22/02/2016 World News Today


22/02/2016

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This is BBC World News Today with me Karin Giannone.

:00:00.:00:09.

The United States and Russia come to an agreement on the war in Syria.

:00:10.:00:13.

A temporary cessation to hostilities will come into affect

:00:14.:00:16.

British Prime Minister David Cameron has been explaining to parliament

:00:17.:00:23.

I believe the choice is between being an even greater

:00:24.:00:29.

Britain inside a reformed EU or a great leap into the unknown.

:00:30.:00:35.

Ten million people are without water in Delhi,

:00:36.:00:38.

after protesters damaged a canal supplying much of the capital.

:00:39.:00:41.

And Ukraine makes a surprise choice for its representative

:00:42.:00:45.

Russia and the United States have agreed the terms of a temporary

:00:46.:01:04.

cessation of hostilities in Syria, which is now due to come into force

:01:05.:01:07.

President Putin says that the agreement is a real step to stop the

:01:08.:01:19.

bloodshed. The plan - which is deliberately not

:01:20.:01:21.

being described as a ceasefire - was agreed in Munich

:01:22.:01:24.

earlier this month. But Russia and the US have been

:01:25.:01:26.

quibbling over terms of the agreement

:01:27.:01:28.

including the start date. The truce does not include attacks

:01:29.:01:30.

on the so-called Islamic State group The White House spokesman Josh

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Ernest had this to say a while ago. Everyone can see what has been

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committed to. It is time for the signatories to step up and for the

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bloodshed to come to an end. I would be quite surprised if this is... If

:01:51.:01:57.

there aren't some bumps along the road as we try to implement this

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agreement. There will be obstacles. There will likely be setbacks but

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this is a moment of opportunity and we are hopeful that all of the

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parties will capitalise on that. After all, the stakes are high.

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Our Washington correspondent Barbara Plett-Usher gave me more

:02:16.:02:18.

I've got the terms here as they are set out.

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They seem to have dealt with one of the big sticking points,

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which is who qualifies to take part in the

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Any group aside from Islamic state and the al-Nusra front

:02:30.:02:35.

who signs up to the terms will be accepted.

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They have to accept a UN facilitated political process,

:02:39.:02:42.

cease all attacks with weapons, refrain

:02:43.:02:44.

from trying to acquire territory, allow full humanitarian access

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to their areas and use proportionate force in self defence.

:02:54.:02:56.

Those groups have until midnight on Friday to indicate to the UN

:02:57.:02:59.

and Russia and the United States that

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The Syrian army, the forces are going to be held to the same

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terms and the Russians are stated as being the ones who will seek

:03:10.:03:12.

So there is something on paper, steps to follow

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through and there is a target date, the cessation of hostilities

:03:20.:03:22.

is supposed to come into effect at midnight on Saturday.

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Do we understand why there is this reluctance to call it a ceasefire?

:03:27.:03:31.

I think the attempts to stop the violence in Syria have been

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so unsuccessful that they want to make

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sure that they keep the bar low in terms

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I think what they want to highlight is

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they have specifics on how this is going to work.

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One of the big problems in Munich after they agreed

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on the cessation of hostilities is that the Russians

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would continue with the Syrian army bombing Aleppo and trying to take

:04:03.:04:05.

territory to the north, to the Turkish border.

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The cessation of hostilities wasn't going anywhere.

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Now it looks like there are mechanisms to deal with that.

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For example, the Russians and Americans

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in this statement say that they are going to have a communications

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hotline set up so that they can distinguish parties who are being

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There is some sort of tribunal or task force to complain

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to and also that they're going to set out the territory

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which is excluded from the cessation of

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The Islamic state territory so that they know which

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I'm joined by my colleague from BBC Arabic. How meaningful is this? The

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superpowers are involved in this and one of them is involved directly in

:05:10.:05:15.

the fighting. The pro-Assad forces on the ground will face any

:05:16.:05:19.

difficulties achieving advances on the ground. The main issue is the

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al-Nusra front, that is close to the Al-Qaeda ideology, it is still

:05:30.:05:37.

considered as a terrorist group. This truce has excluded the Islamic

:05:38.:05:44.

