23/02/2017 Spotlight


23/02/2017

The latest news, sport, weather and features from the South West of England.


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Welcome to Spotlight. Tonight, the threat from cybercrime, a warning

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that the south-west is too complacent. The region needs to do

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more to protect itself. If criminals are targeting your .co .uk e-mail

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address, they're not know that you're in Devon or Cornwall, they

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know you're in the UK and that is probably all they know. It's no

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respect of Geo graffiti unfortunately. Also tonight, Beijing

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for children in a sink, one mother reveals problems of the new heating

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system in town. Plans for a major overhaul of funding to boost the

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economy. And famous for Spotlight and the Antiques road show, Q School

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in's own collection is up for auction.

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The South West is complacent when it comes to the threat

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That's the warning from the Head of the UK's Cyber Crime Unit.

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Mike Hulett was speaking at a major conference in Plymouth where local

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businesses were told the dangers need to be taken more seriously.

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More than ?3 million was lost to internet fraud in just

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six months last year, with more than 1,700

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People's ordinary bank accounts are also being targeted.

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In a moment, we'll hear from the man leading the fight against online

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crime, but first this report from Scott Bingham.

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From breaking into your car to breaking into your computer.

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Crime is changing, with ever more cyber

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If businesses are hacked, they can lose

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all their information, with demands for ransoms to get

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the data back running into thousands of pounds.

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And the south-west is said to be leaving itself vulnerable, as a

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digital world brings attackers with big-city expertise.

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Bank and credit card fraud means no one is immune.

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Here at the cybercrime conference, they are trying to give businesses

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and the public sector the skills they need

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to defend themselves from cyber attacks.

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It's very much like health and safety, you get the wrong advice,

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you can put your organisation in a really bad place.

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Just like any other industry, you get the outcomes where you say

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you will get advisers that won't tell you the right thing

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That's one of the key thing, to understand that advice is advice.

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This is the Hack Shack, where all day a series of workshops

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have been taking place to demonstrate just

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the kind of cyber attacks we might fall prey to.

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Behind me, a live, real-time map, showing cyber threats

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You can see the United States, China, countries all

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Some of the things they can do here, they're demonstrating how easy

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it is to crack a password on your wireless routers

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it is to crack a password on your wireless router

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and they are also sending out test phisihing e-mails to see how many

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Whilst the focus is frequently on technology, many experts say

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we humans are often the weakness in the defences.

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Attackers can take advantage of human behaviour so much easier

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than they can maybe carry out an attack via technology.

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So a lot of this is about understanding the threat and it's

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And none of us is immune to the threat.

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One speaker today said, "Even if you live in a quiet

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countryside village, once you go online, you're never far

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Scott Bingham, BBC Spotlight, Plymouth.

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Well, as I mentioned, Mike Hulett is the head of operations

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I met him during today's conference in Plymouth and asked him

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what proportion of crime is now online.

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Almost half of all recorded crime now is related

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Whether that is by a cyber offence or by some kind

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of cyber enabled fraud, almost half of all reported crime

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now is involving cyber in the Internet in some way.

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Is there a danger, do you think, are you witnessing the fact that

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because people think, well, I'm in the south-west or I'm

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in the north-east or somewhere remote and rural,

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away from a big metropolitan area, that I am less vulnerable to this?

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Is there that sort of, almost complacency

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towards it in some places like the south-west?

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Complacency is exactly the word I was going to use.

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I don't mean to sound harsh to people that may be victims

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of cybercrime but it can feel that if you live in a nice area

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of the country such as this, where statistically you probably

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are less likely to be a victim of certain types of crime,

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if you're connected to the Internet then you are connected

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to the rest of the world and that is a fact, unfortunately.

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So if criminals are targeting your .co.uk e-mail address for example,

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they're not to know that you are in Devon or Cornwall,

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They know you're in the UK but that's probably all they know.

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It's no respect of your coffee, unfortunately.

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It seems very easy to become a victim of cybercrime,

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one click on an inappropriate e-mail and you could be a victim.

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What are the things, the key things that people need

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to do to protect themselves, to be aware of, so that

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OK, there's a number of things that people can do.

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Unfortunately, the fraudsters and the cybercriminals are very smart.

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We've seen them evolve over the last few years,

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so some of their campaigns are much more targeted.

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It's not necessarily the shotgun approach that has

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But there are things that individuals do to help themselves.

