29/04/2014 Look East - West


29/04/2014

Latest news for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, Milton Keynes and Northants.


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at night. There is frost on the way. Thank you very much. Goodbye from

:00:00.3:59:59

me. And Welcome to Look East: In the

:00:00.:00:09.

programme tonight: Unveiled for the first time, the van that secured the

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future of Vauxhall in Luton. Improving ways to fight crime. The

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country's first Institute of Crime and Justice opens in

:00:18.:00:19.

Northamptonshire. We will be here later in the

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programme with the remarkable story of the war`timebomber which survived

:00:23.:00:26.

against all the odds. And home at last. The woman who was

:00:27.:00:30.

almost killed by a stag in Scotland goes back to work in Cambridge.

:00:31.:00:41.

Good evening. The van which secured the future of the Vauxhall plant in

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Luton has been unveiled for the first time today. Over 200 million

:00:50.:00:56.

euros have been invested in the Bedfordshire factory to prepare the

:00:57.:00:59.

production lines for the new Vivaro van. But the battle to secure the

:01:00.:01:02.

future of Vauxhall in Luton has been a long one. In 2009 Vauxhall's

:01:03.:01:05.

parent, General Motors, considered selling its European factories

:01:06.:01:08.

altogether, including the one in Luton. The year after, GM decided

:01:09.:01:14.

against a sale. But it became clear that the only way the Luton site

:01:15.:01:18.

remain open was to secure another contract to build the new model

:01:19.:01:21.

Vivaro. Then finally in March 2011, after months of lobbying, it was

:01:22.:01:25.

confirmed the new model would be built in this region. And today the

:01:26.:01:32.

new Vivaro was revealed to the public. Mike Cartwright reports.

:01:33.:01:39.

Unveiling the van that Vauxhall say saved the day ` the new Vivaro. For

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the factory in Luton, it means survival for at least another ten

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years. The big battle to save the plant has been won. The new van is

:01:49.:01:54.

here and we will go from strength to strength in Luton for many, many

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years to come. I have no doubts about that at all. Colin Kirk is

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preparing Luton's new production line. Employed here for 16 years, he

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says a workforce afraid the factory would close for good, endured

:02:09.:02:11.

everything to help keep it open. It's been a tough couple of years.

:02:12.:02:16.

We've taken pay freezes, changes in our terms and conditions. We are

:02:17.:02:21.

working longer hours, just to secure the future. We've got it now. We've

:02:22.:02:27.

had 12 years of successful, good quality vehicles out there and we

:02:28.:02:30.

are looking forward to ten or 12 years of the future with the new

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Vivaro. In its heyday Vauxhall employed 25,000 in Luton, now less

:02:36.:02:40.

than one tenth of that work here. The plant still integral to the

:02:41.:02:45.

town's economy. In 2010 it was doom and gloom. I don't think anyone

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beyond their wildest dreams expected us to get the second generation

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Vivaro. We supported Vauxhall. In 2012 and 13 they said they looked

:02:55.:02:58.

like they were going to get it. Now, of course, the rest is history. This

:02:59.:03:03.

van has saved the factory for at least the next decade. Now the plant

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will build around 55,000 vehicles a year. And that has saved around

:03:08.:03:15.

1,200 jobs. The production line that produced this van now one of its

:03:16.:03:20.

kind in the country. The Luton plant is now the only volume van

:03:21.:03:24.

manufacturing plant in the UK. It means we have jobs secured at the

:03:25.:03:32.

plant until 2025. Obviously we are in the start up phase of production

:03:33.:03:36.

now and that will ramp up and in time that could mean more jobs at

:03:37.:03:39.

the plant. It's a company that's built not far off a million vans in

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Luton ` the newest model renewing hope for the long term future in the

:03:44.:03:52.

town. Joining me now is Professor Mike Sweeny from Cranfield School of

:03:53.:03:58.

Management. Just how important is the plant at Luton? We heard in that

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report there 1,200 people employed there and thousands more on the

:04:04.:04:10.

production line. Yes, well it is vitally important, for a number of

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reasons. Firstly, it is vitally important to the 1,200 people who

:04:14.:04:18.

have got employment for the next ten years or so. That's testimony to, as

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you heard previously, testimony to the management and the workforce and

:04:26.:04:29.

their commitment to producing a high`quality vehicle. It's also

:04:30.:04:32.

vitally important to the local community. The expenditure of people

:04:33.:04:38.

who work within the factories support local services and the

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commercial market locally and it is vitally important to the UK because

:04:43.:04:48.

this company and the products of this company ` 52% of those produced

:04:49.:04:53.

will be exported. It is good for the economy, too. The new van is due to

:04:54.:04:57.

be launched on to the market in September. How well do you think it

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will do, considering the eurozone is still lagging behind in economic

:05:03.:05:08.

recovery? That's an interesting issue. The status of the market at

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the moment is that the volume of demand in the UK for vans has grown

:05:13.:05:17.

at something like 1%. So you have growth of demand within the UK. ``

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something like 13%. And since we are talking about large numbers of

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vehicle, I mean 50,000 a year, made and sold from the UK, demand of 52%

:05:29.:05:34.

of those go to Europe. Demand from Europe is very important to the

:05:35.:05:38.

company B you that seems to be picking up now. `` but that seems to

:05:39.:05:42.

be picking up now and the economy of the euro countries in central and

:05:43.:05:45.

West Europe is growing. One can expect, I think, the demand for the

:05:46.:05:50.

product to increase. A point to remember, though s that this is a

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life cycle product. It lasts for about ten years. So we are talking

:05:55.:05:58.

about large numbers of vehicles being produced over a long period of

:05:59.:06:04.

time. So things looking good. Well, the contract is only for ten years,

:06:05.:06:08.

isn't it? What more do you think that the company and its staff could

:06:09.:06:13.

do to secure its long`term future beyond that point? What's really

:06:14.:06:17.

important is that the company continues to produce high`quality

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vehicles. More important than that, these are global companies that

:06:23.:06:28.

place products into Britain and they expect reducing costs and increasing

:06:29.:06:33.

productivity. So what is really critical to the survival of the

:06:34.:06:36.

company in the longer term, is that there is continued reduction in the

:06:37.:06:40.

cost of the product year on year. But maintaining the quality of the

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vehicles that they produce. Professor Sweeney thank you very

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much. It's been revealed that a Luton man

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who stabbed his neighbour to death was known to police and had also

:06:56.:06:58.

been referred to a crisis mental health team. But a judge at Luton

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Crown Court has said there was no warning that 35`year`old Sameer

:07:03.:07:05.

Babar would be violent. Babar has admitted killing 67`year`old Leonard

:07:06.:07:07.

Flower outside his garage in Carnegie Gardens last October. Babar

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as been detained indefinitely in a mental health unit.

:07:13.:07:19.

The country's first Institute of Crime and Justice has opened in

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Northamptonshire. The centre is a joint venture between the county's

:07:24.:07:25.

Police and Crime Commissioner and the University of Northampton. It

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will carry out research on crime and its causes. But the Commissioner

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denies that the money spent on the new centre will mean money will be

:07:35.:07:37.

diverted away from frontline policing. It is best seen as an

:07:38.:07:44.

investment in the frontline, helping frontline police officers decide

:07:45.:07:47.

what prevents crime, how to go about their job on a day`to`day basis. How

:07:48.:07:52.

to engage with the communities and what they want back. So the learning

:07:53.:07:58.

that will be created will give us an evidence base of where to spend

:07:59.:08:01.

money, where to put police and where not to put them. A conference has

:08:02.:08:07.

been held in Cambridge looking at the specialist work of the city's

:08:08.:08:10.

new Trauma Unit. The centre opened at Addenbrooke's Hospital two years

:08:11.:08:13.

ago and has already transformed the lives of more than 1,000 patients.

:08:14.:08:16.

Fae Southwell reports Plans for a controversial stone quarry in

:08:17.:08:18.

Northamptonshire have been approved but the County Council has imposed a

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number of planning conditions on the application.

:08:23.:08:24.

At the age of 15, Ben hue ton nearly died. A cycle accident last year,

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left him with shattered bones and internal injuries. He was airlifted

:08:28.:08:29.

to the new trauma centre at Addenbrooke's Hospital where he was

:08:30.:08:33.

treat treated by a specialist team of trauma staff. The whole process,

:08:34.:08:39.

fwaufs started so quickly meant he could go back to school in

:08:40.:08:41.

September, despite his injuries because the treatment was started at

:08:42.:08:46.

the scene. It is the paramedics and doctors who are first at the scene

:08:47.:08:48.

who refer patients to the trawl divra centre. In the past they would

:08:49.:08:52.

have been taken to the nearest A department. The Cambridge trauma

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unit opened two years ago. It's one of only 12 specialist centres of its

:08:57.:09:01.

size in the country. Every year it treats 700 patients. All have been

:09:02.:09:05.

diagnosed with severe multiple injuries. 10% of those treated are

:09:06.:09:09.

children. The existence of the trauma centre could mean getting

:09:10.:09:14.

quicker treatments, which may mean the difference between life and

:09:15.:09:18.

death T could mean the difference `` it could mean the difference between

:09:19.:09:22.

a more prolonged hospital stay verses a shorter one. And it will

:09:23.:09:27.

have an affect on the ability to rehabilitate patients more quickly.

:09:28.:09:31.

Experts have now been sharing their experiences at a conference in came

:09:32.:09:36.

Britain. Ann among the speakers. Her speech full of praise for the team

:09:37.:09:39.

who helped her son make a full recovery.

:09:40.:10:01.

will be shared between 42 stations across the country.

:10:02.:10:03.

will be shared between 42 stations Now over to Stewart and Susie for

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the rest of the programme. to Southend or Manningtree. Coming

:10:06.:10:16.

up next on Look East, the region passes a health check with flying

:10:17.:10:19.

colours. And it's a warm welcome back to work in Cambridge for the

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woman who was gored by a Highland Stag A new survey out today suggests

:10:29.:10:32.

that people living in our region are among the healthiest in the country.

:10:33.:10:35.

We score well on everything from having our five fruit and veg a day,

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to feeling less lonely. But the research by a health insurance

:10:40.:10:42.

company shows we struggle to find time for exercise. And apparently we

:10:43.:10:45.

worry about the impact of growing old. Our special report tonight is

:10:46.:10:53.

from Maria Veronese. Living in the east is good for your

:10:54.:10:57.

health. We are happy and eat our fibre date and keep well trim. I

:10:58.:11:04.

live in a city so it is easy to come to the market. There is fish and

:11:05.:11:11.

vegetables. When you eat vegetables your age increases. Although my body

:11:12.:11:20.

is given up now I think by eating healthily I lose a better wave. `` a

:11:21.:11:40.

bit of a weight. We are not so good when it comes to the gym. Getting

:11:41.:11:53.

ready is the hardest bit. Most of us have good or excellent health. We

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are happy with our lives with a lot saying our lives all worth while.

:11:58.:12:02.

That is the highs in the country. The national average of people being

:12:03.:12:08.

lonely is 34%. Here in the east it is just 29%. It reflect society

:12:09.:12:14.

here. We have a strong sense of community in our towns, and that is

:12:15.:12:20.

an important aspect of life, and it probably is one of the reasons why

:12:21.:12:27.

we have such a low proportion. 29% is still hide? Yes, but we have more

:12:28.:12:34.

people living by themselves. More people are living longer and maybe

:12:35.:12:41.

widowed. Those background backs feed into that figure. Living alone

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shouldn't mean being lonely. They do get out and do things. There are

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lots of activities for older people. They are encouraged to form

:12:55.:12:59.

friendships and do activities. While we may be healthy we have our

:13:00.:13:03.

concerns, and one is getting old and what impact that will have on our

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health. Nobody wants to be old. Things start to wear out. We keep

:13:10.:13:14.

going. There is no point in worrying. You just try and stay as

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fit as you can. Was that a class for women, all were

:13:27.:13:32.

there no men there? We deserve what we get. You eat both fruits for

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yourself and also my portion. In a few weeks' time there will be

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events to mark the 70th anniversary of D`day, the Allied invasions,

:13:50.:13:52.

which changed the course of the Second World War.

:13:53.:13:55.

In a moment, we'll be hearing about a tale of war`time heroism which is

:13:56.:13:59.

being turned into a film. But first, a special exhibition to mark D`day

:14:00.:14:02.

at the Imperial war Museum at Duxford. Ben Bland has been along

:14:03.:14:05.

for a preview. Even 70 years on Nick Archdale is

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still learning things about those he fought alongside at the D`day

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landings. Ron rushed upstairs to establish a firing division. He

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startled a young French couple, lying naked. Nick himself is

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featured in one of the portraits, each capturing a personal moment or

:14:27.:14:32.

memory of the campaign. In that place, a bullet hit the wall right

:14:33.:14:40.

beside my eye. It completely blinded me. Only for a moment. And so I

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always remember that place. A Frenchwoman bathed my eyes. I could

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see again. It took two years to put the exhibition together,

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photographing each veteran at a key location, poignant for those on both

:15:00.:15:07.

sides of the campaign. This was a standout moment, because she hadn't

:15:08.:15:10.

been back to the chateau where she was a nurse for 69 years. So, to

:15:11.:15:17.

walk around the chateau with her listening to her say how things

:15:18.:15:20.

were, and seeing that glimmer of recognition was a standout moment.

:15:21.:15:25.

You will never do that again. In June 1944, Jeff Paterson was just 20

:15:26.:15:29.

years old. He remembers dodging enemy fire on patrol. His photo was

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taken at the stables where he was shot in the leg. What kind of

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feelings does it bring about seeing this photograph? Well, it is strange

:15:40.:15:49.

to see yourself some 70 years ago. I'm only too thankful to be standing

:15:50.:15:54.

there being photographed. Looking at it now it is quite poignant. Each of

:15:55.:16:01.

these photos tells its own story, not just in the words that accompany

:16:02.:16:05.

it, but in the faces of the veterans themselves. The exhibition is open

:16:06.:16:16.

here until the end of this year. The true story of a German fighter

:16:17.:16:20.

pilot, who had the crew of an American bomber at his mercy but

:16:21.:16:23.

instead allowed them to fly to safety, is to be made into a film.

:16:24.:16:27.

The bomber had been on a mission from Cambridgeshire in 1943 when it

:16:28.:16:30.

happened. Now the playwright Tom Stoppard has acquired the rights and

:16:31.:16:38.

filming could start next year. This airfield in Norfolk, former

:16:39.:16:42.

home of the 448th bomb group. There were 3000 young Americans here

:16:43.:16:48.

between 1943 and 1945. In the restored control tower, Pat Evison

:16:49.:16:51.

showed me the officers' watchlog for Monday, 28 December 1943, when an

:16:52.:16:54.

unexpected visitor made an emergency landing. At 14:29, B17 S167 landed

:16:55.:17:03.

from the mission with one engine, one dead, one injured. They informed

:17:04.:17:12.

division and base. 21`year`old pilot Charlie Brown was at the controls.

:17:13.:17:16.

The flying fortress had come under heavy ground fire on a mission over

:17:17.:17:19.

Germany. The tail gunner had been killed, an engine destroyed. When a

:17:20.:17:23.

fighter came alongside, it's pilot, Franz Stigler, decided to spare

:17:24.:17:30.

them. Over 40 years later the two men were reunited and became firm

:17:31.:17:36.

friends. I looked out the right window and there parked on my right

:17:37.:17:42.

wing is a German BF109. The little sucka looked like he owned me and

:17:43.:17:48.

belonged there. It is hard to describe because it was so crippled.

:17:49.:17:55.

You know positively that there were badly wounded people aboard. And for

:17:56.:18:02.

me it would have been the same as shooting at a parachute. I just

:18:03.:18:08.

couldn't shoot. To do something like that was brilliant. They counted up

:18:09.:18:13.

how many people, through his act, were alive now, their children and

:18:14.:18:16.

grandchildren and all the relatives involved. Charlie and Franz died

:18:17.:18:28.

just months apart in 2008. Who will play them in the film based on the

:18:29.:18:32.

bestselling novel, A Higher Call?. We have got people in mind and it

:18:33.:18:36.

would be unfair to say who we are approaching, going to approach. It

:18:37.:18:39.

will be the usual suspects and we are pretty excited about the names

:18:40.:18:45.

on the list. They're holding the first open day of the season on

:18:46.:18:49.

Sunday. Visitors can reflect on the 499 airmen who lost their lives

:18:50.:18:53.

flying from here and on Charlie and his crew, spared by an act of great

:18:54.:19:07.

humanity amidst the fog of war. Isn't that a truly remarkable story?

:19:08.:19:13.

A woman who was gored in the throat by a stag has spoken of the "simple

:19:14.:19:18.

joy" of eating solid food for the first time in nearly four months. Dr

:19:19.:19:21.

Kate Stone was left with "life`threatening" injuries after

:19:22.:19:23.

being struck by the animal in the Scottish Highlands. This week she

:19:24.:19:26.

finally came home to Cambridge. Alex Dunlop caught up with her.

:19:27.:19:38.

It's been a long haul back to work for Kate Stone, a planned week's

:19:39.:19:42.

break for the New Year became a four`month marathon. Are you sure

:19:43.:19:45.

you missed me? How big is the welcome body? Huge. This is what I

:19:46.:19:49.

use to breathe through. If it was on the back, I could have been like a

:19:50.:19:53.

dolphin and swam. Today the welcome back from her small team was

:19:54.:19:56.

heartfelt and humorous. Kate loves baked beans, but finally she can

:19:57.:20:00.

enjoy real food. How does it feel to eat again? Amazing, absolutely

:20:01.:20:07.

incredible. I am sipping my cup of tea, eating my cupcake. It has been

:20:08.:20:13.

incredible. This was Kate's diet while recovering with relatives in

:20:14.:20:16.

Scotland, fed through a gastric tube. She had been on holiday with

:20:17.:20:21.

friends when they startled a stag in this garden. In its panic the animal

:20:22.:20:25.

charged. It's antlers impaled Kate's throat. During an operation in March

:20:26.:20:28.

surgeons reopened her throat,grafting skin from her left

:20:29.:20:35.

shoulder. My food pipe and windpipe, there was a joint between the two.

:20:36.:20:40.

They separated them and laid it up between, whilst leaving me attached,

:20:41.:20:43.

and over about two weeks that healed up and meant I could eat again.

:20:44.:20:50.

Until now Kate has had to manage her employees remotely from Scotland

:20:51.:20:54.

while undergoing treatment. The company is at the cutting edge,

:20:55.:20:57.

using microelectronics to connect artworks and posters with

:20:58.:21:03.

smartphones and tablets. This poster is Bluetoothed to my iPhone and

:21:04.:21:06.

every time you touch a different button, a different sound plays and

:21:07.:21:09.

on the screen you see all the colours. This is an interactive

:21:10.:21:19.

advert? Yes. Kate says the accident has reinforced a personal philosophy

:21:20.:21:22.

of hers, never take anything for granted. I couldn't breathe through

:21:23.:21:29.

my mouth or nose. Suddenly I could breathe, and I blew on my fingers

:21:30.:21:33.

and it was such an incredible experience, and for several hours

:21:34.:21:36.

later I just blew on my hands and cried. It just made me realise it is

:21:37.:21:45.

not until we are lucky enough to lose something that we get to

:21:46.:21:49.

appreciate the most simple things. Good to be back? Good to be back. I

:21:50.:21:54.

have two smiles. This one, and this one.

:21:55.:22:10.

Isn't that amazing? . A reminder that the BBC is offering

:22:11.:22:12.

apprenticeships in its local radio stations. Successful candidates will

:22:13.:22:15.

start a 15 month apprenticeship in September. If you are 18 or over by

:22:16.:22:19.

September, a non graduate and you want to find out more, go to the BBC

:22:20.:22:23.

website at bbc.co.uk/las. The deadline for applications is May

:22:24.:22:33.

12th. And so to the weather. It was a slow

:22:34.:22:42.

start this morning, a lot of Mr round, and some of us some rain but

:22:43.:22:48.

into the afternoon the cloud obeyed `` mist around. It is still possible

:22:49.:22:59.

you might catch a light shower before the day is out but much of

:23:00.:23:04.

the night is dry. Wheelhouse and clear spells overnight and the

:23:05.:23:09.

chance of some misty patches `` we will have some. The temperatures

:23:10.:23:15.

were only get down to eight Celsius. Once more a slow start of

:23:16.:23:21.

the day tomorrow and there could be more cloud through the day. A risk

:23:22.:23:26.

of some isolated showers but they do look isolated. Most of us will be

:23:27.:23:32.

dry and that mist and Fog is slow to clear. Places like the coast may

:23:33.:23:39.

hang on to some mist right through the day but elsewhere looks hopeful

:23:40.:23:44.

that it will brighten up. Where we see the sunshine the temperatures

:23:45.:23:51.

should climb to 16 degrees. The winds are generally light and

:23:52.:23:54.

variable but a little bit cooler on the coast itself. As we get into the

:23:55.:23:58.

afternoon we might bring in some isolated showers, looking those at

:23:59.:24:05.

risk across southern counties. Then of course we look to Thursday

:24:06.:24:08.

because there are some big changes on their way. We have big pressure

:24:09.:24:14.

moving in is that means not the best day of weather on Thursday. It will

:24:15.:24:19.

introduce some cooler air as well, so if you're thinking about the bank

:24:20.:24:26.

weekend, it is quite early to talk about the weather but it looks

:24:27.:24:30.

certain to be dry with some sunny spells, high pressure building in.

:24:31.:24:35.

It will feel quite a bit cooler with a chilly night as well. So we have

:24:36.:24:41.

that web data, on Thursday with some rain or showers `` wet day. That's

:24:42.:24:50.

all from us. Good evening.

:24:51.:24:57.

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