19/09/2014 World News Today


19/09/2014

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This is BBC World News Today with me Daniela Ritorto.

:00:00.:00:07.

Scotland votes to stay in the UK - ending a two-year fight

:00:08.:00:14.

Scenes of jubilation in the pro-union camp - after a decisive

:00:15.:00:19.

referendum victory - and pain in the independence camp - whose leader

:00:20.:00:22.

- and Scotland's First Minister - announces his resignation.

:00:23.:00:34.

It has been a privilege of my life to serve as first Minister. But this

:00:35.:00:47.

is a process which is is not for the SNP or any political party. It is

:00:48.:00:53.

much more important. Queen Elizabeth has released a

:00:54.:00:56.

statement calling for people to come together again. She spoke of mutual

:00:57.:01:00.

respect. Undeterred by the Scottish No vote -

:01:01.:01:03.

the Spanish region of Catalonia says it is pressing ahead with

:01:04.:01:06.

a vote on independence from Spain. As French jets carry out air strikes

:01:07.:01:09.

in northern Iraq - hundreds of Syrian Kurds flee to Turkey in

:01:10.:01:13.

fear of Islamic State extremists. The United Kingdom will remain

:01:14.:01:29.

united after Scottish voters decisively rejected independence

:01:30.:01:34.

at an historic referendum. The result wasn't as close

:01:35.:01:39.

as polls suggested but that didn't stop the day

:01:40.:01:41.

from being one of the most gripping A couple of hours ago, the man who

:01:42.:01:45.

led the two-year campaign for independence, Scotland's First

:01:46.:01:50.

Minister, Alex Salmond, announced He said he accepted the verdict

:01:51.:01:54.

of the electorate which in the end saw 2 million people vote

:01:55.:02:01.

against independence against 1.6 All up,

:02:02.:02:05.

that broke down to a clear 45 Let's cross to Lucy Hockings who is

:02:06.:02:11.

live for us at Holyrood We have been waiting for the Queen

:02:12.:02:42.

to make her views known. I think people have been waiting for the

:02:43.:02:46.

views of the Queen. She was pointed in staying here in Scotland at

:02:47.:02:50.

Balmoral. Before the independence vote, she remained silent. She likes

:02:51.:03:00.

to be neutral on political issues. But she released a statement

:03:01.:03:06.

saying, knowing the Scots as I do, I'm sure that they are able to

:03:07.:03:10.

express strongly held opinions before coming together in a spirit

:03:11.:03:14.

of mutual respect to work constructively for the future of

:03:15.:03:17.

Scotland and all parts of this country. She adds, my family and I

:03:18.:03:22.

will do all we can to support you in this important task. She, like many

:03:23.:03:27.

others today, are in the sizing unity. This country has been divided

:03:28.:03:31.

by this independence referendum but she, along with Alex Salmond, who

:03:32.:03:41.

resigned a massacre, are calling on the country to -- resigned in --

:03:42.:03:49.

dramatically, are calling on the country to come together. With our

:03:50.:03:55.

with all the developers here is our political editor.

:03:56.:04:00.

More people cared, more people believed, more voted

:04:01.:04:06.

Scotland has voted no in this referendum on independence.

:04:07.:04:12.

The result in Fife has taken the no campaign over the line

:04:13.:04:16.

and the official result of this referendum is a note.

:04:17.:04:20.

The final result, 45% yes, 55% no, was clearer than most had predicted.

:04:21.:04:28.

This morning, Alex Salmond put on a brave face,

:04:29.:04:30.

But he called the media to the First Minister's office

:04:31.:04:37.

in Edinburgh and announced that he would soon quit the job.

:04:38.:04:41.

For me as leader, my time is nearly over.

:04:42.:04:46.

But for Scotland, the campaign continues.

:04:47.:04:50.

And the dream should never die. The real guardians of progress are no

:04:51.:04:56.

longer politicians at Westminster, or even at Hollyrood, they are the

:04:57.:05:01.

energised actions of tens of thousands of people who I

:05:02.:05:04.

predict will refuse meekly to go back into the political shadows.

:05:05.:05:08.

We have now the opportunity to hold Westminster's feet to the fire

:05:09.:05:14.

on the vow that they have made to devolve further powers to Scotland.

:05:15.:05:19.

This places Scotland in a very strong position.

:05:20.:05:27.

The story of the night was clear almost

:05:28.:05:29.

from the very first result at 1:30 a.m..

:05:30.:05:31.

The No campaign, subdued for so long, celebrated

:05:32.:05:44.

as result after result in 28 out of 32 areas had them winning.

