06/04/2016 World News Today


06/04/2016

The latest national and international news, exploring the day's events from a global perspective.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 06/04/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Documents from the Panama leak show almost a third of the business

:00:08.:00:12.

of the law firm Mossack Fonseca comes from its offices

:00:13.:00:15.

We have a special report which also shows the other

:00:16.:00:19.

lengths China's elite are going to to get their millions

:00:20.:00:21.

Donald Trump's so-far smooth path to an outright win hits a major bump

:00:22.:00:26.

with Ted Cruz's decisive victory in Wisconsin.

:00:27.:00:30.

We look at what a contested Republican Party convention in July

:00:31.:00:32.

Also coming up, the unhealthy side of the fashion industry.

:00:33.:00:39.

A Gucci advert is banned for using a "thin and gaunt" model.

:00:40.:00:47.

Suits you, sir - we meet the first female tailor to move

:00:48.:00:50.

Leaked files from the secretive Panamanian law firm

:00:51.:01:07.

Mossack Fonseca show almost one third of its business

:01:08.:01:10.

comes from its offices in Hong Kong and China,

:01:11.:01:12.

These files show the staggering amounts of cash leaving China,

:01:13.:01:18.

a move that's undermining the country's fragile economy

:01:19.:01:21.

They're desperate to keep their money safe.

:01:22.:01:33.

Many are anxious to smuggle their wealth out of China, away

:01:34.:01:38.

I met a man who works as a money mule, carrying cash

:01:39.:01:45.

TRANSLATION: I strap the money to my body or carry a small bag.

:01:46.:01:54.

They target those with lots of luggage or who are nervous.

:01:55.:02:05.

Even the Chinese elite are keeping their money offshore.

:02:06.:02:09.

We showed you leaked files from Mossack Fonseca that revealed

:02:10.:02:13.

how the relatives of China's leaders use offshore companies.

:02:14.:02:20.

Now we have learned China is the firm's biggest market.

:02:21.:02:23.

Mossack Fonseca manages more than 16,000 offshore companies

:02:24.:02:27.

It is not just people tied to the leadership, people are moving

:02:28.:02:36.

out of China on a scale never seen before and much of that money passes

:02:37.:02:40.

-- people are moving their money out of China.

:02:41.:02:51.

Then the money has to go somewhere and is often parked in real estate -

:02:52.:02:54.

This woman works for a company that lists companies abroad.

:02:55.:03:06.

In the UK, typically London is popular.

:03:07.:03:10.

we have seen Brighton has seen a 700% increase in popularity.

:03:11.:03:19.

Every Chinese citizen can transfer ?35,000 a year outside the country.

:03:20.:03:23.

But for those who want to hide their wealth,

:03:24.:03:31.

The outflow of capital is something the Chinese government is unhappy

:03:32.:03:40.

But the fact that they are giving it a fair bit of priority and yet

:03:41.:03:52.

the scale of the problem remains so large means they're not entirely

:03:53.:03:56.

Across Hong Kong it is common to see visitors from mainland China

:03:57.:04:04.

Think of it as a symbol for what is happening around the globe.

:04:05.:04:10.

Chinese leaders are spending their money elsewhere.

:04:11.:04:17.

They're protecting themselves, but making China more vulnerable.

:04:18.:04:23.

What is driving people to take so much money out of the country? The

:04:24.:04:37.

majority of people taking money out of the country are simply worried

:04:38.:04:40.

about the economy, so they have built up a nest egg in China but now

:04:41.:04:45.

the currency is really depreciating, and their concerns it is going to

:04:46.:04:50.

depreciate further, so they want to protect their money and sent it off

:04:51.:04:54.

shore. There is a smaller group of people who have made their money

:04:55.:04:58.

illegally and they want to hide it offshore. While China has a serious

:04:59.:05:02.

anti-corruption campaign that doesn't seem to be ending any time

:05:03.:05:07.

soon, they are desperate to hide their wealth overseas. It is legal

:05:08.:05:12.

to take a certain amount of money out of China. Every Chinese person

:05:13.:05:18.

can take up to 50,000 dollars out of China a year, but many people to

:05:19.:05:23.

take more money out to invest or buy property. To take more out, they

:05:24.:05:26.

have to find their way to do it. Some ways are legal but a lot of

:05:27.:05:32.

them are not. What has been the general reaction in China to some of

:05:33.:05:36.

the spotlight which has been cast on some of the offshore habits of the

:05:37.:05:43.

Chinese? The story has been almost entirely blocked. At the same time,

:05:44.:05:48.

this whole story really has put pressure on the Chinese leadership.

:05:49.:05:53.

On the one hand, we learned that the relatives of Chinese top leaders are

:05:54.:05:58.

themselves clients of Mossack Fonseca but the Chinese leadership

:05:59.:06:01.

has said they need to do something to cut down the massive flow of

:06:02.:06:05.

money leading the country, because it is hurting the economy. Are

:06:06.:06:10.

worried the authorities? What effect is it likely to have if it

:06:11.:06:15.

continues? They keep saying they want to enforce Chinese banking

:06:16.:06:19.

controls, which are quite strict, but they're so many ways to get

:06:20.:06:25.

money out, so many methods, the people who helped smuggle money out

:06:26.:06:28.

are one step ahead. It is a real problem. An extraordinary picture of

:06:29.:06:34.

a man taping hundreds of dollars to his legs in an airport. I spoke to a

:06:35.:06:40.

money mule who said he travelled several times across the border

:06:41.:06:43.

every day carrying a small bag of money. It is always transferred into

:06:44.:06:47.

US dollars before they carry it because they are lighter than the

:06:48.:06:52.

Chinese currency. He carries that several times a day. This is a very

:06:53.:06:55.

difficult thing for the authorities to clamp down on.

:06:56.:06:58.

Elsewhere, the impact of the Panama Papers revelations has

:06:59.:07:00.

been felt strongly in Iceland, where the Prime Minister

:07:01.:07:02.

Our correspondent Paul Adams sent us this update on the situation.

:07:03.:07:10.

So this is the parliament building here in Reykjavik.

:07:11.:07:12.

This square in front of Parliament has for the past

:07:13.:07:21.

two nights been the scene of major protests,

:07:22.:07:26.

almost unprecedented in Iceland's recent history.

:07:27.:07:28.

And, as we saw yesterday, they forced the

:07:29.:07:34.

This has been one of the distinctive features of these protests, the

:07:35.:07:45.

bananas hanging from the trees and sometimes wielded by the

:07:46.:07:52.

demonstrators and even thrown at Parliament along with pots of

:07:53.:07:55.

People feel this is not just a story about their

:07:56.:07:59.

former Prime Minister and his financial dealings, dealings that

:08:00.:08:01.

they knew little about in the past, but that this is symptomatic of a

:08:02.:08:05.

demonstrators and even thrown at Parliament along with pots of

:08:06.:08:08.

That, in some ways, Iceland has become a banana

:08:09.:08:15.

republic, a place where the political and business elites

:08:16.:08:17.

conduct their activities behind and out of the

:08:18.:08:19.

public eye, in secret and

:08:20.:08:20.

not necessarily in the interest of the people themselves.

:08:21.:08:22.

And so that is why we are probably going to see

:08:23.:08:25.

more protests here by people who say they want to see a complete

:08:26.:08:28.

resignation of the Government, a new political system, and even some

:08:29.:08:31.

argue a new constitution to increase transparency and reduce the scope

:08:32.:08:33.

for what they see as a level of public corruption.

:08:34.:08:36.

We have so many political problems, I think it is

:08:37.:08:39.

too much for such a small nation to have such big

:08:40.:08:42.