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The first thing I would say is, make sure that you use some

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There's lots of companies out there, who, for a relatively

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small amount of money, will provide an antivirus product.

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Every time you get an e-mail through from your computer company

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saying please update, there's a reason for that,

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it's probably because there's been a security flaw identified somewhere

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in the system that the company has patched for you.

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If you don't download that update, then you are potentially

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If we are the victim of a burglary or a physical assault,

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Who do we turn to if we are the victim of cybercrime?

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OK, the essential reporting point for all cybercrime is Action Fraud.

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The website for that is www.actionfraud.police.uk.

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Having that central point as well can help to spot

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So if you've received an e-mail and you've been the victim of crime

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locally here in the south-west, the strong chance is that that same

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thing has happened to someone else around the country.

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By having that the central point where people report into,

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it helps us spot trends and maybe deal with the bigger organised crime

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gangs that are behind some of these scams.

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Mike Hulett, thank you very much indeed.

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One of Britain's most ambitious "district heating schemes"

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has hit problems in the new Devon town of Cranbrook.

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The unique scheme works by heating hundreds of homes from a central

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power station that sends hot water to everyone.

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But a number of people living there say they can't always run

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One mother says she's been forced to bathe her four

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More from our correspondent Neil Gallacher.

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Any of us with four children under four might expect

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If three of them were triplets, it would be unavoidable.

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But Emma Rosey has been more than normally stressed

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because of Cranbrook's unique district heating system.

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She's one of a number of locals saying it doesn't

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It can be fine for a while, you think everything is good,

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and then all of a sudden we've got no heating.

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Or we try to bathe the children and we've got no hot water.

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I've been spending about three weeks now consistently trying to bathe

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District heating means Emma's house and all the others have their hot

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water and their central heating provided through a giant network

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of pipes fed from a single source on the edge of the new town.

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We work very hard to make sure that all of the residents on Cranbrook,

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schools and community buildings that are connected,

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are listened to and engaged with, with their problems.

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We sit down with regular customer sessions to listen to their concerns

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But are you able to assure people that there aren't

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going to be years of these problems, going forward?

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Of course things will always take time to bed down and this

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We take it very seriously and we will work as hard as we can

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to sort any problems out that come up.

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What they've built here is unique in Britain.

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Much of its energy comes from renewable energy sources

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It also means that e-on have a monopoly -

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Emma's brother lives at the other end of Cranbrook

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I mean, we do get quite a lot of time where we have to run our shower

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or our taps for at least ten minutes to get hot water through,

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I think it's pretty rubbish that we're left with no option

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option but to use e-on, and so do quite a few other

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It's obviously too large a scale for e-on to deal

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E-on told us Emma's issue may lie her house's internal

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plumbing system rather than their heating network.

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Even so, they've called a public meeting to discuss

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The town itself is growing fast, with 1500 homes already.

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Its development has been praised as innovative but it is certainly

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Neil Gallacher, BBC Spotlight, Cranbrook.

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Its been revealed today how much Government money's coming

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to the south west for projects to boost the economy

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There was delight in Devon and I Somerset, which received nearly

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twice as much as expected, but his appointment in Cornwall.

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When you arrive, that's my biggest beef, it's tired, its dilapidated.

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If it's true that first impressions count, today Plymouth had reason to

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celebrate. Sprucing up the area outside the station is on the list

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of ten projects across Devon and Somerset in line for some government

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cash. This is an ideal way in which to spend government money because it

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will leave in huge amounts of private sector investment.

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University are keen to get involved in the project, they want to site a

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new faculty here. We're talking about the freeing around ?50 million

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of private sector investment and it will transform the entire site. The

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money coming down the tracks do here is bid for by business leaders and

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it is for projects to boost the economy and create jobs. Six local

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enterprise partnership areas across the wider south-west are airing ?191

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million. In our area, this is how it breaks down. Dorset is in line for

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19.5 million. Devon and Somerset will pocket 43.5 million, and

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Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly are getting eight been -- 18.03 million.

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Cornwall actually bid for ?127 million, so there are some tough

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decisions on what projects will get the cash. We are clearly

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disappointed it's not more. We absolutely need further investment,

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whether that be in infrastructure, directing business, skills. We still

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need that investment. One thing I would say is that on a per capita

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basis, we are about on a par with many other areas. In Devon and

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Somerset, funds for ten projects instead of the hoped-for 27, but

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some are happy it's more than expected. Some disappointment for

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Cornwall. I think it's very important to look again at the

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quality of bits, the more tangible the better, and in elation to some

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of the bits in Devon and Somerset, lots of joint ventures, people

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working together, and government likes to see that. I think that's

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perhaps a lesson that could be learnt elsewhere. Work continuing of

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these improvements near Saltash. Cornwall Council today branded

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today's settlement shockingly small and disappointing.