:05:45.:05:51.

Nicola Sturgeon, Alex Salmond's deputy and surely

:05:52.:05:55.

The news from Scotland's biggest city, a consolation prize.

:05:56.:06:16.

Not so long ago, few would have believed they would

:06:17.:06:18.

But for Alex Salmond as he left home in the early hours,

:06:19.:06:23.

For them, for those who has hoped for Scotland to remain

:06:24.:06:30.

We have chosen unity over division and positive change

:06:31.:06:43.

Today is a momentous result for Scotland, but also

:06:44.:06:55.

By confirming our place within the union, we have reaffirmed all

:06:56.:07:03.

Those watching outside Scotland had simply had to hold their breath.

:07:04.:07:10.

The Prime Minister watched for much of the night, aware that

:07:11.:07:13.

a yes vote would destroy not just as country but his reputation.

:07:14.:07:17.

They kept our country of four nations together.

:07:18.:07:27.

And like millions of other people, I am delighted.

:07:28.:07:31.

The debate will settle for a generation, he said.

:07:32.:07:47.

reruns. Scotland would get more power but change would go much

:07:48.:07:51.

Some will ask, why on earth politicians talking

:07:52.:08:42.

The anger they feel at the way Westminster currently runs things is

:08:43.:08:50.

felt up and down what remains of the United Kingdom. But this great

:08:51.:08:56.

national debate will now happen without him leading Scotland. One

:08:57.:09:08.

thing that is certain is that the voice was clearly heard and turn out

:09:09.:09:14.

was 85%, that is the highest since 1951. That is seen as a real triumph

:09:15.:09:20.

here. We look now at what tipped voters away from independence.

:09:21.:09:25.

The burden of proof from the beginning lay mostly with

:09:26.:09:27.

To too many voters, their blueprint from the dependency incomplete, I'm

:09:28.:09:40.

-- seemed -- blueprint for independence seemed incomplete, not

:09:41.:09:46.

ready. ready, particularly on what currency

:09:47.:09:49.

and independent Scotland would use. Edinburgh, home to Scotland's

:09:50.:09:51.

financial industry -- financial services into industry,

:09:52.:09:53.

but it 61% to stay within the UK. This is quite well-off country and I

:09:54.:09:56.

think a lot I don't get a surprise that parts of

:09:57.:09:58.

the country where people didn't have Even here though,

:09:59.:10:03.

more than one in three voted yes. But I am inspired to know that

:10:04.:10:07.

almost half the people get it. Been heartbroken

:10:08.:10:14.

but also inspired because we know It is weird knowing that half people

:10:15.:10:16.

are scared of change I think overall it has been very

:10:17.:10:20.

beneficial to Scotland, despite I was in no vote when I heard

:10:21.:10:23.

the result but I started crying because I was relieved but also

:10:24.:10:28.

worried about what happens now. In this --

:10:29.:10:31.

in more prosperous places, In Scotland's business city,

:10:32.:10:35.

Glasgow voted for independence. Here, Labour voters who crossed

:10:36.:10:41.

in large numbers were decisive. Is it oval over for them now, will

:10:42.:10:46.

they return to the Labour fold? The sole reason is that I wanted

:10:47.:10:50.

more than anything a yes vote. A change in labour's policies,

:10:51.:10:54.

they were too close to Tory After what happened with Tony Blair,

:10:55.:10:58.

I don't think the working class In this, the intervention

:10:59.:11:04.

in the last stages of the campaign by a rejuvenated Gordon Brown

:11:05.:11:14.

stemmed the flow of Labour voters to The margin of victory

:11:15.:11:20.

for the union was clear, Does that mean job done,

:11:21.:11:24.

the union is safe? 45% on a high turnout voted to end

:11:25.:11:30.

United Kingdom's stake in Scotland. That would have been unthinkable

:11:31.:11:40.

even 15 years ago, when the Scottish We have to remember that

:11:41.:11:42.

1.6 million of our citizens And the really important thing to do

:11:43.:11:54.

is to try to understand and then respond adequately to

:11:55.:12:00.

the reasons why people voted yes. The Anglo Scottish union has

:12:01.:12:08.

survived the greatest challenge to Scotland has settle the question

:12:09.:12:10.

peacefully and other critically. But the challenge for the UK's

:12:11.:12:20.

legitimacy -- but the popular challenge

:12:21.:12:24.

for the UK's legitimacy in Scotland There are two main thing is to take

:12:25.:12:53.

away from the referendum. The remarkably high turnout. It has been

:12:54.:12:57.

increasingly difficult to get voters to go to the polls. They do not have

:12:58.:13:00.

the partisan sympathies any more that mean that they will turn up for

:13:01.:13:05.

