14/03/2018 Breakfast


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14/03/2018

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LineFromTo

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

0:00:090:00:12

Stephen Hawking, one

of the world's most acclaimed

0:00:120:00:14

physicists and authors,

has died aged 76.

0:00:140:00:21

He lived with a form of motor new

rain disease for much of his life

0:00:210:00:26

but became one of the most talked

about scientists since Einstein. --

0:00:260:00:31

motor neurone disease.

0:00:310:00:33

In a statement his children

said his brilliance and humour

0:00:330:00:36

inspired people across the world.

0:00:360:00:37

I don't have much positive to say

about motor neurone disease, but it

0:00:370:00:41

taught me not to pity myself and

instead get on with what I could do.

0:00:410:00:47

Good morning, it's

Wednesday 14th March.

0:00:590:01:01

Also this morning:

0:01:010:01:02

Russia fails

to meet the Prime Minister's

0:01:020:01:04

midnight deadline to explain how

0:01:040:01:05

a nerve agent was used to attack

a former spy in Salisbury.

0:01:050:01:08

Theresa May will tell parliament

what action she plans to take.

0:01:080:01:16

Good morning from this clothing

manufacturers in North London where

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we're getting reaction to

yesterday's bring statement from the

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Chancellor, he said the economy is

growing stronger, some are saying

0:01:260:01:30

it's not growing fast enough so I

will be looking at that.

0:01:300:01:33

In sport, a dismal night

0:01:330:01:34

for Manchester United

in the Champions League.

0:01:340:01:36

They exit at the last 16 stage

after a 2-1 home defeat to Sevilla.

0:01:360:01:40

Ans all change, plans to get rid

of one and two pence coins

0:01:400:01:43

are under discussion.

0:01:430:01:44

We'd love to hear your thoughts.

0:01:440:01:51

Matt has the weather.

Turning wet

and windy to the west today but for

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a mild day of a chilly start, but

don't cast the warm jumpers aside. I

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will tell you why in 15 minutes.

OK,

Matt, thanks very much.

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Good morning.

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First, our main story.

0:02:050:02:06

Britain's most famous scientist,

Professor Stephen Hawking,

0:02:060:02:08

has died at the age of 76.

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Hawking's fame came largely

from his best-selling book,

0:02:100:02:14

A Brief History of Time,

which outlined his theories

0:02:140:02:16

about the universe.

0:02:160:02:17

He had a brilliant career

despite being diagnosed with motor

0:02:170:02:20

neurone disease in 1964

and being told he had just a few

0:02:200:02:23

years to live.

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Earlier this morning, his children

released this statement.

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A wonderful quote, isn't it, which

many people are sharing this

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morning.

0:03:010:03:01

Nick Higham has been looking back

on the life of Stephen Hawking.

0:03:010:03:04

He was instantly recognisable

and utterly remarkable.

0:03:040:03:06

The visionary scientist,

helpless in his high-tech

0:03:060:03:08

wheelchair, who nonetheless

transformed our view

0:03:080:03:10

of the universe.

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While a student, he developed

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the first signs of motor neurone

disease.

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Gradually his body shut down

until he could communicate only

0:03:180:03:21

using a computerised voice

synthesiser, controlled,

0:03:210:03:22

to start with, by hand.

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It didn't hold him back.

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I was never actually told that I had

only two years to live,

0:03:280:03:32

but I could see the doctors didn't

think my prospects were good.

0:03:320:03:37

His fame sprang from his book,

A Brief History of Time.

0:03:370:03:40

It sold 10 million copies.

0:03:400:03:43

But though many bought it,

rather fewer actually read it.

0:03:430:03:47

His theories about time,

space and black holes

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were stupendously difficult

for non-specialists to grasp,

0:03:510:03:53

but he turned out to

have a genius for communication.

0:03:530:03:56

He gave lectures and interviews,

and became an unlikely celebrity.

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He even appeared in The Simpsons.

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His private life was complicated.

0:04:050:04:07

With his wife, Jane,

he had three children and she looked

0:04:070:04:10

after him until, in 1990,

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he left her for his nurse,

Elaine.

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They eventually married only

for claims to emerge that Hawking

0:04:130:04:16

had been physically abused.

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Police investigated but the case

was dropped for lack of evidence.

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The couple later divorced.

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Too often we are told that these

are stupid questions to ask,

0:04:230:04:28

but this is said by grown-ups

who don't know the answers and don't

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want to look silly by

admitting they don't know.

0:04:310:04:34

He never lost his sense of humour.

0:04:340:04:36

Though by the end, he could only

speak by twitching his cheek to move

0:04:360:04:40

an infrared beam.

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I don't have much positive to say

about motor neurone disease,

0:04:400:04:43

but it taught me not

to pity myself and to get

0:04:430:04:46

on with what I still could do.

0:04:460:04:49

I'm happier now than before

I developed the condition.

0:04:490:04:55

In 2014, his life was dramatised

in The Theory of Everything,

0:04:550:04:58

with Eddie Redmayne playing Hawking.

0:04:580:05:00

..Right back to see happened

with the beginning of time itself.

0:05:000:05:03

Stephen, here you are.

0:05:030:05:08

At Cambridge, they unveiled a statue

of him, a rare honour

0:05:080:05:11

for someone still living.

0:05:110:05:12

But few did more to transform our

understanding of the universe

0:05:120:05:15

and to overcome personal challenges.

0:05:150:05:18

What an incredible man with an

incredible influence around the

0:05:230:05:27

globe.

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Around the world, people have been

reacting to the news that scientist

0:05:270:05:30

Stephen Hawking has died.

0:05:300:05:33

Tim Berners-Lee, the creator of the

world wide web, says:

0:05:330:05:38

Sunder Pichai are, the CEO of

Google, has said:

0:05:380:05:41

The American acts actress, Emily

Ross, said she is shattered by the

0:05:440:05:48

news of Stephen Hawking Stephen

Hawking's death. I have seen this

0:05:480:05:57

from Macauley Culkin, he is a genius

and my favourite Simpsons character.

0:05:570:06:01

We will miss you, Buddy, he says.

Get in touch with us about that

0:06:010:06:05

today and of course we will be

speaking about that later in the

0:06:050:06:09

programme.

0:06:090:06:09

Theresa May is expected to announce

sanctions against Russia

0:06:090:06:12

after the Kremlin failed

to explain their role in a chemical

0:06:120:06:15

attack in Salisbury.

0:06:150:06:15

Last night, the Russian

Embassy hinted

0:06:150:06:17

that the expulsion of its diplomats

from London would have an impact

0:06:170:06:20

on their British

counterparts in Moscow.

0:06:200:06:22

Jane-Frances Kelly reports.

0:06:220:06:24

It began as an attack on the streets

of Salisbury. The poisoning of a

0:06:240:06:28

former Russian intelligence officer

and his daughter. But there is now

0:06:280:06:33

diplomatic deadlock between Britain

and Moscow.

0:06:330:06:35

I'm standing outside the Russian

embassy here in London and the

0:06:350:06:40

midnight deadline has just passed.

The only reaction the British

0:06:400:06:44

government has got from the Russians

so far are angry denials and the

0:06:440:06:49

threat of Retallick reaction if they

take measures against Moscow.

0:06:490:06:52

They've also helpfully got a screen

outside here that shows their

0:06:520:06:57

Twitter feed and on it they say:

0:06:570:07:01

The Russian Foreign Minister, Sergey

Lavrov, has objected to only being

0:07:080:07:13

given 24 hours to respond to the

claim Russia used a chemical weapon.

0:07:130:07:16

Russia should get ten days, he said,

accusing Britain of flouncing the

0:07:160:07:22

chemical weapons Convention.

Meanwhile, in Salisbury, painstaking

0:07:220:07:26

work continues. Police are appealing

for witnesses that might have seen

0:07:260:07:30

Sergei Skripal and Yulia in their

red BMW car on the day they were

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poisoned. Separately a number of

deaths are also being reinvestigated

0:07:350:07:40

by police and MI5 after claims of

Russian involvement. They include a

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man in his 60s found dead in new

Maldon on Monday who is believed to

0:07:430:07:48

be Russian business Nikolai

Glushkov, a friend of Boris

0:07:480:07:52

Berezovsky, who was found hanged in

his home in 2013. This morning

0:07:520:07:55

Theresa May will be briefed by her

National Security Council before

0:07:550:08:00

going to Parliament, where she is

expected to announce a series of

0:08:000:08:04

measures against Russia.

Jane-Frances Kelly, BBC News.

0:08:040:08:09

We know the deadline has passed and

Jonathan Blake is in Westminster for

0:08:090:08:12

us this morning. Good morning to

you. I suppose the pressure now

0:08:120:08:18

ramps up, doesn't it?

It does,

there's been a lot of talk in the

0:08:180:08:22

last week since the attack in

Salisbury about the government

0:08:220:08:25

response. But that time for talking,

that midnight deadline having

0:08:250:08:30

passed, is now over and the time has

come for action and we will find out

0:08:300:08:35

exactly what later from the Prime

Minister. In terms of the options

0:08:350:08:39

available, as we have heard, they

could include expelling Russian

0:08:390:08:43

diplomats from the UK, putting

tighter visa restrictions on

0:08:430:08:46

Russians travelling to the UK,

making it harder for them to come

0:08:460:08:50

here, and also, as we've heard, the

possibility of dignitaries all

0:08:500:08:54

government ministers not going to

the World Cup later this year. None

0:08:540:08:58

of those are an easy option and none

of those on their own will go far

0:08:580:09:04

enough to satisfy those, many of

whom in parliament in Westminster

0:09:040:09:08

who have been calling for the

government to take swift and robust

0:09:080:09:11

action. Those are the kinds of

options we will hear primarily from

0:09:110:09:16

Theresa May today, then there are

options she can take in

0:09:160:09:20

collaboration with other European

Union countries and other allies

0:09:200:09:23

across the world, possibly those in

the Nato military alliance as well.

0:09:230:09:28

But all eyes will be on Theresa May

when she makes her statement to

0:09:280:09:33

Parliament today later after PMQs at

lunchtime.

Jonathan, thanks, John

0:09:330:09:37

that.

Plenty more on that for you on the

0:09:370:09:40

programme this morning.

0:09:400:09:48

The government is to spend £50

million on trying to ease racial

0:09:480:09:50

and religious tensions.

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It is one of a number

of proposals in the government's

0:09:510:09:54

integrated communities strategy,

which is to be published more

0:09:540:09:57

than a year after an independent

review found the country had become

0:09:570:10:00

more divided as it

had become diverse.

0:10:000:10:02

Here's our home editor, Mark Easton.

0:10:020:10:04

17 years after race riots in

Bradford, an official report warned

0:10:040:10:07

of highly segregated communities

where people led parallel lives, the

0:10:070:10:09

city will now be named among five

places in England that must adopt an

0:10:090:10:13

integration plan. The others Waltham

Forest in London, Peterborough,

0:10:130:10:18

Walsall and backburn, all areas with

a history of racial and ethnic

0:10:180:10:23

tensions. 12 Years a Slave Blackburn

was highlighted as suffering from

0:10:230:10:27

deep segregation between white and

Asian communities. To reduce

0:10:270:10:31

tensions, teenagers were bussed in

from other schools to integrate.

0:10:310:10:36

Pupils from a 99% white secondary

school made to meet pupils from a

0:10:360:10:41

95% nonwhite secondary across town.

Today's strategy suggests more

0:10:410:10:46

schemes like this. It also proposes

some extra support for

0:10:460:10:50

English-language classes, state

provision has halved in the last few

0:10:500:10:53

years, new targeted alp to improve

economic opportunities for people in

0:10:530:10:58

segregated communities, particularly

women, and the promotion of

0:10:580:11:02

pluralistic British values by

teachers. The strategy is the latest

0:11:020:11:06

in a long line of government

initiatives to try and deal with one

0:11:060:11:10

of Britain's most sensitive and

injuring social challenges. Mark

0:11:100:11:15

Aiston, BBC News. -- enduring.

0:11:150:11:18

The creators of The Crown have

admitted Claire Foy who portrays

0:11:180:11:21

the Queen was paid less

than her male counterpart.

0:11:210:11:23

Matt Smith's portrayal

of a young Duke of Edinburgh

0:11:230:11:26

earned him more than

Foy's Golden Globe-winning

0:11:260:11:28

performance as Queen Elizabeth

in the Netflix drama.

0:11:280:11:30

The show's producers said Smith's

previous starring role

0:11:300:11:32

in Doctor Who meant he was paid

more than his co-star.

0:11:320:11:39

Well, talking money! Let's talk

about real money. Look at this.

0:11:390:11:48

The public are being asked

for their views on the future

0:11:510:11:58

of the 1p and 2p coins.

0:11:580:12:00

Ministers are carrying out a review

of cash transactions due

0:12:000:12:03

to a rise in customers

using non-cash payments such

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as contactless and online spending.

0:12:050:12:07

The consultation will also look

at whether £50 notes

0:12:070:12:09

should be kept.

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£50 notes... It seems like a lot of

money, £50 notes.

I haven't seen one

0:12:100:12:14

in a while.

Nor have I.

In the

interest of fairness I should have

0:12:140:12:19

one more penny so we are even! We

will sort it out.

We will share.

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Good morning. Kat has the sport, are

we starting with a dismal night for

0:12:270:12:32

Manchester United?

0:12:320:12:33

We are. It was really sluggish,

negative, all the things Manchester

0:12:330:12:40

United fans have been complaining

about about their style of play over

0:12:400:12:43

this season. You were saying this

morning before we came on about

0:12:430:12:49

these post match press conference

comments, saying this was nothing

0:12:490:12:56

new, which will annoy the fans

before the match, considering their

0:12:560:13:02

illustrious European record, and now

they are out.

It was a great chance

0:13:020:13:06

and now it has gone.

Only one trophy

left for them to win.

0:13:060:13:10

It was a night to forget

for Manchester United

0:13:100:13:13

in the Champions League.

0:13:130:13:14

They bow out of the

competition in the last 16

0:13:140:13:16

after a dismal 2-1 defeat

to the Spanish side Sevilla

0:13:160:13:19

at Old Trafford.

0:13:190:13:20

The only silverware left for United

now this season is the FA Cup.

0:13:200:13:23

Buveur D'Air was the big race winner

0:13:230:13:25

on the first day of the Cheltenham

Festival.

0:13:250:13:27

The Nicky Henderson-trained horse

0:13:270:13:29

retained his title in the Champions

Hurdle.

0:13:290:13:30

He was the odds on favourite

but ended up being pushed

0:13:300:13:33

all the way by the seven

to one shot Melon.

0:13:330:13:40

Team Sky have secured

their first major victory

0:13:400:13:41

of the 2018 cycling season.

0:13:410:13:42

Michal Kwiatkowski took

the Tirreno-Adriatico title

0:13:420:13:44

after the final stage time trial.

0:13:440:13:47

Fellow Team Sky rider,

Britain's Geraint Thomas,

0:13:470:13:49

finished

third.

0:13:490:13:50

Adam Yates was fifth.

0:13:500:13:54

That's of course after all the

recent controversy at Team Sky.

0:13:540:13:58

And at the Winter Paralympics this

morning, Britain's Menna Fitzpatrick

0:13:580:14:01

and Jen Kehoe have won

Britain's fifth medal,

0:14:010:14:04

a silver in the women's visually

impared giant slalom to add

0:14:040:14:07

to the two silvers they've

already won these Games.

0:14:070:14:13

That is now five Paralympic Winter

medals.

Great news.

The tally is

0:14:130:14:18

ticking up.

Fantastic. Are you going

to hang around for the papers?

Of

0:14:180:14:23

course.

Have you got more money?

I

have.

0:14:230:14:28

You have a point from the Czech

Republic here, not legal tender in

0:14:280:14:32

this country, but we have 3p each

now -- a coin.

Do you still want

0:14:320:14:38

pennies or not?

There was a picture

in the paper the other day of a

0:14:380:14:43

family who have rejuvenated a house

and they have made the floor out of

0:14:430:14:50

2ppieces with resin and all that

kind of thing. You could still use

0:14:500:14:54

them in the shops but you don't tend

to have them in your pocket, do you?

0:14:540:14:58

I do. Tell us what you think, Matt,

how's the weather looking?

0:14:580:15:06

Not a bad day for many. Some rain in

windy conditions across the West but

0:15:060:15:11

overall, the mildest day of the week

even with that strengthening wind.

0:15:110:15:20

Temperatures at or below freezing.

Temperatures the West. Some rain

0:15:220:15:27

across these western fringes but

it's also set to drag up that

0:15:270:15:31

increasingly mild there and western

parts of France. Temperatures for

0:15:310:15:36

some in the mid-teens. Brightness

across central and eastern parts.

0:15:360:15:46

Further west, the cloud will

steadily thicken. Some splashes of

0:15:460:15:49

brain and drizzle coming and going.

Parts of Devon and Cornwall, where

0:15:490:15:57

gales will develop. As we go to the

end of the day, up to 25

0:15:570:16:01

millimetres. The far west of Wales.

The place is particularly wet later

0:16:010:16:07

today. Western Scotland, gales

developing. The mild air comes in.

0:16:070:16:19

Some spells of hazy sunshine. Maybe

up to around 15 and the north of

0:16:190:16:27

London. Pretty wet weather. Other

parts of southern England.

0:16:270:16:39

Temperatures are peering to tomorrow

morning. Across Scotland in some

0:16:390:16:43

parts of eastern England, another

cool start to tomorrow morning.

0:16:430:16:51

cool start to tomorrow morning. In

fragments a touch. As it gets

0:16:510:16:53

further and further north, some

slightly colder air.

0:16:530:17:02

slightly colder air. Brighter

weather developing.

0:17:020:17:09

weather developing. Temperatures

still holding of the many. Greater

0:17:090:17:11

chance of some snow in the eastern

Pennines. The Grampians has begun to

0:17:110:17:17

Friday. Sunny spells and some

slow-moving Bunbury showers. Still

0:17:170:17:23

double-figure temperatures here.

Towards the north of the country,

0:17:230:17:28

Aberdeen, three Celsius. High

pressure building across

0:17:280:17:33

Scandinavia. Keeping any snow

flurries to the south. Temperatures

0:17:330:17:41

drastically drop through Friday into

Saturday. For some, around 10

0:17:410:17:44

degrees. Some snow flurries as well.

0:17:440:17:47

He did give us a heads up. No

surprises now.

0:17:510:17:56

The world-famous physicist

Stephen Hawking, known

0:17:560:17:58

for his theories on space and time,

has died at the age of 76.

0:17:580:18:05

All the front pages are leading with

UK's relationship with Russia. This

0:18:050:18:15

man was found by family and friends

late on Monday night. News of his

0:18:150:18:23

death, there is still an

investigation into the cause of his

0:18:230:18:27

death. Trump swings the axe again.

Plunging US diplomacy into turn oil.

0:18:270:18:33

They've got a

0:18:330:18:38

They've got a quote here the death

of Nikolai Glushkov. There was no

0:18:490:18:53

proper engagement with regard to

that deadline. The Prime Minister

0:18:530:18:56

due to talk about it later in the

Commons. The Daily Mirror has a

0:18:560:19:02

story about pennies being dropped.

And also, the Cheltenham Festival.

0:19:020:19:10

Obviously

0:19:100:19:11

Obviously reflecting on that lost

the Manchester United. This is quite

0:19:110:19:14

nice. With Southampton rumoured to

be lining up, they got a lovely

0:19:140:19:22

illustration in the Telegraph about

the managerial merry-go-round. The

0:19:220:19:27

six men had been employed by ten

clubs. 24 jobs.

0:19:270:19:36

clubs. 24 jobs. The reason is,

things suffered by those people at

0:19:360:19:42

those clubs. It does seem a little

bit like they are on a central

0:19:420:19:49

contact at the moment. And just a

nice bit of news in the Daily

0:19:490:19:56

Express. Sergio Garcia has had a

baby girl.

0:19:560:20:02

baby girl.

Only a couple of weeks

away, aren't we?

0:20:030:20:12

Breaking news this morning. About

the renowned physicist and

0:20:120:20:16

bestselling author Stephen Hawking

who died at his home in Cambridge.

0:20:160:20:21

In 2013, Breakfast's Tim Muffett

was able to catch up with him ahead

0:20:210:20:25

of a documentary and his life.

0:20:250:20:26

Given how hard it is feared to

communicate any mention in the film,

0:20:260:20:30

when people are chatting, your

thoughts drift off into things like

0:20:300:20:33

how the universe began. Has your

disability made you better

0:20:330:20:36

scientist?

I must admit, I do tend

to drift off into thinking about

0:20:360:20:42

physics or black holes when I get

left behind in the conversation. In

0:20:420:20:47

fact, my disability has been a help

in the way. It has freed me from

0:20:470:20:54

teaching or sitting on boring

committees and given me more time to

0:20:540:20:57

think and do research. Theoretical

physics is one of the few fields in

0:20:570:21:03

which being disabled is no handicap.

It's all in your mind. I am very

0:21:030:21:08

proud and I have been able to

contribute to our understanding of

0:21:080:21:13

the universe.

0:21:130:21:16

We are joined by Nick Goldman, a

molecular biologist from the

0:21:160:21:20

University of Cambridge who was

there when Professor Hawking was.

0:21:200:21:26

And Sean Carroll from the United

States. Thank you for your time.

0:21:260:21:31

Nick, his contribution to what we

know about the world around us is

0:21:310:21:35

hard to fathom.

It literally is hard

to fathom. It's amazing what you

0:21:350:21:41

could teach us by using maths in

using his mind.

Obviously we only

0:21:410:21:47

learned this this morning but he had

a huge impact in so many different

0:21:470:21:51

things.

0:21:510:22:00

things. He was very influential.

When you talk about people who are

0:22:000:22:04

maths students, it is amazing and

infant -- inspirational to suit --

0:22:040:22:07

to see anyone do such far-reaching

work. At the age of 22, he was told

0:22:070:22:14

he best had a few years to live with

motor neurone disease. Is his death

0:22:140:22:21

a shock was something which I

suppose we are expecting strange

0:22:210:22:26

way?

It's both things. Everyone

expected him to not live so long.

0:22:260:22:34

Once you get over that hurdle of

thinking that, you think, it's a

0:22:340:22:42

shock that he doesn't live forever.

Sean, talk to us about how you knew

0:22:420:22:49

him and the influence he had.

My

kind of physics that I do for

0:22:490:22:55

research is similar to what Stephen

did. And he was the master. Everyone

0:22:550:22:59

knew him very well. The very first

time I met him was that of physics

0:22:590:23:04

conference where we went to a scotch

tasting, we tasted single mob

0:23:040:23:08

scotch. He is not going to say, oh

no, I have these medical conditions,

0:23:080:23:15

I can't participate with everyone

else. Its attitude towards life was

0:23:150:23:21

he was going to participate to the

fullest. He had an enormous impact

0:23:210:23:26

on what we do.

He talked a bit about

him there. He clearly had a very

0:23:260:23:34

good sense of humour.

Absolutely.

0:23:340:23:40

good sense of humour.

Absolutely. He

was the most stubborn person I have

0:23:400:23:42

ever met. That was a big part of his

personality. He wanted things his

0:23:420:23:47

own way. He led and it was an

amazing sense of humour. He was

0:23:470:23:54

always cracking jokes of one sort or

another. It took a long time just to

0:23:540:24:00

a sentence. You can tell how

important it was to him that some of

0:24:000:24:06

those sentences be wisecracks.

In

terms of his influence, there aren't

0:24:060:24:12

many theoretical physicists who are

household names. And well-known

0:24:120:24:15

around the world.

In the United

States, we regularly do these

0:24:150:24:24

surveys of Americans and say, named

a living scientist and Stephen

0:24:240:24:29

Hawking is the only person most

people in the United States can name

0:24:290:24:32

as a living scientist that shows how

much velocity is.

I want to pick up

0:24:320:24:38

that point with you because for U2,

clearly academics and enthralled by

0:24:380:24:44

the subjects, he brought that kind

of thing to a vast amount of people.

0:24:440:24:51

It's just extraordinary. I remember

a good piece of advice he gave to us

0:24:510:24:56

was to not put all the equations in

the book as a practising scientist,

0:24:560:25:00

I remember that. Do they want to see

the equations? There are a lot of

0:25:000:25:10

circumstances where they don't. We

would do well to remember that.

His

0:25:100:25:17

book, A Brief History of Time, many

people admit they have it but they

0:25:170:25:21

haven't read it. Even just by having

it on the shelf, you absorbed by

0:25:210:25:26

osmosis.

I kind of rent my copy.

I

turned every page. I did actually

0:25:260:25:33

read it. I pride myself on that in

some ways. We can't really

0:25:330:25:40

underestimate the impact, can we?

One of the amazing things is that

0:25:400:25:45

among science communicators, people

who become very well-known and

0:25:450:25:50

sharing the passion of science,

Stephen Hawking was a world-class

0:25:500:25:55

physicist. He has contribute --

contributed to our understanding of

0:25:550:26:03

gravity more than anyone since

Albert Einstein. His discovery of

0:26:030:26:08

black holes is one of the things

that physicists like ourselves think

0:26:080:26:12

about. We talked about Hawking

radiation and black holes just

0:26:120:26:17

recently.

You adhere to talk about

Stephen Hawking, I'm sorry to talk

0:26:170:26:23

about this, but we were going to

talk about DNA. -- you are not here.

0:26:230:26:33

Re- purpose in the chemical DNA to

store any digital information, not

0:26:330:26:38

just any cells, to be the hard disk

drive of life.

The shortest

0:26:380:26:43

explanation of something we could

talk about for hours on end.

0:26:430:26:47

Thank you both very much indeed. A

celebration of an extraordinary

0:26:470:26:53

life.

In so many people getting in

contact and many comments about

0:26:530:27:01

Professor Stephen Hawking. NASA

said, remembering him, a renowned

0:27:010:27:06

physicist and an ambassador of

science, his theories lost --

0:27:060:27:09

unlocked the universe and we and the

world are exploring it. May you keep

0:27:090:27:17

lying like Superman in microgravity

as you told us many times.

Let's

0:27:170:27:22

talk about something that happened

yesterday.

0:27:220:27:26

Philip Hammond declared himself

to be feeling "positively

0:27:260:27:28

Tigger-like"

0:27:280:27:28

as he delivered his Spring

Statement yesterday.

0:27:280:27:30

Steph is at a clothing factory

in north London for us

0:27:300:27:33

to see if workers there

have a bounce in their step just

0:27:330:27:36

like the Chancellor.

0:27:360:27:37

Good morning. I am here at a

clothing manufacturer in north

0:27:370:27:43

London. Here they make something

like 10,000 garments every single

0:27:430:27:49

week. Why this place is interesting,

our economy is still largely driven

0:27:490:27:56

by what we spend in the shops. It's

really interesting to hear about how

0:27:560:28:02

we spend our money. Tell me a bit

about how things have changed view.

0:28:020:28:11

There was a time where we would do

three, four, 5000 garments reach

0:28:110:28:16

different style now it's much more

often. Smaller quantities could

0:28:160:28:21

really good quality. People are very

discerning about quality. It's not

0:28:210:28:26

disposable like it used to be.

Not

at all. Jenny, I will chat to you

0:28:260:28:31

about the spring statement later.

0:28:310:31:52

in half an hour.

0:31:520:31:54

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

0:31:540:31:55

Hello, this is Breakfast

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

0:31:590:32:03

We'll bring you the latest news

and sport in just a moment.

0:32:030:32:10

Coming up this morning:

Taking on Putin.

0:32:100:32:12

The reporter John Sweeney will be

here to tell us about being targeted

0:32:120:32:16

by the Russian state as part

of his Panorama investigation

0:32:160:32:19

into the power the country's

president wields.

0:32:190:32:22

Could DNA be the best

way to store data?

0:32:220:32:25

We'll meet the scientists

who believe the smart molecule

0:32:250:32:27

could one day become a realistic

permanent storage device

0:32:270:32:30

for all our digital files.

0:32:300:32:38

Singer Kim Wilde will

be here on the sofa.

0:32:410:32:43

She'll tell us why the recording

of her album was a family affair.

0:32:430:32:51

And all so she'll be telling us

about aliens.

0:32:510:32:54

Good morning,

here's a summary of today's main

0:32:540:32:56

stories from BBC News.

0:32:560:32:57

Britain's most famous scientist,

Professor Stephen Hawking,

0:32:570:32:59

has died at the age of 76.

0:32:590:33:01

Hawking's fame came largely

from his best-selling book,

0:33:010:33:03

A Brief History of Time,

which outlined his theories

0:33:030:33:06

about the universe.

0:33:060:33:06

He had a brilliant career

despite being diagnosed with motor

0:33:060:33:09

neurone disease in 1964

and being told he had just a few

0:33:090:33:12

years to live.

0:33:120:33:17

Earlier this morning, his children

released this statement.

0:33:170:33:20

We know that news only in the last

few hours or so, but already from

0:33:510:33:55

around the globe, it is clear how

influential he has been and how much

0:33:550:33:59

loved.

0:33:590:34:00

Nasa has reflected

to his life on Twitter.

0:34:000:34:02

They said:

0:34:020:34:05

We shall continue to reflect on that

throughout the morning for you. But

0:34:230:34:27

elsewhere...

0:34:270:34:31

Theresa May is expected to announce

sanctions against Russia

0:34:310:34:33

after the Kremlin failed

to explain their role in a chemical

0:34:330:34:36

attack in Salisbury.

0:34:360:34:43

Last night, the Russian Embassy

hinted that the expulsion

0:34:430:34:45

of its diplomats from London

would have an impact

0:34:450:34:48

on their British

counterparts in Moscow.

0:34:480:34:56

An accident and emergency consultant

says he's concerned by the rise

0:34:570:35:00

in knife crime after an surge

in admissions from attacks

0:35:000:35:02

involving the weapons.

0:35:020:35:03

Andreas Crede said

the injuries he treats

0:35:030:35:05

are getting more severe.

0:35:050:35:06

The number of victims sent

to hospital with knife-inflicted

0:35:060:35:09

wounds is at its highest

level for five years.

0:35:090:35:11

I think if we don't do something

about it, I think the trend that

0:35:110:35:15

we've seen in the last five years

may continue going upwards and I

0:35:150:35:19

think that is the big concern that

we all have, that this is an

0:35:190:35:22

escalating problem for us.

0:35:220:35:27

The creators of The Crown have

admitted Claire Foy who portrays

0:35:270:35:30

the Queen was paid less

than her male counterpart.

0:35:300:35:33

Matt Smith's portrayal of a young

Duke of Edinburgh earned him more

0:35:330:35:36

than Foy's Golden Globe-winning

performance as Queen Elizabeth

0:35:360:35:38

in the Netflix drama.

0:35:380:35:39

The show's producers said Smith's

previous starring role

0:35:390:35:42

in Doctor Who meant he was paid

more than his co-star.

0:35:420:35:49

This came out after a news

conference and they were asked, who

0:35:570:36:01

is paid more? Extraordinary given

the discussions we've been having

0:36:010:36:05

for the last year or so.

Magnificently awkward as well.

But

0:36:050:36:10

that's the reality.

Exactly.

0:36:100:36:12

The public are being asked

for their views on the future

0:36:120:36:15

of the 1p and 2p coins.

0:36:150:36:16

Ministers are carrying out a review

of cash transactions due to a rise

0:36:160:36:20

in customers using non-cash

payments such as contactless

0:36:200:36:22

and online spending.

0:36:220:36:30

The consultation will also look

at whether £50 notes should be kept.

0:36:320:36:35

I know I'm old-fashioned but I like

these pennies.

I can't remember the

0:36:350:36:39

last time I used one in a shop. I

put them in a jar. Kat was saying

0:36:390:36:44

one in 12 is thrown away?

Thrown in

the bin on the BBC website.

In the

0:36:440:36:50

bin?

50% are used once before they

are put into a jar.

But you have to

0:36:500:36:56

count your pennies!

After that one

in 12 is thrown into the bin, taken

0:36:560:37:01

out of their pockets with tissues

and old tee pegs and put into the

0:37:010:37:05

bin.

Genuine outrage! People throw

money in the bin, I can't believe

0:37:050:37:12

it!

Look after the pennies and the

pounds will look after themselves!

I

0:37:120:37:17

feel a campaign coming on!

We will

start at the Winter Olympics,

0:37:170:37:22

another medal for Britain at the

Winter Olympics.

0:37:220:37:27

Let's speak to our reporter

Kate Grey who's in Pyeongchang..

0:37:270:37:34

More success, bring us up to date on

the latest medal?

0:37:340:37:38

You will know the names well now,

Meena Fitzpatrick and her guide, Jen

0:37:380:37:43

Kehoe, have won their third medal of

the Games, adding to the silver and

0:37:430:37:47

bronze they won earlier in the week.

This time a silver in the giant

0:37:470:37:51

slalom. They get to attempt at the

course, and they help the silver

0:37:510:37:54

medal position throughout the day.

They must be over the moon because

0:37:540:37:59

this is their debut Games and

they've won three medals. A

0:37:590:38:03

brilliant Games for them so far.

Great Britain's Kelly Gallagher, who

0:38:030:38:08

got gold in Sochi, came fifth, still

hunting for that first medal at the

0:38:080:38:13

Games, though. To update you on the

curling, Great Britain beat Germany

0:38:130:38:17

this morning in the wheelchair

curling and they're currently up

0:38:170:38:20

against the USA but are behind at

the moment. We will keep you up to

0:38:200:38:24

date on that as that game

progresses.

0:38:240:38:30

Kate, thanks very much, hopefully we

will be talking to you later about

0:38:300:38:33

more success in Pyeongchang but for

now, keep warm. To the rest of the

0:38:330:38:38

sports news now...

0:38:380:38:38

Manchester United are out

of the Champions League

0:38:380:38:40

after a dismal home

defeat to Sevilla.

0:38:400:38:42

The tie was poised at 0-0

from the first leg,

0:38:420:38:45

but Sevilla took control by scoring

a crucial away goal with less

0:38:450:38:48

than 20 minutes left.

0:38:480:38:49

The Spanish side then put the tie

to bed with a second soon after.

0:38:490:38:53

And although Romelu Lukaku

pulled a late goal back,

0:38:530:38:55

it wasn't enough

0:38:550:38:56

for United, who exit the competition

in the last 16 and now just

0:38:560:39:00

have the FA Cup left as the only

trophy they can win this season.

0:39:000:39:04

I sit in this chair twice

in the Champions League and I have

0:39:040:39:08

knocked out Man United at home,

not at Old Trafford.

0:39:080:39:16

I sit in this chair

with Porto, Man United out.

0:39:190:39:24

I sit in this chair with Real Madrid

and Man United out.

0:39:240:39:28

I don't think it's something

new for them, for the club

0:39:280:39:31

and of course, being

Manchester United manager and losing

0:39:310:39:37

a Champions League tie, at home,

is a delusion, obviously.

0:39:370:39:42

You can see why it's angered the

fans, like its not his

0:39:420:39:46

responsibility, it just happens to

Manchester United!

0:39:460:39:48

Tonight the final last 16 ties take

place, with Chelsea aiming to become

0:39:480:39:52

the third English side

into the quarter-finals.

0:39:520:39:53

But they'll be well up against it

taking on the Spanish

0:39:530:39:56

league leaders Barcelona

in the Nou Camp.

0:39:560:39:58

It's poised at 1-1

from the first leg.

0:39:580:40:05

Every single player wants to play

this type of game at Barcelona at

0:40:050:40:09

the Nou Camp. You must be excited.

Some of my players have never played

0:40:090:40:16

in this stadium at the Nou Camp,

this is the first time and we want

0:40:160:40:20

to try to do our best.

0:40:200:40:22

The Cheltenham Festival is under

way, with Buveur D'Air the big

0:40:220:40:25

winner on day one.

0:40:250:40:29

The Nicky Henderson-trained horse

was the odds-on favourite

0:40:290:40:31

going into the Champion Hurdle,

but he was pushed all the way

0:40:310:40:35

by the 7-1 shot Melon,

winning by barely a neck

0:40:350:40:38

on the line.

0:40:380:40:39

The win means Buveaur D'Air

retains his title after winning

0:40:390:40:42

the same race last year.

0:40:420:40:49

More Cheltenham through the rest of

the week and the crowd looked

0:40:490:40:53

brilliant yesterday, fantastic

pictures from the stands of the

0:40:530:40:56

course, the enormous crowd with the

famous Cheltenham roar when the

0:40:560:41:00

festival opens up so looking good.

Very heavy underfoot, I'm told,

0:41:000:41:04

because of the beast from the east,

it is still very boggy.

Good for

0:41:040:41:10

some and not for others. A festival

of tweed as well. I feel the need,

0:41:100:41:17

the need for tweed!

A different look

to Aintree, you don't see much tweed

0:41:170:41:22

there!

0:41:220:41:23

In terms of surface area it's

the largest country on earth,

0:41:230:41:26

with well over double the population

of the UK and vast reserves

0:41:260:41:29

of oil and gas.

0:41:290:41:30

So how can Russia cowed

by the threat of sanctions?

0:41:300:41:33

Later today, the Prime Minister

will announce her plans to punish

0:41:330:41:36

Moscow

for its apparent role

0:41:360:41:37

in the poisoning of a former spy

and his daughter in Salisbury.

0:41:370:41:41

These are expected to involve

the expulsion of a substantial

0:41:410:41:43

number of the 58 Russian diplomats

currently in London,

0:41:430:41:46

significant financial sanctions

against wealthy Russians

0:41:460:41:47

with links to the Kremlin

and possible curbs on the Russian

0:41:470:41:51

funded TV station, RT.

0:41:510:41:59

Which of these options

might work best?

0:41:590:42:07

Let's speak to the economist,

Evghenia Sleptsova,

0:42:070:42:09

who is in our London newsroom.

0:42:090:42:11

We know the deadline ran out last

night and Theresa May is likely to

0:42:110:42:15

talk today about sanctions that

might be put in place, what evidence

0:42:150:42:18

is there that things work and what

kind of sanctions work?

0:42:180:42:23

Sanctions do need to be well

targeted and well thought through.

0:42:230:42:27

The evidence we have with Ukraine

related sanctions is that sanctions

0:42:270:42:36

that don't necessarily punish the

whole of the Russian economy but do

0:42:360:42:39

make life more difficult for people,

or for sectors close to Putin and

0:42:390:42:47

the Kremlin, those sanctions do tend

to work better. Then things like

0:42:470:42:54

expulsion of diplomats, that is the

mildest response, that's what was

0:42:540:42:58

done with Litvinenko, and that

doesn't do anything.

0:42:580:43:01

Very interesting what you say

because with the expulsion of

0:43:010:43:05

diplomats it becomes a sort of tit

for tat war in some ways?

Exactly.

0:43:050:43:09

And you just don't have dialogue any

more, so you don't have people to

0:43:090:43:13

talk to.

So dialogue is important.

You said things that affect people

0:43:130:43:18

on the streets is important, so how

would you do that, how would that be

0:43:180:43:23

implemented?

People on the street, I'm not sure

0:43:230:43:26

it's going to affect people on the

street because Russia is using

0:43:260:43:30

sanctions as an excuse essentially

for a weaker economy, and also to

0:43:300:43:36

portray the West as an external

enemy, so it's not necessarily going

0:43:360:43:40

to turn the public opinion.

Could

sanctions possibly have the reverse

0:43:400:43:45

effect in someway is? We do have

close ties with Russia in some ways

0:43:450:43:50

with regard to industry and all the

rest of it, could they have a

0:43:500:43:54

detrimental effect on the UK

economy?

0:43:540:43:58

It depends what sanctions are put in

place. Of course the most sensitive

0:43:580:44:03

area, and this is something that

differentiates the UK from the rest

0:44:030:44:06

of the EU, is the amount of shaded

capital from Russia. This is

0:44:060:44:13

something the UK has been prompted

to tackle for a long time, and

0:44:130:44:16

hasn't been. Tackling that, which

would send a signal to Russia, that,

0:44:160:44:25

OK, it's no longer business as

usual, and we are prepared to also

0:44:250:44:30

bear some costs to actually stop the

flow of...

0:44:300:44:36

Well, essentially money laundering.

Okays. What about targeted...

0:44:360:44:41

Targeting individuals, would that be

effective?

0:44:410:44:48

The question we have is there are

already quite tough sanctions

0:44:480:44:51

imposed on a lot of Russian

individuals against... Following the

0:44:510:44:57

Ukrainian crisis. Targeting a few

Russian oligarchs who haven't yet

0:44:570:45:04

been targeted by Ukraine sanctions

might have some effect. But it's

0:45:040:45:11

really hard to tell because what

happens is once you do, let's say,

0:45:110:45:17

asset freezes on those individuals,

the capital flows back to Russia, so

0:45:170:45:22

that is something that Putin wants

as well.

0:45:220:45:26

Very interesting talking to you.

Evghenia Sleptsova, thank you very

0:45:260:45:29

much indeed. We know the Prime

Minister during a meeting of the

0:45:290:45:34

National Security Council and she is

then expected to unveil possibly new

0:45:340:45:37

sanctions on Russia and we'll have

more on that through the programme.

0:45:370:45:46

We are also reflecting on the life

of Professor Stephen Hawking. Is

0:45:460:45:51

family released a statement saying

he died at the age of 76. Many

0:45:510:45:56

sending their reflections on the

influence it has had. Even people

0:45:560:46:00

from NASA, people saying they read

his book. He said a big influence on

0:46:000:46:06

the way they look at the world

around them. We will be talking

0:46:060:46:10

about him trapped the programme.

Let's have a quick look at whether

0:46:100:46:15

White now. Matt, he warned us about

snow. But it's not looking like that

0:46:150:46:19

right now.

0:46:190:46:24

There is some colder weather on the

way. Enjoy today. The mildest day of

0:46:240:46:29

the week the vast majority.

Temperatures in the mid-teens.

0:46:290:46:34

Increasingly windy. Later on, rein

in the West. The lid on the chilly

0:46:340:46:39

side. In the past hour, temperatures

below freezing. This area of low

0:46:390:46:48

pressure, out in the West, will

bring rain into western areas. Some

0:46:480:46:53

very mild air from western parts of

France. Skies are clear to some.

0:46:530:47:01

Hazy sunshine to take us through the

morning. It will still stay bright

0:47:010:47:06

without sunshine at times and

eastern areas. Great conditions

0:47:060:47:11

developing throughout. A few

splashes of rein to take us through

0:47:110:47:14

the day across western areas. Over

25 millimetres, and a bit of rein to

0:47:140:47:26

the vilest of Wales, the Isle of

Man. Much wetter later on. For

0:47:260:47:31

Scotland, rain comes and goes.

Across many western areas as you can

0:47:310:47:36

see, some Gaels the breeze picks up.

The breeze does boost the

0:47:360:47:40

temperatures. Maybe 15 degrees to

the north of London. We finish in

0:47:400:47:47

eastern areas on a high note. The

hazy sunshine around. Clear skies

0:47:470:47:53

and heavy rain towards the

south-west of England. Just inching

0:47:530:47:58

a little bit northwards.

Temperatures up in this part of the

0:47:580:48:01

country but across parts of eastern

Scotland, another cool night. For

0:48:010:48:08

tomorrow, slightly different. The

damp start in Northern Ireland and

0:48:080:48:14

the Midlands, towards the

south-east. It could turn little bit

0:48:140:48:21

wintry over the tops of the southern

Upland 's and eventually into the

0:48:210:48:25

Highlands. It brightens up. Devon

and Cornwall, a few thundery

0:48:250:48:32

showers. The wins will be lightest.

The cold, windy day across northern

0:48:320:48:38

England. On the eastern side of the

Grampians. And very northern edge of

0:48:380:48:46

the Pennines as well. 11 degrees in

the south. Is this high pressure

0:48:460:48:53

builds, at the moment, looking

limited to southern parts of the

0:48:530:48:59

country.

0:48:590:49:03

The Chancellor, Philip Hammond,

delivered his Spring Statement

0:49:030:49:05

yesterday.

0:49:050:49:05

Steph is at a clothing factory

in North London to see if workers

0:49:050:49:09

there have a spring in their step

about the state of the economy.

0:49:090:49:10

there have a spring in their step

about the state of the economy.

0:49:100:49:18

I

about the state of the economy.

0:49:180:49:18

I would

about the state of the economy.

0:49:180:49:19

I would love

about the state of the economy.

0:49:190:49:19

I would love a

about the state of the economy.

0:49:190:49:19

I would love a new

about the state of the economy.

0:49:190:49:20

I would love a new frock.

about the state of the economy.

0:49:200:49:20

I would love a new frock. It's

about the state of the economy.

0:49:200:49:20

I would love a new frock. It's a

about the state of the economy.

0:49:200:49:21

I would love a new frock. It's a

fascinating being here. Just seeing

0:49:210:49:23

how these guys work.

0:49:230:49:30

how these guys work. We are really

seeing the business change. Shoppers

0:49:300:49:35

have changed. It is to be mass

production. Not making as many of

0:49:350:49:43

them. There is a change in that

disposable fashion. How is business

0:49:430:49:53

for you? It changed quite a bit.

It's a fantastic time to be a

0:49:530:50:03

manufacturer. A lot of people assume

it would be in the Far East. There

0:50:030:50:13

has been a massive change. No one

can react as quickly as the UK so

0:50:130:50:18

instead of having thousands of

thousands of garments, it was 43,000

0:50:180:50:23

garments, we have lots more

different styles. But not as many as

0:50:230:50:29

the quantity.

And what has that

meant for price? We have seen prices

0:50:290:50:39

drop across the board in of

different areas.

We have got

0:50:390:50:46

excellent girls hears their machine

skills are passed. Making sure that

0:50:460:50:52

we get our productivity high.

I will

let you get on. It's about trying to

0:50:520:50:59

make sure the economy is going.

Sophie, this is a business which

0:50:590:51:05

reflects how we are changing.

0:51:050:51:13

reflects how we are changing.

It is

the UK, we are still based on how

0:51:130:51:15

much we spend.

0:51:150:51:21

much we spend. The target is 2%, as

Philip Hammond said. Consumers being

0:51:210:51:30

able to spend less.

What did you

make of what the Chancellor had to

0:51:300:51:38

say? He said he was being positively

"tiggerish" about it.

I'm not sure I

0:51:380:51:50

am the same without it. There are a

lot of headwinds. GDP growth is less

0:51:500:51:55

than a lot of the economies. The

Brexit referendum and how we

0:51:550:52:02

negotiate Brexit will have an

overarching effect on how well we

0:52:020:52:04

grow over the next few years, it

could be good in the future but it

0:52:040:52:09

could not be. That uncertainty is

wearing on the UK economy.

There

0:52:090:52:14

will be more from the little bit

later and I will show you more foxes

0:52:140:52:19

Biko but certainly girls here in the

guys are working very fast and

0:52:190:52:22

making stuff this morning.

It's impressive to watch, slightly

0:52:220:52:26

less than arising.

0:52:260:52:28

28 years ago the yacht 'Maiden' made

history when its female crew became

0:52:280:52:31

the first to sail the Whitbread

Round the World Race.

0:52:310:52:34

the first to sail the

0:52:340:52:35

Now the vessel

is being restored ahead of its next

0:52:350:52:38

adventure to promote

education for girls.

0:52:380:52:40

Breakfast's John Maguire

is in Hamble and can tell us more.

0:52:400:52:46

Good morning. You may remember we

brought you live pictures on

0:52:460:52:53

Breakfast just over a year ago of

Maiden coming back here on the river

0:52:530:52:58

Hamble where she was first refitted

more than 30 years ago and it has to

0:52:580:53:03

be said she was in a slightly sorry

state when she was reunited with her

0:53:030:53:07

famous Skip this Tracy Edwards and

she is undergoing some major surgery

0:53:070:53:12

the next chapter in her life and a

very different voyage.

0:53:120:53:19

OK, John, here we are inside the

tent and the Maiden is here in its

0:53:190:53:28

scaffolding. Almost 30 years since

she was first converted into a yacht

0:53:280:53:31

ready to race around the world's

oceans, Maiden is back. She is in

0:53:310:53:36

the same boat shed as the first

refitted and with the same man in

0:53:360:53:40

charge.

We didn't know what we were

letting ourselves in for until we

0:53:400:53:44

blasted all the paint and fell off

the boat inside and out and then we

0:53:440:53:49

can actually judge what it was and

there was a lot more. Once you get

0:53:490:53:54

into it, you find other jobs.

0:53:540:54:00

into it, you find other jobs.

In

1990, Tracy Edwards and her team

0:54:000:54:03

sales around the globe and into the

record books as the first all-female

0:54:030:54:08

clue of the Whitbread race. Last

year, Maiden was rescued from the

0:54:080:54:13

Seychelles and brought back to her

spiritual home. She made a sorry but

0:54:130:54:17

very welcome sight.

A bit emotional

really. I haven't seen the boat

0:54:170:54:22

since 1990 when the race finished.

Right. And then all of a sudden,

0:54:220:54:28

last summer, she reappeared again.

Duncan also worked back on the yacht

0:54:280:54:33

in the 80s and has a very personal

link with her.

One of the girls from

0:54:330:54:38

the first crew never actually did

the round the world trip because I

0:54:380:54:44

separated from the rest of them and

married her. She was the first of

0:54:440:54:48

the two doctors.

Maiden has been

restored to embark later this year

0:54:480:54:53

on another round the world

adventure, this time taking three

0:54:530:54:58

years as a crew promotes education

for girls. This refit will see her

0:54:580:55:02

transformed from the race yacht were

comfort was jettisoned and to save

0:55:020:55:07

weight to one where life on board

should be easier. With so much being

0:55:070:55:12

refurbished or replaced when she

returns to the water in the summer,

0:55:120:55:16

it will feel like her maiden voyage

but in many ways, omission will be

0:55:160:55:21

the same. To once again promote

challenge, at venture and

0:55:210:55:24

opportunity for women and the girls.

0:55:240:55:33

I am with Tracy Edwards. Good

morning to you. We are battling the

0:55:330:55:37

wind, the friends.

Initially when we

bought her and we got her home and

0:55:370:55:47

looked into it, the aluminium hull

had been eaten away.

It's

0:55:470:55:51

interesting she is not coming back

to race. Something very, very

0:55:510:55:54

different.

We were restoring her to

the former glory. With teamed up

0:55:540:56:08

with Her Royal Highness Princess

Hussain and another of her father,

0:56:080:56:11

King Hussein, we are going to do a

three-year world tour and raise

0:56:110:56:16

money for girls education. There are

going to do something towards

0:56:160:56:23

changing things.

And you will be

handing over the keys. Handing of

0:56:230:56:28

the keys to a new skipper.

Absolutely. It's been quite strange

0:56:280:56:34

choosing someone who skipper my

baby. We are very confident that her

0:56:340:56:40

and we are looking for a new crew

and it's fantastic. You are looking

0:56:400:56:45

for a new crew, recruitment survey.

We are working with the magenta

0:56:450:56:49

project. They are the all-female

team and we will be seeking women to

0:56:490:56:54

come from all around the world to

prove the Maiden.

Good luck. That is

0:56:540:56:59

it from us the minute. Join

0:56:591:00:22

in half an hour.

1:00:221:00:23

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

1:00:231:00:26

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

1:00:561:01:01

Stephen Hawking, one

of the world's most acclaimed

1:01:011:01:03

physicists and authors,

has died aged 76.

1:01:031:01:08

He lived with a form of motor

neurone disease for much of his life

1:01:081:01:12

but became one of the most talked

about scientists since Einstein.

1:01:121:01:16

In a statement, his children

said his brilliance and humour

1:01:161:01:18

inspired people across the world.

1:01:181:01:20

I don't have much positive to say

about motor neurone disease,

1:01:201:01:23

but it taught me not to pity

myself and instead get

1:01:231:01:26

on with what I could do.

1:01:261:01:33

Good morning, it's Wednesday

the 14th of March.

1:01:461:01:49

Also this morning:

1:01:491:01:51

Russia fails

to meet the Prime Minister's

1:01:511:01:53

midnight deadline to explain how

1:01:531:01:54

a nerve agent was used to attack

a former spy in Salisbury.

1:01:541:01:57

Theresa May will tell parliament

what action she plans to take.

1:01:571:02:05

Good morning from this clothing

manufacturers in North London,

1:02:071:02:13

where we're getting reaction

to yesterday's Spring Statement

1:02:131:02:15

from the Chancellor,

he said the economy is growing

1:02:151:02:21

but some are saying it's not

growing fast enough.

1:02:211:02:24

I will be looking at why.

1:02:241:02:26

In sport, a dismal night

1:02:261:02:27

for Manchester United

in the Champions League.

1:02:271:02:29

They exit at the last 16 stage

after a 2-1 home defeat to Sevilla.

1:02:291:02:33

Ans all change, plans to get rid

of one and two pence coins

1:02:331:02:36

are under discussion.

1:02:361:02:37

We'd love to hear your thoughts.

1:02:371:02:39

Matt has the weather.

1:02:391:02:42

Good morning. A lovely but rather

chilly start in Neasden areas so far

1:02:421:02:47

today but actually it will be one of

the mildest days of the week --

1:02:471:02:51

Eastern. Dry in the east, wind and

rain in the west. Your full forecast

1:02:511:02:55

in 15 minutes. See you then.

1:02:551:02:57

OK,

1:02:571:02:57

Matt, thanks very much.

1:02:571:02:58

Good morning.

1:02:581:02:59

First, our main story.

1:02:591:03:00

Britain's most famous scientist,

Professor Stephen Hawking,

1:03:001:03:02

has died at the age of 76.

1:03:021:03:04

Hawking's fame came largely

from his best-selling book,

1:03:041:03:06

A Brief History of Time,

which outlined his theories

1:03:061:03:08

about the universe.

1:03:081:03:15

He had a brilliant career

despite being diagnosed with motor

1:03:151:03:18

neurone disease in 1964

and being told he had just a few

1:03:181:03:21

years to live.

1:03:211:03:22

Earlier this morning, his children

released this statement.

1:03:221:03:24

Nick Higham has been looking back

on the life of Stephen Hawking.

1:03:531:03:56

He was instantly recognisable

and utterly remarkable.

1:03:561:03:58

The visionary scientist,

helpless in his high-tech

1:03:581:04:00

wheelchair, who nonetheless

transformed our view

1:04:001:04:01

of the universe.

1:04:011:04:02

While a student, he developed

1:04:021:04:04

the first signs of motor neurone

disease.

1:04:041:04:10

Gradually his body shut down

until he could communicate only

1:04:101:04:13

using a computerised voice

synthesiser, controlled,

1:04:131:04:14

to start with, by hand.

1:04:141:04:16

It didn't hold him back.

1:04:161:04:21

I was never actually told that I had

only two years to live,

1:04:211:04:24

but I could see the doctors didn't

think my prospects were good.

1:04:241:04:32

His fame sprang from his book,

A Brief History of Time.

1:04:331:04:36

It sold 10 million copies.

1:04:361:04:37

But though many bought it,

rather fewer actually read it.

1:04:371:04:40

His theories about time,

space and black holes

1:04:401:04:42

were stupendously difficult

for non-specialists to grasp,

1:04:421:04:44

but he turned out to

have a genius for communication.

1:04:441:04:52

He gave lectures and interviews,

and became an unlikely celebrity.

1:04:541:04:57

His private life was complicated.

1:04:571:04:58

With his wife, Jane,

he had three children and she looked

1:04:581:05:01

after him until, in 1990,

1:05:011:05:03

he left her for his nurse,

Elaine.

1:05:031:05:05

They eventually married only

for claims to emerge that Hawking

1:05:051:05:07

had been physically abused.

1:05:071:05:08

Police investigated but the case

was dropped for lack of evidence.

1:05:081:05:11

The couple later divorced.

1:05:111:05:16

Too often we are told that these

are stupid questions to ask,

1:05:161:05:20

but this is said by grown-ups

who don't know the answers...

1:05:201:05:28

He never lost his sense of humour.

1:05:281:05:30

Though by the end, he could only

speak by twitching his cheek to move

1:05:301:05:33

an infrared beam.

1:05:331:05:34

I don't have much positive to say

about motor neurone disease,

1:05:341:05:37

but it taught me not

to pity myself and to get

1:05:371:05:40

on with what I still could do.

1:05:401:05:42

I'm happier now than before

I developed the condition.

1:05:421:05:46

In 2014, his life was dramatised

in The Theory of Everything,

1:05:461:05:49

with Eddie Redmayne playing Hawking.

1:05:491:05:50

..To see happened with

the beginning of time itself.

1:05:501:05:53

Stephen, here you are.

1:05:531:05:59

At Cambridge, they unveiled a statue

of him, a rare honour

1:05:591:06:02

for someone still living.

1:06:021:06:06

But few did more to transform our

understanding of the universe

1:06:061:06:09

and to overcome personal challenges.

1:06:091:06:17

Around the world, people have been

reacting to the news that scientist

1:06:171:06:20

Stephen Hawking has died.

1:06:201:06:23

We will get through some of those in

a moment.

1:06:231:06:26

In the last hour we spoke

to Sean Carroll, a physicist

1:06:261:06:29

at the California Institute

of Technology, who reflected

1:06:291:06:31

on the type of person

Stephen Hawking was.

1:06:311:06:33

I'd like to say he was the most

stubborn person I've ever met. That

1:06:331:06:37

was a big part of his personality.

He wanted things his own way. He got

1:06:371:06:41

them more often than not. And he

leavened it with this amazing sense

1:06:411:06:44

of humour. You heard in the clip you

already played, you know, he was

1:06:441:06:49

always cracking jokes of one sort or

another and it took him a long time

1:06:491:06:53

just to make a sentence. So you

could tell how important it was to

1:06:531:06:57

him that some of those sentences be

wisecracks, not just serious

1:06:571:07:01

pronouncements from on high.

1:07:011:07:06

Around the world, people have been

reacting to the news.

1:07:061:07:09

Nasa have tweeted to say:

1:07:091:07:17

The creator of the world wide

web, Tim Berners-Lee,

1:07:241:07:27

has said:

1:07:271:07:30

And Cambridge University have

paid tribute with one

1:07:381:07:40

of Stephen Hawking's quotes:

1:07:401:07:44

All of our guests this morning have

spoken about his sense of humour and

1:07:441:07:48

I want to read this, which many

people are posting this morning,

1:07:481:07:52

John Oliver interviewed him and he

said he stated he believed that

1:07:521:07:56

there could be an incident number of

parallel universes, does that mean

1:07:561:07:59

there's a universe where I'm smarter

than you? Stephen Hawking said yes,

1:07:591:08:03

he said there is also one where

you're funny.

Delivered beautifully!

1:08:031:08:08

It's really clear, not only was he

hugely intelligent etc but really

1:08:081:08:14

very very amusing as well. We will

be paying tribute to him and

1:08:141:08:18

remembering him throughout the

programme this morning.

1:08:181:08:20

In other news today...

1:08:201:08:21

Theresa May is expected to announce

sanctions against Russia

1:08:211:08:24

after the Kremlin failed

to explain their role in a chemical

1:08:241:08:27

attack in Salisbury.

1:08:271:08:28

Last night, the Russian

Embassy hinted

1:08:281:08:29

that the expulsion of its diplomats

from London would have an impact

1:08:291:08:33

on their British

counterparts in Moscow.

1:08:331:08:34

Jane-Frances Kelly reports.

1:08:341:08:40

It began as an attack

on the streets of Salisbury.

1:08:401:08:43

The poisoning of a former Russian

intelligence officer

1:08:431:08:45

and his daughter.

1:08:451:08:46

But there is now diplomatic deadlock

between Britain and Moscow.

1:08:461:08:48

I'm standing outside the Russian

embassy here in London

1:08:481:08:51

and the midnight deadline

has just passed.

1:08:511:08:53

The only reaction the British

government has got from the Russians

1:08:531:08:56

so far are angry denials

and the threat of retaliatory

1:08:561:08:58

reaction if they take

measures against Moscow.

1:08:581:09:05

They've also helpfully

got a screen outside

1:09:051:09:12

here that

shows their Twitter feed,

1:09:121:09:13

and on it they say:

1:09:131:09:16

The Russian Foreign Minister,

Sergey Lavrov, has objected to only

1:09:221:09:25

being given 24 hours to respond

to the claim Russia used

1:09:251:09:28

a chemical weapon.

1:09:281:09:29

Russia should get ten days, he said,

accusing Britain of flouncing

1:09:291:09:32

the chemical weapons convention.

1:09:321:09:34

Meanwhile, in Salisbury,

painstaking work continues.

1:09:341:09:42

and Yulia Skripal in their red BMW

car on the day they were poisoned.

1:09:491:09:53

Separately a number of deaths

are also being reinvestigated

1:09:531:09:56

by police and MI5 after claims

of Russian involvement.

1:09:561:09:59

They include a man in his 60s found

dead in New Maldon on Monday,

1:09:591:10:03

who is believed to be Russian

businessman Nikolai Glushkov,

1:10:031:10:06

a friend of Boris Berezovsky,

who was found hanged

1:10:061:10:08

in his home in 2013.

1:10:081:10:11

This morning Theresa May will be

briefed by her national security

1:10:111:10:14

council before going to Parliament,

where she's expected to announce

1:10:141:10:17

a series of measures against Russia.

1:10:171:10:18

Jane-Frances Kelly, BBC News.

1:10:181:10:22

Jonathan Blake is in Westminster

for us this morning.

1:10:221:10:26

Jonathan, good morning. The deadline

has now passed, as Jane-Frances

1:10:261:10:32

Kelly pointed out, what happens now?

The Prime Minister will set out what

1:10:321:10:35

action the government will take in a

statement to the House of Commons

1:10:351:10:39

later. The immediate options she has

our, as we've heard in recent days,

1:10:391:10:44

expelling Russian diplomats from the

UK, possibly even the Russian

1:10:441:10:47

ambassador himself. Tightening

travel restrictions on Russians

1:10:471:10:52

coming into the UK, making it harder

for them to get a visa, and possible

1:10:521:10:57

use of laws to freeze the financial

assets of Russians fear in the UK,

1:10:571:11:02

or proposing new laws to take those

powers further. Those are the sort

1:11:021:11:06

of things I think we'll hear from

the Prime Minister today because

1:11:061:11:09

those things the UK can do on its

own. Any other action would need

1:11:091:11:14

cooperation from other countries

within the European Union and

1:11:141:11:16

further afield, and it could be

tricky to secure tough economic

1:11:161:11:20

sanctions against Russia across the

EU because some countries are

1:11:201:11:24

nervous about doing that. If you

look to the UN, Russia has a veto on

1:11:241:11:28

the Security Council. But the time

for talk, as we've heard a lot of it

1:11:281:11:33

in recent days about the

government's response against

1:11:331:11:35

Russia, that's now over with the

midnight deadline passed and the

1:11:351:11:39

time has come for action. Will find

out exactly what when the Prime

1:11:391:11:44

Minister addresses parliament later

on -- we'll find out.

Jonathan, good

1:11:441:11:47

to talk to you. Thanks very much.

1:11:471:11:51

The government is to spend £50

million on trying to ease racial

1:11:511:11:54

and religious tensions.

1:11:541:11:55

It is one of a number

of proposals in the government's

1:11:551:11:58

integrated communities strategy,

which is to be published more

1:11:581:12:00

than a year after an independent

review found the country had become

1:12:001:12:04

more divided as it

had become diverse.

1:12:041:12:11

The creators of The Crown have

admitted Claire Foy who portrays

1:12:111:12:14

the Queen was paid less

than her male counterpart.

1:12:141:12:16

Matt Smith's portrayal

of a young Duke of Edinburgh

1:12:161:12:19

earned him more than

Foy's Golden Globe-winning

1:12:191:12:21

performance as Queen Elizabeth

in the Netflix drama.

1:12:211:12:23

The show's producers said Smith's

previous starring role

1:12:231:12:25

in Doctor Who meant he was paid

more than his co-star.

1:12:251:12:33

It came out because they were doing

a press conference and the producers

1:12:361:12:40

were asked and they had to reveal

the Queen was paid less, fictitious

1:12:401:12:44

Queen obviously, than the Duke of

Edinburgh. Extraordinary.

You are

1:12:441:12:50

well aware of how the industry

works, for the body of work Matt

1:12:501:12:55

Smith had done until that point,

their argument was he was harder to

1:12:551:12:58

get hold of than Claire Foy at that

time and they had to pay more to get

1:12:581:13:03

him.

I think they can make their own

arguments!

I'm just putting it out

1:13:031:13:06

there!

Talking of money, we want

your views on these, have you got a

1:13:061:13:12

2p?

1:13:121:13:14

The public are being asked

for their views on the future

1:13:141:13:17

of the 1p and 2p coins.

1:13:171:13:18

Ministers are carrying out a review

of cash transactions due

1:13:181:13:21

to a rise in customers

using non-cash payments such

1:13:211:13:24

as contactless and online spending.

1:13:241:13:25

The consultation will also look

at whether £50 notes

1:13:251:13:27

should be kept.

1:13:271:13:32

I'm thinking it's a great shame if

they are lost, you don't use them

1:13:321:13:36

much?

5p is as low as I go. You

can't use them in parking machines

1:13:361:13:42

or anything so we need to find a use

for them other than putting them in

1:13:421:13:46

a big bottle.

You're watching Breakfast, good

1:13:461:13:49

morning, thanks for watching.

1:13:491:13:50

A long-awaited plan on integration

in England will be published

1:13:501:13:53

by the government today,

over a year after an independent

1:13:531:13:56

review found the country had become

more divided as it had

1:13:561:13:59

become more diverse.

1:13:591:14:00

So what are the proposals?

1:14:001:14:01

First, to allow five key areas,

1:14:011:14:03

Bradford, Waltham Forest in London,

Peterborough, Walsall and Blackburn,

1:14:031:14:05

to adopt their own integration plans

1:14:051:14:07

The introduction of

personalised skills training

1:14:071:14:08

to help women in isolated

communities find work

1:14:081:14:10

Ensure schools are teaching British

values and mixing pupils

1:14:101:14:13

from different ethnic

and religious backgrounds

1:14:131:14:14

And to promote the English language

across all communities

1:14:141:14:17

in England.

1:14:171:14:22

With us now is Maya

Ghazal, who moved

1:14:221:14:24

to Birmingham from Syria

in 2015, and Mike Omoniyi,

1:14:241:14:27

the CEO of the TCS Network.

1:14:271:14:33

Good morning to you both.

1:14:331:14:41

I came to the country and I learnt

English in school and stuff like

1:14:411:14:47

that pretty much everyone else

experienced the same thing. It might

1:14:471:14:56

issue with the comments is it puts

blame all responsibility on the

1:14:561:15:00

wrong people. 15 million seems like

a good amount of money to spend on

1:15:001:15:05

integration and one thing I welcome

in her report is integration is a

1:15:051:15:11

part of multiculturalism, which is

fine, but it seems to put them on

1:15:111:15:15

people like me who came all

refugees, to say they are not doing

1:15:151:15:21

enough and really, poverty is a much

bigger issue for learning English. I

1:15:211:15:28

didn't drop in the richest

households, there are difficulties

1:15:281:15:31

in learning English. Attaining, that

kind of stuff. This was Port seems

1:15:311:15:36

to have missed that element.

You

arrived here when you how walls?

Was

1:15:361:15:42

16.

At that point, you spoke little

English.

For me, my expectations and

1:15:421:15:54

imaginations, a basket of chocolate

at my door, it was quite difficult.

1:15:541:16:00

I applied for three schools and I

got rejected. They didn't quite get

1:16:001:16:08

my knowledge. I had my GCSE from

Syria. I said you can check me. It

1:16:081:16:21

was the biggest thing that made that

barrier, I really did not speak

1:16:211:16:26

confident English. I was talking

bits and pieces of what I heard.

You

1:16:261:16:32

speak beautiful English. How did you

learn? What was the most effective

1:16:321:16:39

way? And learning it quickly, which

was what you did.

It comes to the

1:16:391:16:44

person. And the person feeling very

determined to learn a language. You

1:16:441:16:52

want to blend in with your

community. I was 16 and I expected

1:16:521:16:56

to have friends and I wanted that to

happen. I really worked hard. I

1:16:561:17:02

stopped using Arabic, I read English

books, I translated everything in

1:17:021:17:09

the English-language. I wanted to

work hard on that because I wanted

1:17:091:17:16

to carry on with education. Because

education is like the future, and is

1:17:161:17:22

something very important to me.

We

will speak to the Communities

1:17:221:17:27

Secretary later on who talks about

his mother learning English at the

1:17:271:17:31

age of 15 and what difference that

made to her.

The Cabinet minister,

1:17:311:17:37

whose father was a bus driver. He

said he went through his childhood,

1:17:371:17:44

and being physically attacked for

being a different colour.

There is

1:17:441:17:48

money being put into teaching people

English. I wonder whether the next

1:17:481:17:53

generation of young Pakistani people

growing up world went through what

1:17:531:17:56

he did.

Hopefully not. This is one

issue where rhetoric matters. With

1:17:561:18:03

Brexit, we saw a rise in hate crime

after that. Some statements, people

1:18:031:18:09

learning English, it harbours the

sentiment and can exacerbate

1:18:091:18:14

xenophobia. People aren't encouraged

to learn English, they say you have

1:18:141:18:20

to learn it. I think what we have to

do is properly invest in education

1:18:201:18:28

and tackle poverty. Those other

things that people back. Also being

1:18:281:18:33

active contributors to society.

Joseph Rowntree saying, one in five

1:18:331:18:40

children are in poverty. 300,000

pensioners. That seems to be where

1:18:401:18:48

it should be. As much as I love the

government, and that is a good step

1:18:481:18:52

in the right direction. You can see

it is smoke and mirrors. The

1:18:521:18:59

Institute of Fiscal Studies said

there will be reduced spending on

1:18:591:19:06

students if the government doesn't

change course. We have to make sure

1:19:061:19:10

we are looking at the right places.

Also, education.

Thank you both are

1:19:101:19:18

joining us. Lovely to talk to you.

That is find out about the weather.

1:19:181:19:27

-- let us.

1:19:271:19:32

The breeze will pick up and later on

we will see some breeze in western

1:19:321:19:38

areas. A bit of sunshine, a bit of.

Was eastern England and parts of

1:19:381:19:43

southern Scotland. That will not

last too long. The area of low

1:19:431:19:48

pressure to the west of us, bringing

rain into western fringes. It will

1:19:481:19:52

scoop up some mild air from western

France. A bit of hazy sunshine

1:19:521:19:58

overhead. The temperatures will be

boosted. Not a bad day to much of

1:19:581:20:04

eastern Scotland. But in the West

where we will continue to see cloud

1:20:041:20:09

Picken at times. That will turn a

bit heavier into the afternoon. The

1:20:091:20:17

rain across Devon and Cornwall will

get heavier later. Gales developing.

1:20:171:20:24

But too much rain in western Wales.

Also into the Isle of Man and

1:20:241:20:30

Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Another area where will see more

1:20:301:20:35

heavy and persistent rain to take us

overnight. Many central and eastern

1:20:351:20:41

areas stay dry and bright overnight.

Around 12 degrees to the Clyde

1:20:411:20:45

Valley later. Into this evening,

it's fairly mild. Quite windy with

1:20:451:20:51

gales in the West. There will be

some further rain at times. Heavy

1:20:511:20:57

rain across south-west England will

spread into Wales and other parts of

1:20:571:21:01

southern England. Keeping

temperatures up tomorrow morning,

1:21:011:21:06

the east of Scotland and north-east

England, a bit on the chilly side.

1:21:061:21:09

Some morning sunshine to be enjoyed.

The area of rain, the start of

1:21:091:21:16

least, the edges through the morning

into northern England and southern

1:21:161:21:20

Scotland in East Anglia. As it hits

coal direct, into the Grampians, a

1:21:201:21:26

bit of snowfall. It will feel cold

across the north tomorrow as the

1:21:261:21:30

wind picks up. Further south, still

double-figure temperatures. A few

1:21:301:21:35

heavy showers into the south for

Friday with some sunshine in

1:21:351:21:39

between. Still windy. Across the

eastern side of the Grampians into

1:21:391:21:45

Friday, the eastern side of the

southern options. We could see some

1:21:451:21:49

snow. A precursor of what will

happen through Friday night into the

1:21:491:21:54

weekend. Huge amounts of snow but

across the southern flank, a big

1:21:541:22:00

drop in temperature into Saturday.

Parts of England and Wales will see

1:22:001:22:05

some snow flurries. It will

certainly be big Jack it's time once

1:22:051:22:10

again. -- Jack it. -- jacket.

1:22:101:22:20

Philip Hammond declared himself

to be feeling "positively

1:22:201:22:22

Tigger-like" as he delivered his

Spring Statement yesterday.

1:22:221:22:25

Steph is at a clothing factory

in north London for us

1:22:251:22:27

to see if workers there

have a bounce in their step just

1:22:271:22:31

like the Chancellor.

1:22:311:22:35

We wanted to get a bit of reaction

1:22:351:22:38

We wanted to get a bit of reaction

and see what businesses are feeling

1:22:381:22:40

about the economy. When we get

things like this brings statement,

1:22:401:22:44

what is it like out there? This

clothing manufacturer, they make

1:22:441:22:49

10,000 garments every single week. A

business which is employed around

1:22:491:22:53

100 people. A lot to do with how we

are spending and how we are buying

1:22:531:22:59

clothes. Jenny is the boss here.

Your business, how is it doing?

It's

1:22:591:23:06

at an all-time high at the moment.

It's an exciting time to be in

1:23:061:23:10

garment manufacturing. It's changed

quite a lot, hasn't it? When you can

1:23:101:23:18

quote leave times of 2-3 weeks from

conception to delivery, no one can

1:23:181:23:23

compete with that except for the UK.

It's changed quite a bit. Just tell

1:23:231:23:27

us about that.

Once upon a time, we

would be making one style. Different

1:23:271:23:35

colours, different lengths. The

consumers are much more discerning

1:23:351:23:40

about quality. We are talking about

quality fast fashion. We have more

1:23:401:23:47

styles but smaller quantities which

is right. It stops the landfill.

1:23:471:23:52

What you think in terms of the

economy at the moment? Does it feel

1:23:521:23:56

like we are all right. But some

concern about people not having as

1:23:561:23:59

much money as they used to.

We are

all waiting to see what will happen

1:23:591:24:07

with Brexit. The proof is in the

pudding. When you see the factory is

1:24:071:24:12

as busy as this with lots of vibrant

colours, it's about being smarter

1:24:121:24:16

with your manufacturing.

More from

the hearer that a bit later on.

We

1:24:161:24:22

will see its raptor programme.

1:24:221:24:29

Breaking news this morning. The

renowned physicist Stephen Hawking

1:24:291:24:31

has died of at his home in

Cambridge. So many tributes coming

1:24:311:24:36

in. In 2013, we spoke to the

professor about his life.

1:24:361:24:50

Given how hard it is for you to

communicate any mention in the film,

1:24:501:24:54

when people are chatting,

your thoughts drift

1:24:541:24:56

off into things like how

the universe began.

1:24:561:24:58

Has your disability made

you a better scientist?

1:24:581:25:00

I must admit, I do tend to drift off

to thinking about physics or black

1:25:001:25:04

holes when I get left behind

in the conversation.

1:25:041:25:07

In fact, my disability has

been a help in a way.

1:25:071:25:10

It has freed me from teaching

or sitting on boring committees

1:25:101:25:13

and given me more time

to think and do research.

1:25:131:25:16

Theoretical physics is one

of the few fields in which being

1:25:161:25:19

disabled is no handicap.

1:25:191:25:20

It's all in your mind.

1:25:201:25:23

I am very proud and I have been able

to contribute to our understanding

1:25:231:25:27

of the universe.

1:25:271:25:35

That was professor Stephen Hawking

speaking to us a few years ago.

1:25:361:25:42

Professor James Harding is from The

University of California. We don't

1:25:421:25:47

have the best line in the world but

we will be able to hear some of your

1:25:471:25:52

reflections of working and meeting

with Stephen Hawking.

It was

1:25:521:25:56

inspiring to work with Stephen.

First, for his ideas. They often

1:25:561:26:04

pushed us forward. But also for the

way he worked. Theoretical physics

1:26:041:26:14

is kind of a noisy and chaotic

place. People who are not in it

1:26:141:26:22

often think we are working in

lockstep on some particular problem.

1:26:221:26:28

Like out universe begin? It's

actually much more copycat than

1:26:281:26:33

that. At any one time, there are a

lot of ideas floating around. And

1:26:331:26:41

there is a lot of old territory.

Some of that has to be given up.

1:26:411:26:49

Phone rings in the background. The

thing to do is to figure out what is

1:26:491:26:57

the right thing to ask. Stephen

always wondered what the right

1:26:571:27:03

question to ask was.

I think

somebody is asking you a question in

1:27:031:27:07

the background. Hopefully we can

still hear you over the phone. Would

1:27:071:27:12

you like to continue what you are

stating -- saying, the phone has

1:27:121:27:16

stopped.

Should I start again?

No,

just continue where you work, the

1:27:161:27:22

questions being asked.

I can take it

off the hook, I guess. Would that

1:27:221:27:26

help?

It's OK. Please feel free to

continue. It's interesting to hear

1:27:261:27:33

your reflections of working with the

professor.

Stephen knew what the

1:27:331:27:37

right question to ask was. He had

insight into what was wheat and what

1:27:371:27:48

was chaff. What was important and

unimportant. A remarkable insight

1:27:481:27:53

into what to give up, the current

picture in order to make progress.

1:27:531:27:58

It was a real pleasure. I hope I

contributed to that. To see him in

1:27:581:28:09

action and to work with him. Working

on the problem for example of what

1:28:091:28:15

is the beginning of the universe.

Thank you so much of your

1:28:151:28:21

reflection. We've had a few

technical problems. Quite clearly a

1:28:211:28:25

busy man today. Thank you so much as

well for all your messages about

1:28:251:28:33

Stephen Hawking. Our 11-year-old

daughter will be devastated. Stephen

1:28:331:28:42

Hawking was her inspiration. Philips

said the world is a little bit more

1:28:421:28:47

dumb this morning.

1:28:471:32:06

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

1:32:061:32:08

Hello, this is Breakfast

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

1:32:121:32:20

let's bring you up to with some of

the main stories this morning.

1:32:201:32:24

Britain's most famous scientist,

Professor Stephen Hawking,

1:32:241:32:26

has died at the age of 76.

1:32:261:32:28

Hawking's fame came largely

from his best-selling book,

1:32:281:32:30

A Brief History of Time,

which outlined his theories

1:32:301:32:33

about the universe.

1:32:331:32:33

He had a brilliant career

despite being diagnosed with motor

1:32:331:32:36

neurone disease in 1964

and being told he had just a few

1:32:361:32:40

years to live.

1:32:401:32:44

Earlier this morning, his children

released this statement.

1:32:441:32:47

We are joined by Halep Ghosh.

You met him and interviewed him and

1:33:221:33:29

spoke to him on numerous occasions?

That last statement says it all

1:33:291:33:34

about Stephen Hawking, it's as much

for his humanity that he'll be

1:33:341:33:38

remembered as for his science. He

was the most famous scientist in the

1:33:381:33:43

world arguably. So many people knew

him and you can tell from the tweets

1:33:431:33:46

coming in that he was just as

well-known any celebrity you could

1:33:461:33:49

imagine. That was because he reached

out to people in a way other

1:33:491:33:54

scientists haven't been able to. No

one really knows why but I suspect

1:33:541:33:58

part of it was the fact he was

disabled and threw it all he was

1:33:581:34:03

able to achieve what he achieved,

great things in science. Also it

1:34:031:34:08

wasn't just the science, he made

public appearances on TV programmes,

1:34:081:34:12

science programmes, he was keen

people should know about science,

1:34:121:34:16

science and scientists should be

part of our communities. My own

1:34:161:34:21

daughter said there should be a

minute's silence for Professor

1:34:211:34:25

Stephen walking, so everyone is

grieving for him as if he was

1:34:251:34:29

someone that we all knew and loved

and most importantly was inspired by

1:34:291:34:35

-- Professor Hawking.

He was a man who was able to wrestle

1:34:351:34:38

with some huge topics but do it all

with a great sense of humour, which

1:34:381:34:43

so many of our guests have said this

morning.

1:34:431:34:45

That's what struck me, I was lucky

enough to interview him a few times,

1:34:451:34:49

there was always a twinkle in his

eye, always a joke. You will have

1:34:491:34:53

seen from the statements put out

this morning what a very funny man

1:34:531:34:57

he was. He was a great human being

as well as a great scientist. Let's

1:34:571:35:02

not forget his science, he really

did tackle some of the big issues of

1:35:021:35:06

science, coupling together some of

the biggest ideas. Einstein's theory

1:35:061:35:11

of relativity with quantum

mechanics. His ideas will be build

1:35:111:35:15

upon for decades to come. Let's not

forget his science as well as what a

1:35:151:35:19

remarkable man he was.

Halep Ghosh,

thank you very much for that. --

1:35:191:35:27

Pallab Ghosh. Later we will speak to

a scientist who has told us that if

1:35:271:35:34

anyone can name a scientist, and

most people name Stephen Hawking, a

1:35:341:35:39

remarkable statement on his legacy.

We will be speaking about this later

1:35:391:35:45

in the programme.

1:35:451:35:46

Theresa May is expected to announce

sanctions against Russia today

1:35:461:35:49

after the Kremlin failed

to explain their role in a chemical

1:35:491:35:52

attack in Salisbury.

1:35:521:35:53

Last night, the Russian Embassy

hinted that the expulsion

1:35:531:35:55

of its diplomats from London

would have an impact

1:35:551:35:57

on their British

counterparts in Moscow.

1:35:571:36:05

Five councils in England will be

asked to draw up plans to improve

1:36:181:36:21

community cohesion in their areas

as part of wider proposals

1:36:211:36:24

on integration.

1:36:241:36:25

Other proposals outlined

in the government's

1:36:251:36:26

Integrated Communities Strategy

green paper include teaching British

1:36:261:36:29

values in schools, promoting

the English language

1:36:291:36:30

and for councils to provide language

tuition to non-English speakers.

1:36:301:36:33

An accident and emergency consultant

says he's concerned by the rise

1:36:331:36:36

in knife crime after an surge

in admissions from attacks

1:36:361:36:39

involving the weapons.

1:36:391:36:40

Andreas Crede said

the injuries he treats

1:36:401:36:42

are getting more severe.

1:36:421:36:43

The number of victims sent

to hospital with knife-inflicted

1:36:431:36:45

wounds is at its highest

level for five years.

1:36:451:36:48

I think if we don't do something

about it, I think the trend that

1:36:481:36:51

we've seen in the last five years

may continue going upwards

1:36:511:36:54

and I think that is

the big concern that

1:36:541:36:57

we all have, that this

is an escalating problem for us.

1:36:571:37:00

The creators of The Crown have

admitted Claire Foy who portrays

1:37:001:37:04

the Queen was paid less

than her male counterpart.

1:37:041:37:06

Matt Smith's portrayal of a young

Duke of Edinburgh earned him more

1:37:061:37:10

than Foy's Golden Globe-winning

performance as Queen Elizabeth

1:37:101:37:12

in the Netflix drama.

1:37:121:37:13

The show's producers said Smith's

previous starring role

1:37:131:37:15

in Doctor Who meant he was paid

more than his co-star.

1:37:151:37:22

This all came out in a rather

awkward press conference.

It came

1:37:221:37:26

out in a press conference, they were

talking about the series, they were

1:37:261:37:30

asked about the facts, those are the

facts. As yet I've not seen... I

1:37:301:37:36

will look for it, I haven't seen a

reaction from Claire Foy, maybe she

1:37:361:37:39

knew that but maybe she didn't. They

are saying she will be in future

1:37:391:37:43

paid more, but it's one thing being

in the future and it's one thing

1:37:431:37:47

being in the past.

On the subject of

money...

1:37:471:37:51

The public are being asked

for their views on the future

1:37:511:37:54

of the 1p and 2p coins.

1:37:541:37:56

Ministers are carrying out a review

of cash transactions due to a rise

1:37:561:37:59

in customers using non-cash

payments such as contactless

1:37:591:38:02

and online spending.

1:38:021:38:02

The consultation will also look

at whether £50 notes should be kept.

1:38:021:38:09

I didn't know until today that I was

such a fan of the 1p and 2p coins. I

1:38:091:38:16

am so upset they are going.

I hadn't

considered it, lots of charities

1:38:161:38:21

have got in contact today, saying

these are part of our lifeblood,

1:38:211:38:25

people might put them in their

pockets but they often put them into

1:38:251:38:29

our charity boxes.

How often is that

done?

Over a while in a bucket that

1:38:291:38:34

adds up.

The pennies count.

Look

after the pennies and the pounds

1:38:341:38:38

will look after themselves!

Kat...

We aren't talking about copper, we

1:38:381:38:44

are talking about silver medals. We

were talking about Meena Fitzpatrick

1:38:441:38:49

and Jen Kehoe, her guide in the

skiing yesterday, they won the

1:38:491:38:52

silver yesterday and they have only

done and won it again 24 hours later

1:38:521:38:56

so two in two days for Britain's

Paralympics team in South Korea.

1:38:561:39:03

Let's speak to our reporter

Kate Grey who's in Pyeongchang.

1:39:031:39:11

Meena Fitzpatrick and her guide, Jen

Kehoe, have won their third medal,

1:39:111:39:16

this time silver in the giant slalom

to add to the silver and bronze they

1:39:161:39:20

won earlier in the week. In the

giant slalom they get two runs down

1:39:201:39:24

the course and they held the silver

position through the day. A

1:39:241:39:27

brilliant result for the girls, who

at their debut Games are clearly

1:39:271:39:33

thriving in this Paralympic

environment. Disappointment for

1:39:331:39:36

Kelly Gallagher, you may remember

her from the Sochi Paralympics

1:39:361:39:39

winning gold four years ago, but

unfortunately she finished fifth,

1:39:391:39:43

that's her best position at these

Games. The Alpine skiers are really

1:39:431:39:48

performing well, particularly Meena

and Jen, looking to continue that

1:39:481:39:54

success in the slalom later in the

week. The curlers have lost their

1:39:541:39:57

game against the USA, a nervous wait

as they watched the other matches

1:39:571:40:02

unfold with one more day of

round-robin matches to come.

1:40:021:40:05

The curlers are up against it but

for now, Kate, thanks very much. We

1:40:051:40:10

will speak to you later on.

1:40:101:40:12

To the rest of the

sports news now...

1:40:121:40:14

Manchester United are out

of the Champions League

1:40:141:40:16

after a dismal home

defeat to Sevilla.

1:40:161:40:18

The tie was poised at 0-0

from the first leg,

1:40:181:40:21

but Sevilla took control by scoring

a crucial away goal with less

1:40:211:40:24

than 20 minutes left.

1:40:241:40:25

The Spanish side then put the tie

to bed with a second soon after.

1:40:251:40:29

And although Romelu Lukaku

pulled a late goal back,

1:40:291:40:31

it wasn't enough

1:40:311:40:32

for United, who exit the competition

in the last 16 and now just

1:40:321:40:36

have the FA Cup left as the only

trophy they can win this season.

1:40:361:40:39

I sit in this chair twice

in the Champions League and I have

1:40:391:40:43

knock out Man United

at home at Old Trafford.

1:40:431:40:45

I sit in this chair

with Porto, Man United out.

1:40:451:40:48

I sit in this chair

with Real Madrid, Man United out.

1:40:481:40:51

So I don't think it's

something new for the club.

1:40:511:40:54

And of course, being

Manchester United manager and losing

1:40:541:40:56

a Champions League tie, at home,

is a delusion, obviously.

1:40:561:41:04

A lot of the United fans getting in

touch this morning saying they're

1:41:091:41:12

angry he's not taking responsibility

for the result last night, that it

1:41:121:41:16

is due to his philosophy and the way

he instructed his players to play at

1:41:161:41:20

their out of the Champions League

and with comments like that, saying

1:41:201:41:24

it just happens to Manchester

United, he's not taking

1:41:241:41:27

responsibility.

Not going to appease

the fans.

They are getting in touch

1:41:271:41:31

today saying they aren't happy at

all.

1:41:311:41:33

Tonight the final last 16 ties take

place, with Chelsea aiming to become

1:41:331:41:37

the third English side

into the quarter-finals.

1:41:371:41:39

But they'll be well up against it

taking on the Spanish

1:41:391:41:42

league leaders Barcelona

in the Nou Camp.

1:41:421:41:43

It's poised at 1-1

from the first leg.

1:41:431:41:44

Huge match for Chelsea is. --

Chelsea.

1:41:491:41:55

The Cheltenham Festival is under

way, with Buveur D'Air the big

1:41:551:41:58

winner on day one.

1:41:581:41:59

The Nicky Henderson-trained horse

was the odds-on favourite

1:41:591:42:01

going into the Champion Hurdle,

but he was pushed all the way

1:42:011:42:05

by the 7-1 shot Melon,

winning by barely a neck

1:42:051:42:07

on the line.

1:42:071:42:08

The win means Buveaur D'Air

retains his title after winning

1:42:081:42:11

the same race last year.

1:42:111:42:12

The going under hoof at Cheltenham

very heavy because of the beast from

1:42:121:42:16

the East dumping all the snow. The

snow on the course last week, still

1:42:161:42:20

very wet, but cleared, very boggy,

but still heavy going.

1:42:201:42:24

Loads of reflections on our main

story, the sad death of Professor

1:42:241:42:29

Stephen Hawking at 76. Professor

Brian Cox has just tweeted, so sad

1:42:291:42:33

to hear about Stephen Hawking, what

a remarkable life, his contributions

1:42:331:42:37

to science will be used as long as

there are scientists and there are

1:42:371:42:41

many more scientists because of him.

He spoke about the value and

1:42:411:42:45

fragility of human life and

civilisation and greatly enhanced

1:42:451:42:48

both.

One of the many tributes to serve

1:42:481:42:50

Professor walking this morning.

We will be talking about him through

1:42:501:42:55

the programme. -- serve Professor

Hawking -- Sir.

1:42:551:43:01

It may not be blooming just yet,

but Chancellor Philip Hammond

1:43:011:43:04

painted an unusually rosy picture

of the country's finances

1:43:041:43:06

in his Spring statement yesterday.

1:43:061:43:08

The economy is growing,

and borrowing is expected

1:43:081:43:10

to fall in 2019.

1:43:101:43:11

But, he told the BBC's political

editor, Laura Kunessberg,

1:43:111:43:13

this isn't a reason

to increase spending just yet.

1:43:131:43:16

This coming year, 18/19, we will see

debt starting to fall after 17

1:43:161:43:21

relentless years of increasing our

debt.

1:43:211:43:24

There are very strong demands for

the tight control on public spending

1:43:241:43:28

to ease up just slightly, and with

interest rates so low, you could do

1:43:281:43:33

that with merely the blink of an

eyelid?

1:43:331:43:36

If you're talking about borrowing

more to finance current spending,

1:43:361:43:39

that is simply unfair to the next

generation, asking them to pick up

1:43:391:43:43

the bills that we are not to pay.

1:43:431:43:46

Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell,

challenged Mr Hammond's optimism

1:43:461:43:48

in the House of Commons yesterday.

1:43:481:43:50

He joins us now from Westminster.

1:43:501:43:51

Good morning. So much to talk to you

about today. He said yesterday that

1:43:511:43:57

he's feeling tigerish, he said

there's good news on the economy,

1:43:571:44:02

are they doing something right?

No.

If you go behind the actual words

1:44:021:44:07

there and look at the report from

the office of budget responsibility,

1:44:071:44:11

on every criteria virtually were not

doing well. In terms of growth, we

1:44:111:44:16

grow a little bit this year and then

growth is predicted to fall back.

1:44:161:44:21

Productivity predicted to fall back.

In terms of wages, subdued at best.

1:44:211:44:27

Then, in terms of investment, again

predicted to fall back every year

1:44:271:44:31

for the next three years. So

actually the optimism he was

1:44:311:44:35

displaying I think was false

optimism. However, the point I was

1:44:351:44:39

making in the debate yesterday is

actually we have a crisis in our

1:44:391:44:43

public services and the reason we've

got a crisis in our public services

1:44:431:44:47

is he has shifted the debt, the

deficit, onto those public services.

1:44:471:44:55

Health, education, policing, local

councils especially, and they need

1:44:551:44:57

assistance. I don't want the

government to borrow for day-to-day

1:44:571:45:01

expenditure, Labour in government

will never do that, I want him to

1:45:011:45:05

stop the tax giveaways to the rich,

the corporations and as he did last

1:45:051:45:10

month, giving $5 billion nearly to

the banks in a tax cut. He should

1:45:101:45:16

use that money to invest in our

public services.

1:45:161:45:18

You are painting a much worse

picture than he's painting, but at

1:45:181:45:22

the same time...

It's not me, it's the office of

1:45:221:45:25

budget responsibility report.

At the same time you're saying spend

1:45:251:45:28

money on the NHS, where would that

money come from?

It would come from

1:45:281:45:34

stopping the tax giveaway. Let's

take what happened in the finance

1:45:341:45:37

act only four weeks ago, he pushed

through a cut in the levy on banks

1:45:371:45:42

that was introduced after the banks'

crash. That means he'll be giving

1:45:421:45:47

away to the banks a tax cut of up to

about £5 billion over the next few

1:45:471:45:52

years. We should use that to invest

in our public services so I'm saying

1:45:521:45:56

to him, you've got your priorities

wrong, you can't keep on giving tax

1:45:561:46:00

cuts to the rich, corporations and

the banks when our public services

1:46:001:46:04

are in crisis.

Can I ask you about

another thing, of course we've been

1:46:041:46:09

talking about Russia and what

happened in Salisbury throughout

1:46:091:46:12

this week, your leader talked about

having a robust conversation with

1:46:121:46:17

Russia.

1:46:171:46:21

He went on and said we need strong

action as well, robust action. We

1:46:211:46:26

need to tell them how strongly we

feel but also what he said, and I

1:46:261:46:31

think it's more important, we need

to hit, whether it's Russia or

1:46:311:46:34

anyone else, it was abusing human

rights and critically abusing human

1:46:341:46:41

rights in our own country, we need

to hit them where it hurts. That's

1:46:411:46:45

why we've been promoting the clause

in the Finance Bill going through at

1:46:451:46:50

the moment. The money laundering

Bill. It identifies individuals who

1:46:501:46:56

are human rights abuses. We then hit

them in the pocket. We isolate them

1:46:561:47:04

completely from this market as well.

In that way, we have international

1:47:041:47:11

cooperation. President Obama made it

effective. That's the point Jeremy

1:47:111:47:19

was making.

So you back financial

sanctions. We don't know what the

1:47:191:47:24

Prime Minister was going to say

later. It may involve the expulsion

1:47:241:47:28

of a number of Russian diplomats.

We

will see what the Prime Minister

1:47:281:47:33

comes up with. We will see what she

is saying. I think that's the sort

1:47:331:47:40

of traditional methods, sometimes

they really don't have much effect.

1:47:401:47:44

If you hit them financially, that

has the effect. I have been raising

1:47:441:47:50

this for quite awhile now about how

the City of London, if you remember

1:47:501:47:54

last year, has been laundering

Russian money. Last you, there was

1:47:541:48:00

that image of what we called the

Russian laundromat. It was being

1:48:001:48:06

laundered out again. If we use the

clause and we moved it -- we used in

1:48:061:48:13

the legislative -- legislative

committee. We are hoping the

1:48:131:48:17

government will accept that

legislation and we can have some

1:48:171:48:21

effective sanctions.

Let us talk

about the World Cup. Some people

1:48:211:48:29

have suggested perhaps we should be

going to the World Cup.

I'm not keen

1:48:291:48:33

on that. The one thing about the

World Cup, it is fans mixed with

1:48:331:48:40

fans. More people mix together and

understand one another, I supported

1:48:401:48:45

the anti-apartheid campaign.

Literally we had run out of bed --

1:48:451:48:50

every other mechanism. But I'm not

sure. It isolates the politicians in

1:48:501:48:57

some ways. I'm not sure whether that

would be effective. It's just us

1:48:571:49:03

pulling out, it would not have much

of an effect. I would rather we did

1:49:031:49:09

something much more effective.

Introduce the clause into

1:49:091:49:13

legislation, implemented and where

it is, Russia or whoever else who is

1:49:131:49:20

committing human rights abuses, we

can isolate them and really have an

1:49:201:49:25

effect.

So many people around the

world are paying to be to Stephen

1:49:251:49:35

Hawking. Did you meet him? I was

trapped in a meeting as always. I

1:49:351:49:44

celebrate his scientific

achievements but possibly more

1:49:441:49:49

celebrating his humanity. Everyone I

know who has met him, accuracy was.

1:49:491:49:55

I think that combination of real

scientific achievement but at the

1:49:551:50:03

same time, what a human being. He

will be greatly missed.

1:50:031:50:12

will be greatly missed. Matt is

looking at the weather price.

Not a

1:50:121:50:19

bad day. The lovely start. This was

a shot in East Yorkshire. A bit of a

1:50:191:50:27

chill out there. Still,

1:50:271:50:31

a shot in East Yorkshire. A bit of a

chill out there. Still, temperatures

1:50:311:50:31

very close to freezing in one or two

spots.

But things are changing. Low

1:50:311:50:36

pressure to the West. Strengthening

winds, picking up. Bringing with it,

1:50:361:50:44

some mild air. Temperatures will be

boosted. Eastern Scotland in

1:50:441:50:53

particular. By any means, we will

see rain come and go. Into the

1:50:531:51:02

afternoon, that rain will turn a bit

heavier. As the wind picks up, we

1:51:021:51:07

could see gales across time -- the

Times across Devon and Cornwall. 25

1:51:071:51:12

millimetres to take us through the

afternoon and overnight.

1:51:121:51:16

Particularly wet to later on in

Northern Ireland. Rain coming in

1:51:161:51:21

going in the far west of Scotland.

Like other Western areas, strong to

1:51:211:51:25

gale force winds. It's going to be a

southerly wind. A chilly start. 12

1:51:251:51:33

degrees. Making it the mildest day

of the week. Most will be dry. Still

1:51:331:51:43

some rain in the West. Wales,

south-west England and the

1:51:431:51:48

south-east later on. Another cool

might install.

1:51:481:51:58

might install. Tomorrow morning we

will start right. Northern Ireland,

1:51:581:52:02

northern Wales. Barely wet. That

rain spreads. It could turn a little

1:52:021:52:11

bit wintry. Temperatures five

degrees there. The brightness comes

1:52:111:52:18

out.

1:52:181:52:25

out. Other parts of southern

England. Further north, a cold wind

1:52:251:52:31

starts to blow. Parts of the

Southern plumes. Three degrees in

1:52:311:52:40

Aberdeen. 11 degrees in Cardiff and

London. It will work its way

1:52:401:52:46

southwards into the weekend. High

pressure building. Only a few snow

1:52:461:52:52

flurries. Focus across parts of

England and Wales. A big thing

1:52:521:52:59

everything will notice is the

southern -- the sudden drop in

1:52:591:53:02

temperatures. A cold weekend.

1:53:021:53:08

temperatures. A cold weekend. A big

coat needed and will wallet might

1:53:091:53:12

become a bit lighter.

1:53:121:53:16

Our wallets could become a lot

lighter, as the government reviews

1:53:161:53:19

the future of the one pence and two

pence coins due to a rise

1:53:191:53:22

in customers using

non-cash payments.

1:53:221:53:24

So could this spell

the end of coppers?

1:53:241:53:25

So could this spell

the end of coppers?

1:53:251:53:26

We asked people on the streets

of Manchester what they thought.

1:53:261:53:29

I tend to use pound coins a bit. I

rarely use small change. I just put

1:53:291:53:35

it in my little chart.

1:53:351:53:41

it in my little chart.

I can't see

very well and the 1p and 2p coins, I

1:53:431:53:47

often have a problem with that.

I

never knew, when something is great

1:53:471:53:53

to be taken away from you, you

realise how much you love things. I

1:53:531:53:57

love these pennies.

I still spend

them. Minor a little bit shinier

1:53:571:54:03

than yours. I don't tend to keep

them in the pocket because they

1:54:031:54:10

weigh a lot. Again, many people are

getting into contact saying that

1:54:101:54:14

everything in this country is still

priced at 99p.

Let's get rid of

1:54:141:54:21

those shops. That is a good point

about charities. You can often put

1:54:211:54:26

your money on the charity.

Cat was

saying earlier that one in 12

1:54:261:54:33

pennies, I throw them straight in

the bin.

It's really upsets me.

1:54:331:54:39

Also, do get in touch with us about

that and our main story here today

1:54:391:54:44

of course. We heard in the early

hours of this morning that Stephen

1:54:441:54:48

Hawking died. A truly brilliant man.

So many of you sending in messages

1:54:481:54:53

about him.

1:54:531:54:59

about him. Elspeth says, rest in

peace, a brilliant man. Many people

1:54:591:55:04

talking about his sense of humour.

Quite a few people sharing this.

1:55:041:55:10

John Oliver interviewed him. He said

he was a man who believed in the

1:55:101:55:17

multiplicity of universes. There's

that mean there is a universe where

1:55:171:55:21

I am cleverer than you? He said yes.

There is also one where you are

1:55:211:55:25

funny.

You can imagine that delivery. That

1:55:251:55:29

is what is coming through all the

messages. As well is being utterly

1:55:291:55:33

intellectually brilliant, he was

also very funny. We will be

1:55:331:55:39

remembering him throughout the

programme. He somehow managed to

1:55:391:55:45

survive to the age of 76.

Absolutely. Send us your

1:55:451:59:07

in half an hour.

1:59:071:59:08

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

1:59:081:59:10

Hello, this is Breakfast

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

1:59:411:59:47

Stephen Hawking - one

of the world's most acclaimed

1:59:471:59:49

physicists and authors

- has died.

1:59:491:59:51

He was 76.

1:59:511:59:53

He lived with a form of motor

neurone disease for much of his life

1:59:531:59:56

but became one of the most

talked-about scientists

1:59:561:59:58

since Einstein.

1:59:581:59:59

In a statement, his children

said his brilliance and humour

1:59:592:00:02

inspired people across the world.

2:00:022:00:06

I don't have much positive to say

about motor neurone disease,

2:00:062:00:11

but it taught me not to pity myself

and instead get on with

2:00:112:00:14

what I could do.

2:00:142:00:17

Scientitsts from around the world

have been reacting to the news -

2:00:182:00:21

Nasa said his theories unlocked

a universe of possibilities

2:00:212:00:23

that we and the world are exploring.

2:00:232:00:26

The scientist and broadcaster

Brian Cox said...

2:00:342:00:41

Good morning, it's

Wednesday 14th March.

2:00:522:00:54

Also this morning...

2:00:542:00:58

Russia fails to meet

the Prime Minister's midnight

2:00:582:01:01

deadline to explain how a nerve

agent was used to attack

2:01:012:01:04

a former spy in Salisbury -

Theresa May will tell parliament

2:01:042:01:06

what action she plans to take.

2:01:062:01:14

Good morning from this clothing

manufacturer in North London where

2:01:152:01:18

we are getting reaction to the

Chancellor's Spain statement. He

2:01:182:01:23

said our economy is going. -- Spring

statement.

2:01:232:01:29

In sport, a dismal night

for Manchester United

2:01:292:01:31

in the Champions League.

2:01:312:01:32

They exit at the last 16 stage

after a 2-1 home defeat to Sevilla.

2:01:322:01:35

And Matt has the weather.

2:01:352:01:40

Lovely, bright day across central

and eastern areas. In the West,

2:01:402:01:47

cloud bringing rain and

strengthening winds. Don't put away

2:01:472:01:53

the winter coat yet because much

colder area backed by the weekend

2:01:532:01:56

and some of you will see snow. How

much? Journey for the full forecast.

2:01:562:02:01

Good morning.

2:02:012:02:02

First, our main story.

2:02:022:02:04

Britain's most famous scientist,

Professor Stephen Hawking,

2:02:042:02:06

has died at the age of 76.

2:02:062:02:08

Hawking's fame came largely

from his best-selling book,

2:02:082:02:11

A Brief History of Time,

which outlined his theories

2:02:112:02:13

about the universe.

2:02:132:02:15

He had a brilliant career

despite being diagnosed with motor

2:02:152:02:17

neurone disease in 1964

and being told he had just

2:02:172:02:21

a few years to live then.

2:02:212:02:26

Earlier this morning, his children

released this statement...

2:02:262:02:29

He was instantly recognisable

and utterly remarkable.

2:02:592:03:02

The visionary scientist, helpless

in his high-tech wheelchair,

2:03:022:03:04

who nonetheless transformed our view

of the universe.

2:03:042:03:08

While a student, he

developed the first signs

2:03:082:03:10

of motor neurone disease.

2:03:102:03:15

Gradually, his body shut down

until he could communicate only

2:03:152:03:18

using a computerised voice

synthesiser, controlled,

2:03:182:03:19

to start with, by hand.

2:03:192:03:20

It didn't hold him back.

2:03:202:03:26

I was never actually told that I had

only two years to live,

2:03:262:03:29

but I could see the doctors didn't

think my prospects were good.

2:03:292:03:33

His fame sprang from his book,

A Brief History of Time.

2:03:332:03:36

It sold 10 million copies.

2:03:362:03:38

But though many bought it,

rather fewer actually read it.

2:03:382:03:42

His theories about time,

space and black holes

2:03:422:03:44

were stupendously difficult

for non-specialists to grasp,

2:03:442:03:49

but he turned out to

have a genius for communication.

2:03:492:03:52

He gave lectures and interviews,

and became an unlikely celebrity.

2:03:522:03:58

His private life was complicated.

2:03:582:04:00

With his wife, Jane,

he had three children

2:04:002:04:03

and she looked after him until,

in 1990, he left her

2:04:032:04:06

for his nurse, Elaine.

2:04:062:04:08

They eventually married only

for claims to emerge that Hawking

2:04:082:04:11

had been physically abused.

2:04:112:04:13

Police investigated but the case

was dropped for lack of evidence.

2:04:132:04:16

The couple later divorced.

2:04:162:04:18

Too often we are told that these

are stupid questions to ask,

2:04:182:04:22

but this is said by grown-ups

who don't know the answers

2:04:222:04:30

He never lost his sense of humour.

2:04:322:04:33

Though by the end, he could only

speak by twitching his cheek

2:04:332:04:36

to move an infrared beam.

2:04:362:04:37

I don't have much positive to say

about motor neurone disease,

2:04:372:04:40

but it taught me not to pity myself

and to get on with

2:04:402:04:43

what I still could do.

2:04:432:04:46

I'm happier now than before

I developed the condition.

2:04:462:04:50

In 2014, his life was dramatised

in The Theory of Everything,

2:04:502:04:52

with Eddie Redmayne playing Hawking.

2:04:522:04:54

..Right back to see happened

with the beginning of time itself.

2:04:542:04:58

Stephen, here you are.

2:04:582:05:01

At Cambridge, they unveiled a statue

of him, a rare honour

2:05:012:05:03

for someone still living.

2:05:032:05:06

But few did more to transform our

understanding of the universe

2:05:062:05:09

and to overcome personal challenges.

2:05:092:05:17

Around the world, people have been

reacting to the news that scientist

2:05:222:05:25

Stephen Hawking has died.

2:05:252:05:28

One of the programmes he did a cameo

in, Big Bang Theory.

2:05:282:05:38

American television presenter Larry

King said...

2:05:422:05:51

Astronaut Tim Peake said...

2:05:532:06:00

We showed you earlier, the physicist

Brian Cox said...

2:06:052:06:14

You will remember the actor Eddie

read main lady Stephen Hawking in

2:06:262:06:31

The Theory Of Everything. He said...

2:06:312:06:48

Many of you are getting in contact

with us, talking about Star Trek The

2:06:522:06:59

Next Generation, and his cameo in

the Simpsons.

2:06:592:07:12

Last night, the Russian Embassy said

expulsion of the diplomats from the

2:07:162:07:25

Russian Embassy in London would have

an impact. The

2:07:252:07:29

the midnight deadline has passed?

Things will speed up today because

2:07:342:07:39

the Prime Minister is expected to

make a statement in the House of

2:07:392:07:43

Commons after Prime Minister's

Questions at lunchtime. In terms of

2:07:432:07:46

the measures she was set out,

options available include expulsion

2:07:462:07:53

of Russian diplomats, maybe even the

Russian ambassador from the UK.

2:07:532:07:58

Further restrictions of Russians

travelling to the UK, harder for

2:07:582:08:04

them to get a Visa. Freezing the

assets of Russian individuals living

2:08:042:08:08

in the UK and haps the announcement

of further legislation to tighten up

2:08:082:08:13

on that. When she spits at

lunchtime, she might say these

2:08:132:08:20

things. Any further legislation will

involve other countries. That could

2:08:202:08:26

be tricky. Other EU states have

suggested they might not be too keen

2:08:262:08:33

to put other economic sanctions

against Russia. There are already

2:08:332:08:36

several in place. The United Nations

action beyond that. There is a

2:08:362:08:45

Russian veto on the council. And the

military alliance could look into

2:08:452:08:50

the further build-up of Allied

troops into the European countries

2:08:502:08:54

bordering Russia. In the medium

term, concerned with diplomatic ties

2:08:542:09:00

with Russia and restricting the

movement and financial activity of

2:09:002:09:04

Russian individuals living in the

UK. All eyes will be on the premise

2:09:042:09:07

that when she sets out the

Government was my response to the

2:09:072:09:10

House of Commons at lunchtime.

2:09:102:09:18

The Government's integration

strategy is going to be published.

2:09:242:09:32

Here is an editor Mark Easton. 17

years after race riots in Bradford

2:09:322:09:38

and a official report warning of

segregated communities. One of five

2:09:382:09:47

places in England which must adopt

an integration plan, the others

2:09:472:09:49

are... All areas with a history of

racial and ethnic tensions. 12 years

2:09:492:10:01

ago, Blackburn was highlighted as

suffering deep segregation of white

2:10:012:10:04

and Asian communities. To release

tension, integration. Pupils taken

2:10:042:10:15

in by bus. Today's strategy suggests

more schemes like this. Also

2:10:152:10:23

proposes extra support for English

language classes. State provision

2:10:232:10:26

has halved in the last few years.

Improving economic opportunities for

2:10:262:10:33

people in segregated communities,

particularly women, and the

2:10:332:10:37

promotion of pluralistic British

values by teachers. The strategy is

2:10:372:10:41

a latest in a long line of the

Government's attempts to do with one

2:10:412:10:45

of Britain's most enduring and

sensitive challenges. An accident

2:10:452:10:52

and emergency consultant says he is

concerned by the rise of knife crime

2:10:522:10:57

after attacks by the weapons. He

says the injuries he cheats are

2:10:572:11:02

getting more severe and knife

inflicted wounds in hospital at the

2:11:022:11:07

highest level for five years. Lots

of people talking about the creators

2:11:072:11:12

of the Crown, the actress who plays

the Queen paid less than her male

2:11:122:11:24

counterpart. Matt Smith. He is being

paid more for his role in the

2:11:242:11:33

Netflix drama. Because of his role

in Dr Who previously, the producers

2:11:332:11:41

say he is played more. They were

doing a press conference. The

2:11:412:11:44

producers were asked, that is the

facts, as they had to tell them. We

2:11:442:11:51

are looking for a reaction from

Claire and Matt. It seems

2:11:512:11:56

extraordinary. Awkward. We are being

asked for our views on the future of

2:11:562:12:06

these, 1p and 2p coins. Ministers

carrying out reviews of cash

2:12:062:12:12

transactions due to a rise in

customers using non-cash payments.

2:12:122:12:20

The consultation will look at

whether £50 notes should be kept or

2:12:202:12:25

not also. I feel slightly guilty. I

don't carry coppers. I do!

2:12:252:12:33

don't carry coppers. I do! I just

carry them in the pockets. I feel

2:12:332:12:37

guilty for just putting them in a

bucket or a bottle at home. Not in a

2:12:372:12:43

charity bucket. That is where they

should all go. It is important for

2:12:432:12:47

us because if you got rid of these,

that is a huge amount of money they

2:12:472:12:51

get every year from people putting

money in charity boxes. What about

2:12:512:12:57

when we all go contactless for

charity donations? It is the

2:12:572:13:01

future!. Now, our main story,

Stephen Hawking died at his home in

2:13:012:13:09

Cambridge. Tim Moffat spoke to the

professor about his life a few years

2:13:092:13:15

ago. You mention in the film when

people are chatting your thoughts

2:13:152:13:21

drift off into how the universe

began. In some ways has your

2:13:212:13:26

disability made you a better site

is?

I must admit, I do tend to drift

2:13:262:13:31

off to thinking about physics of

black holes when I get left finding

2:13:312:13:36

the conversation. In fact, my

disability has been a help, in a

2:13:362:13:42

way. It has freed me from teaching

or sitting on boring committees and

2:13:422:13:46

given me more time to think and do

research. Theoretical physics is one

2:13:462:13:51

of the few fields in which being

disabled is no handicap. It is all

2:13:512:13:58

in the mind. I am very proud and I

have been able to contribute to our

2:13:582:14:03

understanding of the universe.

There

was the man himself. Here is Harry

2:14:032:14:09

Cliff, particle physicist and

curator at London's science Museum,

2:14:092:14:13

who attended the same Cambridge

college as Stephen Hawking. Dell us

2:14:132:14:18

about your thoughts.

It is really

sad. I remember the first time I saw

2:14:182:14:27

Stephen Hawking as an undergraduate.

I was in awe of him. Occasionally

2:14:272:14:33

seeing him at dinner. Rolling about

the college. He had a sense of

2:14:332:14:37

mischief. If he could catch you he

would accelerate towards you, send

2:14:372:14:42

students jumping out of the way or

try to run over their toes.

2:14:422:14:47

Brilliant scientist and sense of

humour.

That is clear, the

2:14:472:14:53

endearment. How much did he change

things in terms of science?

Huge

2:14:532:14:58

contribution particularly to the

understanding of black holes.

2:14:582:15:02

Bidding he is most famous for a

showing that black holes, we think

2:15:022:15:05

of them as objects which swallow and

saplings into them, if you leave

2:15:052:15:10

them on their own they evaporate,

give off the level radiation, called

2:15:102:15:20

Hawking radiation. We are tried to

create tiny black holes. We were

2:15:202:15:24

asked when the experiments were

turned on, what happens if they

2:15:242:15:27

swallow the Earth? Stephen Hawking

showed us there was no danger of

2:15:272:15:32

that. A huge impact on science.

Thank goodness! Inspiring to young

2:15:322:15:40

scientists, isn't he?

Absolutely. He

is an icon. I think is probably the

2:15:402:15:46

only other scientist you can think

of with the sinking a public figure.

2:15:462:15:52

His willingness to engage not just

in science but explaining to the

2:15:522:15:56

public and popular culture. He

showed up on the Simpsons. He

2:15:562:16:00

described it as his greatest

achievement, making a bit of a joke!

2:16:002:16:05

On the Big Bang Theory. Willing to

put himself out there. And his

2:16:052:16:12

personality, making him an icon.

2:16:122:16:13

He came to the London science

Museum. You saw him there?

He came

2:16:162:16:22

one day with his family. I was asked

to come down and talk to him while

2:16:222:16:26

he was waiting in our reception

room. I was slightly terrified

2:16:262:16:31

because he was looking at me. I was

desperately trying to think of

2:16:312:16:35

something intelligent to say. He had

a quizzical stayer. Probably

2:16:352:16:40

thinking, who is this idiot? You are

lost for words. Someone, as a child,

2:16:402:16:45

an icon, someone you look up to. The

day he went out with his family to

2:16:452:16:51

the science Museum he was being

mobbed, enjoy the attention.

2:16:512:16:54

Fantastic figure.

Thank you sharing

your memories.

2:16:542:17:04

asked to thank you all so much for

your memories of reading A Brief

2:17:072:17:13

History Of Time of time.

You read it? I did. I can't explain

2:17:132:17:21

it, but I did read it front to back.

It was a challenge, but it was

2:17:212:17:26

absolutely fascinating and still is.

2:17:262:17:30

Here's Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

2:17:302:17:37

A lovely sunrise over the River Tay.

Different conditions across the

2:17:412:17:45

West. In Cornwall you are closer to

this area of low pressure. There

2:17:452:17:56

will be milder air from Western

France though. After a chilly start

2:17:562:18:04

in western areas, temperatures will

be on the rise. Staying dry through

2:18:042:18:10

central Scotland. The cloud will wax

and wane throughout the day. In the

2:18:102:18:15

West you saw those pictures in

Cornwall. It will be fairly similar

2:18:152:18:20

all day long. The rain could turn

heavier, particularly over the

2:18:202:18:24

moors. Girls could also develop.

Occasional rain in Western Wales.

2:18:242:18:33

Northern Ireland gets wetter towards

the end of the afternoon. Over 25

2:18:332:18:39

millimetres of rain expected. Rain

comes and goes in western Scotland.

2:18:392:18:44

The winds will pick up, but it will

bring milder air. The central belt

2:18:442:18:51

of Scotland will be up to 12

degrees. We could hit 50 degrees in

2:18:512:18:55

London. It means that many of you

have a reasonable rush hour to look

2:18:552:18:59

forward to, but the wetter weather

will head into Wales and Northern

2:18:592:19:07

Ireland as we start tomorrow

morning. Temperatures up towards the

2:19:072:19:11

south western corner. There will be

some cloud coming and going, maybe

2:19:112:19:20

one or two wintry showers on the

Grampians. The rain will shift into

2:19:202:19:29

East Anglia, northern England and

southern Scotland. In the south,

2:19:292:19:35

sunshine with one or two thundery

showers in Devon and Cornwall. As

2:19:352:19:44

colder air digs in, rain to snow

over the Pennines, the Pennines, the

2:19:442:19:50

Eastern Grampians and eastern parts

of the Highlands as well. The colder

2:19:502:19:54

air for all of us this weekend.

2:19:542:20:02

More than a year after

an independent review found better

2:20:112:20:13

integration was needed in the UK,

the Government will today

2:20:132:20:16

release their proposals for England.

2:20:162:20:17

50 million is set to be invested

in improving community relations

2:20:172:20:19

over the next two years.

2:20:192:20:21

The Communities Secretary,

Sajid Javid joins us now

2:20:212:20:23

from our Westminster studio.

2:20:232:20:24

Thank you for coming on. The

original report was published

2:20:242:20:26

original report was published two

years ago in 2016. Why has it taken

2:20:262:20:29

such a long time to implement some

of these changes?

We have had a

2:20:292:20:34

general election. Also, the main

issue has been coming up with a

2:20:342:20:42

strategy that is cross government

has not happened for the first time.

2:20:422:20:49

The result is you have a more robust

strategy that will make

2:20:492:20:52

You have spoken about the issue of

learning English. I know that you

2:21:082:21:13

used to translate for your mother? I

did. When my mother first arrived in

2:21:132:21:20

England in the 1960s, she did not

speak any English, hardly a word and

2:21:202:21:25

it really affected her life. As a

child, I was six or seven years old

2:21:252:21:30

and I remember going to be doctors

surgery with her because she needed

2:21:302:21:34

someone to for her. My father

encouraged her to learn English. It

2:21:342:21:43

transforms her life.

You have spoken

about having verbal and physical

2:21:482:21:57

abuse because of your background.

You are hoping that the Next

2:21:572:22:01

Generation, your children won't have

to suffer some of the things you

2:22:012:22:03

did?

We live in a remarkable

country. In many ways we are one of

2:22:032:22:12

the most diverse countries and we

have come a long way, but what the

2:22:122:22:17

strategy today recognises is there

are still too many parts of Britain

2:22:172:22:21

that are too delighted. That

segregation is not good for anyone.

2:22:212:22:25

It's not good for the people who are

settled here, the resident

2:22:252:22:30

community. It can breed mistrust and

misunderstanding and we need to do

2:22:302:22:35

more to tackle it.

It is that fine

balance of recognising the division

2:22:352:22:40

in society and recognising what it

is. Some have made the point that

2:22:402:22:47

even though there is an opportunity

to learn English, some don't want

2:22:472:22:50

soon. How do address that?

We

estimate there are 770,000 people

2:22:502:22:58

who are settled here who speak

either poor or no English. It won't

2:22:582:23:02

work if you just turn up at the door

of some Pakistani origin woman who

2:23:022:23:09

has been here for 50 years and then

just hand her a leaflet. You need a

2:23:092:23:17

more proactive approach where

perhaps someone from her community

2:23:172:23:21

talks to her, insights to a meeting

her local community group, a play

2:23:212:23:25

she recognises. We are setting out

the five pilot areas across the

2:23:252:23:33

country that will pilot different

approaches. We need to understand

2:23:332:23:37

there is no one size fits all

policy, but they all want to achieve

2:23:372:23:41

the same objective and in this

regard it's about making sure many

2:23:412:23:51

more people speak English.

2:23:512:23:56

more people speak English.

The Prime

Minister is having to deal with

2:23:562:23:58

Anglo Russian issues. The deadline

transpired last night.

What should

2:23:582:24:05

she do? It is clear that this nerve

agent is a military grade nerve

2:24:052:24:11

agent only made in Russia. She set

up an ultimatum to Russia and we

2:24:112:24:17

have seen from public reports that

Russia is denying any

2:24:172:24:21

responsibility. The Prime Minister

will come back to Parliament and set

2:24:212:24:24

out what action Britain will take a

look at the whole suite of options

2:24:242:24:28

we have.

We spoke earlier to John

McDonald, talking about his

2:24:282:24:34

reflections on our main story, the

death of Stephen Hawking. He said he

2:24:342:24:38

had the

2:24:382:24:44

had the opportunity to meet him, but

he was stuck in one of the many

2:24:442:24:47

meetings MPs had to go to. Did you

ever meet him?

I heard him speak a

2:24:472:24:51

couple of times. Growing up I found

him very inspirational. I always

2:24:512:24:57

made an effort to see him and seeing

him in person, it was moving, but

2:24:572:25:03

also you learn an incredible amount

from him. I think he is one of the

2:25:032:25:10

most remarkable men I can think of

and just to think that everything he

2:25:102:25:14

went through, or the challenges he

faced, yet he contributed so much to

2:25:142:25:20

society, things that will help us

from the -- for years to come, it's

2:25:202:25:26

incredible.

Thank you for your time

this morning. And we will be looking

2:25:262:25:33

at more tributes being paid to

Stephen Hawking.

2:25:332:25:41

Philip Hammond declared

himself to be feeling

2:25:412:25:43

"positively Tigger-like"

as he delivered his Spring

2:25:432:25:44

Statement yesterday.

2:25:442:25:46

Steph is at a clothing factory

in north London for us to see

2:25:462:25:49

if workers there have a bounce

in their step just

2:25:492:25:51

like the Chancellor.

2:25:512:25:54

Good morning, Steph. Good morning. I

am at a clothing manufacturers. It's

2:25:542:25:59

fascinating watching everyone work,

making these different garments

2:25:592:26:05

made. They make about 10,000 every

week. I'm going to grab Jenny, who

2:26:052:26:11

is the boss. Just tell me about the

business, it has changed a lot?

Yes,

2:26:112:26:17

we have more styles, but the

quantities have reduced. It's about

2:26:172:26:21

the quality and make sure we don't

have landfill.

This shop is one --

2:26:212:26:32

this is about shoppers wanting

quality in more than disposable

2:26:322:26:36

clothing? That's right.

It's about

making less units.

It's interesting

2:26:362:26:45

how this business has had to adapt

to the way we spend. What else are

2:26:452:26:49

we seeing?

Rising costs of materials

as have an affect. There was also a

2:26:492:27:01

school shortage for businesses

across the economy.

So any positive

2:27:012:27:06

messages from the Chancellor

yesterday?

Taxes are a big issue,

2:27:062:27:15

also business rates, more frequent

valuations. Also issues regarding

2:27:152:27:25

late payment.

Thank you for your

time. Let's get

2:27:252:30:49

I'm back with the latest

from the BBC London

2:30:492:30:52

newsroom in half an hour.

2:30:522:30:58

Hello, this is Breakfast

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

2:30:582:31:06

Let's bring you up-to-date with some

of the main stories this morning.

2:31:062:31:10

Let's bring you up-to-date with some

of the main stories this morning.

2:31:102:31:12

Britain's most famous scientist,

Professor Stephen Hawking,

2:31:122:31:14

has died at the age of 76.

2:31:142:31:16

Hawking's fame came largely

from his best-selling book,

2:31:162:31:18

"A Brief History of Time"

which outlined his theories

2:31:182:31:20

about the universe.

2:31:202:31:21

He had a brilliant career

despite being diagnosed with motor

2:31:212:31:23

neurone disease in 1964.

2:31:232:31:27

In a statment, his family said

he was a great scientist

2:31:272:31:29

and an extraordinary man whose work

and legacy will live

2:31:292:31:32

on for many years.

2:31:322:31:39

Around the world people have reacted

to the news of his death. Astronaut

2:31:392:31:44

Tim Peake said he inspire

generations to look beyond the blue

2:31:442:31:48

planet and understand the universe.

The physicist Brian Cox said...

2:31:482:32:03

Thank you for all of your tributes

and messages you have sent in this

2:32:152:32:19

morning. We will try and read a few

of them later.

2:32:192:32:21

Theresa May is expected to announce

sanctions against Russia today

2:32:212:32:23

after the Kremlin failed

to explain their role

2:32:232:32:25

in a chemical attack in Salisbury

at the start of the month.

2:32:252:32:32

The attack left a former Russian spy

2:32:322:32:34

and his daughter seriously ill,

as well as a police officer

2:32:342:32:36

who went to help them.

2:32:362:32:43

Leila Nathoo is in Salisbury.

2:32:432:32:47

You have been there for several

days, and the scale of the operation

2:32:472:32:51

is really something. Good morning.

Good morning. Theresa May's deadline

2:32:512:32:56

has been and gone but the police

investigation here continues.

2:32:562:33:00

Yesterday we got the second public

appeal from police. They are now

2:33:002:33:05

focusing on wanting to know Sergei

Skripal's movements before he and

2:33:052:33:11

Yulia arrived in Salisbury city

centre. The appeal was focused on

2:33:112:33:15

his car and they are asking anyone

who saw a red BMW between 1pm and

2:33:152:33:22

1:40pm on Sunday afternoon anywhere

in Salisbury to come forward. We now

2:33:222:33:26

know that the red BMW was parked

just up there at the top level of

2:33:262:33:31

the Sainsbury's car park, a

pay-and-display machines covered in

2:33:312:33:36

a police tent, and before that there

was a lengthy decontamination

2:33:362:33:41

operation in place, so we now know

that that was where they parked

2:33:412:33:44

their car before they came into

Salisbury city centre. They went to

2:33:442:33:48

a pub called the mill and then went

on to the Zizzi restaurant. So a bit

2:33:482:33:56

more of the timeline is emerging for

their movements. We now know that

2:33:562:34:02

Yulia had arrived from Moscow just

the day before. Police are also

2:34:022:34:06

saying there is likely to be a

lengthy operation here, and don't be

2:34:062:34:11

alarmed by police activity which

they say will now go on for many

2:34:112:34:14

weeks.

Thank you very much.

2:34:142:34:17

Five councils in England will be

asked to draw up plans to improve

2:34:172:34:20

community cohesion in their areas

as part of wider

2:34:202:34:22

proposals on integration.

2:34:222:34:23

Other proposals

outlined in the government's

2:34:232:34:25

Integrated Communities Strategy

green paper include teaching

2:34:252:34:27

British values in schools,

promoting the English language

2:34:272:34:29

and for councils to provide language

tuition to non-English speakers.

2:34:292:34:34

An Accident and Emergency consultant

says he's concerned by the rise

2:34:342:34:37

in knife crime after an surge

in admissions from attacks

2:34:372:34:39

involving the weapons.

2:34:392:34:42

Andreas Crede said

the injuries he treats

2:34:422:34:44

are getting more severe.

2:34:442:34:46

The number of victims sent

to hospital with knife-inflicted

2:34:462:34:49

wounds is at its highest level

for five years.

2:34:492:34:55

The creators of The Crown have

admitted Claire Foy who portrays

2:34:552:34:57

the Queen was paid less

than her male counterpart.

2:34:572:35:03

Matt Smith's portrayal

of a young Duke

2:35:032:35:06

of Edinburgh earned him more

than Foy's Golden Globe-winning

2:35:062:35:08

performance as Queen Elizabeth

in the Netflix drama.

2:35:082:35:11

The show's producers said Smith's

previous starring role

2:35:112:35:13

in Doctor Who meant he was paid more

than his co-star.

2:35:132:35:21

The producers were asked how much

she was paid, and they had to admit

2:35:222:35:29

it was less than her co-star. We

keep saying the public. Never read

2:35:292:35:36

what is written. We like to add live

on this programme. -- and labour.

2:35:362:35:42

The public are being

asked for their views

2:35:422:35:44

on the future of

the 1p and 2p coins.

2:35:442:35:46

Ministers are carrying out a review

of cash transactions due

2:35:462:35:48

to a rise in customers

using non-cash payments such

2:35:482:35:51

as contactless and online spending.

2:35:512:35:52

The consultation will also look

at whether £50 notes should be kept.

2:35:522:35:57

You have been sending your thoughts

on that. I have noticed, if there is

2:35:572:36:01

money on the table, you cannot stop

fiddling with it? I've dropped it

2:36:012:36:04

about eight times. I don't think we

should get rid of them. Did you ever

2:36:042:36:11

play Charb

2:36:112:36:19

play Charb halfpenny -- shove

ha'penny?. Thank you for your

2:36:192:36:21

tributes as well to Stephen Hawking.

So many inspired by his brilliant

2:36:212:36:26

mind and his humour as well.

2:36:262:36:28

Matt will have

the weather in 10 minutes.

2:36:282:36:31

Here's what else is still

to come on Breakfast.

2:36:312:36:36

The singer, Kim Wilde

will be here on the sofa.

2:36:362:36:41

She'll tell us why the recording

of her album was a family affair.

2:36:412:36:45

And also aliens.

2:36:452:36:47

Taking on Putin.

2:36:472:36:49

The reporter John Sweeney will be

here to tell us about being targeted

2:36:492:36:52

by the Russian state as part

of his Panorama investigation

2:36:522:36:54

into the power the country's

president wields.

2:36:542:36:59

Highlighting the "culture of

silence" around male sexual assault.

2:36:592:37:02

Coronation Street's producer

will tell us why it is hoped

2:37:022:37:04

the storyline will help

survivors come forward.

2:37:042:37:07

All that still to come.

2:37:082:37:11

But first, let's get

the sport with Kat.

2:37:112:37:14

There is good news to talk about.

More Paralympic Winter medal sport

2:37:142:37:18

Team GB. -- for Team GB. There was a

silver yesterday, and there was

2:37:182:37:28

another today, but it is that pesky

Slovakian girl who won by something

2:37:282:37:33

like five seconds, and she beat them

today and yesterday. We will take

2:37:332:37:37

the two Cor -- Silvers. Slovakia are

a problem for Paralympics GB.

2:37:372:37:45

Let's speak to our reporter

Kate Grey who's in Pyeongchang.

2:37:452:37:47

Bring us up-to-date with that medal,

but nobody could beat the

2:37:472:37:51

Slovakians, could they?

If you've

been watching the Paralympic games

2:37:512:37:56

over the last few days you will know

the names well. Mina Fitzpatrick and

2:37:562:38:00

her guide have won their third medal

of the games to add to the silver

2:38:002:38:05

and bronze they won earlier in the

week. This time it was a silver

2:38:052:38:09

medal in the giant slalom and they

get two runs down the giant slalom

2:38:092:38:15

course, and in the first run they

managed to finish in second position

2:38:152:38:18

as they moved into the second run

and managed to maintain the silver

2:38:182:38:25

medal position behind the Slovakian

who was dominating the class from

2:38:252:38:29

day one here. And the British pair

managed to safely negotiate their

2:38:292:38:34

way round the wind the course and

were over the moon when they came to

2:38:342:38:39

the end of the race, clearly

thriving in this Paralympic

2:38:392:38:42

environment. This is their first

Paralympic games, so it's a

2:38:422:38:45

brilliant achievement and hopefully

more to come. Just to update you on

2:38:452:38:48

the other writs in the race, Kelly

Gallagher and Gary Smith finished in

2:38:482:38:55

fifth. -- the other Brits.

Disappointment for them but a

2:38:552:39:00

brilliant result for Menna

Fitzpatrick and Jen Kehoe. All of

2:39:002:39:04

them will be back in action on

Sunday for the final of this in the

2:39:042:39:10

slalom.

And what a fantastic debut

Winter Paralympics for Menna

2:39:102:39:15

Fitzpatrick and Jen Kehoe.

2:39:152:39:16

Manchester United are out

of the Champions League

2:39:162:39:18

after a dismal home

defeat to Sevilla.

2:39:182:39:20

The tie was poised

at 0-0 from the first leg,

2:39:202:39:22

but Sevilla took control by scoring

a crucial away goal with less

2:39:222:39:25

than 20 minutes left.

2:39:252:39:26

The Spanish side put the tie to bed

with a second soon afterwards.

2:39:262:39:29

United now just have the FA Cup left

as the only trophy they can win this

2:39:292:39:33

season and Jose Mourinho's comments

after the match are unlikely

2:39:332:39:35

to soothe angry United fans.

2:39:352:39:38

I sit in this chair twice

in the Champions League and I have

2:39:452:39:48

knocked out Man United

at home at Old Trafford.

2:39:482:39:50

I sit in this chair

with Porto, Man United out.

2:39:502:39:52

I sit in this chair

with Real Madrid, Man United out.

2:39:522:39:55

So I don't think it's

something new for the club.

2:39:552:40:00

And of course, being

Manchester United manager and losing

2:40:002:40:07

a Champions League tie,

at home, is a delusion, obviously.

2:40:072:40:13

He said it was nothing to be sad

about and not the end of the world.

2:40:132:40:17

I don't know why he says it is a

delusion. Probably trying to deflect

2:40:172:40:21

attention from himself. No, it did

happen.

2:40:212:40:25

Tonight, the final last 16 ties take

place, with Chelsea aiming to become

2:40:252:40:28

the third English side

into the quarter-finals.

2:40:282:40:30

But they'll be well up against it,

taking on the Spanish

2:40:302:40:32

league leaders Barcelona in the Nou

Camp.

2:40:322:40:34

It's poised at 1-1

from the first leg.

2:40:342:40:41

The Cheltenham Festival

is underway, with Buveur D'Air

2:40:412:40:43

the big winner on day one.

2:40:432:40:44

The Nicky Henderson trained horse

was the odds-on favourite

2:40:442:40:46

going into the Champion Hurdle,

but he was pushed all the way

2:40:462:40:50

by the 7-1 shot Melon,

winning by barely a neck

2:40:502:40:53

on the line.

2:40:532:40:54

The win means Buveaur D'Air

retains his title after winning

2:40:542:40:56

the same race last year.

2:40:562:41:00

I think I would have had a bet on

Melon, because I pick courses by

2:41:002:41:05

their name, and I think that is a

splendid name. -- I pick horses.

2:41:052:41:14

splendid name. -- I pick horses. I

have a Shetland pony called Muffin.

2:41:142:41:17

Muffin and Melon, I suppose

combination -- I suppose it is a

2:41:172:41:26

superb, nation.

I had some Alan

Pardew memories there. -- Alan part

2:41:262:41:34

ritual stop

2:41:342:41:37

Last month, the journalist

John Sweeney spent ten days

2:41:372:41:39

in Russia filming a Panorama

programme looking ahead to this

2:41:392:41:42

weekend's presidential elections

and the all-but-certain victory

2:41:422:41:43

of Vladimir Putin.

2:41:432:41:44

The on-going diplomatic crisis has

made his documentary

2:41:442:41:46

even more pertinent.

2:41:462:41:47

Before we speak to John, let's see

how he was treated on his trip.

2:41:472:41:50

I have come to Moscow to find out

what life is really like for the

2:41:542:41:58

opposition here.

2:41:582:42:03

opposition here.

And that means I

will be a target as well.

2:42:032:42:10

will be a target as well. We think

we are being followed by a dark blue

2:42:112:42:14

Volkswagen. We have gone quite a

complicated way. It is hanging back,

2:42:142:42:21

but it follows is everywhere we go.

-- follows us. It seems somebody

2:42:212:42:28

wants to know what we are up to.

It

is now reversing.

The same one? I

2:42:282:42:37

remember.

Close the doors.

Close the

door.

You get a sense of what is

2:42:372:42:43

going on.

2:42:432:42:44

John Sweeney joins us now.

2:42:442:42:46

You started this panorama before

what happened in Salisbury, so give

2:42:462:42:53

us a sense of what you were trying

to do and what you found in Russia.

2:42:532:42:57

You came under serious pressure and

trouble.

What we are there to do is

2:42:572:43:03

a simple task which is defined what

life is like for the Russian

2:43:032:43:08

opposition, the real Russian

opposition, that is. People say

2:43:082:43:10

Vladimir Putin is or was afraid of

two politicians. Boris Nemtsov was

2:43:102:43:19

shot dead three years ago and the

other politician has been barred

2:43:192:43:22

from standing. When Russians go to

the polls on Sunday they can vote

2:43:222:43:26

for Vladimir Putin or Vladimir

Putin. But we went and spoke to the

2:43:262:43:33

supporters of the opposition and ran

through some of the things that have

2:43:332:43:38

happened to them. Stabbed antes

uttered. Banged over the head with

2:43:382:43:42

an iron bar. Beaten senseless by

silence folks -- silent thugs. He

2:43:422:43:49

was also a victim of Di attack when

he thought we might be blinded in an

2:43:492:43:55

high. It is heavy stuff, this. When

we were working and talking to the

2:43:552:44:01

opposition figures, we were

followed, 24/ seven. Teams of cars.

2:44:012:44:06

Quite obvious as well?

It was horses

head in the bed stuff. It was

2:44:062:44:15

deliberate, look what we can do.

Then there is a moment. And I met

2:44:152:44:20

Boris Nemtsov, and I really liked

him. He was a bit of a hero to me.

2:44:202:44:25

There is a shrine to him by his old

house. These guys, who are

2:44:252:44:31

fanatically pro-Kremlin, and are

suspected of attacking the

2:44:312:44:37

opposition with green died, they

took Boris Nemtsov's picture down

2:44:372:44:42

and threw his reef in the toilet. It

was all captured on camera. I said,

2:44:422:44:47

are you not desecrating a shrine? --

wreath. The next day we are called

2:44:472:44:52

into the police station, three hours

in there and while we are in there,

2:44:522:44:57

I am accused by Russian media of

vandalising the shrine.

You were?

2:44:572:45:02

And then I am doorstep by Russian TV

and I eat give them a lick with the

2:45:022:45:08

rush edge of my tongue -- I give

them.

This is the moment you are

2:45:082:45:13

talking about.

2:45:132:45:15

It soon becomes clear why we have

been followed and film.

2:45:212:45:23

One of the main TV channels in

Russia runs a special about me.

2:45:352:45:45

As well as repeating the claims, it

accuses me of making up stories

2:45:452:45:51

about students and soldiers I

haven't even met.

2:45:512:45:56

Watching that, John, it is kind of

staggering but it's really serious,

2:45:562:46:01

isn't it?

We are in trouble, in

trouble a very,

2:46:012:46:09

trouble a very, very powerful man,

Vladimir Putin, and the Russian

2:46:112:46:14

state. It feels like, being in

Russia now, talking to the

2:46:142:46:20

opposition, it feels like Nazi

Germany in 1933 before the really

2:46:202:46:24

horrible stuff. But the idea that

these are decent people, there was

2:46:242:46:31

one wearing a Vladimir Putin mask,

he was stabbed and Tasered. In

2:46:312:46:36

Britain, you mock the Prime

Minister, nothing will happen to

2:46:362:46:39

you. We can all wear Theresa May

masks.

What do you say to the people

2:46:392:46:44

who say that he is popular and he

may well legitimately win the

2:46:442:46:47

election this weekend?

It is not an

election, says the opposition. It is

2:46:472:46:54

a coronation. If Jeremy Corbyn is

not allowed to stand next to Theresa

2:46:542:47:03

May, that is not an election. There

is no real opposition in Russia.

2:47:032:47:08

Russia is not a democracy and this

is scary, the extent. They told

2:47:082:47:16

great lies about this. They put my

passport up on Russian media. I had

2:47:162:47:22

to cancel it. I don't know exactly

what happened in Salisbury,

2:47:222:47:26

obviously, but clearly you cannot

buy that nerve agent in a shop. You

2:47:262:47:31

cannot do that. This is done by the

state and they have got, Vladimir

2:47:312:47:35

Putin has got previous, for hunting

down people he sees as traitors. So

2:47:352:47:40

the question is, and it is a big

question, what is the British

2:47:402:47:44

government going to do to signal to

the Russians, stop this? Stop

2:47:442:47:50

mucking around, stop poisoning

people in our country. It's scary.

2:47:502:47:54

Does it make you fearful?

No, I was

with a big Irish cameraman and a

2:47:542:48:02

fantastic and super clever Northern

Irish producer and we had a serious

2:48:022:48:11

laugh, even in the Russian Nick. We

never lost our sense of humour. But,

2:48:112:48:18

I have to say, when I got home to

Heathrow, there were two customs

2:48:182:48:24

officials, and there's that awful

moment, they are going to go through

2:48:242:48:27

your bag, and one of them cracked a

joke with the other guy and they

2:48:272:48:32

buckled up laughing, and it's the

first time I had seen officials

2:48:322:48:34

laugh and I almost kissed the tarmac

at Heathrow.

Feel free to do that.

2:48:342:48:42

Thank you very much.

2:48:422:48:45

You can watch John's Panorama -

Taking On Putin -

2:48:452:48:48

at 7.30pm tonight on BBC One.

2:48:482:48:49

Are you still editing butter no,

it's done.

2:48:492:48:54

Here's Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

2:48:542:48:56

Here's Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

2:48:562:49:00

A cracking start to the day but a

different story in the west to

2:49:002:49:05

Calderdale. Many western fringes

will cede conditions similar to this

2:49:052:49:09

throughout the day

2:49:092:49:11

will cede conditions similar to this

throughout the day as you are

2:49:112:49:12

will cede conditions similar to this

throughout the day as you are closed

2:49:122:49:12

to this. The rain will

2:49:122:49:21

to this. The rain will bring the

wins with it, but we have got mild

2:49:212:49:24

air coming up from France for the

east and south. A good part of

2:49:242:49:31

England, east Wales, dry with spells

of hazy sunshine coming and going.

2:49:312:49:36

In the west, the Grey shots in

Cornwall will continue with further

2:49:362:49:38

rain at times. Some of that will

become heavy through the afternoon.

2:49:382:49:42

We could see an inch of rain on the

moors before we get through tomorrow

2:49:422:49:48

morning. Rain coming and going in

western parts of Wales. Northern

2:49:482:49:53

Ireland, like Cornwall and Devon

will get wet out through the night

2:49:532:49:57

with occasional rain in western

Scotland, the heaviest through the

2:49:572:49:59

end of the afternoon will be in the

south-west. Gales in the south-west,

2:49:592:50:05

tempering the temperature, but in

the east, that breeze picking up

2:50:052:50:10

with 7 degrees in Scotland and 15

degrees in London. The mildest day

2:50:102:50:13

of the week. Only one way to go.

Looking at what is happening beyond

2:50:132:50:19

that, tonight, whilst eastern areas

will stay dry, rain in the

2:50:192:50:23

south-west of England will spread

through Northern Ireland, Wales, the

2:50:232:50:27

Midlands and the south-east by the

end of the night. Across the

2:50:272:50:29

north-east of England and Scotland,

it will be another chilly night and

2:50:292:50:34

a cold start to tomorrow morning. A

dry start,

2:50:342:50:43

dry start, potential... After a dry

start in Northern Ireland, that rain

2:50:432:50:48

spreads its way into the east of

England and the North east, the

2:50:482:50:55

potential for thundery showers.

Temperatures will drop here further

2:50:552:51:00

into Friday. Colder air starting to

work its way in with snow at times

2:51:002:51:03

on the hills on the far north of

England. Also the eastern Highlands

2:51:032:51:08

and the Grampians. Further south, we

see big temperature drops for all

2:51:082:51:14

into the weekend. Back to Dan and

Louise.

2:51:142:51:22

into the weekend. Back to Dan and

Louise.

2:51:222:51:22

Sorry, we were chatting away to Kim

Wilde. You have to speak to her when

2:51:222:51:27

she is on the favour.

Isn't that brilliant?

2:51:272:51:32

Kim Wilde made a name

for herself as a pop

2:51:322:51:34

star in the eighties -

the era of big hair and even

2:51:342:51:37

bigger shoulderpads.

2:51:372:51:38

Now, Kim's embarking on her first

UK tour in 35 years.

2:51:382:51:42

It's about 30 years, yes.

2:51:422:51:45

We'll talk to her in a moment

about the inspiration

2:51:452:51:47

behind her new album.

2:51:472:51:48

But first, let's have a look

at her performing.

2:51:482:51:50

# New York to east California

2:51:502:51:52

# There's a new wave

coming, I warn ya

2:51:522:51:54

# We're the kids in America

2:51:542:51:55

# We're the kids in America

2:51:552:51:57

# Everybody lives for

the music-go-round

2:51:572:52:00

# Get out, get out of my life

2:52:002:52:03

# And let me sleep at night

2:52:032:52:06

# Cos you don't really love me

2:52:062:52:09

# You just keep me hanging on

2:52:092:52:14

# Well I know your love is rough

2:52:142:52:17

# And the road you take is tough

2:52:172:52:19

# But I just can't get

enough

2:52:192:52:22

# Chequered love

2:52:222:52:25

# Come here,

baby, gotta show you

2:52:252:52:27

# I swear I'm gonna die tonight

2:52:272:52:31

# Take a chance

2:52:312:52:32

# Make it nice and slow

2:52:322:52:37

# Ooooh, touch me

2:52:372:52:38

# I'll show you where to go...

#

2:52:382:52:42

Kim joins us now.

2:52:422:52:48

Some memories in there. Over 30

million albums. Welcome to BBC

2:52:482:52:53

breakfast.

It's great to be here.

The new album is called here come

2:52:532:53:00

the aliens. And there is an

inspiration to this from the aliens?

2:53:002:53:05

Indeed,

2:53:052:53:11

Indeed, Here Come The Aliens is the

chorus to a song referencing the

2:53:112:53:18

mainland then but I also saw some

incredible lights in the sky one

2:53:182:53:24

night and I think people are used to

me talking about this now. Stephen

2:53:242:53:28

Hawking believed very much aliens

were there. A big also suggested we

2:53:282:53:33

shouldn't get in contact with them.

I think they are getting in contact

2:53:332:53:35

with us.

Do you have any evidence

for that?

Well, I saw it at the

2:53:352:53:43

time.

In the sky above your house?

Yes, in the back garden, and there

2:53:432:53:51

were other witnesses at the time. It

has happened to a lot of people. The

2:53:512:53:56

olds in the sky and no one can say

what they are. Some of them are

2:53:562:54:01

massive and I am sure of what I saw.

It inspired the song for Here Come

2:54:012:54:06

The Aliens, the Tour, I will be

going up and down Britain for the

2:54:062:54:14

whole of April singing about aliens.

Is it really 30 years? You must be

2:54:142:54:19

incredibly excited.

I have been

doing rewind and singing their hits

2:54:192:54:25

you just played but I will be

swapping between those and these

2:54:252:54:31

great new tracks from my new album.

This is always the way you have

2:54:312:54:35

always done things. This is fully

inspired, with the Kim Wilde plan

2:54:352:54:40

coming out again.

Yes, my brother is

coming out again, he thinks a duet

2:54:402:54:49

with me, my niece did all the

amazing artwork for the album and

2:54:492:54:54

the singles, and it's incredible.

Sort of sci-fi, 50s B-movie kind of

2:54:542:55:02

carting stuff. Anyway, she's done a

brilliant job. We've thrown a lot of

2:55:022:55:08

creativity and energy at it. I have

a lot of energy anyway as a human

2:55:082:55:13

being.

We can see this.

I don't know

if you've noticed!

We certainly

2:55:132:55:23

have. There is a wonderful clip of

using in America on a train from a

2:55:232:55:28

few years ago. Let's show the clip.

I look, they are going back on.

If

2:55:282:55:42

you listen to this sand honest,

there was a gal about 22nd -- about

2:55:422:55:53

20 second in a verb, it's really

have!

Is live after a Christmas

2:55:532:55:57

party? It is after Christmas party

and all I can say is thank God for

2:55:572:56:02

the antlers. At least I could come

out of it with some dignity.

2:56:022:56:14

out of it with some dignity. I think

I gave you guys antlers, Louise.

You

2:56:142:56:20

did. I think I may have won this

Christmas. Anyway, talk about Candy

2:56:202:56:27

crashed. Some people have played

this game.

Andy creche is a new

2:56:272:56:40

this game.

Andy creche is a new --

Kandy Krush is a new song, my new

2:56:402:56:46

single, letters coming onto with me.

I wanted to write something to light

2:56:462:56:50

up the state and this is the song

for doing mad.

2:56:502:56:57

for doing mad. We will be in Salford

on the last day of the gig and we

2:56:592:57:03

start in Ipswich at the end of

March.

Come everyone. Lots of your

2:57:032:57:08

fans are getting in touch today and

saying that the best thing about

2:57:082:57:12

going to see is that you are not

afraid to play the classics as well

2:57:122:57:15

as the new stuff.

Because you love

those. I do. They are the sounds of

2:57:152:57:21

our feelings. Everyone responds to

them. It sounds great. It's a

2:57:212:57:30

feel-good song, kids in America, and

it's fun to sing, so we will be

2:57:302:57:38

playing old hits as well as anyone

from Here Come The Aliens.

I will

2:57:382:57:44

get both antlers out and be done

thing.

You know it! Throughout

2:57:442:57:51

April, I am coming to town near you.

2:57:512:57:55

Kim's Album is called Here Come

the Aliens and you can

2:57:552:57:57

catch her on tour across the UK

from the 30th of March.

2:57:572:58:00

I feel so much better about life in

general.

2:58:002:58:05

It is such effervescence.

I think we need three hours of Kim

2:58:052:58:10

Wilde. What have you got planned

this week?

2:58:102:58:15

28 years ago, the yacht Maiden made

history when its female crew

2:58:152:58:17

became the first to sail

the Whitbread Round the World Race.

2:58:172:58:20

I am appeased! -- I am in enthused!

2:58:202:58:35

Now the vessel

is being restored ahead of its next

2:58:352:58:37

adventure to promote

education for girls.

2:58:372:58:39

Breakfast's John Maguire

is in Hamble and can tell us more.

2:58:392:58:41

From one of icon to another, Tracy

Edwards is with me, as well as Susan

2:58:412:58:49

Glennie, who will be the new skipper

of Maiden. Good morning to both of

2:58:492:58:53

you. Tracy, tell us why you brought

Maiden back and what you are going

2:58:532:58:57

to do with her?

We brought her back

to restore her because she was in a

2:58:572:59:02

sorry state and we didn't want her

to be a floating museum, she

2:59:022:59:06

wouldn't be good at teaching

sailing, so we are regenerating

2:59:062:59:10

heart to help with girls education,

starting with a three-year tear

2:59:102:59:19

around the world. And she has a new

skipper, see the Glennie.

You have a

2:59:192:59:25

great story about what got you into

this business.

I am a full-time

2:59:252:59:30

sailor and I can vividly remember my

very early teenage years, my father

2:59:302:59:35

calling me into the living room, I

started sailing with him, and then,

2:59:352:59:40

come on at this woman on television.

She is amazing and mailing it in the

2:59:402:59:44

Whitbread race and I remember

watching Tracy being interviewed in

2:59:442:59:51

the evening and it was this iconic

oilmen that we'd -- it with this

2:59:513:00:00

iconic women speaking and now she

called me up and I am sailing about.

3:00:003:00:05

Big deck shoes to fill.

Tracy is

going to go as bright red as her

3:00:053:00:12

jacket. This is a three-year round

the world voyage and you are

3:00:123:00:17

recruiting for greed?

Yes, we are.

We will have five Ali,

3:00:173:00:24

professionally paid female group

then we are also going to have some

3:00:243:00:27

younger women who are looking to

build up their sea miles to get

3:00:273:00:31

their tickets. We will also, from

April onwards, be selling

3:00:313:00:41

April onwards, be selling places,

and we will allow men to sail on

3:00:413:00:45

Maiden for the first time ever.

It

is great to see Baber be this

3:00:453:00:49

morning. All the very best for next

month, but getting Maiden back in

3:00:493:00:52

the water and for the maiden voyage

as well. There you go. You heard it

3:00:523:00:57

here. If you fancy a trip around the

world would be fantastic sale give

3:00:573:01:01

no where to look.

3:01:013:01:05

What a lovely day there and what a

lovely story.

3:01:053:01:10

Reacting to the news

of the death of Stephen Hawking,

3:01:103:01:12

the Prime Minister, Theresa May

described him as a "brilliant

3:01:123:01:15

and extraordinary mind -

one of the great scientists

3:01:153:01:17

of his generation" whose "courage,

humour and determination

3:01:173:01:19

to get the most from life

was an inspiration".

3:01:193:01:22

So many people getting in touch.

3:01:223:01:24

We're joined now by Nick Goldman,

a molecular biologist who studied

3:01:243:01:27

Maths at the University of Cambridge

when Professor Hawking

3:01:273:01:29

was there and from Cambridge we can

speak to Professor Paul Shellard

3:01:293:01:32

who was colleague and friend

of Professor Hawking.

3:01:323:01:39

It is such a sad day, but it's been

inspiring listening to people's

3:01:393:01:44

memories of him. What would you say

today?

The world has lost a truly

3:01:443:01:50

great figure in terms of

intellectual and scientific

3:01:503:01:56

achievement, in terms of outreach to

the general public in communicating

3:01:563:02:01

science. And as an icon to disabled

people, an exemplar of courage and

3:02:013:02:11

determination in the face of many

challenges.

So it is a very sad day

3:02:113:02:16

indeed. You've known him for many

years and so many people have spoken

3:02:163:02:20

about not just his brilliant

intellectual mind, but his warmth

3:02:203:02:23

and humour as well.

That's right. I

was his student back in the 1980s.

3:02:233:02:32

And I have stayed on here in

Cambridge and become the director of

3:02:323:02:39

his institute for theoretical

cosmology. It's been a great and

3:02:393:02:44

special privilege to know him during

that time and to see him first-hand

3:02:443:02:48

and the way he thinks about problems

in such an incisive way and to see

3:02:483:02:55

his daily courage, the sheer grit

and determination with which he

3:02:553:02:59

faced life and always in such good

humour. He had his impish smile, no

3:02:593:03:07

matter how difficult things were he

could see the lighter side of life,

3:03:073:03:12

and that was very important for him

in persisting and persevering so

3:03:123:03:17

successfully.

As Paul was saying,

it's a great sadness, and many

3:03:173:03:23

people reflecting on that, but also

today talking about the great

3:03:233:03:28

achievements and the scope of his

intellectualism which has affected

3:03:283:03:32

so many people.

It's very unusual

for such a skilled scientist to make

3:03:323:03:38

such an impact in his own field, but

to get some of that across to the

3:03:383:03:43

public, if not giving them a great

understanding of cosmology, giving

3:03:433:03:47

them a great understanding of how

science works and the value of that

3:03:473:03:52

to society. And to do it with humour

and interest is fantastic.

Brian Cox

3:03:523:03:58

was interesting this morning, saying

he was an inspiration to scientists

3:03:583:04:01

and Nehra more scientists around

today, not totally in part, but many

3:04:013:04:06

of them have been inspired by him

and his work and the way he went

3:04:063:04:12

about his business.

Absolutely. You

would see him around Cambridge and

3:04:123:04:16

out and about. He did not hide away

in any way. He was visible to

3:04:163:04:22

everyone so you felt you knew a

little bit of him even if you were

3:04:223:04:25

not a personal acquaintance and I

think that came across in his

3:04:253:04:28

television appearances. Although it

is this great world of advanced

3:04:283:04:34

scientific work, he gave a little

bit of that to everyone.

Give as a

3:04:343:04:38

sense of the impact on science

himself and the way we think about

3:04:383:04:42

the universe.

It's not my field. You

have the expert behind me who should

3:04:423:04:47

do that.

Let's talk to you about

that then, shall we. Professor?

You

3:04:473:04:54

want me to tell you about his great

achievements?

Go for it.

I hope you

3:04:543:05:01

have quite a while, because Stephen

Hawking made many contributions to

3:05:013:05:07

the modern theory of black holes and

our understanding of them is largely

3:05:073:05:11

due to his work and those of the

group that followed. He described

3:05:113:05:17

the black holes, he described how

they collided, and he established

3:05:173:05:25

important steps proving their

uniqueness and he asked the

3:05:253:05:28

question, can they live for ever?

This was his most well-known work,

3:05:283:05:33

showing that black holes radiate

this kind of microscopic effect

3:05:333:05:42

meaning that the energy will radiate

away, and it is called Hawking

3:05:423:05:46

evaporation. It is a very important

phenomena -- phenomenon that is

3:05:463:05:53

driving physics at the moment. In

terms of cosmology, his early work

3:05:533:05:58

was to show there was a beginning in

time, and all the reasonable

3:05:583:06:04

assumptions we know, there had to be

a big bang in the past and this is a

3:06:043:06:07

Mac -- matter -- mathematical proof.

He showed the same sort of phenomena

3:06:073:06:13

that happens for black holes also

happens for the universe. It

3:06:133:06:18

radiates. And these small

fluctuations are the key to

3:06:183:06:23

understanding where galaxies come

from. These little fluctuations are

3:06:233:06:27

the primordial seeds around which

everything in the universe

3:06:273:06:30

collapses. Beyond that, he made

amazing speculations about the

3:06:303:06:36

origins of the universe from

nothing, his so-called no boundary

3:06:363:06:41

proposal. So across the field, I

mean, any one of these contributions

3:06:413:06:45

would have made him famous within

the scientific community but he made

3:06:453:06:50

at least five major breakthroughs.

It sounds bizarre to say it, but we

3:06:503:06:55

are running out of time. We are not,

essentially, are we? But we are on

3:06:553:06:59

this programme. Thank you very much

professor and Nick for talking to

3:06:593:07:04

us. What a lovely way of wrapping

things up. Talking to Kim Wilde

3:07:043:07:09

earlier about alien life and there

was acquired from Stephen Hawking

3:07:093:07:12

saying he had not found much

evidence of intelligent life on

3:07:123:07:16

Earth. -- there was a quote.

3:07:163:07:21

But first, a last, brief

look at the headlines

3:07:213:07:23

where you are this morning.

3:07:233:08:56

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

3:08:563:08:58

Now though it's back

to Dan and Louise.

3:08:583:09:07

Welcome back, everybody. We will

talk about something

3:09:093:09:11

Welcome back, everybody. We will

talk about something completely

3:09:113:09:11

different.

3:09:113:09:13

From murder to drug abuse

to grooming, Coronation Street has

3:09:133:09:15

had its fair share of hard-hitting

plotlines in the last year.

3:09:153:09:17

Now, in a first

for the soap, it will deal

3:09:173:09:20

with the issue of male rape.

3:09:203:09:21

The hope is that the storyline

will help victims come forward.

3:09:213:09:24

We'll speak to the show's

series producer, Kate

3:09:243:09:26

It

3:09:263:09:27

Oates.

3:09:273:09:30

thanks for joining us. It's one of

those storylines which has got

3:09:303:09:34

people talking and it's something

which Coronation Street has not been

3:09:343:09:37

afraid to shy away from with

controversial issues over the years.

3:09:373:09:39

I think that is true. Ultimately the

show has always dealt with issues

3:09:393:09:44

that are noteworthy and promote

discussion and that is kind of the

3:09:443:09:48

point. If you don't promote

discussion, it gets pushed away. We

3:09:483:09:53

raise issues and people talk about

them and hopefully we can change

3:09:533:09:56

opinions and make people think

differently.

I don't want to give

3:09:563:09:59

too much away because it will be on

the telly, but Teller salute a bit

3:09:593:10:03

about the storyline.

The storyline

is about David Platt, who has been

3:10:033:10:09

through his fair share of trauma,

being a soap character, played by

3:10:093:10:14

Jack Shepherd. This guy kind of

grooms him, really. He drugs him and

3:10:143:10:20

he is raped. It is a storyline about

power, because rape is as much about

3:10:203:10:25

power as sex. Ultimately David finds

it impossible to talk about and it

3:10:253:10:29

is that bottling up through shame

and fear which threatens to bring

3:10:293:10:32

him down.

We have talked about these

subjects in the past, but I imagine

3:10:323:10:38

this has been meticulously

researched and you have looked into

3:10:383:10:41

every detailed reaction, the setup,

and everything to make sure you

3:10:413:10:45

betrayed as true to life as you can.

We worked with an amazing charity

3:10:453:10:51

called Survivors Manchester, headed

by Duncan Craig, who is generous

3:10:513:10:54

with his time and expertise on the

matter. He has made us realise

3:10:543:11:00

things that men take in excess of 25

years to talk about sexual abuse.

3:11:003:11:05

One in ten rapes in the UK are of a

male victim. It's not spoken about

3:11:053:11:09

as much as it should be. Men find it

hard to talk about emotions at the

3:11:093:11:13

best of times, let alone when

something is difficult and traumatic

3:11:133:11:16

like this happens, and that is what

we are trying to shine a light on.

3:11:163:11:20

Jack Shepherd has done a lot of

research, talking to people, because

3:11:203:11:24

it is an odorous role.

It is a

responsibility. We have met

3:11:243:11:30

survivors of rape and it's

phenomenal when you meet people who

3:11:303:11:32

have managed to turn the experience

around and turn it into something

3:11:323:11:37

positive. When people talk to us and

share their stories and gives a

3:11:373:11:40

chance to talk about that on a wider

platform. It really does take

3:11:403:11:44

something very traumatic, but there

is good to come from this.

What you

3:11:443:11:49

say to those, and I'm sure you've

had a lot of this, murder, drug

3:11:493:11:53

abuse. Where is the fun side of

this?

We have fantastic comedy

3:11:533:12:03

performers, Dolly Rose Campbell, so

we have got the balance because she

3:12:033:12:06

won the best comic performance. You

can see it in the dark, hard-hitting

3:12:063:12:13

stories, gallows humour, funny

one-liners. That is what I like.

We

3:12:133:12:17

were talking to Nicola Thorpe about

the set.

Big story Street extension,

3:12:173:12:22

a bit of Coronation Street history.

It is a fantastic new story to be

3:12:223:12:28

played out on that street.

Can we go

and visit? It's just across the

3:12:283:12:32

water. Thank you for coming in. The

series producer of Coronation

3:12:323:12:37

Street.

3:12:373:12:39

You can watch the storyline unfold

from this Friday on ITV

3:12:393:12:41

at 7:30 then again at 8:30.

3:12:413:12:43

That's all from us today.

3:12:433:12:46

All morning we have been celebrating

the life of Stephen Hawking. We had

3:12:463:12:51

so much reaction from around the

world, we thought we would remind

3:12:513:12:55

everyone of one of his most

inspirational quotes. Have a look at

3:12:553:12:58

this.

3:12:583:13:03

Stephen Hawking. It's been a

pleasure to be talking about him

3:13:183:13:21

here on this programme today. Thank

you for all of your contributions.

3:13:213:13:26

We will be back tomorrow from six.

Fonau, goodbye.

3:13:263:13:32