06/03/2017 South Today - Oxford


06/03/2017

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how far can authorities go to clean up our polluted air?

:00:00.:00:10.

Police and the football authorities investigate,

:00:11.:00:12.

as a non-league football match is abandoned following

:00:13.:00:14.

A family tradition lost in the post -

:00:15.:00:22.

the birthday card sent between father and daughter for over

:00:23.:00:24.

First tonight, the head of the World Health Organisation

:00:25.:00:40.

says more than 90% of the world's population

:00:41.:00:44.

breathes poor-quality air, presenting a greater health problem

:00:45.:00:46.

But this isn't only a problem for Beijing, Rio de Janiero

:00:47.:00:51.

Cherwell District Council has estimated as many as 10%

:00:52.:00:57.

of adult deaths in Oxfordshire may be due to air pollution.

:00:58.:01:00.

Toxic pollutants like nitrogen dioxide, particularly from diesel

:01:01.:01:14.

vehicles, are at dangerously high levels in many towns and cities.

:01:15.:01:19.

Oxfordshire's lead GP for respiratory conditions thinks air

:01:20.:01:25.

condition is having a direct effect. People come and see me and say they

:01:26.:01:29.

have been much better until they came to Oxford city, whereupon they

:01:30.:01:33.

got their symptoms back. Equally you will find people who have struggled

:01:34.:01:39.

to control their asthma and then they moved back home or go away from

:01:40.:01:43.

the Thames Valley only to discover their symptoms get better. Pollution

:01:44.:01:48.

levels in Oxford have been cut by a third over the past decade but the

:01:49.:01:52.

city and county councils want to do more. One idea is to create a zero

:01:53.:01:58.

emission zone, only accessible to electric vehicles, cyclists and

:01:59.:02:04.

pedestrians. It has to go in those streets where pollution is

:02:05.:02:09.

dangerously high. It has worked very successfully in the high street

:02:10.:02:12.

where we say only buses during the daytime so it is a similar sort of

:02:13.:02:17.

thing. People are used to not ringing their cars into Oxford and

:02:18.:02:21.

it will have to continue. It is not just the city. Pollution targets are

:02:22.:02:25.

being breached in 11 areas across Oxfordshire, including the market

:02:26.:02:29.

town of Wallingford. Here there are proposals to close the main ridge to

:02:30.:02:34.

try to reduce the amount of vehicles travelling through the time but the

:02:35.:02:40.

idea has divided opinion. I think closing it will be really difficult

:02:41.:02:43.

for a awful lot of people. It will certainly make it more pleasant

:02:44.:02:48.

walking across the bridge so maybe it will be a good idea. It is a

:02:49.:02:52.

possibility if it helps but I am not sure it will be as convenient as we

:02:53.:02:57.

all want. Environmental campaigners say lives are at risk if not -- if

:02:58.:03:02.

more action is not taken to cut emissions. We are specifically

:03:03.:03:06.

talking about the air quality management action zone in the centre

:03:07.:03:09.

of town which has had a legally toxic limits that break the EU

:03:10.:03:13.

directives for 12 years. -- illegally. Back in Oxford,

:03:14.:03:21.

councillors said attitudes to how we get around need to change. It is

:03:22.:03:25.

investing in electric charging points and hopes zero emission zone

:03:26.:03:27.

will be in place by 2020. So what does all this

:03:28.:03:30.

pollution do to us? Earlier I spoke to Dr Matt Loxham,

:03:31.:03:38.

who studies airborne pollution So when we inhale air pollution,

:03:39.:03:40.

and it's this mixture of particles and gases,

:03:41.:03:50.

what it does is it enters our lungs, and it can cause our lungs

:03:51.:03:52.

to become inflamed. Now, in people who are otherwise

:03:53.:03:55.

healthy, they might just get a cough or a sore throat,

:03:56.:03:57.

but in people who are at risk, and this can be asthmatics,

:03:58.:04:04.

it can be very young people, very old people, we see a whole

:04:05.:04:07.

range of health effects that we wouldn't see if they weren't

:04:08.:04:10.

in polluted environments, things like asthma attacks,

:04:11.:04:12.

heart attacks, strokes, they are all linked to exposure

:04:13.:04:14.

to air pollution, and right across the life course,

:04:15.:04:16.

from very young children to elderly people, you see these affects of air

:04:17.:04:19.

pollution that you wouldn't see When we cover stories

:04:20.:04:22.

like this we often bombard Is there really a safe

:04:23.:04:25.

level of pollution? That is one of the things

:04:26.:04:28.

we are pretty sure about, there is no safe limit,

:04:29.:04:32.

so however low it goes, as long as there is pollution there,

:04:33.:04:34.

it's still damaging your health. The good news is that if you make

:04:35.:04:37.

any reduction it will result in an improvement to health,

:04:38.:04:40.

so any reduction is better than nothing but there's

:04:41.:04:42.

always further you can go. Lots being said today about,

:04:43.:04:47.

for example, the effect What would you say to those

:04:48.:04:58.

arguments, about maybe banning The first question is,

:04:59.:05:02.

do diesel vehicles have an affect? Diesel vehicles are probably

:05:03.:05:14.

the major polluters They're by no means the only

:05:15.:05:16.

polluters but pollution from diesel vehicles can constitute a large

:05:17.:05:20.

amount of air pollution, but banning them is very difficult,

:05:21.:05:22.

because if you ban people who bought diesel cars in good faith

:05:23.:05:25.

from using their cars, how are they going to

:05:26.:05:28.

replace their cars? Maybe you want them to use

:05:29.:05:32.

public transport, what if there isn't public

:05:33.:05:36.

transport provision? It becomes apparent very quickly

:05:37.:05:38.

that this is a really complex difficult to solve without really

:05:39.:05:41.

joined-up thinking. So in brief there is no

:05:42.:05:45.

straightforward one bullet It's got to involve a lot

:05:46.:05:47.

of joined-up thinking, a lot of activity from a wide range

:05:48.:05:52.

of contributors, whether this is big companies and big organisations

:05:53.:05:55.

or people at the individual level as well, and it's got to involve

:05:56.:05:58.

commitment from all of those groups of society as well, and only

:05:59.:06:05.

then, with all this joined-up work, will we really see a major impact

:06:06.:06:08.

on air quality in our cities. So no one thing can change

:06:09.:06:11.

the air pollution levels, but many want to try

:06:12.:06:16.

and do something. Milton Keynes has been given

:06:17.:06:18.

?9 million by the Government to cut vehicle emissions and to get

:06:19.:06:21.

everyone driving electric. David Whitely has been to the town

:06:22.:06:23.

to see how many people have plugged A quarter of a million people

:06:24.:06:26.

live in Milton Keynes, The population is predicted

:06:27.:06:30.

to double in the next few years. Milton Keynes is one of four places

:06:31.:06:35.

in the UK to get government funds The aim is to reduce harmful

:06:36.:06:42.

emissions and also cut the carbon footprint, but just how realistic is

:06:43.:06:56.

all of this? I have come to quiz the council's

:06:57.:06:58.

head of transport innovation. The take-up of people buying

:06:59.:07:01.

electric cars in this country at this current moment isn't that

:07:02.:07:03.

great, only a few thousand, compared to millions of traditional

:07:04.:07:06.

style cars being driven. There's a long way to

:07:07.:07:08.

go yet, isn't there? There is a long way to go,

:07:09.:07:11.

but results are showing that by having this type of investment

:07:12.:07:14.

and thinking that We've seen over the past 12 months

:07:15.:07:16.

200% increase in the number You are right, it is small numbers,

:07:17.:07:23.

we've gone from 220 to 660, It's not just private road

:07:24.:07:27.

users that are being Milton Keynes has the country's

:07:28.:07:31.

first wirelessly charged electric bus service and it's pushing

:07:32.:07:38.

for more of its 1200 taxis Say everybody in Milton Keynes

:07:39.:07:40.

overnight decided to change their vehicle to an electric vehicle

:07:41.:07:45.

the next day, how would we cope with that in this country

:07:46.:07:48.

with our electricity production? If you did that at that

:07:49.:07:53.

sort of speed you'd have You'd overtax the electricity

:07:54.:07:58.

distribution system. But we've also been working

:07:59.:08:02.

here in Milton Keynes on smart energy systems,

:08:03.:08:05.

where you can actually have more flexible grids that can cope

:08:06.:08:09.

with the demands on electric vehicles, so for example we've had

:08:10.:08:14.

some work done with ourselves at the Open University on how people

:08:15.:08:18.

can charge their electric vehicles from their solar

:08:19.:08:21.

panels on the house, and that helps to stop any

:08:22.:08:23.

stress on the electricity Other news now, and officials

:08:24.:08:25.

at Didcot Town Football Club are counting the cost after a pitch

:08:26.:08:46.

invasion by away supporters saw their stadium vandalised

:08:47.:08:48.

and players abused. The match against league leaders

:08:49.:08:50.

Hereford descended into chaos in the 87th minute when

:08:51.:08:52.

the visitors went 2-1 ahead. Fans invaded the patch and match

:08:53.:08:55.

officials abandoned the game. Fans and stewards spill

:08:56.:08:57.

from the terraces and onto the turf, in a scene more resembling

:08:58.:09:01.

of a bar-room brawl Today staff at Didcot Town FC

:09:02.:09:03.

were assessing the damage, after their home game with Hereford

:09:04.:09:06.

FC turned into chaos. We were being battered at that time

:09:07.:09:09.

so we knew we weren't And then all of a sudden

:09:10.:09:13.

we saw a ruckus on the pitch, our goalkeeper

:09:14.:09:18.

was surrounded by a few supporters and our own players trying

:09:19.:09:20.

to protect him, and, yeah, This stadium has a capacity of more

:09:21.:09:25.

than 3000 people but for Saturday's visit of Hereford

:09:26.:09:32.

there was a gate of 796. Now, 700 of those were away

:09:33.:09:34.

supporters, and all was fine, until the 87th minute,

:09:35.:09:37.

when Hereford took the lead. Luckily we had TV footage available

:09:38.:09:43.

to us, we had a company which was filming this game,

:09:44.:09:48.

so we've got everything, in HD, wonderfully, so, yeah,

:09:49.:09:51.

we'll be presenting that to the Southern League and the FA

:09:52.:09:57.

when we're called upon to do that, and they hopefully have captured

:09:58.:10:00.

everything that went on. Two men have been arrested

:10:01.:10:02.

following the incident, and in a statement a spokesperson

:10:03.:10:04.

for Hereford FC said... It's yet to be decided

:10:05.:10:15.

if the result will stand, or whether a potential rematch will

:10:16.:10:17.

be played, behind closed doors. Bus drivers in Oxford have gone

:10:18.:10:22.

on strike for a second day in a dispute sparked

:10:23.:10:27.

by Christmas pay. Unite union members

:10:28.:10:30.

at the Oxford Bus Company are demanding payment for working

:10:31.:10:34.

five holiday days over Christmas. For an update on the dispute,

:10:35.:10:40.

earlier I spoke to our reporter David Lumb, who has been covering

:10:41.:10:43.

the story. If you ever wanted an indication

:10:44.:10:44.

of the strength of feeling around this, you could see it

:10:45.:10:47.

quite clearly today. There were more than 100 workers

:10:48.:10:49.

on the picket line - lots of them with placards,

:10:50.:10:52.

flags, vuvuzelas. It was really, really

:10:53.:10:53.

emotional and strong. A number of services

:10:54.:10:55.

have been disrupted. They include the x90 bus service

:10:56.:10:59.

between London and Oxford. The Unite union, which has been

:11:00.:11:01.

backing these workers, says taking industrial action wasn't

:11:02.:11:03.

a decision that was taken lightly. However, the passengers

:11:04.:11:06.

and the public have been really We humbly apologise

:11:07.:11:09.

for the disruption but at the end of the day you have to make a stand

:11:10.:11:14.

and the only way you can make a stand is to do what the guys

:11:15.:11:18.

and gals are doing behind me. On the face of this it's a dispute

:11:19.:11:22.

about how much workers should get In practice, though,

:11:23.:11:26.

the union says that that is just the straw that broke

:11:27.:11:29.

the camel's back. It says workers have deep-rooted

:11:30.:11:31.

frustrations about the pay and working conditions

:11:32.:11:33.

they are having to deal with. I did speak to Phil Southall

:11:34.:11:40.

from the Oxford Bus Company. He says that he's made

:11:41.:11:43.

a number of offers, Well, today we've managed to get

:11:44.:11:45.

around 90% of the service out. We are focusing on minimising

:11:46.:11:52.

the inconvenience to our customers, so we've got a really good level

:11:53.:11:54.

of service out, we've had more people coming to work

:11:55.:11:58.

