19/01/2017 World News Today


19/01/2017

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Donald Trump has arrived in Washington ahead of his inauguration

:00:13.:00:17.

tomorrow as America's 45th President. Martin McGuinness, the

:00:18.:00:24.

former IRA commander turned peacemaker has announced his

:00:25.:00:27.

retiring from front line politics. The Sinn Fein politician recently

:00:28.:00:31.

quit Northern Ireland's Power saving executive and he now says he is

:00:32.:00:35.

suffering from ill health. The question I ask myself is are you

:00:36.:00:40.

physically capable? Theresa May said Britain will be

:00:41.:01:01.

open for business after Brexit as one high St bank predicted London

:01:02.:01:04.

will remain your's top financial centre despite the UK's leading.

:01:05.:01:11.

Also coming up, the latest on the unfolding crisis in Gambia.

:01:12.:01:16.

Neighbouring Senegal has sent in troops to make sure a new present --

:01:17.:01:23.

presidency. Under French -- and a winning record time.

:01:24.:01:45.

Hello, and welcome to BBC News. Donald Trump has arrived in

:01:46.:01:53.

Washington ahead of their inauguration tomorrow as the 43rd

:01:54.:01:54.

President of the United States. Let's cross to our Washington

:01:55.:02:10.

Correspondent Jane O'Brien. A sign of the times, our viewers saw

:02:11.:02:24.

the pictures. That plane did not have the word Trump all over it and

:02:25.:02:30.

it will be official tomorrow. The clock is ticking, fewer than 24

:02:31.:02:36.

hours to go on Donald Trump will become president. He is on his way

:02:37.:02:40.

right now to the national cemetery to lay a wreath. He has had lunch

:02:41.:02:43.

with some of his cabinet picks and the Republican leadership at Trump

:02:44.:02:49.

Hotel which he jokingly referred to as weird he would move in whether or

:02:50.:02:54.

not he won the White House, also on Pennsylvania Avenue. He has a

:02:55.:02:59.

concert with on this afternoon at the Lincoln Memorial which he is

:03:00.:03:04.

expected to speak. The celebrations underway for Donald Trump at least

:03:05.:03:08.

but a lot of protests expected to kick off, including a big march at

:03:09.:03:14.

the weekend where women from all over the country had expected to

:03:15.:03:20.

converge on Washington. There will be a huge security presence with

:03:21.:03:24.

$500,000 spent on security around the inauguration site.

:03:25.:03:30.

Non-collapsible umbrellas will not be allowed and no selfie sticks.

:03:31.:03:34.

That is right, but the Park service has made a concession to the rain

:03:35.:03:41.

because it is expected to report tomorrow, they say short collapsible

:03:42.:03:43.

umbrellas will be allowed so you can take some shelter. Security will be

:03:44.:03:50.

tight. We're not sure at the moment how many people to expect. There has

:03:51.:03:57.

been some controversy. Donald Trump, as you would expect, said hotels are

:03:58.:04:01.

booked solid but they are not. He has also got less than a stellar

:04:02.:04:07.

line-up of celebrities, a lot refusing to appear with him, so a

:04:08.:04:13.

bit of a B list for some of the events, but his new press secretary

:04:14.:04:19.

today said the inauguration was 20% under budget and that the money

:04:20.:04:24.

would be returned to the taxpayer. He said Donald Trump was already off

:04:25.:04:29.

to a good start. This historians pour over presidential inaugurals.

:04:30.:04:40.

What do they expect from President Tromp tomorrow? That is an

:04:41.:04:44.

interesting question. His press secretary said it wouldn't be so

:04:45.:04:51.

much an agenda as a philosophical document. I am not sure what we can

:04:52.:04:57.

take from that. It will be quite short, we think. He has not finished

:04:58.:05:04.

writing it as couple of hours ago. We don't really know whether it will

:05:05.:05:11.

lay out his priorities. According to Mr Spicer it is about what it means

:05:12.:05:16.

to be an American, this is a member of Congress, and what it means to be

:05:17.:05:22.

a citizen at this point of time. This is all important because the

:05:23.:05:26.

country according to the latest polls is more divided than ever, 86%

:05:27.:05:32.

think Donald Trump is taking office over a deeply divided nation. Thank

:05:33.:05:40.

you very much. I should say of course stay with us tomorrow because

:05:41.:05:44.

you will be able to see the inauguration ceremony.

