28/06/2016 World News Today


28/06/2016

The latest national and international news, exploring the day's events from a global perspective.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 28/06/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello, I'm Ros Atkins with World News Today in Brussels -

:00:08.:00:13.

where David Cameron is spending a working dinner, outlining his

:00:14.:00:16.

plans for Britain's future relationship with Europe.

:00:17.:00:24.

He's already been told that he can't expect to "cherry pick" a new deal -

:00:25.:00:28.

and tomorrow he'll find himself excluded from summit discussions.

:00:29.:00:36.

His possession was not helped by the tone in the European Parliament.

:00:37.:00:52.

You all after me. I have to say, you are not laughing now, are you?

:00:53.:00:58.

The other headlines : The Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn loses a vote

:00:59.:01:02.

of no confidence by a huge margin - but says he won't resign.

:01:03.:01:07.

And - has the EU referendum led to an increase in the number

:01:08.:01:10.

We'll discuss growing concern about the legacy

:01:11.:01:13.

Welcome to the European Council in Brussels on a day where the

:01:14.:01:38.

ramifications of the UK vote to leave the European Union continue to

:01:39.:01:42.

evolve and expand. Let me run you through the developments. In London,

:01:43.:01:49.

the Chancellor in charge of the UK economy said he anticipates tax

:01:50.:01:53.

rises and spending cuts in the coming months. Also, the opposition

:01:54.:01:58.

Labour Party is in complete disarray after its MPs voted through a

:01:59.:02:03.

no-confidence motion in its leader. More in a minute. And then in

:02:04.:02:07.

Brussels for the first time since the UK opted out of the EU, all 28

:02:08.:02:12.

member nation leaders are in one place this building, to talk about

:02:13.:02:18.

how the so-called Brexit is going to work. We begin our coverage of what

:02:19.:02:20.

has happened with Laura Kuenssberg. David Cameron might have

:02:21.:02:26.

wanted to slip in the back The Prime Minister made the same

:02:27.:02:28.

grand arrival as ever, While we are leaving

:02:29.:02:32.

the European Union, we must not be These countries are our neighbours,

:02:33.:02:40.

our friends, our allies, our partners, and I hope

:02:41.:02:43.

we will seek the closest possible relationship in terms of trade

:02:44.:02:46.

and cooperation and security, because that is good for us

:02:47.:02:50.

and that is good for them. That's the spirit in

:02:51.:02:54.

which the discussions He told us and them he wouldn't quit

:02:55.:02:56.

if he lost, and would start No surprise that the president

:02:57.:03:05.

of the commission didn't There is genuine upset

:03:06.:03:11.

and a desire to get on with it. The day after Brexit,

:03:12.:03:18.

I felt as if someone very close Brexit is not only about procedures

:03:19.:03:21.

and politics and interest. It is also about our

:03:22.:03:31.

emotions and fears. What do you have to say

:03:32.:03:35.

to the Prime Minister? I think he has to say something

:03:36.:03:38.

to us, not us to him. We should wait until

:03:39.:03:41.

the Conservative Party has But nothing can happen until Britain

:03:42.:03:43.

is ready to start, says Europe's Sometimes, these bunfights

:03:44.:03:53.

are all about working out the body language,

:03:54.:04:03.

trying to find out what is going on. Europe's leaders are sad and angry,

:04:04.:04:06.

almost in disbelief at what has been decided, and in no mood to make

:04:07.:04:11.

the exit process easy. But so many British voters felt

:04:12.:04:14.

the EU didn't listen. Nigel Farage wanted to enjoy

:04:15.:04:19.

the warm embrace of schadenfreude, delighted

:04:20.:04:21.

at Brussels' agony. Mutual loathing in the European

:04:22.:04:25.