State and the al-Nusra front from the cessation of hostilities. That

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means that the Russians can carry on bombing these two groups. So there

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has always been disagreement about who these groups are? Other groups

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are considered, such as the free Syrian army. The bombing of al-Nusra

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front will mean a total collapse of the truce. So there is a risk of

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business as usual on the ground. There is an opposition meeting going

:06:22.:06:28.

on in Saudi at the moment. Has there been any reaction? We spoke to one

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of the leaders taking part and we asked him what he thought of this

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announcement? He said that the United States and the Russians have

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announced something and are responsible for it but we haven't

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reached any decision yet and are still debating it. They don't expect

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to reach a decision before tomorrow. The pro-Saudi opposition is meeting

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in Riyadh tomorrow and they will meet their decision then. There are

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some improvements on the ground. Thereafter some humanitarian

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gestures that were welcomed by the opposition as a strong and solid

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basis for diplomatic efforts that may take place in the future within

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this Geneva talks. People have been watching what is happening in Syria

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with despair and will wonder what will change at midnight on Friday.

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In the next 48 hours we will hear more positions from the opposition

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at least. We will put these questions to all parties who are

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involved in the fighting and know what they consider al-Nusra. If each

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come with a final answer of how it is going to work on the ground, to

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exclude al-Nusra from the cessation of hostilities, how it's going to

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work, then it is going to be clearer. They are discussing this at

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the moment and we will know more in the next 48 hours. Thank you very

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much. The British prime minister has made

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an impassioned case for staying in the EU to a packed House

:08:13.:08:15.

of Commons in Westminister. David Cameron said he believed

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the choice was between being an even greater Britain inside a reformed EU

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or taking a leap into the dark. The Labour leader dismissed

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as "irrelevant" the deal struck by Mr Cameron in Europe

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but said Labour is overwhelmingly for remaining within

:08:27.:08:28.

the European Union. He was in the unusual position

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of needing not to persuade MPs on the opposition benches

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but many on his own side. So far more than 100

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Conservative MPs have said Our Political Editor Laura

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Kuenssberg watched the exchanges. Wherever he goes,

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chaos often follows. Boris Johnson revealed he wants to

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leave the European Union yesterday. Although the Prime Minister

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had tried to persuade him to join his side

:08:58.:09:01.

and campaign to stay. Is his decision

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about Britain's future? Are you losing the

:09:05.:09:12.

argument over the EU? It was David Cameron's job

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to set out the case to stay. And a test of how many of his own

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MPs back what he claims will be We are a great country

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and whatever choice we make, I believe the choice

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is between being an even greater Britain inside a reformed EU,

:09:39.:09:46.

or a great leap into the unknown. The Prime Minister seemed just

:09:47.:09:49.

as passionate about needling Boris Johnson, suspecting

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the London Mayor's decision is about ambition to take

:09:54.:09:55.

the Prime Minister's job. I have no other agenda

:09:56.:09:58.

than what is best for our country. I am standing here

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telling you what I think. My responsibility as Prime Minister

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is to speak plainly about what I believe

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is right for our country and that is what I will do

:10:14.:10:23.

for the next four months. The referendum is not just about two

:10:24.:10:26.

men, allegedly friends, May I ask my right honourable

:10:27.:10:28.

friend, the Prime Minister, to explain to the House

:10:29.:10:36.

and to the country in exactly what way this deal return

:10:37.:10:40.

sovereignty over any field of lawmaking to these

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Houses of Parliament? Seven ministers who sit

:10:48.:10:52.

at the Cabinet table are at odds Only one of them put himself

:10:53.:10:55.

in the front line today. But Tory backbenchers are split

:10:56.:11:01.

and would not shy of speaking out. For so much labour he has achieved

:11:02.:11:05.

so little that the European Union The security of Europe is dependent

:11:06.:11:08.

on Nato and not the EU. Those who advocate a no vote do not

:11:09.:11:18.

seem to know what a no vote means. Those who want to leave Europe

:11:19.:11:23.

are unable to agree on the terms Number 10 is not just trying to keep

:11:24.:11:27.

us in the EU but to keep This is the back entrance

:11:28.:11:39.

to Downing Street. On Saturday when the Cabinet met

:11:40.:11:42.

