21/06/2016 World News Today


21/06/2016

The latest national and international news, exploring the day's events from a global perspective.


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Hello, this is BBC World News today, with me Karin Giannone.

:00:00.:00:00.

On the programme today - the husband of the British MP Jo Cox

:00:07.:00:10.

speaks about her killing for the first time:

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It is seen as a symbol for something much bigger. A sense of creating

:00:20.:00:27.

more compassion and more love in the world. The thing I do not want to

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lose if she was also their mum. Brendan Cox pays his

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tribute to his wife - and talks about the grief

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which her death has caused Just 36 hours to go before

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the UK's EU Referendum - we'll look at how the rival camps

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are trying to win over voters - and reveal what Britain's EU

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neighbours think of the debate. The International Olympic Committee

:00:49.:00:51.

confirms that Russian track and field athletes WILL be banned

:00:52.:00:53.

from the Rio Games - after allegations of

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state-sponsored doping. We'll reveal just what it takes

:00:56.:00:58.

to persuade the Pope to open The husband of the British Labour MP

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Jo Cox, who died last week after being shot and stabbed

:01:03.:01:28.

in her constituency, has spoken publicly for the first

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time about her terrible loss. He told the BBC he believes

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she died because of her He talks movingly to the BBC's

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Political Editor Laura Kuenssberg about his wife, the grief

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of their children and the outpouring of love from the public

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at her sudden death. The public reaction has been off

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the scale and the two things I have been very focused on is how do

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we support and protect the children and how do we make sure something

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good comes out of this? And, what the public

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support and outpouring of love around this does,

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it is it also helps the children see that what they are feeling,

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other people are feeling. The grief they feel isn't abnormal,

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that they feel it more acutely, more painfully and more personally,

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but actually, their mother was someone who was loved

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by lots of people and therefore it's OK to be upset and it's OK for them

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to cry and be sad about it. And the reason I wanted to speak

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today was just to thank the public, who have been incredible

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in response to this. What will you sell your children

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about her as they grow up? One of the things from the public reaction

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is she is being seen as a symbol for something bigger, a sense of

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creating more compassion and smart blob in the world. The thing I do

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not want to lose if she was also their mum. -- more love in the

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world. As well as the political memory and the symbolism I do not

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want them to forget that. Was she worried about the current political

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culture? Definitely, and from left and right. She was worried that the

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language was becoming more course and people were being driven to take

:03:55.:03:59.

more extreme positions. I think she worried we were entering an age that

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we have not seen maybe since the 1930s of people feeling insecure for

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lots of reasons, economic or security, and then populist

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politicians, whether Donald Trump in the USA or whoever else, exploiting

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bat and diving communities to hate each other. This has happened is

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when Britain is engaged in a big conversation about our place in the

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world and Europe. We know she was clearly bursting in the EU but what

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did she make of how the conversation was being conducted. -- she was

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clearly for staying in. She was a passionate pro-European and worried

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about the tone of the debate is, not that it is not a legitimate debate

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and there is legitimate views on both sides but more about the tone

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of whipping up fears and is whipping up hatreds. Do you want it now about

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people using her in political debates? Boost -- do you worry now.

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She was a politician with strong political views and I believe she

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was killed because of those views. She died because of them and she

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would want to stand up for those, in death as much as she did in life.

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And what will you remember? I will remember with someone --

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someone was incredible energy, joy, about living life and no regrets

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about how she lived her life. She met the world would love -- with

:05:50.:06:00.

love. Both for her children and family but also people she did know.

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She was not perfect but she just wanted to make the world a better

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place and contributes and we love her very much.

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It's been one of the most divisive and hard-fought campaigns

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Britain has ever seen - but it's almost time

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There are just 36 hours to go before the UK votes on its referendum

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to decide if it will stay in, or leave, the European Union.

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In just under an hour's time one of the biggest debates

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of the campaign takes place at London's Wembley Arena.

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Leading figures from the Remain and Leave campaigns are among

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John Pienaar reports on the day's developements.

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Where this thing comes out you know it's serious. The campaign has been

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called the bad that seek leave and heads for remain. David Cameron

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today played on both, saying don't risk the economy.

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It will just be you in the polling booths. Taking a decision that will

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affect your future, your children's future, your grandchildren's future.

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It is stronger if we stay, if we believe we put it at the risk and

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that is no going back. Remain campaigners say Black Friday

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could see the pound and shares tumble if we vote out. Its format

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camera adviser says he is struggling and was one years ago -- the warned

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years ago immigration would never be under control.