Labour or Conservative come what may. They have to be presented with

:13:06.:13:11.

a choice, they have to be persuaded that the referendum matters. On this

:13:12.:13:16.

occasion, Scotland's voters clearly decided it mattered, therefore

:13:17.:13:21.

nobody can argue that the outcome on Thursday was anything other than the

:13:22.:13:25.

collective judgement of all of Scotland's adults. The second thing

:13:26.:13:29.

that I would take away is that it is clear that in terms of the

:13:30.:13:33.

arithmetic, the yes side lost and Scotland has voted to remain in the

:13:34.:13:39.

union. At I think in many respects, the yes side won the referendum

:13:40.:13:45.

campaign. It was not expected for them to get as many as 20 -- 45%.

:13:46.:13:52.

Because they got as many as that, the no side found themselves under

:13:53.:13:56.

pressure to firm up its offer in terms of more devolution for

:13:57.:14:00.

Scotland within the framework of the UK, making this building here more

:14:01.:14:06.

powerful than it is already. And as a result of that, Scotland is going

:14:07.:14:12.

to change. It is going to find its constitutional check -- status will

:14:13.:14:16.

change anyway. Indeed, public support for the status quo is now

:14:17.:14:21.

down to 20%. We now move on to the arguments about the detail of

:14:22.:14:26.

devolution. In the resignation of Alex Salmond, have we lost a great

:14:27.:14:31.

figure? I think that we have to recognise that this is a man who

:14:32.:14:35.

inherited a party with about three MPs which was in a weak position and

:14:36.:14:40.

he ended up becoming its first parliamentary leader in government

:14:41.:14:47.

and the did not succeed in taking his party across the waters to the

:14:48.:14:51.

promised land of independence, but he certainly brought them to the

:14:52.:14:56.

side of the river bank. For that, he would clearly be remembered. He has

:14:57.:15:02.

also managed to remain -- to become a remarkably popular politician for

:15:03.:15:05.

somebody who has been in power for seven years. But he has form in

:15:06.:15:12.

terms of surprising us by resigning. He first resigned as SNP leader in

:15:13.:15:17.

the sum of 2000. He also announced he was leaving the Scottish

:15:18.:15:20.

parliament, which he did for a while. And any came back and now,

:15:21.:15:25.

all of a sudden, he has decided to leave. I think it means that we will

:15:26.:15:29.

see a debate inside the Scottish National party about what its stance

:15:30.:15:34.

in terms of Scotland's constitutional future will be in the

:15:35.:15:37.

immediate future and in particular, whether it will get involved in

:15:38.:15:41.

those talks that the Unionist parties want to hold about more

:15:42.:15:49.

devolution. Thank you. One small point I would like to mention, it is

:15:50.:15:51.

coming through that 71% of 16 and point I would like to mention, it is

:15:52.:15:59.

17-year-olds voted here in Scotland. People here are saying they are very

:16:00.:16:00.

proud of that. So,

:16:01.:16:05.

the vote in Scotland could have a profound impact on government across

:16:06.:16:08.

the United Kingdom with new powers for England, Wales and Northern

:16:09.:16:12.

Ireland as well as Scotland. Dr Mark Elliott is a reader

:16:13.:16:22.

in public law at the University of Cambridge where he specialises

:16:23.:16:25.

in constitutional law. a great big new constitutional

:16:26.:16:37.

headache is now just starting? a great big new constitutional

:16:38.:16:46.

think that is absolutely right. I think he is very relieved that the

:16:47.:16:55.

think that is absolutely right. I Particularly because of the

:16:56.:17:00.

think that is absolutely right. I additional powers for Scotland, that

:17:01.:17:04.

opens up a new series of questions about how

:17:05.:17:06.

opens up a new series of questions UK should be treated. Talk is

:17:07.:17:12.

through what those options are because the three main parties are

:17:13.:17:15.

all promising something slightly different? I think it is clear

:17:16.:17:19.

something is going to be on offer and there will be a transfer of

:17:20.:17:24.

additional powers to Scotland. What is not clear at the present time is

:17:25.:17:28.

firstly, whether that will happen on the very rapid timescale that Gordon

:17:29.:17:35.

