15/07/2011 World News Today


15/07/2011

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This is a BBC News. The headlines. Rebekah Brooks resigns as chief

:00:14.:00:17.

executive of News International. She says she wants to concentrate

:00:17.:00:22.

on clearing her name. As I said when I called her resignation 10

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days ago, this isn't about one individual but the culture of

:00:26.:00:30.

organisation. Rupert Murdoch meet the family of

:00:30.:00:34.

murdered teenager Milly Dowler. He gives what is described as a humble

:00:34.:00:38.

apology. We will have the latest

:00:38.:00:43.

developments in another dramatic day in the scandal. Also coming up:

:00:44.:00:46.

an investigation into three suspicious deaths at Stockport

:00:46.:00:49.

hospital. Police say solution was

:00:49.:00:54.

deliberately tampered with. A strike at the BBC. News services

:00:54.:00:58.

are disrupted as journalists take industrial action over compulsory

:00:58.:01:04.

redundancies. Europe's biggest ever lottery winners celebrate landing

:01:04.:01:12.

�161 million. We were tickled pink! The whole notion of winning so much

:01:12.:01:22.
:01:22.:01:33.

Rebekah Brooks has resigned as chief executive of News

:01:34.:01:37.

International. She faces allegation over her role in the phone hacking

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scandal. And illegal payments to police officers. In a statement she

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said Geller deep responsibility for the people who had been hurt. She

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wanted to concentrate on defending a record. This afternoon, Rupert

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Murdoch apologised to the family of Milly Dowler. The revelations about

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a can of her phone sparked the crisis. This report contains flash

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photography. She is the most high-profile

:02:05.:02:08.

casualties so far in the scandal which has spread to both sides of

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the Atlantic. For the past 10 days, she has been at the heart of the

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storm which has swept Rupert Murdoch media empire and remained

:02:17.:02:21.

by his side. Today she decided to step down. In her statement she

:02:21.:02:31.
:02:31.:02:42.

I am pleased that Rebekah Brooks has finally accepted responsibility

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for what happened on her watch as editor of the News of the World,

:02:47.:02:52.

backing of the phones of Milly Dowler for example. When I called

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for her resignation 10 days ago, this isn't about one individual but

:02:56.:03:00.

the culture of an organisation. man picked up to replace her is

:03:00.:03:06.

already at his desk. He has been brought in from Sky TV in Italy.

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Writing to all at News International staff, James Murdoch

:03:10.:03:20.
:03:20.:03:25.

thanked Rebekah books for 22 years -- Rebekah box. Not a view echoed

:03:25.:03:35.
:03:35.:03:36.

in the House of Lords where she was referred to. She said she likes to

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be on the bridge. I was a seafarer for 10 years. I would like her on

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the bridge if you didn't know what direction she was going in. That is

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why she is gone, thank God. This afternoon, Rupert Murdoch acted to

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underline the apology offered by his former chief executive.

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Travelling across London to meet the family who lost their daughter

:03:56.:04:00.

and who are amongst the alleged targets of his paper's phone

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hacking. The shock expressed by Milly Dowler's family has fuelled a

:04:05.:04:10.

sense of national outrage. Mr Murdoch emerged after one hour to a

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barrage of questions. The lawyer eventually gave details of the

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conversation. He was humbled to give a full and a sincere apology

:04:22.:04:32.
:04:32.:04:33.

to the Dowler family. We told him that his papers should lead the way,

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to set the standard of honesty and decency in the field, and not what

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had gone on before. Tomorrow, Rupert Murdoch the signature will

:04:43.:04:49.

appear on a further apology in every main national newspaper. The

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News of the World was in the business of holding others to

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account, he says. It failed when it came to itself. Rebekah Brooks may

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have left the bridge but her role in this developing story and her

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forthcoming appearance with her former employers at next week's

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select committee will ensure she remains in the headlines.

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Rebekah Brooks had worked for News International for 22 years before

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becoming chief executive. She edited its most popular tabloid

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titles. We look back at her career. Rebekah Brooks was closer to Rupert

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Murdoch and his own daughters, some said. She was close to his son,

:05:26.:05:31.

