At the start of the week,

the Government handed over

1:48:431:48:46

an 850-page document,

detailing how it thought the UK's

1:48:461:48:48

departure from the European Union

would affect 58 sectors

1:48:481:48:51

of the economy.

1:48:511:48:52

But, some sections of the so-called

Brexit impact studies

1:48:521:48:55

were blacked out to the fury

of opposition parties.

1:48:551:48:57

There was little about this

on BBC News on Monday

1:48:571:49:01

or Tuesday, which prompted

Chris Hill to write:

1:49:011:49:02

Well, one reason why that story

received less attention than it have

1:49:261:49:29

done was a certain engagement

announced this week, which we think

1:49:291:49:32

you might just have noticed.

1:49:321:49:34

Victoria Derbyshire was on air

when the long awaited and much

1:49:341:49:37

predicted news broke

on Monday morning.

1:49:371:49:40

Clarence House have just

announced in the last few

1:49:401:49:42

seconds that Prince Harry

is to marry his American

1:49:421:49:45

girlfriend, Meghan Markle.

1:49:451:49:50

For the rest of the day,

the BBC News operation,

1:49:501:49:53

in common with almost all British

media organisations,

1:49:531:49:55

went into overdrive.

1:49:551:49:56

With presenters and reporters

deployed to Kensington Palace,

1:49:561:49:58

bulletins devoting more

than half their time

1:49:581:50:00

to the engagement, a scheduled

edition of Panorama changed

1:50:001:50:02

to a special programme on the Royal

news, and extensive coverage

1:50:021:50:05

on the news channel and online.

1:50:051:50:13

The response of Sarah Louise Ellis:

1:50:131:50:14

Ian Holton told us:

1:50:321:50:33

Other viewers had another objection,

articulated here by Carolyn Watts.

1:50:541:50:59

I was quite amazed that I heard

the news reader actually say,

1:50:591:51:03

Ms Markle, who is of mixed race,

and then went on to the item

1:51:031:51:07

of news, regarding the arrangements

that are going to take place.

1:51:071:51:10

Why does she have to say that?

1:51:101:51:12

Why is it relevant that

she is of mixed race?

1:51:121:51:16

What difference does it

make what colour she is?

1:51:161:51:19

I do sometimes feel that

by making these statements,

1:51:191:51:22

the BBC is sometimes being divisive

and is actually setting up barriers

1:51:221:51:25

where there aren't any,

they just don't exist.

1:51:251:51:27

I know that she herself actually

says that she is mixed race and has

1:51:271:51:31

used this to her own benefit

and to the benefit of others,

1:51:311:51:34

and I think that's great.

1:51:341:51:38

To actually say it,

in the introductory line,

1:51:381:51:40

I don't think that's right.

1:51:401:51:42

Well, another viewer who contacted

us this week about the coverage

1:51:421:51:45

of the Royal engagement was Bob

Davie.

1:51:451:51:47

He joins us now from Sheffield.

1:51:471:51:50

With me in the studio

is Richard Burgess, UK news

1:51:501:51:52

editor for BBC News.

1:51:521:51:53

Bob, first, what did

you feel about the coverage?

1:51:531:51:56

I just thought that,

with other events happening

1:51:561:51:58

in the world of far more

significance and importance

1:51:581:52:00

to the people of this country,

to waste more than half

1:52:001:52:03

the Six O'Clock News bulletin

to coverage of the engagement,

1:52:031:52:06

which everyone knew about already,

I thought was absolutely pointless.

1:52:061:52:21

This is the issue, isn't it,

Richard, it's the excess.

1:52:211:52:24

It's a simple fact.

1:52:241:52:25

Most people knew it was coming.

1:52:251:52:26

More than half the bulletin.

1:52:261:52:28

Well, it was announced that morning,

so we didn't know it was definitely

1:52:281:52:31

happening that day.

1:52:311:52:34

And at six o'clock was the first

time we'd actually had the chance

1:52:341:52:37

to hear from both Harry and Meghan

in the interview they did

1:52:371:52:41

with Michelle Hussain.

1:52:411:52:41

I think there were a lot

of interesting issues

1:52:411:52:44

to get into in relation

to how their relationship developed,

1:52:441:52:47

how he proposed, all stuff we found

out for the first time

1:52:471:52:50

in the Six O'Clock News bulletin.

1:52:501:52:53

So, I appreciate Bob's point

that there was quite a bit

1:52:531:52:56

of time devoted to it.

1:52:561:52:58

But, as far as we can tell,

a lot of the audience was really

1:52:581:53:01

engaged with the story and actually

really enjoyed the coverage.

1:53:011:53:04

Bob, did you feel a lot of other

stories got squeezed out?

1:53:041:53:07

Well, yes.

1:53:071:53:10

The announcement of the engagement

matters not the slightest.

1:53:101:53:15

It's not going to make the slightest

difference to anyone

1:53:151:53:17

in this country's life.

1:53:171:53:21

And yet events that are happening

in Parliament are going to affect

1:53:211:53:27

people in this country

for decades to come.

1:53:271:53:29

Surely we should be paying

more attention to that

1:53:291:53:32

than the fripperies

of what the Royals get up to.

1:53:321:53:34

You see, you look at

what was on the news.

1:53:341:53:37

The Pope in Burma, the redacted

Brexit impact studies, you know,

1:53:371:53:42

which the Government released

with a huge row, the Chennai six.

1:53:421:53:45

We needed to have these

stories properly explained.

