11/05/2016 World News Today


11/05/2016

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This is BBC World News Today with me Philippa Thomas.

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Our top story - one of the bloodiest days in Iraq in years.

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Iraq's bloodiest day this year - at least 94 people die

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Many people were killed and you can see blood everywhere. They were poor

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people who are here to earn their living.

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After the UK Prime Minister David Cameron labelled Nigeria

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as "fantastically corrupt", the

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Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari agrees.

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Why should I oppose him for telling the truth? I could pretend that

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Nigerian is corrupt and there is no corruption in Nigeria.

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High heels or high tail it our of here -

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the London receptionist sent home from work for apparently refusing

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It's the bloodiest day of attacks in Iraq this year.

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More than 90 people killed in a series of bomb blasts.

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The strikes appear to be orchestrated by the so called

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Islamic State, their target: Shia communities across

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The first attack happened at a busy market in the Shia stronghold

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of Sadr City - at least 63 people died there.

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Further car bombings in the northwest

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Kadimiya neighborhood and nearby Jamiya followed -

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Carnage in Sadr City. Scenes reminiscent of the dark days of Iraq

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sectarian war. This mainly Shi'ite district witnessing the worst attack

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on the capital in months. It was rush hour. A pick-up truck.

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Explosives hidden under fruit and vegetables detonating is the busy

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market. So-called Islamic State says that it carried out the attack and

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it was aimed at Shi'ite militia men, but many of the victims were women,

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some at a nearby beauty salon, preparing for weddings. TRANSLATION:

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Many people were killed and you can see blood everywhere. They were poor

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people and they were here to earn their living. They were killed in

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cold blood. Why did this happen? Can this corrupt Government tell us why?

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People have been destroyed because of this Government. The blast

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destroyed vehicles and shops. Some were smouldering hours after the

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attack. Security has gradually improved in Baghdad, with

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large-scale attacks happening only occasionally. Islamic State capable

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of striking fear far beyond the territory it controls. In February,

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a double suicide bomb killed 70 people, also in Sadr City. But other

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neighbourhoods were also caught up in the latest violence, with more

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death and injury in Kadimiya. This was the bloodiest day in Baghdad

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this year. The attacks come in the midst of a deep political crisis.

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The Government crippled by factional divisions and Parliament unable to

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meet. While the politicians dither, civilians wonder why the Government

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can't do more to protect them. With me is the BBC's Middle East

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analyst, Alan Johnston. What do you think the self-styled

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Islamic State was trying to achieve here? Well, think back to my tears

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to the summer of 2014 and the Islamic State group was rampaging

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across Iraq seizing towns and cities and great swathes of territory, but

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the picture now is very different. For several months now, on front

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lines across the rock to the West, the Islamic State group has been

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pushed back by the Iraqi security forces, but it does retain the

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capacity to carry out devastating bomb attacks in the heartland of

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what it would see as its enemies. It uses these means to undermine

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confidence in the Government and the security forces. Remember that

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Islamic State always wants to portray itself as the force that

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fights for defence of the Shia Muslim community and it will feel

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that it benefits all the time from any deepening of the sectarian

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divide and of course by targeting a soft target likely market in Sadr

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City, that bastions of Shia, they will feel that they are deepening

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that divide. So it was to create anger. What can be done to stop it?

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The security forces faced the most enormous challenge. Islamic State

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seem to have an end list stream of fanatical young men who are ready to

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die in an effort of getting these terrible bombs into the most

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sensitive parts of the capital. Many people in Islamic State will no

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Baghdad very well indeed. It is a huge, sprawling city. Countless ways

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in an out and very easy for these people to mingle with the throngs in

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the streets, but on a day like this, of course, we know that the security

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forces, many members of them will be risking their lives every day on

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checkpoints and carrying out searches and so on, but on a day

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like this it is easy to believe that they are simply not getting good

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enough intelligence, that they have not been able to probably populate

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penetrate Islamic State and get the kind of information that might just

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prevent these bomb attack is getting through. And meanwhile, civilians,

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ordinary people, going about their business, and they are dying. Some

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of the things you have been reported on really do bring it on.

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Absolutely, we heard a report saying that a bomb had gone very close to a

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beauty salon where there were some brides preparing for their weddings

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and even, we understand, some of the brooms, perhaps where IT barber shop

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nearby, that they too were all among the casualties. As you say, the most

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ordinary civilians on the front line in this war in Baghdad. Thank you

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very much. In the last couple of hours,

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Brazil's Supreme Court has rejected President Dilma Rousseff's last

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ditch appeal and right now the Senate is proceeding with its

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debate on a full impeachment trial. It's expected that a simple majority

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of Senators will vote in favour, which means Brazil's first woman

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president will be automatically suspended from office

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and from presiding over Dilma Rousseff is accused

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of doctoring her government's budget figures - she says she's

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the victim of a judicial coup The Senate president has warned

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that if they vote to go ahead with the trial,

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it will be a long and traumatic process for Brazil,

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with no quick results. This debate could go on for hours

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and at the heart of it is the accusation that Dilma Rousseff is

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accused of doctoring her Government's figures. She says she

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is the victim of a political coup by her components.

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Joining us from the capital Brasilia is the political

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Our correspondent Julia Carneiro is in the capital Brasilia.

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Is this book expected to go against? Yes, it is. Senators have been

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speaking very openly about how they will vote and they estimate that the

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majority will vote in favour of the impeachment of President Dilma

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Rousseff, which means if this happens, President Dilma Rousseff

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will be suspended for up to six months while she faces trial in the

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Senate. She is expected to record a statement to the nation later today

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in which she will reinforce this message that she is facing an

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attempted coup and that she will fight to return to Government during

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this trial to defend herself so that she can finish her mandate of the

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two years that I left as she told the BBC in an interview last week.

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Her supporters have been out, haven't they, in force, but there

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are also many who frankly want to see her go. Yes. The country is very

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divided. We have seen mass demonstrations in Brazil over the

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past months. Millions of people taking to the streets to call for

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the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff, but as this moment

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approaches and as it becomes more complete, her defenders and

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supporters are also taking to the streets. Yesterday, there were lots

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of road blockages disrupting traffic and destructing life in many parts

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of the country. Here, we are in the main administrator Leo --

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administration area. There are demonstrations planned here for

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pro-impeachment and also anti-impeachment, so we will see how

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this develops. It is not expected that these demonstrations will grow

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very big because at this point, even though people might have their

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convictions, their beliefs in what is right or wrong, the outcome seems

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pretty clear that President Dilma Rousseff will be temporarily

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suspended and people are already talking about what comes next. She

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will be replaced by her vice president and there is ready lots of

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talk about how he will compose his cabinet and how he will try to put

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Brazil's economy back on track. Meanwhile, this whole process hasn't

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done a lot for the reputation of politicians in general in Brazil.

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Not at all. We have a Congress where so many legislators face corruption

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allegations and the speakers and Senate... Well, just last week, the

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former Speaker of the lower house was suspended for corruption

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allegations and he was the person behind the impeachment proceedings

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and that was driving this process so there is not that much credibility

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unfortunately here towards politicians and President Dilma

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Rousseff herself is not facing corruption allegations, the

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allegations for her impeachment are based on claims that she resorted to

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manoeuvres to mask public spending in her former mandate and her

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current mandate, borrowing money from state banks to pay for social

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policies, so there is this whole feeling, mood in Brazil about his

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big corruption probe that is going on and that has contributed for her

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popularity to drop but there are no criminal allegations against her and

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she has been portraying herself as a victim of this political drive to

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oust. You have a long day ahead of you. Thanks for keeping us up to

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date. Now a look at some of

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the days other news. The UK has raised the threat level

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from dissident Northern Ireland It means an attack on the British

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mainland is now considered The threat level in Northern Ireland

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has not changed and currently The Italian parliament has given

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the government the green light The long-awaited and much-disputed

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legislation was hailed by civil rights groups as a landmark

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achievement, but it's been criticised by some

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conservative politicians Ukrainian border guards have

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recovered 17 paintings stolen last November from a museum in Verona -

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including some works President Petro Poroshenko

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was pictured inspecting the haul. His office said the paintings

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were seized in a special operation, while they were about to be

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transferred to neighbouring Moldova. The Nigerian President,

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Muhammadu Buhari, has told an anti-corruption conference

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in London that he won't demand an apology from David Cameron

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for describing his country But he has urged Britain to return

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billions stolen by corrupt officials One of his Government's main goals

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is to fight corruption. He is telling the truth. He was talking

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about what he knew and if you look at this Government and what the

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Government I am heading has been trying to do, we campaign on three

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things, security, economy, and fighting corruption. What has been

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uncovered since we came in. What is the skill of corruption in Nigeria?

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It is enormous. I think it is high time some action is taken so that we

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can turn things around. I think a lot of that money that has been

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siphoned off from the public purse from Nigeria has ended up in London

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and other European capitals. What are you doing to try to get that

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money back? It is still here and in America. We had to produce the

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evidence. We had to go through the financial institutions. Through

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their shipping lines. It will take time, that we are determined to get

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as much of the documentation done. The international meeting that

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David Cameron is organising in London this Thursday will bring

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together politicians, business people and other groups

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as part of efforts to clamp down on bribery, money-laundering

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and other forms of wrong After his comments to the Queen,

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we asked our Nigeria correspondent The British Prime Minister says

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Nigeria is fantastically corrupt. But is he right? Well, Nigeria has

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been looted from top to bottom. But it is only the world's 32nd most

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corrupt country. Oil rich, it should be well off, but $20 billion in oil

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revenue has simply disappeared and from the Army's budget, another $15

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billion was stolen, money that was supposed to be spent on arms to

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fight Boko Haram. Now, Nigeria's president has declared war on

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corruption. He has lodged a tough new anti-corruption campaign. And

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dozens of officials are under investigation. Among the assets

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recovered, cars, jewellery, houses, and even one of these, and M are eye

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scanner, allegedly bought by the official for his Private clinic --

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MRI scanner. So can it work? It has to work because we cannot afford to

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go back to where we are coming from. I do not think everybody is on

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board. Some people profited from the status quo. You can imagine that

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those who profited with the starters quote will not be happy with what is

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happening right now. Corruption comes at a terrible price. It could

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cost Nigeria nearly 40% of its potential growth. And that is

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something the country can't afford. A hospital in Jordan is unlike any

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in the world. It specialises in racial reconstruction. Our

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correspondent reports from a place where people's faces are

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reconstructed on a daily basis. -- facial reconstruction. I want to

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show you around a really incredible place. This is where the tree people

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who have been entered in warrants around the Middle East. People who

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have been really horrifically injured. The aim is to rebuild their

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bodies and also their lives. So come with me. This play specialises in

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reconstructive surgery in plastic surgery and the patient are from all

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around the Middle East and all of them have had life changing

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injuries. In the operating theatre, and today they are doing seven

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operations on Syrians and Iraqis, and the aim is to get this man here

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walking properly again. Here on our project...

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This is the physiotherapy department, and this is where the

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patients spend long, long hours working with the physiotherapists on

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getting their bodies fit again. This is where the kids were being

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treated here come for education and therapy. This is the paediatric

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counsellor. What are you doing here? As we've been hearing,

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coverage of the comments has Reports on this channel

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are being blacked out. Instead, state media outlets have

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dedicated their coverage to the Queen's dress sense

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and notable party attendees. This was the moment when the viewers

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in China had their BBC News coverage scrambled. Shortage covered when we

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started covering another element. This is the section Chinese censors

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found ineligible for broadcast. Whitney is our royal correspondent

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Sarah Campbell. That was the official cameraman. Yes, the Queen

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has a cameraman. What happened was about 18 years ago when 24-hour news

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coverage really started to come to the fore, it was decided that rather

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than all of the main broadcasters in Britain, which is sky, ITN, and the

:20:38.:20:42.

BBC, rather than in having the own crews follow the Queen is all of the

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time, essentially getting the same pictures, then it made sense for

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them to pull together so they all pay for one cameraman and his

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footage is the footage that is recorded and sent around the world.

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And so the Queen is very used to this and the cameraman is at

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many royal events and the Queen is very used to having Peter around. He

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does it very discreetly and he is their most of the time. He is at

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garden parties and when she goes to open schools, all of these visits

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are all recorded and the footage is given to the broadcasters. What

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makes this one different is that the Queen said something which has been

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construed widely as pretty controversial. And that is what made

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it newsworthy because as we know the Queen has been on the tone for 64

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years and has rarely been known to say anything controversial and many

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people say that is why she has been so successful. It is fascinating,

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because you might have assumed that she speaks her mind all the time and

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we never get to hear it, but actually she is quite tight-lipped

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all of the time and steer is not bland conversation but quite easy

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conversation. And you can see why, because here she has made a comment

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that she clearly feels quite strongly about. It is fairly

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black-and-white that she considered the Chinese officials had been very

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rude, her words, and what has happened is that it has created

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headlines all across the world. Has it been damaging? Well, from the

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palace's perspective, I think it is fair to say that they are not

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ecstatic that this is what we are talking about today, these comments,

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that at the same time, the instinct is that they are not looking at

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changing the system, they're not looking at reviewing it or censoring

:22:37.:22:39.

this footage in any way, so that gives some sense that they can deal

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with it. It might be slightly more of a problem for the British

:22:46.:22:48.

Government because there has been so much diplomacy behind the scenes to

:22:49.:22:54.

build up relationships with China. And today, from that perspective,

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the Chinese spokesperson was very keen to point out that this was a

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very successful visit, the relationship continues to be a

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strong one, this golden area of relations continues. The Foreign

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Secretary gave a very interesting statement. What is fascinating about

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this is it is a bit of an insight into these visits. He said that the

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Chinese lizard got a bit stressful on both sides, but this was a

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massive occasion back in October of last year, all the pomp and

:23:28.:23:31.

circumstance, a four-day visit. It was a really big deal for both

:23:32.:23:35.

countries and this is a little bit of a revealing insight into how the

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Queen felt about it, behind the scenes. We are both wearing heels,

:23:39.:23:47.

but not vertiginous, and this is relevant because this is a story

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today. Sent home from work for refusing

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to wear high heels. That's a story a lot

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of you are reading on the BBC online, and it's all about a British

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woman Nicola Thorp who says she was sent home from a

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receptionist job because she wanted She's now petitioning

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the British Parliament to change the law, so that women aren't

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subject to such a requirement. Let's hear first from

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Nicola Thorp talking to the BBC She said, I'm sorry. All women who

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work here on reception have to wear heels and there was a male

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receptionist there and I said he is not wearing heels and she laughed at

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me, which is understandable. They said, you have to go home. They said

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I could go out and buy a pair of heels and were happy for me to do

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that with my own money and I refused. It was a nine-hour shift to

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escort clients from the front desk to meeting rooms. I would be on my

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feet for nine hours. I said I do not want to do that in high heels and I

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am not entirely sure why adding two inches of four inches to my height

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makes me more professional or makes me what any professional manner. I

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don't think it affects how come across. Well, we asked the firm

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involved for a statement, they responded

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"The dress code is not a PwC policy."

:25:10.:25:25.

The company it that provided the job here is actually called Portico.

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It says "In line with industry standard practice, we have personal

:25:29.:25:31.

appearance guidelines across many of our corporate

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locations," but now it also says, "We have taken on board the comments

:25:35.:25:37.

regarding footwear and will be reviewing our guidelines."

:25:38.:25:48.

You can get in touch with me - Philippa Thomas - and most

:25:49.:25:51.

of the team on Twitter - I'm @PhilippaBBC.

:25:52.:25:55.

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