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Now a brief round-up of other news tonight.

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A woman's died following a fire at a bungalow in Wadebridge.

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Firefighters managed to get her out of the building and she was taken

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to the Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro.

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Officers have praised the "brave attempts" made

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to make way for a ?75 million redevelopment -

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The city council says it needs more time to finish its bid.

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Construction on the new leisure complex and a new bus station had

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been due to start at the end of next month.

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The Maritime and Coastguard Agency says people calling 999

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in South Devon will still get help, despite a dispute with

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members of the Dartmouth Coastguard Rescue Team.

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It's understood two senior members have quit

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The team is responsible for cliff rescues.

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It's thought the dispute centres around changes to their procedures.

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Justin? Volunteering for the BBC. And I'm still volunteering in a way!

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I used to back-up horse manure and sell it by the side of the road. Did

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you! Very useful. Well, matching up those looking

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for the first rung on the employment ladder with the jobs available

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hasn't proved easy in But that's all changing,

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thanks to a group of teenagers at Treviglas Community College in

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Newquay. Christine Butler has been catching

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up with the schoolgirls turned The teenagers that could help out

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coastal resorts in peak season. Paige cleans surfboards

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and was lucky enough to be I help wax them and I helped just

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sorting out the wetsuits, helping people get

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the wetsuits, the rash vests. And then on the last surf

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of the day, I go out with the group and I kind of help them there,

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like push them onto the waves and help them stand up and just help

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them feel confident in the water. Abigail mucks out all the time

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at home but is now feeling she wants Well, I have horses at home

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so I have a lot of experience with them and I don't

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mind hard work. And although I don't have goats,

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I think I could get used to them. I've advertised before and you only

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get one or two people reply and you end up choosing somebody

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that may not be wholly suitable for the job,

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but you're restricted on choice. Back in the classroom,

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the schoolgirls learnt to set Soon to be launched online,

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linking employers with teenagers. Teenwork Cornwall is basically

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a meeting place for employers and employees to connect

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and find jobs. And it's all done over social media

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and a website which will be With this system, the employer

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advertises vacancies on the website. The student picks a job

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and gives them a call. Teenwork is even improving

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the prospects for those Because we are only Year 10,

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it's kind of hard because we don't really have much experience,

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but we are having lots of meetings with different employers and getting

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lots of different opinions. And so we, it's definitely

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an experience, and we are learning Farmer Rob has already

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subscribed to the scheme. This Teenwork thing,

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they are almost coming to you. They are looking for work,

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so you've got a guarantee that out of the pool of people you're

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going to get someone that you want, or someone that is actually

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interested in what your advertising. If it's the employment market

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Abigail wants to attract, she's already getting a bit

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of a nipple! Christine Butler, BBC

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Spotlight, Newquay. Still to come in

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tonight's programme... an international photojournalist

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reveals his images at And join me later when I'll be here,

:16:31.:16:44.

learning a feud dance steps from the guys at Lord of the Dance.

:16:45.:16:51.

The late Hugh Scully is fondly remembered as a presenter of this

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programme, as well as Nationwide and of course Antiques Roadshow.

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But away from the screen, he was something of a collector

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himself and this weekend his collection of antique framed

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Graham Bazeley, who was a friend of Hugh's, is the auctioneer

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and he gave us a preview of what will be going

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Well, Hugh Scully was an avid collector, as you can see here,

:17:15.:17:19.

of political cartoons from a particular period.

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They were 18th-century, early 19th century,

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the reigns of George II, George I, George II,

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George III, up until the reign of Queen Victoria.

:17:34.:17:35.

The cartoons were a way of criticising the court

:17:36.:17:39.

and the ongoings of the government at the time, and therefore some

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of them are quite, well, shall we say, bawdy,

:17:43.:17:44.

and some of them are quite rude, in the nicest possible way!

:17:45.:17:51.

ARCHIVE: Napoleon Bonaparte described us

:17:52.:17:52.

We've also been called a nation of goalkeepers.

:17:53.:17:56.

But are we, I wonder, on the point of becoming

:17:57.:18:00.

I remember Hugh from the beginning, Nationwide and Spotlight

:18:01.:18:08.

And then eventually, of course, hosting the Antiques Roadshow.

:18:09.:18:14.

The one subject we've not really done so far

:18:15.:18:16.

So I'm using this opportunity to speak to John about that.

:18:17.:18:21.

And John, you know all the old wives' tales

:18:22.:18:25.

about soaking your rings in gin and scrubbing...

:18:26.:18:28.

This particular one is very interesting.

:18:29.:18:32.

They obviously knew that he collected 18th-century cartoons.

:18:33.:18:38.

We've been on the air for so many years now that we are beginning

:18:39.:18:41.

Hugh Scully also made quite an extensive collection of maps.

:18:42.:18:46.

I would call them the 17th century version of a satellite

:18:47.:18:49.

They are for coaching maps and they are in strict form and it

:18:50.:18:58.

This one is particularly old, dating from around 1640.

:18:59.:19:09.

Illustrated here with this castle, in a little vignette there.

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We're really lucky to have this collection and it will come under

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the hammer on Saturday morning in Penzance.

:19:15.:19:19.

Looks like a massive collection. Very extensive, wasn't it?

:19:20.:19:25.

He's had a ringside seat during some of the biggest moments

:19:26.:19:28.

As a photojournalist, Tor Eigeland has captured

:19:29.:19:31.

images of news events from around the globe.

:19:32.:19:33.

But he's now settled in Dorset and is showing his work

:19:34.:19:35.

at Duke's Auctioneers in his new home town of Dorchester.

:19:36.:19:38.

Our reporter Claire Vera has been to see some of the moments

:19:39.:19:41.

You try to transmit feelings, events.

:19:42.:19:47.

You don't fake anything, you do it straight.

:19:48.:19:52.

For more than half a century, Tor Eigeland has been

:19:53.:19:54.

putting a thousand words into a single picture.

:19:55.:20:04.

It was hot and this desperate mother didn't know how

:20:05.:20:06.

ARCHIVE: Joyous followers of Fidel Castro sweep

:20:07.:20:21.

triumphantly through the Cuban capital, hours after...

:20:22.:20:23.

In 1959, Tor witnessed Castro's arrival in Havana,

:20:24.:20:25.

Tor, living closely with his subjects, here

:20:26.:20:33.

is saddened by the loss of some of the worlds he's captured.

:20:34.:20:37.

A lot of the things I've covered definitely do not exist any longer,

:20:38.:20:42.

In a way I wish I hadn't met all those people.

:20:43.:20:49.

As you can see what has happened to Syria, it really,

:20:50.:20:51.

Well, he may have travelled the world, but all roads have

:20:52.:21:01.

eventually led to Dorset, where he is putting on his first

:21:02.:21:03.

exhibition, so local people can see his work.

:21:04.:21:10.

I think it's just amazing for Dorchester to have an exhibition of

:21:11.:21:18.

such global significance. Tor has had an amazing career. I wouldn't be

:21:19.:21:23.

surprised if we really had a wide range of people coming in to see it.

:21:24.:21:30.

His later work features laces more familiar to us, but Tor Eigeland is

:21:31.:21:40.

still learning. I think it is a blessed, calm corner of the world.

:21:41.:21:44.

People here are very lucky to be here, I think.

:21:45.:21:53.

Now, get ready for a spot of Celtic music and fast dancing.

:21:54.:21:56.

Yes, Michael Flatley's Lord of the Dance has

:21:57.:21:58.

It's part of the 20th anniversary UK tour,

:21:59.:22:01.

which is visiting more than 20 venues.

:22:02.:22:04.

So we thought we'd send our one Irish reporter

:22:05.:22:12.

Johnny Rutherford learn a few Irish steps from one

:22:13.:22:14.

Have a look at what I'm wearing. I'm not quite sure why, why am I wearing

:22:15.:22:23.

this? Well, you're Irish, we might need you in the show tonight, you

:22:24.:22:30.

must at dancing! Tonight? For a lesson.

:22:31.:22:37.

CHUCKLES Faster than me! But let's be

:22:38.:22:44.

serious, you're here for four nights, it's the middle of the tour,

:22:45.:22:49.

it's a new style of what has been done for 20 years. What's new? Well,

:22:50.:22:55.

Michael Flatley released the show in 2015. We put new choreography in

:22:56.:22:59.

there, new hand movements, new beats. We've got new costumes, new

:23:00.:23:04.

set, lighting, sounds of these great graphics as you can see behind us.

:23:05.:23:08.

We're really excited just to take you around the world again. That

:23:09.:23:14.

does sound very exciting. And out here, Plymouth pavilions will be

:23:15.:23:16.

absolutely packed to be able to watch a show as good as this.

:23:17.:23:24.

It is very impressive, isn't it? I thought Johnny did a good job. Going

:23:25.:23:59.

back to his Irish roots! Now, performing Lord of the dance and

:24:00.:24:02.

bringing us the weather at the same time, David, over to you! You need

:24:03.:24:04.

to get those legs up a bit more! Hello, good evening. It's been a

:24:05.:24:12.

pretty wild day. Perhaps not too bad for us, a normal blustery day

:24:13.:24:16.

really, although the gusts of wind have been pretty lively, but other

:24:17.:24:21.

parts of the country have been battered by Storm Doris, which has

:24:22.:24:25.

now left us and moved away to Scandinavia. You've been out taking

:24:26.:24:30.

pictures of rough conditions, this picture sent in by Keith of Paul

:24:31.:24:34.

Townend beat channel so long in Somerset and Devon we have had

:24:35.:24:44.

pretty lively conditions. -- this picture of Porthtowan Beach. Peak

:24:45.:24:51.

gusts up at just shy of 70 mph. Not unusual to see those gusts of wind

:24:52.:25:00.

but a much quieter day to look forward to tomorrow, just that

:25:01.:25:04.

cooler, slightly fresher air has arrived after the low pressure has

:25:05.:25:08.

moved out of the way. The main setup for the next 24 hours is for a ridge

:25:09.:25:13.

of high pressure coming over us. Compared to the conditions we've

:25:14.:25:16.

seen today, it is quite a bit for tomorrow. This was along the north

:25:17.:25:22.

coast today, where our cameraman went to Jabbar with

:25:23.:25:30.

-- Trebarwith Strand. The waves dangerous along the coastline but

:25:31.:25:37.

very quickly I think these scenes will calm down in the second half of

:25:38.:25:41.

the night and tomorrow we will lose the strength of the wind. It is that

:25:42.:25:45.

clear sky that will allow temperatures to fall away, that is

:25:46.:25:48.

already happening this evening. The ridge of high pressure with us for

:25:49.:25:52.

perhaps just one day because the weekend forecast is pretty

:25:53.:25:55.

unsettled, one weather front coming in from the West on Saturday

:25:56.:25:58.

bringing some outbreaks of rain and another will follow as we move

:25:59.:26:02.

through Sunday. Behind that, to the north of this cold front, it's white

:26:03.:26:06.

on here suggesting that some of the showers in Monday and Tuesday's

:26:07.:26:10.

forecast could turn wintry and perhaps a return to some overnight

:26:11.:26:14.

frost. Frost is possible to night with a good deal of clear sky but I

:26:15.:26:17.

think temperatures will not get much lower than around two or three

:26:18.:26:22.

degrees. The further west, the higher the temperatures, so parts of

:26:23.:26:25.

Dorset and Somerset may see a brief frost first thing tomorrow morning.

:26:26.:26:29.

For all of us to marry a pretty good day, there might be few showers

:26:30.:26:32.

around but I think the wind is much lighter than they have been, nothing

:26:33.:26:36.

to worry us too. Perhaps more cloud around later in the day but we

:26:37.:26:40.

should see temperatures back up to nine or 10 degrees. The forecast for

:26:41.:26:45.

the Isles of Scilly, a bright start but turning cloudy with the risk of

:26:46.:26:49.

a few showers later in the day. The times of the high water, Penzance...

:26:50.:26:58.

And for most of our beaches, the waves are still quite big and still

:26:59.:27:02.

a bit choppy with those north-west conditions along the coast between

:27:03.:27:06.

four and six feet but nothing compared to what we've seen today.

:27:07.:27:09.

There is our coastal waters forecast. As we head into the

:27:10.:27:18.

weekend, there is a lot of cloud, relatively mild and breezy with the

:27:19.:27:22.

winter and the south-west and now turning colder on Sunday night and

:27:23.:27:26.

into Monday. Have a good evening, back to you.

:27:27.:27:29.

Thank you, Lord David! Back with the late news at half past ten. Hope you

:27:30.:27:41.

can join us then. From all of us on Spotlight, goodbye.

:27:42.:27:42.

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