28/02/2017 Points West


28/02/2017

The latest news, sport, weather and features from the West of England.


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Welcome to BBC Points West with Liz Beacon and David Garmston.

:00:00.:00:09.

Our main story tonight: Dyson sucks up an old airfield.

:00:10.:00:11.

The company's buying the site in Wiltshire

:00:12.:00:13.

In four years, we have grown four times. I hope that kind of growth

:00:14.:00:27.

will continue in future. We really need the 500 acres at Hullavington

:00:28.:00:28.

to help us do that. We'll have the details live

:00:29.:00:30.

from Dyson headquarters. Our other headlines tonight: Sir

:00:31.:00:38.

David Hempleman Adams, I presume. A knighthood today for

:00:39.:00:42.

a West country explorer. They said he would never walk

:00:43.:00:45.

again - how an injured the pancake days we

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have known and loved. The man who has made billions

:00:49.:01:02.

of pounds from vacuum cleaners, Sir James Dyson, has tonight

:01:03.:01:05.

announced plans for an expansion which could see

:01:06.:01:08.

thousands of new jobs. He's acquired the former RAF

:01:09.:01:11.

airfield at Hullavington Sir James, who is a keen Brexit

:01:12.:01:14.

supporter, says he's confident leaving the EU will not

:01:15.:01:19.

hold his business back. The company is announcing

:01:20.:01:23.

the deal right now, so let's join Robin Markwell

:01:24.:01:25.

at Dyson HQ in Malmesbury. Yes, staff here were told the News

:01:26.:01:39.

about this big expansion earlier on today. While other firms are being

:01:40.:01:44.

buffeted by winds and the global economy, Dyson continues to grow and

:01:45.:01:48.

grow. To put in some perspective, four years ago there were 900 staff

:01:49.:01:55.

on this site. Today, there are 3500. The truth is, this site here in

:01:56.:01:59.

Malmesbury simply is not big enough so they are seeking out a new campus

:02:00.:02:04.

at an old airfield ten times the size of this place. It is all too

:02:05.:02:08.

much the ambition of the man at the top. He's the billionaire inventor

:02:09.:02:15.

with big dreams for the world and the West. A supporter of Brexit, Sir

:02:16.:02:21.

James Dyson always insisted the UK would survive outside of the EU, now

:02:22.:02:25.

he has made the scale of his ambition clear. He already has

:02:26.:02:29.

spaces in Malmesbury, Chippenham and Bristol. Today he added the airfield

:02:30.:02:34.

at baize to that list. He wants a high-tech campus here. The aim is to

:02:35.:02:40.

come a global hub for development. He hopes to have converted to Second

:02:41.:02:46.

World War aircraft hangars into factories. To win in the world

:02:47.:02:53.

stage, do how to develop new technology and new products. That's

:02:54.:02:57.

where doing here. Because we do that successfully, we are able to export

:02:58.:03:02.

our products all around the world. And enjoy the really fast expanding

:03:03.:03:07.

markets that exist in the far east. In nearby Malmesbury, the only shop

:03:08.:03:12.

licence to stock his wares, the latest bout of investment was warmly

:03:13.:03:16.

received. I think it will be good for the area because the town is

:03:17.:03:22.

getting bigger all the time. We need expansion job wise, especially for

:03:23.:03:24.

the kids who are leaving school this year. Those who work at Dyson were

:03:25.:03:32.

also pleased. We've got a back in trainers, fans, hair dryers. We have

:03:33.:03:39.

got loads. Five or six categories. We are always adding categories, the

:03:40.:03:43.

future is extremely bright for Malmesbury as Dyson. There has been

:03:44.:03:49.

no word on precisely what will be developed at Hullavington, but

:03:50.:03:54.

plenty of speculation. There's lots of talk. He bought a battery company

:03:55.:03:58.

recently, so it is highly likely it will involve some kind of battery

:03:59.:04:02.

production of vehicle production that involves electric batteries. My

:04:03.:04:05.

gut feeling is he will probably go with the electric car. Whether cars

:04:06.:04:12.

or planes, air blades or air purifiers, Dyson 's determination

:04:13.:04:15.

remained stronger than ever. While its markets in the far east are

:04:16.:04:20.

fuelling his firm's March across the world, the brains of his operation

:04:21.:04:21.

remained rooted here, in the West. It is worth stressing that the jobs

:04:22.:04:31.

that will be created as a result will be high-tech jobs. We think of

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Bristol and Bath as clusters for innovation with the development of

:04:37.:04:39.

five G and high-technology jobs there, but thanks to Dyson,

:04:40.:04:43.

