20/11/2013 World News Today


20/11/2013

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This is BBC World News Today, with me, Philippa Thomas. They're off

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again - a fresh round of talks about Iran's nuclear programme has started

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in Geneva. But back in Tehran, stern words from Iran's Supreme Leade,

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in Geneva. But back in Tehran, stern words from Iran's Supreme Leade the

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Ayatollah warns that his country will not step back from its "right"

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to enrich uranium. Under fire from Al-Shabab - we have a special report

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from the front line in Somalia, targeting the militants behind the

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attack on a Kenyan shopping mall. I roadside bomb has just gone off.

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Also coming up: Britain's Prime Minister rules out an amnesty in

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Northern Ireland - we talk to a leading Irish American who advised

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President Clinton on the peace process.

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And Mumbai eight London nil - how India is blazing a trail with the

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number of female executives running the country's top banks.

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Hello and welcome. What does Iran intend to do with its

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nuclear power programme? Its diplomats are meeting in Geneva for

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more talks with the US, UK, France, China, Russia, and Germany. Iran's

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Supreme Leader in Tehran is warning that Iran will not step back "one

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iota" from its nuclear rights. And its Foreign Minister - in a YouTube

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video - is talking in more conciliatory tones about Iranian

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dignity and its desire for diversified energy. Our Iran

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correspondent James Reynolds in Geneva reports now on the latest

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diplomatic developments. The world's power negotiator has a

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driver, but she probably knows the roads well enough to take the wheel

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herself. This is the third time in the last five weeks that she has

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been here for nuclear talks. She wants to persuade this man, Iran's

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Foreign Minister, to make negotiations about the nuclear

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programme. It is not about joining the club or threatening others.

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Nuclear energy is about a leaked. I jumped towards deciding our own

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destiny. These talks are essentially an effort to sort out to run's place

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in the world and in its own region. So the discussions which are taking

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place here affect the shape of the entire Middle East. And in that

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region Iran's supreme leader has told a loyal audience that he is

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watching the talks closely. Any final decision on a nuclear

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agreement will be made by him. Although we do not intervene in the

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details of these talks there are certain red lines, there are limits.

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These limits are to be observed. On a visit to Istanbul, William Hague

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raised the possibility of an interim agreement. This is an historic

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opportunity to build agreement on how to curb nuclear proliferation in

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the Middle East. And potentially to set are lesions whether run on a

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different path. It is the best chance for a long time to make

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progress on one of the gravest problems in foreign policy. For a

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decade, that problem has defeated teams of the goal shooters.

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Diplomats here have three days to see if they can draft deal for a

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first step. In the last 30 minutes it has been

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reported that delegates in Geneva were saying it would be difficult to

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strike a deal. Michael Mann, spokesman for the EU's Foreign

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Policy chief Catherine Ashton, is in Geneva. The first session only

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lasted ten minutes - what do you make of that? You must feel you are

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getting to know Geneva very well, too. What about this downbeat line

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from an American official? I do not think it is necessarily downbeat

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upbeat. These are very complicated negotiations, we have made a lot of

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progress over the last two meetings. Nobody is pretending this is going

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to be simple, it is often tying up the fine details that is the

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difficult bit. We have come with the message that Catherine Ashton was to

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negotiate hard to find assisting the ball and robust deal. We have made a

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lot of progress, there are still differences between us, but we will

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work hard to make sure we move things forward. It is difficult for

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me to make any predictions, but we want to progress certainly. The

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opening session lasted ten minutes. They need to have these bilateral

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discussions. That is right. There was a long lunchtime meeting between

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Catherine Ashton and Minister -- the Catherine Ashton and Minister - the

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Foreign Minister of Iran. There was a brief recession, people got

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excited. There was need for that -- no need for that excitement. They

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broke into what we call bilateral meetings with the Iranians I with

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each of the six in turn, and that is what is happening at the time. While

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you are negotiating, there is this line taken by the reader. -- leader.

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We are continuing our work here. I do not think anyone should get too

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worried about what has been said. There is a political process in

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various capitals. We will continue our work here to keep things going

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forward. We take note of what is being said, but I think both sides

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of the negotiations understand each other and we will try and move wings

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forward. The fact that we are here just ten days after the other talks

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shows how serious we are. I will have to be invasive here, we cannot

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go into detail about what is on the table. We are here to see as the

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assurance, verifiable reassurance from the Iranians said that their

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nuclear programme is for peaceful means. There is an issue with the

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level of uranium enrichment going on in Iran. We are seeing from their

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obligations that they were full on, they are prepared to prove that

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their programme is purely peaceful and they will stop purifying and

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enriching uranium to that level That is the key issue. Good to talk

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to you as always. Thank you. Meanwhile, security is tight in

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Beirut after Iran's embassy in the Lebanese capital was targeted in a

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bomb attack on Tuesday, which killed 23 people and injured more than 140.

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A Sunni Lebanese group fighting with rebels in neighbouring Syria has

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claimed responsibility. It's likely the attack came in retaliation for

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Iran's support for Syria's President Assad. It also comes at a time when

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rebels just over the border in Syria are struggling to reverse recent

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government gains. In the Qalamoun hills north of Damascus, suicide

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bombers today targeted government troops and a hospital. Let's talk to

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our Middle East correspondent Paul Wood, who's in Beirut, about this

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regional hotspot. Can you tell us more about this

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hotspot and the significance of the Qalamoun Hills. They are important

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because if you have the Qalamoun bills, you have the main highway.

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Ultimately you can threaten Damascus. The battle is all about

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what is the endgame for Syria, the battle for Damascus. If the rebels

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have Qalamoun, they can be group and they can mount as they have been

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doing over the past two years of fences into the suburbs of Damascus.

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It is difficult for them to do that any longer. This successful

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defensive from the regime will push the rebels out of these last pockets

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into Lebanon. Given that the government offensive has been

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relatively successful so far, there are reports of hundreds of rebel

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fighters pouring in. You sense that feeling of escalation on both sides?

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Talking to people we understand that the main Al-Qaeda linked group in

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Syria has been trying to final fighters down from the North where

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they do not feel they are doing very much at the moment, into the fight

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in the Qalamoun bills. That was according to sources ten days ago. I

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do not know how much they will be able to accomplish. It is important

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now, not least the cost of rebels lose this area altogether, they will

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not have any means of getting their casualties out. It does sound as

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there is potential turning point here. Neither side looks likely to

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win in the near future. We are in a sense in a state of stalemate? If

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the government is winning in Qalamoun, it will take a long, long

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time. These are isolated mountains, there is one road in and one road

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out. Even if they have taken this town and they hold it as they appear

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to be doing, the rebels will it back. It is starting to turn into

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winter, it is difficult for troops and people on both sides and

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refugees streaming into Lebanon in greater numbers. There is a feeling

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generally that the momentum is with the government. That does not mean

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that they can extinguish the fighters on the rebel side. There is

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some kind of stalemate with the rebels holed up parts of the

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countryside, the government's authority extends to some highways.

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Britain and the United States and even countries like Iran are telling

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all sides in the conflict the only way out is a negotiated solution,

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one that does not seem to be happening on either side at the

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moment. Thank you very much. The Somali group Al-Shabab may be

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the most powerful Islamist force in the world - and put itself back in

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the spotlight recently when it attacked the Westgate Shopping Mall

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in Nairobi. It sought to justify that attack as revenge for Kenya

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sending troops to fight Al Shabaab in Somalia, where the militants have

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been waging a bloody war for several years. The African Union mission in

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Somalia has now been reinforced - and we have a special report on the

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dangers it faces. Our correspondent Mark Doyle travelling with the

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Ugandan contingent deep into central Somalia.

