07/12/2017 Breakfast


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07/12/2017

The latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC's Breakfast team.


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Hello.

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This is Breakfast,

with Charlie Stayt and Naga

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Munchetty.

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Missed targets on Accident

and Emergency waiting times.

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More than three million people

in the UK were not seen for more

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than four hours in the last year.

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The number of people waiting has

more than doubled since 2013.

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Doctors say they can't meet demand.

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Good morning.

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It's Thursday the

seventh of December.

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Also this morning.

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Pressure on the Prime Minister.

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Ireland and the EU call

for Theresa May to have more clarity

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on Brexit by the end of the week.

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Widespread condemnation

of President Trump's decision

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to recognise Jerusalem

as Israel's capital.

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The UN Security Council will hold

an emergency meeting.

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It took 10,000 people

and £3 billion to build.

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The HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircraft

Carrier will be commissioned today.

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Good morning. We are at Hull Marina.

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Is it worth being a City of Culture?

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I'll be chatting to businesses

all morning about how things have

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changed for them this year.

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Good morning.

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In sport, Liverpool net seven goals,

making England the first country

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to have five teams through to

the Champion's League knockout

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stages in the same season.

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And Carol has the weather.

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Good morning. Storm Caroline will

make its presence felt in the north

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of Scotland today. 90 miles per hour

gusts. Blizzards as well. A mild and

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a wet start to the day away from

that. It will be noticeably windy. I

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will have more details in 15

minutes. Thank you, Carol.

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Good morning.

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First, our main story:

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The number of patients experiencing

long waits in accident and emergency

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departments in the UK has more

than doubled in the last four years.

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Research by the BBC found that more

than three million people waited

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longer than the four-hour

target in the last year.

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Doctors say it shows

the NHS can no longer cope.

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The Department of Health said more

money had been made available to NHS

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England.

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Here's our health

correspondent, Dominic Hughes.

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Right across the UK,

Accident and Emergency departments

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have been working at full capacity.

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Now, BBC analysis shows how

an already busy system

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is struggling to cope.

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The waiting time target to treat

or deal with 95% of patients

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within four hours has been

missed across the country.

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In the past year, more than 3

million patients waited longer

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than four hours, an increase

of 120% on four years ago.

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But visits to A&E are up by only 7%,

to nearly 27 million.

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To ensure the target is met,

the NHS would need to build

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an additional 20 A&E departments.

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There is no more

capacity in the system.

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Our staff are working really hard,

our nurses, our doctors.

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And we have reached a point

where we unfortunately cannot

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meet that demand.

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Scotland has come closest

to hitting the target,

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while England has seen the biggest

increase in those facing

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a long wait.

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But performance is

even worse in Wales.

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And Northern Ireland manages to see

three quarters of patients

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within four hours.

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A busier NHS means

longer waiting times.

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And as we head into what could be

a very hard winter, there's little

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sign of respite for

staff or patients.

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Dominic Hughes, BBC News.

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And you can find out how your local

hospital service is performing

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by using the BBC NHS Tracker,

which you can find on the BBC

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News website.

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The Irish Prime Minister has said

Theresa May wants to put forward

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a new plan for the future

of the Irish border after Brexit.

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Negotiations with the EU stalled

earlier this week when a proposal

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on the issue was rejected

by Northern Ireland's Democratic

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Unionist Party.

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Our political correspondent,

Iain Watson, is in Westminster this

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morning.

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Ian, the pressure on the Prime

Minister is really growing now?

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Deadlines keep coming thick and

fast.

Definitely. People talk about

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hard and soft borders between

Northern Ireland and Ireland. This

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was supposed to be sorted out before

the crucial summit next week which

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will decide whether Theresa May can

get trade talks with the EU under

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way. The latest deadline, if you

like, is effectively tomorrow night.

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The chief negotiator of the EU says

unless a deal is struck, EU

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ambassadors will not have time to go

back to their leaders and prepare

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for the crucial summit next week.

Certainly, as we heard, the Irish

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Prime Minister seems to be upbeat.

He thinks he will get new word from

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Theresa May which will solve the

problem of the Northern Ireland

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border either today or tomorrow.

However, the problem is that the

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DUP, the party propping up Theresa

May at Westminster, seemed to be

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more downbeat. They were talking

about radical surgery, talking about

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what would have to be agreed on this

issue, more or less hinting there

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may not be a deal this week. If

there is no deal, it will be hugely

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difficult for Theresa May to hold

the party together because the thing

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that is currently keeping them

together is the prize of the crucial

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trade talks. If that is moving

further into the distance, political

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problems here at are about to grow.

For the moment, thank you, Iain.

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No British citizen who has fought

for the Islamic State group should

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never be allowed back

into the country,says the Defence

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Secretary.

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Gavin Williamson, who was promoted

to his post last month,

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told the Daily Mail that British

fighters should be "hunted down"

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and killed because "a dead terrorist

couldn't cause any harm to Britain."

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Widespread condemnation

of President Trump's decision

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to recognise Jerusalem

as Israel's capital.

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The UN Security Council will hold

an emergency meeting.

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Donald Trump said the decision was

long overdue and reflected the

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reality in the city. He says this

does not mean an end to the strong

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commitment to peace of the US in the

Middle East. Tom Bateman is in

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Jerusalem. We can talk to him. Good

morning. The reaction

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internationally has been quite

interesting to this.

Absolutely.

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Jerusalem itself last night was

relatively calm, although there were

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protests elsewhere Niger The West

Bank town of Hebron and also in

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Gaza. It continued into the

evenings. -- near the. Further

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afield, I think Donald Trump has

galvanised the condemnation of the

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opposition of Muslim countries and

the Arab world, starting with

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president Mahmoud Abbas. He said

Donald Trump's actions were

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reprehensible and disqualified the

US from its historic role as a

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broker of peace. That is in direct

contrast to what you just said about

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Donald Trump's second half of his

speech, commitment to the peace

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process remaining absolute. The list

of countries that are either

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criticised, condemned, expressing

concern about what Donald Trump as

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that continues to grow overnight.

Most notably, perhaps, a key

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strategic ally of the US in the

region, Saudi Arabia, who said that

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they condemned the Israeli

recognition of tourism as the

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capital of Israel. They expressed

deep regret over it. -- Jerusalem.

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Later today we expect more

protesting. There is concern among

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critics of Donald Trump that for

calm to prevail will be hard, and

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the opposite might happen.

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A fast-moving wildfire

in Southern California has jumped

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the US state's main costal highway

and reached the Pacific Ocean

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according to firefighters

tackling the blaze.

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The homes of more than

150,000 people have been

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evacuated in an area north

of Los Angeles and hundreds

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of buildings have been damaged.

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Strong winds are expected to further

hinder efforts to contain the fire

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which is still endangering

some 12,000 properties.

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The departing Vice Chancellor

of Bath Spa University received

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£808,000 last year

in pay and benefits.

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Professor Christina Slade wasn't

the highest paid Vice Chancellor

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in the UK.

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From next year, universities

in England will have to justify pay

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of more than £150,000.

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The Labour peer, Lord Adonis,

is calling for an independent

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inquiry into senior university pay.

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The Royal Navy's new aircraft

carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth will be

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commissioned into

service later today.

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The Queen will be guest of honour

at the ceremony which marks

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the carrier's official

handover to the Navy.

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The ship is the most expensive

in British naval history,

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costing around £3 billion to build.

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It won't be operational until 2021,

but its captain says today marks

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an important milestone.

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It is symbolic. It formally

recognises her as a warship legally.

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But for us it is more than that. It

says here we are. We have arrived.

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This says a lot about the country.

The flag has been flying in the

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service of the country for many

years. For us, it is a magnificent

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day, a very proud day, and, yeah, it

is a major day for us.

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The UK's next City of Culture

will be named later today as Hull's

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year-long celebration

in the spotlight nears an end.

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Coventry, Paisley, Stoke-on-Trent,

Sunderland, and Swansea

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are in the running

for the 2021 title.

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Our entertainment and arts

correspondent, Colin Paterson,

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has been taking a look

at the contenders.

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We have moved on. Coventry has

grown.

Coventry's UK City of

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Culture's bid draws on the history

of invention and reinvention, from

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bicycle to the jet engine to music.

The average age is 33, seven years

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younger than the national average,

so there is a big focus on youth.

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Paisley is best known for the

Paisley pattern, created in the 19th

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century by the town's weavers. It

now has some of the worst pockets of

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Scotland's depravation, and believes

that being the City of Culture would

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turbocharge regeneration. They

enlisted the help of a local boy as

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well.

It has always been my home. I

love my town and you want to see it

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grow.

Stoke-on-Trent is six towns in

one city.

Something special is

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happening.

Its bid aims to both

celebrate its title as the world's

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capital of ceramics, while also

changing perceptions of the place by

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highlighting that it is one of the

UK's fastest growing economies. Also

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in the running is Sunderland.

This

honour and title is because we

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believe in ourselves.

They say they

would use the national glass centre

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as a starting point from which to

deliver a celebration of art and

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culture to make the whole country

proud.

Swansea is culture.

And the

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final city in contention is that

Swansea, who argue they are the

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ideal choice as they are a creative

city rich with heritage and culture.

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And Reece Hands is backing their

bid. -- Rhy Fans. The result will be

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announced live on The One Show this

evening. Colin Paterson, BBC News.

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The art of Neapolitan pizza

making could be included

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on a cultural heritage list.

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A decision will be made by UNESCO

in the next few hours

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after a petition was signed by more

than two million people.

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In anticipation of the news,

the Italian Minister of Culture lit

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up the oven at the Neapolitan Museum

of Capodimonte, where the first ever

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Margherita pizza was baked in 1899.

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Do you know, I think it is never too

early in the day for pizza. If

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someone brought me a lovely, big,

thin, Chris Vui, juicy, oh, cheesy

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pizza...

Extra garlic!

Definitely!

No pineapple.

I am sorry, I love it.

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You will be chucked out unless the

sport news is exceptional.

It is

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unless you are a Liverpool fan.

No,

but I am interested.

Liverpool were

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the only team last night not booked

in the last 16 and they did it in

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style. They have done it before.

They are through to the knockout

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stages, making it five English

teams, record-breaking! No other

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team has ever had five teams in the

knockout stages of the Champions

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League.

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Liverpool scored seven goals at home

to make it a record five English

0:13:490:13:53

teams through to the knockout stages

of the Champions League

0:13:530:13:56

in the same season.

0:13:560:13:57

Sadio Mane scored twice

with Philippe Coutinho helping

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himself to a hat-trick.

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Jurgen Klopp's side are joined

in the last 16 by Tottenham who beat

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Apoel Nicosia and Manchester City,

who lost at Shakhtar Donetsk.

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Ben Stokes has been named

in England's squad for the one-day

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international series

in Australia next month.

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But Stokes, who is playing

in New Zealand, is unlikely

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to feature unless his

circumstances change.

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The all-rounder is waiting to hear

if police will take any action over

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an incident in Bristol in August.

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There's been another upset at the UK

Snooker Championship as three time

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winner, John Higgins,

was knocked out in a deciding frame

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by Mark King.

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13 of the top 16 seeeds are now out

of the tournament in York.

0:14:300:14:34

Serena Williams has entered next

year's Australian Open,

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just four months after giving

birth to her first child.

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She's the defending champion and won

in Melbourne in January

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for a seventh time, while also

in the early weeks of pregnancy.

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That is extraordinary, isn't it?

If

she won in January, that would be a

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lovely way to bookend the baby.

We

did know she was planning to play in

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January, it's been confirmed?

She

has formally entered but it's never

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100%. Certainly seems fit.

Good luck

to her.

Absolutely.

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The papers in a moment but first

carol with the weather. A storm

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almost your namesake, which is

wreaking a bit of havoc?

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It

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It will be through the day, Storm

Caroline will be showing her hand in

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the north of Scotland. The forecast

for everyone today is windy

0:15:240:15:27

generally with strongest winds where

we have the storm. Wet, rain

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clearing, and turning colder so for

many maximum temperatures likely at

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the moment. Look at the isobars,

across-the-board, quite tightly

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packed, so windy, but the big

squeeze is across the north of

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Scotland, still pretty tightly

packed in Northern Ireland and also

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the rest of Scotland. The Met Office

has warnings. An and the be prepared

0:15:480:15:55

warning for the far north, 80 mph

gusts, maybe 90, maybe even more

0:15:550:15:59

possible. -- amber. In Northern

Ireland, 70 mph gusts so bear that

0:15:590:16:06

in mind if you're travelling. A wet

start in Scotland and Northern

0:16:060:16:09

Ireland, showers falling as snow in

lower levels in Scotland. Cooler

0:16:090:16:14

behind the rain in northern England

where it has been wet overnight and

0:16:140:16:18

the rain in western England, Wales

and the south-east but look at the

0:16:180:16:22

temperatures, still on the mild

side, 11 and 12, but that will

0:16:220:16:26

change. Then the dregs of earlier

rain continuing to push from the

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south-east so a bit of a lull them

back into the heavier rain as it

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moves south. Behind that in northern

England it will brighten up but feel

0:16:340:16:38

colder. The wind arrows are on,

indicating it will be windy, Storm

0:16:380:16:43

Caroline moving from the west to the

east, snow falling at low levels so

0:16:430:16:48

blizzard conditions in the north of

Scotland and some atrocious

0:16:480:16:51

travelling conditions if you're

heading out. Further snow showers

0:16:510:16:55

coming in across Northern Ireland

and also northern England.

0:16:550:16:58

Meanwhile, the rain clears the

south-east and the temp starts to

0:16:580:17:02

fall but the sun will come out, but

even so we could see some showers

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through the day. Through the evening

and overnight, still windy, not as

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windy as Caroline pulls away, but

then we'll see a lot of showers, not

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unusual to see snow showers at this

time of year in Northern Scotland

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but we will see some in Northern

Ireland, parts of north-west

0:17:190:17:22

England, Wales and the north-west

Midlands and they will accumulate

0:17:220:17:25

because they will keep piling in.

Tomorrow morning at low levels some

0:17:250:17:30

could have between 2-5 centimetres

of lying snow and at higher ground

0:17:300:17:35

it could be ten centimetres. A cold

night, highs and a widespread frost.

0:17:350:17:40

Tomorrow we start with that scenario

and we continue with it. Snow

0:17:400:17:43

showers coming in with the wind

piling into Scotland, snow showers

0:17:430:17:48

in Northern Ireland, north-west

England, Wales, the Midlands, and

0:17:480:17:51

even flurries in London. In between,

sunshine, but not feeling warm,

0:17:510:17:56

despite the temperatures there, this

is how it will feel if you're

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exposed to the wind so feeling more

like -5 in Newcastle, -6 in

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Aberdeen, freezing towards London.

On Saturday things settle down a

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touch. Still blustery, not as windy

as today, and we will still see

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showers. Sunday's forecast has rain

and snow, we will get to that later,

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but still quite a bit of uncertainty

about the forecast for Sunday.

0:18:220:18:26

Because I been listening to you all

week I have swapped a game of golf

0:18:260:18:30

for a nice lunch and a bowl of soup

because it is too horrible to be out

0:18:300:18:35

there.

I like the sound of that! I

would swap golf for that any time of

0:18:350:18:40

the week!

I know you would but I

will convince you to play one-day!

0:18:400:18:45

What type of soup?

I don't think it

will be bland, not potato and leak.

0:18:480:18:53

Just checking, we like to know these

things.

I like good old-fashioned

0:18:530:18:58

tomato.

And pineapple on your pizza,

which we have outlawed already!

0:18:580:19:02

Let's take a look at today's papers.

0:19:020:19:04

The front page of the Daily Mail,

the interview with the new Defence

0:19:040:19:08

Secretary, Britons who have fought

for Islamic State shouldn't be

0:19:080:19:12

allowed home, Gavin Williamson, an

interview with the Daily Mail, the

0:19:120:19:17

estimated 270 UK jihadists in Syria

and Iraq will be hunted down and

0:19:170:19:20

killed.

The Guardian is looking at a couple

0:19:200:19:25

of stories we're covering this

morning, anger as Trump declares

0:19:250:19:29

Jerusalem Israel's capitol and we

have been speaking to Tom Bateman in

0:19:290:19:33

Israel. Looking at the international

reaction. And Theresa May given 48

0:19:330:19:40

hours to seal Brexit deal over

Ireland. The UK Chief Brexit

0:19:400:19:45

negotiator Michel Barnier has told

the UK they have 48 hours to secure

0:19:450:19:50

a deal or trade negotiations will

suffer on the 14th of 15th of

0:19:500:19:55

December. On the front page of the

Daily Telegraph, Theresa May will

0:19:550:20:01

fall without deal, a warning from

the EU, and the big picture is the

0:20:010:20:05

much talked about musical, Hamilton,

which has gone to previews in the

0:20:050:20:10

West.

Worth talking about the EU Brexit

0:20:100:20:13

issue, we will have Chris Grayling,

the memo of the Cabinet, we will get

0:20:130:20:18

an insight into what it's like

sitting around the Cabinet table

0:20:180:20:22

over the next 24 to 48 hours.

On the front page of the Sun, Simon

0:20:220:20:27

Cowell has upset his neighbours over

parking issues. We all understand

0:20:270:20:34

when people get upset in front of

his house. Car parking is a bit of

0:20:340:20:39

an issue. One of his neighbours had

a rant over it and was waving a golf

0:20:390:20:44

club at him. What have you got?

Liverpool's scoreline dominating a

0:20:440:20:49

lot of the back pages. Magnificent

seven there. The full English is

0:20:490:20:54

probably my favourite with five

English teams in the Champions

0:20:540:21:00

League knockout stages for the first

time.

0:21:000:21:03

Steve Smith, the Australian captain,

has revealed he took a sleeping pill

0:21:030:21:08

on the fourth evening of the match

because he was so nervous. Make of

0:21:080:21:12

that what you will, insert joke

here.

What time of day did he do

0:21:120:21:16

that?

Before he went to bed

presumably, not before the match on

0:21:160:21:21

the fifth day.

If he took a sleeping

pill and they won in the fashion

0:21:210:21:25

that they did, that really would be

worrying, wouldn't it?

That's why I

0:21:250:21:30

said insert joke here. And the Daily

Telegraph talking about how the RFU

0:21:300:21:34

world spend what it takes for Eddie

Jones to win the World Cup in Japan.

0:21:340:21:40

-- would spend.

What this one, reaction to Christmas

0:21:400:21:44

presents?

I think if I bought you a

Christmas present you wouldn't

0:21:440:21:48

like...

In the unlikely event.

I

have already bought your present. I

0:21:480:21:53

think you would be polite whether

you like it or not, but you would be

0:21:530:21:57

one of these people who would say

something tactful if you didn't like

0:21:570:22:02

it.

What phrase is that?

The phrase

is it's just what I've always

0:22:020:22:07

wanted, or this will go really

nicely with my... Insert word. This

0:22:070:22:12

is about how you know if someone

really likes your Christmas present

0:22:120:22:17

when they've given you something

really awful. We have to practise

0:22:170:22:23

those phrases. Are you good at

buying presents?

I am great at

0:22:230:22:27

buying presents but I'd tell people

not to buy me stuff because I'm

0:22:270:22:31

afraid of having to save things like

that.

You need to practise these

0:22:310:22:35

phrases! -- to say.

0:22:350:22:38

You're watching

Breakfast from BBC News.

0:22:380:22:39

The main stories this morning:

0:22:390:22:41

The number of patients having

to wait more than four hours in A&E

0:22:410:22:44

has more than doubled

in the last four years.

0:22:440:22:47

The Irish Prime Minister says

Theresa May wants to put forward

0:22:470:22:50

a new plan for the future

of the Irish border after Brexit.

0:22:500:22:53

The Royal Navy's new aircraft

carrier will be commissioned

0:22:530:22:55

into service by the Queen

0:22:550:22:57

at a ceremony in Portsmouth later

today.

0:22:570:23:00

The event marks the official

handover of HMS Queen Elizabeth

0:23:000:23:03

to the Royal Navy.

0:23:030:23:04

It's one of two new British aircraft

carriers and cost around

0:23:040:23:11

£3 billion to build.

0:23:110:23:12

Up to 40 aircraft will be able to be

0:23:120:23:17

transported on board,

including the F-35 B fighter jet,

0:23:170:23:20

which the ship has

been built around.

0:23:200:23:22

It's due to come into active service

by 2021 and will be joined

0:23:220:23:25

by sister ship HMS

Prince of Wales in 2023.

0:23:250:23:28

Our defence correspondent

Jonathan Beale has this report.

0:23:280:23:32

This is a big day for the Royal

Navy. A moment to forget about

0:23:320:23:37

recent cuts and fears of even more.

The crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth has

0:23:370:23:42

been rehearsing for the arrival of

the monarch here in the carrier's

0:23:420:23:46

giant aircraft hangar. Today the

Queen will be welcome on board to

0:23:460:23:50

officially commission a ship that

bears her name into service. It's

0:23:500:23:55

been a long wait. Work began on

this, the first of the Royal Navy's

0:23:550:24:02

two new aircraft carriers in 1998.

Slowly changing shape, she was built

0:24:020:24:06

with the help of 10,000 people right

across the UK. For the past few

0:24:060:24:12

months, HMS Queen Elizabeth and her

700 crew have been at sea testing

0:24:120:24:16

her systems. This is the largest and

most expensive warship ever built

0:24:160:24:20

for the Royal Navy, at a cost of

more than £3 billion. And today, now

0:24:200:24:26

at her new home at Portsmouth, she

officially becomes a Royal Navy

0:24:260:24:31

warship where they'll raise the

white sign for the very first time.

0:24:310:24:38

Hoisting the white sign is symbolic,

it formally and legally recognises

0:24:380:24:42

her as a warship but for us it's

much more, here we are, we've

0:24:420:24:46

arrived and everyone synonymous with

British warships says a lot about

0:24:460:24:51

the country, a lot of pride and it's

been flying for many hundreds of

0:24:510:24:55

years, the service to the country

and the sovereign at the time so for

0:24:550:25:00

us, a magnificent day.