than we were expecting and therefore we have tried to minimise the impact

:11:59.:12:00.

in what was very difficult Two more days of strike action have

:12:01.:12:03.

been scheduled for next Friday Both sides say they hope

:12:04.:12:07.

an agreement can be More than 100 people have

:12:08.:12:11.

taken part in a women's The event in Cowley over

:12:12.:12:15.

the weekend included practical workshops about improving

:12:16.:12:20.

strength and flexibility, There were also talks from female

:12:21.:12:22.

champions and local cycling clubs. Part of my journey in cycling has

:12:23.:12:29.

been finding other women like me who are inspiring and encouraging

:12:30.:12:34.

and I want to be able to share that Representation is also really

:12:35.:12:37.

important when it comes to cycling, be it if you're a woman of colour,

:12:38.:12:44.

if you're a woman of a certain age as well, it feels

:12:45.:12:48.

like there shouldn't be any barriers to it, so having events

:12:49.:12:51.

like this going on, like, across a whole weekend,

:12:52.:12:53.

is amazing, to encourage about a family tradition

:12:54.:12:55.

lost in the post - the birthday card sent between

:12:56.:13:06.

father and daughter for over A former army officer from Sussex

:13:07.:13:09.

has been shot dead in Kenya. Tristan Voorspuy was

:13:10.:13:20.

the founder of the luxury He was killed by rural herdsmen

:13:21.:13:22.

while inspecting one of The Foreign Office says

:13:23.:13:26.

it is supporting his family. Southern Health is to face

:13:27.:13:32.

prosecution over alleged failings The Care Quality Commission said it

:13:33.:13:35.

follows an incident at Melbury Lodge at the Royal Hampshire

:13:36.:13:40.

County Hospital in Winchester. In December 2015, a patient

:13:41.:13:43.

suffered serious injuries The CQC said the alleged offence

:13:44.:13:46.

by the trust was failing to provide A week after its principal resigned,

:13:47.:13:52.

dozens of jobs are likely to go Bosses at the Isle of Portland

:13:53.:14:00.

Aldridge Community Academy say they need to axe a minimum of

:14:01.:14:06.

45 jobs to balance the books. It's currently facing

:14:07.:14:11.

a deficit of ?2.6 million. In January the academy was rated

:14:12.:14:15.

"inadequate" by Ofsted, with governors,

:14:16.:14:19.

senior leaders and teachers The BBC's North America Editor

:14:20.:14:21.

is giving a lecture at his former Jon Sopel, who started his career

:14:22.:14:27.

at BBC Radio Solent was appointed Pro Chancellor

:14:28.:14:31.

of Southampton University last year He covered the US presidential

:14:32.:14:35.

elections for the BBC and tonight's talk focuses

:14:36.:14:40.

on Donald Trump's election Donald Trump as a nominee, at the

:14:41.:14:57.

candidate, as President, has defied every rule, has defied political

:14:58.:15:02.

gravity, and you keep thinking, you can't say that, you can't do this,

:15:03.:15:07.

he does, he has got a very strong support base, a lot of American

:15:08.:15:11.

people love him. I'm sure a lot of people in Europe think he is not

:15:12.:15:14.

going to last very long. I think you cannot say that at all.

:15:15.:15:18.

What a time to be the BBC's North American correspondent!

:15:19.:15:28.

On to sport, Tony is here. Feisty adult Trafford and we're talking

:15:29.:15:32.

referees again? A week ago it was about the offside

:15:33.:15:36.

law and we are talking about things officials did not actually see on

:15:37.:15:39.

Saturday but of course, television cameras did and there could be a

:15:40.:15:41.

price to pay for Bournemouth. Both Tyrone Mings and Zlatan

:15:42.:15:42.

Ibrahimovic have been charged with violent conduct by the FA

:15:43.:15:45.

and Mings is facing a lengthy ban after the pair clashed in Saturday's

:15:46.:15:48.

1-1 draw at Old Trafford. An action-packed game was already

:15:49.:15:51.

level at 1-1 after Marcus Rojo had put United in front,

:15:52.:15:55.

only for the Cherries to equalise But just before half-time,

:15:56.:15:58.

Mings appeared to stamp Moments later, the Swedish

:15:59.:16:03.

striker threw an elbow Neither player was sanctioned at

:16:04.:16:08.

the time, but in the ensuing fuss, Andrew Surman did see red

:16:09.:16:14.

for his complaints. Ibrahimovic stayed on the pitch

:16:15.:16:17.

but saw a second-half penalty saved, a big point for Bournemouth,

:16:18.:16:19.

but at a cost. It was a good battle. You know what

:16:20.:16:33.

you're going to get and it was a good battle all afternoon. On the TV

:16:34.:16:38.

you can see the images. In my situation, I jumped up, I jump high,

:16:39.:16:43.

I protect myself and I am unlucky, he jumps into me and he jumps into

:16:44.:16:49.

my elbow. On many times this occasion happens, and I hope he did

:16:50.:16:57.

not get injured. Quote of the weekend, he jumped into

:16:58.:16:58.

my elbow! Southampton are up to tenth

:16:59.:17:00.

in the Premier League after a 4-3 win at Watford

:17:01.:17:02.

on Saturday. They fell behind early on

:17:03.:17:04.

to Troy Deeney's well-taken goal, Dusan Tadic fired them level

:17:05.:17:06.

from just inside the box. Then Nathan Redmond gave

:17:07.:17:09.

them a half-time lead Southampton didn't capitalise

:17:10.:17:11.

and Watford pulled the game level at 2-2, but new striker

:17:12.:17:15.

Manolo Gabbiadini continued his terrific start as a Saint

:17:16.:17:19.

when he followed up Redmond produced a classy finish

:17:20.:17:21.

to make it four and although Watford pulled a goal back in the final

:17:22.:17:27.

seconds, Claude Puel's side clinched From the Premier League

:17:28.:17:37.

An above average 18,500 was at Reading's Madesjski Stadium -

:17:38.:17:43.

they will hope for another bumper crowd tomorrow night

:17:44.:17:45.

This wasn't a classic, but Yann Kermorgant put them

:17:46.:17:49.

in front just after half-time with that deflected

:17:50.:17:52.

It was a lead that would not last long.

:17:53.:17:56.

Ben Marshall with the leveller for the visitors, and suddenly

:17:57.:17:59.

But it was a set piece which provided the winner.

:18:00.:18:04.

Jaap Stam still believes the play-offs are a long way off,

:18:05.:18:07.

but Reading are fifth after Paul McShane's goal.

:18:08.:18:10.

Brighton have had a bad week, beaten by Newcastle.

:18:11.:18:13.

They slumped at the City Ground against Nottingham Forest.

:18:14.:18:16.

This is a disputed goal, Zach Clough claiming it,

:18:17.:18:19.

David Stockdale presented Forest with a second -

:18:20.:18:24.

in the 89th minute, it was really game up after this moment.

:18:25.:18:28.

Chris Hughton admitted the goals conceded were poor,

:18:29.:18:30.

the third actually a spot kick, and today the news that Shane Duffy

:18:31.:18:33.

is out injured for the next six weeks with a foot injury.

:18:34.:18:37.

Tomorrow, they go to rock bottom Rotherham, defeat there unthinkable.

:18:38.:18:42.

In League 2, what do you make of Portsmouth?

:18:43.:18:44.

A big win at Carlisle last week, then a point from two home games

:18:45.:18:47.

The winner there coming 13 minutes from time.

:18:48.:18:54.

Elsewhere this weekend, Basingstoke Bison are just

:18:55.:18:56.

a point off third in ice hockey's Premier League.

:18:57.:19:03.

In the National League, struggling Worthing Thunder had

:19:04.:19:09.

Lyonell Gaines scored 24 points as the Thunder won 67-60.

:19:10.:19:15.

Reading Rockets are second after a 17th consecutive win.

:19:16.:19:18.

And in rugby, a chance to bring you some London Irish pictures.

:19:19.:19:22.

Irish, still based at Reading's Madejski Stadium,

:19:23.:19:23.

made it 16 wins from 16 in the Championship when they won

:19:24.:19:26.

20-14 at Yorkshire, including this try from Ben Franks,

:19:27.:19:29.

keeping them on course for an immediate return

:19:30.:19:31.

When the Americans entered the First World War in 1917,

:19:32.:19:35.

they had a tiny, unsophisticated air force.

:19:36.:19:38.

But they established five airbases in West Sussex, including one

:19:39.:19:41.