Brown promised a week ago and secondly, although it seems pretty

:17:36.:17:38.

clear that the powers will include things like enhanced taxation powers

:17:39.:17:44.

and spending, precisely how far that will kill remains to be seen. We are

:17:45.:17:50.

broadcasting to the UK and internationally as well, we have

:17:51.:17:54.

heard a lot today about the so-called induced question, can you

:17:55.:17:59.

explain that? England finds itself in a strange position because when

:18:00.:18:01.

devolution was introduced in the late 1990s, new parliament were

:18:02.:18:07.

cratered in Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland. But no English

:18:08.:18:12.

Parliament was created. The issue which that gives rise to raise that

:18:13.:18:17.

when for example, Scotland makes laws for itself, the only law makers

:18:18.:18:23.

involved in that art the members of the Scottish Parliament. Because

:18:24.:18:27.

there was an English parliament, its laws have got to be made by the UK

:18:28.:18:31.

Parliament in Westminster and of course, MPs from all four of the

:18:32.:18:37.

nations sit in that parliament. So the problem really is that while an

:18:38.:18:44.

English MP can no longer influenced the vast majority of Scottish law,

:18:45.:18:49.

Scottish and Welsh and Northern Irish MPs still have a in relation

:18:50.:18:55.

to the making of English law. One week to think one way to solve that

:18:56.:18:59.

would be a federal UK, I am thinking of Australia, with happen? It could

:19:00.:19:06.

happen, lots of people have used the Word, federalism, and the last few

:19:07.:19:09.

weeks. But that would be a very significant change and that strikes

:19:10.:19:17.

me as unlikely. The UK constitution is built on a very long and

:19:18.:19:22.

continuous history and the tendency has always been towards incremental

:19:23.:19:30.

piece by piece change and switching to a federal system would involve

:19:31.:19:32.

the adoption of a written constitution and it would be a

:19:33.:19:38.

seismic change of the Constitution at a time when we don't usually

:19:39.:19:39.

adopt here. The vote and its result has been

:19:40.:19:44.

watched closely across the world, especially in regions wanting

:19:45.:19:47.

independence, perhaps nowhere more Our correspondent is in the Catalan

:19:48.:19:49.

capital, Barcelona. The main message from Catalonia's

:19:50.:19:55.

president reacting to that no vote in Scotland was that he still plans

:19:56.:20:00.

to hold a Scottish style referendum here in Catalonia on independence

:20:01.:20:04.

from Spain on November 9. Pressed from journalists over

:20:05.:20:09.

whether the Scottish no vote was a defeat or setback for him

:20:10.:20:14.

personally, he said it was not, despite having said a week ago that

:20:15.:20:18.

he wanted a yes vote in Scotland. Why does he claim it is not

:20:19.:20:24.

a setback? He is focused on the right to

:20:25.:20:26.

a vote here in Catalonia. The Spanish government had said

:20:27.:20:30.

a vote in Catalonia would be illegal, it doesn't fit with

:20:31.:20:34.

the Spanish constitution. The Spanish constitutional court is

:20:35.:20:38.

expected to rule exactly that in a matter of days but he praised

:20:39.:20:41.

both Scotland and Britain. He said it shows that Britain is

:20:42.:20:45.

a mature society, He said we seek a similar choice

:20:46.:20:48.

and it is the only way, the right way in the 21st-century, but it is

:20:49.:20:55.

still unclear whether the vote here in Catalonia will take place and

:20:56.:21:00.

if it does, what will it mean? A look now at some

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of theday's other news. The authorities in the West African

:21:07.:21:10.

nation of Guinea have launched an investigation after eight people

:21:11.:21:13.

including doctors, local officials and journalists died while trying to

:21:14.:21:15.

raise awareness about Ebola. They are believed to have been

:21:16.:21:18.

killed with machetes and clubs by villagers who feared they had

:21:19.:21:21.

come to spread the disease. Guinea's Prime Minister said those

:21:22.:21:23.

responsible will be punished. Thousands of people have been forced

:21:24.:21:31.

to leave their homes in Northern California after

:21:32.:21:34.

a wildfire burning out of control The blaze is the biggest

:21:35.:21:36.

in what officials describe as the A man has been arrested

:21:37.:21:40.

on suspicion of arson. The Syrian Observatory for Human

:21:41.:21:50.

Rights is reporting that Islamic State militants have seized 60

:21:51.:21:53.

Kurdish villages near the Turkish The report comes

:21:54.:21:55.

as Turkey is allowing thousands of Syrian Kurds fleeing IS to cross

:21:56.:21:59.

its southern border. Meanwhile in neighbouring Iraq,

:22:00.:22:03.