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Driving by night through a war zone is not ideal. But the soldiers I was

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with wanted to press ahead. The relative safety of their next well

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defended position. We are headed for one of the most dangerous areas of

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Somalia, 120 kilometres south of the capital. There are Al-Shabab

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positions on both sides of the vehicle I am travelling in now and

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we are heading for a Ugandan base. As we arrived, we heard over the

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sound of night-time insects, an attack on the adjacent base. These

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African union soldiers are trying to stop Al-Shabab from turning Somalia

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into an Al-Qaeda style strictly Islamist country. The African forces

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mainly financed by the United States and is making some progress. But

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Al-Shabab are fighting back. These are parts of the roadside bomb that

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was detonated against the tiger that was ahead of us. This is the battery

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and this is the detonator that was strung out on a wire on the side of

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the road there. -- the tank. All of these little bits of green, these

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are the leaves from the trees which have been blasted off by the

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strength of the explosion. This is the vehicle itself. It was hit from

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underneath. The blast went up through the store and you can see

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the fragments and so on the shrapnel which are asked about the windows in

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the mirrors. -- have blasted. Then another explosion and even closer

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call. The roadside bomb has gone off binders. The gardeners on the

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carrier we are in our shooting at the bushes all around. -- the

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Gunners. Many of the roadside bombs are set off by children. We cannot

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give this man's name, he is only 15 years old. What did you do? At first

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he says I was sent into towns to shoot people in the lead. Then I

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became a commander myself and sent out others to carry out

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assassinations. Al-Shabab our only interested in religion. They told me

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I would go to heaven when I died. African Union firepower has got a

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long way down a deadly road. It has pushed Al-Shabab out of Somalia's

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pushed Al-Shabab out of Somalia s main towns. But those advances were

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headed by soldiers from Uganda are threatened and shortages of military

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equipment. We need more trucks, more helicopters and more manpower. To do

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what? To make sure we cover up all the areas that are covered by the

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Al-Shabab. These soldiers are gearing themselves up for more

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fighting stop but will richer countries support them with the

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tools they need to finish the job? Now a look at some of the day's

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other news. One of 30 Greenpeace activists being

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detained in Russia has been released. Brazilian Ana Paula Maciel

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is among 20 activists so far granted bail after they were arrested at an

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offshore oil rig in the Arctic two months ago. The court in the city of

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St Petersburg ruled that the activists would be released once the

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bail sum of about ?60,000 each was paid. -- $60,000.

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The Church of England's ruling body has voted in favour of proposals

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which could allow the ordination of women bishops. The approval paves

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the way for a vote next year, which could see the measures become part

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of church legislation. The issue of women bishops has been discussed

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within the Church of England for nearly 50 years.

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The South African double-amputee Olympic runner, Oscar Pistorius has

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been charged with a further two gun-related offences. Pistorius has

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already been charged with murder for the killing of his girlfriend Reeva

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Steenkamp. Mr Pistorius has admitted killing Ms Steenkamp, but denies it

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was murder. His trial begins in March next year.

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The British scientist who helped the world to understand the building

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blocks of DNA has died. Frederick Sanger, the only person from Britain

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to have won two Nobel Prizes, was 95. Fellow researchers describe him

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as "one of the greatest scientists of any generation" and "a real hero"

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of British science. The British Prime Minister David

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Cameron has ruled out plans for an amnesty on offences during the

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Northern Ireland Troubles - that is, crimes committed before the Good

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Friday Agreement in 1998. His comments came after Northern

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Ireland's Attorney-General said there should no more prosecutions

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linked to the deaths inflicted during decades of sectarian

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violence. Chris Buckler reports. Belfast is a place that has

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benefited from peace. As city opened up after years of tight security.

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But the decades of violence cannot be forgotten. Bombings and killings

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were on all too common part of life. There are still murders and solved,

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killer is not held accountable. But now the Attorney-General for

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Northern Ireland has suggested that the time may have come to end any

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prosecutions or investigations related to the worst years of

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troubles. -- of the Troubles. The time may have come to set online

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set out the Good Friday Agreement with respect to prosecutions and

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inquests. Across Northern Ireland, there are

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families who feel they have never had justice. This proposal would

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mean anybody involved in killings before 1998 would be immune from

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prosecution. He did not have a chance to draw a gun pointed --

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anything, it was in the back and he was left lying in the road to die,

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with nobody there. That memory comes to be quite often.