Wiltshire seems to be matching them. It is good news for the future

:04:44.:04:45.

proofing of the West's economy. A coroner has concluded that

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a couple from Wiltshire were unlawfully killed in a terror

:04:51.:04:55.

attack in Tunisia two years ago. He condemned the police response

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to the attacks in Sousse in which 38 people died,

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but stopped short of ruling that It was just before lunch on a friday

:05:02.:05:04.

in June 2015 when an armed terrorist began shooting at tourists

:05:05.:05:13.

on the beach at the Among the 30 British victims

:05:14.:05:15.

were 73-year-old Eileen Swannack from Biddestone, and her

:05:16.:05:20.

partner John Welch, I've been in touch with Eileen's

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family throughout and this afternoon they told me of their relief

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that the inquest is finally over. But they also said how

:05:30.:05:34.

difficult it's been to listen In fact, Des, Eileen's

:05:35.:05:36.

son, said that after any TV for three weeks,

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he still finds the footage He told me how Eileen and John had

:05:41.:05:45.

been together for eight years In fact this was their seventh

:05:46.:05:52.

or eighth trip to the hotel. But they, like many others,

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weren't completely aware of how Des remembers how a friend asked

:05:58.:06:00.

Eileen "do you feel safe Her response was "Yes,

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I love that hotel. It's lovely and quiet

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and I feel safe there." Today Judge Nicholas Loraine-Smith

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said the response to the attack by Tunisian police was "at best

:06:16.:06:19.

shambolic and at worst cowardly". Some families are now preparing

:06:20.:06:24.

legal action against the tour operator TUI for not

:06:25.:06:27.

informing their loved ones about the latest

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Foreign Office advice, but Des said he has been

:06:30.:06:31.

through enough already, and after today him and his family

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need to try to find The Independent's travel editor,

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Simon Calder, was in court I spoke to him a little earlier

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and asked him what lessons could be Well, it's very easy to look

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with 2020 hindsight and see the connection between the terrible

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Bardo Museum attack in March 2015 and the fact that holiday-makers

:06:59.:07:02.

were in harms way on the beach in Sousse on the 26th

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of June of that year. But of course, the Foreign Office

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was really doing the best it could to come up with

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an appropriate level of warning. And, unless it warns

:07:16.:07:18.

against going to a particular place, the holiday

:07:19.:07:21.

companies are happy to take people I think the main lesson

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going forward is let's try to focus a bit more

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on what the risks are, and making Looking forward, if we are

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booking a holiday now for the summer, what precautions do

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you think we should take? I think you need to keep

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things in perspective. Despite these 30 awful tragedies,

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actually the much bigger danger for you, me and everybody watching this

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is being involved abroad in a road So, therefore when I am risk

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managing, which I do all the time, I am looking specifically at how I can

:07:53.:07:59.

reduce the time spent in a car, how can I be safer when I am

:08:00.:08:03.

walking around a city, If you can get rid of those risks,

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you are actually eliminating Terrorism happens,

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of course it does, it is awful, but I put it in the same

:08:13.:08:15.

category as a plane crash. I guess on those grounds

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you could argue against going to France all Belgium,

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even actually to London. earlier that Tunisia

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was as safe as London. I don't personally buy that,

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because Tunisia has a 300 mile frontier with the failed state

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of Libya, but I do believe the risk involved in going to

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Tunisia is tolerably low. As soon as the Foreign Office lifts

:08:40.:08:46.

that warning I will be Detectives are to review the case

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of a man from Gloucestershire who was shot dead more

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than a quarter of a century ago. Tony Alliss died in July 1990

:08:58.:09:00.

in woodland near Stroud. Now police say they will look

:09:01.:09:03.

at the case again to see if there's any new evidence that could lead

:09:04.:09:06.

to a reinvestigation. Our Gloucestershire reporter,

:09:07.:09:09.

Steve Knibbs, has been looking back at the night when the murder

:09:10.:09:11.

was first reported. Shortly before

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ten o'clock last night, residents reported hearing gunshots

:09:16.:09:17.

in the woods above the hamlet This was Penn Wood in July 1990,

:09:18.:09:20.

and those shots killed Tony Alliss. It followed a dispute with his

:09:21.:09:27.

neighbours over a boundary fence. The police investigation led to them

:09:28.:09:30.

being charged with murder, but the trial collapsed,

:09:31.:09:33.

with the judge telling the jury: For 27 years, Tony's family haven't

:09:34.:09:50.

stopped campaigning for the case to be looked at again,

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and have sought help, advice and examination of the evidence

:09:54.:09:55.

from their own experts. A commander from the Met,

:09:56.:09:59.

a homicide detective of 30 years, a ballistic expert, who is a court

:10:00.:10:02.

expert witness, and a pathologist, who all said the case

:10:03.:10:08.

needed reinvestigation. The sticking point used to be

:10:09.:10:14.

the double jeopardy law, that prevented people being tried

:10:15.:10:16.

for the same crime twice, Now a fresh prosecution can happen

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if new evidence is uncovered that wasn't available at the time

:10:20.:10:24.

of the original trial. Bob Alliss believes their own

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forensic evidence raises questions What we listened to in the court,

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that Tony was struggling with a man on the floor,

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and he had his arms by his side. Our evidence says, and this

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is the evidence of our three exerts, Tony was shielding his face

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with his arms in what is known as the pugialistic stance,

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and the wounds substantiate this, it's what you call

:10:51.:10:52.

indelible evidence, I want This latest review into Tony's

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death has come about due to a new scheme to support families

:10:57.:11:04.

in cases of acquittal. It will be led by DCI Richard Ocone,

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one of the senior officers in charge of the Becky Watts murder

:11:07.:11:10.

investigation in Bristol. His team will look for any

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new evidence or information that could be presented

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to the Crown Prosecution Service. Steve Knibbs, BBC

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Points West, Gloucester. We feel that it needs

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reinvestigation rather than just a review of that same old evidence. As

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long as the person doing the review looks at it from a blank piece of

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paper, hopefully they will agree with us. Gloucestershire

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Constabulary said today in a statement that a review of the case

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did not meet the threshold of compelling new evidence. It is news

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that the Alice family have got used to over the years, but they say that

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every chance to look at the case again is one worth taking.

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Thank you for joining us this Shrove Tuesday evening.

:12:04.:12:05.

Liz and David with tonight's Points West.

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Coming up a little later in the programme:

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We meet the Royal Marine who lost three limbs in Afghanistan -

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now in training for the Invictus Games.

:12:18.:12:21.

Maybe this is what happens when you forget the lemon and sugar...

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He said it was the proudest day of his life.

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The Wiltshire explorer Sir David Hempleman-Adams

:12:45.:12:46.

collected his knighthood today from Buckingham Palace.

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The Knight Commander of the Victorian Order is a special

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personal award by the Queen herself, and the one for Sir David

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was the only one of its kind given out this year.

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He was accompanied to the Palace by his three daughters,

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and our Wiltshire reporter Will Glennon was there too.

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With two touches of the sword in time-honoured tradition,

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David Hempleman-Adams becomes Sir David.

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Prince William awarded him a special knighthood,

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Supported today by his three daughters,

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It's a personal gift of the Queen, so being in Buckingham Palace, it

:13:22.:13:28.

felt like a tremendous honour. It is one of those days when you wish your

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parents were there to see it. Supported today

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by his three daughters, he said that aside from their birth,

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this was his proudest day. Wonderful. One of those special

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days. I started my adventurous career through the Duke of Edinburgh

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award, that's what got me started as a young 14-year-old. I was a young

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boy from the West Country, going out to the rest of the world. The

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knighthood bestowed today on Sir David is just another milestone on

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an extraordinary man who has been to the four corners of the world.

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Climbed Mount Everest twice, from north and south sides,

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and every highest peak on each of the seven continents.

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He's been to both Poles, sailed around the ice cap, and ballooned

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into the record books, winning the Gordon Bennett Race

:14:26.:14:28.

in 2008, and flying across the Atlantic.

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He tries now to inspire and encourage young people.

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We are too soft on them. I think we should get them out on the hills and

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toss them up a bit. When they do get there, they respond fantastically.

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-- tough them up a bit. It's getting them away from the games on the TV

:14:56.:14:56.

that is the struggle. But for Sir David it

:14:57.:14:58.

doesn't stop here. The next expedition

:14:59.:15:00.

is to Greenland this summer. Will Glennon, BBC Points West,

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at Buckingham Palace. Also honoured today

:15:02.:15:10.

was Sir Roger Bannister. He was a pupil at the City

:15:11.:15:12.

of Bath Boys' School and he picked-up the

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Companion of Honour. Sir Roger, who is 87,

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was the first person to run a mile in less than four

:15:17.:15:20.

minutes, back in 1954. The red deer of Exmoor

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are being targeted by Exmoor National Park says

:15:31.:15:34.

it is concerned by a marked increase in the number of deer being killed,

:15:35.:15:38.

especially at night. This week it is conducting a survey

:15:39.:15:40.

of the deer to establish Long gone are the days of that

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romantic notion of a poacher going The price of venison

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has increased, the demand for venison has increased,

:15:50.:15:52.

hence we seem to have these organised gangs coming

:15:53.:15:55.

in and targeting our Avon and Somerset Police say

:15:56.:15:59.

they are aware of the increased activity of poachers,

:16:00.:16:04.

and they've urged the public not to encourage poaching

:16:05.:16:07.

by buying illegal venison. A bicycle project that's been

:16:08.:16:15.

helping to rehabilitate inmates in Bristol prison has won

:16:16.:16:17.

a national award. For the last seven years,

:16:18.:16:19.

prisoners have been fixing bikes which are then sold,

:16:20.:16:23.

giving them a chance to learn Ross Pollard went along

:16:24.:16:25.

to find out more. Living behind bars, cut off

:16:26.:16:32.

from the outside world. But in this prison workshop,

:16:33.:16:39.

prisoners are preparing for life I'm learning something that

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I didn't know before, Because I can take them apart

:16:43.:16:46.

from scratch, and put it up all by myself,

:16:47.:16:50.

no help from no-one. I feel like when I come outside,

:16:51.:16:53.

I'd like to continue with this. I'm doing a Level 1 NVQ certificate,

:16:54.:16:56.

I'd like to go further with it, If I come out and I can work

:16:57.:17:00.

in a bike shop, that would be fine. Today, the charity's in Westminster,

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to receive an award We are so, so thrilled

:17:07.:17:10.

to have won this award. It's just an endorsement

:17:11.:17:15.

of all the hard work that everybody's put into it,

:17:16.:17:18.

over the last six years. It's enormously satisfying that such

:17:19.:17:21.

a simple scheme can have More than 200 prisoners have taken

:17:22.:17:25.

part in this scheme - three quarters of them have gained

:17:26.:17:31.

a qualification, and the same amount want to do more training

:17:32.:17:35.

when they are released. I've got six kids,

:17:36.:17:38.

they are all boys. So it would be good for me

:17:39.:17:40.

to teach them to fix bikes. The charity says they still need

:17:41.:17:44.

people to donate bikes, which can be fixed up by prisoners,

:17:45.:17:51.

and then sold cheaply back Ross Pollard, BBC

:17:52.:17:55.

Points West, Bristol. Now a remarkable story

:17:56.:18:03.

about a former marine who's re-built his life after losing three

:18:04.:18:05.

limbs during a tour Doctors told Mark Ormrod

:18:06.:18:09.

he would never walk again. He's now making a film

:18:10.:18:15.

about his experience to give others strength,

:18:16.:18:18.

and Mark's with us and his friend We're delighted they can join

:18:19.:18:25.

us here in the studio. Maps, the film-maker is also here.

:18:26.:18:41.

It's nice to meet you. Ten years on, walking into a television studio.

:18:42.:18:45.

Tell us how you got to this point. It's been a roller-coaster. As you

:18:46.:18:49.

can imagine in the beginning, I was told I would have no chance of

:18:50.:18:52.

walking because of the walking because of the severity of

:18:53.:18:58.

my injuries. But through some incredible support and meeting some

:18:59.:19:01.

incredible people I was able to overcome it and walk and it is an

:19:02.:19:04.

incredible feeling to walk in here today. When you were injured, of

:19:05.:19:12.

course, you were shattered not only physically but mentally. Initially,

:19:13.:19:16.

yes. It was a big shock and a lot to take in. But now, nine or ten years

:19:17.:19:22.

down the line, I am mentally stronger than I was before I was

:19:23.:19:29.

injured. Maps, you're making a film about Mark. With both former Marines

:19:30.:19:37.

and I met Mark quite some time ago just after he was injured. We talked

:19:38.:19:44.

about the documentary and the whole idea was to document a year of his

:19:45.:19:49.

life, show every aspect that we can show and, like you say, it is an

:19:50.:19:54.

inspiration piece. Nothing has been easy for you during this process.

:19:55.:19:58.

Tell us the story about your lens. Learning to walk again? Yes. I

:19:59.:20:06.

joined the Royal Marines when I was 17 and I thought it was the hardest

:20:07.:20:09.

thing I would ever have to do. This was harder. It takes more energy to

:20:10.:20:20.

do anything than for able-bodied person. The first time I put these

:20:21.:20:24.

on started learning to walk again it was a big shock. I was 24 years old

:20:25.:20:31.

and at the peak of my physical fitness and I could only walk a few

:20:32.:20:38.

metres. Just getting them was a struggle wasn't it? Yes. Because I

:20:39.:20:44.

was the UK's first triple amputee, I found someone in America who mentors

:20:45.:20:52.

to me. He trained with me for three weeks. His company fitted the

:20:53.:20:57.

and programmed them and trained me and programmed them and trained me

:20:58.:21:01.

how to use them properly. And in 2009 was the last time I used a

:21:02.:21:08.

wheelchair. You have a family, a son. Tell us what a difference it

:21:09.:21:11.

makes to the people in your life. That is the thing that is

:21:12.:21:15.

underrated, the support that goes on behind-the-scenes. None of us that

:21:16.:21:22.

oranges get here on our own. Everyone from people when you are

:21:23.:21:25.

initially injured, the medics, doctors, nurses, physios, the

:21:26.:21:34.

charities that support us after we leave, all those people have been

:21:35.:21:37.

incredible and that is why I am fortunate to be here now. I think

:21:38.:21:43.

you are a hero for what you have done and achieved. Good luck making

:21:44.:21:44.

the film. It is nice to meet you. If you've gone this far

:21:45.:21:50.

today without a pancake, you may need reminding that

:21:51.:21:52.

it's Shrove Tuesday. Every year we tend to do

:21:53.:21:54.

the same things to mark the occasion, but in times gone

:21:55.:21:56.

by it was very, very different, Another year another Shrove Tuesday.

:21:57.:22:11.

I've got my sugar, my lemon and my eggs will stop I could just do with

:22:12.:22:20.

a nice clean bowl. You'll need more than a bowl in there, mate. This is

:22:21.:22:22.

Tudor England. Right... 500 years ago, this is how

:22:23.:22:27.

Shrove Tuesday might Music was very important -

:22:28.:22:29.

it was a time to get drunk, and even dance with

:22:30.:22:34.

women you don't know. Remember, gentlemen, ladies on the

:22:35.:22:44.

right as they always are. Doesn't look like it's worked

:22:45.:22:49.

out very well for me. Tudors marked the occasion in a more

:22:50.:22:59.

dramatic fashion than us too. Shrove Tuesday is the last feast

:23:00.:23:13.

before the fast of Lent. In medieval times one of the fun things you do

:23:14.:23:17.

us part of the beast is fight a turbulent. Go on, hit my shield!

:23:18.:23:27.

Now? Yes. No, don't stroke it. Hate it! I'm out, I'm out!

:23:28.:23:31.

The Tudor ones would have more ingredients. They would have a lot

:23:32.:23:41.

of the same things but they would also have more spices, cinnamon,

:23:42.:23:48.

ginger, and the most surprisingly is they would have a you'll which is

:23:49.:23:54.

like beer. A lot has changed over the years but one thing has stayed

:23:55.:23:58.

the same. Even in Tudor times they liked flipping pancakes. Here we go.

:23:59.:24:05.

But I was by no means the worst. Plenty of practice still needed to

:24:06.:24:06.

get up to Tudor standards. Over the years, we've covered

:24:07.:24:13.

a fair share of pancake races across the west -

:24:14.:24:16.

we've been digging into the archive as part of our 60th birthday

:24:17.:24:19.

celebrations. How did I look so awkward tossing a

:24:20.:24:39.

pancake? Now we had some proper

:24:40.:25:17.

snow in the west today. This was the scene

:25:18.:25:19.

on Exmoor this morning. Certainly felt a lot colder -

:25:20.:25:21.

but are we going to get any more? Sara Thornton is with us this

:25:22.:25:25.

evening to tell all. Those red deer on Exmoor, woke up

:25:26.:25:44.

and thought flipping heck! This picture is taken from the Quantocks.

:25:45.:25:49.

You can see at lower levels it was still green, it was just at higher

:25:50.:25:56.

levels that we saw snow overnight. I think we have largely lost that

:25:57.:26:02.

threat of snow for the next few days but in climate terms tomorrow starts

:26:03.:26:06.

spring and it won't always feel springlike in the next few days

:26:07.:26:09.

because we still have areas of low pressure moving towards us. The one

:26:10.:26:14.

we had earlier starting to pull away now, it's quite breezy out here, but

:26:15.:26:20.

through the next few hours you can see the isobars spacing out and it

:26:21.:26:23.

will be less windy through the night. Clear skies as well, mean the

:26:24.:26:29.

temperatures will fall away. Some of us might have to scrape our cars

:26:30.:26:33.

tomorrow morning. Overnight lows down to two or three degrees

:26:34.:26:36.

places. A bright start but not for places. A bright start but not for

:26:37.:26:40.

long. Cloud and training moving towards asked into the afternoon

:26:41.:26:49.

tomorrow. Some heavy bursts of rain. Temperatures of eight or nine

:26:50.:26:54.

Celsius. As the rain pulls away tomorrow night we get a squeeze in

:26:55.:26:59.

the isobars, and that means more windy conditions. The wind gusts

:27:00.:27:07.

will be in excess of 50 miles an hour overnight. They should ease by

:27:08.:27:11.

first thing Thursday morning. It will start with some sunshine and it

:27:12.:27:12.

is generally drive. And, just before we go,

:27:13.:27:14.

congratulations go to our Last night they picked up

:27:15.:27:16.

"Highly Commended" at the British Sports Journalism Awards

:27:17.:27:19.

in London, for their live coverage of Yeovil Town Ladies'

:27:20.:27:22.

promotion last season. How can we take some of the credit?

:27:23.:27:34.

I don't think we can. That is where we have to leave you tonight. There

:27:35.:27:41.

will be an update at ten o'clock here, on BBC One. Enjoy your

:27:42.:27:46.

pancakes if you are having them! Oh, yes!

:27:47.:27:53.

MUSIC: Another Day Of Sun by the La La Land Cast

:27:54.:27:57.

Another chance to see Peter Kay's BAFTA award-winning Car Share.

:27:58.:28:02.

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