Parliament today was pretty clear. When I came here 17 years ago,

:04:26.:04:32.

and I said I wanted to lead a campaign to get Britain

:04:33.:04:45.

to leave the European Union, Well, I have to say,

:04:46.:04:49.

you're not laughing now, are you? There is not upset at the results,

:04:50.:04:59.

but contempt for how After six years, David Cameron's job

:05:00.:05:02.

is not to make the deal. From the look on their faces,

:05:03.:05:18.

he has first to explain himself This will probably be

:05:19.:05:21.

one for the album. It is likely to be his last

:05:22.:05:26.

Brussels get-together. There is uncertainty about the basic

:05:27.:05:31.

blocks of our future relationship. Commiseration too alongside

:05:32.:05:34.

the deep confusion, But David Cameron is no longer here

:05:35.:05:37.

to be the one who decides. Laura Kuenssberg,

:05:38.:05:45.

BBC News, Brussels. You saw Nigel Farage, the Ukip

:05:46.:05:58.

leader being a little bit cheeky with members of the European

:05:59.:06:01.

Parliament. Later in a speech accused them of having never done a

:06:02.:06:07.

hard days work in a life which did not go down well. One person who

:06:08.:06:13.

pushed back hard was the former Belgian prime minister, a senior MEP

:06:14.:06:19.

in the European Parliament. He said to mystify Rush, one good thing

:06:20.:06:23.

about Brexit is the European Union will be paying his salary for much

:06:24.:06:33.

longer. We spoke to him about the tone he struck with mystify rush.

:06:34.:06:36.

We have watched you over the years, locking horns with Nigel Farage.

:06:37.:06:39.

This morning you accused him of using Nazi propaganda and you're

:06:40.:06:41.

He has gone and the UK has exited the European Union.

:06:42.:06:45.

The main thing that I want to do is not to attack somebody.

:06:46.:06:53.

The main thing I want to do is to reform.

:06:54.:06:55.

This morning you were attacking him with vigour.

:06:56.:06:59.

He said to the 700 people, members of the European Parliament,

:07:00.:07:07.

you do nothing, you have never worked in your life and then

:07:08.:07:13.

at the same time he says I am defending the poor man and he has

:07:14.:07:17.

an offshore financial system put in place.

:07:18.:07:21.

He looked for this attack from my side.

:07:22.:07:26.

He was so rude with the whole house, with the whole Parliament.

:07:27.:07:34.

When I watch you and Nigel Farage I'm thinking it is going to be

:07:35.:07:40.

difficult for the UK and the European Union to stay

:07:41.:07:43.

amicable while it goes through this process.

:07:44.:07:45.

Fortunately I don't think Nigel Farage is really

:07:46.:07:48.

Maybe Little Anglia but not Great Britain.

:07:49.:07:56.

I'm joined by Alberto Nardelli from Buzzfeed UK, Europe Editor.

:07:57.:08:08.

One of the huge journalists gathered. Have you spotted a

:08:09.:08:12.

difference between a European perspective and the British one?

:08:13.:08:17.

There has been some difference, when you talk to British officials, there

:08:18.:08:24.

is talk about the possibility of maybe the European countries

:08:25.:08:27.

offering the UK better membership terms, I asked that to one official

:08:28.:08:32.

and he describes the idea as delusional. Is that Britain has

:08:33.:08:37.

voted to leave and now it is about getting on with the exit

:08:38.:08:40.

negotiations but beyond that it is about sending a signal to the other

:08:41.:08:45.

EU member states that you cannot blackmail the countries and have a

:08:46.:08:52.

referendum and get better terms. They reminded us of Greece, they

:08:53.:08:55.

ended up with terms that were worse than they were offered before.

:08:56.:09:00.

Everyone wants to get on exit process, but they cannot. Everybody

:09:01.:09:06.

is waiting for the UK. They are and there seems to be some consensus now

:09:07.:09:12.

that in September once a new pro-minister is in place, that is

:09:13.:09:17.

when article 50 will be triggered. An extraordinary Council in

:09:18.:09:21.

Bratislava where more formal talks will begin however what is unclear,

:09:22.:09:28.

and I were asked too many people, what happens if the UK refuses to

:09:29.:09:32.

trigger Article 50 and treat is nobody knows! Presumably the people

:09:33.:09:37.

who voted to leave would ask the government why are you not

:09:38.:09:41.

triggering it so it would be a big domestic story. A question about the

:09:42.:09:44.

future of the European Union because I have been struck and spending last

:09:45.:09:50.

week in the UK there is quite a lot of confidence about the European

:09:51.:09:54.

Union future, the idea this vote will start a disintegration process

:09:55.:10:01.

seems premature. That is a fundamental point in this debate. As

:10:02.:10:06.

the German chancellor mentioned speaking to her Parliament in

:10:07.:10:11.

Germany, it is a key point and when a 27 member states renegotiate with

:10:12.:10:15.

Britain, the one thing they will have in mind is keeping the EU

:10:16.:10:19.

together. That will be at the front of the mind of the other countries

:10:20.:10:24.

and they will do everything they can to make sure the EU stays together.

:10:25.:10:29.

It'll make the negotiation for the UK even harder. A couple of other

:10:30.:10:35.

issues aside from Brexit, Nigel Farage was keen to point out this

:10:36.:10:39.

vote by the UK was one of the European Union's problems and a

:10:40.:10:43.

migrant crisis, the difficulties of the euro, they are greater

:10:44.:10:47.

difficulties and Britain exiting. When will they get discussed because

:10:48.:10:53.

Britain is dominating everything. There are two sides come on the one

:10:54.:11:00.

hand you... Niger since the referendum but before you had months

:11:01.:11:05.

and months of councils dominated by negotiations and changing Britain's

:11:06.:11:12.

status in the Union and the parallel migration crisis and a crisis still

:11:13.:11:18.

going on in Ukraine which people have forgotten about. All these

:11:19.:11:21.

issues are happening in parallel and all of them in different ways are

:11:22.:11:26.

pulling the strings of Europe, the migration crisis in Eastern Europe

:11:27.:11:31.

has created a backlash against refugees, Hungary will be holding a

:11:32.:11:37.

referendum on whether to take ref -- refugees. There are various

:11:38.:11:39.

migration debates around the continent. One of the biggest

:11:40.:11:44.

stories on Friday was the fact older people voted to leave and younger

:11:45.:11:50.

people had not voted to leave. But as feed has younger readers who

:11:51.:11:55.

follow news via your website. Do you think there is anger now towards the

:11:56.:12:04.

British decision -- Buzzfeed. It is a generational divide. If we look at

:12:05.:12:08.

the results, it is true most older people voted to leave the majority

:12:09.:12:14.

of young people voted to remain however it is also true that 80 per

:12:15.:12:19.

cent of all the people who voted and 40% of younger people voted so the

:12:20.:12:23.

flip side of the story is older people vote, if younger people voted

:12:24.:12:27.

in similar numbers, we may be talking about a different story. It

:12:28.:12:31.

is also about getting that vote out and if you care about these issues,

:12:32.:12:36.

they have to vote. Thank you for your time. I am looking over the

:12:37.:12:44.

press pit of the European Council, there are several thousand

:12:45.:12:48.

journalists here, they are not going anywhere because the leaders of the

:12:49.:12:52.

European Union are meeting over dinner and we hope to hear from some

:12:53.:12:56.

of them later. None of us are going anywhere but waiting for the

:12:57.:12:57.

statements when they emerge. And the political fallout

:12:58.:13:00.

after the referendum results shows no sign of easing for the main

:13:01.:13:02.

opposition Labour Party MPs have overwhelmingly backed

:13:03.:13:05.

a vote of no confidence in their leader Jeremy Corbyn

:13:06.:13:11.

after widespread criticism of his performance

:13:12.:13:13.

during the campaign. But Mr Corbyn is staying put -

:13:14.:13:17.

he says he won't bow out, arguing to do so would be a betrayal

:13:18.:13:21.

of all the party members Jeremy Corbyn is obviously

:13:22.:13:24.

uncomfortable, a leader under siege, a Shadow Cabinet patched together

:13:25.:13:39.

after mass resignations. Just look at his deputy,

:13:40.:13:41.