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Florence's son was a police officer, murdered on duty in 1980. She

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strongly feels you cannot draw a line. I know we have to go on with

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life, but I think we never got closure, so how can you have closure

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if you did not get justice? Dealing with that legacy of violence

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is always a difficult discussion. It has been debated on radio phone in

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programmes. And the American -- this American diplomat is trying to

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broker an agreement between politicians about the past.

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However, the Prime Minister has suggested this could be a step too

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far. We have no plans to legislate for an amnesty for crimes committed

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during the Troubles. But there are politicians concerned,

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as well as victims propose groups. This is a place where the past casts

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a long shadow. -- victims' groups. Former US Congressman Bruce Morrison

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was an adviser to President Bill Clinton on Northern Ireland issues

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during the peace process. He joins us live from Washington.

:19:06.:19:15.

Your thoughts on this idea of an end to prosecutions on these historic

:19:16.:19:22.

crimes. I think your piece that you just ran kind of explains why it is

:19:23.:19:28.

a bad idea. Justice is something we want to prevail in the future of

:19:29.:19:33.

Northern Ireland, and there are many victims who still feel that justice

:19:34.:19:37.

has not been done for their cases and those cases and or on the smack

:19:38.:19:42.

are on both sides of the divide. When the victims feel that it is

:19:43.:19:46.

time to move on, then I think one can move on, but I don't think you

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can leave them, believed as they are, feeling that closure has been

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abandoned in their cases. Is there not a danger that by egging into

:19:58.:20:02.

these historic crimes you are unearthing old bitterness is in

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feelings of betrayal, and yet every year it finds the smack it finds the

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smack it becomes harder to check out that evidence? -- it becomes harder.

:20:12.:20:21.

In a lot of cases there has been a suggestion there would be

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prosecutions in the killings from Bloody Sunday, those are on one

:20:26.:20:32.

side, there are Parliament -- paramilitary offences that others

:20:33.:20:35.

are concerned about. The past is still alive, it is not being on

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earth, it still lives in Northern Ireland. -- it is not being on

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earth. Northern Ireland has benefited from negotiations between

:20:47.:20:49.

the communities and the politicians, and it is a bottom-up solution that

:20:50.:20:53.

is needed here. A top-down decree that these historical cases are

:20:54.:20:58.

off-limits will not please anyone, and I don't think it will pave the

:20:59.:21:03.

way towards a better future. Northern Ireland's Chief Constable

:21:04.:21:09.

is saying the cost of policing the past has a massive impact on how we

:21:10.:21:12.

deal with the present. He said dealing with what he calls legacy

:21:13.:21:18.

issues put significant pressure on our finances. That suggestion that

:21:19.:21:21.

people of Northern Ireland today could lose out from the money being

:21:22.:21:26.

invested in the Palace -- in investigating the past. I think that

:21:27.:21:32.

is a decision for the political leadership in the province to come

:21:33.:21:38.

together and debate at Stormont. I don't think there are priorities to

:21:39.:21:44.

be set on an efficiency basis as opposed to what brings the greater

:21:45.:21:49.

sense of justice and protection to the people who are living there now.

:21:50.:21:56.

There are still very live issues like flags, parades, as well as the

:21:57.:22:00.

investigation of past crimes. From an American standpoint you feel

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there is a very difficult death suspect different view of Northern

:22:07.:22:11.

Ireland to a few years ago? -- a different view of Northern Ireland?

:22:12.:22:17.

View among the people generally is that a tremendous amount of progress

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has been made. -- the view is. But it will take a long time to resolve

:22:25.:22:29.

the many conflicts that exist. It is a positive story, but it has not

:22:30.:22:34.

reached its end, and work will have to be done, and I think that what

:22:35.:22:43.

Richard Hass is trying to do is a very positive contribution, but at

:22:44.:22:47.

the end of the day it comes from the people in Northern Ireland to chart

:22:48.:22:50.

their own future in a way that builds on the peace that has been

:22:51.:22:55.

created. We have to leave it there. Thank you

:22:56.:22:59.

for joining us. London may be the world's largest

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financial centre, but there aren't ANY women at the helm of any British

:23:03.:23:06.

banks and very few at senior levels in finance in the UK. Yet in India

:23:07.:23:09.

several females are running the country's banks, including the

:23:10.:23:13.

largest. How did they do it? Reeta Chakrabarti reports.

:23:14.:23:21.

Banking has been one of the engines driving the Indian economy. Its

:23:22.:23:26.

growth has seen a startling rise in the success of women, not just on

:23:27.:23:31.

the shop floor but right at the very top. This woman has worked at

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India's second-largest rank for nearly 30 years, and she now leads

:23:37.:23:41.

it. How is it that women like her have done so well? The banks are

:23:42.:23:45.

making a decision based on merit, and picking and choosing the

:23:46.:23:49.

candidate they think is the most meritorious at that point in time.

:23:50.:23:54.

Without any inhibition in their mind of whether the candidate is male or

:23:55.:23:57.

female. As banking has grown, so has female

:23:58.:24:07.

talent. There are now eight major banks headed by female executives.

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They include this woman, who says Indian woman have an advantage as

:24:14.:24:17.

there is always domestic help and the extended family. Family support

:24:18.:24:24.

is a huge distinction for us, so my mother or my mother-in-law or even

:24:25.:24:27.

my father father-in-law would come by and help me if I was stuck in a

:24:28.:24:32.

situation. -- father or father-in-law. Competition to get

:24:33.:24:38.

into this management college is unbelievably fierce, with around

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1000 applications per place. Girls are determined to succeed. I wanted

:24:43.:24:49.

to make sure I am working. I want to make a contribution. It is more

:24:50.:24:58.

about the talent you have less about social constraints. India's first

:24:59.:25:04.

female banking boss was in the 1990s, but she says it was an only

:25:05.:25:09.

business then being the only woman at the top. But banking was always

:25:10.:25:13.

seen as a good option for women. These women joined because it was a

:25:14.:25:19.

dream job for them. The family did not object to them, they went to an

:25:20.:25:24.

air-conditioned office, they were very happy, and meeting so many

:25:25.:25:28.

people, dealing with money, it was glamorous.

:25:29.:25:32.

Women have always worked in India, but their rise in the last two

:25:33.:25:37.

decades in banking at least has proved a phenomenal success. All the

:25:38.:25:38.

more remarkable given the many -- more remarkable given the many -

:25:39.:25:43.

and said -- conservative attitudes to women in many other parts of the

:25:44.:25:44.

country. With much of the population still

:25:45.:25:50.

lacking basic education, there's attitudes will not disappear soon.

:25:51.:25:55.

But the educated middle class now equals around 250 million people.

:25:56.:25:59.

With numbers like that, India's corporate revolution might have only

:26:00.:26:15.

just began. A reminder of our main news.

:26:16.:26:19.

Talks between Iran and six world powers have resumed in Geneva to try

:26:20.:26:22.

to reach a deal to curb Iran's nuclear programme. An Iranian

:26:23.:26:25.

official described as constructive preliminary discussions between the

:26:26.:26:27.

foreign minister and the EU's foreign policy chief Catherine

:26:28.:26:29.

Ashton. Earlier the Supreme Leader of Iran, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei,

:26:30.:26:31.

of Iran, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said Tehran would not back down from

:26:32.:26:34.

its right to have a nuclear programme.

:26:35.:26:36.

Well, that's all from the programme. Next, the weather. But for now, from

:26:37.:26:41.

me, Philippa Thomas and the rest of the team, goodbye.

:26:42.:26:46.

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