27/01/2017 World News Today


27/01/2017

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I'm Laura Trevelyan live in Washington.

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Theresa May becomes the first overseas leader to hold face-to-face

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Trade was top of the agenda, as well as strengthening the special

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relationship between the UK and the US.

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A free and independent Britain is a blessing to the world and our

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relationship has never been stronger. I am convinced that a

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trade deal is in the national interest of both countries and will

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cement the crucial relationship that exists between us. We will bring you

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more from that news conference and the gut how the relationship might

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develop. -- how the relationship might develop.

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In the past hour, Theresa May has been giving a news conference

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alongside Donald Trump, after she became the first

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Mr Trump said the US was renewing what he described as its "deep bond"

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It came at the end of the first meeting he has had with any foreign

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leader. The agree to strengthen their mutual ties. Theresa May told

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reporters that the UK and US had reaffirmed their commitment to Nato

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following their meeting, which had focused on trade and security. The

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United States respects the sovereignty of self-determination. A

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free and independent Britain is a blessing to the world. Our

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relationship has never been stronger. Both America and Britain

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understand that governments must be responsive to everyday working

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people, that governments must represent their own citizens. Madam

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Prime Minister, we look forward to working closely with you as we

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strengthen our mutual ties and commerce, business and foreign

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fears. Great days lie ahead for our two peoples and our two countries.

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-- foreign affairs. More from that news conference but firstly our

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correspondent is that the White House for us. Theresa May came here

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needing a trade deal but she also got a very strong commitment,

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doesn't she? Tell us more about that. I think there are in number of

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things that were important for her in this press conference. One of

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those with the commitment and she spoke to Mr Trump and he said they

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were ?100 to 100% behind Nato. That is a very important signal to send

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to Britain and members of the European union. That is an

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achievement for her. She did say at the also talked about ways to reform

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Nato and make it more nimble with dealing with current threats, like

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cyber security and terrorism. I think the other thing that was

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important for her to get, which she did, was her statement on torture.

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It has played very badly over in the UK. He was axed about his support

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for torture. It is his belief that it could work. He said it is my

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belief but I am going to defer to my secretary of defence. He does not

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believe torture is the way to go and he will have the deciding vote on

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this. It was a clear statement on an issue that has been quite

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contentious in the UK. Also here in many quarters as well. The two

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leaders are having a working lunch now in the White House. Theresa May

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said they were going to talk about Syria and Russia. What is likely to

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come up there? It was interested that Russia was raised, with his

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ties with Putin. He said he has not met the man and he does not know

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whether they will have a good relationship with him. He left that

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open. Also more importantly for Britain, this issue of sanctions.

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There are reports you might be lifting sanctions and he said that

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as premature. It is too early to say and that is something that would

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have reassured Theresa May. Britain's position is that it should

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not be lifted. In terms of Russia and Syria, Mr Trump has talked about

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being willing to join Russia in fighting Islamic State in Syria and

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putting Basha Assad's fit on the back burner. It is possible that Mrs

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May may be possible to go some distance with him on that, due to

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comments made by her Foreign Secretary recently. Thank you very

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much. The first British journalist to ask a question was Laura

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Ginsberg. Here's what happened. Laura? Laura Ginsberg, BBC News. You

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have talked about where you agree. You have also said you will be frank

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where you disagree with the president. Can you tell us where in

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your talks you do disagree and do you think the president listened to

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what you had to say? Mr President, we will see what she says. Mr

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President, you have said before that torture works. You have praised

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Russia, you say you want to ban some Muslims coming to America, you have

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said they should be punishment for abortion. Many people in Britain,

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those sound like alarming beliefs. What do you say to our viewers at

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home who are worried about some of your views and worried about you

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becoming a leader of the free world? Your choice of the question. There

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goes that relationship. I have been listening to the

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president and that is the point of having a conversation and a

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dialogue. We have been discussing a number of topics and we will carry

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on after this press conference meeting and discussing a number of

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other topics. There will be times that we disagree, the point of the

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special relationship is that we are able to have an open and frank

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discussion. So that we are able to make that clear when that happens. I

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am clear also that there are many issues that the United Kingdom and

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United States stand alongside each other and many issues that we agree

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on. I said yesterday in my speech that we are at a moment now that we

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can build a stronger and special relationship, that will be in the

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interests of the wider world as well. We have a great general, who

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has just been appointed secretary of defence, General James and she has

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stated publicly that he does not necessarily believe in torture. Or

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water boarding, or however you want to define enhanced interrogation,

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these are worse lots of people would like to use. I do not necessarily

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agree, but I would tell you that he will override because I am giving

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him that power. He is an expert, he is highly respected. He got through

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the Senate very, very quickly, which in this country is not easy, I will

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tell you. I am to rely on him. I believe it does work, I have been

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open about that for a long time but I am going with our leaders and we

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are going to win with an without, but I do disagree. As far as Putin

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and Russia, I do not see good, bad or indifferent. I do not know the

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gentleman. I hope we have a fantastic relationship. That is

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possible and it is also possible that we will not. We will see what

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happens. I will be representing the American people very strongly and

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forcefully and if we have a great relationship with Russia and other

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countries and if we go after Isis together, which has to be stopped.

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That is an evil that has to be stopped. I will consider that a good

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thing, not a bad thing. How the relationship works out, I will be

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able to tell you that later. I have heard many times when I thought I

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was going to get along with people but I do not like them at all. I

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have had some were I did not think I was going to have much of a

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relationship and it turned out to be a great relationship. To Reza, we

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never know about those things, do we? -- Theresa May. I will be

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representing the American people very strongly. We can now get

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reaction to that joint news conference from our political

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correspondent who is in London. Chris, Theresa May had to walk a

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tightrope here, making sure she got that trade deal because Britain is

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going to leave the EU but not wanting to defer too much to Donald

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Trump. How did she do? It was extraordinary to watch that because

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you have to be partly a critical correspondent but also the body

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language expert and pop psychologist as well as you see the dynamic

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between the two leaders, both new in post. Mrs May is the first foreign

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leader to step into the White House since President Trump took office.

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You could see an element of the awkwardness. They had not met

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before. I was really struck early on at how the Prime Minister was

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willing explicitly to say that President in their private talks had

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given 100% backing to Nato. We have seen the scepticism that he has

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articulated towards Nato. He is concerned about what he sees busy on

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fair funding burden that Washington has two shoulder for the Atlantic

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alliance. We have heard lots of concern here in the UK, not just

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from the Conservatives, but from across the House of Commons in the

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last couple of days about that outlook from President Trump on

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Nato. It was one of the questions that was tucked into the Prime

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Minister's pocket just the other day. For her to say that they had

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that conversation in private and she has had reassuring words on Nato, I

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thought was very, very striking. As you say, she has two strike a tricky

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balancing act. She has to be able to make the case that is in the UK's

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interest to have a good relationship with the White House, whoever the

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occupant of the building has to be. At the same time, politically and

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personally, the clearly different characters. They are, indeed. What

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impression do you think President Trump made over there in Britain? It

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was his very first press conference with a foreign leader. What I

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thought was striking in that sense was that you got an element from a

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British's viewer perspective of President Trump, as opposed to

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candidate Trump. He was more softly spoken, wasn't he? Then you got

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flashes of the man that we saw on the campaign trail. Crucially, the

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approach that he has struck, that is also different to help so many other

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occupants of senior political roles take to operate. At the end of that

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exchange, when he was talking about volunteering the difference views

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between him and his Defence Secretary over water boarding and

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torture and volunteering that as Defence Secretary would have the

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final say over the policy. That kind of approach, to publicly volunteered

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differences and to save the subordinate may have the final say,

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is unconventional. It is something of his prize. I suspect, in terms of

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the overall UK reaction, the die-hard critics of Mr Trump will

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not have changed his mind watching the press conference. Those who love

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him will be reassured that his presidency would be good news the

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UK. Maybe some who were open minded and could be persuaded one way or

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the other might acknowledge that is another side to President Trump and

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those -- from those performances on the campaign stage. Chris Mason in

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London, thank you very much. Mr Trump is planning to speak to

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Vladimir Putin on the phone on Saturday. His relationship was

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brought up and here is what he had to say in that press conference. As

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far as Putin and Russia, I do not see good, bad or indifferent. I do

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not know the gentleman. I hope we have a fantastic relationship. That

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is possible and it is also possible that we will not. We will see what

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happens and I will be representing the American people very, very

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strongly and very forcefully and if we have a great relationship with

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Russia or other countries and if we go after Isis together, which has to

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be stopped because it's an evil that has to be stopped, I will consider

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that a good thing and not a bad thing. How the relationship works

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out, I will not be able to tell you that until later. I have had many

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times when I thought I would get along with people and I do not like

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them at all. I have had some were I did not think I was going to have

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much of a relationship and it turned out to be a great relationship. So

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Theresa May, we never know about those things, do we? I will tell you

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one thing, I will be representing the American people very strongly.

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Donald Trump. Joining me now from London is the Republican commentator

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and part of President Trump's transition team. Thank you for

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joining us. This was his diplomatic debut. How did you do? I thought he

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did very, very well. I was disappointed that the first question

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that he was asked that took everything out of context, is going

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back to campaign staff. Women being punished for abortion was a

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hypothetical question. He changed his position and very much came out

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of yesterday that anyone coming from an Arab nation that supports

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terrorism. They have accomplished more things on his to do list and

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every single day there has been an achievement of one of his promises.

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People are in shock about what he has done. Can we stick to what was

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said at the press conference? What did you make of Theresa May saying

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that the president had told her he was 100% behind Nato? Where you

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reassured? People take Trump literally and not seriously and

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combine things. I am sure he still feels that it is obsolete because

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Donald Rumsfeld said it was obsolete. He is most perturbed that

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we carry 80% of the cost and 27 nations to not pay for it. If you

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think that has disappeared, the fact of the matter is he selected and has

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now been concerned ats confirmed the general who is behind Nato. That is

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the other good thing is that he does not need people to agree with

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heading. He once the variety... He said, didn't he, in that press

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conference that he would be overruled by the general when it

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comes to torture. That he thinks that it works but he accepts the

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journal does not believe in it. That may be extraordinary but is that the

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essence of Donald Trump's are we going to do that all antique pieces

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out a look at the whole picture? He has been very, very comfortable with

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people disagreeing with him and he has created that. He has not changed

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his opinion. What you said is that he would never ask anyone to do

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anything illegal. He would defer to the general and in the Wall Street

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Journal and article written had said that torture had worked. He says he

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believes that but he is not going to force that belief on the people who

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are experts. That is one of the key things about him. Let's turn to

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Russia, we know that President Trump is going to speak to Vladimir Putin,

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someone who he said that if he could have a good relationship with him,

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that would be great. Do you think it is too early to be talking about

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lifting sanctions on Russia over their behaviour in Ukraine? I do not

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know if that is the question of is it too early, what the question is

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is what would be the reason? What is the thinking behind it? Is it a

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carrot? What is really going on because I will tell you, Donald

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Trump does not do anything without having thought it through

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strategically and even anticipating what potential reaction could be. It

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was interesting to that Theresa May talked about the question of Russia.

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She talked about the agreement to which Russia must live up to if

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those sanctions are imposed. Donald Trump did not seem so familiar with

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the diplomatic language as Theresa May. Is that something that is going

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to come in time? I think that for someone who is 18 months ago, two

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years ago, was not a politician at all has turned our entire political

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system upside down, who took 3084 counties. Hillary only 157. -- 384.

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Give him a chance. He is a fast learner and he has been impresseds

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impressive at what he has mastered in such a short time. -- impressive.

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Thank you for that perspective on President Trump following his first

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meeting with a foreign leader. Let's hear more from that press

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conference. One of the key items was trade and the economy. Trade between

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our two countries is already worth over ?150 billion per year. Together

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we have around $1 trillion invested in each other's economies. The

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defence relationship is the broadest, deepest and most advanced

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of any two countries sharing military hardware and expertise. I

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think the president and I are ambitious to build on this

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relationship in order to grow our economies and provide the high

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skilled, high-paid jobs of the future for working people across

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America and across the UK. Theresa May there. Joining me is that Bishop

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from the London Chambers of commerce. I am not an economist but

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I understand tariffs currently between Britain and the US are

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minimal. If there was a trade deal, how much would trade be boosted? You

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are right. The rules apply and there is an extra layer on top from

:20:22.:20:28.

most-favoured-nation. The tariffs are not generally a barrier to trade

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and as you just heard, the trade between the US and the UK is

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enormous. They are our biggest individual country export market and

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we are in the top five of their export markets. Investment is

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enormous, too. We are starting from a good place. The trade agreement

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usually comes into play because barriers to trade are high and if

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you reduce those barriers, trade will grow. There has got to be some

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thought put into what the trade negotiations will entail. Peter,

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would this not mean if there was a trade agreement that those

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politically sensitive areas, which are Government protected, like

:21:21.:21:23.

defence and health spending, that Britain would have to open up to the

:21:24.:21:30.

Americans. Like open up the NHS? We have to pick on areas, like Donald

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Trump has said he is putting America first. He has got to find something

:21:36.:21:41.

in it from the USA, the getting a preferential access to us. We have

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65 million people, it is never going to be an equal deal. It has to work

:21:46.:21:54.

for them, too. Do you think then this is much more about the

:21:55.:21:58.

symbolism of the special relationship between Britain and

:21:59.:22:01.

America at a time where both political leaders want to show they

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can go it alone? I think that is an important part of it. By some levels

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of measurement, the USA and the UK are in the top five of the easiest

:22:14.:22:19.

places to do business in the world. Doing business with each other is,

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at the starting point, easy. That is not to say that free trade

:22:24.:22:29.

agreements can achieve more. Those tariffs are low but not known every

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sector, they can be lowered on both sides. You can take away export

:22:34.:22:40.

licensing, you can take away other licensing regimes. And have the

:22:41.:22:46.

mutual recognition of standards. All the nontariff barriers things can go

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down. I do not want to give the overall impression that the free

:22:50.:22:54.

trade agreement is a bad thing, but is not the massive boost to trade

:22:55.:22:59.

that it could be with countries where it is harder to do business.

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Thank you so much over there in London. Donald Trump said he had a

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friendly call with mixes president -- with the Mexican president. We

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had a talk that lasted for an hour this morning and we are going to be

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working on a theatre relationship and a new relationship. The United

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States cannot continue to lose vast amount of business, companies and

:23:28.:23:31.

millions and millions of people losing their jobs. That will not

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happen with me. We are no longer going to be the country that does

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not know what it is doing. We are going to renegotiate our trade deals

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and we are going to renegotiate other aspects of our relationship

:23:46.:23:50.

with Mexico. In the end, I think it will be good for both countries.

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Donald Trump talking about Mexico earlier in that press conference.

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Joining me now is the BBC's correspondent. You just heard what

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Donald Trump said there but earlier today he had a long phone

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conversation with the Mexican president after that bust up

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yesterday and now the Mexican president is not coming here. What

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did you make of his public comments following the bust up yesterday and

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the phone call with the Mexican president this morning? During that

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press conference, Donald Trump said he was not as brash as you might

:24:25.:24:28.

think that if you use some of the language he used to describe the

:24:29.:24:32.

Mexican president. He said he loves the Mexican people but they have

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beaten us to a pulp. You saw a bit of the characteristic Donald Trump

:24:39.:24:42.

that we are used to, rather than the more statement like President Trump

:24:43.:24:47.

that we saw alongside Theresa May. He is continuing that fight, shall

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we say, but he did have a phone conversation with the Mexican

:24:53.:24:55.

president earlier today and one of the upshot is from that conversation

:24:56.:24:59.

from the Mexican side, we have heard that both have agreed not to discuss

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publicly how they will pay for the wall. He did not mention the war,

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did he? Maybe he is coming steeped in the art of diplomacy. Maybe he

:25:10.:25:14.

has kept as part of the bargain but he said that the US cannot continue

:25:15.:25:18.

to lose vast amounts of business to Mexico. He is not giving up some of

:25:19.:25:22.

that fight he has picked with Mexico, which we saw throughout the

:25:23.:25:26.

campaign and has led to the meeting being cancelled next week. What you

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make of the overall tone of what did you think of the

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body language between Theresa May and Donald Trump? I think it felt at

:25:44.:25:46.

times that she was in charge. I felt like Donald Trump was dragged be

:25:47.:25:49.

more statement like. Except for of course the moments with Mexico. One

:25:50.:25:51.

of the most telling moments was when one of our little editors asked a

:25:52.:25:55.

tough question. What I have been saying on social media is that

:25:56.:26:00.

British journalists are ASCII and tougher questions than we have seen

:26:01.:26:01.

in the US. -- are asking tougher questions. You are watching BBC News

:26:02.:26:10.

life here in Washington, DC. I think I am ready for something

:26:11.:26:19.

milder.

:26:20.:26:23.