Tom Watson, on the right. Everyone knows he is not truly

:13:42.:13:50.

backing his leader, But later, most of his MPs

:13:51.:13:52.

were officially against him, leaving his team empty chairs

:13:53.:14:04.

and unfilled vacancies waiting for the leadership challenge that

:14:05.:14:06.

will now surely come. Jeremy must accept now that his

:14:07.:14:12.

leadership is untenable. He is unable to fill

:14:13.:14:15.

shadow ministerial posts, he is unable to fill the basic

:14:16.:14:17.

function of opposition, which is to hold the government

:14:18.:14:19.

to account, and he has to do Angela Eagle resigned yesterday

:14:20.:14:23.

as Shadow Business Secretary. Now she is weighing up a leadership

:14:24.:14:27.

challenge and is meeting Tom Watson Might reunite a party torn apart,

:14:28.:14:30.

and as she told me yesterday, I feel I have served

:14:31.:14:37.

in the best way I can, In the coming Labour leadership

:14:38.:14:42.

contest, a challenger needs backing from 50 Labour MPs or MEPs

:14:43.:14:48.

from the European Parliament. The contest's results

:14:49.:14:53.

will be announced at the autumn conference

:14:54.:14:54.

or an emergency It is still unclear if Mr Corbyn

:14:55.:14:56.

would automatically get on the ballot without needing

:14:57.:15:01.

nominations. Voting is by party members,

:15:02.:15:03.

registered supporters who have paid ?3 each,

:15:04.:15:06.

and affiliated union supporters. Are party members like these

:15:07.:15:14.

in Croydon beginning I ended up voting for him

:15:15.:15:15.

in the leadership election because I felt we needed a change

:15:16.:15:19.

and we needed to create a nicer But increasingly, I have become

:15:20.:15:23.

disillusioned and is appointed So many people say the same thing,

:15:24.:15:27.

that he is a lovely guy It is almost irresponsible for them

:15:28.:15:33.

to advocate for a new leader But Mr Corbyn has strong

:15:34.:15:42.

support in the country. Young members turned up today

:15:43.:15:49.

to urge rebels to back off. And among the loyal minority

:15:50.:15:54.

at Westminster, there is defiance. I think a lot of people are very

:15:55.:15:59.

concerned about the behaviour This week, we should have been

:16:00.:16:01.

exposing our hapless Prime Minister. Labour's past appearance of unity

:16:02.:16:09.

was always something of a charade, but now the fight is out in the open

:16:10.:16:12.

and whichever side wins, the wounds that are about to be

:16:13.:16:15.

inflicted will be painful and deep. As the UK prepares for a slow and

:16:16.:16:33.

painful diverse, the people of Turkey are wondering how that they

:16:34.:16:38.

should with Europe will develop. The government in Istanbul has been

:16:39.:16:41.

seeking to strengthen its case to join the EU but is that possibility

:16:42.:16:47.

closer or further away now? Are Turkey Reporter reports. Proud,

:16:48.:16:58.

patriotic and problematic. Turkey is the EU's neighbour it can't afford

:16:59.:17:02.

to ignore. After becoming a candidate for membership in 2005,

:17:03.:17:07.

relations between the sides largely frozen until the migrant crisis came

:17:08.:17:12.

along and EU realised it needed Turkey more than ever and so earlier

:17:13.:17:18.

this year EU and Turkish leaders struck a deal in Brussels, failed

:17:19.:17:22.

asylum seekers would be deported from Greece and sent back to Turkey.

:17:23.:17:26.