:05:45.:05:51.

The former Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister,

:05:52.:05:52.

Martin McGuinness has announced he is to retire from politics

:05:53.:05:55.

and will not seek re-election to the Stormont Assembly in March.

:05:56.:05:57.

Mr McGuinness says he had been planning to stand down in May,

:05:58.:06:00.

on the tenth anniversary of sharing power with Ian Paisley.

:06:01.:06:03.

But he says that plan was over taken by his health

:06:04.:06:05.

problems and the political crisis at Stormont.

:06:06.:06:07.

Our chief correspondent Gavin Hewitt has more.

:06:08.:06:13.

Martin McGuinness is one of the most controversial leaders in British and

:06:14.:06:20.

Irish politics. He has been a central figure in both Northern

:06:21.:06:24.

Ireland's pain and peace and is now standing down due to illness. I have

:06:25.:06:30.

to be honest with myself and the question I ask is are you physically

:06:31.:06:34.

capable of fighting this election with the intensity with which they

:06:35.:06:38.

need to be fought? The honest answered I am physically capable.

:06:39.:06:45.

His background lay in the civil rights and riots in Londonderry but

:06:46.:06:48.

Martin McGuinness chose violent resistance. By the age of 21 he was

:06:49.:06:54.

second-in-command of the IRA in Derry talking about the bombing

:06:55.:06:58.

campaign. Can you save whether the bombing is likely to stop in the

:06:59.:07:01.

near future in response to public demand? We've always take

:07:02.:07:07.

consideration the feelings of the people of Derry and these feelings

:07:08.:07:13.

will be passed on. He served two prison sentences in the Irish

:07:14.:07:16.

Republic and was also convicted of IRA membership. He openly attended

:07:17.:07:21.

IRA events, he denied he was the IRA chief of staff but said he regarded

:07:22.:07:26.

it as a compliment. We don't believe that winning elections or any amount

:07:27.:07:30.

of votes will bring freedom to Ireland. At the end of the day it is

:07:31.:07:34.

the cutting edge of the IRA that will bring freedom. Today he asked

:07:35.:07:41.

-- was asked if he had any regrets. People have to remember the

:07:42.:07:43.

circumstances that existed in the city when I joined the IRA are --

:07:44.:07:48.

the IRA. We had a situation with people being murdered wholesale by

:07:49.:07:56.

the RUC, as on bloody Sunday, and the fact many young people and

:07:57.:08:00.

myself were supported by thousands in the city. I am not saying it was

:08:01.:08:04.

a majority but we decided to fight back. He was one of the IRA leaders

:08:05.:08:13.

who recognised that further violence would not bring political gains. In

:08:14.:08:18.

1994 there was a ceasefire which laid the foundation of peace talks

:08:19.:08:21.

and Sinn Fein nominated him for a lead negotiator leading to the Good

:08:22.:08:25.

Friday agreement and eventual power-sharing. But foes sat

:08:26.:08:29.

alongside each other in a new assembly. My journey has been a long

:08:30.:08:35.

journey, more than 25 years building the peace. His departure from

:08:36.:08:42.

politics comes at a sensitive time for Northern Ireland. Its

:08:43.:08:45.

power-sharing assembly has collapsed and the Brexit poses difficult

:08:46.:08:50.

questions about the future of the border with Ireland. Many people

:08:51.:08:54.

would struggle to forgive the man who played such a key role in a

:08:55.:08:59.

violent campaign but he earned grudging respect for his commitment

:09:00.:09:02.

to peace and the gunmen had turned politician have the authority to

:09:03.:09:04.

make compromises. Let's cross to our Northern Ireland

:09:05.:09:10.

Political Editor Mark Devenport. This he had been ill for some time,

:09:11.:09:22.

any surprise he is stepping down. Not particularly. It was probably

:09:23.:09:26.

predictable from the time he appeared and resigned as Deputy

:09:27.:09:29.

First Minister and appeared very weak on that particular day about

:09:30.:09:34.

ten days ago. There had been a lot of speculation he would not be able

:09:35.:09:37.

to fight the campaign but it nevertheless has the feel of the end

:09:38.:09:41.

of a new dock and while he didn't use the word retirement he said if

:09:42.:09:47.

he conquers the illness you could perform an ambassadorial role, there

:09:48.:09:50.

is the sense of him stepping back from the front line. His family were

:09:51.:09:56.

they are supporting him. And how much of a loss is this for Sinn

:09:57.:10:01.

Fein? There is no doubt he will miss Martin McGuinness and he says this

:10:02.:10:05.

is part of a process of transition which will like it will also see

:10:06.:10:12.

Gerry Adams at some point yet to be announced stepping down. The new

:10:13.:10:15.

generation are not as well-known and certainly across the world as Martin

:10:16.:10:21.

McGuinness or Gerry Adams. They will be tested soon on handling the

:10:22.:10:27.

difficulties because we have had the breakdown of the power-sharing

:10:28.:10:30.

system in Northern Ireland over the renewable heating scandal. The one

:10:31.:10:34.

hope is they will not be tested in the tough times that Martin

:10:35.:10:35.

McGuinness lived through. The Prime Minister says she's

:10:36.:10:43.

confident that Britain's financial services sector will continue

:10:44.:10:45.

to prosper after It's a view echoed by the head

:10:46.:10:47.

of Barclays who says he expects the City of London to remain

:10:48.:10:51.

the financial centre of Europe. That's despite a number of OTHER

:10:52.:10:54.

banks and financial institutions suggesting they will move thousands

:10:55.:10:56.

of jobs AWAY from London.Theresa May has been talking to business

:10:57.:10:59.

leaders in Davos - and to our economics

:11:00.:11:01.

editor Kamal Ahmed. Wrapped up warm, whisked from

:11:02.:11:14.

meetings with bankers to millionaire technology entrepreneurs. It is hard

:11:15.:11:20.

to come to Davos cannot look like a member of the global elite. While

:11:21.:11:23.

she was here to say that Britain is open for business she was also hear

:11:24.:11:29.

with a warning. Talk of greater globalisation can make people

:11:30.:11:35.

fearful. For many it means jobs outsourced and wages undercut. It

:11:36.:11:39.

means having to sit back as they watch communities change around

:11:40.:11:44.

them, and in their minds, it means watching as those who prosper seem

:11:45.:11:50.

to play by a different set of rules. To these age came to the World

:11:51.:11:54.

Economic Forum not so much to celebrate business as to warn that.

:11:55.:12:00.

She backs globalisation and free trade and a deal with the European

:12:01.:12:05.

rain, but she had another message for this rather privileged audience,

:12:06.:12:09.

do more to make globalisation work for everyone or if you don't she

:12:10.:12:15.

will be quite willing to intervene to ensure businesses change their

:12:16.:12:20.

behaviour. It was sunny here today but the Prime Minister's visit to

:12:21.:12:25.

Davos was overshadowed with a number of international banks involving

:12:26.:12:29.

Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan saying they are reducing investment or

:12:30.:12:35.

planning to cut jobs. The city is a big place with different voices and

:12:36.:12:38.

for Barclays London are still in the lead. I think the UK will continue

:12:39.:12:48.

to be the financial ones for Europe. We may have to change the legal

:12:49.:12:52.

structure we used to operate in Europe but I think it will be at the

:12:53.:12:57.

margin and will be manageable. I caught up with the Prime Minister

:12:58.:13:00.

later. What have the bank said to you about why they are moving jobs?

:13:01.:13:05.

I have had a positive discussion with banks about the benefits of the

:13:06.:13:09.

City of London and what has brought them, and how we can continue to

:13:10.:13:14.

build on that for the future. There are huge benefits for investment in

:13:15.:13:18.

the UK. We have fundamentally strong economy and the service sector that

:13:19.:13:22.

is very important but valued around the world. I believe a truly global

:13:23.:13:29.

Britain can bring jobs and prosperity to the UK and across the

:13:30.:13:33.

board including financial services. Many are reflecting on one of the

:13:34.:13:41.

key tests of Brexit, keeping UK financial services buoyant. Hard

:13:42.:13:44.

Brexit does the country damage but the point I am making to political

:13:45.:13:48.

leaders is if businesses decide to leave London, they are going to

:13:49.:13:54.

Paris, Madrid or Frankfort, they are going to Hong Kong and New York. It

:13:55.:14:01.

is a lose- lose battle, bad for London and the UK and the EU as

:14:02.:14:06.

well. Theresa May said she was an optimist and free trade discussions

:14:07.:14:09.

had also started with India and Australia. She admitted the journey

:14:10.:14:15.

ahead was unpredictable but with the right deal the future was bright.

:14:16.:14:23.

Dozens of people are feared dead after an avalanche buried a hotel

:14:24.:14:26.

At least three people have been killed

:14:27.:14:29.

rescue teams are searching for up to 35 people still trapped

:14:30.:14:31.

The avalanche happened after a series of powerful

:14:32.:14:34.

earthquakes struck the area of Abruzzo yesterday

:14:35.:14:36.

The three-storey hotel was pushed almost 10 metres downhill

:14:37.:14:39.

as the huge wall of snow hit it directly as it raced down

:14:40.:14:42.

It's the third in a series of earthquakes in the region

:14:43.:14:46.

since last summer killing almost 300 people.

:14:47.:14:48.

Our correspondent James Reynolds is in the nearby village of Penne.

:14:49.:14:58.

At night, the quickest way through this the wall

:14:59.:15:01.

These rescuers are among the most experienced in Europe.

:15:02.:15:07.

Step-by-step, they shovelled their way up towards the Rigopiano hotel.

:15:08.:15:25.

They went further in and came to where the avalanche hit.

:15:26.:15:39.

A six foot high wall of snow and rock broke

:15:40.:15:42.

Several miles away, a father waited for news

:15:43.:15:51.

Straight after yesterday's earthquakes, they texted each other.

:15:52.:15:55.

"I think the worst has already happened", he reassured her.

:15:56.:16:08.

His daughter and many other people, may be trapped

:16:09.:16:16.

These pictures, filmed after daybreak, show the Rigopiano

:16:17.:16:23.

Do you think it's possible to find more people alive?

:16:24.:16:34.

In the past, we found people after three days

:16:35.:16:38.

And especially in this case, there could be some

:16:39.:16:42.

Rescuers are helped by the fact that conditions here have improved.

:16:43.:16:52.

We haven't felt any more earthquakes or tremors.

:16:53.:16:54.

Relief workers a few miles up the hill, will hope the snow holds

:16:55.:17:01.

And those rescuers continue on their path to and from

:17:02.:17:06.

the destroyed hotel, searching for survivors or bodies.

:17:07.:17:07.

James Reynolds, BBC News, Penne, central Italy.

:17:08.:17:27.

you are watching BBC News, the top stories now.

:17:28.:17:29.

Donald Trump has arrived in Washington, ahead of being sworn

:17:30.:17:32.

in tomorrow as America's 45th President.

:17:33.:17:35.

Martin McGuinness, Northern Ireland's former

:17:36.:17:36.

deputy first minister, has announced he's retiring

:17:37.:17:38.

Dozens are feared dead in Italy, after an avalanche engulfed a hotel.

:17:39.:17:44.

The Foreign Office has confirmed that six Britons have dry after a

:17:45.:18:06.

road accident in Saudi Arabia. The victims were all thought to be on

:18:07.:18:13.

pilgrimage when their minibus crashed. We understand that this

:18:14.:18:17.

family travelled on a journey they had booked through the two operator

:18:18.:18:21.

behind me, they have told us that all 12 of the people on the minibus

:18:22.:18:26.

are part of the same extended family. Some from Scotland, some

:18:27.:18:31.

from here in Manchester, with age ranging from pensioners down to a

:18:32.:18:35.

small baby just a couple of months old. That baby, we are told that he

:18:36.:18:43.

dry in the crash along with his grandparents who are from

:18:44.:18:48.

Manchester. Another relative from Manchester as well. Also that the

:18:49.:18:53.

two people from Glasgow who died were part of that family as well. We

:18:54.:19:01.

believe from Glasgow Central mosque that they had five children who we

:19:02.:19:05.

don't think were involved in the crash. There were also several

:19:06.:19:09.

people injured including the mother of the baby and his siblings,

:19:10.:19:16.

children aged between two and four, and also a pensioner in a critical

:19:17.:19:21.

condition so the Foreign Office are providing consular assistance. The

:19:22.:19:25.

tour operators say it is the first accident may have had anybody

:19:26.:19:29.

involved with in the last 15 years since we have been running the trip

:19:30.:19:34.

and they say the family was partway through a fortnight trip, making a

:19:35.:19:41.

pilgrimage, travelling on a minibus to the second leg of their journey

:19:42.:19:46.

to the holy site in the Medina. It is thought that one of the tires on

:19:47.:19:51.

the vehicle had a blow out but they are still trying to work out what

:19:52.:19:53.

happened and are providing assistance to other members of the

:19:54.:19:56.

extended family from the UK now in the process of travelling over to

:19:57.:20:01.

Saudi Arabia to find that information for themselves.

:20:02.:20:02.

Senegalese troops have entered The Gambia to ensure Adama Barrow

:20:03.:20:04.

assumes power as the country's new president, a Senegalese

:20:05.:20:07.

Mr Barrow has been sworn in at the Gambian embassy in Senegal.

:20:08.:20:11.

In his inaugural speech, President Barrow urged

:20:12.:20:12.

Gambian soldiers to remain in their barracks, saying

:20:13.:20:14.

those who did not would be considered rebels.

:20:15.:20:16.

The UN Security Council has unanimously backed

:20:17.:20:18.

the West African regional group, ECOWAS, which has threatened

:20:19.:20:20.

military intervention to ensure that the new president takes power

:20:21.:20:22.

from Yahya Jammeh who is refusing to stand down.

:20:23.:20:34.

We're less than 24 hours away from the inauguration of US

:20:35.:20:36.

Last year's elections had been dominated by the allegations that

:20:37.:20:40.

Russia ran a hacking campaign to influence the results.

:20:41.:20:42.

Stephen Sackur from BBC's Hardtalk has just completed an interview

:20:43.:20:44.

with the Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov who works closely

:20:45.:20:47.

It's good to see you. Was he defensive as far as the ledger that

:20:48.:21:01.

actions of Russia, as far as those actions are concerned, but America

:21:02.:21:06.

clearly believes influenced the US election. I wouldn't say he was

:21:07.:21:13.

defensive so much as combative and that really is Peskov's style. He is

:21:14.:21:23.

spokesman for the president and also one of Vladimir Putin's most trusted

:21:24.:21:29.

advisers, and he really is the spin doctor and message manager of the

:21:30.:21:32.

Kremlin. Under enormous pressure in the last few days because as you

:21:33.:21:38.

say, all these allegations of hacking and dirty tricks and

:21:39.:21:41.

allegations of a honey trap being laid, all of this stuff has in a

:21:42.:21:48.

sense being laid at the floor of the chief press officer, and when I saw

:21:49.:21:51.

him a couple of hours ago when his office close to the Kremlin are said

:21:52.:21:56.

to him, how do you respond to these allegations which, from the very top

:21:57.:22:02.

of the US intelligence agencies, and this is how he responded to me.

:22:03.:22:10.

Every day, we have hundreds and thousands of cyber attacks against

:22:11.:22:17.

our digital systems in the Russian Federation. Some of them are coming

:22:18.:22:24.

from the territorial of the United States. Dozens are coming from the

:22:25.:22:29.

territorial Germany. Dozens from Great Britain. Do you think that it

:22:30.:22:41.

means, with the high state of certainty, that those attacks

:22:42.:22:44.

against our digital systems are being promoted by the governments in

:22:45.:22:51.

Washington, London and Berlin? You would probably say no. We want to

:22:52.:22:55.

have good relationships with America. We believe that we cannot

:22:56.:23:02.

solve lots of problems in this world and in the region that are

:23:03.:23:07.

endangering our country without cooperation with the Americans. That

:23:08.:23:13.

is why we desperately need good relationships with Washington, but

:23:14.:23:18.

it takes two to tangle. What would be the approach by President from,

:23:19.:23:24.

this is the question. It takes two to tangle, clearly Russia hoping

:23:25.:23:31.

there will be a reset when Donald Trump takes power in Washington,

:23:32.:23:36.

that relations will be more cooperative and warmer with the new

:23:37.:23:40.

US administration, but there is some scepticism and very much an attitude

:23:41.:23:44.

of wait and see and that is what we all must do until we see what Donald

:23:45.:23:49.

Trump really means by his talk of a new relationship by the mere Putin.

:23:50.:23:51.

Thank you. It's nicknamed the Everest

:23:52.:23:56.

of the Seas -- a gruelling solo round the world yacht race

:23:57.:23:58.

which after 74 days finishes today. British sailor -- Alex Thomson --

:23:59.:24:01.

turned round a disastrous start and looks set to come second

:24:02.:24:04.

in the prestigious Our Sports correspondent

:24:05.:24:06.

Natalie Pirks is following the race from Les Sables d'Olonne

:24:07.:24:09.

on France's Atlantic coast. After ten unpredictable weeks, the

:24:10.:24:24.

Frenchman celebrating was a well one story, for six weeks he has battled

:24:25.:24:28.

everything the ocean has thrown at him, eating only freeze dried

:24:29.:24:32.

noodles and jelly and surviving on as little as 20 minutes sleep every

:24:33.:24:33.

few hours. When he set off with 28 other boats

:24:34.:24:38.

on the 6th of November, the Hampshire yachtsman waved

:24:39.:24:44.

goodbye to his wife and two young children and attempted

:24:45.:24:46.

for the fourth time to become the first Briton to win the Vendee

:24:47.:24:48.

Globe in the race's 27 year history. He headed around Antarctica, across

:24:49.:25:00.

the Cape of good Hope, around the furthest place from civilisation on

:25:01.:25:05.

Earth and back around Cape Horn. When he arrives here tomorrow

:25:06.:25:09.

morning he was not stop somewhere between 25 and 30,000 nautical

:25:10.:25:10.

miles. There have been good moments This is the southern ocean

:25:11.:25:17.

moments and it's sunny. And moments over Christmas

:25:18.:25:19.

where his family worried his wife is simply desperate to get

:25:20.:25:39.

him home. I can't wait! I am so excited about seeing him. I have

:25:40.:25:44.

spoken to him and been in contact but actually seeing him, I can't

:25:45.:25:49.

wait. Just two weeks into the race has bought got so badly damaged that

:25:50.:25:54.

usually affected his speed yet he still smashed the world record for

:25:55.:25:57.

the greatest distance sailed so low in 24 hours. The big event tomorrow

:25:58.:26:05.

if the inauguration of Donald Trump and stay with us on BBC News for

:26:06.:26:11.

that, life. You are watching BBC News and no time for a look at all

:26:12.:26:12.

the

:26:13.:26:13.

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