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It is amazing to see Cameron wheeled out by panicky spin doctors which is

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ever imagine they have lost economic and immigration arguments. As we

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were warned in Government many years ago it was impossible to meet

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targets on immigration as long as we were in the EU.

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Leaders believe they are the ones who draw the crowds. Attacks from

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Nigel Farage on migration strictly sour note with opponents, but he

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does not care. This is what people will vote on in

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the referendum. Getting back control of our borders and using pressure on

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public services. Frankly, I do not care where the doctor loss has came

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from. I value the skills, dedication and professionalism. Our NHS is an

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example of what people working together can achieve.

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Tonight the drivers have arrived at Wembley covering up for the last big

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debate of the campaign. Boris Johnson, and Sadiq Khan. We have

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heard the arguments, free of the economy and worry about mass

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migration. It is not about who can reach the most hearts and minds.

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Tonight and ended the final hours of campaigning. -- in the final hours.

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Well my colleague Ros Atkins is at Wembley arena and has been

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speaking to one of the UK's leading experts on polling.

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This is looking as though it will be extremely tight, which could go to

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the wire. If the polls are right at all, it looks as though it will be

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something very close to 50-50. The most recent poll with the remain,

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50, leave freshly. We had a couple of other polls slightly different

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but the corrective message is it is a very tight race. -- most of the

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polls say it is a very tight race. The secret of the exit poll is by

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going to the same polling stations as we went to five years previously.

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That enables us to compare results polling station by polling station

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between elections and enables us to overcome a difficulty which is we

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don't count, vote at individual polling stations, we bring them to a

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single place. It is difficult to know that each polling station is

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representative. By doing it this way we get around that problem but you

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cannot do it for the referendum because there is no previous boat.

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I feel what the media there is the risk of an echo chamber with poles.

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The narrative last week was it was good for leave and this week it is

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things are getting better for remain, we saw the pound surging. If

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some of the narrative be media is telling accurate?

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The first thing to say is the remarkable stability of opinion

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polls. For most of the referendum the Poles have literally and

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consistently said 54 remain, 54 leave. Polls over the telephone

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slightly different but pimping inconsistent picture. That has been

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less stable over the past few weeks -- painting and -- painting a

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picture. That doesn't seem to have reversed a bit but we're certainly

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not in a position where the beam inside look as strong as they did

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two weeks ago. The poll that just came out, by telephone, until very

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recently every telephone pole with remain ahead and now even the

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telephone polls are saying it was very close, albeit with remain may

:11:54.:11:59.

be slightly ahead. Internet polls saying believe may be slightly

:12:00.:12:07.

ahead. It this tighter and it was an appropriate remain has made since

:12:08.:12:11.

bad polls last week is not quite of the character for us to be sure they

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will one. -- will win. So - the UK gets to vote,

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but the whole of the European Union will have to deal with

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the consequences, The campaign here has been fought

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on two main issues, Here's the view from our

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correspondents in three of the most Germany does not want Britain to

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leave the EU. There is genuine alarm among politicians and Berlin that

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the Brexit is a possibility. Do not expect to get much from them because

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there is also a concern that recent German interventions have been

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interpreted by British voters as interference. The majority of

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Germans are frustrated and perplexed by the referendum debate. A recent

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poll found around 80% of Germans think regs it is a bad idea. There

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are obvious reasons. -- think Brexit is bad. Germany considers Britain to

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a be ported political and economic ally. There are strong ties between

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the two countries, such as a car industry. If Britain leaves that is

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a concern other member states may seek concessions or even head for

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the door. People in Poland are watching the

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referendum closely. It affects so many Polish families. They are about

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850,000 polls in the UK, making them the largest non-British nationality.

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The worst thing for them is the uncertainty. Especially those who

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have not lived in Britain long enough to claim permanent residency.

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The fact is no one knows what working conditions would be like for

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polls after a Brexit vote. It Poles desire to lead Britain may reduce

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the amount of cash they send to families. That is the $1 billion a

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year. -- desire to leave Britain. If they come home that could be good

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news for Pollard as pollen has a rapidly ageing society and a

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shortage of skilled workers. -- good news for Portland. Here in Athens,

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where less than a year ago they were in a similar position with the EU.

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Most people here will tell you that if they have the chance they would

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vote for a Brexit. Given the state of the economy and markets there is

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a real fear here that if Britain then leave the EU it could have a

:14:58.:15:00.

massive financial impact on ordinary people. There is also a fear that if

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one country is seen to leave it could have a domino effect on

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countries like Greece and the entire European project could tear apart

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and back, they tell me, is the problem. Even the most Eurosceptic

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people and police feel they have sacrificed so much already to stay

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in Europe they do not want to find themselves accidentally falling out.

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-- people here at field. -- people here feel.

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This is the scene live at Wembley now, where the BBC's Great Debate

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High profile politicians, business leaders and cultural

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experts will be speaking in front of a live audience of thousands -

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and it will all be broadcast live on BBC News, both here in the UK

:15:45.:15:47.

and around the world, starting from 1900 GMT.

:15:48.:15:59.

The International Olympic Committee, has confirmed that Russian track

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and field athletes will be banned from this year's Rio Games.

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Last week, the governing body of world athletics, the IAAF,

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decided not to lift a suspension imposed on Russia,

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following allegations of state-sponsored doping -

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The president of the Olympic Committee, Thomas Bach,

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said serious doubts have been raised on the presumption of innocence

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for athletes from Russia - and

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Each athlete coming from these two countries will have to declare the

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Mac declared ineligible, following an individual procedure and

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individual evaluation of the situation.

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Russia was of course quick to respond.

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Here's the general secretary of the Russian Athletics

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Please, find a compromise for clean athletics. We can organise anything

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against doping in athletics, for any criteria to organise such a

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procedure. In any case we should be sure that clean athletes can compete

:17:14.:17:18.

at the Olympics and other official competitions as well.

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Live now to Lausanne in Switzerland and our sport

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Is this the end of the presumption of innocence? Has everything been

:17:23.:17:33.

turned on its head? What we heard from Thomas Bach was it gets off

:17:34.:17:38.

message. The Olympic Games are only a few weeks away and his message

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was, as far as Russia and Kenny are concerned, they could be taking no

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chances. -- Russia and Kenya. The weird individuals wanting to go to

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Russia and Kenya in any sport must be evaluated by the International

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Federation before they are given permission. -- any individuals

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wanting to go. What we will have in the next few weeks are a battle

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between Russia, who are still very much hoping their track and field

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stars will be able to go to Rio, and the IAAF and it will be played out

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that the Court of Arbitration for Sport, the highest legal body for

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sporting disputes. We heard from the Russians and they will lodge appeals

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from the Olympic Committee and individuals. But the IAAF are

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seemingly in line saying, as it stands, you cannot go and compete

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and only a small number of Russians, outside the Russian testing regime,

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then go and must compete under a Russian flag. The Russians will not

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take this lying down and they still see each and indicating that in the

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courts. Russian state TB was sounding very

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upbeat and reporting outcome. Potentially it could have been

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worse. -- Russian state TV. That plays into the Russian narrative,

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this argument of collective responsibility. They feel they are

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being collectively punished against individual justice. Is it the right

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clean athletes, people not tested positive, are denied an opportunity

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to go to the Olympic Games because of the actions of others? That is

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the argument Russia is putting forward. Today, what they got was

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effectively the hope, a slim hope they can pursue this through the

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courts. Thomas Bach saying he is waiting for these appeals to go

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through and it will be in their hands and the International

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federations to decide on that basis. But we understand IAAF are sticking

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to their guns and Russia have not fill the criteria requested of them

:19:58.:20:02.

to come back into international competition and it will be the Court

:20:03.:20:06.

of arbitration in sport that will have a big final say in this.

:20:07.:20:10.

The International Criminal Court has sentenced the former Congolese

:20:11.:20:12.

vice-president Jean-Pierre Bemba to eighteen years in

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prison for crimes against humanity and war crimes.

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The atrocities were carried out in the neighbouring Central African

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republic by his private army nearly fifteen years ago.

:20:21.:20:30.

Jean-Pierre Bemba, now the RC vice president now an international court

:20:31.:20:38.

convict. He was sent into 18 years in prison for failing to stop put

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under his command killing, routing and reaping in the Central African

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Republic in 2002 and 2003. The chamber convicted under article 28

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AA as a person effectively acting as a military commander who knew that

:20:58.:21:04.

forces under his effective authority and control were commenting about to

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commit the crimes against humanity of murder and rape and the war

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crimes of murder, rape and pillaging. Before pronouncing the

:21:16.:21:19.

sentence the judge detailed a lasting trauma inflicted on rape

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victims, many of which were young girls. This trial mark the first

:21:24.:21:28.

time the court focuses on rape as a weapon of war and the first time a

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defendant is held directly responsible for war crimes committed

:21:34.:21:39.

by his subordinates. Jean-Pierre Bemba, who created his

:21:40.:21:43.

rebel group, the movement for the liberation of Congo, with the

:21:44.:21:48.

support of Uganda in 1998, sent 1000 offers trips to the central African

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Republic between October 2002 and March 2003 to support the country's

:21:54.:22:01.

reader. -- said over 1000 troops. During this time his forces are

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accused of leading a widespread attack against civilians. Some of

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his supporters argue he was not in the Central African Republic when

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the crimes were committed and the troops were answering to the orders

:22:15.:22:21.

of the flight-mac authorities. His lawyers will appeal the court 's

:22:22.:22:26.

decision, he said. -- answering to the orders of the flight-mac

:22:27.:22:30.

authorities. They were hoping he would be freed in time for the

:22:31.:22:35.

presidential election schedule in November. It is now clear that will

:22:36.:22:38.

not happen. On top of the sentence today, Thomas -- Jean-Pierre Bemba

:22:39.:22:50.

will have to answer further charges. Breaking news, reports from Libya

:22:51.:22:54.

saying 20 people have been killed in an explosion at and -- ammunitions

:22:55.:23:06.

install. The explosion happened with local people entered the abandoned

:23:07.:23:10.

base. It is not clear what triggered the blast. French police have

:23:11.:23:20.

arrested several Polish football fans after trouble in Marseille

:23:21.:23:25.

after the Euro 2016 football match. Using tear gas and batons they broke

:23:26.:23:30.

up fight in the port area. On the pitch, Poland won their game against

:23:31.:23:36.

Ukraine one - nil. Germany topped the group with the one - zero win

:23:37.:23:44.

over Northern Ireland, who finished third.

:23:45.:23:48.

Today, June the 21st is the longest day of the year

:23:49.:23:51.

The date has long been part of celebrations, with Stonehenge,

:23:52.:23:55.

which has stood in the West of England for thousands of years,

:23:56.:23:57.

the traditional gathering place here in the UK.

:23:58.:24:04.

Many of the people who went took part in Druid ceremonies,

:24:05.:24:08.

harking back to the days before the Romans invaded Britain.

:24:09.:24:10.

The UK is not of course the only place where the longest -

:24:11.:24:14.

or if you're in the Southern Hemisphere, shortest -

:24:15.:24:16.

day was marked - we particularly liked this image from Macedonia,

:24:17.:24:18.

at the Kokino Megalithic Observatory.

:24:19.:24:20.

However, while June the 21st is best known as the Solstice,

:24:21.:24:22.

it's also been given a more modern event to mark.

:24:23.:24:25.

It's National Selfie Day, in America, at least.

:24:26.:24:26.

Taking a photo of yourself at roughly arm's length is now

:24:27.:24:29.

so popular, the selfie-sharing site Instagram has just celebrated having

:24:30.:24:32.

So just why are we so keen to keep taking and uploading

:24:33.:24:35.

Our North America Technology Correspondent Dave Lee has been

:24:36.:24:39.

asking Instagram's co-founder and chief executive,

:24:40.:24:40.

People like to thank self is are new but if you look at history of Art,

:24:41.:24:51.

what is one of the largest formats? The portrait. -- like to think. Just

:24:52.:24:57.

now everyone can be an artist and capture lives. Do you think

:24:58.:25:03.

Instagram has taken the mantle of being the celebrity social network

:25:04.:25:07.

of choice? I would say it was Twitter previously but now

:25:08.:25:13.

celebrities seem to congregate on Instagram.

:25:14.:25:17.

Sure, there are a lot of celebrities on Instagram because celebrities

:25:18.:25:21.

know they can, to Instagram and have an audience. I mean, the Pope

:25:22.:25:26.

recently joined Instagram. We flew over to Vatican and sat with him.

:25:27.:25:36.

You pitched the Pope? You have too. I pitched that Instagram is the new

:25:37.:25:42.

way of communicating. If you want to get in touch I am on

:25:43.:25:50.

Twitter and we are also on Facebook. Stay with us for the great debate

:25:51.:25:54.

taking place in just over half an hour. Thanks for watching.

:25:55.:26:09.

Thunderstorms are going to develop across northern France through the

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latter part of Wednesday. Same for Thursday and Friday. With the winds

:26:17.:26:19.

backing this will drag

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