It cut the flow of migrants dramatically down from 10,000 a day

:17:27.:17:33.

to barely 100. But Turkey negotiated something in return, to get rid of

:17:34.:17:37.

these cues the lifting of these requirements for Turks travelling to

:17:38.:17:40.

the Schengen zone. You're supposed to have that happen at the end of

:17:41.:17:45.

the month but installed, the commission says Turkey has not met

:17:46.:17:51.

the criteria. The EU wants Turkey to stop using anti-terrorism laws to

:17:52.:17:55.

arrest journalists and critics. When the government took over in

:17:56.:17:59.

opposition, newspaper claiming it was run by terrorists protests were

:18:00.:18:03.

attacked. Turkey says it will not change the legislation and it faces

:18:04.:18:07.

multiple terror threats. It has warned Brussels and less visas are

:18:08.:18:10.

lifted, it could pull out of the migrant deal. And so it is that old

:18:11.:18:16.

tricky relationship again, between Turkey and EU. And for this summit,

:18:17.:18:23.

a dilemma, how to stop Europe's gatekeeper from jettisoning the

:18:24.:18:28.

whole migrant deal whilst still not kowtowing to a controversial

:18:29.:18:31.

president Burda one. It could be a bumpy ride.

:18:32.:18:39.

Ikea is to recall 27 million Malm chests of drawers in North America

:18:40.:18:44.

after the deaths of three children in the United States.

:18:45.:18:48.

As shown on this demonstration video, the children were killed

:18:49.:18:55.

after being crushed by drawers toppling over on top of them.

:18:56.:18:57.

Ikea US president Lars Peterson said the company had stopped

:18:58.:19:00.

selling its Malm series products because they "could be a danger".

:19:01.:19:02.

Last year, Ikea warned customers to use wall

:19:03.:19:04.

The German car manufacturer, Volkswagen, has agreed on a package

:19:05.:19:10.

worth nearly fifteen billion dollars to settle US consumer lawsuits

:19:11.:19:14.

Lawyers say the settlement is the largest of its

:19:15.:19:22.

It states that the company must offer to buy back nearly half

:19:23.:19:28.

a million cars with diesel engines and compensate their owners.

:19:29.:19:31.

Last year, US regulators discovered that some VW cars

:19:32.:19:33.

were fitted with software that distorted emission tests.

:19:34.:19:39.

World number one golfer Jason Day has withdrawn

:19:40.:19:41.

from the Rio Olympics because of concerns

:19:42.:19:42.

The 28-year-old Australian said while the risk is small,

:19:43.:19:46.

it is not one he is willing to take because of potential risks

:19:47.:19:49.

Last week another international golfer, Rory McIlroy,

:19:50.:19:55.

pulled out because of worries about Zika.

:19:56.:20:04.

Back to our main story now, the UK's vote to leave the European Union

:20:05.:20:07.

and the disturbing reports that there have been

:20:08.:20:10.

in the UK since the vote of an increase in racist attacks

:20:11.:20:13.

on Eastern Europeans and other ethnic minorities.

:20:14.:20:17.

A number of groups who monitor such incidents say there has been

:20:18.:20:20.

an increase, and some are linking this to the charged debate around

:20:21.:20:23.

immigration that featured during the referendum campaign.

:20:24.:20:28.

With me now is Farah Elahi, who is a research and policy analyst

:20:29.:20:31.

at the Runnymede Trust, a race equality think

:20:32.:20:33.

Give us a sense, some perspective on this, is this a new phenomenon in?

:20:34.:20:50.

No, it is not new, hate crime against minorities has been

:20:51.:20:53.

long-standing but what we are seeing is a significant spike in incidence

:20:54.:21:00.

since the referendum. Why is there a spike, can we link this to the Leave

:21:01.:21:04.

campaign and the rhetoric we heard around immigration? The rhetoric we

:21:05.:21:08.

saw coming out of the referendum across all parties has a role to

:21:09.:21:17.

play in the spike under things legitimising mainstream but we can

:21:18.:21:21.

also point to government interventions for a number of years

:21:22.:21:25.

that have been creating this and stoking tensions from the government

:21:26.:21:30.

and the media. Of course it is not in any way racist to worry about

:21:31.:21:37.

levels of immigration. It is not racist to worry about levels of

:21:38.:21:41.

immigration, it is how you express concerns and how you target

:21:42.:21:44.

individuals that you might hold responsible. Should we be surprised,

:21:45.:21:51.

we have had six years of austerities Britain, some cuts to benefits as

:21:52.:21:56.

well, given the growing social divide in this country, should we be

:21:57.:22:00.

so surprised we are seeing an increase and prejudice? It is not

:22:01.:22:07.

about surprise, we should be concerned about the increasing

:22:08.:22:11.

levels of prejudice and the way it is expressed. And in difficult

:22:12.:22:16.

times, we are turning on our neighbours and those around us

:22:17.:22:19.

rather than holding people in power to account. What can we do to change

:22:20.:22:26.

it? Then needs a new narrative for Britain, one focused on unity, we

:22:27.:22:30.

need stronger leadership that condemns these unacceptable acts and

:22:31.:22:35.

we also need decisive action from the police and services to tackle

:22:36.:22:39.

these crimes. I'm glad you brought up the response from police. I

:22:40.:22:43.

wonder how their powers change in the future in which the UK is

:22:44.:22:49.

outside of the EU, do they still have the powers they need to be able

:22:50.:22:54.

to hold people accountable and to prosecute people who are found to

:22:55.:22:59.

incite violence and race hate crime? At the moment they have all the

:23:00.:23:04.

powers they had last week. They should be exercising those. We don't

:23:05.:23:10.

know what will happen in terms of the Brexit and how things will

:23:11.:23:15.

change. There are a number of UK legislations that give police

:23:16.:23:19.

significant powers to prosecute hate crimes. In terms of the response, we

:23:20.:23:24.

need strong leadership, the moment there seems to be a real absence of

:23:25.:23:28.

leadership modest in the UK but also in Brussels, it is unclear as to who

:23:29.:23:34.

will lead negotiations in Brussels. What do we need in the vacuum of

:23:35.:23:40.

leadership that we have in the next few months can what can we do

:23:41.:23:44.

ourselves as a people to prevent this? May be what we need to look

:23:45.:23:50.

for is someone who can give a positive story for Britain and the

:23:51.:23:55.

future of Britain and takes decisive stands on the issues. Thank you for

:23:56.:23:59.

coming in and taking us through those issues. Today has been a

:24:00.:24:09.

dramatic day in Brussels, before we go, let me show you some key moments

:24:10.:24:13.

from the debate at the European Parliament.

:24:14.:24:20.

I know virtually none of you have ever done a proper job in your

:24:21.:24:34.

lives! Or worked... Or worked in business, or worked in trade or

:24:35.:24:41.

indeed ever created a job. I am surprised you are here. You were

:24:42.:24:47.

fighting for the exit. The British people voted in favour of the exit.

:24:48.:24:52.

Why are you here? There are many things to be negotiated and we need

:24:53.:24:58.

cool heads and warm hearts. But please remember this, Scotland did

:24:59.:25:06.

not let you down, please I beg you, do not let Scotland down now. It is

:25:07.:25:13.

the climate of fear that has been created, negative things, that is

:25:14.:25:19.

the most shocking of what happened in Britain, not the choice of the

:25:20.:25:23.

people because the choice of the people is democracy. MEPs like Diane

:25:24.:25:30.

Dodds and marine Le Pen would say that we in the North of Ireland are

:25:31.:25:38.

bound by a UK vote, we say we are not. And like the previous MEP, Miss

:25:39.:25:44.

dismissed, we asked you to respect our vote. We stand by the vote of

:25:45.:25:50.

the people of the North of Ireland just like Scotland which voted

:25:51.:25:59.

remain. Emotions running high. That is it from us. Next, the weather.

:26:00.:26:00.

Goodbye. Tuesday's weather went downhill

:26:01.:26:05.

for the eastern side

:26:06.:26:09.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS