01/03/2017 Points West


01/03/2017

The latest news, sport, weather and features from the West of England.


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tonight. Their arch -- there are plans for children as young as four

:00:00.3:59:59

to be taught about So, what will it mean for the West?

:00:00.:00:26.

James Guy two is very keen to fill the gap of well-qualified people --

:00:27.:00:33.

James Dyson. We are supportive of that, it is important for the

:00:34.:00:35.

opportunity of our young people. We'll be assessing the impact

:00:36.:00:40.

of the development on other Our other headlines tonight:

:00:41.:00:42.

The chickens coming home to roost. Bird flu regulations are relaxed,

:00:43.:00:48.

apart from in high-risk zones. Bristol's links with slavery -

:00:49.:00:52.

a new petition to rename The steam train that attracted

:00:53.:00:54.

thousands of loving glances today. The Prime Minister has hailed

:00:55.:01:10.

the Dyson development in Wiltshire as evidence that the UK can

:01:11.:01:14.

thrive after Brexit. As we exclusively revealed last

:01:15.:01:17.

night, Sir James Dyson is spending more than ?2 billion on high-tech

:01:18.:01:20.

research at a converted It's thought he'll hire thousands

:01:21.:01:24.

of people to work on innovations such as artificial intelligence,

:01:25.:01:30.

robots and electric cars. And that's likely to have knock-on

:01:31.:01:34.

effects for dozens of smaller Robin Markwell is at

:01:35.:01:37.

Engine Shed in Bristol, Thank you, Liz. Welcome to the

:01:38.:01:55.

Engine Shed. We have an incubator of a high-tech businesses, it is where

:01:56.:01:59.

they start their lives. It is a good example of what is going on in the

:02:00.:02:03.

West's economy right now. It has proved so successful, this place,

:02:04.:02:06.

just by Temple Meads, that they have had to find your new premises to fit

:02:07.:02:11.

in all the start-ups that are coming up. It is typical what is happening

:02:12.:02:18.

in our economy, this drive towards high-tech, as James Dyson has bought

:02:19.:02:22.

an airfield in watcher. -- in Wiltshire.

:02:23.:02:24.

Sir James Dyson poured petrol in the tank of Wiltshire's economy

:02:25.:02:28.

yesterday with investment on a vast scale.

:02:29.:02:35.

He wants to turn the hangers of Hullavington Airfield

:02:36.:02:37.

Those who work out of the same buildings over

:02:38.:02:41.

I think the businesses it is definitely good news. With

:02:42.:02:47.

potentially another 5000 people working on our doorstep, lunchtime

:02:48.:02:48.

trade could really pick up. The old RAF site is huge -

:02:49.:02:50.

bigger than Monaco. Now everyone wants to know what he's

:02:51.:02:52.

going to do with all the space. The only secret the billionaire has

:02:53.:02:57.

let slip is that these spaces will It's not stopped

:02:58.:03:01.

tongues from wagging. There has been various rumours.

:03:02.:03:13.

From, like I say, battery development to, new factoring, and

:03:14.:03:19.

what I have read recently is that it is going to be AI. -- two, new

:03:20.:03:21.

factoring. So perhaps AI -

:03:22.:03:23.

or artificial intelligence - But this councillor -

:03:24.:03:25.

who was told six months ago - What's he going to use it for?

:03:26.:03:34.

Research and development of products. Can you be more specific?

:03:35.:03:43.

No! You know, though? Yes, but I can't tell you. Welch has no

:03:44.:03:50.

unemployment. This is bringing high-value jobs to Wiltshire, which

:03:51.:03:53.

is really positive. We need higher paid jobs in Wiltshire. We are

:03:54.:03:57.

pleased that Boeing are moving into Porton Down, it is another high

:03:58.:03:59.

school, high-value job centre. It's the same story at engineering

:04:00.:04:03.

giants Renishaw in Gloucestershire. China accounts for a quarter

:04:04.:04:09.

of their trade in precision And a booming business means they've

:04:10.:04:11.

doubled the number of staff So with Dyson recruiting

:04:12.:04:15.

thousands close by, will there be enough engineers

:04:16.:04:20.

to go round? If we work together to ensure that

:04:21.:04:29.

our youngsters across the region come through onto the entry-level

:04:30.:04:33.

schemes, they are studying the right subjects, the Stem subjects in

:04:34.:04:36.

schools, and we work together with schools to make sure that those

:04:37.:04:39.

skills come through, then we will be OK. If we don't reinvest now, we

:04:40.:04:43.

will have a problem with skills in the future.

:04:44.:04:45.

Balanced economy is a finely-tuned thing.

:04:46.:04:46.

And keeping the West's high-tech sector soaring will need many

:04:47.:04:49.

new minds to dream up the machines of tomorrow.

:04:50.:04:52.

Let's pick up on that point with the regional chairman of the Institute

:04:53.:04:57.

of Directors. He also runs this play. You are booming, they booming

:04:58.:05:03.

in Wiltshire and in Gloucestershire. There enough engineers to go around?

:05:04.:05:07.

Of course, but only in the long-term. It depends what the mix

:05:08.:05:11.

of jobs are going to be on the new campus with Dyson. I hope there will

:05:12.:05:15.

be a mixture of high-level, mid-level and perhaps low-level

:05:16.:05:18.

jobs. That gives you more opportunity to tap into the local

:05:19.:05:25.

workforce rather than having to recruit from elsewhere. We could see

:05:26.:05:27.

a shortage in the short-term? There may be a short-term pinch. But this

:05:28.:05:30.

is raising the profile of the south-west, so I don't think this is

:05:31.:05:33.

going to be a problem. What we need to see however is more housing to be

:05:34.:05:36.

able to accommodate all of these new people. Is high-tech the new

:05:37.:05:42.

backbone for the West's economy? What has made it a robust and

:05:43.:05:47.

resilient economy is the diversity of sectors. There is something for

:05:48.:05:51.

everybody, we have so much going on. Thank you. It seems they are

:05:52.:05:57.

celebrating artificial intelligence. The robots might be taking over,

:05:58.:06:01.

though! LAUGHTER

:06:02.:06:07.

Thank you, Robin. Any artificial intelligence going on we will badly

:06:08.:06:09.

risk youth. -- gladly. Plans have been unveiled

:06:10.:06:12.

for a new business park Around 4,000 people could work

:06:13.:06:15.

on the site near Junction 25 of the M5, with the proposals

:06:16.:06:18.

including offices A man's been treated for minor

:06:19.:06:20.

injuries after a fire at an industrial unit

:06:21.:06:25.

on the outskirts of Bristol. 30 firefighters tackled the flames

:06:26.:06:28.

at Clevedon Road in Failand No one else was injured,

:06:29.:06:30.

but there was traffic disruption in the area while the fire

:06:31.:06:35.

was put out. Meanwhile, a new piece of kit

:06:36.:06:39.

to help crews tackle incidents more quickly and safely is to be given

:06:40.:06:42.

to every fire station Firefighters have spent the past

:06:43.:06:45.

year trying it out - with dramatic results,

:06:46.:06:50.

as Clinton Rogers reports. It's not often the Fire

:06:51.:06:56.

Brigade start a fire. To test a new piece of kit -

:06:57.:06:59.

a hand-held probe, seen here through a thermal imaging

:07:00.:07:05.

camera, which they think Now, before we see how that

:07:06.:07:08.

demonstration actually developed, let me show you in close-up the kit

:07:09.:07:14.

they were trialling. Put simply, what they do

:07:15.:07:19.

is they drive this through a wall, and water is pushed through it

:07:20.:07:22.

here at high pressure. It comes out this end as a mist,

:07:23.:07:25.

which can quickly and radically reduce the temperature

:07:26.:07:29.

of a burning building. The trial in this derelict building

:07:30.:07:34.

produced astonishing results. The water sprayed inside reduced

:07:35.:07:38.

the temperature of the burning room from 400 degrees to 80 degrees in 30

:07:39.:07:42.

seconds, allowing the firemen to get inside more safely.

:07:43.:07:47.

That makes the chance of survival for anybody in that

:07:48.:07:51.

building much, much greater. And it also reduces

:07:52.:07:56.

the risk for our staff. So it very much is at the core

:07:57.:07:58.

of what we're trying to do. The probes were used in a real

:07:59.:08:01.

fire at a leisure centre The Brigade say unquestionably it

:08:02.:08:04.

halted the fire more quickly. So now every fire station

:08:05.:08:10.

across Devon and Cornwall will get one of these -

:08:11.:08:14.

an investment of around ?150,000. What it does is it gives them

:08:15.:08:18.

the option to fight the fire Potentially, this could

:08:19.:08:21.

save firefighters' lives. It absolutely will make our

:08:22.:08:26.

firefighting operation is not safer. So, on the face of it,

:08:27.:08:33.

a simple piece of kit - but one which will change the way

:08:34.:08:38.

building fires are This is BBC Points West

:08:39.:08:41.

with Liz and David. 40 years on, Bath's Theatre

:08:42.:08:46.

Royal accepts an invite And, a glimpse of a golden

:08:47.:08:54.

age, as steam returns More than 1500 people have now

:08:55.:09:01.

signed a petition to get the name They're unhappy about Edward

:09:02.:09:13.

Colston's role in the slave trade. But others say that would be

:09:14.:09:18.

airbrushing history. It was opened 150 years

:09:19.:09:21.

ago as a music venue It has already had a new entrance,

:09:22.:09:27.

and another ?45 million is expected There are lots of changes taking

:09:28.:09:32.

place at the Colston Hall, but one thing that's not

:09:33.:09:39.

being painted over That's despite a growing campaign

:09:40.:09:41.

to get Edward Colston's surname removed because of his role

:09:42.:09:46.

in the slave trade. And I think it's offensive

:09:47.:09:50.

to have a civil building that is for music, for celebration,

:09:51.:09:55.

something that should uplift your spirit and your soul,

:09:56.:09:58.

to be named after someone I think the name should reflect

:09:59.:10:00.

the inspirational people that I don't think it's really

:10:01.:10:05.

appropriate anymore that Colston More than 1500 people have

:10:06.:10:10.

now signed the petition History should be

:10:11.:10:16.

taught warts and all. I don't think we should rename

:10:17.:10:22.

it, we shouldn't seek We should teach every bit

:10:23.:10:27.

of our history, and not just selected bits that make

:10:28.:10:32.

us feel comfortable. The Colston Hall is on Colston

:10:33.:10:33.

Street, opposite Colston Tower and around the corner

:10:34.:10:36.

from the Colston statue. He has schools in the city

:10:37.:10:38.

named after him, too. But, whether Edward Colston's name

:10:39.:10:41.

stays or goes from the music venue is ultimately down to the trust

:10:42.:10:44.

which runs it. We have a very well-planned

:10:45.:10:48.

programme of work over And the name, what the new

:10:49.:10:51.

wonderful building will be The Colston Hall

:10:52.:10:56.

name is going, then? What the building will be called

:10:57.:10:59.

is part of that consideration over We've always said that we will bear

:11:00.:11:02.

that in mind when we look towards opening the triumphant

:11:03.:11:08.

new building in 2020. So keeping the name

:11:09.:11:11.

is also an option, then? Everything is on the

:11:12.:11:14.

table at the moment. And, bearing in mind,

:11:15.:11:16.

only ?30 million of the ?45 million needed for renovation work has

:11:17.:11:21.

been raised already. So, naming the venue after a sponsor

:11:22.:11:25.

is also a possibility to earn Now some news which is just

:11:26.:11:28.

developing. Plans to extend Cribbs Causeway

:11:29.:11:43.

are on hold after concerns were raised about the impact

:11:44.:11:46.

on the surrounding economy. The proposed development would see

:11:47.:11:51.

the site grow by 50%. It includes shops, flats

:11:52.:11:54.

and an indoor ski centre. South Gloucestershire Council

:11:55.:11:56.

granted planning permission in November, but the scheme is now

:11:57.:11:58.

being reviewed by the New measures have been

:11:59.:12:01.

introduced to try to stop Most people who keep

:12:02.:12:07.

chickens will now be able to let them outside again,

:12:08.:12:10.

as long as they take But that isn't the case

:12:11.:12:13.

in some parts of the West which the Government says

:12:14.:12:16.

are at a higher risk than others. Here's our Gloucestershire

:12:17.:12:19.

reporter, Steve Knibbs. And although it would appear that

:12:20.:12:21.

restrictions have been eased in some parts,

:12:22.:12:26.

many producers are Defra has now introduced

:12:27.:12:27.

"higher-risk zones", These are usually close to large

:12:28.:12:33.

areas of water popular These are birds known as a source of

:12:34.:12:41.

avian flu. But farmers are being warned that

:12:42.:12:47.

higher risk doesn't mean lower risk In terms of what is happening in the

:12:48.:12:56.

wild bird population, avian flu is still endemic in it, and will be

:12:57.:13:01.

until the migratory Bird season is passed. And therefore we need

:13:02.:13:06.

farmers, producers, backyard poultry keepers, all to be practising the

:13:07.:13:09.

same standards of bio-security that we are encouraging before these

:13:10.:13:11.

appeared. At the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust

:13:12.:13:12.

at Slimbridge, which saw four cases of avian flu in January,

:13:13.:13:15.

biosecurity measures By it's very nature,

:13:16.:13:17.

as a wetlands reserve, it's well Experts here are monitoring

:13:18.:13:21.

the situation every day. Our guys are out at dawn every day

:13:22.:13:33.

looking for any signs of unusual behaviour or dead birds. We haven't

:13:34.:13:38.

found any since January. Even then, it was only a few cases. Hundreds of

:13:39.:13:44.

thousands of birds. -- tens within hundreds and thousands of birds.

:13:45.:13:48.

They are few and far between. But it only takes one bird to start an

:13:49.:13:50.

outbreak. At risk of infection from wild

:13:51.:13:51.

birds with avian flu, But it seems that they're

:13:52.:13:58.

coping well so far. It's quite common for us to have

:13:59.:14:04.

them away at certain points of the winter, during periods of high winds

:14:05.:14:09.

or maybe a freeze up, for the benefits of the flamingos. It is

:14:10.:14:12.

just good to see the condition they are in, it is very good and we are

:14:13.:14:14.

pleased for that. Defra will review the restrictions

:14:15.:14:16.

at the end of April, but for now, the public face of avian flu

:14:17.:14:19.

is a new sticker. EU regulations mean hens housed

:14:20.:14:21.

for more than 12 weeks are no longer free-range,

:14:22.:14:24.

so eggs will be labelled "laid by hens temporarily housed

:14:25.:14:26.

in barns for their welfare". But with outbreaks still happening

:14:27.:14:28.

around the country, there is a concern that avian flu

:14:29.:14:30.

is something the industry may have to get used to during

:14:31.:14:33.

the annual migratory season. This is something we are all going

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to enjoy. Thousands of people in the West got

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a glimpse of the Age of Steam today. They turned out at stations along

:14:50.:14:53.

the route of the Tornado Steam train, which ran on the mainline

:14:54.:14:56.

from London to Cardiff. There was a buzz of excitement

:14:57.:14:58.

on Platform Three as A1 Pacific A slight delay caused by a broken

:14:59.:15:02.

freight train on the line only added The spectators interested

:15:03.:15:08.

in every aspect of the trip. We did have a full set of water from

:15:09.:15:23.

just before we left Paddington, and we are taking water again at

:15:24.:15:25.

Bristol. In a cloud of steam, she set off

:15:26.:15:26.

bound for Wales on St David's Day. A blast of the whistle,

:15:27.:15:34.

a mark of respect as the former railworks in Swindon passed by,

:15:35.:15:37.

the spiritual home of steam. It just brings back memories of when

:15:38.:15:49.

I was a young lad. And I always prefer steam travel to air travel or

:15:50.:15:57.

being in a car. It's relaxing. It's exciting. And my father is a train

:15:58.:16:03.

fanatic. So it means a lot to him. And it's just a great family

:16:04.:16:07.

experience. And obviously in the modern day life, is nice to see what

:16:08.:16:11.

it was like in the old days. It's just being able to sit back and get

:16:12.:16:15.

the whole experience, knowing it is a new train that has not long been

:16:16.:16:19.

built, it's quite fun coming for the day out.

:16:20.:16:21.

Tornado is a Peppercorn Class A1 train.

:16:22.:16:23.

It's a brand-new steam train, to an original design,

:16:24.:16:25.

completed nine years ago at a cost of ?3 million.

:16:26.:16:31.

Travelling on the tornado is really like a throwback to a bygone era. It

:16:32.:16:38.

feels, sounds and smells different. If you look out of the window, you

:16:39.:16:42.

can even see the clouds of steam passing by. Britain gave railways to

:16:43.:16:47.

the world. They are great technology, great fun. Everybody of

:16:48.:16:52.

all ages can appreciate them. Even now, young children, boys and girls

:16:53.:16:53.

still love steam engines. Tornado's due in London

:16:54.:16:56.

tonight at around 9pm, after bringing joy to spectators

:16:57.:16:58.

and passengers alike. She'll be back in the West

:16:59.:16:59.

again in late May. Will Glennon, BBC

:17:00.:17:02.

Points West, Swindon. More than 100 actors

:17:03.:17:06.

from across the region are teaming up with professionals and volunteers

:17:07.:17:12.

to make a feature film The finished project will weave

:17:13.:17:15.

together six different stories There's a crew of about 40 people

:17:16.:17:18.

who'll film in 50 locations, including with us here at BBC

:17:19.:17:25.

Points West today. We have got no budget, so we've had

:17:26.:17:37.

to beg, borrow and steal. It is superb that the city has lots of

:17:38.:17:41.

venues and places like here today, supporters have offered spaces, we

:17:42.:17:45.

have had a church, we have used a Freemasons Hall is a City Hall,

:17:46.:17:48.

people are letting us use their houses. We have had other partners

:17:49.:17:52.

offer food, because we have to feed the cast and crew.

:17:53.:17:57.

And the finished film will premier at the Komedia in Bath next month.

:17:58.:18:01.

If you need a leading man or the lady, we are here!

:18:02.:18:06.

It's 40 years since an infamous party first unfolded.

:18:07.:18:08.

Mike Leigh's Abigail's Party elevated cheese and pineapple,

:18:09.:18:11.

awkward small-talk, and Demis Roussos, to iconic status.

:18:12.:18:16.

The anniversary production opens at Bath's Theatre Royal tonight -

:18:17.:18:19.

starring Sherlock actress Amanda Abbington and Ben Caplan

:18:20.:18:22.

I went to meet them during their final dress rehearsal,

:18:23.:18:28.

and asked Amanda about her love of the play.

:18:29.:18:33.

I grew up with it, so it became, when I decided I wanted

:18:34.:18:36.

to become an actress, which I suppose was about the age

:18:37.:18:42.

of 14 or 15, I thought I wanted to be either a dancer or an actress,

:18:43.:18:46.

I kind of started watching sort of Victoria Wood

:18:47.:18:48.

and stuff like that, and French and Saunders.

:18:49.:18:50.

Two of the things that I love that he did was Nuts in May

:18:51.:18:57.

Particularly Abigail's Party, because of the performances,

:18:58.:19:01.

and because of Alison Steadman's iconic character

:19:02.:19:02.

It was kind of one of those things that I would really watch every now

:19:03.:19:09.

and again just kind of cheer myself up, because it's an amazing

:19:10.:19:12.

I think when you think of Abigail's Party,

:19:13.:19:20.

Have you found it quite hard to kind of make the role your own?

:19:21.:19:26.

Yeah, it was in the beginning, because I kind of like,

:19:27.:19:28.

I mimic people anyway slightly, so I had her voice in my head.

:19:29.:19:31.

And we had a lovely voice lady coming in to kind of manipulate me

:19:32.:19:38.

So we've gone, we've moved away from that voice slightly.

:19:39.:19:42.

We've hopefully kind of adapted her into a different Beverley.

:19:43.:19:45.

Not so far removed, but just another essence of her, really.

:19:46.:19:47.

Be that as it may, we have to find out where she is gone.

:19:48.:19:51.

Ben Caplan plays Lawrence, Beverly's husband.

:19:52.:19:54.

And although she knows the play inside out,

:19:55.:19:58.

In some ways it's quite good that I haven't,

:19:59.:20:05.

because when I came to work on this, I came to it completely fresh,

:20:06.:20:08.

I didn't have any kind of preconceived ideas about the film

:20:09.:20:11.

And I'm desperate now to kind of go back and watch it.

:20:12.:20:18.

But obviously I'll wait until we're up and running

:20:19.:20:20.

It was 1977 I think it was conceived.

:20:21.:20:29.

And, yes, I was obviously very young at the time.

:20:30.:20:31.

I'm so pleased that I now do know it.

:20:32.:20:34.