France has become the first country to join the US campaign

:22:04.:22:06.

of air strikes against IS fighters. The French have now joined the fight

:22:07.:22:21.

against Islamic State. Inside northern Iraq, fighter jets like

:22:22.:22:26.

these struck a logistics depot and apparently killed dozens of

:22:27.:22:37.

militants. I think there are always risks in taking responsibility. I

:22:38.:22:40.

have reduce these risks as much as I can. The onus is always on trying to

:22:41.:22:44.

extinguish terrorism but this form of terrorism is not exclusive to the

:22:45.:22:50.

Middle East. It threatens us all stop the French intervention will be

:22:51.:22:54.

welcomed by the US and its allies. The Kurdish forces in Iraq on the

:22:55.:22:59.

front line up the fight against Islamic State. But inside

:23:00.:23:02.

neighbouring Syria, Kurds find themselves under and even more

:23:03.:23:09.

immediate threat. Face-to-face with more guns on a Turkish

:23:10.:23:14.

paramilitaries block Kurdish refugees from crossing into Turkey,

:23:15.:23:17.

shots were fired and not all into the air. One man showed the wind

:23:18.:23:24.

from one of the bullets. These Kurdish refugees have just fled the

:23:25.:23:28.

spreading violence in northern Syria and were greeted by arms and barbed

:23:29.:23:35.

wire. These are the people now with nowhere to go. Families is giving

:23:36.:23:40.

the advance of Islamic State fighters and fearing for their

:23:41.:23:44.

lives. Militants had besieged a Kurdish town in northern Syria and

:23:45.:23:49.

seized many villages. On the Turkish side of the border, the Kurds were

:23:50.:23:58.

angry at the Turkey army. This man said the people on the other side

:23:59.:24:02.

are our cousins. They are running away from war and they came here to

:24:03.:24:05.

seek shelter. We demand our relatives are let in. The flow of

:24:06.:24:10.

people has stirred up deep anxieties inside Turkey about Kurdish

:24:11.:24:14.

separatism and Turkey already shelters around 1.5 million Syrian

:24:15.:24:21.

refugees. Under pressure, Ankara has now opened the border. These Kurds

:24:22.:24:25.

at least will be able to join their families. But with the advance of

:24:26.:24:32.

Islamic State at, there is likely to be more turmoil and clinical

:24:33.:24:35.

questions of the future of the Kurds will intensify.

:24:36.:24:41.

The former French President Nicolas Sarkozy has

:24:42.:24:43.

announced he is returning to politics after two years away.

:24:44.:24:46.

He has said he will stand for the leadership of the centre-right

:24:47.:24:49.

He resigned in 2012 after losing France's presidential election.

:24:50.:25:02.

Nicolas Sarkozy is back? Indeed he is. It was expected, he has let it

:25:03.:25:12.

be known over the last few months that this was going to happen. It

:25:13.:25:16.

happened as an announcement on his Facebook page. A text in which he

:25:17.:25:24.

pours pity on the current state of France and says it has reached a cut

:25:25.:25:28.

of Tropic state and pose is therefore as a kind of saviour of

:25:29.:25:32.

the nation, he wants to come back and basically he feels he cannot not

:25:33.:25:37.

come back, given the state of the country and what he wants to do now

:25:38.:25:41.

is run for the leadership of the UMP party, the opposition centre-right

:25:42.:25:48.

party but which has been Roger less since the last election. He wants to

:25:49.:25:52.

be the leader of that party and the election is coming up in November

:25:53.:25:55.

and from there he wants to launch a bid for the presidency. It is a big

:25:56.:26:01.

moment because we have a return to French politics of the biggest beast

:26:02.:26:05.

there is. The man who defeated him of course is Francoise Hollande, he

:26:06.:26:10.

has ordered these air strikes in Iraq, what is the public mood?

:26:11.:26:17.

People are pretty much behind it but I think one

:26:18.:26:20.

People are pretty much behind it but need to make is how deeply unpopular

:26:21.:26:24.

President Hollande is. need to make is how deeply unpopular

:26:25.:26:31.

unpopular and ironically, for an action is the one

:26:32.:26:40.

From me and the rest of the team, goodbye.

:26:41.:26:56.

There has been some lively storms across parts of the UK today and

:26:57.:27:00.

some of these are running into the night. The humid air will be

:27:01.:27:05.

replaced by fresh conditions find this cold front as we go into the

:27:06.:27:10.

weekend. We are stuck with that humidity through the next few hours

:27:11.:27:17.

and into tomorrow morning across England and Wales. For Northern

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