Eurosceptic ministers did not leave through the front door

:11:43.:11:45.

but snuck out instead. Now Tory divisions are

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in the wide open now. David Cameron hopes

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it can stay polite. Some of David Cameron's loudest

:11:53.:11:55.

cheers came from the Labour side. They will criticise him,

:11:56.:12:04.

but support staying in the EU. Labour believes the EU is a vital

:12:05.:12:09.

framework for European trade A vote to remain is in the interests

:12:10.:12:12.

of people not only on what the EU delivers today but as a framework

:12:13.:12:20.

through which we can achieve more I want Scotland and the rest

:12:21.:12:23.

of the UK to remain However, if we are forced out,

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I am certain the public in Scotland will demand a referendum

:12:30.:12:36.

on Scottish independence and we will protect

:12:37.:12:39.

our place in Europe. And the importance of this debate

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brought out old faces. Does he believe we have more

:12:46.:12:47.

influence in the EU or outside? Surely the answer is more

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influence inside the EU. This referendum is about the future

:12:55.:12:58.

of our country, not the future The six of us who stand here today

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are committed to campaigning They seem to shy to speak

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in the Commons today but you will hear plenty from these

:13:12.:13:16.

ministers who want to defy Their voices will influence

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the campaign for and against the EU, but it is yours that

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will really count. Britain would be more vulnerable

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to terror attacks and counter terrorism would be harder if the UK

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leaves the European Union. That's the warning today

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from director of Europe's But many campaigning for an exit say

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it's "laughable" to suggest Europe Our security correspondent

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Frank Gardner takes a closer look. Britain is a top

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target for terrorists. But in recent years it has stopped

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a large number of attacks on plots A key question now is whether that

:13:58.:14:01.

would change of Britain left the EU. Britain's border already differs

:14:02.:14:11.

from its neighbours. That is partly because we are

:14:12.:14:13.

an island and partly because we do not belong to

:14:14.:14:17.

Europe's Schengen borderless zone. That it means it's harder if not

:14:18.:14:28.

impossible to smuggle guns We do not have an open border

:14:29.:14:31.

with the EU, we are out You have to have a passport or visa

:14:32.:14:37.

to get into Britain and you have to be checked

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when you come into Britain. We do not have a right to stop

:14:42.:14:44.

people entering from other countries within the EU and if we to control

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numbers coming in it is difficult to do that unless we take

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back control of borders. The Paris attacks were a shocking

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reminder of what could happen here. So-called Islamic State already has

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sympathisers in this country. European intelligence

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failed last year. Britain's intelligence

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agencies like MI6 behind me, have their closest relationships not

:15:15.:15:20.

with Europe that the United States. They do share information

:15:21.:15:30.

and tip-offs with their European partners but tend to do it

:15:31.:15:33.

bilaterally, on a country by country basis and not through

:15:34.:15:36.

an EU wide mechanism. In many European countries,

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especially Belgium, the intelligence agencies are often reluctant

:15:39.:15:40.

to share what they know The head of Europol insists European

:15:41.:15:42.

intelligence helps Britain. UK gets considerable

:15:43.:15:51.

benefit every day. Thousands of cases I see

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at Europol every year, British police are given operational

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benefits and to target criminals and terrorists seeking

:15:59.:16:01.

to penetrate the UK. With diplomacy, the EU plays a big

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role in collective security. It has imposed sanctions

:16:06.:16:12.

on the resurgent Russia. But some say leave deterrence

:16:13.:16:24.

to Nato and not the EU. Remember Nato brings in the US

:16:25.:16:26.

and Canada and crucially in Europe, Norway and Turkey, not members

:16:27.:16:29.

of the European Union. The Nato population is 900

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hundred million, compared There are arguments on both sides

:16:37.:16:38.

but the truth is Britain's existing security arrangements are likely

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to remain unchanged if we stay Ten million people in the Indian

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capital Delhi are now without water, Protesters demanding job guarantees

:16:47.:16:54.

have sabotaged a key supply canal. The army has taken control

:16:55.:17:00.

of the waterway. But it will still take several days

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before the supply is fully restored because the canal

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needs to be repaired. For 10 million people in Delhi,

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this is how they now More than half of the population

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of Delhi now has no They depend on bottled water

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and the supply of water It is an extraordinary situation

:17:26.:17:31.

for any capital city to be in, and certainly a city

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on the scale of Delhi. And it has been caused by a battle

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over caste privilege. These people are part

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of an upper caste group. They have taken to the streets

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to demand it be reclassified as lower caste - that way

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they will get automatic rights The protestors badly damaged this

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canal, which supplies more than half The military has now taken control,

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but repairs are needed before That means millions in Delhi

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will have to continue to get There is no water.

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We are having no water. Myself, my two sons,

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my daughter-in-law, my grandson. The head of Delhi's water board told

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the BBC today it will take three or maybe four days before

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a supply is fully restored. Like millions in the city,

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Mr Kumar's taps are likely to be A man who worked as an Uber taxi

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driver has been charged with six counts of murder

:18:52.:19:22.

after six people were shot dead in the town of Kalamazoo in the US

:19:23.:19:25.

state of Michigan on Saturday. Jason Dalton, who's 45,

:19:26.:19:28.

also faces ten other charges, among them eight felony

:19:29.:19:30.

firearms violations. In Bolivia, President Evo Morales

:19:31.:19:32.

says he'll respect the result of a referendum on whether he can

:19:33.:19:34.

stand for a fourth term in office. He told journalists

:19:35.:19:37.

he was optimistic, but would wait But, with more than 70%

:19:38.:19:39.

of the votes counted, those opposed to the move

:19:40.:19:43.

are leading by a ten-percent margin. First elected in 2006,

:19:44.:19:45.

Mr Morales is Bolivia's first It's been home to around five

:19:46.:19:48.

thousand migrants for the best part of a year, but the French

:19:49.:19:51.

authorities have confirmed that the southern section

:19:52.:19:54.

of the migrant camp in Calais known as "the Jungle" will start

:19:55.:19:56.

being cleared this week. Most of those who live there have

:19:57.:19:58.

come from the Middle East and Africa, and they'll have

:19:59.:20:01.

until Tuesday evening to go This flattened area is land

:20:02.:20:04.

the state has already reclaimed from the so-called

:20:05.:20:08.

Jungle migrant camp. The people here are

:20:09.:20:12.

being told to move out. And so the French Interior Ministry

:20:13.:20:14.

has sent officials to You have to leave this

:20:15.:20:19.

part of the Jungle. This Kurdish young man, Abdullah,

:20:20.:20:35.

is presented with two options - move into a converted shipping

:20:36.:20:39.

container, or relocate to a migrant On the outskirts of the Jungle,

:20:40.:20:43.

a small village of containers. Mohammed moved his family of six

:20:44.:21:02.

here after five months The Jungle, this

:21:03.:21:05.

is better, thank God. They have travelled

:21:06.:21:14.

from Afghanistan, and despite many failed attempts, Mohammed

:21:15.:21:24.

and his family still aim to join The whole camp will

:21:25.:21:27.

eventually be shut down. The southern half, where

:21:28.:21:33.

we are now, is to go first. This is the cultural and commercial

:21:34.:21:36.

heart of the Jungle. People come to stay warm

:21:37.:21:39.