Next year HMS

Queen Elizabeth will begin flight

0:25:000:25:05

trials from this massive deck, first

with helicopters and then jets, the

0:25:050:25:10

new F-35Bs which is cost £100

million each, which will take off

0:25:100:25:16

from that ski ramp. But she won't be

operational until 2021. Russia's

0:25:160:25:22

already dismissed her as a large

convenient target, but the Royal

0:25:220:25:26

Navy believes HMS Queen Elizabeth

and her sister ship HMS Prince of

0:25:260:25:31

Wales will be a potent show of

British military power for the next

0:25:310:25:35

50 years. Jonathan Beale, BBC News,

Portsmouth.

0:25:350:25:42

You're watching

Breakfast from BBC News.

0:25:420:25:45

Still to come this morning:

0:25:450:25:48

There'll be a new UK city of culture

0:25:480:25:50

crowned this evening,

but how much is it worth

0:25:500:25:53

to the local economy?

0:25:530:25:54

How much do cities benefit from it?

0:25:540:25:56

Steph is in the Hull,

which is the current title holder,

0:25:560:25:59

to find out.

0:25:590:25:59

It is very windy, how are you doing?

Good morning. Good morning,

0:25:590:26:04

everyone. It is very windy here this

morning. Carol was talking about it

0:26:040:26:09

in the weather and we're feeling the

full force of Storm Caroline. If we

0:26:090:26:14

lose you that's because our signal

has been blown off back because

0:26:140:26:18

we're working on a satellite. This

is Hull Marina and as you were

0:26:180:26:23

saying, it was this city which was

crowned the City of Culture last

0:26:230:26:27

year. We looking at the difference

it can make to an area. Around here

0:26:270:26:35

there's been a lot of development,

we've heard people talk about the

0:26:350:26:39

inward investment in the area and

the general boost in confidence

0:26:390:26:43

which can be so important but some

research has been done on this to

0:26:430:26:47

look at what difference it can make

to an area in terms of the money it

0:26:470:26:51

can create. There's an estimate that

around £60 million is boosted into

0:26:510:26:58

the economy because of it becoming

City of Culture, and there's lots of

0:26:580:27:03

ways you can look at this. For

example, if you look at the number

0:27:030:27:06

of new businesses that have been

created over the last few years,

0:27:060:27:10

there is around 89 of those, there's

more people using the trains in the

0:27:100:27:14

area, and hotels and things like

that as well. You can't exactly tell

0:27:140:27:19

what's come... INAUDIBLE... Using

the trains in the area. Certainly

0:27:190:27:24

here they think it's made a big

difference. Will be talking to

0:27:240:27:29

council leaders, business owners and

in the cafe we're in this morning we

0:27:290:27:33

will be having a look around,

because this is one of the

0:27:330:27:36

businesses that was pleased that

this area got the City of Culture

0:27:360:27:39

because it's made a difference for

them. Lots of May through the

0:27:390:27:42

morning if the

0:27:420:31:02

in around half an hour.

0:31:020:31:04

For now, though, it's back

0:31:040:31:05

to Charlie and Naga and BBC

Breakfast.

0:31:050:31:07

Bye bye.

0:31:070:31:07

Hello. Welcome back.

0:31:190:31:20

This is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt

and Naga Munchetty.

0:31:200:31:23

We'll bring you all the latest news

and sport in a moment.

0:31:230:31:26

But also on Breakfast this morning.

0:31:260:31:27

Amsterdam is the only city in Europe

to have brought down childhood

0:31:270:31:31

obesity rates in

the past five years.

0:31:310:31:32

But how have they done it?

0:31:320:31:34

We'll have some tips

from Dutch parents later.

0:31:340:31:36

Books about hobbies are now three

times more popular with children

0:31:360:31:39

than the classics.

0:31:390:31:39

We're finding out what's making it

onto children's Christmas lists,

0:31:390:31:42

and asking if if it really matters

what they're reading about.

0:31:420:31:51

#A beautiful sound, we're happy

tonight...

0:31:510:31:53

He's the Pointless host,

who's a man of many talents,

0:31:530:31:56

and now he's gifting us an album

of Christmas classics.

0:31:560:31:59

Alexander Armstrong

will be here later.

0:31:590:32:02

Good morning.

0:32:040:32:04

Here's a summary of this morning's

main stories from BBC News.

0:32:040:32:11

The number of patients experiencing

long waits in accident and emergency

0:32:110:32:14

departments in the UK has more

than doubled in the last four years.

0:32:140:32:18

Research by the BBC found that more

than three million people waited

0:32:180:32:21

longer than the four-hour

target in the last year.

0:32:210:32:24

Doctors say it shows

the NHS can no longer cope.

0:32:240:32:26

The Department of Health said more

money had been made available to NHS

0:32:260:32:30

England.

0:32:300:32:33

There is no more capacity in the

system. Staff are working really

0:32:330:32:38

hard, the nurses and doctors, and we

have reached a point where

0:32:380:32:44

unfortunately we cannot meet that

demand.

0:32:440:32:53

And you can find out how your local

hospital service is performing

0:32:530:32:56

by using the BBC NHS Tracker

which you can find on the BBC News

0:32:560:33:00

website.

0:33:000:33:03

The Irish Prime Minister has said

Theresa May wants to put forward

0:33:030:33:06

a new plan for the post-Brexit

future of the Irish

0:33:060:33:09

border by Friday.

0:33:090:33:11

Negotiations with the EU

stalled earlier this week

0:33:110:33:13

when a proposal on the issue

was rejected by Northern Ireland's

0:33:130:33:16

Democratic Unionist Party.

0:33:160:33:17

Downing Street said work was ongoing

with all parties but it wouldn't

0:33:170:33:20

provide a running commentary.

0:33:200:33:26

No British citizen who has fought

for the Islamic State group should

0:33:260:33:29

never be allowed back

into the country,says the Defence

0:33:290:33:32

Secretary.

0:33:320:33:32

Gavin Williamson, who was promoted

to his post last month,

0:33:320:33:35

told the Daily Mail that British

fighters should be "hunted down"

0:33:350:33:38

and killed because "a dead terrorist

couldn't cause any harm to Britain."

0:33:380:33:42

The UN Security Council is expected

to hold an emergency meeting

0:33:420:33:44

after President Trump made

an historic decision to recognise

0:33:440:33:47

the disputed city of Jerusalem

as Israel's capital,

0:33:470:33:49

overturning decades of US policy.

0:33:490:33:50

Mr Trump said the decision was long

overdue and reflected

0:33:500:33:53

the reality of Israel's

presence in the city.

0:33:530:33:55

He said this doesn't mean an end

to the United States' "strong

0:33:550:33:59

commitment" to peace

in the Middle East.

0:33:590:34:01

The fate of Jerusalem is one

of the thorniest issues

0:34:010:34:03

between Israel and the Palestinians.

0:34:030:34:11

A fast-moving wildfire

in Southern California has jumped

0:34:110:34:14

the US state's main costal highway

and reached the Pacific Ocean

0:34:140:34:17

according to firefighters

tackling the blaze.

0:34:170:34:18

The homes of more than

150,000 people have been

0:34:180:34:21

evacuated in an area north

of Los Angeles and hundreds

0:34:210:34:23

of buildings have been damaged.

0:34:230:34:25

Strong winds are expected to further

hinder efforts to contain the fire

0:34:250:34:28

which is still endangering

some 12,000 properties.

0:34:280:34:30

The departing Vice Chancellor

of Bath Spa University received

0:34:300:34:32

£808,000 last year

in pay and benefits.

0:34:320:34:34

Professor Christina Slade wasn't

the highest paid Vice Chancellor

0:34:340:34:37

in the UK.

0:34:370:34:38

From next year, universities

in England will have to justify pay

0:34:380:34:41

of more than £150,000.

0:34:410:34:42

The Labour peer, Lord Adonis,

is calling for an independent

0:34:420:34:44

inquiry into senior university pay.

0:34:440:34:58

A feathered dinosaur resembling a

mutant swine... Well, we all know

0:34:580:35:04

what that looks like, don't we --

swan.

There we go. The description

0:35:040:35:10

is pretty accurate. A graceful neck,

claws, a reptilian tail, and a beak

0:35:100:35:25

lined with teeth. This is

fascinating. It is thought to have

0:35:250:35:28

lived 75 million years ago and was a

theropod like to run as. --T Rex.

0:35:280:35:41

What was its name?

Theropod. No,

that was the type of dinosaur.

0:35:410:35:59

Apparently, you cannot pronounce the

name, so that is why we weren't

0:35:590:36:03

given it.

Was it a meat eater?

Well,

it has sharp teeth.

This is one of

0:36:030:36:18

those conversations which is not

really working. We do not know

0:36:180:36:22

enough.

Here's the name.

0:36:220:36:48

Liverpool scored seven goals at home

to make it a record five English

0:36:480:36:51

teams through to the knockout stages

of the Champions League

0:36:510:36:54

in the same season.

0:36:540:37:03

Sadio Mane scored twice

with Philippe Coutinho helping

0:37:030:37:05

himself to a hat-trick.

0:37:050:37:06

Jurgen Klopp's side are joined

in the last 16 by Tottenham who beat

0:37:060:37:10

Apoel Nicosia and Manchester City,

who lost at Shakhtar Donetsk.

0:37:100:37:32

This year is special. Not often can

you go against Bayern Munich and

0:37:320:37:38

Real Madrid in the top 16. So, that

is quite interesting.

0:37:380:37:45

Spurs finished the group stages

on a high with a 3-0 win at Wembley

0:37:450:37:48

over Apoel Nicosia.

0:37:480:37:49

Fernando Llorente scored his first

for the club in a much changed side.

0:37:490:37:53

Son heung-Min scored a well worked

second before half-time.

0:37:530:37:55

Tottenham were already sure

of finishing above Real Madrid

0:37:550:37:58

in the group.

0:37:580:38:01

Manchester City lost for the first

time this season at Shakhtar

0:38:010:38:04

Donetsk.

0:38:040:38:05

Bernard scored a terrific first

for the home side in freezing

0:38:050:38:07

temperatures in Ukraine.

0:38:070:38:08

Ismailly added a second

for Shakhtar before half-time.

0:38:080:38:11

And there was no way back

for a changed City side

0:38:110:38:14

despite Sergio Aguero's

late penalty.

0:38:140:38:21

Ben Stokes has been named

in England's squad for the one day

0:38:210:38:24

internationals in

Australia next month.

0:38:240:38:26

Stokes is currently in New Zealand

while he waits to find out

0:38:260:38:29

if he will be charged for

an altercation in Bristol in August.

0:38:290:38:32

The BBC understands Stokes is highly

unlikely to be involved

0:38:320:38:35

in the series unless his

circumstances change.

0:38:350:38:37

Meanwhile, England's Ashes hopes

with or without Stokes are hanging

0:38:370:38:40

by a thread after defeat

in the second test yesterday.

0:38:400:38:42

Test match special's

Geoffrey Boycott says England's

0:38:420:38:44

batting isn't good enough.

0:38:440:38:51

We do not make enough runs. We made

302, 190, 150 in two innings, 460!

0:38:510:39:02

You need to make 460 in one innings.

Then you give the bowlers something

0:39:020:39:13

to bowl at! We do not make enough

runs.

0:39:130:39:16

Russia's President, Vladimir Putin,

says he won't stop Russian athletes

0:39:160:39:19

competing independently

at February's winter Olympics

0:39:190:39:20

in South Korea.

0:39:200:39:21

The IOC banned Russia from the games

this week but athletes are proven

0:39:210:39:25

to be clean can compete as neutrals.

0:39:250:39:26

Former British athlete,

Kelly Sotherton, is set to be

0:39:260:39:29

awarded a bronze medal from the 2008

Summer Olympics after Russian rivals

0:39:290:39:32

were banned for doping.

0:39:320:39:33

She says the IOC's decision

doesn't go far enough.

0:39:330:39:36

I personally think it should be a

blanket ban. No Russians. For the

0:39:360:39:43

sake of the many clean athletes at

the Olympics, you sacrifice a few to

0:39:430:39:50

save the many. Even if some are

potentially clean, they are still

0:39:500:39:58

Russian.

0:39:580:39:59

The three time champion,

John Higgins, is out of the UK

0:39:590:40:02

Championship at the quarter-final

stage, after being beaten by world

0:40:020:40:04

number 21, Mark King.

0:40:040:40:05

King won four of the last

five frames in York

0:40:050:40:08

to squeeze through 6-5.

0:40:080:40:09

While Higgins is the 13th player

among the top-16 seeds to go out.

0:40:090:40:16

Britain's number one, Johanna Konta,

has a new coach and it's

0:40:160:40:19

the American, Michael Joyce.

0:40:190:40:20

He spent six years as part

of Maria Sharapova's team,

0:40:200:40:23

and also worked with

Victoria Azarenka earlier this year.

0:40:230:40:25

Joyce will join the Wimbledon

semi-finalist from New Year's Eve

0:40:250:40:28

at the Brisbane Open.

0:40:280:40:39

Serena Williams has entered next

year's Australian Open,

0:40:390:40:42

just four months after giving

birth to her first child.

0:40:420:40:44

She's the defending champion and won

in Melbourne in January

0:40:440:40:47

for a seventh time, while also

in the early weeks of pregnancy.

0:40:470:40:52

Can she make more history by

retaining the title?

It would be

0:40:520:40:56

extraordinary!

Some have done it!

Many women do it!

Thank you. We will

0:40:560:41:06

see you later roll in. -- later on.

0:41:060:41:14

Jerusalem has long been synonymous

with the Palestinian-Israeli

0:41:140:41:16

conflict as well as being

of important religious significance

0:41:160:41:18

to the Muslim, Jewish

and Christian faiths.

0:41:180:41:20

It's now the focus of

the international community

0:41:200:41:22

after the United States became

the first country to recognise

0:41:220:41:25

Jerusalem as Israel's capital,

decision dubbed a "Kiss of Death"

0:41:250:41:28

for the Middle East peace process.

0:41:280:41:29

Joining us now to discuss

the issue is Lauren Banko,

0:41:290:41:32

a specialist on the region

from the University of Manchester.

0:41:320:41:35

Good morning.

Good morning.

Thank

you for joining us. A kiss of death.

0:41:350:41:40

What do you make of that phrase

regarding what Donald Trump has

0:41:400:41:45

done?

It is inflammatory language.

It depends on how things play out on

0:41:450:41:50

the ground whether or not what

Donald Trump is saying and what the

0:41:500:41:54

rest of the Middle East is saying

whether it will really inflamed the

0:41:540:41:57

region.

-- inflame. Who will object?

What will be the consequences?

First

0:41:570:42:05

and foremost, it is quite a radical

break with the past 50 years and the

0:42:050:42:13

status quo and with the

international community's

0:42:130:42:15

recognition of East Jerusalem and

the holy city as occupied. The

0:42:150:42:20

Israeli perspective since 1967 is

Jerusalem has been unified and it is

0:42:200:42:27

the undivided capital of the State

of Israel. The United Nations and

0:42:270:42:31

even the United States and the rest

of the international committee have

0:42:310:42:35

long recognised it as annexed and

illegitimately annexed. The new

0:42:350:42:41

recognition of Jerusalem by the US,

not only to remove the embassy from

0:42:410:42:46

Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, but to

endorse...

Which has not been done

0:42:460:42:50

yet?

And will probably take some

time. But the process of doing so

0:42:500:42:55

inherent in that, the recognition of

Jerusalem as the capital of Israel,

0:42:550:42:59

certainly will spell trouble for

the... Any attempt in the future of

0:42:590:43:07

the peace process based on the

2-state solution.

Pursuing that

0:43:070:43:11

thought, because many commentators

are saying that although Donald

0:43:110:43:14

Trump used the phrase 2-state

solution, officially, they still

0:43:140:43:19

support that, many people are saying

that from the point of view of the

0:43:190:43:23

Palestinians, the notion of that

solution with Jerusalem removed from

0:43:230:43:26

any discussions can never happen.

Right. Yeah, I think to not

0:43:260:43:33

recognise Jerusalem as a future

Palestinian capital would mean that

0:43:330:43:36

the Palestinians will likely refuse

to go to the negotiating table

0:43:360:43:42

because this has been such a

sticking point since the Oslo

0:43:420:43:45

Accords and certainly up until the

early 2000 as well. Umm, the

0:43:450:43:53

recognition as a Palestinian

capital, there is no recognition.

0:43:530:43:57

And to recognise it as the undivided

capital of Israel and under full

0:43:570:44:02

Israeli sovereignty certainly is

problematic for the Palestinians

0:44:020:44:08

living in East Jerusalem but also

the 200,000 Israeli settlers in the

0:44:080:44:12

east of the city.

Talk us through

the diplomacy. Many supporting

0:44:120:44:19

Donald Trump say this can only be

resolved by the two nations, if you

0:44:190:44:23

like, involved, not by outside

forces, ironically given what Donald

0:44:230:44:27

Trump has done. If that is the case,

what discussion can there be if

0:44:270:44:33

Israel are now saying this is a done

deal, which is Jerusalem is ours?

0:44:330:44:40

Certainly, the United States'

recognition of Jerusalem under

0:44:400:44:43

Israeli sovereignty, I mean, it is a

major endorsement. I don't think the

0:44:430:44:47

peace process will be restarted

without the US there as the sort of

0:44:470:44:54

middle man, but we will see, there

will have to be a radically new

0:44:540:44:59

platform to think about a solution

to the conflict if the Israelis and

0:44:590:45:03

the US stand firm in their

recognition of Jerusalem as the

0:45:030:45:07

capital.

0:45:070:45:11

What about the countries in the

Middle East? How do they react and

0:45:110:45:14

what does it do to those relations?

I think it will be a tricky issue,

0:45:140:45:19

especially because in recent years

there has been an almost warming of

0:45:190:45:23

relations between Israel and some of

the other Middle Eastern countries,

0:45:230:45:27

like Turkey and even Saudi Arabia. I

think probably the only thing that

0:45:270:45:32

can really possibly change the

relations between Israel and the

0:45:320:45:36

wider Middle East are the extent to

which the populations in the wider

0:45:360:45:40

region put pressure on governments

to actually perhaps withdraw,

0:45:400:45:46

measures of support, withdrawal

diplomacy from Israel.

That all

0:45:460:45:50

seems very long-term.

Yeah. In the

short term... The big statements of

0:45:500:45:57

opposition from the wider Middle

East and the Palestinian side

0:45:570:45:59

against what Donald Trump has done

has been there. In recent days, the

0:45:590:46:04

last couple of days, there's been

calls for a general strike on the

0:46:040:46:10

Palestinian side, even going further

than a general strike, the beginning

0:46:100:46:14

of a third uprising. I certainly

think if that does occur the

0:46:140:46:18

population of the wider Middle East

will be in support of the

0:46:180:46:21

Palestinians, which will put the

leadership in quite a precarious

0:46:210:46:24

position as to who to them support,

the Palestinians, or to continue

0:46:240:46:30

negotiations with the Israelis.

We

will keep a close eye on that.

0:46:300:46:34

Thanks for talking to us.

0:46:340:46:36

Here's Carol with a look

at this morning's weather.

0:46:360:46:39

We have seen some windy conditions,

we saw Stephanie and Hull earlier,

0:46:390:46:44

it's going to get windy, isn't it?

-- Steph in Hull.

0:46:440:46:49

Storm Caroline showing her hand in

the Outer Hebrides with 70 mph

0:46:510:46:55

gusts, that will strengthen but for

everyone today, very windy, rain

0:46:550:46:59

clearing and then turning much

colder behind the rain. Already cold

0:46:590:47:03

in Scotland and Northern Ireland as

the rain has cleared. Storm Caroline

0:47:030:47:06

coming in from the west will be

drifting east through the day. You

0:47:060:47:10

can see the isobars via. Windy

wherever you are today, but look at

0:47:100:47:16

the squeeze in the north and west of

Scotland. -- isobars here. Storm

0:47:160:47:21

Caroline moving from west to east.

The wind is still strong in western

0:47:210:47:26

Scotland and Northern Ireland. The

Met Office has an ambo a weather

0:47:260:47:29

warning out for the north of

Scotland, 80 mph plus gusts -- and

0:47:290:47:34

ambo weather warnings. We could get

maybe 90 mph as it crosses the

0:47:340:47:40

Northern Isles. 70 mph in western

Scotland and Northern Ireland.

0:47:400:47:45

Showers in Scotland and Northern

Ireland, wintry, coming down to

0:47:450:47:49

lower levels. Quieter in northern

England but we've had heavy rain

0:47:490:47:52

pushing south. Watch out for service

water and spray this morning. Lots

0:47:520:47:57

of rain moving across the Midlands

to the south. -- surface water.

0:47:570:48:02

Behind it a bit of a gap but the one

thing you will notice is the

0:48:020:48:06

temperatures, 11 and 12, those

temperatures are at their height

0:48:060:48:10

now, they are going down during the

day as they will do in the north of

0:48:100:48:14

England. Through the day this rain

will rattle south with the wind is

0:48:140:48:18

attached. Snow progressively goes

down to lower levels in the north of

0:48:180:48:22

Scotland. Ashwin is attached.

Blizzard conditions, some atrocious

0:48:220:48:28

conditions -- winds attached. It

will feel better. As well as that,

0:48:280:48:33

as temperatures struck and the

showers continue, the showers will

0:48:330:48:35

be wintry across Northern Ireland --

temperatures drop. For the south we

0:48:350:48:40

should see a return to dry

conditions but note how the

0:48:400:48:43

temperatures have gone down, 11 and

12 this morning, by mid-afternoon,

0:48:430:48:48

close to seven or eight but only

three or four in the north, feeling

0:48:480:48:53

much colder than temperatures are

suggesting in the wind. As we go

0:48:530:48:57

through the evening and overnight,

Storm Caroline goes to Scandinavia

0:48:570:49:00

and we see most snow showers coming

in across the north of Scotland.

0:49:000:49:04

Still a windy night. Further snow

showers coming in across Northern

0:49:040:49:08

Ireland, northern England, Wales,

heading to the Midlands. We will

0:49:080:49:14

keep on piling in. By the end of the

night we will see the snow

0:49:140:49:19

accumulate. At lower levels we could

have between 2-5 centimetres, on

0:49:190:49:23

higher ground, we could have up to

ten centimetres. As well as that,

0:49:230:49:27

the ground is wet and the

temperatures are low, there is

0:49:270:49:30

likely to be ice and there will be a

widespread frost, something to

0:49:300:49:34

consider if you're travelling early.

For the rest of tomorrow that

0:49:340:49:38

scenario continues. We have these

strong north-westerly winds coming

0:49:380:49:42

in, bringing more snow across

Scotland and also Northern Ireland,

0:49:420:49:46

again northern England, Wales and

the Midlands and some of them will

0:49:460:49:50

blow to the London area as well.

Temperatures regardless of what it

0:49:500:49:53

says on your thermometer, when you

add on the strength of the wind,

0:49:530:49:57

will feel colder against your skin.

-6 in Aberdeen, -5 in Newcastle,

0:49:570:50:04

freezing as we push down towards

Plymouth. Then into the weekend, a

0:50:040:50:09

ridge of high pressure building in

on Saturday so things settle down a

0:50:090:50:13

bit more. A lot of dry weather

around. Not as windy, but blustery,

0:50:130:50:18

and still a few showers knocking

around, some of which will be wintry

0:50:180:50:21

but many will stay dry and the

temperatures, 2-5, maybe eight

0:50:210:50:26

towards the Channel Islands. Sunday

is giving us such a headache. At the

0:50:260:50:31

moment it looks like it will start

on a cold and frosty and dry note

0:50:310:50:35

but we do have a weather system

coming in from the west that will

0:50:350:50:38

bring in rain and on its leading

edge it will also bring in some

0:50:380:50:42

snow. The snow could be significant.

Where we think at the moment it will

0:50:420:50:47

fall is from the Midlands

Northwoods, as you can see in the

0:50:470:50:50

charts. That could change so keep in

touch with the forecast but look at

0:50:500:50:54

the mild air following in, so all to

play for, Charlie and Naga.

Thanks

0:50:540:50:59

very much, Carol.

0:50:590:51:02

From the Snowman to Scrooge,

some of the most popular Christmas

0:51:020:51:05

characters originated

in a good old fashioned book.

0:51:050:51:08

But are these classics

still on children's Christmas lists?

0:51:080:51:10

Research suggests books on hobbies

are three times more

0:51:100:51:13

popular, but does it really matter

what young people are reading?

0:51:130:51:16

Breakfast's Tim Muffett

has been finding out.

0:51:160:51:22

Twas the night before Christmas

0:51:220:51:23

Twas the night before Christmas when

all through the house not a creature

0:51:230:51:26

was stirring, not even a mouse.

The

stockings were hung... Gadgets and

0:51:260:51:35

books. Not always a great mix. At

the Discover Children Story Centre

0:51:350:51:43

in east London, we're looking at the

impact of devices and gaming on

0:51:430:51:47

reading and story telling.

When you

play gadgets it's like a waste of

0:51:470:51:52

time, you can do something else.

I

always liked reading more because

0:51:520:51:56

you can just sit down and relax and

read a book, and it's quite nice to

0:51:560:52:00

just sit down and read a book.

Parents tend to put kids in front of

0:52:000:52:06

their devices very young.

My sun

loves the mist Men books on the

0:52:060:52:12

tablet, is that a bad thing? I can

see the sleigh.

Today's storyteller

0:52:120:52:17

is Lee is patient, author of the

hugely popular Tom Gates Jordans

0:52:170:52:21

books. She's reading a Christmas

classic. It was the night before

0:52:210:52:27

Christmas was first published in

1823.

0:52:270:52:30

There are some things that just

don't and you can't replace having a

0:52:300:52:34

physical book. It's the rhyming as

well. And laying this finger the

0:52:340:52:40

side of this nose and giving a nod.

Up the chimney he rose. Book Trust

0:52:400:52:46

is a charity that once kids to read.

Gadgets for many Armore appealing

0:52:460:52:52

indeed. In its survey they said a

quarter of all parents say the same,

0:52:520:52:57

they would give their children a

book rather than a game.

Parents

0:52:570:53:05

give their kids a gadget because

that's what they kid once, they

0:53:050:53:08

don't make the effort to give their

child a good book.

The charity found

0:53:080:53:12

a fifth of parents said books bought

as Christmas presents wouldn't be

0:53:120:53:18

read but even authors can see why.

When I was younger if the digital

0:53:180:53:24

devices were around I would be using

them. My dad moaned about me

0:53:240:53:28

watching TV all the time.

Last

Christmas children's printed book

0:53:280:53:35

exceeded £100 million.

The biggest seller was the Midnight

0:53:350:53:39

Gang by David Walliams but four of

the top 20 were books about Pokemon

0:53:390:53:44

or Minecraft. Does it matter if a

child wants to read a book about

0:53:440:53:49

gaming?

No, the most important thing

is we encourage children to get

0:53:490:53:53

reading and to like reading.

For these children the message has

0:53:530:53:56

already got through.

If you've got a

gadget you will be too tempted to,

0:53:560:54:01

like, play a game.

It is peace and

quiet and not bright and shining at

0:54:010:54:08

you.

This Christmas big sales are

expected for Philip Pullman and

0:54:080:54:16

David Walliams but some Christmas

stories remain timeless.

Merry

0:54:160:54:20

Christmas to all and to all a good

night.

Tim Muffet, BBC News.

0:54:200:54:26

A therapeutic way to finish a book.

Brought back some memories. We were

0:54:260:54:31

told to look at the books we enjoyed

reading when we were young, what

0:54:310:54:34

about you?

You brought in some of

the original is.

This took me back,

0:54:340:54:40

Enid Blyton, big favourite in the

office. Carol is a big fan of Enid

0:54:400:54:45

Blyton and Roald Dahl, how can you

not read him? The jungle book, Roger

0:54:450:54:50

Kipling.

On Enid Blyton... Tracy has

got in touch, saying, I love the

0:54:500:55:00

Famous Five, I used to get lost in

them, in my mind I was on the

0:55:000:55:04

adventure with them, I've lost count

on Hamon the times I read them, 40

0:55:040:55:08

years on I'm still an avid reader.

-- lost count on how many times.

You

0:55:080:55:15

associated yourself with the

characters, I was George in Famous

0:55:150:55:21

Five. Elizabeth said the secret

garden, Tom's midnight garden,

0:55:210:55:26

Heidi, Black beauty, Mary Poppins,

secret seven.

0:55:260:55:32

You're watching

Breakfast from BBC News.

0:55:320:55:34

Still to come this morning:

0:55:340:55:35

The journalist Jane Merrick made

headlines when she claimed

0:55:350:55:42

she was sexually harassed

by the former Defence

0:55:420:55:45

Secretary Michael Fallon,

0:55:450:55:45

and she's just been named

in Time Magazine's Person

0:55:450:55:48

of The Year piece.

0:55:480:55:49

We're talking to her later.

0:55:490:55:50

Time now to get the news,

travel and weather where you are.

0:55:500:59:12

in around half an hour.

0:59:120:59:13

There's plenty more on our website

0:59:130:59:15

too at the usual address.

0:59:150:59:16

Bye bye.

0:59:160:59:17

Hello.

0:59:380:59:38

This is Breakfast,

with Charlie Stayt and Naga

0:59:380:59:40

Munchetty.

0:59:400:59:41

Missed targets on Accident

and Emergency waiting times.

0:59:410:59:43

More than three million people

in the UK were not seen for more

0:59:430:59:46

than four hours in the last year.

0:59:460:59:48

The number of people waiting has

more than doubled since 2013.

0:59:480:59:51

Doctors say they can't meet demand.

0:59:510:59:58

Good morning.

1:00:061:00:06

It's Thursday the

seventh of December.

1:00:061:00:08

Also this morning.

1:00:081:00:09

Pressure on the Prime Minister.

1:00:091:00:10

Ireland and the EU call

for Theresa May to have more clarity

1:00:101:00:13

on Brexit by the end of the week.

1:00:131:00:17

Widespread condemnation

of President Trump's decision

1:00:171:00:19

to recognise Jerusalem

as Israel's capital.

1:00:191:00:21

The UN Security Council will hold

an emergency meeting.

1:00:211:00:26

It took 10,000 people

and £3 billion to build.

1:00:261:00:29

The HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircraft

Carrier will be commissioned today.

1:00:291:00:38

Good morning. We are at Hull Marina.

1:00:381:00:42

Is it worth being a City of Culture?

1:00:421:00:44

The businesses here in Hull think

so, with an estimated £60 million

1:00:441:00:47

boost to the economy.

1:00:471:00:48

I'll be chatting to businesses

all morning about how things have

1:00:481:00:51

changed for them this year.

1:00:511:00:52

Good morning.

1:00:521:00:53

In sport, Liverpool net seven goals,

making England the first country

1:00:531:00:56

to have five teams through to

the Champion's League knockout

1:00:561:00:59

stages in the same season.

1:00:591:01:02

And Carol has the weather.

1:01:021:01:04

Good morning.

1:01:041:01:05

Storm Caroline will make

its presence felt in the north

1:01:051:01:07

of Scotland today.

1:01:071:01:09

90 miles per hour gusts. The Met

Office has an amber warning. For the

1:01:091:01:21

rest of us, a wet and mild start to

the day. Cooling down considerably.

1:01:211:01:28

Very windy. Details on all of that

in 15 minutes. Thank you, Carol.

1:01:281:01:35

Good morning.

1:01:351:01:38

First, our main story:

1:01:381:01:39

The number

of patients experiencing long waits

1:01:391:01:41

in accident and emergency

departments in the UK has more

1:01:411:01:44

than doubled in the last four years.

1:01:441:01:46

Research by the BBC found that more

than three million people waited

1:01:461:01:49

longer than the four-hour

target in the last year.

1:01:491:01:52

Doctors say it shows

the NHS can no longer cope.

1:01:521:01:54

The Department of Health said more

money had been made available to NHS

1:01:541:01:58

England.

1:01:581:01:58

Here's our health

correspondent, Dominic Hughes.

1:01:581:02:00

Right across the UK,

Accident and Emergency departments

1:02:001:02:02

have been working at full capacity.

1:02:021:02:04

Now, BBC analysis shows how

an already busy system

1:02:041:02:06

is struggling to cope.

1:02:061:02:07

The waiting time target to treat

or deal with 95% of patients

1:02:071:02:10

within four hours has been

missed across the country.

1:02:101:02:13

In the past year, more than 3

million patients waited longer

1:02:131:02:16

than four hours, an increase

of 120% on four years ago.

1:02:161:02:19

But visits to A&E are up by only 7%,

to nearly 27 million.

1:02:191:02:22

To ensure the target is met,

the NHS would need to build

1:02:221:02:26

an additional 20 A&E departments.

1:02:261:02:39

There is no more

capacity in the system.

1:02:391:02:41

Our staff are working really hard,

our nurses, our doctors.

1:02:411:02:44

And we have reached a point

where we unfortunately cannot

1:02:441:02:47

meet that demand.

1:02:471:02:48

Scotland has come closest

to hitting the target,

1:02:481:02:58

while England has seen the biggest

increase in those facing

1:02:591:03:01

a long wait.

1:03:011:03:02

But performance is

even worse in Wales.

1:03:021:03:04

And Northern Ireland manages to see

just three quarters of patients

1:03:041:03:07

within four hours.

1:03:071:03:08

A busier NHS means

longer waiting times.

1:03:081:03:10

And as we head into what could be

a very hard winter, there's little

1:03:101:03:14

sign of respite for

staff or patients.

1:03:141:03:16

Dominic Hughes, BBC News.

1:03:161:03:30

The Irish Prime Minister has said

Theresa May wants to put forward

1:03:301:03:33

a new plan for the future

of the Irish border after Brexit.

1:03:331:03:37

Negotiations with the EU stalled

earlier this week when a proposal

1:03:371:03:39

on the issue was rejected

by Northern Ireland's Democratic

1:03:391:03:42

Unionist Party.

1:03:421:03:43

Our political correspondent,

Iain Watson, is in Westminster this

1:03:431:03:45

morning.

1:03:451:03:45

Ian, the pressure on the Prime

Minister is really growing now?

1:03:451:03:52

Good morning. The Prime Minister

needs an acceptable solution.

Huge

1:03:521:03:58

pressure on the Prime Minister. The

chief negotiator, Michel Barnier,

1:03:581:04:03

said they have just entered tomorrow

evening to get this problem sorted

1:04:031:04:08

out if EU ambassadors are going to

recommend that Britain has made

1:04:081:04:12

sufficient progress in its

discussions to let trade talks

1:04:121:04:20

begin, which is what she wants. So,

she does not have long. Positive

1:04:201:04:25

words from the Irish Prime Minister

is expecting to see new proposals

1:04:251:04:30

either today or tomorrow. He is

saying he will compromise a little

1:04:301:04:38

bit and respect the integrity of the

UK. But the DUP's views are crucial.

1:04:381:04:46

They are propping up the Prime

Minister at. They sound more down on

1:04:461:04:55

the issue. They feel a lot more

needs to be done. In effect,

1:04:551:05:02

although the EU is saying they will

sort this out by tomorrow night,

1:05:021:05:06

there needs to be more flexibility

in the face of the hard deadline of

1:05:061:05:12

next week's summit. Theresa May's

leadership on this issue could be

1:05:121:05:17

called into question.

Thank you.

1:05:171:05:21

No British citizen who has fought

for the Islamic State group should

1:05:211:05:24

never be allowed back

into the country,says the Defence

1:05:241:05:26

Secretary.

1:05:261:05:27

Gavin Williamson, who was promoted

to his post last month,

1:05:271:05:29

told the Daily Mail that British

fighters should be "hunted down"

1:05:291:05:32

and killed because "a dead terrorist

couldn't cause any harm to Britain."

1:05:321:05:47

Widespread condemnation

of President Trump's decision

1:05:471:05:48

to recognise Jerusalem

as Israel's capital.

1:05:481:05:50

The UN Security Council will hold

an emergency meeting.

1:05:501:05:54

Donald Trump said the decision was

long overdue and reflects the

1:05:541:05:58

reality of Israel's presence in the

city. Tom Bateman is in Jerusalem.

1:05:581:06:07

We can speak to him now. Donald

Trump said some time ago he was

1:06:071:06:12

going to do this and made the

announcement yesterday. Talk us

1:06:121:06:15

through some of the reaction.

On the

ground in Jerusalem overnight things

1:06:151:06:21

were relatively calm. There were

small protests in the Gaza Strip and

1:06:211:06:32

Hebron near the West Bank. They

burned pictures of American flags

1:06:321:06:37

and Donald Trump. More broadly, I

think Donald Trump's declaration

1:06:371:06:43

that he would recognise Jerusalem as

the capital of Israel has galvanised

1:06:431:06:48

condemnation from leaders across the

Arab and Muslim world, and as the

1:06:481:06:54

night wore on, other countries added

to the long list of those either

1:06:541:06:58

criticising, condemning, or

expressing concern over that action.

1:06:581:07:02

Now, there will be, as you said, a

meeting of the UN Security Council

1:07:021:07:07

tomorrow. In the meantime, there are

more demonstrations planned here. In

1:07:071:07:13

Bethlehem last night in the occupied

West Bank, the Christmas tree's

1:07:131:07:20

lights were turned off in the main

square to be a visual sign of their

1:07:201:07:24

displeasure. As for the Israelis,

Benjamin Netanyahu hailed this as an

1:07:241:07:30

historic decision, he said, by

Donald Trump. He has called on other

1:07:301:07:35

countries now to move their

embassies from Tel Aviv to

1:07:351:07:38

Jerusalem. But he was keen to stress

that he says those key and very

1:07:381:07:42

sensitive holy sites in the old city

of Jerusalem will not have their

1:07:421:07:47

status quo, the arrangements around

how they are listed, changed by

1:07:471:07:51

Israel.

For the moment, thank you.

1:07:511:07:56

A fast-moving wildfire

in Southern California has jumped

1:07:561:07:58

the US state's main costal highway

and reached the Pacific Ocean

1:07:581:08:01

according to firefighters

tackling the blaze.

1:08:011:08:03

The homes of more than 150,000

people have been evacuated

1:08:031:08:06

in an area north of Los Angeles

and hundreds of buildings

1:08:061:08:09

have been damaged.

1:08:091:08:09

Strong winds are expected to further

hinder efforts to contain the fire

1:08:091:08:13

which is still endangering

some 12,000 properties.

1:08:131:08:15

The departing Vice Chancellor

of Bath Spa University received

1:08:151:08:18

£808,000 last year

in pay and benefits.

1:08:181:08:20

Professor Christina Slade wasn't

the highest paid Vice Chancellor

1:08:201:08:22

in the UK.

1:08:221:08:23

From next year, universities

in England will have to justify pay

1:08:231:08:26

of more than £150,000.

1:08:261:08:27

The Labour peer, Lord Adonis,

is calling for an independent

1:08:271:08:30

inquiry into senior university pay.

1:08:301:08:41

The Royal Navy's new aircraft

carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth will be

1:08:411:08:44

commissioned into

service later today.

1:08:441:08:46

The Queen will be guest of honour

at the ceremony which marks

1:08:461:08:49

the carrier's official

handover to the Navy.

1:08:491:08:51

The ship is the most expensive

in British naval history,

1:08:511:08:53

costing around £3 billion to build.

1:08:531:08:55

It won't be operational until 2021,

but its captain says today marks

1:08:551:08:58

an important milestone.

1:08:581:09:03

Swapping the Blue Ensign

and War Ensign is symbolic.

1:09:031:09:11

It formally recognises her

as a warship legally.

1:09:111:09:16

But for us, it is

much more than that.

1:09:161:09:23

It is saying "Here we are."

1:09:231:09:26

"We've arrived."

1:09:261:09:27

The War Ensign says

a lot about the country.

1:09:271:09:30

The flag has been flying

in the service of the country

1:09:301:09:33

for many years.

1:09:331:09:34

For us, it is a magnificent day,

a very proud day, and,

1:09:341:09:37

yeah, it is a major day for us.

1:09:371:09:39

The UK's next City of Culture

will be named later today as Hull's

1:09:391:09:43

year-long celebration

in the spotlight nears an end.

1:09:431:09:45

Coventry, Paisley, Stoke-on-Trent,

Sunderland, and Swansea

1:09:451:09:46

are in the running

for the 2021 title.

1:09:461:09:49

Our entertainment and arts

correspondent, Colin Paterson,

1:09:491:09:50

has been taking a look

at the contenders.

1:09:501:09:53

The ghost town's gone.

1:09:531:09:54

We've moved on.

1:09:541:09:55

Coventry has grown.

1:09:551:09:57

Coventry's UK City of Culture's bid

draws on their history of invention

1:09:571:10:00

and reinvention, from the bicycle

to the jet engine to two-tone music.

1:10:001:10:01

The average age there is 33, seven

years younger than the national

1:10:011:10:04

average, so there is

a big focus on youth.

1:10:041:10:14

Paisley in Renfrewshire is best

known for the Paisley pattern,

1:10:141:10:17

created in the 19th century

by the town's weavers.

1:10:171:10:31

It now has some of Scotland's worst

pockets of depravation,

1:10:311:10:33

and believes that being the City

of Culture would turbocharge

1:10:331:10:36

regeneration.

1:10:361:10:36

They've enlisted the help

of local boy, Paolo Nutini.

1:10:361:10:39

It has always been my home.

1:10:391:10:40

I love my town and you

want to see it grow.

1:10:401:10:43

Stoke-on-Trent is six

towns in one city.

1:10:431:10:45

Something special

is happening again.

1:10:451:10:50

We're a city on the up.

1:10:501:10:52

Its bid aims to both

celebrate its title as the world's

1:10:521:10:55

capital of ceramics,

while also changing perceptions

1:10:551:10:57

of the place by highlighting that

it's one of the UK's

1:10:571:11:00

fastest growing economies.

1:11:001:11:01

Also in the running is Sunderland.

1:11:011:11:02

Why give us this honour, this title?

1:11:021:11:04

Because in spite of a few

hard decades, we still

1:11:041:11:07

believe in ourselves.

1:11:071:11:08

They say they would use

the National Glass Centre

1:11:081:11:19

as a starting point

from which to deliver a celebration

1:11:191:11:22

of art and culture to make

the whole country proud.

1:11:221:11:25

Swansea is culture.

1:11:251:11:25

And the final city in contention

is that Swansea, who argue

1:11:251:11:29

that they are the ideal choice

as they are a creative city rich

1:11:291:11:32

with heritage and culture.

1:11:321:11:33

And the actor, Rhys Fans,

is backing their bid.

1:11:331:11:36

I feel good about

this, I feel lucky.

1:11:361:11:38

The result will be announced live

on The One Show this evening.

1:11:381:11:41

Colin Paterson, BBC News.

1:11:411:11:43

The art of Neapolitan pizza

making could be included

1:11:431:11:46

on a cultural heritage list.

1:11:461:11:47

A decision will be made by UNESCO

in the next few hours

1:11:471:11:51

after a petition was signed by more

than two million people.

1:11:511:11:54

In anticipation of the news,

the Italian Minister of Culture lit

1:11:541:11:57

up the oven at the Neapolitan Museum

of Capodimonte, where the first ever

1:11:571:12:00

Margherita pizza was baked in 1899.

1:12:001:12:16

I just want pizza. That is all I

want is now.

It is funny, it does

1:12:161:12:22

not have that effect on it. If I see

a curry, I want one in the morning,

1:12:221:12:33

though. The weather and sport later

on.

1:12:331:12:39

Winter is a busy time of year

for accident and emergency

1:12:391:12:42

departments, as they try to deal

with the extra pressures

1:12:421:12:45

the season brings.

1:12:451:12:45

But BBC analysis of NHS figures

shows the number of patients

1:12:451:12:48

waiting more than four hours to be

seen has more than doubled

1:12:481:12:52

in the past four

years across the UK.

1:12:521:12:54

We can talk now to the president

of the Royal College

1:12:541:12:57

of Emergency Medicine,

Dr Taj Hassan.

1:12:571:12:58

Good morning.

1:12:581:12:59

Why are we seeing this significant

increase in the amount of patients

1:13:071:13:11

waiting to be seen? More than

doubling.

It has been clear those

1:13:111:13:20

attending emergency departments as

well as the complexity of the care

1:13:201:13:24

in terms of elderly patients has

steadily increased. However, we have

1:13:241:13:29

not had the resources to meet that

increased demand. That has affected

1:13:291:13:33

the overall system performance and

the ability of the staff to be able

1:13:331:13:37

to cope with this extreme challenge,

which is just this winter, it has

1:13:371:13:41

been getting worse over the last

five years.