1:53:451:53:47

They all get squeezed and other

stories get dropped off for us

1:53:471:53:50

to find out how he proposed?

1:53:501:53:52

Well, I think we did

cover all those stories,

1:53:521:53:54

and have done over the course

of the week.

1:53:541:53:57

We led with the Rohinga Muslim

situation on Tuesday,

1:53:571:53:59

when the Pope actually did not

mention them by name in the meeting

1:53:591:54:03

with Ang Sung Su Kyi.

1:54:031:54:04

OK, Channai Six, on the day,

that would have been

1:54:041:54:07

your lead, wouldn't it?

1:54:071:54:08

Well, maybe.

1:54:081:54:09

Let's face it, the interest

in the Harry and Meghan

1:54:091:54:12

engagement was extraordinary.

1:54:121:54:13

5.6 million watched

the Six O'Clock News on Monday.

1:54:131:54:15

That's the biggest audience we've

had for a news bulletin all week.

1:54:151:54:19

It was the most popular news story

on the website by a long distance,

1:54:191:54:22

nearly 7 million people read

the main story.

1:54:221:54:25

So, there really is

the interest there in it.

1:54:251:54:27

The other stories you mentioned,

we have covered and we continue

1:54:271:54:30

to cover in depth.

1:54:301:54:32

I think, like a lot of viewers,

you also had concern

1:54:321:54:35

about the tone of the coverage

of the engagement, didn't you?

1:54:351:54:38

Yes, it seems as though

the Royal reporters

1:54:381:54:40

are fawning and sycophantic.

1:54:401:54:45

I don't know how

they get their jobs.

1:54:451:54:47

I thought Nicholas Witchell

was quite a good reporter

1:54:471:54:50

until he became the Royal reporter

and then seems to have gone

1:54:501:54:53

the way of Jennie Bond.

1:54:531:54:55

To be fair, Bob, do

you have an issue that

1:54:551:54:58

you personally don't care

for Royal coverage?

1:54:581:55:00

Not really, no.

1:55:001:55:04

To be frank.

1:55:041:55:06

It was perhaps worth a mention.

1:55:061:55:11

It would perhaps have been

at the bottom of page

1:55:111:55:18

eight in the Guardian

or something like that.

1:55:181:55:22

But, apart from that, no.

1:55:221:55:25

You know, Richard,

it is a happy occasion.

1:55:251:55:27

We all know, it's not time

for a tough grilling.

1:55:271:55:29

But, a lot of viewers do

detect what they see

1:55:291:55:32

as a fawning tone, don't they?

1:55:321:55:34

Let's face it.

1:55:341:55:34

We were reporting what ostensibly

was a happy story on Monday.

1:55:341:55:38

Most people saw it as good news

and most people saw it

1:55:381:55:41

as a positive story.

1:55:411:55:42

So, I think, you've got to reflect

that in the tone of your coverage

1:55:421:55:46

but we also reflected the issues

that the Royal Family have had

1:55:461:55:49

in the past with marriage.

1:55:491:55:50

We reflected the fact

that she is a divorcee.

1:55:501:55:53

So, I think there were issues

to cover but ostensibly Monday

1:55:531:55:56

was a happy story that,

clearly, when you look

1:55:561:55:58

at the figures our

audiences really enjoyed.

1:55:581:56:00

Richard, we also know a few viewers,

and we had one on webcam there,

1:56:001:56:04

felt uncomfortable about the amount

of discussion of Meghan Markle's

1:56:041:56:07

mixed race background.

1:56:071:56:07

Separate whether she raises it,

dropping it into an introductory

1:56:071:56:10

line, did the BBC perhaps misjudge

how to discuss that?

1:56:101:56:13

Make too much of it?

1:56:131:56:14

No, I don't think we

made too much of it.

1:56:141:56:17

It was one question

within Michelle's interview.

1:56:171:56:19

It is an element of the story,

an element of her story.

1:56:191:56:22

We're telling the audience

about who she is.

1:56:221:56:24

She also raised it herself,

her and Prince Harry issued

1:56:241:56:27

a statement about racial undertones

they talked about in comment pieces

1:56:271:56:30

and racism on social media.

1:56:301:56:31

She talked in the interview

about her pride at her ethnicity.

1:56:311:56:34

So, I think it was an element

of the story and it was important

1:56:341:56:38

we reflected that element

of the story.

1:56:381:56:40

Do you think you got anything wrong

in the coverage of this?

1:56:401:56:43

Quite clearly people enjoyed

the coverage and we've had a lot

1:56:431:56:46

of positive feedback but I know

there are people like Bob

1:56:461:56:49

who will always think,

actually, too much.

1:56:491:56:51

There are people in my own

family who think that.

1:56:511:56:54

It divides people.

1:56:541:56:55

Of course.

1:56:551:56:55

But I think this was a good news

story for a lot of our audience

1:56:551:56:59

and I think they enjoyed

the positive news.

1:56:591:57:01

Bob, a final word to you,

the wedding was in May,

1:57:011:57:05

how would you like to see BBC News

coverage handle this story over

1:57:051:57:08

the next six months?

1:57:081:57:09

Well, I think it would be

interesting for some people.

1:57:091:57:12

I don't know if OK or Hello magazine

is going to cover it

1:57:121:57:15

but I would have thought that

would be sufficient.

1:57:151:57:18

Those that are interested will buy

Hello and OK magazines,

1:57:181:57:21

the rest of us can get

on with our lives and

1:57:211:57:24

address important things.

1:57:241:57:24

Bob Davie, thank you so much,

and Richard Burgess.

1:57:241:57:27

Finally, the BBC Two comedy series

W1A, presented a satirical,

1:57:271:57:30

but not entirely unfamiliar view

of life at the BBC.

1:57:301:57:32

One episode in the last series

dealt with an issue we've

1:57:321:57:35

addressed on this programme.

1:57:351:57:42

So, it's been live for 24 hours

now and basically we're

1:57:421:57:45

looking at 93% accuracy.

1:57:451:57:46

Right.

1:57:461:57:46

Except in those one

or two areas, obviously.

1:57:461:57:48

A new version of the BBC

state-of-the-art Syncopatico

1:57:481:57:51

operating system has just gone live,

including a major upgrade

1:57:511:57:53

of the Syncopati-caption automatic

live subtitling software.

1:57:531:57:55

So, can we talk about the other 7%?

1:57:551:57:57

Yeah, sure.

1:57:571:58:01

Although Synchopati-caption 2.0

is already out subtitling

1:58:011:58:05

its predecessors in many areas,

the area where it's least accurate

1:58:051:58:08

is that of proper names.

1:58:081:58:10

Like Tweezer May, for instance.

1:58:101:58:12

To be fair, phonetically,

that's actually pretty close.

1:58:121:58:14

Politically and in every other way

except phonetically it's a disaster.

1:58:141:58:17

Yeah.

1:58:171:58:18

Worse still, Vladimir puking.

1:58:181:58:19

Yeah, that was really bad.

1:58:191:58:21

Subtitling blunders like that

couldn't happen in fact

1:58:211:58:24

as well as fiction, could they?

1:58:241:58:26

Well, on Monday, Jeremy Corbyn

was congratulating Prince Harry and

1:58:261:58:33

Meghan Markle on their engagement

in a speech saying, "I really do

1:58:331:58:37

admire the way that Harry

and his brother have drawn attention

1:58:371:58:39

to mental health conditions."

1:58:391:58:41

But this is what viewers

with subtitling switched

1:58:411:58:43

on saw on their screens.

1:58:431:58:44

It was a particularly unfortunate

error, considering the criticism

1:58:471:58:50

Mr Corbyn has faced for referring

to his friends in Hezbollah and some

1:58:501:58:54

viewers were unimpressed

with Will Pollock asking:

1:58:541:58:55

While Elisabeth Lefebvre

commented:

1:59:011:59:02

The BBC is said the voice

recognition technology used

1:59:051:59:08

when subtitling live news broadcasts

misrecognised the phrase,

1:59:081:59:11

"his brother", and the error

was corrected on screen.

1:59:111:59:14

But that wasn't the only

on-screen oddity on Monday.

1:59:141:59:17

Not a subtitling issue this time

but it will have come as a surprise

1:59:171:59:21

to many that the Royal engagement

led to crisis talks between

1:59:211:59:24

the leaders of the two main parties.

1:59:241:59:26

Thank you for all your

comments this week.

1:59:261:59:28

If you want to share your opinions

on BBC News and current affairs,

1:59:281:59:32

or even appear on the programme,

you can call us on 0370 0106676,

1:59:321:59:35

or e-mail [email protected]

1:59:351:59:36

You can find us on Twitter

at Newswatch BBC.

1:59:361:59:38

and do have a look at our website.

1:59:381:59:40

The address for that is

bbc.co.uk/newswatch.

1:59:401:59:42

That's all from us.

1:59:421:59:48

We'll be back to hear your

thoughts about BBC News

1:59:481:59:51

coverage again next week.

1:59:511:59:52

Goodbye.

1:59:521:59:53

Hello, this is Breakfast with

Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt.

2:00:232:00:25

The investigation into Russian

meddling in the US election closes

2:00:252:00:27

in on President Trump's inner

circle.

2:00:272:00:30

His former National Security Advisor

Michael Flynn admits lying

2:00:302:00:33

to the FBI as US media reports that

he's prepared to implicate

2:00:332:00:36

the president's son-in-law,

Jared Kushner.

2:00:362:00:45

Good morning, it's Saturday

the 2nd of December.

2:00:542:00:56

Also this morning:

2:00:562:01:06

We need the England boys to win.

Come on!

2:01:122:01:14

Come on!

2:01:142:01:15

A big day for England fans

in Brisbane as they get ready for

2:01:152:01:19

the Rugby League World Cup final.

2:01:192:01:20

Yes, England will face the hosts

Australia whom they haven't beaten

2:01:202:01:23

since 1995, which was also the same

year they were last in the final.

2:01:232:01:26

Cyber security experts warn

government departments

2:01:262:01:27

against using Russian anti-virus

software, saying it

2:01:272:01:29

could be exploited.

2:01:292:01:31

England's untold history -

the public is asked to nominate

2:01:312:01:34

places that deserve to be part

of a new national memorial scheme.

2:01:342:01:39

Darren has the weather for us.

Our weather could not be more

2:01:392:01:44

different this weekend instead of

the cold, northern winds and wintry

2:01:442:01:48

showers. This weekend we have got a

lot of cloud and rain and not a

2:01:482:01:53

great deal of sunshine, but at least

temperatures are rising.

2:01:532:02:00

Good morning.

2:02:002:02:01

First our main story.

2:02:012:02:03

US media reports say

Donald Trump's former

2:02:032:02:05

national security adviser,

Michael Flynn, who has

2:02:052:02:07

admitted lying to the FBI

about his contacts with Russia,

2:02:072:02:09

is prepared to give testimony that

implicates the President's

2:02:092:02:11

son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

2:02:112:02:13

Mr Flynn has agreed to co-operate

with an investigation

2:02:132:02:15

into Russian meddling in the US

Presidential election.

2:02:152:02:17

It's thought he'll tell

investigators he was taking

2:02:172:02:19

directions from senior members

of Donald Trump's campaign team.

2:02:192:02:22

The White House says Mr Flynn has

implicated no-one but himself

2:02:222:02:24

in the investigation.

2:02:242:02:27

Our Washington Correspondent

Laura Bicker has more.

2:02:272:02:32

Michael Flynn, a retired three star

general, left the court

2:02:322:02:35

in Washington to a familiar chant.

2:02:352:02:38

"Lock him up."

2:02:382:02:40

He'd once encouraged Donald Trump

supporters to use a similar version

2:02:402:02:43

against rival Hillary Clinton.

2:02:432:02:45

The 58-year-old played a key part

in Mr Trump's campaign

2:02:452:02:48

and often travelled with him.

2:02:482:02:55

If I did a tenth,

a tenth of what she did,

2:02:552:02:58

I would be in jail today.

2:02:582:02:59

He was rewarded with the post

of national security adviser,

2:02:592:03:02

but was forced to resign after just

23 days when his contacts

2:03:022:03:05

with Russia to discuss US

sanctions were disclosed.

2:03:052:03:07

On the 29th of December,

Michael Flynn spoke

2:03:072:03:10

to the Russian Ambassador

on the phone in the first

2:03:102:03:12

of a series of calls.

2:03:122:03:15

On the 15th of January,

Vice President Mike Pence said that

2:03:152:03:17

sanctions were not discussed

in those calls.

2:03:172:03:21

Only after the 9th of February,

when a newspaper revealed

2:03:212:03:24

General Flynn did discuss sanctions,

did pressure increase

2:03:242:03:26

and Michael Flynn lost his job.

2:03:262:03:30

As part of his guilty plea,

prosecutors said Mr Flynn is now

2:03:302:03:33

cooperating with the investigation.

2:03:332:03:36

US media claims he will testify that

senior members of the Trump team,

2:03:362:03:39

including Mr Trump's son-in-law

Jared Kushner, encouraged

2:03:392:03:41

Flynn to make contact

with Russian officials.

2:03:412:03:44

The White House is now

trying to distance himself

2:03:442:03:47

from Flynn's actions,

and the lies he told to the FBI,

2:03:472:03:50

but having reached a plea

bargain to co-operate,

2:03:502:03:53

what else has Mr Flynn told

the enquiry and what further

2:03:532:03:56

revelations are to come?

2:03:562:04:01

All government departments

have been advised by

2:04:012:04:03

The National Cyber Security Centre

not to use Russian anti-virus

2:04:032:04:05

software on systems containing

sensitive information.

2:04:052:04:09

Kaspersky Lab, which has 400 million

customers worldwide,

2:04:092:04:12

was banned from US government

networks earlier this year.

2:04:122:04:15

The company denies any

links to the Kremlin.

2:04:152:04:17

Our reporter, Jon

Donnison, has more.

2:04:172:04:23

Cyber security software like that

provided by Kaspersky Lab requires

2:04:232:04:25

extensive access to the files

on a computer phone or network

2:04:252:04:29

to look for viruses.

2:04:292:04:33

Our mission has always

been to protect...

2:04:332:04:36

Kaspersky is used by consumers

and businesses as well as some parts

2:04:362:04:38

of government to protect systems

from criminals and hackers.

2:04:382:04:43

But now a new warning about Russian

anti-virus software,

2:04:432:04:46

amid fears it could be

used for spying.

2:04:462:04:49

Secrets of global significance...

2:04:492:04:52

At Britain's National

Cyber Security Centre,

2:04:522:04:55

they say they've not seen actual

proof of such espionage,

2:04:552:04:58

but they've told government

departments not to use Kaspersky

2:04:582:05:02

for systems containing

sensitive data.

2:05:022:05:07

This is specifically about entities

that may be of interest

2:05:072:05:10

to the Russian government

and so for us that's

2:05:102:05:12

about national security

systems in government,

2:05:122:05:15

of which there are

a very small number.

2:05:152:05:17

Kaspersky Lab has already denied

allegations that it's been used

2:05:172:05:19

for espionage in America.

2:05:192:05:23

We don't do anything wrong.

2:05:232:05:25

They are just speculating

about some rumours, opinions

2:05:252:05:28

and there is zero of the hard data.

2:05:282:05:37

400 million people use Kaspersky

products around the world,

2:05:372:05:40

but officials say they're not

telling the general

2:05:402:05:42

public to stop using it.

2:05:422:05:45

Kaspersky Lab denies any wrongdoing,

but today's warning is another sign

2:05:452:05:48

about growing fears over the risk

posed by Russia.

2:05:482:05:57

The conduct of two

former police officers

2:05:572:05:59

who leaked allegations that

pornographic images had been found

2:05:592:06:02

on the computer of the now

First Secretary of State,

2:06:022:06:04

Damian Green, have been

criticised by the former

2:06:042:06:06

Attorney General, Dominic Grieve.

2:06:062:06:09

Mr Green has repeated his insistence

that he didn't view the material.

2:06:092:06:12

Our political correspondent

Tom Barton joins us now.

2:06:122:06:21

Bring us up with the latest

developments.

2:06:212:06:29

After yesterday's further

allegations by a second for the

2:06:292:06:33

Metropolitan police officers

surrounding claims that pornography

2:06:332:06:35

was found on Damian Green's computer

after his parliamentary office was

2:06:352:06:42

raided in 2008, Conservative MPs

have been rallying to his support,

2:06:422:06:47

including the Brexit secretary David

Davis, who yesterday told Downing

2:06:472:06:51

Street they should not sack him over

these allegations. Then last night

2:06:512:06:57

the former Attorney General, Dominic

Grieve, raised concerns about the

2:06:572:07:01

conduct of the two officers who have

been making these allegations.

They

2:07:012:07:07

choose to put material that an

ordinary citizen would be prohibited

2:07:072:07:11

from acquiring under data protection

rules into the public domain on

2:07:112:07:15

their own judgment. There is a way

of dealing with that. If you think

2:07:152:07:19

something is relevant, do it by

proper, official means. You do not

2:07:192:07:24

go freelancing as these officers

have done and it has the smack of a

2:07:242:07:28

police state about it.

Damian Green

is to reason's me's second closest

2:07:282:07:36

ally, the second most important

person sitting around the table.

2:07:362:07:40

This matters because it pits his

denial of these allegations against

2:07:402:07:45

the Word of two former police

officers. A senior government

2:07:452:07:51

official, Sue Gray, is looking into

these allegations as well as

2:07:512:07:55

separate allegations of the

inappropriate behaviour by Damian

2:07:552:07:59

Green towards a Conservative

activist, allegations which Damian

2:07:592:08:03

Green also denies, and her report

could well be on the desk of the

2:08:032:08:06

Prime Minister within days.

2:08:062:08:10

Pope Francis is spending his final

day in Bangladesh after using his

2:08:102:08:13

highly-anticipated Asia trip

to express support for

2:08:132:08:15

the Rohingya Muslims.

2:08:152:08:17

Yesterday, the Pope met a group

of refugees and referred to them

2:08:172:08:19

using the word "Rohingya"

for the first time.

2:08:192:08:25

He had been criticised for not using

the term on his earlier visit to

2:08:252:08:28

Myanmar.

2:08:282:08:35

White House officials have indicated

that President Trump is likely

2:08:352:08:37

to announce next week

that the United States

2:08:372:08:39

will recognise Jerusalem

as the capital of Israel.

2:08:392:08:41

The status of Jerusalem

is highly contentious,

2:08:412:08:43

with both Israelis and Palestinians

claiming all or part

2:08:432:08:45

of the city as their capital.

2:08:452:08:46

Critics have warned

that the decision by Donald Trump

2:08:462:08:48

could jeopardise peace negotiations.

2:08:482:08:50

It's feared there could be hundreds

of job losses at Toys R Us

2:08:502:08:54

after the retailer announced it

would close around

2:08:542:08:56

a quarter of its UK stores.

2:08:562:08:57

The move, which would see

the closure of 25 shops,

2:08:572:08:59

is part of a deal by the owners

to renegotiate debts

2:08:592:09:02

with its landlords.

2:09:022:09:03

It's thought Christmas trading

and gift vouchers will not be

2:09:032:09:05

affected by the move.

2:09:052:09:13

Those are the main stories this

morning.

2:09:132:09:19

We've learnt so much about special

educational needs here on Breakfast

2:09:192:09:22

this week and have discovered

a record number of parents

2:09:222:09:25

are fighting for the support

their child requires at tribunals.

2:09:252:09:27

We've found out there's been

a staggering increase in the number

2:09:272:09:30

of parents who have taken their kids

out of school because they felt

2:09:302:09:33

their needs aren't being met.

2:09:332:09:34

We've also learnt so many more

children will be affected by such

2:09:342:09:37

issues over the course of their life

than previously thought -

2:09:372:09:44

Today we are launching a week-long

series to look at what life is like

2:09:442:09:48

for our most vulnerable children.

Children with special needs are

2:09:482:09:52

being let down by the education

system.

I do not think most people

2:09:522:09:56

will understand unless you are a

parent of a child with special needs

2:09:562:10:01

how much of a battle it is to get

the appropriate support for your

2:10:012:10:04

child.

Cruel, dramatic, heart

wrenching. Diane describes the

2:10:042:10:09

process she has gone through, two

years fighting two Tribunal is to

2:10:092:10:13

get the right support for her

daughter.

It does not make sense

2:10:132:10:17

what we have been through.

Many

parents tell as they also have had

2:10:172:10:23

to pay for financial independent

advice, lawyers and experts, and

2:10:232:10:26

emotional cost which cannot be

quantified.

Life with disabilities

2:10:262:10:32

is a fight. I once said many years

ago to the social worker when she

2:10:322:10:35

was small if something happens to

me, put her in the grave with me

2:10:352:10:41

because I do not feel in the past 15

years we have made much of an

2:10:412:10:45

improvement as far as services are

concerned for these vulnerable kids.

2:10:452:10:52

Services are overstretched, been

reduced, rising referrals and

2:10:522:10:57

unacceptable long waiting times.

We

have not had any response from the

2:10:572:11:00

government but that is not through

lack of trying. Nobody will front up

2:11:002:11:05

about this.

I have a response from a

teaching assistant who is working in

2:11:052:11:10

outstanding school who says we do

not have the funding or the

2:11:102:11:13

facilities to allow them to

flourish.

My staffing is so low

2:11:132:11:17

because of the cuts I have had to

make over the last three years that

2:11:172:11:21

I now have to phone parents up and

say, sorry, I cannot have your son

2:11:212:11:25

or daughter in today.

# What have you done today to make

2:11:252:11:32

you feel proud...

Learning

difficulties and autism. A speech

2:11:322:11:39

impediment.

You are just phenomenal

kids and we absolutely love you even

2:11:392:11:49

though our family puts the funk into

dysfunctional, you guys rock.

And he

2:11:492:11:55

has been here it is a complete

turnaround for him. He has friends,

2:11:552:11:59

he can count, he is recognising the

signs and trying to read, things

2:11:592:12:03

they told us he would never be able

to do.

This is about helping

2:12:032:12:09

children fulfil their potential.

I

am proud of getting my first job.

2:12:092:12:16

The doctor told me I would never

talk. I am proud of that.

Sophie has

2:12:162:12:26

been in touch saying I think that

school is amazing, the staff do an

2:12:262:12:30

amazing job, it does not pay much,

people do the job for the love of

2:12:302:12:35

it.

Thanks everyone for cheerleading

as. Keep saying it for Manchester.

2:12:352:12:41

We have had an enormous amount of

interest in this this week.

And we

2:12:412:12:47

do read all the e-mails and tweets.

# What have you done today to make

2:12:472:13:00

you feel proud?

2:13:002:13:09

You have been with us throughout

this series.

I am quite emotional.

A

2:13:092:13:16

lot of the stories are a very

emotional. Joe had his moment, but

2:13:162:13:21

in amongst all of that and inspiring

stories there are a lot of

2:13:212:13:25

frustrations. For you as a

journalist there is the lack of

2:13:252:13:29

government representation.

We wanted

a minister here on the sofa with us

2:13:292:13:36

and to say come on, let's talk about

this. This is a work in progress, we

2:13:362:13:40

will not let it go, we will work on

that.

The government offered

2:13:402:13:45

something, a moment, one question.

But not enough time. We wanted to

2:13:452:13:53

have a big discussion about this,

this is serious stuff. We wanted a

2:13:532:13:58

significant amount of time to go

through this and we wanted not just

2:13:582:14:03

the sound bite. Work in progress,

let's take a moment. We always say

2:14:032:14:09

so many people have responded. This

has been like nothing else. No story

2:14:092:14:15

has touched people in the same way

that this one has. Many people have

2:14:152:14:18

got in touch. Can I share a couple

with you. Barry was intact and said

2:14:182:14:25

this. We lived a nightmare,

timescales ignored, expert evidence

2:14:252:14:30

ignored, their decisions based on

nothing other than their ill

2:14:302:14:33

informed thoughts and budget all

while our daughter had no education.

2:14:332:14:38

Catherine says I and many other

parents resonate with this, there is

2:14:382:14:42

so little provision for the future,

moreover the worry of real care and

2:14:422:14:47

understanding and love of our

children when they become adults and

2:14:472:14:49

we are not there was it keeps me

awake at night. Our greatest fear is

2:14:492:14:55

being able to secure a safe and

happy future for our precious girl

2:14:552:15:00

without us. We asked people out

there to send their positive

2:15:002:15:03

thoughts. We wanted them to send

them to the people who made a

2:15:032:15:08

difference in their lives because

there are so many people and we have

2:15:082:15:11

been cheering them on social media

all week. Can I take a moment to do

2:15:112:15:16

that? One goes to Conor sparrowhawk,

a young man who died in an

2:15:162:15:22

assessment treatment unit. Chatting

to his mother on this sofa made

2:15:222:15:27

breakfast do more than we have ever

done on social disabilities. So many

2:15:272:15:36

people said, the media never talks

about this. He made a significant

2:15:362:15:42

difference. Another one goes to Joe

who we talked about, who we saw in

2:15:422:15:49

that report. He is amazing. He said

I want to shout out to all my pals

2:15:492:15:54

in Tesco where he does work

experience. Also vary on the front

2:15:542:16:00

row in that choir singing his heart

out. He was such a quiet little boy

2:16:002:16:04

he hardly spoke, but he sang the

loudest. He smiled the widest and

2:16:042:16:10

looking at him yesterday in that

choir it maybe think about all those

2:16:102:16:16

parents fighting for something

better and it made me think about

2:16:162:16:19

the children sitting at home

separated from their friends and it

2:16:192:16:22

made me think we will carry on

shining a light. The boss agrees and

2:16:222:16:27

we will keep on at it and I will

shut up.

It has touched you greatly

2:16:272:16:32

and that is what the stories do to

us. Thank you.

2:16:322:16:39

Let's talk to Darren. It is warming

up a little bit. One day?

2:16:392:16:45

It is cold across the eastern side

of England and it will turn milder

2:16:482:16:58

this weekend. But we have got a lot

more cloud this weekend and it is

2:16:582:17:02

big enough to give as rain and

drizzle from time to time. It is a

2:17:022:17:08

dull picture, cloudy skies for many

of us, rain and drizzle in East

2:17:082:17:13

Anglia and the south-east. Dab in

the South West. Rain coming in

2:17:132:17:17

towards the north of Scotland. We

will hang onto cloudy skies. Grizzly

2:17:172:17:23

showers in Wales and the south-west

and perhaps in the Midlands. You see

2:17:232:17:28

temperatures struggling up the

eastern side of England. Five or six

2:17:282:17:32

this afternoon, still quite cold.

Sunshine in north-eastern parts of

2:17:322:17:38

England and the Pennines and a

glimmer of brightness in south-west

2:17:382:17:41

Scotland. The wet weather is over

the Highlands. This evening and

2:17:412:17:49

overnight that patchy, light rain

thinks further south and moves away

2:17:492:17:52

from Scotland into Northern Ireland

Wales, northern England, the

2:17:522:17:57

Midlands and East Anglia. It keeps

the temperatures up, but behind that

2:17:572:18:02

in Scotland it could turn rather

chilly, otherwise a mild night

2:18:022:18:06

ahead. The cold weather has gone

into the near continent and we have

2:18:062:18:13

got high pressure out towards the

West. But around the top of it there

2:18:132:18:18

is mild air. It will be chilly start

in eastern Scotland, sunshine for a

2:18:182:18:23

while in eastern Scotland. A better

chance of seeing sunshine in

2:18:232:18:28

England, improving in Wales and East

Anglia and maybe eventually in the

2:18:282:18:34

south. Temperatures will be nine or

ten. On the western side of the UK

2:18:342:18:38

it is cloudy and dial and a bit

damp. We start the new week with

2:18:382:18:44

cloudy skies and the best chance of

seeing sunshine in the eastern part

2:18:442:18:49

of the UK. Mild at nine or ten. In

mid week it could get wet and then

2:18:492:18:55

cold air returns towards the end.

2:18:552:18:59

From the birthplace of grime music

to the site where stainless steel

2:18:592:19:02

was invented, these are just some

of the locations that could be

2:19:022:19:05

celebrated as part of a new memorial

scheme from Historic England.

2:19:052:19:13

Do you know where stainless steel

was invented? Well, the answer is no

2:19:132:19:18

and I was going to make a guess

because I do not. That is why they

2:19:182:19:23

want to draw attention to this.

2:19:232:19:25

That is why they want

to draw attention to this.

2:19:252:19:27

The heritage group wants to find

places, people and events which have

2:19:272:19:30

played a part in shaping the country

but aren't widely

2:19:302:19:32

recognised at the moment.

2:19:322:19:33

Here to tell us more

is Celia Richardson

2:19:332:19:35

from Historic England.

2:19:352:19:36

Do you know where stainless steel

2:19:362:19:37

Do you know where stainless steel

was invented?

Sheffield I think.

Of

2:19:372:19:44

course. Is it because we have not

got enough plaques, what is the

2:19:442:19:50

point to this?

This is a scheme to

enable communities to mark out the

2:19:502:19:54

spots where history was made. We are

quite small country, very rich in

2:19:542:20:00

firsts, inventions and the founding

of things from a couple of millennia

2:20:002:20:06

right up to the present day we have

got popular culture. It is important

2:20:062:20:10

for a sense of identity and pride

and important to local economies and

2:20:102:20:15

tourism and there are a lot of

passionate groups around the country

2:20:152:20:18

who have told us this is what they

want to do.

Can you give us a sense

2:20:182:20:24

of what the threshold is? If

somebody says the man who

2:20:242:20:27

invented... Spark plugs. The

lollipop stick. What is the

2:20:272:20:35

threshold for what is important?

A

lot of our statues and plaques are

2:20:352:20:44

about one person and what we are

interested in is the sort of history

2:20:442:20:48

that has happened on a sport that

has involved groups of people. One

2:20:482:20:53

of the longest-running campaigns in

the country has been by the Peterloo

2:20:532:20:57

campaigners. They want a permanent

memorial to the Peterloo massacre.

2:20:572:21:02

It was a defining moment for the

struggle for democracy and 15 people

2:21:022:21:07

were killed and it has taken a long

time to get this memorial to come to

2:21:072:21:11

fruition. It is happening now and we

are delighted. We want to make it

2:21:112:21:16

easier for communities. The

threshold will be decided by a panel

2:21:162:21:20

and we want to help them. But it is

about things that local communities

2:21:202:21:25

find important. It might be the

birthplace of ska music, something

2:21:252:21:31

like the Peterloo massacre. We have

not decided exactly what the

2:21:312:21:34

threshold will be. We are still in

the research stage and we are

2:21:342:21:38

uncovering a lot of local passion

and people wanting to mark this out.

2:21:382:21:43

It is a storytelling job as well.

You want to stand on the spot where

2:21:432:21:47

history happened, but you cannot do

it unless somebody tells you.

You

2:21:472:21:58

mentioned it would help tourism.

Basically communities decide how to

2:21:582:22:00

define themselves and once you have

that narrative that is how you sell

2:22:002:22:03

yourself to be on the trail. We have

not even been to far-flung ends of

2:22:032:22:11

our own country, but yet when people

come here they say, you should go

2:22:112:22:15

there, but it is hard to cover. You

need to prove you are attractive and

2:22:152:22:21

worth visiting.

You need to think

why your place is special and your

2:22:212:22:24

local heritage. A lot of places do

this. A packet of their stories and

2:22:242:22:31

history well. But there are so many

places where we do not know what has

2:22:312:22:34

gone on. Local communities are the

people we are trying to help get

2:22:342:22:41

these stories out to help places and

their sense of identity.

When will

2:22:412:22:48

we see it?

We are starting next

year.

Any ideas, send them on a blue

2:22:482:22:55

plaque to be busy Breakfast. Or on

an e-mail or Twitter. Celia will be

2:22:552:23:01

coming back to us.

2:23:012:23:03

Celia will be coming back to us.

2:23:032:23:04

You're watching Breakfast.

2:23:042:23:06

Time now for a look

at the newspapers.

2:23:062:23:07

The writer and broadcaster,

Simon Fanshawe, is here to tell us

2:23:072:23:10

what's caught his eye.

2:23:102:23:15

He is clearing his throat.

I want to

know who invented the cardboard box.

2:23:152:23:23

Every child up to the age of five,

that is what matters.

The

2:23:232:23:28

information is probably out there

somewhere.

I hope so.

You said you

2:23:282:23:33

have got a cold. On the front page

of the Telegraph is as lemon and

2:23:332:23:38

honey.

It is either that or Pilates

and roast tofu.

You pick out what

2:23:382:23:49

you want.

There is one story, this

guy is called Doctor Oliver

2:23:492:23:55

Bevington. He is chairman of the

Royal College of paediatrics and

2:23:552:24:02

Child health Chinese committee and

he says there is no evidence that

2:24:022:24:06

cough medicines work. He says the

danger is you could unintentionally

2:24:062:24:10

overdose your children with

paracetamol.

There it is, hot honey

2:24:102:24:15

and lemon. The part of taking cough

medicine is the thought you think

2:24:152:24:21

you are doing something.

Maybe

Doctor Watson will tell me it was

2:24:212:24:30

the natural progress of the cough

going away, but I feel like it has

2:24:302:24:35

got better.

Where are you going

next?

I am not the only one who

2:24:352:24:42

wondered about this. I have been

wondering why has all this stuff

2:24:422:24:46

about Damian Green suddenly

resurfaced? I am not going to talk

2:24:462:24:52

about the allegations and the

so-called pornography, but why has

2:24:522:24:56

it suddenly come back after such a

long time. The Guardian and a number

2:24:562:25:00

of papers have done this and it is a

fascinating story. It is a grudge

2:25:002:25:04

and it is about 11 years old. In

2006 a civil servant, Christopher

2:25:042:25:11

Galley, approached David Davies

originally, Damian Green's boss, and

2:25:112:25:18

said I am a conservative, I want to

help the Conservatives. He got a job

2:25:182:25:23

in Jacqui Smith's office, the then

Home Secretary. He leaked document

2:25:232:25:27

which were then used by Damian Green

to get stories in Conservatives

2:25:272:25:32

supported newspapers. Move on and

there was a stink about this and the

2:25:322:25:38

leaks were investigated. The person

investigating the leaks was this

2:25:382:25:43

policeman, Bob quick, who is now

coming back about allegations about

2:25:432:25:47

Damian Green's computer and so on.

You remember that Damian Green's

2:25:472:25:52

office was invaded and there was a

big controversy about whether or not

2:25:522:25:57

a Parliamentary office should be

invaded by the police. What then

2:25:572:26:02

happened was there was a story that

was designed to blacken the name of

2:26:022:26:06

Bob Quick planted in the newspapers

about some business that his wife

2:26:062:26:11

was running, a wedding chauffeur

business, and he alleged, which he

2:26:112:26:18

subsequently withdrew, that it had

been planted by Damian Green in the

2:26:182:26:22

newspapers. He was appointed to

investigate the leaks, he exposed

2:26:222:26:27

Damian Green, he then thought he had

been blackened by a story in the

2:26:272:26:30

press and he has nurtured this

thing. So when these allegations

2:26:302:26:35

came up about Damian Green from

somebody called Kate Moss Beek who

2:26:352:26:39

alleges Damian Green was

inappropriate with her, he jumped

2:26:392:26:43

back on the bandwagon.

We cannot

speculate on someone's motivations

2:26:432:26:47

for saying what they have said, but

we cannot know someone's reasons

2:26:472:26:53

behind it.

No, we cannot, but I

guess my point is Bob Quick and

2:26:532:27:00

Damian Green have had a relationship

over various things for a long time.

2:27:002:27:04

According to the Guardian.

You

suddenly wonder where do these

2:27:042:27:10

stories come from? And then somebody

joins the dots for you and I find it

2:27:102:27:13

fascinating. So often these things

are just arguments.

So we talk about

2:27:132:27:23

pronouncing tomato and potato?

Speech science lecturer at the

2:27:232:27:28

University of York has done some

analysis on things like Alexa and

2:27:282:27:35

all these boys response mechanisms.

He has discovered they do not

2:27:352:27:39

respond to things like Yorkshire

accent and Cockney accent. What is

2:27:392:27:46

happening is that the speech

recognition things are conniving the

2:27:462:27:50

American pronunciation of tomato

rather than the English one. They

2:27:502:27:59

are programmed by Americans and so

they are dictated by American

2:27:592:28:04

pronunciation. The chairman of the

ITV wrote a story the other day

2:28:042:28:08

saying he had been in a friend's

house and there had been some rock

2:28:082:28:11

music on which he had not liked and

he turned to Alexa and said please

2:28:112:28:17

show pan. Alexa came back and said,

there is no shopping nearby.

You

2:28:172:28:25

will be back in an hour's time.

2:28:252:28:35

This is where we leave

viewers on BBC One, as it's

2:28:352:28:38

time for the build up

to the Rugby League World Cup Final,

2:28:382:28:44

which kicks off in half an hour.

2:28:442:28:46

We are on BBC Two and also

on the News Channel

2:28:462:28:48

until ten this morning.

2:28:482:28:50

Still to come on Breakfast;

2:28:502:28:51

It's the subject of a new film

starring Julia Roberts

2:28:512:28:53

and Owen Wilson and as a new survey

suggests half of children

2:28:532:28:56

with facial disfigurements

are bullied at school,

2:28:562:28:58

we'll be asking what more can be

done to support them.

2:28:582:29:01

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