and socialise in the restaurants Clear this area, it is not just

:21:40.:21:41.

dwellings, but it is a sense of community that is

:21:42.:21:51.

going to be lost. The French are hoping to fill buses

:21:52.:21:54.

like this one with migrants relocating to temporary

:21:55.:21:57.

shelters across the country. Local authorities say more

:21:58.:22:00.

than 2500 have already signed This man didn't want

:22:01.:22:04.

to show his face. He has given up on the idea

:22:05.:22:11.

of getting to Britain. He has applied for asylum

:22:12.:22:14.

here in France instead. I tried to go to England

:22:15.:22:16.

but they closed the border. Now I want to stay here,

:22:17.:22:20.

because every facility in England... France also give us

:22:21.:22:24.

facilities for the living. For this woman from Iran this

:22:25.:22:28.

is a necessary goodbye. The Jungle is as close

:22:29.:22:38.

as she managed to get Her resolve is unchanged,

:22:39.:22:40.

though she admits this bus After five months in the uncertainty

:22:41.:22:47.

of the Jungle, she is on the road again, wanting to be

:22:48.:23:05.

reunited with her partner, but instead taking another

:23:06.:23:09.

ride to the unknown. Ukraine has chosen an ethnic Tatar

:23:10.:23:21.

singer from the annexed region of Crimea to represent it

:23:22.:23:24.

at the Eurovision Song Contest this Jamala's song, entitled

:23:25.:23:27.

1944 refers to the year Josef Stalin enforced deportation

:23:28.:23:37.

of the Tatar people. The singer's great-grandmother

:23:38.:23:41.

was one of around 240,000 people who were sent to Central Asia

:23:42.:23:45.

by the dictator who accused them Earlier I spoke to our correspondent

:23:46.:23:48.

in Kiev, Tom Burridge, about the politics surrounding

:23:49.:23:54.

the song. This isn't your average Eurovision

:23:55.:23:59.

entry, it's gone down pretty well. Well enough to win here

:24:00.:24:03.

as the entry for Ukraine. It won, according

:24:04.:24:09.

to a popular vote and a panel of judges last night,

:24:10.:24:11.

so it will, if the Eurovision panel or judges don't disqualify it

:24:12.:24:18.

for being too political. The rules of Eurovision are that

:24:19.:24:20.

you can't have a political song. But Jamala has told Eurovision

:24:21.:24:23.

she doesn't believe it is political, it is a personal story of family

:24:24.:24:26.

and the tragedy that befell Nevertheless,

:24:27.:24:29.

it's talking about 1944. One suspects that there is a lot

:24:30.:24:31.

of allusion to today's situation You can't avoid the fact

:24:32.:24:34.

that song has added poignancy within the context

:24:35.:24:38.

of the political crisis Nearly two years ago,

:24:39.:24:46.

an unrecognised Ukraine maintains that Crimea

:24:47.:24:56.

is part of its sovereign territory. Of course, Jamala does admit

:24:57.:25:10.

at least that her father and grandfather, interestingly,

:25:11.:25:13.

are still in Crimea and she says that they are being

:25:14.:25:15.

patient and still hope that one day Crimea will be

:25:16.:25:17.

returned to Ukraine. Returning to our top story. The US

:25:18.:25:33.

and Russia have announced that a cessation of hostilities should go

:25:34.:25:38.

into effect at midnight on Friday in Syria. They said that the truce

:25:39.:25:46.

didn't include so-called Islamic State and the al-Nusra front. They

:25:47.:25:50.

agreed on the 12th of February that a truce would come into effect and

:25:51.:25:56.

that has been quibbled over. Finally, the announcement of this

:25:57.:25:59.

cessation of his stunts tease this coming Saturday. That said. Next,

:26:00.:26:01.

the weather. From the team, goodbye. Skies are clear and the temperature

:26:02.:26:18.

is dropping away. There is a

:26:19.:26:19.

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