And as I say, I'm very much looking forward to watching it

:20:35.:20:37.

40 years on, this play still reflects the 1970s.

:20:38.:20:50.

But Amanda really believes it will resonate with an audience today.

:20:51.:20:53.

There's a lot of feminist issues in it, and there's a lot of,

:20:54.:20:57.

you know, you realise there's kind of a lot of sexism in it.

:20:58.:21:00.

So it's kind of highlights what was going on at the time, I suppose.

:21:01.:21:04.

You know, it was just before Thatcher.

:21:05.:21:05.

So there was a feeling of like materialistic stuff

:21:06.:21:08.

So I think people will kind of resonate with it, I do.

:21:09.:21:16.

It has stood the test of time as a period piece.

:21:17.:21:21.

Is there anything in particular you love about the play?

:21:22.:21:23.

There is some fantastic music in this.

:21:24.:21:27.

It was very similar to my house when I was growing up.

:21:28.:21:35.

And just, just the language of it, and the tone of the play

:21:36.:21:38.

is very 70s, obviously, because it is 70s period.

:21:39.:21:41.

But there is a fantastic tone of that period going through it,

:21:42.:21:43.

that they have managed to really highlight and shadow.

:21:44.:21:47.

It's really interesting. I suppose it is curtain up in about half an

:21:48.:21:51.

hour's time. Break a leg! There were mixed fortunes

:21:52.:21:55.

for our football teams last night. Bristol City lost 2-0

:21:56.:22:00.

at Aston Villa, with former striker Jonathan Obika scored the pick

:22:01.:22:04.

of Swindon's goals in a 3-1 Bristol Rovers drew 1-1 at Bolton,

:22:05.:22:10.

while it was goalless A couple from Dursley

:22:11.:22:19.

have just got married - almost half a century

:22:20.:22:27.

after first meeting. Alison Blackwell and James Hodges

:22:28.:22:29.

not only went to school together, but were born in the same

:22:30.:22:33.

hospital, on the same day! They came into the world on the same

:22:34.:22:45.

day in the same place. My name is James, and I was born on the 3rd of

:22:46.:22:51.

February, 1967. I'm Alison, and I was born in the same day, on the

:22:52.:22:57.

same hospital, on the same ward. Bid baby James, seen here with his

:22:58.:23:01.

grandad, and little Alison, didn't just arrived in the same hospital.

:23:02.:23:05.

They even went to school together. Here's James on the second row of

:23:06.:23:10.

Mrs Telford's class. And there is Alison sitting on the front row.

:23:11.:23:16.

Cute little round face. Very quiet. He did have a little pudding basin

:23:17.:23:19.

haircut. I think we knew that we were both born on the same day, even

:23:20.:23:23.

back then. I remember saying it wants in the hall where we used to

:23:24.:23:27.

have dinner. That is where I first saw a smile! It has always stayed

:23:28.:23:31.

with me. I remember feeling very sorry for him when he suddenly lost

:23:32.:23:36.

his mum. Soon after James lost his mother at the age of eight, he moved

:23:37.:23:45.

away. Years pass, and Alice married and had a daughter. In 2013, now

:23:46.:23:48.

divorced, she had a message from James on Facebook. Hello, when is

:23:49.:23:52.

your birthday again? And my reply was, oh, you silly double, you know

:23:53.:23:57.

when my birthday is, is the same day as yours! And three years later,

:23:58.:24:02.

they married, the day after their 50th birthday. Many of the class

:24:03.:24:05.

came to the wedding, even Mrs Telford, their teacher, came to

:24:06.:24:11.

share the day. It was amazing. The sun shone all day. Even though it

:24:12.:24:16.

was February. It was brilliant. She changed my life, for the better,

:24:17.:24:19.

it's just fantastic. I love her to bits.

:24:20.:24:27.

Love finds a way, you see, which is the good news! And they will never

:24:28.:24:32.

forget each other's birthday as well! You'd hope not. Let's catch up

:24:33.:24:38.

with the weather. Saira is up advice is very much stay close to

:24:39.:26:41.

the forecast! Thank you! It seems so mean keeping you up on the roof, but

:26:42.:26:46.

the weather people like it! See you again tomorrow, I.

:26:47.:27:07.

I think my political beliefs are really quite straightforward.

:27:08.:27:12.

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