I think it's really amazing how much a

:08:43.:08:47.

little country can do so much kind of damage to its own country and

:08:48.:08:51.

just be pretty much a laugh around the universe.

:08:52.:08:55.

The ruling coalition believes that it can carry

:08:56.:08:58.

But a new poll out today suggests that 70% of

:08:59.:09:04.

Icelanders want to see more resignations.

:09:05.:09:06.

Indeed, a lot of people wanting entirely new

:09:07.:09:09.

When we spoke to one member of the coalition last night,

:09:10.:09:13.

he admitted that early elections are a real possibility.

:09:14.:09:20.

The fallout continues for the European football

:09:21.:09:21.

Police in Switzerland have raided its headquarters

:09:22.:09:24.

after it became embroiled in the financial scandal.

:09:25.:09:26.

Authorities were searching for a contract signed by former Uefa

:09:27.:09:29.

official Gianni Infantino, who is now President of Fifa.

:09:30.:09:34.

The leaked document allegedly shows that rights to televise

:09:35.:09:36.

the Champions League were sold to businessmen accused of bribery.

:09:37.:09:39.

Gianni Infantino and Uefa deny any wrongdoing.

:09:40.:09:46.

The frontrunner for the Republican US presidential nomination,

:09:47.:09:48.

Donald Trump, has suffered a heavy defeat in the latest

:09:49.:09:50.

He was beaten into second place by the Texan senator Ted Cruz,

:09:51.:09:55.

who called his victory a "decisive turning point".

:09:56.:09:58.

In the Democratic race, Bernie Sanders scored a strong

:09:59.:10:00.

Our North America Editor, Jon Sopel, explains.

:10:01.:10:14.

Last night was a turning point in the race...

:10:15.:10:19.

Good morning, Milwaukee, after a dramatic night

:10:20.:10:22.

Donald Trump beaten, and conservative talk radio hosts like

:10:23.:10:25.

The thing about Donald Trump, not only does he act

:10:26.:10:28.

like a 12-year-old bully in the playground,

:10:29.:10:35.

he is a remarkably thin-skinned individual who runs away

:10:36.:10:37.

This visit to a diner yesterday morning was

:10:38.:10:42.

the last that they've seen of Donald Trump in Wisconsin.

:10:43.:10:45.

He held no party, no news conference, nothing last night.

:10:46.:10:47.

A man who has been ever present on TV screens went to ground.

:10:48.:10:59.

His campaign issued a terse statement saying Ted Cruz is worse

:11:00.:11:01.

But try telling that to the victor, the Conservative evangelical

:11:02.:11:16.

He is massively preferred to Mr Trump and they are

:11:17.:11:25.

Last night a win for him, a win for them.

:11:26.:11:29.

It is a call from the hard-working men and women of Wisconsin

:11:30.:11:36.

This is a significant victory for Ted Cruz because it means

:11:37.:11:47.

there are now no certainties in the Republican race.

:11:48.:11:50.

Yes, Donald Trump is way out in front, but having spent nine

:11:51.:11:53.

months to find political gravity, tonight he has come back

:11:54.:11:57.

to earth with a bump, to the delight of the people in this

:11:58.:12:02.

room and a good many in the Republican establishment.

:12:03.:12:07.

Because what they're eyeing now is something called a brokered

:12:08.:12:10.

The candidate chosen by arm-twisting and backroom deals.

:12:11.:12:16.

The Republican grandees' last chance to stop Trump.

:12:17.:12:26.

This summer's convention takes place in the hall where the first

:12:27.:12:28.

Republican debate took place last August, but Donald Trump isn't

:12:29.:12:30.

It could be a bloody battle for the nomination, for the soul

:12:31.:12:35.

Jon Sopel, BBC News, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

:12:36.:12:43.

The EU has been outlining proposals to reform its asylum system

:12:44.:12:46.

At the moment people must claim asylum in the first

:12:47.:12:50.

member nation they enter, but this has put a huge burden

:12:51.:12:52.