It was a pivotal moment in the establishment

:19:42.:19:45.

of what is widely known as the "special relationship"

:19:46.:19:47.

But little is known about life on the bases, until now,

:19:48.:19:51.

The outbreak of the First World War in 1914 sparked off rapid

:19:52.:19:58.

improvements in aircraft design across Europe.

:19:59.:20:03.

Basic observation planes were soon being replaced with faster,

:20:04.:20:05.

it seems almost unbelievable, but when the United States into the

:20:06.:20:19.

First World War, they were miles behind the British, Germans and

:20:20.:20:23.

French in terms of aviation technology. They ended up having to

:20:24.:20:29.

buy European planes, like this one. The Wright Brothers Wine in 1904 and

:20:30.:20:34.

by 1914 you have advanced military aircraft. United States is way

:20:35.:20:37.

behind the curve and it is only with the advent of the First World War

:20:38.:20:40.

they begin to develop this area of technology. To try to catch up, the

:20:41.:20:46.

Americans set up five airfields in West Sussex, including one here at

:20:47.:20:50.

Tangmere, where pilots and ground crew could be trained.

:20:51.:20:53.

In a century, life has turned full circle at Tangmere.

:20:54.:20:55.

It was a farm, became an airbase in two world wars,

:20:56.:20:58.

A great deal is known about Tangmere's role

:20:59.:21:01.

in the Second World War, but details of what the Americans

:21:02.:21:03.

did here in World War I are very sketchy, which is why the research

:21:04.:21:07.

What we're hoping to do is track down the biographies of Americans

:21:08.:21:19.

who served in the area, to find out their reactions, their responses to

:21:20.:21:23.

something arising in Sussex in that time.

:21:24.:21:25.

Tangmere's role was to train American crews to fly the big

:21:26.:21:27.

Handley Page bombers that were coming into service.

:21:28.:21:29.

Britain had helped the Americans by giving them the designs,

:21:30.:21:32.

the first of many defence collaborations.

:21:33.:21:40.

It sets the agenda for the special relationship, which is then going to

:21:41.:21:46.

characterise the rest of the 20th century. So Tangmere is a place

:21:47.:21:50.

where we see the special relationship begin to bloom.

:21:51.:21:51.

So far, no-one has even been able to find photographs

:21:52.:21:54.

of the Americans at Tangmere, but it is hoped the research project

:21:55.:21:56.

will uncover a treasure trove of archive material.

:21:57.:22:03.

I have no doubt that somewhere in a loft or in a drawer, people perhaps

:22:04.:22:11.

have had it handed down to them and never bother to look, I'm sure there

:22:12.:22:17.

are lots and lots of stuff and it is our history, and it would be

:22:18.:22:19.

wonderful if anyone did have something like that that we could

:22:20.:22:23.

get our hands on. The big idea is to hold an exhibition in September, so

:22:24.:22:27.

the researchers can share what they have discovered. Steve Humphrey, BBC

:22:28.:22:29.

South Today, Tangmere. On to the weather, Alexis is here.

:22:30.:22:38.

We will look ahead to the whole week. A bit of a mixed picture but

:22:39.:22:43.

turning milder from 30 onwards. -- Thursday.

:22:44.:22:44.

Christopher David took this great shot of Horton Tower in Dorset.

:22:45.:22:47.

Heather Brooks photographed a robin at Hunston near Chichester.

:22:48.:22:49.

And Colin Lee captured a carpet of crocuses in Lyndhurst.

:22:50.:22:54.

Some decent amount of sunshine today, but that ten hazy and will

:22:55.:23:01.

see similar conditions tomorrow. A bright start but clouding over

:23:02.:23:05.

through the course of the day. This week there will be sunny spells at

:23:06.:23:08.

times but a fair amount of rain, not too heavy, but turning milder

:23:09.:23:13.

particularly from Thursday on words. South-westerly wind started to

:23:14.:23:17.

develop. Tonight with light wind and clear skies, there may be some

:23:18.:23:21.

showers initially, but things will dry out and temperatures will fall

:23:22.:23:26.

away to around one or two Celsius in the countryside. There may be some

:23:27.:23:29.

frost first thing tomorrow, blue skies overhead first thing that that

:23:30.:23:33.

will not stay that way, we expect increasing cloud from the West,

:23:34.:23:37.

turning sunshine hazy. During daylight hours, it should be mainly

:23:38.:23:41.

dry. You can see a weather front waiting, that will move towards us

:23:42.:23:44.

tomorrow evening. Temperatures tomorrow to around eight or nine

:23:45.:23:49.

sources. Tomorrow night, the breeze will increase and the cloud will

:23:50.:23:53.

thicken and the rain will move in. Could be heavy at times during

:23:54.:23:57.

Wednesday one. A fair amount of cloud tomorrow night with lows of

:23:58.:24:03.

six to eight Celsius. A damp start on Wednesday, but we'll see

:24:04.:24:06.

outbreaks of rain during the course of the day, particularly in the

:24:07.:24:10.

morning. Drying out during the afternoon. The breeze and starting

:24:11.:24:14.

to develop from the South West, drawing in milder air, allowing

:24:15.:24:17.

temperatures to be up to around 12 or 13. A dry end to Wednesday but

:24:18.:24:23.

further showers are possible on Thursday, spells of rain at times.

:24:24.:24:27.

This one front will introduce the milder air through the course of

:24:28.:24:31.

Thursday into Friday. Temperatures on Thursday with the rain and the

:24:32.:24:36.

cloud could still reach highs of 12 to 14. A similar day on Friday, a

:24:37.:24:41.

fair amount of cloud, 12 bright spells, highs of 11 to 12 and

:24:42.:24:45.

outbreaks of rain are possible. The weekend, still a few days away but

:24:46.:24:50.

we expect some brightness, it will be showery at times and the wind

:24:51.:24:51.

will be fairly strong on Saturday. It's a treasured keepsake

:24:52.:24:54.

and a symbol of deep affection Stephen and Claire Fuller have been

:24:55.:24:57.

exchanging the same birthday card, sending it back and forth,

:24:58.:25:02.

for more than three decades, each time putting

:25:03.:25:05.

a fresh message inside. But although Stephen posted the card

:25:06.:25:07.

as normal at the pillar box near his home in Thame last month,

:25:08.:25:09.

it failed to arrive It is so lovely when it arrives in

:25:10.:25:26.

the post, I look forward to it. And look forward to trying to find out

:25:27.:25:27.

where he has written his message. These photos - taken the last time

:25:28.:25:29.

Claire received the card - show just how many times birthday

:25:30.:25:32.

greetings have been scribbled - every year, once to her from

:25:33.:25:34.

her dad, then from her But after 33 years,

:25:35.:25:37.

this year, it didn't turn up. It's been a month and is now

:25:38.:25:41.

presumed lost forever. It is sad, I mean, I don't hold out

:25:42.:25:56.

a huge amount of hope, because there was no return address on it, but

:25:57.:26:00.

hopefully somebody who might receive it by accident opens it and realises

:26:01.:26:05.

that this is a special thing and hangs on to it rather than throws it

:26:06.:26:06.

away. Claire's an author,

:26:07.:26:07.

and shared her sadness about Her message has been

:26:08.:26:09.

shared thousands of times, with many saying they now intend

:26:10.:26:12.

to copy the idea of re-sending Forgive me for saying, but it is a

:26:13.:26:28.

bit cheap! Recycling the same card for more than 30 years. What was the

:26:29.:26:32.

thinking behind it? Because of the money we save!

:26:33.:26:34.

Royal Mail have acknowledged the loss and advise that anyone

:26:35.:26:37.

sending something of value through the post should use

:26:38.:26:39.

a special delivery service, so they can track its journey.

:26:40.:26:41.

That said, they also accept the sentimental value of this

:26:42.:26:44.

particular birthday card, and are are doing what they can

:26:45.:26:46.

There's still hope that Claire will get her belated

:26:47.:26:49.

and a treasured family tradition can go on.

:26:50.:26:53.

Allen Sinclair, BBC South Today, Winchester.

:26:54.:26:57.

Such a pity! Lets hope it turns up. It goes without saying, if you have

:26:58.:27:03.

knowledge of this or maybe you just want to share the story with

:27:04.:27:07.

somebody, and certainly share the photo of the card, just go to our

:27:08.:27:12.

Facebook page and you will find all the information there. That's all

:27:13.:27:15.

from us this evening, more at eight o'clock and then at 10:30 and were

:27:16.:27:20.

back tomorrow at 6:30. Join us if you can good night.

:27:21.:27:25.

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