What is the answer?

1:13:411:13:48

There are three things. The first is

leadership. The second is we have to

1:13:481:13:54

have the tools to be able to cope.

Thirdly, what were we do in the

1:13:541:13:58

immediate term? In terms of

leadership, there is absolutely no

1:13:581:14:02

doubt I think we have some of the

finest leadership in the world

1:14:021:14:06

running the NHS. Simon Stevens has

done an incredible job for us. Jim

1:14:061:14:11

Matthews just retired. And

colleagues as well at health

1:14:111:14:18

education England, they are people I

have worked within the nine months.

1:14:181:14:23

Indeed, we secured a workforce

strategy for emergency medicine

1:14:231:14:27

which was the most comprehensive

thing going. But it will take 6-9

1:14:271:14:32

months to kick in. Simon Stevens and

others have been clear about the

1:14:321:14:37

resources we need in order for the

NHS to function as we the public and

1:14:371:14:44

the people who worked in the NHS

want it to. So, that goes onto the

1:14:441:14:48

tools. And the tools are that there

is no doubt we can improve

1:14:481:14:53

processes, but the bottomline is

that we need more for bad, we need

1:14:531:14:56

more money for staff, and we need

more money for social care and

1:14:561:15:01

community care. -- beds.

Sorry,

please continue.

And I suppose the

1:15:011:15:06

last thing, as I said, is what are

we going to do in the meantime? In

1:15:061:15:11

the meantime, at the moment, it is

just allowing the staff to work to

1:15:111:15:15

their very best to deliver safe

care, to try to deliver performance

1:15:151:15:22

in the 9-5 hour standard, which we

all aspire to. But many of the staff

1:15:221:15:28

working in departments with tighter

performance is at 60- 70- 80%, there

1:15:281:15:36

are a small number of systems doing

really well, and they managed to

1:15:361:15:41

connect the sector and community

really well We have to find ways to

1:15:411:15:45

support them.

1:15:451:15:49

Talking about the tools in the

immediate term, the Department of

1:15:491:15:53

Health has given us a statement, it

says, the government is supporting

1:15:531:15:57

the NHS with an extra 435 and pounds

to cope with winter, including

1:15:571:16:01

making sure people get directed to

the right service if they go to A&E

1:16:011:16:08

-- 435 and pounds. Money is being

given to the NHS to allow these

1:16:081:16:12

tools to be in place. Is it simple

enough to say that's just not

1:16:121:16:16

enough?

-- £475 million. You should

look to independent observers -- 435

1:16:161:16:28

and pounds. We very grateful for the

money. We are grateful they can find

1:16:281:16:34

some money in these very tough times

but the reality is we are trying to

1:16:341:16:40

deal with and manage and care for

the most vulnerable in our society,

1:16:401:16:45

the young, the old, the ill and

injured, and we as a speciality,

1:16:451:16:53

representing my colleagues, are

finding that an extreme struggle for

1:16:531:16:55

the last few years and increasingly

worse. Explain to me this statistic,

1:16:551:17:01

visits to A&E have risen by 7%.

So

why are we seeing, as we began this

1:17:011:17:07

interview, such a jump in the number

of people waiting longer and the

1:17:071:17:12

number of people that aren't being

seen within the targeted timeframe

1:17:121:17:15

of four hours?

Visits to emergency departments have

1:17:151:17:19

risen steadily approximately 2%

every year for the last 15 years,

1:17:191:17:24

and the 7% that you describe for the

last few years is consistent. The

1:17:241:17:29

reason is that unfortunately we

don't have the resources to be able

1:17:291:17:34

to manage the whole chain, the money

to be able to and the staff to be

1:17:341:17:40

able to cope in emergency

departments, the staff to have acute

1:17:401:17:44

beds and the ability for patients

who are really well enough to get

1:17:441:17:48

them back into the community where

they and their families want them to

1:17:481:17:51

be.

The extra money that we were

talking about, the 400 plus million,

1:17:511:17:56

is that not going to make any

difference?

I think one of the

1:17:561:18:01

things that I'm sure Sandra Stevens

and others are working really hard

1:18:011:18:05

for is as much of that money as

possible really gets truly to the

1:18:051:18:09

front line, truly gets to patients

and staff on wards and staff in the

1:18:091:18:15

emergency department so we can get

through the winter as safely as

1:18:151:18:19

possible. I think that money is good

but probably nowhere near good

1:18:191:18:25

enough and for Simon Stevens, the

King's Fund and others have clearly

1:18:251:18:30

described that for us. I would say

to the Secretary of State, who I

1:18:301:18:37

think has acquired money for us,

unfortunately we do need more.

1:18:371:18:44

Doctor Taj Hassan, president of the

Royal College of emergency medicine,

1:18:441:18:47

thank you for talking to us this

morning.

1:18:471:18:50

Here's Carol with a look

at this morning's weather.

1:18:501:18:54

What's happening, Carol?

1:18:541:18:55

Snow in the forecast, and we have

Storm Caroline today. Good morning.

1:18:571:19:01

Starting with the whole of the UK

today, a windy day wherever you are,

1:19:011:19:06

we have that at the moment. Rain

pushing south and as that clears

1:19:061:19:10

that will turn colder behind it and

the rain showers we have will

1:19:101:19:15

increasingly be wintry or falling as

low generally. Storm Caroline is

1:19:151:19:18

coming in from the west, affecting

the Outer Hebrides with gusts around

1:19:181:19:24

74 mph -- as snow. Pushing east in

the north of Scotland through the

1:19:241:19:29

day and the wind will strengthen,

just look at the squeeze in the

1:19:291:19:33

isobars, but windy wherever you are.

The Met Office has an amber be

1:19:331:19:41

prepared warning for the north of

Scotland, 75 and 80 mph gusts, for

1:19:411:19:45

the rest of Scotland and Northern

Ireland, gusts of 70 mph, damaging

1:19:451:19:51

gusts, and we have snow falling and

increasingly the snow will fall at

1:19:511:19:56

low levels so blizzard conditions.

In Northern Ireland increasingly

1:19:561:20:00

your showers will turn wintry,

northern England, a quieter start

1:20:001:20:03

but wet, lots of surface water and

spray on the roads and now turning

1:20:031:20:08

colder. For Wales and the rest of

England, heavy rain moving to the

1:20:081:20:13

south-east, but much milder

temperatures. Our earlier band of

1:20:131:20:16

rain drifting towards Kent and that

will eventually clear. Some of the

1:20:161:20:20

rain will be heavy as it moves

south-east, drier and brighter

1:20:201:20:24

conditions in the north of England,

but the temperature now falling and

1:20:241:20:27

that will be the process today as

this band of rain and windy

1:20:271:20:31

conditions go to the south-east. It

will dry up and brighten up but the

1:20:311:20:35

temperature will fall, so our

maximum temperature around now. The

1:20:351:20:39

showers keep piling into Northern

Ireland, northern England, north

1:20:391:20:45

Wales, some wintry, but in the north

of Scotland, atrocious blizzard

1:20:451:20:49

conditions. It will feel cold,

bitter in the north and it will feel

1:20:491:20:53

cold in the rest of the UK. Through

the evening and overnight the

1:20:531:20:57

showers keep piling in, the wintry

showers, falling as low in Scotland

1:20:571:21:02

and Northern Ireland and parts of

northern England, Wales, down

1:21:021:21:05

towards the Midlands -- as snow. A

covering of snow, some of it will be

1:21:051:21:11

quite significant, and as we head

towards the London area, a dusting

1:21:111:21:15

of snow first thing. Also ice and

frost to look out for. Tomorrow sees

1:21:151:21:20

a replay of what happens overnight.

We continue with the snow and the

1:21:201:21:25

wind in Scotland, Northern Ireland,

parts of northern England, Wales,

1:21:251:21:29

the Midlands, and snow flurries

across London. In between that it

1:21:291:21:33

will be sunny, regardless of the

temperatures on your thermometers,

1:21:331:21:36

this is how it will feel with the

wind against your skin. Naga and

1:21:361:21:43

Charlie, more snow in the forecast

as we head to the weekend.

Thank you

1:21:431:21:48

very much, Carol.

1:21:481:21:50

The Royal Navy's new aircraft

carrier will be commissioned

1:21:501:21:52

into service by the Queen

1:21:521:21:54

at a ceremony in Portsmouth later

today.

1:21:541:21:55

The event marks the official

handover of HMS Queen Elizabeth

1:21:551:21:58

to the Royal Navy.

1:21:581:22:01

It's one of two new British aircraft

carriers and cost around

1:22:011:22:04

£3 billion to build.

1:22:041:22:05

Up to 40 aircraft will be able to be

1:22:051:22:11

transported on board,

including the F-35B fighter jet

1:22:111:22:13

which the ship has

been built around.

1:22:131:22:15

It's due to come into active service

by 2021 and will be joined

1:22:151:22:18

by sister ship HMS Prince

of Wales in two years later.

1:22:181:22:21

Our defence correspondent

Jonathan Beale has this report.

1:22:211:22:23

This is a big day

for the Royal Navy.

1:22:231:22:31

A moment to forget about recent cuts

and fears of even more.

1:22:311:22:34

The crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth has

been rehearsing for the arrival

1:22:341:22:37

of the Monarch here in the carrier's

giant aircraft hangar.

1:22:371:22:41

Today the Queen will be welcome

on board to officially commission

1:22:411:22:44

the ship that bears

her name into service.

1:22:441:22:46

It's been a long wait.

1:22:461:22:56

Work began at Rosyth on this,

the first of the Royal Navy's

1:22:561:22:59

two new aircraft carriers, in 1998.

1:22:591:23:01

Slowly taking shape,

she was built with the help

1:23:011:23:04

of 10,000 people

right across the UK.

1:23:041:23:05

For the past few months,

HMS Queen Elizabeth and her 700 crew

1:23:051:23:09

have been at sea

testing her systems.

1:23:091:23:13

This the largest and most

expensive warship ever built

1:23:131:23:16

for the Royal Navy, at a cost

of more than £3 billion.

1:23:161:23:19

And today, now at her new home

at Portsmouth, she officially

1:23:191:23:22

becomes a Royal Navy warship

where they'll raise the White Ensign

1:23:221:23:25

for the very first time.

1:23:251:23:32

Swapping the Blue Ensign

and White Ensign is symbolic.

1:23:321:23:38

It's formally recognising her

as a warship legally.

1:23:381:23:40

But for us it is more than that.

1:23:401:23:44

It says, "Here we are,

1:23:441:23:47

we've arrived.

1:23:471:23:50

The White Ensign says

a lot about the country.

1:23:501:23:53

The flag has been flying

in the service of the country

1:23:531:23:56

for many years.

1:23:561:23:58

For us, magnificent day.

1:23:581:23:59

Next year, HMS Queen

Elizabeth will begin flight

1:23:591:24:01

trials from this massive deck,

first with helicopters and then

1:24:011:24:04

jets, the new F-35Bs

which each cost £100

1:24:041:24:06

million, which will take

off from that ski ramp.

1:24:061:24:09

But she won't be

operational until 2021.

1:24:091:24:11

Russia's already

dismissed her as a large

1:24:111:24:13

convenient target,

but the Royal Navy believes HMS

1:24:131:24:15

Queen Elizabeth and her sister ship,

HMS Prince of Wales,

1:24:151:24:18

will be a potent show

of British military power

1:24:181:24:20

for the next 50 years.

1:24:201:24:27

Jonathan Beale, BBC

News, Portsmouth.

1:24:271:24:36

Still to come this morning:

1:24:361:24:38

Still to come this morning: A new UK

City of Culture crowned this

1:24:381:24:41

evening.

At the moment it is Hull

and we've been looking at how that's

1:24:411:24:45

been benefiting from being the

titleholder. Steph is in a very

1:24:451:24:50

windy Hull this morning. Good

morning, Steph.

1:24:501:24:53

Good morning to you and good

morning, everyone, I'm at Hull

1:24:531:24:57

Marina this morning and as Carol was

talking about, it is quite windy

1:24:571:25:02

today! This of course was the city

that was crowned City of Culture

1:25:021:25:06

last year and tonight we will find

out who will be the next one. A lot

1:25:061:25:10

of talk at the moment about what

difference it can make to a city by

1:25:101:25:14

getting this status. We'll be

talking to people through the

1:25:141:25:17

morning about that and we can chat

with the council leader Stephen

1:25:171:25:20

about the difference it has made.

Good morning. Tell us about what it

1:25:201:25:24

has meant for Hull.

There's been a

huge surge in confidence and a real

1:25:241:25:30

pride that we've given a real good

show this year. 90% of the residents

1:25:301:25:35

in this city have taken part in

cultural events, 350,000 in the

1:25:351:25:39

first week alone in the cold days of

January in the city centre. Records

1:25:391:25:45

have been broken in the museums and

art galleries in the first quarter,

1:25:451:25:50

over 1 million people visited the

city to have a look at what we've

1:25:501:25:54

got an offer. There's been a new...

There's been an increase in

1:25:541:26:02

business. 43 new businesses in the

city centre alone. And, yeah, it's

1:26:021:26:08

been really good Hull has been able

to get its message across, what a

1:26:081:26:13

lovely city it is and we've found it

difficult over time to put that

1:26:131:26:17

across.

As you say, there's been

lots of different benefits, is it

1:26:171:26:22

sustainable? We are in an area

that's been regenerated, is it

1:26:221:26:25

something you can carry on using?

I

do believe that. There's been an 80%

1:26:251:26:33

increase in the night-time economy,

over £3 billion since it was

1:26:331:26:37

announced we got City of Culture, £3

billion has been invested into the

1:26:371:26:42

city and there's a real confidence

there.

We will chat to some of the

1:26:421:26:46

business people here with us this

morning. But first, back out in the

1:26:461:26:50

wind, let's

1:26:501:30:08

For now, though, it's back

1:30:081:30:10

to Charlie and Naga and BBC

Breakfast.

1:30:101:30:12

Bye bye.

1:30:121:30:12

Hello.

1:30:201:30:21

Welcome back.

1:30:211:30:22

This is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt

and Naga Munchetty.

1:30:221:30:24

We'll bring you all the latest news

and sport in a moment.

1:30:241:30:28

But also on Breakfast this morning.

1:30:281:30:37

The number

of patients experiencing long waits

1:30:371:30:39

in accident and emergency

departments in the UK has more

1:30:391:30:42

than doubled in the last four years.

1:30:421:30:44

Research by the BBC found that more

than three million people waited

1:30:441:30:47

longer than the four-hour

target in the last year.

1:30:471:30:50

Doctors say it shows

the NHS can no longer cope.

1:30:501:30:52

The Department of Health said more

money had been made available to NHS

1:30:521:30:56

England.

1:30:561:30:57

The number of people attending

departments as well as the

1:30:571:31:00

complexity of care in terms of

elderly patients has increased.

1:31:001:31:06

Unfortunately, we have not had the

resources to meet that increased the

1:31:061:31:10

mind and that has affected the

overall system form and -- demand.

1:31:101:31:18

It has been increasing for the last

five years.

1:31:181:31:30

The Irish Prime Minister has said

Theresa May wants to put forward

1:31:301:31:33

a new plan for the future

of the Irish border after Brexit.

1:31:331:31:36

Negotiations with the EU stalled

earlier this week when a proposal

1:31:361:31:39

on the issue was rejected

by Northern Ireland's Democratic

1:31:391:31:42

Unionist Party.

1:31:421:31:56

The UN Security Council is expected

to hold an emergency meeting

1:31:561:31:59

after President Trump made

an historic decision to recognise

1:31:591:32:02

the disputed city of Jerusalem

as Israel's capital,

1:32:021:32:04

overturning decades of US policy.

1:32:041:32:05

Trump said the decision was long

overdue and reflected

1:32:051:32:08

the reality of Israel's

presence in the city.

1:32:081:32:10

He said this doesn't mean an end

to the United States' "strong

1:32:101:32:13

commitment" to peace

in the Middle East.

1:32:131:32:15

The fate of Jerusalem is one

of the thorniest issues

1:32:151:32:18

between Israel and the Palestinians.

1:32:181:32:19

Legislation for same-sex marriage

has been passed by the Australian

1:32:191:32:22

parliament. The move follows a

public vote earlier this year in

1:32:221:32:25

which a majority of people supported

the change. The bill is expected to

1:32:251:32:28

be ratified by the country's

Governer-General within days,

1:32:281:32:31

meaning the first weddings under the

new law could take place early next

1:32:311:32:34

year.

1:32:341:32:34

A fast-moving wildfire

in Southern California has jumped

1:32:341:32:37

the US state's main costal highway

and reached the Pacific Ocean

1:32:371:32:40

according to firefighters

tackling the blaze.

1:32:401:32:41

The homes of more than 150,000

people have been evacuated

1:32:411:32:44

in an area north of Los Angeles

and hundreds of buildings

1:32:441:32:47

have been damaged.

1:32:471:32:48

Strong winds are expected to further

hinder efforts to contain the fire

1:32:481:32:51

which is still endangering

some 12,000 properties.

1:32:511:32:54

The departing Vice Chancellor

of Bath Spa University received

1:32:541:32:56

£808,000 last year

in pay and benefits.

1:32:561:32:58

Professor Christina Slade wasn't

the highest paid Vice Chancellor

1:32:581:33:01

in the UK.

1:33:011:33:01

From next year, universities

in England will have to justify pay

1:33:011:33:04

of more than £150,000.

1:33:041:33:05

The Labour peer, Lord Adonis,

is calling for an independent

1:33:051:33:08

inquiry into senior university pay.

1:33:081:33:25

A feathered dinosaur resembling a

mutant swan has been discovered by

1:33:251:33:35

scientists. It is quite an accurate

description. It has a graceful neck

1:33:351:33:41

at clause and a long neck. -- but

claws. It lived 75 million years

1:33:411:33:51

ago. It is the first dinosaur to

adopt the lifestyle of a modern-day

1:33:511:33:57

water bird.

The idea of a teethed

beak scares me.

I always think about

1:33:571:34:17

that.

How often? Lots of goals for

Liverpool last night.

Absolutely.

1:34:171:34:22

They wanted to go to the Champions

League. 7-0. That confirms it. It

1:34:221:34:28

means they have scored the most

goals in the group stages over any

1:34:281:34:33

other club now. Manchester United

got the last with 23.

1:34:331:34:44

England have become the first

country to have five teams

1:34:441:34:46

in the Champions League

knock-out stage.

1:34:461:34:48

Manchester United, Manchester City,

Chelsea, Tottenham, were already

1:34:481:34:50

through to Monday's draw.

1:34:501:34:51

And Liverpool joined them last night

with a brilliant 7-0 win over

1:34:511:34:54

Spartak Moscow at Anfield.

1:34:541:34:56

Phillip Coutinho scored a hatrick,

while Sadio Mane got a couple

1:34:561:34:58

of goals too.

1:34:581:34:59

Jurgen Klopp's side topped

their group so he might not be too

1:34:591:35:03

happy with who they

draw to face next.

1:35:031:35:06

The last 16 have always been strong.

1:35:061:35:10

This year is special.

1:35:101:35:11

Not often can you go

against Bayern Munich

1:35:111:35:13

and Real Madrid in the top 16.

1:35:131:35:19

Also Juve! And all the others!

1:35:191:35:22

So, that is quite interesting.

1:35:221:35:24

Spurs finished the group stages

on a high with a 3-0 win at Wembley

1:35:241:35:28

over Apoel Nicosia.

1:35:281:35:28

Fernando Llorente scored his first

for the club in a much changed side.

1:35:281:35:32

Son heung-Min scored a well worked

second before half-time.

1:35:321:35:34

Tottenham were already sure

of finishing above Real Madrid

1:35:341:35:37

in the group.

1:35:371:35:48

Manchester City lost for the first

time this season at Shakhtar

1:35:481:35:51

Donetsk.

1:35:511:35:51

Bernard scored a terrific first

for the home side in freezing

1:35:511:35:54

temperatures in Ukraine.

1:35:541:35:55

Ismailly added a second

for Shakhtar before half-time.

1:35:551:35:57

And there was no way back

for a changed City side

1:35:571:36:00

despite Sergio Aguero's

late penalty.

1:36:001:36:02

Ben Stokes has been named

in England's squad for the one day

1:36:021:36:06

internationals in

Australia next month.

1:36:061:36:07

Stokes is currently in New Zealand

while he waits to find out

1:36:071:36:10

if he will be charged for

an altercation in Bristol in August.

1:36:101:36:13

The BBC understands Stokes is highly

unlikely to be involved

1:36:131:36:16

in the series unless his

circumstances change.

1:36:161:36:18

Meanwhile, England's Ashes hopes

with or without Stokes are hanging

1:36:181:36:21

by a thread after defeat

in the second test yesterday.

1:36:211:36:23

Test match special's

Geoffrey Boycott says England's

1:36:231:36:25

batting isn't good enough.

1:36:251:36:26

We do not make enough runs.

1:36:261:36:28

We made 302, 190, 150

in two innings, 460!

1:36:281:36:31

You need to make 460 in one innings.

1:36:311:36:33

Then you give the bowlers

something to bowl at!

1:36:331:36:35

We do not make enough runs.

1:36:351:36:46

Russia's President, Vladimir Putin,

says he won't stop Russian athletes

1:36:461:36:48

competing independently

at February's winter Olympics

1:36:481:36:50

in South Korea.

1:36:501:36:51

The IOC banned Russia from the games

this week but athletes are proven

1:36:511:36:54

to be clean can compete as neutrals.

1:36:541:36:56

Former British athlete,

Kelly Sotherton, is set to be

1:36:561:36:59

awarded a bronze medal from the 2008

Summer Olympics after Russian rivals

1:36:591:37:02

were banned for doping.

1:37:021:37:03

She says the IOC's decision

doesn't go far enough.

1:37:031:37:09

I personally think it

should be a blanket ban.

1:37:091:37:12

No Russians.

1:37:121:37:12

For the sake of the many clean

athletes at the Olympics,

1:37:121:37:15

you sacrifice a few

to save the many.

1:37:151:37:17

Even if some are potentially clean,

they are still Russian.

1:37:171:37:22

The three time champion,

John Higgins, is out of the UK

1:37:301:37:32

Championship at the quarter-final

stage, after being beaten by world

1:37:321:37:35

number 21, Mark King.

1:37:351:37:36

King won four of the last

five frames in York

1:37:361:37:39

to squeeze through 6-5.

1:37:391:37:40

While Higgins is the 13th player

among the top-16 seeds to go out.

1:37:401:37:54

And 23-time Grand Slam Champion

Serena Williams has entered herself

1:37:541:37:56

into the 2018 Australian Open,

after giving birth

1:37:561:37:59

to her first child four months ago.

1:37:591:38:00

The Defending champion won

in Melbourne in January

1:38:001:38:03

for a seventh time, while in

the early weeks of pregnancy.

1:38:031:38:06

She gave birth to her daughter

in September, but can she now make

1:38:061:38:09

even more history by

retaining the title?

1:38:091:38:11

I just want to revisit the results

last night.

1:38:111:38:15

Now then, make of

this what you will.

1:38:151:38:17

The coach

1:38:171:38:18

of Shaktar Donetsk celebrated

his side qualifiction

1:38:181:38:20

for the Champions League

knockout stage by dressing

1:38:201:38:22

up as Zorro.

1:38:221:38:23

Paulo Fonseca had said

he would wear a Zorro outfit,

1:38:231:38:32

the the fictional masked vigilante,

if Shakhtar advanced.

1:38:321:38:34

As we heard earlier,

they beat Manchester City and go

1:38:341:38:37

into the hat...

1:38:371:38:37

Not that one...

1:38:371:38:38

..for Monday's draw

for the next stage.

1:38:381:38:40

This could start something. Costumes

that press conferences.

I think they

1:38:401:38:43

should all do it.

And he kept it on

through the whole thing?

He takes it

1:38:431:38:49

off now.

Towards the end. He did

most of it. It probably got hot.

1:38:491:38:57

There you go. That was the end. Make

sure the hair is in place. Thank

1:38:571:39:02

you.

1:39:021:39:14

Hull was the City of Culture for

2017. It is a knock-on effect for

1:39:141:39:18

the local economy. We are there this

morning.

Good morning.

Good morning.

1:39:181:39:24

I am out Hull Marina. It is a bit

wet and windy. That has not stopped

1:39:241:39:31

the city from celebrating the fact

that for over a year now it has in a

1:39:311:39:38

City of Culture. They think it has

made a difference of £60 million in

1:39:381:39:42

terms of the economy. Tonight, we

find out who gets the crown next. We

1:39:421:39:46

are looking this morning at what

difference having that title means

1:39:461:39:49

to an area. We have some local

businesspeople we can talk to. First

1:39:491:39:54

of all, Laura, what difference has

it made? A huge difference. It has

1:39:541:39:59

given the city confidence, which has

been seen to be local businesses

1:39:591:40:05

established this year. Our business

has had that. We went on and have

1:40:051:40:17

not looked back. It has been an

amazing year and have many clients

1:40:171:40:21

in the city.

Do you think you would

not have had that if this area had

1:40:211:40:26

not had the City of Culture.

We

could still have made a success, but

1:40:261:40:34

it gave us the opportunity to start

are in agency and leave our previous

1:40:341:40:38

job and follow our dreams. -- our

own.

And you have a 3D printing

1:40:381:40:44

business. Has it made a difference?

Having the creative culture of the

1:40:441:40:51

UK focused on Hull has made it easy

to be nationwide rather than local.

1:40:511:40:57

In for a business like yours, one of

the criticisms of him in the act one

1:40:571:41:02

is the transport is not great. --

being in the north.

There are slight

1:41:021:41:09

concerns about that. But the fact of

having everything focused on us for

1:41:091:41:14

a year and going on from that, the

barriers are overcome quite quickly.

1:41:141:41:18

Especially with the Internet.

You

are from Siemens, a huge company,

1:41:181:41:26

tell us what it has meant for your

business.

I work for the wind

1:41:261:41:30

turbines division. It is not a great

retail impact, because we will not

1:41:301:41:36

sell more wind turbines for the back

of it, but it is critical we get

1:41:361:41:42

behind the city. It is critical for

us to employ people who feel

1:41:421:41:47

involved in the culture.

For you

guys, it is about the skills it can

1:41:471:41:51

bring to the area. Are people who

could potentially work for you.

One

1:41:511:41:56

of the major installations was a

giant wind turbine in the centre of

1:41:561:42:06

town. If it inspires people, that is

fantastic for everyone.

And let's

1:42:061:42:09

talk about some pies. We have the

local pie man. Your business

1:42:091:42:22

supplies lots in the area.

It has

been great. It increases tourism,

1:42:221:42:25

bringing a focus on the brand on the

brand and the awareness. We supplied

1:42:251:42:29

the stadium and pubs and many

things. But what it has brought us

1:42:291:42:34

is tourism and people coming to the

city and engaging and going back to

1:42:341:42:38

their home city to tell other

people.

It is a lot of confidence as

1:42:381:42:45

well.

Totally. The city has grown

within itself this year. The

1:42:451:42:49

confidence is high. Everyone is

excited, and they love the fact

1:42:491:42:53

everyone is looking at us and

thinking, wow, check them out, they

1:42:531:43:03

can go the extra mile.

That is a

boost this area needed. Like my

1:43:031:43:06

hometown, it can often get a lot of

bad press because people say they

1:43:061:43:10

are struggling with jobs and that

kind of thing. It is important.

It

1:43:101:43:14

is. You can feel the increased

confidence, you can feel the boost

1:43:141:43:17

the city has had. People talk about

Hullness. I have heard that since I

1:43:171:43:23

have been here. The pride in the

area has increased.

Can I ask you a

1:43:231:43:28

bit about how sustainable this is in

terms of, you know, you have the

1:43:281:43:41

title now but it goes somewhere else

soon. Can it continue, the

1:43:411:43:45

investment and confidence?

I am

confident. It has been a springboard

1:43:451:43:47

for the city. It has awakened

people. There is creative curiosity.

1:43:471:43:52

There is momentum. I don't think

people want that to stop. With that

1:43:521:43:56

back in the city and the new energy

we have seen invigorating everyone,

1:43:561:44:00

I feel confident. We have a lot to

offer. Even just with arts and

1:44:001:44:14

culture. The Freedom Festival has

been here for ten years. I think it

1:44:141:44:18

will continue.

I love your optimism

this morning. It is fantastic to see

1:44:181:44:21

you, despite the fact it is

incredibly windy outside. More from

1:44:211:44:24

me later. It is! We are talking

about food again so be it is a theme

1:44:241:44:31

this morning! Does look like some

really tasty pies. Pies. -- again.

1:44:311:44:44

Tomorrow we will be live from the

newly crowned winner of City of

1:44:441:44:48

Culture 2021, it will be Sunderland,

commentary, Paisley, or

1:44:481:44:52

Stoke-on-Trent. -- Coventry.

1:44:521:44:57

This was meant to be a decisive week

when it came to Brexit but there's

1:44:571:45:02

no sign Theresa May has found a

solution to the sticking point of

1:45:021:45:05

the Irish border issue. There have

been hints from Dublin that a new

1:45:051:45:09

offer from Downing Street is on its

way but no details have yet emerged.

1:45:091:45:18

Our next guest may have more

of an idea, we can welcome

1:45:181:45:22

the transport secretary

1:45:221:45:23

Chris Grayling from Westminster this

morning.

1:45:231:45:24

What can you tell us?

We're in the

middle of a negotiating process, I

1:45:241:45:28

can't give you a running commentary

on the detail, but I'm optimistic we

1:45:281:45:32

will return an agreement that allows

us to move to the next stage of

1:45:321:45:36

negotiations. This is just a

bridging agreement, allowing us to

1:45:361:45:39

broaden the discussion is to discuss

the future of trade which is crucial

1:45:391:45:43

to working out what happens on the

Irish border. I hope there will be

1:45:431:45:47

free trade and no real change. This

stock line, not going to give you a

1:45:471:45:53

Wierling commentary, isn't good

enough.

Given the chaos that has

1:45:531:45:56

surrounded this process, I think you

and your Cabinet colleagues of

1:45:561:46:01

people more -- running commentary.

-- owe people more. I think many

1:46:011:46:09

people would want to know what you,

Theresa May and the Cabinet and the

1:46:091:46:13

Brexit secretary are doing between

now and then to change things?

We

1:46:131:46:17

are aiming at four things, we are

not going to... We are working very

1:46:171:46:21

hard to make sure we have a sensible

agreement for the future, that we

1:46:211:46:25

have a partnership in trading terms,

that we continue to work together

1:46:251:46:29

closely in areas like security and

we have a smooth transition out of

1:46:291:46:34

the European Union.

You were doing

those things before, you are giving

1:46:341:46:38

me generalities, what we're trying

to establish and the clock is

1:46:381:46:41

ticking here, you know that more

than anyone, what's going to be

1:46:411:46:44

different about the wording of the

proposals that you are hopefully

1:46:441:46:48

going to put forward? Let's start

with some basics, is there going to

1:46:481:46:52

be a new forming of words that you

put forward by tomorrow night?

I'm

1:46:521:46:56

not going to go into the specifics

of the discussion that is taking

1:46:561:47:00

place.

That's a very simple

question, is there going to be one?

1:47:001:47:04

We're very clear, look at the Irish

border, we're not going to impose a

1:47:041:47:09

hard border on the divide between

Northern Ireland and the Republic of

1:47:091:47:13

Ireland. We're not going to do a

deal that undermines the integrity

1:47:131:47:17

of the United Kingdom. What we are

going to do is come up with what we

1:47:171:47:21

believe will be a strong partnership

for the future, one where there is

1:47:211:47:25

free trade and actually the whole

issue of the free movement of goods

1:47:251:47:28

across the Irish border becomes

superseded by the partnership we put

1:47:281:47:31

in place for the future. That the

Cotia Asian is taking place right

1:47:311:47:35

now and we're working towards a

negotiating council next week --

1:47:351:47:41

that negotiation. You wouldn't

expect massive details at this

1:47:411:47:46

stage.

You are misunderstanding me,

the Irish are expecting to hear from

1:47:461:47:53

Theresa May either today or

tomorrow, are they going to hear

1:47:531:47:57

from her today or tomorrow and are

you relaxed about the idea of this

1:47:571:48:01

deadline disappearing and we are

talking about next year for the

1:48:011:48:04

trade talks?

There are discussions

taking place all the time and they

1:48:041:48:08

will continue up to the European

council. Of course that's happening.

1:48:081:48:14

I'm confused, if you can't tell me

Theresa May is going to come up with

1:48:141:48:18

a new proposal, that's a bit

alarming, isn't it? That means

1:48:181:48:21

everything will be pushed into the

long grass possibly into the New

1:48:211:48:25

Year.

I'm saying there are

discussions taking place through the

1:48:251:48:30

new goal Mike week and I'm confident

they will get us to a point that by

1:48:301:48:34

the time we get to the European

Council we will have an agreement to

1:48:341:48:38

have constructive trade talks --

through the week. Those talks will

1:48:381:48:42

take place through the week.

How

close is the government now

1:48:421:48:46

involving the DUP in any wording of

any proposals?

We talk to the DUP

1:48:461:48:52

regularly of course.

But you didn't

before, that's the problem, that's

1:48:521:48:56

why I asked the question.

This isn't

about the relationship between two

1:48:561:49:00

parties, it's about doing the right

thing for the people of Northern

1:49:001:49:03

Ireland as well and we are clearly

mindful of that as we do this. We're

1:49:031:49:07

not going to do anything that

undermines the integrity of the UK.

1:49:071:49:11

It's not just a question of the DUP,

as the Conservative and Unionist

1:49:111:49:16

party we wouldn't do anything to

undermine the integrity of the UK.

1:49:161:49:21

Maybe you could reassure people, if

that's what you're seeking to do,

1:49:211:49:24

given what happened on Monday too

many people's shock that the

1:49:241:49:29

negotiations, the discussions had

not included the DUP, who then

1:49:291:49:33

stopped the whole process, maybe you

could reassure people that this time

1:49:331:49:37

around the DUP will be across the

wording so they don't scupper it

1:49:371:49:41

again.

We will be very careful to

make sure as we go through the rest

1:49:411:49:45

of the process we are mindful both

of the concerns and interests of

1:49:451:49:49

people in Northern Ireland, but also

the need to maintain the integrity

1:49:491:49:53

of the United Kingdom. That's

absolutely right. But Appian of this

1:49:531:49:56

we aren't going to sign up to a deal

bad for the United Kingdom. -- but

1:49:561:50:01

at the end of this. When Theresa May

said no deal is better than a bad

1:50:011:50:05

deal she's right.

Can we talk about

Philip Hammond's comments, during

1:50:051:50:10

this process people have been

surprised about the disparities

1:50:101:50:13

between what you and your Cabinet

colleagues have been saying, the

1:50:131:50:17

Chancellor, Philip Hammond, appeared

to suggest that if there was no deal

1:50:171:50:22

we pay the 50 billion euros anyway.

Is he correct?

The key point is we

1:50:221:50:26

and the European Union have said

nothing is agreed until everything

1:50:261:50:30

is agreed. When we get to an

agreement at the end of this we of

1:50:301:50:34

course expect to fulfil the terms...

If you don't reach an agreement will

1:50:341:50:38

do pay anyway?

There won't be an

agreement on money until we get to a

1:50:381:50:43

complete agreement. We have always

said and we say now that nothing is

1:50:431:50:50

agreed until everything is agreed.

This is a staging post on the way to

1:50:501:50:53

a second phase of talks. We are

agreeing principles about the final

1:50:531:50:58

settlement, we will then talk about

trade but nothing is agreed until

1:50:581:51:01

everything is agreed.

David Davis

also gave people a bit of a shock

1:51:011:51:06

yesterday by informing us that there

is no strategic plan, no

1:51:061:51:12

calculations made about the impact

of Brexit. Other politicians were

1:51:121:51:18

aghast at the notion that your

government is not making those

1:51:181:51:22

plans, not trying to make those

calculations. How on earth is that

1:51:221:51:27

responsible?

Well, I think there's a

misunderstanding over these papers.

1:51:271:51:30

What we have done over 800 pages of

analysis is look at how European law

1:51:301:51:37

impacts different sectors in the

country to sort out different areas.

1:51:371:51:40

We aren't looking at fighting the

referendum campaign again to say

1:51:401:51:45

what the impact of different

scenarios of Brexit, because

1:51:451:51:49

ultimately what we are aiming for is

a sensible free trade agreement and

1:51:491:51:52

that we are not in the job of the

economic forecasting you see from

1:51:521:51:59

organisations like the Office for

Budget Responsibility. Our job is to

1:51:591:52:02

work out exactly what we need to

negotiate and there are 800 pages of

1:52:021:52:06

impact analysis of European law on

individual sectors of the economy

1:52:061:52:10

that we provided to the committee in

the House of Commons that help us

1:52:101:52:14

shape that negotiation.

I'm not

quite sure what your role was today

1:52:141:52:18

in being sent out and doing media

interviews, I know you're doing the

1:52:181:52:22

rounds today, but was your job to

reassure people that things are

1:52:221:52:26

going well and things are in hand,

because I'm not sure you've done

1:52:261:52:30

that!

My job very simply is to say

to people, look, we're in the middle

1:52:301:52:35

of a negotiation, it's a complex

negotiation, they have their ups and

1:52:351:52:39

downs and we're confident we will

have a sensible basis to move to the

1:52:391:52:43

next stage of talks. Our goal is to

secure a sensible free-trade

1:52:431:52:50

partnership for the future with the

EU and not have any kind of border

1:52:501:52:54

between northern and southern

Ireland, we are clear, we won't

1:52:541:52:56

impose a border between the two and

our goal is to make sure we do the

1:52:561:53:01

right thing to support the union of

Great Britain and Northern Ireland

1:53:011:53:04

and our goal is to get a good deal

for Britain and not a bad deal for

1:53:041:53:09

Britain.

One more thing, if in the

middle of next week when in theory

1:53:091:53:13

we are meant to celebrate the trade

talks beginning, if that doesn't

1:53:131:53:17

happen, for whatever reason, how

much of a calamity is that?

Look, I

1:53:171:53:23

am an optimist.

I understand you're

an optimist but if it doesn't

1:53:231:53:27

happen...

We doing all the

preparations people would expect for

1:53:271:53:31

all scenarios. We are preparing for

a no deal scenario and a free-trade

1:53:311:53:35

agreement. All the work people would

expect us to do is being done.

1:53:351:53:39

Chris Grayling, thanks for your time

this morning. Speaking from Weston

1:53:391:53:44

is that this morning, the transport

Secretary.

1:53:441:53:47

Let's talk to Carol to look at the

weather. It's getting very chilly.

1:53:471:53:50

It is getting chilly today, you're

quite right, but as well as that we

1:53:521:53:56

have a storm on the way, some

feeling the impact already, Storm

1:53:561:53:59

Caroline. Wherever you are today it

will be very windy but the storm

1:53:591:54:05

force winds in the north of Scotland

are strong. The rain clearing and

1:54:051:54:08

behind the rain it's turning much

colder. The Met Office has an amber

1:54:081:54:14

weather warnings out for Storm

Caroline. You can see it here, 80

1:54:141:54:19

mph gusts, even 90 mph gusts. For

the most of the rest of Scotland and

1:54:191:54:23

the north of Northern Ireland, 70

mph gusts, they are damaging and

1:54:231:54:27

could cause power cuts and bring

down power lines and other root

1:54:271:54:31

trees. That's half the story because

in the north of Scotland we've also

1:54:311:54:35

got snow and that will be

increasingly falling at low levels

1:54:351:54:39

so blizzard conditions. Moving away

from Scotland, rain continuing to

1:54:391:54:43

move across England and Wales,

pushing into the south-east and

1:54:431:54:47

behind it, brighter skies and the

temperature will drop and it will be

1:54:471:54:51

a windy day wherever you are. As the

temperature drops the showers and

1:54:511:54:54

rain showers we have will

increasingly turn wintry in Northern

1:54:541:54:59

Ireland, northern England and north

Wales. Through the evening and

1:54:591:55:02

overnight it will still be very

windy, Storm Caroline pushes off to

1:55:021:55:07

the net continent and we continue

with our snow piling in cross

1:55:071:55:11

Northern Scotland -- near continent.

Northern Ireland, northern England

1:55:111:55:15

and Wales and the Midlands. We could

see lying snow first thing,

1:55:151:55:20

significant amounts, even at lower

levels and a dusting across much of

1:55:201:55:23

the rest of England and down to the

south, including the London area. A

1:55:231:55:28

cold night with the risk of ice and

a widespread frost. Tomorrow, an

1:55:281:55:33

action replay of what happened

overnight, more snow coming in a

1:55:331:55:38

cross Northern Scotland, Northern

Ireland, parts of northern England,

1:55:381:55:41

around Cheshire for example,

Manchester, Wales and the Midlands,

1:55:411:55:45

snow flurries across the London

area. But showers and so not all

1:55:451:55:48

will see them and in between will be

some sunshine. Temperature wise,

1:55:481:55:55

whatever you see on your

thermometer, it will feel colder, it

1:55:551:55:59

will feel like -64 example of the

windchill -- -6 four example in

1:55:591:56:07

Aberdeen because of the

1:56:071:56:08

There's plenty more on our website

too at the usual address.

1:59:291:59:31

Bye bye.

1:59:311:59:32

Hello, this is Breakfast, with

Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty.

1:59:541:59:56

Missed targets in

Accident and Emergency.

1:59:562:00:00

More than 3 million people in the UK

waited more than four

2:00:002:00:02

hours in the last year.

2:00:022:00:05

The numbers have more

than doubled since 2013.

2:00:052:00:07

Doctors say they can't meet demand.

2:00:072:00:17

Good morning, it's

Thursday, 7th December.

2:00:242:00:25

Also this morning...

2:00:252:00:27

Pressure on the Prime Minister -

Ireland and the EU call

2:00:272:00:29

for Theresa May to have more clarity

on Brexit by the end of the week.

2:00:292:00:34

Widespread condemnation

of President Trump's decision

2:00:342:00:37

to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's

capital - the UN Security Council

2:00:372:00:40

will hold an emergency meeting.

2:00:402:00:48

Good morning from Hull Marina. This

area was declared the City of

2:00:482:00:54

Culture last year. Tonight we will

find out where the crown will be

2:00:542:00:58

going next so I have come here to

find out what difference it has made

2:00:582:01:01

to the city.

2:01:012:01:05

Good morning.

2:01:052:01:06

In sport, Liverpool net

seven goals to make it

2:01:062:01:08

a record-breaking five English teams

through to the Champions

2:01:082:01:10

League knockout stages.

2:01:102:01:15

# Silent night, holy night... #

2:01:152:01:22

He's the Pointless presenter

turned singing star -

2:01:222:01:24

Alexander Armstrong will be here.

2:01:242:01:25

And Carol has the weather.

2:01:252:01:28

Good morning. Stallman Caroline

crossing the north of Scotland --

2:01:282:01:34

Storm Caroline. Falling snow at snow

levels, blizzard conditions. For the

2:01:342:01:43

rest of us, windy, the rain

clearing, temperatures falling. The

2:01:432:01:47

rain showers will turn wintry. All

of the details and 15 minutes.

2:01:472:01:55

Good morning.

2:01:552:01:56

First, our main story.

2:01:562:01:58

The number of patients experiencing

long waits in accident and emergency

2:01:582:02:00

departments in the UK has more

than doubled in the last four years.

2:02:002:02:03

Research by the BBC found that more

than 3 million people waited longer

2:02:032:02:06

than the four-hour target

in the last year.

2:02:062:02:08

Doctors say it shows

the NHS can no longer cope.

2:02:082:02:11

The Department of Health said

more money has been made

2:02:112:02:13

available to NHS England.

2:02:132:02:14

Here's our health

correspondent, Dominic Hughes.

2:02:142:02:16

Right across the UK,

accident and emergency departments

2:02:162:02:20

have been working at full capacity.

2:02:202:02:24

Now BBC analysis shows how

an already busy system

2:02:242:02:26

is struggling to cope.

2:02:262:02:32

The waiting time targets to treat

or deal with 95% of patients

2:02:322:02:35

within four hours have been missed

across the country.

2:02:352:02:38

In the past year, more

than 3 million patients waited

2:02:382:02:41

longer than four hours -

an increase of 120%

2:02:412:02:43

on four years ago.

2:02:432:02:53

But visits to A&E are up by only 7%,

to nearly 27 million.

2:02:532:02:56

To ensure the target is met,

the NHS will need to build

2:02:562:02:59

an additional 20 more

A&E departments.

2:02:592:03:00

There is no more

capacity in the system.

2:03:002:03:02

Staff are working really hard,

our nurses, our doctors,

2:03:022:03:04

and we have reached a point

where we, unfortunately,

2:03:042:03:07

cannot meet that demand.

2:03:072:03:14

Scotland has come closest

to hitting the target,

2:03:142:03:18

while England has seen the biggest

increase in those facing a long

2:03:182:03:21

wait, but performance

is even worse in Wales.

2:03:212:03:23

Northern Ireland manages

to see just three quarters

2:03:232:03:25

of patients within four hours.

2:03:252:03:32

A busier NHS means longer waiting

times and as we head

2:03:322:03:35

into what could be a very hard

winter, there is little sign

2:03:352:03:38

of respite for staff or patients.

2:03:382:03:39

Dominic Hughes, BBC News.

2:03:392:03:41

You can find out how your local

hospital is performing by using the

2:03:412:03:45

BBC NHS track on the BBC News

website.

2:03:452:03:52

The Irish Prime Minister has said

Theresa May wants to put forward

2:03:522:03:55

a new plan for the future

of the Irish border after Brexit.

2:03:552:03:57

Negotiations with the EU stalled

earlier this week when a proposal

2:03:572:04:00

on the issue was rejected

by Northern Ireland's

2:04:002:04:02

Democratic Unionist Party.

2:04:022:04:03

Our political correspondent,

Iain Watson, is in

2:04:032:04:05

Westminster this morning.

2:04:052:04:09

The message we are hearing, we spoke

to Chris Grayling, Transport

2:04:092:04:15

Secretary, it is fine, and control,

but we are still negotiating, yet

2:04:152:04:20

there is pressure on the Prime

Minister to come up with something

2:04:202:04:23

solid.

Is huge pressure. But Irish

prime ministers is expecting new

2:04:232:04:30

proposals from Theresa May today or

tomorrow and the chief negotiator of

2:04:302:04:35

the EU is suggesting that if he does

not see them by tomorrow evening,

2:04:352:04:38

the EU ambassadors cannot go back to

their individual countries to

2:04:382:04:42

prepare the way for trade talks, the

big prize, the European summit

2:04:422:04:50

meeting next week. Chris Grayling on

this programme earlier, I am not

2:04:502:04:55

quite sure he regarded it as a

deadline. The deadline he was

2:04:552:04:58

working towards and the Government

was the summit which is actually in

2:04:582:05:03

a week. He tried to reassure people

that the negotiations were on track.

2:05:032:05:08

Our goal is to not have any kind of

border between northern and southern

2:05:082:05:13

island, we will not impose a fixed

border. Our goal is to make sure we

2:05:132:05:18

do the right thing to support our

union of the UK and Great Britain

2:05:182:05:22

and Northern Ireland and our goal is

to make sure we sign up to a deal

2:05:222:05:26

that is good for Britain, not a deal

that is bad.

Chris Grayling making

2:05:262:05:31

the point the Government does not

want a bad deal, no surprise there,

2:05:312:05:35

but how it can get to a good deal is

very much in Theresa May's focus

2:05:352:05:40

because she does not have to simply

keep the Irish prime ministers at

2:05:402:05:45

the or even the EU, she has to get

on board, the DUP, the party

2:05:452:05:53

propping up. They sounding less

upbeat, suggesting there will not be

2:05:532:05:58

a deal this week. That will make it

difficult. You will see a lot more

2:05:582:06:02

criticism of the Prime Minister at

Westminster.

We will keep following

2:06:022:06:07

it. Thank you very much.

2:06:072:06:10

British citizens who leave

the country to fight

2:06:102:06:12

for the Islamic State group

shouldn't be allowed

2:06:122:06:14

back into the country -

that's according to the Defence

2:06:142:06:16

Secretary, Gavin Williamson.

2:06:162:06:18

Mr Williamson told the the Daily

Mail that such British fighters

2:06:182:06:20

should be hunted down and killed

because, as he put it,

2:06:202:06:23

"A dead terrorist couldn't cause

any harm to Britain."

2:06:232:06:28

The UN Security Council is expected

to hold an emergency meeting of the

2:06:282:06:32

President Trump made the historic

decision to recognise the disputed

2:06:322:06:36

city of Jerusalem as Israel's

capital overturning decades of US

2:06:362:06:40

policy. Mr Trump said the decision

was long overdue and reflected the

2:06:402:06:46

reality of Israel's presence in the

city and said it does not mean an

2:06:462:06:59

end to the US's commitment to peace

in the Middle East. We can speak to

2:06:592:07:03

our correspondent in Jerusalem now.

Explain to us what the reaction has

2:07:032:07:06

been because Donald Trump said he

would do this and he has now made

2:07:062:07:08

the announcement, it is a reality,

what has the reaction been?

In

2:07:082:07:11

Jerusalem, things on the streets

were calm last night. There are

2:07:112:07:15

however demonstrations planned for

later today, particularly in the

2:07:152:07:19

occupied West Bank. There were

protests yesterday into the evening

2:07:192:07:24

particularly in Gaza where

demonstrators were burning American

2:07:242:07:27

flags and pictures of Donald Trump,

more broadly, in terms of the

2:07:272:07:31

diplomatic reaction, it has not gone

down well, to say the least. With

2:07:312:07:36

just about every other country in

the world, aside from Israel.

2:07:362:07:41

Palestinian Authority said Donald

Trump Ozma speech was reprehensible

2:07:412:07:47

and Mahmoud Abbas said the decision

to recognise Jerusalem as the

2:07:472:07:50

capital in effect disqualified the

US from having its historical role

2:07:502:07:55

as a broker for peace between

Israelis and Palestinians. The list

2:07:552:08:00

grew overnight as to the number of

countries particularly in the Arab

2:08:002:08:04

and Muslim world who have condemned

or expressed concern over this.

2:08:042:08:08

There will be a UN meeting tomorrow,

an emergency session, to address

2:08:082:08:17

this. As for Israel, the Prime

Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hailed

2:08:172:08:23

the speech as historic, recognition

from the US of their true place as

2:08:232:08:27

having Israel's capital is

Jerusalem. There has been many pride

2:08:272:08:34

among Israelis particularly on the

front pages of the newspapers about

2:08:342:08:39

the decision. Benjamin Netanyahu

stressed there would be no change to

2:08:392:08:41

the status quo, the arrangement

around the holy sites, very

2:08:412:08:47

sensitive sites, in the old city of

Jerusalem.

For the moment, thank

2:08:472:08:50

you.

2:08:502:08:53

A fast moving wildfire in southern

California has hit the highway and

2:08:532:08:56

reached the Pacific ocean according

to firefighters. The homes of more

2:08:562:09:01

than 150,000 people have been

evacuated in an area north of Los

2:09:012:09:05

Angeles. Hundreds of buildings have

been damaged. Strong winds are

2:09:052:09:10

expected to further hinder efforts

to contain the fire which is

2:09:102:09:15

endangering 12,000 properties.

Legislation for same-sex marriage

2:09:152:09:17

has been passed by the. A public

vote earlier this year, the majority

2:09:172:09:22

of people supported the change. --

passed by the Australian government.

2:09:222:09:29

The first weddings under the new law

could take place early next year.

2:09:292:09:33

Fresh controversy over the pay of

senior academics after it emerged

2:09:332:09:38

Bath spa University paid its

departing Vice Chancellor more than

2:09:382:09:43

£800,000 last year in pay and

benefits. University said the figure

2:09:432:09:48

reflected her entitlement under the

contract and was agreed following

2:09:482:09:51

legal advice. The Royal Navy's new

aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth

2:09:512:10:02

will be commissioned into service

later today. The Queen will be guest

2:10:022:10:05

of honour at the ceremony marking

the official handover to the Navy.

2:10:052:10:08

The ship is the most expensive in

British naval history. It cost

2:10:082:10:14

around £3 billion to build. It will

not be operational until 2021 but

2:10:142:10:19

the captain says today marks an

important milestone.

2:10:192:10:25

The sport for us a little later. And

the weather later.

2:10:252:10:33

Childhood obesity is an issue the UK

Government has been trying to tackle

2:10:332:10:36

for a number of years

and a new report is suggesting

2:10:362:10:39

the answer may be to go Dutch.

2:10:392:10:41

The independent think tank,

the Centre for Social Justice, says

2:10:412:10:43

we should be following the example

of Amsterdam, which is apparently

2:10:432:10:46

the only city in Europe

to have reduced obesity

2:10:462:10:48

in the last five years.

2:10:482:10:49

So, what can we learn from them?

2:10:492:10:51

We spoke to parents in Amsterdam

to find out what they've been doing.

2:10:512:10:55

It is really, really important

that they have enough exercise

2:11:022:11:08

and I think that's the advantage of

living in a big city like Amsterdam.

2:11:082:11:12

We don't always have

the luxury to move by car.

2:11:122:11:15

When I go shopping and do

the groceries, I also think about,

2:11:152:11:18

well, what do I want to eat myself,

but also, what do I want

2:11:182:11:21

to learn the kids?

2:11:212:11:22

And I teach them about what's

healthy and what's not.

2:11:222:11:27

No Cola, no Fanta or

something like that.

2:11:272:11:29

So a lot of water.

2:11:292:11:35

We try to give him healthy foods

and make sure that he has

2:11:392:11:42

a decent breakfast.

2:11:422:11:44

Sometimes if they ask for more sugar

and for more chips and for more...

2:11:442:11:50

You can say no.

2:11:502:11:55

We're joined now by Paul Gately,

who's a professor of

2:11:552:11:57

exercise and obesity

from Leeds Beckett University

2:11:572:11:59

and has helped create that report.

2:11:592:12:02

He also travelled to

Amsterdam to see for himself

2:12:022:12:04

what they've been doing.

2:12:042:12:10

All the advice is good and parents

are saying, we are being much more

2:12:102:12:15

mindful, schools getting involved

and banning children from drinking

2:12:152:12:18

certain things, it feels a little

bit nanny state, or is that not the

2:12:182:12:23

feeling you got?

No, what I got was

an action by parents, children,

2:12:232:12:31

public health officials, companies

across Amsterdam, they were really

2:12:312:12:34

working together to save, childhood

obesity is a major issue, we see the

2:12:342:12:39

impact it is having on our children

and economy and health care system,

2:12:392:12:44

we need to work collectively. It is

not about saying ban this, it is

2:12:442:12:49

about educating, living and living

more effectively.

If a child is sent

2:12:492:12:53

to school in Amsterdam with a sugary

drink, are they allowed to drink it

2:12:532:12:57

at lunchtime in the school?

There

are restrictions during school time.

2:12:572:13:04

The school have control over what

they eat and drink?

Absolutely. But

2:13:042:13:08

they are not restricting outside of

school. It is about a balance,

2:13:082:13:12

creating an environment that does

not create obesity but at the same

2:13:122:13:17

time says, there are plenty of times

to eat healthily and unhealthily.

I

2:13:172:13:23

do not think anyone would disagree.

But I wonder how it would go down

2:13:232:13:28

here in the UK.

The point is, there

are many lessons to learn from

2:13:282:13:33

Amsterdam. First and most important,

the deputy mayor of Amsterdam, he

2:13:332:13:38

has taken on this as an agenda and

driven it collectively. That

2:13:382:13:43

political collective myth is

critical. We do not have government

2:13:432:13:48

leadership on childhood obesity --

that political collectivity is

2:13:482:13:53

critical. They have looked at

children that might be overweight

2:13:532:13:57

and obese in the future and put

things in to help them address the

2:13:572:14:01

problem. They have also focused on

the one in five children in

2:14:012:14:05

Amsterdam that have a problem and

they have tackled that problem

2:14:052:14:09

directly. We have got some bits of

that in the UK, we have done great

2:14:092:14:14

work recently on sugar tax and other

things that will prevent children

2:14:142:14:18

getting overweight and obese. Ten

years ago, we gave up on the one in

2:14:182:14:23

three children that already have the

problem and those are the children

2:14:232:14:29

who will cost the NHS a lot of money

in the future. It is the leadership

2:14:292:14:35

across the population that Amsterdam

have pulled together and also the

2:14:352:14:38

different partners. It is very much

a partnership approach, it is not

2:14:382:14:42

one blaming another, not parents or

schools or the government being

2:14:422:14:48

blamed, everybody working

collectively and that is the

2:14:482:14:50

critical thing they have that we

have not achieved in the UK.

How do

2:14:502:14:54

we square what you have said with

what the Department of Health have

2:14:542:14:58

told us? They say, the Government is

delivering the most ambitious

2:14:582:15:02

childhood obesity plan in the world.

Yeah.

You said yes? Are they?

No.

2:15:022:15:10

That is what we hear. There is no

political leadership. Jamie Oliver

2:15:102:15:16

flagged last year the childhood

obesity plan was ripped apart. The

2:15:162:15:21

original one set by David Cameron

was ripped apart, and then it was a

2:15:212:15:25

12 page document.

Help us with some

of the practicalities. At the

2:15:252:15:31

moment, they say they have got an

ambitious plan, most ambitious in

2:15:312:15:35

the world. If you have the

wherewithal, you were within

2:15:352:15:38

Whitehall, what is this thing you

want to start? What is it, a whole

2:15:382:15:43

new department? What is it that

starts the process?

As a scientist,

2:15:432:15:51

I would say, what does the data tell

us? Year on year, obesity rates are

2:15:512:15:57

going up. In Amsterdam, it is going

down. You cannot have the most

2:15:572:16:01

ambitious plan in the world if our

rates are going up and other

2:16:012:16:05

people's are going down. The second

point is, it is ambitious on things

2:16:052:16:12

like sugar tax and reformulation but

that only prevents the problem in

2:16:122:16:16

those that do not have the issue.

Those who have the problem, we gave

2:16:162:16:20

up on them ten years ago, all of

the... 2.5 million children in the

2:16:202:16:27

UK are obese. Services provided by

the NHS for 133 of those children.

2:16:272:16:32

You cannot tell me that is world

leading.

2:16:322:16:40

In an ideal world what does it look

like?

The first thing is political

2:16:402:16:45

leadership driving all partners

together, not one saying one thing

2:16:452:16:49

and the others saying another thing

which is what happens in the UK.

2:16:492:16:54

That political leadership drives

direction. Second, we have to look

2:16:542:16:57

at those who have already got a

problem and not give up on them.

2:16:572:17:02

Third, Amsterdam have been very

careful to make sure that they do

2:17:022:17:05

not widen the health issues. We are

seeing an increase in obesity rates

2:17:052:17:12

in the most deprived communities. It

is about leadership in action at all

2:17:122:17:16

levels and focusing on those most in

need.

Paul, very interesting, thank

2:17:162:17:21

you very much.

2:17:212:17:28

Here's Carol with a look

at this morning's weather.

2:17:282:17:32

There is going to be some snow on

the way, and it is windy as well.

2:17:322:17:36

For the whole of the UK we have a

very windy day in prospect. Storm

2:17:402:17:46

Caroline is coming in and we have

got some rain. It clears away from

2:17:462:17:52

the south-east and it will turn much

colder. The rain showers will turn

2:17:522:17:55

wintry. Storm Caroline is coming in

from the West and heading eastwards.

2:17:552:18:03

It is also going to be very windy

across Scotland and Northern Ireland

2:18:032:18:07

and also in England and Wales. The

Met Office has an amber weather

2:18:072:18:12

warning out for the North of

Scotland, gusts of wind are lucky to

2:18:122:18:17

be 80 miles an hour. For the rest of

Scotland and Northern Ireland, 70

2:18:172:18:24

miles an hour. They could take

slaves of the roof and cause power

2:18:242:18:28

cuts. Something to be aware of. As

well as that we have got wintry

2:18:282:18:34

showers in the North of Scotland

progressively turning to snow even

2:18:342:18:37

at lower levels and that combination

means blizzards. As the rain pulls

2:18:372:18:42

away from the South East it will

still be windy behind it, but there

2:18:422:18:46

will be sunshine coming through. The

showers will be wintry in nature as

2:18:462:18:53

well. This afternoon we have got the

snow, the wind, the storm crossing

2:18:532:18:57

and it will feel bitter with

blizzards. For Northern Ireland,

2:18:572:19:03

southern Scotland and northern

England there will be wintry showers

2:19:032:19:05

and it will feel cold. For Wales and

into the South West it will brighten

2:19:052:19:10

up and we will see some sunshine.

The maximum temperature now is 14th

2:19:102:19:17

in Exeter and that will go down

during the day. In the south-east it

2:19:172:19:22

will be dry this afternoon with

sunny spells. Showers continue

2:19:222:19:27

across northern England and some of

them will be wintry. This evening

2:19:272:19:32

and overnight we continue with the

snow falling across Scotland and

2:19:322:19:36

further snow will fall across

Northern Ireland, parts of northern

2:19:362:19:39

England and Wales and the Midlands.

It will be called with the risk of

2:19:392:19:51

ice and frost. Tomorrow we continue

with that scenario, still more snow

2:19:512:19:55

coming into the same areas, northern

Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales

2:19:552:20:01

and the Midlands. We could see some

snow flurries in London as well.

2:20:012:20:07

Despite the temperatures it will

feel cold because of the wind. More

2:20:072:20:13

snow in the weekend. But not

everywhere.

2:20:132:20:14

When a group of women including

singer Taylor Swift came forward

2:20:212:20:24

to speak out about sexual

misconduct, little did they know

2:20:242:20:26

they would be honoured on the front

cover of the American weekly news

2:20:262:20:29

publication Time Magazine.

2:20:292:20:35

They have been named as Person of

the year.

2:20:352:20:39

The journalist Jane Merrick also

spoke out against the practice

2:20:392:20:41

following her own

personal experience.

2:20:412:20:43

She joins us down the line

now from west London.

2:20:432:20:46

Thank you for talking to us. How

does it feel to be part of the

2:20:462:20:49

person of the year?

It is amazing. I

am proud to be on that list, it is

2:20:492:20:56

extraordinary. When I and others

started to talk about this we had no

2:20:562:21:01

idea about the impact it would have.

Being caught up in it you do not get

2:21:012:21:06

the chance to step back and see. The

recognition they have given to this

2:21:062:21:11

is one of the major stories of the

year is important.

We are talking

2:21:112:21:23

about the #metoo campaign. Did you

have any idea about the momentum it

2:21:232:21:26

would gather at all when the Harvey

Weinstein allegations were coming

2:21:262:21:33

out of Hollywood I was aware of my

own experiences and when it came to

2:21:332:21:38

Westminster the stories were

gathering pace and it seems to have

2:21:382:21:42

taken the momentum of its own and

what is really important is that it

2:21:422:21:45

carries on having that momentum, it

just does not become a story about

2:21:452:21:51

2017, it carries on about being

something we can shed light on.

2:21:512:21:57

In the previous year Time magazine

named Donald Trump as Person of the

2:21:572:22:02

Year. Do you take anything from

that?

It is quite a nice symmetry

2:22:022:22:07

that Donald Trump beat the woman to

the White House last year and he

2:22:072:22:12

also beat Hillary Clinton as Time

magazine Person of the Year. He was

2:22:122:22:19

elected against a backdrop of

allegations of misconduct against

2:22:192:22:22

him, so it is a nice symmetry that

for me and other women who have

2:22:222:22:27

suffered sexual harassment like a

setback for equality last year but

2:22:272:22:34

because of the things we have done

we have beaten him and he is a

2:22:342:22:38

runner-up to us.

How do you

encourage people who are not in high

2:22:382:22:45

profile jobs to come forward about

their experiences? It is important

2:22:452:22:51

to hear from people who have

significant profiles that people

2:22:512:22:55

recognise, but how does that

translate?

That is a really good

2:22:552:22:59

question and what the #metoo

movement provided was a hash tag

2:22:592:23:06

that other people could jump onto.

What the Time cover shows is it not

2:23:062:23:14

just Hollywood actors and musicians

and journalists with huge

2:23:142:23:18

followings, but there is a

strawberry picker and a hotel worker

2:23:182:23:21

and you are right it is not just

about the people on this list. It is

2:23:212:23:25

about the people who do not have a

platform and they need to be thought

2:23:252:23:29

about in this conversation and we

need to change things culturally by

2:23:292:23:33

carrying on talking about this to

make sure that people who want to

2:23:332:23:37

harass and assault people cannot and

will not be tolerated any more. But

2:23:372:23:41

also companies need to have much

more proactive, anti-harassment

2:23:412:23:48

policies, and employees need to have

confidence to come forward and make

2:23:482:23:51

complaints about people who are more

powerful and that is what has to

2:23:512:23:55

change after this. It cannot just be

about this list.

You said you had

2:23:552:24:01

spoken from your own experience and

you have been following other people

2:24:012:24:04

who have been vocal about their

experiences and what needs to be

2:24:042:24:08

done. The campaign has gathered

momentum very quickly, rightly so

2:24:082:24:13

perhaps. How quickly do these

changes feed into everyday life do

2:24:132:24:17

you think?

I think a really good

test would be if he were to take a

2:24:172:24:24

poll of 100 women or men, mainly

women because they are mainly

2:24:242:24:31

affected day, and ask them in a year

plus that time to see how their

2:24:312:24:35

experiences have changed. Obviously

this has had a huge impact and it

2:24:352:24:40

has been very quick in two months,

but this will trickle out to

2:24:402:24:45

society? Will people in a year's

time say they are suffering sexual

2:24:452:24:52

harassment? I think the jury is

still out on this. That is why I am

2:24:522:24:57

keen we have to carry on talking

about this. It cannot be a story

2:24:572:25:02

about 2017, it has to carry on being

a real change in society.

Jane

2:25:022:25:08

Merrick made it onto the list of

Person of the Year. Still to come: A

2:25:082:25:18

new UK City of Culture will be

crowned this evening. How much is it

2:25:182:25:22

worth to the local economy.

2:25:222:25:27

UI either in whole, how bracing is

it?

2:25:272:25:39

Yes, it is a bit windy outside and

we are in Hull harbour this morning

2:25:392:25:44

and we are talking about what the

impact the City of Culture can have

2:25:442:25:50

on the city. They won it last year

and later on we will be finding out

2:25:502:25:54

who will get that crown next time.

Stephen here is the council leader.

2:25:542:25:59

What impact has a tab? A huge

impact. 350,000 people in the centre

2:25:592:26:06

of Hull on a cold January day, the

start of the year, 90% of the public

2:26:062:26:13

in Hull have been to cultural

events. 1 million people have been

2:26:132:26:19

through in the first quarter in

museums and Art galleries, so it has

2:26:192:26:23

been a very good year. Do you think

it is something you can continue to

2:26:232:26:28

do given that the Crown will go to

someone else? Is it sustainable?

The

2:26:282:26:33

city has changed for ever. The

people are full of confidence and

2:26:332:26:39

proud. We will deliver and this city

will move on from this event.

Thank

2:26:392:26:46

you very much for your time. Later

on we will be talking to some of the

2:26:462:26:51

local business people here as well

about what it has meant for them.

2:26:512:26:54

Winning this is great for optimism

and the question is how do you keep

2:26:542:26:59

hold of that? More from me later.

First, let's get the news, travel

2:26:592:27:04

and weather where

2:27:042:30:26

sleet, particularly in north-western

areas and our own but drier ground.

2:30:272:30:29

A dry day on Saturday, still chilly,

with some sunshine. We will be back

2:30:292:30:32

in half an hour, goodbye.

2:30:322:30:33

Hello, this is Breakfast with

Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty.

2:30:382:30:41

The number of patients waiting more

than four hours in accident

2:30:412:30:43

and emergency departments in the UK

has more than doubled

2:30:432:30:46

in the last four years,

according to research by the BBC.

2:30:462:30:48

More than three-million people

experienced waits longer

2:30:482:30:50

than the four-hour target

in the last 12 months.

2:30:502:30:52

Doctors say it shows

the NHS can no longer cope.

2:30:522:30:55

The Department of Health says more

money is being made available

2:30:552:30:58

to help hospitals in England.

2:30:582:31:03

I think it has been clear over the

last four or five years that the

2:31:032:31:08

number of patients attending our

emergency department as well as the

2:31:082:31:11

complexity of the care in terms of

elderly patients have steadily

2:31:112:31:15

increased. Unfortunately we've not

had the resources to meet that

2:31:152:31:20

increased demand and that has

affected our overall system

2:31:202:31:23

performance and our ability of our

staff to be able to cope with this

2:31:232:31:28

extreme challenge, which is not just

this winter, it has been steadily

2:31:282:31:32

worse, sadly, for the last three or

four years.

2:31:322:31:37

You can find out how your local

service is running on the BBC News

2:31:372:31:43

Tracker at the website.

2:31:432:31:48

The Irish Prime Minister has said

Theresa May wants to put forward

2:31:492:31:52

a new plan for the post-Brexit

future of the Irish

2:31:522:31:54

border by Friday.

2:31:542:32:01

Negotiations stalled earlier this

week.

2:32:012:32:05

Earlier this morning we spoke

to the Transport Secretary Chris

2:32:052:32:08

Grayling who said the Government

is continuing to work

2:32:082:32:10

towards securing a good deal

for all regions of the UK.

2:32:102:32:13

Our goal is to absolutely not have

any kind of border between northern

2:32:132:32:18

and southern Ireland, we are clear

we will not impose a fixed border

2:32:182:32:21

between the two. Our goal is to make

sure we do the right thing to

2:32:212:32:26

support our union, the United

Kingdom of Great Britain and

2:32:262:32:28

Northern Ireland, and our goal is to

make sure we sign up to a deal which

2:32:282:32:31

is good for Britain, not to sign up

to one which is bad for Britain.

2:32:312:32:34

The UN Security Council is expected

to hold an emergency meeting

2:32:342:32:37

after President Trump made

an historic decision to recognise

2:32:372:32:39

the disputed city of Jerusalem

as Israel's capital,

2:32:392:32:41

overturning decades of US policy.

2:32:412:32:43

Mr Trump said the decision was long

overdue and reflected the reality

2:32:432:32:49

of Israel's presence in the city.

2:32:492:32:51

He said this doesn't mean an end

to the United States' "strong

2:32:512:32:54

commitment" to peace in the Middle

East.

2:32:542:32:56

The fate of Jerusalem is one

of the thorniest issues

2:32:562:32:58

between Israel and the Palestinians.

2:32:582:33:01

Legislation for same-sex

marriage has been passed

2:33:012:33:03

by the Australian parliament.

2:33:032:33:08

The move follows a public

vote earlier this year

2:33:082:33:10

in which a majority of people

supported the change.

2:33:102:33:13

The bill is expected to be

ratified by the country's

2:33:132:33:15

Governer-General within days,

meaning the first weddings under

2:33:152:33:17

the new law could take

place early next year.

2:33:172:33:20

A fast-moving wildfire in southern

California has hit the US state

2:33:202:33:24

putts main coastal highway and

reached the Pacific Ocean according

2:33:242:33:27

to firefighters tackling the blaze.

The homes of more than 150,000

2:33:272:33:32

people have been evacuated in an

area north of Los Angeles, and

2:33:322:33:35

hundreds of buildings have been

damaged. Strong winds are expected

2:33:352:33:40

to further hinder efforts to contain

the fire, which is still endangering

2:33:402:33:43

some 12,000 properties.

2:33:432:33:46

There is fresh controversy over the

pay of senior academics after it

2:33:462:33:51

emerged Bath Spa University paid its

departing Vice Chancellor Professor

2:33:512:33:54

Christina said more than £8,000 last

year in pay and benefits. The

2:33:542:34:01

university said it regretted her

entitlement under her contract and

2:34:012:34:06

was agreed following legal advice.

The University and College Union

2:34:062:34:09

says figures make staff seem greedy

and out of touch.

2:34:092:34:13

The Royal Navy's new aircraft

carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth

2:34:132:34:15

will be commissioned

into service later today.

2:34:152:34:19

The Queen will be guest of honour

at the ceremony which marks

2:34:192:34:22

the carrier's official

handover to the Navy.

2:34:222:34:23

The ship is the most expensive

in British naval history,

2:34:232:34:28

costing around £3-billion to build.

2:34:282:34:29

It won't be operational until 2021

but it's captain says today marks

2:34:292:34:32

an important milestone.

2:34:322:34:38

Swapping the Blue Ensign and

hoistening a War Ensign is symbolic.

2:34:382:34:41

It formally recognises her

as a warship legally.

2:34:412:34:43

But for us, it is

much more than that.

2:34:432:34:50

It's saying, "Here we

are, we've arrived."

2:34:502:34:53

The White Ensign says

a lot about the country.

2:34:532:34:56

It has been flying

in the service of the

2:34:562:34:58

country for many years.

2:34:582:35:00

For us, it is a magnificent day,

a very proud day, and, yeah,

2:35:002:35:03

it is a major day for us.

2:35:032:35:11

A feathered dinosaur,

resembling a mutant swan, has been

2:35:112:35:13

discovered by scientists.

2:35:132:35:16

The strange creature

has a graceful neck,

2:35:162:35:19

but scythe-like claws,

a reptilian tail and

2:35:192:35:21

a beak lined with teeth.

2:35:212:35:26

It's thought to have lived

75 million years ago,

2:35:262:35:32

and was a therapod,

like the Tyrannosaurus Rex.

2:35:322:35:33

It may have been the first dinosaur

to adopt the lifestyle

2:35:332:35:36

of a modern-day water bird.

2:35:362:35:41

You learn things everyday. I wasn't

aware until this morning that no

2:35:412:35:46

birds have teeth, I thought some

must have teeth, but they don't.

2:35:462:35:55

8:35am is the time. Victoria

Derbyshire is on at 9am on BBC Two,

2:36:022:36:05

let's find out what is on the

programme.

2:36:052:36:08

Good morning, we are taking an

exclusive look inside the fashion

2:36:082:36:12

industry as models tell others about

the sexual harassment and

2:36:122:36:14

exploitation they have experienced.

2:36:142:36:20

Plus, earlier this year rush Khan

had acid thrown over her by a total

2:36:322:36:37

stranger as she sat in a car with

her cousin. In an exclusive

2:36:372:36:42

interview, she said she now pities

her attacker and still does not know

2:36:422:36:44

why he did it. Join us on BBC Two,

BBC News, and online.

2:36:442:36:53

The weather coming up soon with

Carol, snow on the Horizon. But

2:36:532:36:56

coming upon Breakfast...

2:36:562:37:00

Books about hobbies are now

three times more popular

2:37:002:37:02

with children than the classics.

2:37:022:37:04

We're finding out what's making it

onto children's Christmas lists.

2:37:042:37:07

Brian Cox is the professor

who's made science into

2:37:072:37:09

the new rock and roll -

he's with us later to talk

2:37:092:37:12

about his record-breaking

sell-out arena tours.

2:37:122:37:20

# A beautiful sight, we're happy

tonight.

2:37:202:37:22

# Walking in a winter

wonderland...#.

2:37:222:37:24

And he's the Pointless host who's

a man of many talents -

2:37:242:37:27

and now he's treating us to an album

of Christmas classics.

2:37:272:37:29

Alexander Armstrong joins us soon.

2:37:292:37:39

We will be talking about a lot of

goals.

2:37:412:37:46

A spectacular seven goals from

Liverpool last night.

2:37:462:37:50

England have become the first

country to have five

2:37:502:37:53

teams in the Champions

League knock-out stage.

2:37:532:37:55

Manchester City annd

Tottenham were already

2:37:552:37:57

through to Monday's draw,

along with Manchester

2:37:572:37:58

United and Chelsea.

2:37:582:37:59

And Liverpool joined them last

night, getting seven goals

2:37:592:38:02

past Russian champions

Spartak Moscow at Anfield.

2:38:022:38:05

Phillip Coutinho scored a hatrick,

while Sadio Mane got

2:38:052:38:07

a couple of goals too.

2:38:072:38:08

As they've topped their group,

Jurgen Klopp might not be too happy

2:38:082:38:11

with who they have to face next.

2:38:112:38:21

Last 16, Champions League,

they are only strong sides but this

2:38:222:38:24

year it's quite special.

2:38:242:38:26

I don't think you can face really

often Bayern Munich and Real Madrid

2:38:262:38:29

in the last 16 if you win the group.

2:38:292:38:31

And Juve!

2:38:312:38:32

And all the others.

2:38:322:38:33

So that's quite interesting.

2:38:332:38:39

You could see his realisation there!

2:38:392:38:42

Ben Stokes has been

named in England's squad

2:38:422:38:45

for the one-day internationals

in Australia next month.

2:38:452:38:47

But the BBC understands he's highly

unlikely to be involved

2:38:472:38:50

until prosecutors decide

whether or not he'll be charged

2:38:502:38:52

for an altercation in Bristol.

2:38:522:38:53

Russia's President Vladimir Putin

says he won't stop Russian athletes

2:38:532:38:55

competing independently

at February's Winter

2:38:552:38:57

Olympics in South Korea.

2:38:572:39:03

The IOC banned Russia

from the Games this week,

2:39:032:39:05

but athletes that are proven to be

clean can compete as neutrals.

2:39:052:39:08

Former British heptathlete

Kelly Sotherton is set to be awarded

2:39:082:39:10

a bronze medal from the 2008

Summer Games, after Russian rivals

2:39:102:39:13

were banned for doping.

2:39:132:39:14

She says the IOC's decision

doesn't go far enough.

2:39:142:39:20

I personally think it

should be a blanket ban.

2:39:202:39:22

No Russians.

2:39:222:39:23

And for the sake of the many clean

athletes that are going to be

2:39:232:39:27

at the Winter Olympics,

you sacrifice a few

2:39:272:39:29

to save the many.

2:39:292:39:34

Because regardless the few

athletes in Russia that

2:39:342:39:36

potentially are clean,

or can prove they are,

2:39:362:39:38

they are still Russian.

2:39:382:39:43

In snooker, the three-time champion

John Higgins is out of the UK

2:39:432:39:46

Championship at the quarter final

stage, after being beaten by world

2:39:462:39:49

number 21 Mark King.

2:39:492:39:50

King won four of the last

five frames in York

2:39:502:39:52

to squeeze through 6-5.

2:39:522:39:54

Higgins is the 13th player among

the top 16 seeds to go out.

2:39:542:40:00

Serena Williams is set to make a

comeback at the Australian open

2:40:002:40:03

after giving birth to her first

child for months ago. The Twenty20

2:40:032:40:08

time grand slam champion born in

Melbourne for a seventh time during

2:40:082:40:10

her pregnancy.

2:40:102:40:13

And finally, I just want to revist

last night's Champions League

2:40:132:40:20

results, because the coach

of Shaktar Donetsk celebrated his

2:40:202:40:23

side's qualification

for knockout stage by

2:40:232:40:25

dressing up as Zorro

at the post-match press conference.

2:40:252:40:29

Paulo Fonseca had promised he would

dress as the fictional masked

2:40:292:40:32

vigilante if Shakhtar went through.

2:40:322:40:33

By beating Manchester City,

they go into the hat -

2:40:332:40:35

not that one - for Monday's draw

for the next stage.

2:40:352:40:38

Has he pledged he would wear a

different costume if they progressed

2:40:382:40:40

to a different round?

I think beating Manchester city was

2:40:402:40:43

quite an achievement! But this is

the same guy who was up for the job

2:40:432:40:47

at Everton, you cannot imagine Big

Sam wearing this in a press

2:40:472:40:52

conference.

I want to see a football manager in

2:40:522:40:56

an Ironman suit.

Any particular one?

2:40:562:40:59

What about Big Sam?

I would like to see one in an Andy

2:40:592:41:04

Pandy suit. Do you know what I am

talking about?

2:41:042:41:10

Yes!

Hence the strange look! Maybe you

2:41:102:41:13

should present the show tomorrow in

an Andy Pandy suit. It is not too

2:41:132:41:17

different...

Ryan Cox has joined us!

I remember

2:41:172:41:22

Andy Pandy! He was my first memory

of television when I was growing up,

2:41:222:41:29

nineteen 70s...

We do not have a

picture, we were not expecting to

2:41:292:41:34

talk about Andy Pandy!

Your first

memory of television as a child?

2:41:342:41:40

Yes, and Bill and Ben the flowerpot

men. That really dates me, that was

2:41:402:41:46

1969!

Was there any science involved

in Andy Pandy?

And minimal amount, I

2:41:462:41:52

think.

Is that your Segway

interscience?

You could say he is

2:41:522:42:02

made of star stuff, the atoms of

Andy Pandy were undoubtedly formed

2:42:022:42:07

in the Stella many thousands of

years ago, as were ours.

I nearly

2:42:072:42:11

said that.

LAUGHTER.

2:42:112:42:15

You are about to launch on an arena

tour?

Yes, it is 2019, a year out in

2:42:152:42:25

advance, but we did one earlier this

year and it sold out really fast and

2:42:252:42:29

people seem to enjoy it. It took me

by surprise, doing essentially

2:42:292:42:34

stadium cosmology and astrology!

But

you are not dumbing down science?

I

2:42:342:42:40

was worried because I thought, with

these audiences, 9000 people, I

2:42:402:42:46

thought you can't explain things in

detail, but what it allows us to do

2:42:462:42:50

is have massive screens committed

huge, huge screens, and it took me

2:42:502:42:54

by surprise the images that we have

from the Hubble telescope, the

2:42:542:42:58

Cassini mission, they are so high

resolution, you just never see them

2:42:582:43:01

like that on a computer monitor,

even some astronomy friends who came

2:43:012:43:05

to the show is said, I have never

seen the universe like that! You can

2:43:052:43:17

have a 30 metre wide high resolution

screen in these places, so that was

2:43:172:43:19

the joy for me, being able to show

the beauty of the universe.

It does

2:43:192:43:22

not surprise me these tours have

become so popular because you have

2:43:222:43:25

managed to bridge the gap between

science and getting to people who

2:43:252:43:28

perhaps may have been turned off by

it. Let's give everyone an idea what

2:43:282:43:32

you have been up to.

2:43:322:43:38

Well, that is probably many people's

picture of the Big Bang, this vast

2:43:572:44:03

explosion that flung the matter out

into the void. But that is

2:44:032:44:09

completely wrong. As we understand

it at the moment, all of space was

2:44:092:44:13

created that moment. So the Big Bang

didn't just happen somewhere out

2:44:132:44:21

over there in the universe, it

happened everywhere at the same

2:44:212:44:25

time, it happened here, so this

space here was at the Big Bang.

2:44:252:44:32

Brian, people will get the sense,

many people will have seen some of

2:44:322:44:36

that already, but from my point of

view, somebody who did badly at

2:44:362:44:41

science at school, we didn't have

something to look at, someone to

2:44:412:44:44

look at, not just you but other

scientists as well now that feel

2:44:442:44:47

like they are more like you,

scientists when I was growing up

2:44:472:44:52

were distant people in laboratories

doing things I didn't understand.

It

2:44:522:44:56

is one of the most important

messages when I go to a

2:44:562:45:08

school to say, if you want to be a

scientist, you don't have to be a

2:45:162:45:19

genius or some kind of intellectual

rigour, Einstein famously said, when

2:45:192:45:21

I was a child, I was no Einstein,

which is true. You just have to be

2:45:212:45:25

interested in nature, this is

astronomy but you can be interested

2:45:252:45:27

in collecting butterflies, whatever

it is, if you have that interest you

2:45:272:45:29

can do it, it is not an unusual job

and I think that is important.

How

2:45:292:45:32

do you square it with children, just

the word science in itself, it is

2:45:322:45:35

such a broad brush, it can go from

the ocean, studying animals, any

2:45:352:45:38

part, but when you say scientist to

someone, it does seem... Geeky is

2:45:382:45:42

the wrong word, technical, that you

need an analytical brain, that it

2:45:422:45:47

does not fit everyone.

The thing you

need is interest. Talking about

2:45:472:45:53

astronomy, when I do the shows, the

questions that are raised I think

2:45:532:45:58

our universal questions. When you

hear that the earth is one planet

2:45:582:46:03

around one star amongst 200 billion

stars in the Milky Way galaxy, which

2:46:032:46:08

is one of 2 trillion galaxies in the

observable universe, it raises

2:46:082:46:12

important questions about our place

in the universe.

Have you ever been

2:46:122:46:16

asked something that has dumped you?

All the time, that is the thing

2:46:162:46:21

about science, people tend to think

scientists know everything, and

2:46:212:46:26

being a research scientist means you

are on the frontier of our

2:46:262:46:29

knowledge, and the key trait is to

be delighted in not knowing and to

2:46:292:46:33

be excited about not being sure,

because as long as you are that kind

2:46:332:46:37

of person then it is a great job.

2:46:372:46:42

Some point in the way science was

presented to people generally, there

2:46:422:46:45

was a change in which you embrace

people for not knowing, whereas you

2:46:452:46:54

don't ridicule them any more, it's

good to ask questions and you are

2:46:542:46:57

not stupid now for not knowing the

answer?

It's a problem across our

2:46:572:47:02

wider society and in politics in

some respects, that ref a lot of

2:47:022:47:06

people now who seem so sure, they

say "I know, I know how to do it",

2:47:062:47:11

that is one of the great lessons,

one of the Nobel Prize winners said

2:47:112:47:16

science is a satisfactory philosophy

of ignorance, a beautiful

2:47:162:47:19

definition. It's saying there are

lots of things. Nature is complicate

2:47:192:47:24

and it teaches you humility actually

because if you think you know how

2:47:242:47:29

something works, usually if you look

carefully you will find out that you

2:47:292:47:33

are not so clever.

What are you most

excited about in terms of what we

2:47:332:47:36

don't know?

Oh, I think the big

questions now are, are we alone in

2:47:362:47:42

the universe, we are likely not

because the universe is so big but

2:47:422:47:46

locally are we alone. Some of the

moons of sat turn, for example,

2:47:462:47:51

there is one that has a saltwater

ocean 60 Klopp terse deep with

2:47:512:47:59

volcanic vents, those we think led

to the origins of earth. There are

2:47:592:48:06

microbes and we could find that in

the next ten or 15 years.

We are

2:48:062:48:10

talking about Mars and missions to

Mars, they seem to... I mean there

2:48:102:48:14

is a lot of talk about how soon it

can be done but in terms of science

2:48:142:48:19

and advancement in terms of what we

need to survive, that will be

2:48:192:48:23

longer.

I had the pleasure of

speaking to e-London must have

2:48:232:48:31

beening recently, for a documentary,

he didn't want to be filmed but he

2:48:312:48:34

wanted to chat so that was unusual,

but he announced that he's going to

2:48:342:48:41

the falcon heavy which is going to

take people to Mars within the next

2:48:412:48:47

ten years -- Elon Musk. He's sending

a Teslar to Mars.

Are people

2:48:472:48:57

sceptical about his claims though?

Although space acts are now the

2:48:572:49:02

delivery company for the space

station so that works and they have

2:49:022:49:05

a contract to deliver astronauts in

the space station which they hope to

2:49:052:49:08

to next year. So the interesting

thing about these companies, they

2:49:082:49:14

are doing this, they have reusable

rockets which mean it's far cheaper

2:49:142:49:19

to get into space than it once was.

We grew up talking about the old

2:49:192:49:26

programmes like Space 1999, we

thought we'd have moon bases, I

2:49:262:49:29

think now finally we have the

technology to start building that

2:49:292:49:32

future that we all thought would be

hire. -- here.

You have got a busy

2:49:322:49:39

day because you are teaching at the

University of Manchester?

The

2:49:392:49:44

undergraduates at 10 o'clock, yes,

so if you are watching, don't worry.

2:49:442:49:48

What is your opener to quantum

mechanics?

It's usually, now this

2:49:482:49:53

may be in the exam!

That is a good

line. This afternoon you have got a

2:49:532:49:58

couple of hours free, you could

choose one space move twroi watch.

2:49:582:50:02

Which one would it be?

I'll tell you

what, at the moment, the thing I've

2:50:022:50:07

been watching recently is Star Trek

Discovery, the new Star Trek one.

2:50:072:50:11

That's brilliant. I would recommend

that.

From the past?

I still love

2:50:112:50:18

2001 actually, it's brilliant but

also Star Wars.

A new one coming out

2:50:182:50:21

very soon.

I know. Excited.

Lovely

to see you. Thank you very much.

2:50:212:50:27

Professor Brian Cox goes on tour in

2019.

2:50:272:50:32

Here's Carol with a look

at this morning's weather.

2:50:322:50:38

We have got it all in the forecast

in the next few days. Today it's

2:50:382:50:42

windy wherever you are. The

strongest winds across the north of

2:50:422:50:49

Scotland where we have a

2:50:492:50:50

strongest winds across the north of

Scotland where we have a storm.

2:50:502:50:52

Behind it, any rain showers will

turn wintry. Storm Caroline making

2:50:522:50:56

her presence felt across the north

of Scotland. Coming in from the west

2:50:562:51:01

drifting eastwards through the

course of the day. As you can see

2:51:012:51:04

from the isobars, wherever you are

it's going to be windy. The Met

2:51:042:51:08

Office has issued a weather warning

for wind across the north of

2:51:082:51:11

Scotland where we are looking at

gusts of 80mph, possibly more. For

2:51:112:51:15

the rest of Scotland and Northern

Ireland, we are looking at 70mph

2:51:152:51:19

gusts, damaging gusts which could

cause power cuts, for example. As

2:51:192:51:23

well as that, wintry showers will

increasingly be falling at lower

2:51:232:51:26

levels. We'll see blizzard-like

conditions. Meanwhile, the rain

2:51:262:51:31

continues across England and Wales,

clearing, leaving brighter skies

2:51:312:51:34

behind with a plethora of showers

coming in on the wind and, in the

2:51:342:51:38

colder air this afternoon, well many

of those will be turning wintry. So

2:51:382:51:44

this afternoon, across Scotland,

storm Caroline continuing to push

2:51:442:51:46

over in the direction of the

Northern Isles and our southern and

2:51:462:51:51

western flank, the winds will be

strongest here. Once again snow

2:51:512:51:55

blowing blizzards. Snow showers in

the north of England. Southern

2:51:552:52:00

England has drier conditions. You

will notice a drop in the

2:52:002:52:04

temperatures there. In Exeter it's

14, this afternoon it will be round

2:52:042:52:08

about nine. Here is the tail edge of

the rain clearing from Kent. Behind

2:52:082:52:13

it, a lot of sunshine around,

feeling cold for some of us and here

2:52:132:52:17

are the wintry showers I told you

about in the north of England.

2:52:172:52:22

Overnight, Caroline moves away, we

still will have strong winds and

2:52:222:52:26

blowing in a lot of showers, snow

showers across Scotland, Northern

2:52:262:52:34

Ireland, parts of northern England.

We could see two to five centimetres

2:52:342:52:38

of lying snow, more of that with

height. We could see a dusting in

2:52:382:52:42

the south and across the east too.

There is the risk of ice on

2:52:422:52:47

untreated surfaces and there's also

going to be some frost. Tomorrow

2:52:472:52:50

sees an action replay of tonight's

weather. Further showers coming in

2:52:502:52:55

on the wind in Scotland, Northern

Ireland, the Isle of Man, parts of

2:52:552:52:59

northern England, Wales. A few in

the south-west. Also getting in

2:52:592:53:02

towards the Midlands. Some of those

will blow in some wintry flurries

2:53:022:53:06

across London. Temperature-wise,

regardless of what you see with,

2:53:062:53:14

with the wind chill, it will feel

colder than the temperatures.

2:53:142:53:24

Saturday, a high ridge of pressure

blows in. Sunday's forecast

2:53:242:53:28

uncertain but it looks like some

will see some more snow.

2:53:282:53:32

Thank you very much. Let us see what

it feels and looks like in Hull this

2:53:322:53:37

morning.

2:53:372:53:37

it feels and looks like in Hull this

morning. A little bracing earlier on

2:53:372:53:42

with heavy gusting winds. Steph is

there for us this morning because it

2:53:422:53:45

has been UK City of Culture and

tonight, the new City of Culture

2:53:452:53:50

will be revealed. Good morning,

Steph.

2:53:502:53:55

Good morning, everybody. Carol is

not wrong with the weather this

2:53:552:53:58

morning. It's windy and wet. We are

here to talk about what impact

2:53:582:54:04

winning the City of Culture can have

on an area. We are at Hull Marina in

2:54:042:54:11

a little business called Thieving

Harry's, a cafe which is one of the

2:54:112:54:15

new businesseses in the area,

there's been lots of regeneration

2:54:152:54:18

and lots of people are saying it's

thanks to the City of Culture that's

2:54:182:54:25

helped reinvigorate the area. We

have some guests here. Ali, this is

2:54:252:54:29

your business, tell us a bit about

what winning the City of Culture has

2:54:292:54:33

meant for this area and for you?

It's been an incredible year. Foot

2:54:332:54:40

fall's increased ten fold probably.

The public roadworks were finished

2:54:402:54:50

this year. It's been incredible.

For

your business, you were a pop-up

2:54:502:54:56

originally, so it's given you more

certainty as well I guess?

We

2:54:562:55:00

started as a pop-up in 2011, became

permanent residents here 2014 and so

2:55:002:55:05

we've kind of seen the area grow

around us and it's been a really

2:55:052:55:10

brilliant couple of years seeing new

businesses and having more people

2:55:102:55:14

around.

Yes, lots of optimism

around. Kofi for you, this whole

2:55:142:55:20

face of City of Culture in Hull,

what's it meant for the city?

It's

2:55:202:55:26

allowed people to shout out louder

about what it means to come from

2:55:262:55:29

Hull. You guys will know if you are

involved in music, arts anything,

2:55:292:55:33

there is a sea here, but now the

world's been able to see what the

2:55:332:55:38

creatives can do, what our identity

is, it was a crap town a while ago

2:55:382:55:43

but now we are the City of Culture.

Nine in ten people have been to a

2:55:432:55:49

City of Culture event and I bet that

one person you meet didn't realise

2:55:492:55:56

it was put on by the City of

Culture.

You have got a hotel

2:55:562:56:00

business haven't you?

Yes, we opened

this year and have had people from

2:56:002:56:03

all over the world visit us. People

coming for events, people coming to

2:56:032:56:07

have a nose around the city, there's

so much going on. You can come here

2:56:072:56:11

without planning to go to an event

and end up at one, there's that much

2:56:112:56:15

going on. It's been great to drag

people here and people have been

2:56:152:56:21

blown away when they've got here,

they've not expected much and got so

2:56:212:56:24

much more so hopefully people will

keep coming back.

Dominic, you are

2:56:242:56:28

in property development aren't you,

tell us what it's meant for you as a

2:56:282:56:31

businessman?

It's been a fantastic

change for the city. When we won in

2:56:312:56:36

2013, there was a lot of businesses

got behind the bid originally and

2:56:362:56:40

once that came through to 2017, more

businesses got behind it and there

2:56:402:56:44

are more getting behind it. What's

been most interesting, it's allowed

2:56:442:56:49

us to invest far more quicker. We

are maybe a year or two ahead of

2:56:492:56:55

where we thought we'd be. It's been

fantastic, the level of

2:56:552:56:59

collaboration across from the

private and public sector, academia,

2:56:592:57:03

cultural organisations, the third

sector, the conversation going

2:57:032:57:06

around the city is far more

collaborative than it ever was which

2:57:062:57:10

will help the legacy and the future

growth of the city.

Georgia, you

2:57:102:57:15

mentioned about the people coming

here and them being able to two to

2:57:152:57:18

events. Do you think it's

sustainable, given that you won't

2:57:182:57:21

have this crown for ever?

Yes. This

year has been mental. It will be

2:57:212:57:26

like no other year we'll probably

have, but now it's up to private

2:57:262:57:30

investors like ourselves and local

businesses to sort of host the

2:57:302:57:34

events ourselves now. City of

Culture has given us the confidence

2:57:342:57:38

to say I'm going to host a slightly

different event and people will come

2:57:382:57:42

so it's totally changed the mindset

and views of the locals, so all it's

2:57:422:57:46

done is given the positive impact on

the creativity in the city.

Which is

2:57:462:57:50

great to hear from an area that's

had a bad reputation in the past.

2:57:502:57:54

Dominic, what advice for the next

winners of the City of Culture in

2:57:542:57:58

terms of making the most of it?

Get

behind it. Everybody get behind what

2:57:582:58:03

it means to the area. At the end of

the day, if you have the economy of

2:58:032:58:07

a city that has to grow, it's all

right doing the physical

2:58:072:58:11

regeneration on the other hand can

happen, but you need the culture and

2:58:112:58:16

social regeneration, that only

happens by everybody working

2:58:162:58:18

together as one.

Excellent. Thank

you very much for your time and Ali

2:58:182:58:22

thanks for hosting us as well, some

cracking food here as well, we don't

2:58:222:58:28

normally get this when I'm out and

about! Not great weather outside but

2:58:282:58:32

a cracking atmosphere in here this

morning. One of those pies were

2:58:322:58:38

missing from earlier? !

There's

quite a few pies missing, to be

2:58:382:58:43

honest, and a couple of the sausage

rolls have gone too. You know, while

2:58:432:58:49

I'm here!

Steph ate all the pies.

2:58:492:58:56

From the Snowman to Scrooge,

some of the most popular Christmas

2:59:002:59:03

characters started life in a good

old fashioned book.

2:59:032:59:05

But in this age of screens

and devices, are the classics even

2:59:052:59:08

still on today's kids'

Christmas lists?

2:59:082:59:09

Breakfast's Tim Muffett

has been to find out.

2:59:092:59:11

'Twas the night before Christmas,

when all through the house not

2:59:112:59:14

a creature was stirring,

not even a mouse.

2:59:142:59:16

ALL: Shhhh!

2:59:162:59:18

The stockings were hung...

2:59:182:59:20

Gadgets and books.

2:59:202:59:22

Not always a great mix.

2:59:222:59:25

At the Discover

Children's Story Centre

2:59:252:59:29

in east London, we're looking

at the impact of devices and gaming

2:59:292:59:32

on reading and story telling.

2:59:322:59:35

When you play gadgets it's more

like a waste of time that you can

2:59:352:59:39

use for something else.

2:59:392:59:40

I always like reading more

because you can just sit down

2:59:402:59:44

and relax and read a book,

and it's quite nice to just sit down

2:59:442:59:47

and read a book.

2:59:472:59:51

A lot of parents tend to put kids

in front of their devices very young

2:59:512:59:55

because it frees up their time.

2:59:552:59:56

My son loves the Mr Men

books on the tablet,

2:59:562:59:58

is that a bad thing?

2:59:583:00:00

I don't know.

3:00:003:00:05

I can see the sleigh.

3:00:053:00:06

Today's author is Liz Pichon,

author of the hugely popular

3:00:063:00:08

Tom Gates children's books.

3:00:083:00:09

She's reading a festive classic.

3:00:093:00:11

And out on the lawn there

rose such a clatter...

3:00:113:00:14

'Twas the Night Before Christmas

was first published in 1823.

3:00:143:00:16

..To see what was the matter!

3:00:163:00:18

There are some things that just

don't date and you can't replace

3:00:183:00:20

having a physical book.

3:00:203:00:27

It's the rhyming as well.

3:00:273:00:35

..And laying this finger aside

of his nose and giving

3:00:353:00:37

a nod, up the chimney he rose.

3:00:373:00:39

Book Trust is a charity

that wants kids to read.

3:00:393:00:41

Gadgets for many are

more appealing indeed.

3:00:413:00:43

In its survey, a quarter

of all parents said the same,

3:00:433:00:46

if they give kids a book,

they'd rather play a game.

3:00:463:00:49

We're really worried

that the temptation is that parents

3:00:493:00:51

just let their kids stay on digital

and tablets because that's

3:00:513:00:54

what they say they want first go.

3:00:543:00:55

They don't make the effort to find

a good book which their child

3:00:553:00:58

would want to read.

3:00:583:01:00

The charity found that a fifth

of parents suspected books bought

3:01:003:01:02

as Christmas presents

wouldn't actually be read,

3:01:023:01:04

but even authors can see why.

3:01:043:01:05

When I was younger, if digital

devices were around then I'd be

3:01:053:01:08

picking them up and using them.

3:01:083:01:12

I mean, I can remember my dad

moaning about me watching TV

3:01:123:01:14

all the time.

3:01:143:01:16

Last Christmas,

children's printed book

3:01:163:01:19

sales exceeded £100 million,

according to Nielsen BookScan,

3:01:193:01:21

which analyses the market.

3:01:213:01:24

The biggest seller was

the Midnight Gang by David Walliams,

3:01:243:01:26

but four of the top 20

were books about Pokemon

3:01:263:01:29

or Minecraft.

3:01:293:01:30

Does it matter if a child wants

to read a book about gaming?

3:01:303:01:33

No.

3:01:333:01:36

The most important thing

is we encourage children to get

3:01:363:01:39

reading and to like reading.

3:01:393:01:40

For these children, the message has

already got through.

3:01:403:01:50

If you go on a gadget,

you've got to be absolute,

3:01:513:01:54

you'll be too tempted

to, like, play a game.

3:01:543:01:56

It's peace and quiet and you don't

have bright shining at you.

3:01:563:01:59

This Christmas big sales

are expected for Philip Pullman

3:01:593:02:05

and David Walliams, and Jeff Kinney,

author of Diary Of A Wimpy Kid.

3:02:053:02:09

But some Christmas

stories remain timeless.

3:02:093:02:10

Merry Christmas to all

and to all a good night.

3:02:103:02:12

Tim Muffet, BBC News.

3:02:123:02:16

It has got a lot of viewers

reminiscing about the books they

3:02:163:02:19

used to read when they were younger,

as we did. These are some I have

3:02:193:02:24

brought in from the book shelf, Enid

Blyton, Roald Dahl, bloody odd

3:02:243:02:28

Kipling.

Shall I read out a little bit...

3:02:283:02:33

This is Five Run Away Together by

Enid Blyton, this is what is going

3:02:333:02:38

to happen, the five are together

again at the cottage because

3:02:383:02:41

George's mother is ill, they are

left in the own satisfactory care of

3:02:413:02:46

Mrs Dick, who has an unpleasant son

and a sailor husband. To get away

3:02:463:02:54

from the Sticks, they hide on the

island.

3:02:543:02:58

I used to love reading nose. Jennie

Kermode The Far-away Tree series,

3:02:583:03:04

yes! Erica says her daughter's

favourite book is The Three Grumpy

3:03:043:03:12

'S, I have not heard of that one.

For me it was Just William, a

3:03:123:03:19

constant sense of injustice in the

world! Anyone who read those stories

3:03:193:03:24

would know what I am talking about.

Did you feel like you work Just

3:03:243:03:29

William?

Still do, every day! It is time to

3:03:293:03:33

get the news, travel and weather

where you are, Alexander

3:03:333:05:10

A top temperature of 13 Celsius.

3:05:103:05:11

I'll be back at 1.30pm

with the lunchtime news.

3:05:113:05:14

Bye-bye.

3:05:143:05:14

Presenter of Pointless, voice

of children's TV and comedy star -

3:05:203:05:23

Alexander Armstrong is a man of many

talents, and a fixture

3:05:233:05:25

on our TV screens.

3:05:253:05:30

He is counting on the sofa.

What am

I doing?

You were counting, one,

3:05:303:05:41

two, three, four, five...

Oh, I was

counting the cameras, so many

3:05:413:05:45

cameras in this studio, they are

everywhere!

Not as many in the

3:05:453:05:50

Pointless studio?

No, not as many, a

couple of Go-Pros is how we get it

3:05:503:05:57

out of their!

You are into the

festive spirit with your latest

3:05:573:06:04

musical offering?

Indeed I am, I

have a Christmas album, which is

3:06:043:06:08

something I have been longing to do

for ever.

Let's hear a little bit.

3:06:083:06:12

# Sleigh bells ring,

are you listening?

3:06:123:06:13

# In the lane, snow is glistening

3:06:133:06:15

# A beautiful sight,

we're happy tonight

3:06:153:06:18

# Walking in a winter wonderland...#

3:06:183:06:23

# Silent night, holy night

3:06:233:06:29

# Shepherds quake at the sight...#

3:06:293:06:39

# Everybody knows a turkey

and some mistletoe

3:06:393:06:48

# Helps to make the season bright

3:06:483:06:56

# Tiny tots with

their eyes all aglow

3:06:563:07:03

# Will find it hard

to sleep tonight...#.

3:07:033:07:12

I understand, Alexander, the idea of

the videos is to make it look like

3:07:123:07:16

you are at home, but do you actually

wander around your own real home at

3:07:163:07:22

Christmas singing?

I do, actually, I

do like to bellow a bit. As you are

3:07:223:07:28

cooking the Christmas... Slightly

less staged than on the clipboarded

3:07:283:07:31

promo! But Christmas is all about

music, I think pretty much every

3:07:313:07:39

household, when we get to Christmas

we have our favourite things that we

3:07:393:07:42

kind of have to listen to, we

ritualised thing that Christmas and

3:07:423:07:46

music is one of those things are

especially, if we hear Christmas

3:07:463:07:49

music out of season we go... We want

to save it, keep it, it brings the

3:07:493:07:55

flavours acquit Mr ever so -- the

flavours of Christmas together. So

3:07:553:08:01

there is a mix of music, quite a lot

of classical music on there, some

3:08:013:08:06

choral music.

You were trained in

classical music?

I was, so it is

3:08:063:08:12

nice to do classical things, but it

has also got a nice fun, schmaltzy

3:08:123:08:16

Christmas music. Party Christmas

music.

What was the one by Kim

3:08:163:08:22

Wilde...

And Mel Smith, exactly,

which I got to sing with her on

3:08:223:08:30

Pointless, she came on Pointless and

we sang.

What was the song?

It is

3:08:303:08:38

like eight Pointless question. Now I

know how you feel every time you

3:08:383:08:41

come on! Now I know what you do so

badly!

Because you can't remember

3:08:413:08:47

the song!

We will find out.

3:08:473:08:52

You singing on Pointless is not an

oddity...

We have had a couple of

3:08:523:09:01

near jumping the shark moments when

Richard and I formed a band and did

3:09:013:09:05

little Eurovision song written

especially to the Pointless music

3:09:053:09:13

and Richard was wearing a big zip up

thing and every now and then

3:09:133:09:19

unzipped it and said, Van a lot too.

Oh, what have we got here? This is

3:09:193:09:24

from a couple of years ago. My

goodness, you have been through the

3:09:243:09:28

archive. Those poor people having to

awkwardly stand there and

3:09:283:09:33

pretending... That was probably

filmed on a different day!

Does

3:09:333:09:38

Richard Singh?

He's very musical,

Richard. He comes from pure indie

3:09:383:09:49

stock, the band Suede, his brother

is in the band, they were created in

3:09:493:09:55

his house.

Was it at this point you

thought, I can do a whole album?!

3:09:553:10:04

This was before I did any of them.

The idea just came about, they said

3:10:043:10:09

to me, would you like to make an

album?

This is my third one.

Have

3:10:093:10:13

you written music? I have, two

tracks on this.

How difficult is it

3:10:133:10:19

right with a theme?

Someone asked me

the key ingredient of a Christmas

3:10:193:10:25

the song and I started listing them

all and realised I had not used any

3:10:253:10:29

of them, I did not stick to the

rule! You have to have a certain

3:10:293:10:34

rhythm... That is important, you

have to have lots of key changes,

3:10:343:10:38

that is basically it.

Say the word

snow?

As many times as you can! But

3:10:383:10:45

it has been a lovely experience,

really good fun.

You did not come

3:10:453:10:50

here to talk about other people's

albums but there are a number of

3:10:503:10:53

people bringing out albums that you

possibly previously would not have

3:10:533:10:57

thought Bob as fingers and you may

fall into that category? -- may not

3:10:573:11:03

have thought of as singles.

Bradley

has an album out, which is doing

3:11:033:11:09

well, but the more the merrier,

let's have everyone, when is your

3:11:093:11:14

album coming out?!

We are going to

be involved in a singing project for

3:11:143:11:21

Christmas...

What is this, next

week? I am giving something

3:11:213:11:28

exciting, Peter and the Wolf with

Liverpool Philharmonic, I recorded

3:11:283:11:32

that earlier this year and I will be

doing a gig there.

What does that

3:11:323:11:36

involve?

It is me narrating Peter

and the Wolf?

Singing?

No, just

3:11:363:11:44

narrating.

You do a lot of

voice-over work, narrating, do you

3:11:443:11:50

protect your voice? You are a

baritone...

I generally keep up my

3:11:503:11:56

vocal exercises, if not daily then

every other day.

Charlie could

3:11:563:12:02

benefit, I understand...

Oh, vocal exercising?

The noises you

3:12:023:12:09

have to make before doing any vocal

exercising. You basically want to

3:12:093:12:14

find all the points of sonorous

muscles around your head. It just

3:12:143:12:21

opens up the channels! What am I

doing?!

Pointless is still going

3:12:213:12:33

strong, isn't it?

Isn't that

marvellous? We have a wonderful time

3:12:333:12:37

making Pointless, we are in the

middle of a tranche of it at the

3:12:373:12:42

moment and it just flies by.

It is

devastating for people when they

3:12:423:12:46

don't do well on it.

You only get

two chances at it, unless they are

3:12:463:12:53

celebrities, in which case they can

come back as often as they like,

3:12:533:12:55

Charlie.

To be fair, Naga has not

done that well on it either.

3:12:553:13:03

Do you remember who my partner was?!

Charlie!

Comeback with a

3:13:033:13:11

different... Or give Charlie and

Encyclopaedia for Christmas. But we

3:13:113:13:18

are lucky enough that people keep

watching it, and we love making it,

3:13:183:13:22

so as long as we keep enjoying it

and they keep enjoying it, I think

3:13:223:13:26

we will get to make lots and lots.

Lovely to see you, have a lovely

3:13:263:13:30

Christmas as you finger around your

home on Christmas day! -- as you

3:13:303:13:38

sing around your

3:13:383:13:38