The European Commissioner, Frans Timmermans, said EU countries

:12:53.:12:55.

should consider either adding an emergency measure when nations

:12:56.:12:58.

could no longer cope, or scrapping the present system altogether.

:12:59.:13:07.

The WhatsApp phone messaging service says it has started encrypting

:13:08.:13:10.

That means nobody except the sender and receiver can read them,

:13:11.:13:13.

More than 1 billion people around the world use

:13:14.:13:17.

WhatsApp to send text, picture and video messages.

:13:18.:13:21.

You can also use it to make phone calls.

:13:22.:13:23.

WhatsApp says this announcement is about privacy and freedom

:13:24.:13:26.

of speech, and will protect its customers' messages.

:13:27.:13:29.

We've been speaking to Jurgen Geuter, a journalist and computer

:13:30.:13:43.

scientist, about the benefits of and problems with encryption.

:13:44.:13:48.

We use encryption when we do online banking and we don't want anybody

:13:49.:13:53.

else to see what the amount of money we have is in our bank accounts

:13:54.:13:58.

or be able to even send money to someone else

:13:59.:14:00.

Also, of course, there is the benefit in being able

:14:01.:14:06.

to encrypt your data, so your passwords are not sent

:14:07.:14:09.

in the clear and people can't take over your social media accounts.

:14:10.:14:13.

As well as not being able to listen to what ever it is that

:14:14.:14:17.

If you want to talk online with a lawyer or with a doctor,

:14:18.:14:23.

you don't want anyone else to be able to listen in on that exchange

:14:24.:14:26.

That is obviously useful if not important to have that

:14:27.:14:34.

kind of infrastructure there for everyone to use.

:14:35.:14:40.

It creates problems when it is seen as an absolute because we have

:14:41.:14:43.

in our Western democracies, we have the rule of law,

:14:44.:14:45.

we have freedoms, freedom of speech, your flat or apartment is secure

:14:46.:14:50.

from anyone else looking into it, but we also know that these

:14:51.:14:59.

freedoms sometimes need to be restricted in order

:15:00.:15:01.

Matt Burgess is a writer at the technology magazine Wired.

:15:02.:15:09.

He can tell us how widespread encrypted messaging apps are.

:15:10.:15:16.

There's the end-to-end encrypted messaging platform Telegram.

:15:17.:15:19.

That is completely free, it has 100 million users,

:15:20.:15:21.

This move from WhatsApp actually makes it the biggest encrypted

:15:22.:15:26.

We could see other companies follow suit, so Facebook owns WhatsApp,

:15:27.:15:30.

so Facebook could move down this line.

:15:31.:15:32.

iMessage on Apple is already end-to-end encrypted,

:15:33.:15:36.

so there are other companies that do this and other protocols that do.

:15:37.:15:39.

But it's going to be something that increases.

:15:40.:15:41.

It will provide a challenge for authorities who want to seek

:15:42.:15:44.

information and actually access information that is on these phones

:15:45.:15:47.

that actually is encrypted, but that's where the balance has

:15:48.:15:50.

These companies have to work with authorities on certain

:15:51.:15:54.

cases and they also have to protect their users

:15:55.:15:56.

Now a look at some of the day's other news.

:15:57.:16:04.

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic has appeared

:16:05.:16:06.

in court for the first time since he was sentenced

:16:07.:16:08.

to 40 years for genocide and crimes against humanity.

:16:09.:16:10.

He described his conviction as "monstrous" and insisted

:16:11.:16:12.

he was innocent, urging the judge at The Hague to release him

:16:13.:16:15.

Prosecutors at the Yugoslavia crimes tribunal in The Hague say

:16:16.:16:21.

they will appeal the acquittal of Serb ultra-nationalist

:16:22.:16:23.

Vojislav Seselj, who was found not guilty last week of war crimes

:16:24.:16:26.

and crimes against humanity during the Balkan wars in the 1990s.