James, who runs the UK business. Even at Rupert's patronage couldn't

:05:31.:05:37.

save her. She took over the News of the World in 2000. She was

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Britain's youngest national editor at 32. Campaigns like Sarah's law,

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naming and shaming paedophiles, showed she was not afraid of

:05:45.:05:51.

controversy. The papers are on the side of protecting children and not

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the rights of paedophiles, and I strongly believe the public are

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behind us. A former colleague on the news of the World says she is

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tough and talented. She got to the top because she is ambitious. Some

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people might say ruthless. Others would say talented. She was

:06:12.:06:17.

certainly a person that did stand out. Rebekah Brooks is a well-

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connected woman, knowing its celebrities and politicians. Her

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former husband is a Ross Kemp. She was on good terms with more than

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one prime minister. Tony Blair. And the current Prime Minister, David

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Cameron. She would get on with Gordon Brown, Tony Blair, David

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Cameron. They know that she says what she believes. As opposed to

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many people. Her friendships brought to access, influence and

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stories. But she made mistakes balls-up this admission to a

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parliamentary committee was one. have paid the police in the past

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for information. That is against the law. Her successor resigned as

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editor over the phone hacking scandal but Rebekah Brooks was

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promoted to News International's chief executive, denying all

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knowledge of wrong doing. Critics were not impressed. It is

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inexplicable to me that Rupert Murdoch has this strange

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affiliation with her because she wasn't that a brilliant as an

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editor. For example, she turned down a huge leak about the MPs

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expenses on the grounds that there wasn't enough sex in it. Of course,

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the Telegraph got the story. That's not very good. She seemed to think

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every story had to be about sex. No. Now the woman who had become a

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lightning rod for public anger has gone.

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Tom Barton is at Westminster. Earlier, you were at at hotel where

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the meeting between Rupert Murdoch and the Dowler family took place.

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It seems as though, overnight, Rupert Murdoch decided this was the

:08:05.:08:12.

day of apologies. Yes, Chris Comber it is hard to know for sure what

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led to this run of decisions by Rupert Murdoch and News

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International, first the announcement this morning before

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10am that Rebekah Brooks was stepping down as the chief

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executive of News International. At some point this morning, but calls

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also made from News International's lawyers to the lawyer for the

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Dowler family. They said Rupert wants to meet you. That meeting was

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set up for this afternoon. An extraordinary meeting at the end of

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an extraordinary 10 days. A meeting in which Mr Murdoch apologised to

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the Dowler family, he put his head in his hands several times, he

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looked humbled and shaken according to the family lawyer, who was in

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that meeting. That apology, of course, to be repeated tomorrow in

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the national newspapers. Everyone in the country, to print that

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personally signed apology by Rupert Murdoch. It has been an

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extraordinary day. I think one in which the Murdoch family, News Corp,

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News International will all be hoping they can begin finally to

:09:29.:09:36.

draw a line under what has been the most astonishing 10 days about the

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media. May be drawing a line under that but of course the questions

:09:41.:09:45.

will be asked from Tuesday when they come face to face for a

:09:45.:09:50.

grilling. Absolutely it. No matter how hard they tried to draw the

:09:51.:09:55.

line and the story, it seems that it keeps coming back. The sense

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amongst MPs and Peers here in Westminster is that everything the

:10:01.:10:07.

Murdoch family do is too little too late. It almost feels, to many who

:10:07.:10:12.

have been watching the story, who have been campaigning against the

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Murdochs, and against the actions of the News of the World, they're

:10:17.:10:25.

only doing things when it feels like they are forced to. They are

:10:25.:10:28.

hoping this will draw a line under it but no matter how hard they hope,

:10:28.:10:33.

there is no getting away from the fact, Tuesday next week, both James

:10:33.:10:38.

Murdoch and Rupert Murdoch, senior figures in News Corp, will be in

:10:38.:10:42.

front of MPs facing the culture of Media and Sport Committee. There

:10:42.:10:47.

will be Rebekah Brooks, because when she accepted that invitation

:10:47.:10:51.

she was chief executive of News International. She is no longer

:10:51.:10:54.

chief-executive of News International but has indicated she

:10:54.:11:00.

will still appear and it will be fascinating to see if her leaving

:11:00.:11:05.

the company, will in any way influenced what she has to say to

:11:05.:11:10.

that committee. How she response to M Ps, under what will be,

:11:10.:11:17.

inevitably, a very tough grilling. Tom, thank you.

:11:17.:11:21.

Police are investigating the deaths of three patients at Stepping Hill

:11:21.:11:25.

Hospital in Stockport after staff discovered vials of saline had been

:11:25.:11:29.

tampered with. A further 11 patients have been affected but are

:11:29.:11:33.

not seriously harmed. John Williams has the story.

:11:33.:11:38.

Staff at the hospital contacted police on Tuesday after patients on

:11:38.:11:41.

one ward were found to have unexplained low blood sugar levels.

:11:41.:11:45.

Detectives believe they were wrongly given insulin after their

:11:45.:11:48.

medication was tampered with. The police say someone had done so

:11:48.:11:54.

deliberately. Over the past two days, our major incident team,

:11:54.:12:00.

having now identified potentially three suspicious deaths, all

:12:00.:12:04.

involving a 44-year-old woman, and two involving males in the

:12:04.:12:09.

Seventies and Eighties. Detectives believe saline used to treat

:12:09.:12:13.

dehydration, patients are not able to take food and liquid orally, had

:12:13.:12:17.

been contaminated with insulin. Health service managers say the

:12:17.:12:22.

hospital is safe. It was the start who brought this matter to our

:12:22.:12:25.

attention and I have asked them to be extra vigilant to help safeguard

:12:25.:12:29.

patients. We have increased security in terms of access to the

:12:29.:12:34.

hospital and to medicine and replaced all saline drips in the

:12:34.:12:40.

hospital. Patrols at the hospital have been stepped up but at one

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place, people should feel most cared for, police say.

:12:45.:12:50.

A main opposition groups in Libya have been recognised as the

:12:50.:12:53.

country's legitimate government by America and the Alliance of

:12:53.:12:55.

countries seeking the removal of its leader Colonel Gaddafi. The

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announcement came at a special meeting in Istanbul of so-called

:12:59.:13:04.

Contact Group's. Top officials for the US, Britain

:13:04.:13:08.

and 40 countries and organisations meeting in Istanbul have reached a

:13:08.:13:13.

historic decision. To formally recognise the Transitional National

:13:13.:13:19.

Council, as the country's legitimate representatives.

:13:19.:13:23.

assurances they offered today reinforce our confidence that it is

:13:23.:13:27.

the appropriate interlock government for the USA in dealing

:13:27.:13:32.

with Libya's present and future. That is why I announced earlier

:13:32.:13:39.

that, until authority is in place, the USA will recognise the TMC as

:13:39.:13:43.

the legitimate government authority for Libya. We will deal with it on

:13:43.:13:50.

that basis. It came as NATO called for increased efforts to find and

:13:50.:13:54.

destroy Colonel Gaddafi's remaining weaponry. Britain is sending four

:13:54.:13:59.

more tornadoes strike jets equipped with sophisticated sensor pods.

:13:59.:14:02.

These can detect movement and weapons at some distance, allowing

:14:02.:14:07.

them to be targeted. Britain's Defence Secretary denied that

:14:07.:14:12.

NATO's campaign was running out of steam. We have been intensifying

:14:12.:14:15.

our campaign against the Libyan regime. We have been selecting

:14:15.:14:19.

targets to ram home the message that we are very serious, Colonel

:14:19.:14:24.

Gaddafi needs to stop the violence he is inflicting on his own people.

:14:24.:14:28.

The international community has international law and military

:14:28.:14:33.

capabilities but above all else, we have the resolve to see it through.

:14:33.:14:37.

Britain's Ministry of Defence says the additional tornadoes are a

:14:37.:14:41.

temporary deployment lasting just one month. Few are prepared to bet

:14:41.:14:48.

for certain that Colonel Gaddafi regime will be over in 30 days.

:14:48.:14:53.

Let's go to Washington to talk to our Correspondent there. Colonel

:14:53.:14:58.

Gaddafi has already dismissed the recognition, as expected, but how

:14:58.:15:04.

significant is it? Very significant. It is the final step in what has

:15:04.:15:11.

been a very slow evolution in the way the USA has dealt with the

:15:11.:15:14.

Libyan Transitional National Council, the rebel opposition group.

:15:14.:15:19.

It started with Washington a few months ago, acknowledging them as a

:15:19.:15:27.

representative, of the Libyan people. It then moved on at some

:15:27.:15:32.

point last month, to the USA saying they were the sole legitimate

:15:32.:15:37.

representative of the Libyan people. And now we have this final step,

:15:37.:15:43.

which is the USA saying and recognising them as the legitimate

:15:43.:15:47.

governing authority and that is different from saying that they are

:15:47.:15:51.

a legitimate government because the USA doesn't recognise governments

:15:51.:15:56.

but States. It needs to find a way to boost the credibility of the T N

:15:56.:16:01.

S C so it has chosen this wording of governing authority for this

:16:01.:16:05.

interim period until Colonel Gaddafi steps down and is removed

:16:05.:16:15.
:16:15.:16:18.

from power. The Nato-led military Yes, there does not seem to be a

:16:18.:16:22.

military outcome to this in the near future, unless we see some

:16:22.:16:26.

sort of action on the ground in the coming weeks also. It is not clear

:16:27.:16:32.

how this ends. It is probably why Washington has taken this

:16:32.:16:35.

additional step in boosting the opposition in Libya, because this

:16:35.:16:39.

step will allow, not only the United States, but other countries

:16:39.:16:47.

around the world which deal with the TMC, to unlock frozen assets,

:16:47.:16:53.

some $30 billion which were frozen after the war started. The money is

:16:53.:16:59.

badly-needed to help the TMC boost their credibility in areas where

:16:59.:17:02.

they are operating, where they have to provide services to keep people

:17:02.:17:08.

fed and happy and enable them also to fight on the ground. We heard

:17:08.:17:12.

Hillary Clinton speaking from the meeting earlier, we are aware that

:17:12.:17:16.

America slipped back after the initial phase of the military

:17:16.:17:20.

campaign in Libya, just how much notice are the American people

:17:21.:17:25.

giving the campaign in Libya and how involved is the White House?

:17:25.:17:30.

The White House is very involved. United States is a key NATO member,

:17:30.:17:36.

but they have wanted to make sure that their NATO partners take

:17:36.:17:41.

responsibility, take their fair share of the load when it comes to

:17:41.:17:46.

fighting this war in Libya, to protect civilians. There is some

:17:46.:17:50.

dispute about whether it is only about protecting civilians or only

:17:50.:17:56.

about removing Colonel Gaddafi from power. The United States is coming

:17:56.:17:59.

under criticism that it is not going all the way, that it is not

:17:59.:18:05.

doing enough to move there so long. This is a country that is facing

:18:05.:18:10.

increased economic crisis and it simply cannot put itself forward as

:18:10.:18:14.

much as it did before and it wants its European allies to take a fair

:18:15.:18:20.

share of the low does well. That means it is taking much longer that

:18:20.:18:28.

-- than many people had anticipated. Thank you.

:18:28.:18:32.

The News Corporation chief Rupert Murdoch has met the family of the

:18:32.:18:36.

murdered teenager Milly Dowler, to say sorry to them personally about

:18:36.:18:41.

the phone hacking. Tomorrow, a series of News

:18:41.:18:46.

International advertisements will appear in the papers apologising

:18:46.:18:48.

for what the Murdoch's call serious wrong doings that the News of the

:18:48.:18:53.

World. And Rebekah Brooks resigns as chief

:18:53.:18:57.

of News International. She says she feels a deep responsibility for the

:18:57.:19:01.

people hurt in the phone hacking scandal.

:19:02.:19:06.

Journalists at the BBC are taking part in a 24 hour strike in a

:19:06.:19:10.

dispute over compulsory redundancies. The walkout began at

:19:10.:19:15.

midnight and is affecting news services on television, radio and

:19:15.:19:19.

online. The BBC says it is disappointed by the action. What do

:19:19.:19:25.

want? Save our jobs. Pickets were outside the BBC in

:19:25.:19:28.

Cardiff today and at regional centres and local radio stations

:19:28.:19:33.

across Britain. The National Union of journalists described the strike

:19:33.:19:38.

as solid. Nobody wants to go on strike and lose a day's pay but

:19:38.:19:42.

management have left us with no option. At Television Centre in

:19:42.:19:47.

west London, managers and none striking staff worked to put out

:19:47.:19:52.

news programmes but services were affected. Some programme guests

:19:52.:19:57.

refused to cross picket lines. The strikes are over compulsory

:19:57.:20:01.

redundancies at Bush House, the headquarters of the World Service

:20:01.:20:05.

and the BBC Monitoring Centre at Caversham, brought on by government

:20:05.:20:09.

cuts to their grants. The NUJ says no one should be forced to leave if

:20:09.:20:14.

they do not want to. Management says that is not practical. In a

:20:14.:20:19.

statement, the BBC said, we apologise to our audience for any

:20:19.:20:22.

destruction this may cause. Industrial action will not alter

:20:22.:20:27.

the fact that the BBC is faced with a number of potential redundancies.

:20:27.:20:31.

Lucy Adams, the director of business operations said in an

:20:31.:20:37.

email, no business of our size could commit to such a policy. The

:20:37.:20:41.

NUJ has criticised the BBC for refusing to use the conciliation

:20:41.:20:48.

service ACAS, to find a way forward. It calls the BBC stance stubborn.

:20:48.:20:52.

Plans are being drawn up for big cuts across the organisation which

:20:52.:20:59.

will mean more job losses and possibly, more strikes.

:20:59.:21:03.

Eight European banks have failed tests to see how they would cope

:21:03.:21:07.

with any future financial meltdown. 90 banks, including four from the

:21:07.:21:14.

UK, had their finances examined in detail by the European Banking

:21:14.:21:18.

Authority. Five banks from Spain, two from Greece and one from

:21:18.:21:22.

Austria failed the test. All four UK banks were given a clean bill of

:21:22.:21:26.

health. Charlie Gilmour, the adopted son of

:21:26.:21:31.

the print -- Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, has been jailed for

:21:31.:21:36.

violent disorder. He was arrested last year after protests against

:21:36.:21:41.

student tuition fees. �15 million has been raised for

:21:41.:21:46.

victims of the worst drought in East Africa for six decades. The

:21:46.:21:48.

Disasters Emergency Committee so that is not enough to help the

:21:48.:21:53.

estimated 10 million people who are fighting famine and disease. Clive

:21:53.:21:57.

Myrie has been travelling through some of the worst affected areas in

:21:57.:21:59.

northern Kenya from where he sent this report.

:21:59.:22:05.

This is north-eastern Kenya, one of the poorest parts of the country,

:22:05.:22:09.

the landscape parched, the allowance -- lives of the people

:22:09.:22:14.

blighted by drought. In one hospital in the district of

:22:14.:22:23.

Habaswein, we found three-month-old Umi, she weighs less than a bag of

:22:23.:22:29.

sugar, less than half the weight of a healthy newborn child. The weight

:22:29.:22:39.

of her mother meant she was weak at birth. My daughter is a live now

:22:39.:22:44.

but I worry about how we take her home. We have so little. In the bed

:22:44.:22:50.

opposite, another mother consumed by malnutrition. She gave birth

:22:50.:22:54.

just before we arrived at the hospital but she is grieving. Her

:22:54.:23:01.

son was buried an hour ago. Azumi clings to life. She is a source of

:23:01.:23:07.

pride for a father. Later, he took us to a village and explained how

:23:07.:23:12.

the drought had wrecked lives. All our animals are dead, there is no

:23:12.:23:18.

grazing pasture, he said, because there is no rain. We have nothing.

:23:18.:23:23.

A short walk away, rotting animal carcasses bake in the sun.

:23:23.:23:27.

This village is typical of so many communities of this part of rural,

:23:28.:23:32.

north-eastern Kenya, reliant on livestock for everything, for milk

:23:32.:23:37.

and fruit and if the animals are sold for an income. Normally, this

:23:37.:23:40.

area would be teeming with cattle and goats but it is completely

:23:40.:23:45.

empty. Dusty roads around here twist

:23:45.:23:53.

through a land that has not seen rain for close to three years. We

:23:53.:23:59.

found an outreach clinic in a village. This child is hot, tired

:23:59.:24:04.

and underfed. This card says he is severely malnourished? He is

:24:04.:24:09.

severely malnourished, yes. with the right food supplements, he

:24:09.:24:14.

and so many others can survive. Already, the generosity of the

:24:14.:24:18.

British public means we are saving children's lives but we can address

:24:18.:24:24.

the underlying causes. We can help the communities rebuild their lives,

:24:24.:24:31.

harvest and build reservoirs when it finally rains. Help came too

:24:31.:24:36.

late for baby Mohammed, buried at just 20 days old. The sharp twigs

:24:36.:24:42.

around his grave are to stop hyenas digging up his body. But it is not

:24:42.:24:51.

too late to save others, if the world acts now.

:24:51.:24:56.

You are watching BBC News. A couple from Falkirk have emerged as the

:24:56.:25:00.

winners of the record-breaking Euromillions jackpot. Tuesday's

:25:00.:25:08.

prize of more than �161 million was Europe's over -- biggest ever. This

:25:08.:25:15.

report contains flash photography. They say they are just a normal

:25:15.:25:21.

family, not flashy, not celebrities. But Colin and Chris Weir, a retired

:25:21.:25:26.

TV cameraman and a former nurse are now one of Britain's wealthiest

:25:26.:25:31.

couples. It was some hours after Tuesday's draw when Chris realised

:25:31.:25:35.

she had the winning ticket. They were still checking the numbers

:25:35.:25:39.

when the dawn broke. We could see the sun coming up and it was just

:25:39.:25:44.

magical but we could not sleep, we were absolutely full of adrenalin.

:25:44.:25:51.

We even opened a bottle of wine and I do not drink! Here, those you

:25:51.:25:56.

root millions results now! With morning came the confirmation that

:25:56.:26:01.

they had won the jackpot, after weeks of rollover as. The wind

:26:01.:26:07.

catapults the couple to 130th on the Sunday Times Rich List, still

:26:07.:26:11.

some way behind the combined wealth of David and Victoria Beckham. They

:26:11.:26:15.

would have preferred not to go public but did not think they could

:26:15.:26:19.

keep their massive win secret but they want to enjoy it. We are not

:26:19.:26:25.

scared of it. It will be fantastic and so much fun. They are

:26:25.:26:29.

determined to do some good with their windfall. They do not plan to

:26:29.:26:35.

move house but there is talk of foreign travel and maybe a new car.

:26:35.:26:38.

I do not think we will be immediately swapping cars. If you

:26:38.:26:44.

have got a reliable car, what is the point? I will be swapping cars!

:26:44.:26:49.

And one of the first things they intend to buy? Eight ticket for the

:26:49.:26:53.

next draw. And that is a round-up of the day's

:26:53.:26:59.

news here on BBC News. One more story to bring you. The

:26:59.:27:03.

Queen has paid tribute today to the code-breakers who worked at

:27:03.:27:07.

Bletchley Park, the top secret cypher station which broke the

:27:07.:27:11.

German Enigma codes in the Second World War. She unveiled a memorial

:27:11.:27:15.

to the men and women who worked there and made such an important

:27:15.:27:18.

contribution to the victory over Nazi Germany.

:27:18.:27:22.

They were some of the darkest days of the Second World War, when

:27:22.:27:26.

Britain's survival was in the balance. Out in the Atlantic, the

:27:27.:27:30.

shipping convoys bringing essential supplies, the food without which

:27:30.:27:34.

the population would staff, the munitions without which the war

:27:34.:27:38.

effort would collapse, were being sunk by German submarines. The U-

:27:38.:27:44.

boats which had a largely free rein to plunder convoys that will. Adolf

:27:44.:27:48.

Hitler's Nazi Germany was in danger of winning. Britain desperately-

:27:48.:27:53.

needed a breakthrough to survive. It happened here in the secluded

:27:53.:27:57.

countryside 40 miles north of London. This is Bletchley Park,

:27:57.:28:03.

quiet and rather overlooked now. 70 years ago, these prefabricated hut

:28:03.:28:08.

were part of Britain's most vital establishment. It was here people

:28:08.:28:11.

break the codes of the German military. The country's most

:28:11.:28:16.

brilliant mathematicians, crossword experts and linguist were brought

:28:16.:28:21.

together to solve the messages of this, the supposedly impenetrable

:28:21.:28:26.

German cypher machine known as enigma. A British-built this. It

:28:26.:28:31.

was called colossus and it is generally considered to be the

:28:31.:28:36.

world's first computer. With it, codes which had taken the code-

:28:36.:28:40.

breakers six days to crack by hand could now be broken in a matter of

:28:40.:28:50.
:28:50.:28:51.

Hello, if you had the sunshine, make the most of it. There will be

:28:51.:28:56.

spells of rain and showers and the temperatures will be coming down.

:28:56.:29:00.

This does not look like a chart we would expect in mid- July. Because

:29:00.:29:04.

of the low pressure, the wind will pick up. Tomorrow, the wettest

:29:04.:29:08.

weather will be in southern and eastern England. A band of heavy

:29:08.:29:14.

rain will move on three and elsewhere a rash of showers. By 4

:29:14.:29:18.

o'clock, we are into brighter, showery weather through North East

:29:18.:29:23.

England, the Midlands and East Anglia. The last of the rain will

:29:23.:29:27.

depart in the South East into Kent. Elsewhere along the south coast it

:29:27.:29:33.

is blustery. Showers will be hit and miss it nature. Dry and bright

:29:33.:29:38.

spells in between. Sunshine and between the showers in Wales and

:29:38.:29:42.

north-west England. They are driven along by a brisk wind. The range of

:29:42.:29:45.

not last too long. For Northern Ireland, the showers moved through

:29:45.:29:52.

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