:16:27.:16:29.

His Radical Serb Party is expected to return to parliament

:16:30.:16:31.

The jury at the Hillsborough inquests into the deaths of 96

:16:32.:16:40.

Liverpool fans has been sent out to consider its verdicts,

:16:41.:16:43.

The coroner has asked the jury to consider 14 key questions,

:16:44.:16:49.

including whether or not the match police commander was responsible

:16:50.:16:53.

for the unlawful killing of the fans by gross negligence.

:16:54.:17:04.

The Italian fashion house Gucci has been banned from using an advert

:17:05.:17:07.

in the UK which features an "unhealthily thin" model.

:17:08.:17:09.

Here's the image - take a look and see what you think.

:17:10.:17:13.

Gucci has defended it, saying the model is toned and slim.

:17:14.:17:23.

We were trying to show you the image in question from the advert. You may

:17:24.:17:29.

catch a glimpse in the monitor behind B, but it does show a very

:17:30.:17:36.

thin model. Israel is the first question to ban size zero models.

:17:37.:17:39.

Dr Yofi Tirosh from the University of Tel Aviv

:17:40.:17:41.

Israel was the first country to take this measure. What led to that move?

:17:42.:17:56.

There were a few cases of anorexic models being hospitalised, being at

:17:57.:18:02.

real risk to their life and health, and they later converted, a fashion

:18:03.:18:12.

agent decided to take things into his hands and he lobbied for this

:18:13.:18:17.

law, which goes to show you that people can make a real difference

:18:18.:18:24.

single-handedly. What the law says is two simple things. One, if you

:18:25.:18:29.

want to shoot models, you have to provide the publisher of the adverts

:18:30.:18:38.

or commercials with a note from the doctor that says the BMI of the

:18:39.:18:47.

model is not too low. So the responsibility is on the advertising

:18:48.:18:55.

agency in the newspaper or television channel cannot put an

:18:56.:19:01.

advert that shows waiflike models. The other thing that it does is

:19:02.:19:06.

that, if you use photo shop in adverts to make your models zero,

:19:07.:19:13.

you have to put a banner, just like we would have on cigarettes, that

:19:14.:19:18.

says, we used photo shop to make this model their nerve. What was the

:19:19.:19:24.

general reaction and what impact has it had on the images people are

:19:25.:19:28.

seeing? Was there a positive response? As you would expect, some

:19:29.:19:35.

of the responses were positive and some were negative, especially from

:19:36.:19:39.

models themselves, that said this was an infringement on their right

:19:40.:19:46.

to free occupation and their income would be damaged etc. But, after the

:19:47.:19:56.

first wave, it became part of the reality and nobody is really

:19:57.:19:59.

opposing it these days. Although, I have to say, in my eyes, the

:20:00.:20:05.

importance of this law is pretty much in the discussion that it

:20:06.:20:12.

raised. There are no cases. Nobody goes to court at this law. It is

:20:13.:20:16.

only four years old, so we don't know what will happen. It is more

:20:17.:20:20.

the fact that it exists and that, through it, we are talking about

:20:21.:20:27.

body image issues. This is what I see as the importance of this law.

:20:28.:20:32.

We will have to leave it there. Fascinating. Thank you for joining

:20:33.:20:36.

us. We appreciate your time. The World Health Organisation has

:20:37.:20:43.

warned the world is facing The disease now affects

:20:44.:20:46.

almost one in 11 adults. The surge is mainly down to type two

:20:47.:20:56.

diabetes, the four most closely linked to lifestyle and diet. The

:20:57.:21:04.

WHO said that was to blame for 1.2 million deaths in 2012.

:21:05.:21:09.

The conviction of a woman in Northern Ireland two days ago

:21:10.:21:11.

for taking pills to bring about an abortion has reopened

:21:12.:21:14.

The law on the termination of pregnancy is much more

:21:15.:21:17.

strict in Northern Ireland than the rest of the UK.

:21:18.:21:20.

We hear from another woman in Northern Ireland who decided

:21:21.:21:22.

to end her pregnancy in the same way.

:21:23.:21:24.

Here's our Ireland Correspondent Chris Page.

:21:25.:21:29.

There is no issue in Northern Ireland more complex

:21:30.:21:31.

This woman has spoken to the BBC about her experience.

:21:32.:21:36.

She took pills illegally to bring about a miscarriage.

:21:37.:21:40.

We've agreed to her request for anonymity.

:21:41.:21:43.

I'm afraid for this young mother who has been taken

:21:44.:21:52.

This what is like what was going on in the 1880s.

:21:53.:22:00.

The woman who was prosecuted about about 11 months pregnant.

:22:01.:22:05.

She took drugs that she bought online.

:22:06.:22:08.

The court heard she could not raise enough money to go to England

:22:09.:22:11.

The judge gave her a suspended sentence.

:22:12.:22:18.

I would be concerned that the judge undermined

:22:19.:22:22.

This antiabortion campaigner thinks the punishment

:22:23.:22:27.

She is opposed to any moves to loosen

:22:28.:22:34.

I think it is important that Northern Ireland continues to be

:22:35.:22:38.

There are many women's lives destroyed in the United Kingdom,

:22:39.:22:43.

And the denial of the human rights of 200,000 babies

:22:44.:22:46.

There have been some cases here at the High Court in Belfast

:22:47.:22:57.

examining how the legislation should be interpreted and whether the law

:22:58.:22:59.

But in Northern Ireland, abortion remains basically illegal,

:23:00.:23:04.

The Stormont Justice Minister has tried to legalise terminations

:23:05.:23:09.

in cases where the foetus has a fatal abnormality.

:23:10.:23:13.

But other politicians wouldn't agree.

:23:14.:23:16.

He thinks there could be a change after the elections to the Northern

:23:17.:23:19.

The reality is we cannot continue to assume that people catching

:23:20.:23:24.

planes to England will solve the problems of Northern Ireland.

:23:25.:23:28.

Limited changes have been talked about, but none of main political

:23:29.:23:34.

parties here are in favour of bringing the law into line with

:23:35.:23:37.

Events like the recent prosecution generate strong feelings on both

:23:38.:23:41.

London's Savile Row is known worldwide for its famous suits

:23:42.:23:54.

Today history was made when for the first time

:23:55.:23:57.

in over 200 years a shop was opened by a female master tailor.

:23:58.:24:10.

For 170 years, it's meant quality, tradition

:24:11.:24:13.

I'm the first female master craftsmen to have a business

:24:14.:24:38.

on Savile Row, and the first woman to have their own name

:24:39.:24:41.

above the door, so yes, I think that's quite something.

:24:42.:24:43.

Kathryn Sargent learned her skills on Savile Row.

:24:44.:24:47.

Born in Leeds, the day she first visited London's home of tailoring,

:24:48.:24:50.

All the tailors look like clubs, almost.

:24:51.:24:56.

They have beautiful uniforms and garments in the windows,

:24:57.:24:59.

so I was determined and I thought this is where I would like to work.

:25:00.:25:05.

Introducing the best dressed street in the world.

:25:06.:25:08.

Savile Row was founded here by the first and most famous

:25:09.:25:11.

So now Henry Poole has a new female neighbour.

:25:12.:25:16.

And chief cutter Philip Parker remembers her well.

:25:17.:25:19.

She was the one female among a number of young men...

:25:20.:25:25.

I did try, but, you know, that's the way it goes.

:25:26.:25:32.

And while Kathryn Sargent is the first on the Row,

:25:33.:25:40.

What used to be a men-only world is changing fast.

:25:41.:25:54.

Next the weather - but for now from me and the rest

:25:55.:25:59.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS