Cheshire Cash in the Attic


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Cheshire

Joy Cheshire wants to sell the memorabilia she collected with her husband David, a theatre historian. Gloria Hunniford and John Cameron help her chase her £1,000 target.


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Hello and welcome to Cash In the Attic,

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the programme that searches for antiques and collectables

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to help their owners realise a dream or fund a special project.

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It's always very sad when one has to downsize because of bereavement

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but when you go in for the final declutter,

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it's very poignant to find out what the family can bear to part with and what they can't.

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Coming up on Cash In The Attic, the lady of the house has little time

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for our expert's football fads.

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A big favourite of mine, star of England and Manchester United,

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Sir Bobby Charlton.

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And the daunting face of this Victorian actor

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sends shivers up our spines.

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It's often believed that the character Dracula was based

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on Henry Irving.

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-You can see why, can't you?

-Very sinister.

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We ask her the crucial question - which is better,

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Lord Olivier or a Sunderland ware plate?

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Why are they homing in on that and not on Laurence Olivier?

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-I couldn't quite see...

-Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

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There's only one way to find out - be there when the hammer falls.

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Now, today I'm near Chichester

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on what would have been the site of a magnificent Roman palace.

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In fact, when you look at the symmetry of the gardens,

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the Romans built the trenches in which the box trees are planted.

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Now, the man who lived here - I had to write this down -

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is Tiberius Claudius Togidubnus. Quite a name.

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But I'm off to meet Joy Cheshire who lives just down the road.

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This garden may not be quite as extensive as those at the Roman palace

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but it really makes an idyllic setting

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for the charming rectory in West Sussex.

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It's been Joy's home for more than a decade.

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Even so, the time has now come for her to leave.

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A few months ago, she very sadly lost her husband, David Cheshire,

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a well-respected author, theatre historian and collector

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and the place simply isn't the same without him.

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She needs help sorting through all the porcelain, paintings,

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furniture and books that they collected over their long marriage

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before she can even consider downsizing.

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She's also very keen to fly to Australia

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to visit her half-sister Suzette,

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with whom she was reunited just a few years ago.

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Joy has two grown-up children, a son, and a daughter, Ellen,

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and Ellen is helping us out today.

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We're all depending on our valuer, John Cameron,

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who has more than 20 years' experience in antiques.

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So while he makes a start in the parlour, I meet our hosts.

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Well, Joy. I find you in the middle of your record collection.

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-Very good. Very nice to see you.

-How do you do?

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-We were so looking forward to meeting you.

-My daughter Ellen.

-Hello.

-Nice to see you.

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So, Joy, yours is a very interesting story,

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a very interesting set of circumstances,

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but why did you call in the Cash In The Attic team?

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Yeah, because, I lived here 11 years with David,

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which was just brilliant.

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And so slowly we're getting rid of the things,

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passing them on to other people who will enjoy them, I hope.

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Our expert's going to have the most wonderful time today.

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You've got so many different things.

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Yes, from lollipop wrappers to records and CDs, DVDs,

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the really quirky next to the real sublime,

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so this is a real mix of stuff that we've been having to go through

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and find homes for.

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Well, John's already rummaging along your bountiful shelves

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and in the drawers, finding all sorts of things,

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-so would you like to come and meet him?

-Yes, that would be great.

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Joy hopes to make £1,000 at auction to pay for her trip Down Under

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to visit her half-sister, Suzette.

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With luck, John's already laid eyes on some valuable mementoes

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that could just get us started.

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Ooh, you found the royal mugs.

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How many mugs do you have here?

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-I don't know.

-There's about 24, 25 of them here,

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starting from Queen Victoria

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and going right up to Queen Elizabeth II.

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Nice collection. One or two interesting items amongst them.

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It's an amazing collection.

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-Are you the guilty person in terms of collecting?

-Not really.

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I'm not even a royalist. THEY LAUGH

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David started work up in Stafford, which is near Stoke-on-Trent,

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so they were just in the market and he bought one or two if they were really cheap.

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And that's what he did during the rest of his life.

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He just happened to be somewhere and he saw one

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and it was like 30 pence maximum, he'd buy it,

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and we'd stick them up above the picture rail

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But they grew until they went all the way along the picture rail.

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Well, my favourite two have to be these.

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The colouring's the same. They're made about 17 years apart.

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These are both by Royal Doulton. They're transfer printed,

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this one for the coronation of Edward VII,

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this one here to celebrate the end of the First World War.

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We've got all the names of the different allies here

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and there we are, Britannia, there - "Pro patria", for country.

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You've got one or two very common examples.

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I wouldn't cherry pick. I'd say put the lot in and see what happens.

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So are they very collectable? Will they sell at auction?

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And the third question is, how much do you think we might get?

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Well, the majority of them are quite common -

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20, 30, 40, 50 pence, the sort of things you see in charity shops,

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but you do have some from earlier in the 20th century.

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I'd put them together. I'd put £40-£60 on them as an estimate.

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-On the lot?

-Yes. And then see where you go from there.

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Joy, I may not be able to drink out of Queen Victoria's mug

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but at least I can make the tea, so let's head this way.

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'And I'm good at it!

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'A very respectable figure to start our search.

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'It's our host who makes the next discovery,

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'an oil painting of the actor Laurence Olivier

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'in his Shakespearean role as Coriolanus.

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'On our expert's advice, she pairs it up with another picture of the acting lord

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'in character as Hamlet.

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'Together, they could bring in £50-£80

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'And I find a very attractive plate. showing the tea clipper Red Jacket,

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'named after a famous Native American chief.

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'She was built in the USA and launched in 1853.

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'The plate was made by Adams pottery of Staffordshire.

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'and we think it should be worth at least £20.'

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Well, Joy, it's lovely, enjoying the sunshine

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in your gorgeous garden

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and I'm beginning to get a picture of David,

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just having had a look at this accumulator man

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and some of the things he's collected.

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Tell me what kind of a person he was. Was he a real character?

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I suppose he was and certainly, at the funeral,

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the stories people were telling made him suddenly become larger than life.

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So how big did his collection of various things become?

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Well, when they took away the books the other week,

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there were over 14,000 books.

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And where do you think this passion came from?

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Was it his upbringing or did it just develop over the years?

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I don't really know.

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He came from a village in Northamptonshire

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and he was a clever boy,

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you know, like the first in the village to get the 11 plus,

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the first in the village to go to grammar school,

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all that sort of thing.

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But he got very much attached to the theatre.

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So how difficult is it for you, doing this downsizing

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and getting rid of a lot of stuff that he put so much passion into?

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I think it is probably the best displacement activity

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that I could have.

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I don't want to live here without David.

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Ellen said I said that the day after he died and that is quite true.

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And then I found other reasons not to stay here -

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too big a house, couldn't afford it, all the other things.

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I just threw myself into placing the library and the archive

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and the ephemera collection and the other bits and bobs.

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Well, Joy, I have so loved hearing about your husband, David.

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And we're enjoying looking at some of his things today

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but I think we'd better get cracking.

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-We need £1,000...

-Yeah.

-..to get you to Australia.

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It sounds as if David was a really fascinating man,

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very respected as an expert in his field

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and, of course, very much missed by those who knew and loved him.

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I'm pleased that John and Ellen have kept up the search for items

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that should have lots of appeal at auction.

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It seems appropriate that our next find relates to David's interest

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in the long history of British theatre.

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John? They're unusual.

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-Oh, yes.

-Gosh. Do these ring a bell?

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-Yes, well, there's a clue at the bottom. Sir Henry Irving...

-Ah!

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-..as various characters he must have played.

-Oh, right.

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-So are they watercolours, John?

-They are indeed

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and each one has been signed.

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Have a look at the detail. The treatment of the costume is quite remarkable.

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And looking at the face of Henry Irving, he looks quite menacing.

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He's really captured the character.

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There must be a story about this awful face.

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I believe that at the Lyceum Theatre, where he was so well-connected,

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the manager there was Bram Stoker

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and it's often believed that the character of Dracula

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was based on Henry Irving.

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-And you can see why, can't you?

-Very sinister.

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When you look at the face, there is a touch of the Peter Cushing there.

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But looking at the signature, it's not an artist I know. J Winship.

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I don't know that name.

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They are dated as well and each one is titled,

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we can see the character.

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I think that this may well be somebody

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attached to the actual theatre production,

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either in costume or in set design.

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-So do you think Mum will be happy for these to go?

-I think so, yes.

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-OK. What might we get for them, John?

-They're nice.

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I do think they'll appeal to a certain sort of person.

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There must be a lot of theatre collectors, though?

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Absolutely. It's a case of marketing them

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but without any further research,

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I'd put an estimate of £400-£600 on them.

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-That seems quite healthy, Ellen, doesn't it?

-It does.

-All right.

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We'll see if they sell, if they are to be or not to be.

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Well, £400 makes a huge difference to our potential auction takings

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but will the bidders be quite so generous?

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We're on 310. 320, 330.

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340, 350, 360.

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This could be an exciting sale.

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Ellen's found another picture of Sir Henry Irvingdated 1899

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and signed by Ernest Moss.

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Also, a colour print attributed to J Beaumont

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and a ceramic gilt bust, stamped 1876.

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'With luck, this second lot of Irving goodies

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'should bring in £250-£300.

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'Also winging its way to auction

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'is this 19th century Japanese dinner service

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'which Joy's grandfather collected during his time working as a ship's engineer for P&O.'

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'John gives it a £70-100 price tag.'

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-Have you found anything interesting?

-Well, there's this here, yes.

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-Is there just the one of them?

-No, there's a pair.

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-This one's here.

-Is that one named as well?

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-Er, no. No name on this one.

-Just this one here.

-Yes.

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-What do you know about them?

-Well, I've seen them for years.

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They were originally at my grandma's.

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Well, they're of a type of pottery known as Sunderland lustreware,

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copper lustreware,

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and these were made throughout the 19th century

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in large quantity in the Sunderland area.

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And you often see vessels - jugs and mugs with this decoration on.

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That one's not named, this one is.

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This one is the Bretagne. She's quite an important vessel.

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She was a French ship and I think she had some distinguished service

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out in the Crimean War.

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-There's a bit of damage but it's on the one that's not named.

-Right.

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I think the value is in this one here

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but even with the damage, I'd still be hoping for £100-£200 for them.

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-Oh, right.

-Do you think that's good?

-I think so.

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Well, don't hang them back up, I'll take these.

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We'll get them wrapped up but there's lots of rummaging to do,

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so you don't have permission to go to shore just yet. Come on.

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He's masterful, you know. And John goes on to make the next find,

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again with a nautical theme.

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The dining room windows are lined with model yachts

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that David and Joy collected over the years.

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Pricing them at £80-£120,

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John hopes someone else will fall in love with them as well.

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And I wonder if Joy has struck gold with more theatrical memorabilia.

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Hello, Joy, these look interesting. What are they?

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These are two statues, obviously. Laurence Olivier.

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-Are you old enough to remember him?

-I remember Olivier.

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-But who's this one?

-This is Joan Sutherland, magnificent lady.

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-The Australian soprano?

-That's right.

-There's not a great deal of age to them.

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They're made of resin. They're reproductions.

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But if you have a look on the back of this one,

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and I know I've seen that one,

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we've got a signature on here - Sedlecka.

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Have you noticed that before? It's Irena Sedlecka,

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a Czechoslovakian-born sculptor born in around about 1928

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and is known for this sort of work.

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She fled the old communist regime in about 1967,

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came to this country and she also worked in America.

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But she did win the Lenin prize for sculpture

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before she left the old Soviet Union.

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But she also had some rather interesting commissions,

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people like Freddie Mercury.

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-There's a huge life-sized sculpture in Montreux...

-Oh, fantastic.

-..of Freddie Mercury.

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And a big favourite of mine, star of England and Manchester United,

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Sir Bobby Charlton.

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JOHN LAUGHS

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So if I was selling these today,

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I'd put an estimate, probably, of £80-£120 on them.

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-Oh, yes, yes. I'd love that.

-Excellent.

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In the immortal words of Freddie Mercury

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and in keeping with the theatrical theme, the show must go on, so we must keep rummaging.

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Ellen has found a print called Popularity and is a representation

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of all the stars of Edwardian music hall,

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dating back to 1903.

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It's also signed in pencil by the artist, Walter Lambert.

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John thinks it could bring in £60-£80.

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Well, our day near Chichester is drawing to a close

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but on the landing a delightful print catches my eye.

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-Come and have a look.

-OK, what have you found?

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It's an interesting lithograph

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-and I'm sure you've seen in it many, many times, Ellen.

-I have, yes.

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Well, I did notice it on the way past. I'm a big fan of Sir Stanley Spencer

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and it's a nice lithograph.

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What I like about him is his passion for his village where he grew up in Berkshire, Cookham.

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I read somewhere once that he was introduced to a head of state,

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it may have been China or Russia, somewhere like that,

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and he introduced himself as, "Hello, I'm Stanley from Cookham."

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-And...

-Lovely, that.

-Brilliant.

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Primarily known as a primitive, a surrealist,

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his work draws comparisons with Gauguin, the post-impressionists.

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But his work is quite distinctive.

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He was primarily a religious painter.

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He painted Biblical scenes and miracles,

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things like the loaves and the fishes, things like that.

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He did landscape work, which was popular commercially,

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but his passion was the religious pictures.

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He always used the people from Cookham.

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They were his own interpretations of these things

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using modern people from his village of Cookham.

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-So they were ones doing the miracles.

-They were.

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So obviously highly collectable but what value would you put on this?

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This limited edition lithograph I would estimate at £300-£500.

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You wanted £1,000 to go to Australia to meet your half-sister, Suzette.

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If the estimations work out right

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you've got £1,450.

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-Right. Spending money.

-So, Ellen, half a ticket!

-Half a ticket.

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-Maybe I could go...

-Maybe we could make a bit more.

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-We look forward to seeing you at auction.

-Thank you very much.

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Wow, this bodes very well for Joy's travel plans.

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Fingers crossed, she'll soon be waltzing with Suzette, her sister,

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if not Matilda, with the help of these items going to auction.

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One of the most distinguished actors to grace the British stage, Sir Henry Irving,

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seen in five original watercolours.

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We're looking for £400-£600.

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We have high hopes for the Sunderland lustreware plaques.

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It should be worth at least £100 to militaria collectors.

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And what about that lithograph,

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showing the artist Sir Stanley Spencer's family with a dog?

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Will this one make its £300 asking price?

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'Still to come on Cash In The Attic,

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'it's never easy to keep track of a packed auction.'

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I'm busy looking to see who's bidding

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and he's moved on. What did it go for?

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And what's this? Could things be taking off in more ways than one?

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So is that business class? No, it's not business class.

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It's not enough for business class.

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Find out at the final crack of the gavel.

0:16:530:16:57

What a fascinating day we had at Joy's cottage,

0:17:010:17:04

which was absolutely full of atmosphere

0:17:040:17:07

and full of things for us to have a look at.

0:17:070:17:09

So we picked out the creme de la creme

0:17:090:17:12

in the hope that we can raise at least £1,000

0:17:120:17:14

to send her off to Australia in style

0:17:140:17:16

and we brought them all here to the Chiswick Auction Rooms

0:17:160:17:19

in West London.

0:17:190:17:21

All we need now are bidders who are prepared to part with their cash.

0:17:210:17:24

Joy and Ellen sent their mementoes here in good time for viewing

0:17:240:17:28

but as many relate to the theatre,

0:17:280:17:31

I hope the specialist buyers turn out.

0:17:310:17:35

John's with me as we find them checking the Sunderland lustreware.

0:17:350:17:38

So here you are clutching onto what I think are very unusual.

0:17:380:17:42

Aren't they, yes?

0:17:420:17:43

They've just been around and we've taken them for granted.

0:17:430:17:46

And, of course, all important, we've got to get the £1,000.

0:17:460:17:51

-Absolutely.

-That's the goal.

-To see your half-sister.

0:17:510:17:54

Best of luck. I hope you get the money.

0:17:540:17:56

-Let's follow John.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:17:560:17:59

The auctioneer is already cracking on with the sale

0:17:590:18:01

and Joy's first lot under the hammer

0:18:010:18:04

is the plate that I found tucked away in the spare bedroom.

0:18:040:18:07

John, do you think this is the kind of thing

0:18:070:18:09

-that will appeal in the room today?

-Well, I love anything maritime,

0:18:090:18:13

so I think it's worthy of a single lot on its own.

0:18:130:18:16

It's a nice plate with a good tea clipper on there.

0:18:160:18:19

At £20-£30, it should sell.

0:18:190:18:21

£20 for it. £10 for it.

0:18:210:18:24

£10, £10 for it.

0:18:240:18:26

Give me a bid of £10 or I'll pass the lot. Not a good start for you.

0:18:260:18:29

No-one's at £10, then? £5 for it?

0:18:290:18:32

Oh, dearie me. We'll pass that lot.

0:18:320:18:34

-Did he sell it at all?

-He didn't get a bid on it.

0:18:340:18:37

-Nothing, nothing.

-So it's going home with you.

0:18:370:18:39

Uh-oh. Not the start we were hoping for

0:18:390:18:43

and I hope this won't augur badly for us

0:18:430:18:45

with three more ceramic lots still to come.

0:18:450:18:48

For instance, this large collection of mugs valued at £40-60.

0:18:480:18:54

They're worth £50. Start me, please. £30, the whole lot.

0:18:550:18:58

£30, at £30, give me 32, at 32, 35.

0:18:580:19:01

35, 38, 40, 42.

0:19:010:19:05

45? 45. 48? 50?

0:19:050:19:08

Five. 50 bid. At £50. At £50. Take five. All done?

0:19:080:19:12

At £50. We're going to sell at £50. It's your last chance. Gone.

0:19:120:19:15

Right in the middle of John's estimate.

0:19:150:19:18

And I hope their new owner enjoys them as much as Joy and her lovely husband David did.

0:19:180:19:23

We have the first of his theatrical memorabilia up next,

0:19:240:19:27

with the oil painting of renowned actor, Lord Olivier.

0:19:270:19:31

£50?

0:19:330:19:35

£30? £30, I'm bid. I'm bid £30. Thank you.

0:19:350:19:38

At £30 on the chairs. At 30. Bang me 32. Bang me 32.

0:19:380:19:41

32, 35? 35. 38?

0:19:410:19:44

38. 40?

0:19:440:19:45

42? At £40. A bid at £40.

0:19:450:19:48

New bidder. 42. 45?

0:19:480:19:50

-45, you're back in. 48?

-Good.

-Mm.

-50?

0:19:500:19:54

At £48. Are we there? At £48. Take 50. At £48. At £48. Sold.

0:19:540:19:58

-So you're not dissatisfied, then?

-No, no.

0:19:580:20:00

The little pot is slowly but surely building up towards Australia.

0:20:000:20:03

Well, it's not a bad result, and the modern statues of Lord Olivier

0:20:030:20:07

and opera singer Dame Joan Sutherland quickly follow.

0:20:070:20:11

Bidding so far is at 75. It's your bid, sir, at 75.

0:20:130:20:15

Who'll give me 80? At 75 in the blue, you've got them.

0:20:150:20:19

Selling just under John's estimate of £80.

0:20:190:20:22

'I was bowled over by the mementoes that she and David had gathered

0:20:220:20:27

'and this collection certainly brought a great deal of charm to their dining room.'

0:20:270:20:33

We've got one pond yacht and three static models.

0:20:330:20:36

Now, we've got £80-£100, it's only £20 apiece.

0:20:360:20:40

-And are they very collectable?

-The early ones are.

0:20:400:20:42

They can go for thousands of pounds.

0:20:420:20:44

These are purely decorative.

0:20:440:20:46

£100. £50.

0:20:460:20:47

£50 for the four boats. £40. I'm bid £40. At 45?

0:20:470:20:52

45, 50?

0:20:520:20:53

55. 60, five, 70.

0:20:530:20:55

Five? 70 bid, at £70. Take five. At £70.

0:20:550:21:00

£70. Out of the door at £70 and sold.

0:21:000:21:03

-So that was pretty good, wasn't it?

-Yeah, yeah, fine.

0:21:030:21:05

-70, John, yeah?

-Not bad. Just a bit under.

0:21:050:21:07

I would like to have done a bit better.

0:21:070:21:09

There's no pleasing our John. That seemed like a fair result to me

0:21:090:21:13

and I'm sure Joy and Ellen would agree

0:21:130:21:15

We're halfway through the sale and we've made £243 so far.

0:21:150:21:18

Remember, though, we're looking for £1,000 for Joy's plane ticket.

0:21:180:21:24

So, it's onwards and upwards.

0:21:240:21:26

Now, if you have a holiday or a special project in mind

0:21:260:21:29

and you'd like to try selling some of your items in this way,

0:21:290:21:32

it's worth bearing in mind that auction houses charge various fees,

0:21:320:21:36

such as commission.

0:21:360:21:38

Your local sale room will advise you on all these extra costs.

0:21:380:21:42

Joy's next lot is another rare print from her husband's collection.

0:21:420:21:46

It shows music hall stars of the Edwardian era.

0:21:460:21:49

At 42, 45, 48.

0:21:490:21:51

50, 55, 60.

0:21:510:21:54

Five? No. One in the corner at £60. At £60. Take five. At £60.

0:21:540:21:58

Are you all done? At £60 and going. Are we out? £60.

0:21:580:22:01

Bearing in mind this is your first auction, isn't it funny how it seemed to stick

0:22:010:22:04

and then it just took off?

0:22:040:22:06

I'm busy looking to see who's bidding and he's moved on.

0:22:060:22:11

-What did it go for?

-£60.

-60.

0:22:110:22:14

I quite understand, Joy. I've been doing this for years

0:22:140:22:17

and I still can't always tell who is bidding on what.

0:22:170:22:20

But not a bad result for the painting.

0:22:200:22:22

Unfortunately, the same can't be said of the Japanese dinner service.

0:22:220:22:26

It takes up an entire table at the auction.

0:22:260:22:28

John said £70-£100 but the bidders have other plans.

0:22:280:22:32

Pass that lot.

0:22:320:22:33

I hate it. Another no sale, so disappointing

0:22:330:22:36

but at least Joy will be able to sell it on another day.

0:22:360:22:39

Now, what will the buyers make of the Sunderland lustreware plaques?

0:22:390:22:43

£50? A bid at £50. At £50. I'll take 55.

0:22:460:22:48

55. 60? Five?

0:22:480:22:50

70, five. 80, five, 90, five.

0:22:500:22:54

100, 110, 120.

0:22:540:22:57

130, 140, 150.

0:22:570:22:58

160? At 160 and going. 160.

0:22:580:23:02

People would come to the house and say, "I like those,"

0:23:020:23:04

and I'd think, "Why are they homing in on that and not Laurence Olivier?"

0:23:040:23:07

-I couldn't quite see...

-Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

0:23:070:23:11

We can always count on John to remind us of our favourite sayings

0:23:110:23:15

and as we come to our next lot, he may have a point -

0:23:150:23:18

two 19th-century pictures and a bust of the actor Henry Irving.

0:23:180:23:23

£100 to start me for these three bits. £100 I'm bid.

0:23:230:23:26

I'll take 110. £100 in front of me. I'll take 110.

0:23:260:23:30

110, I'm bid. 120.

0:23:300:23:31

130? 130, 140, 150.

0:23:310:23:34

150, 160, 170?

0:23:340:23:35

The bid's here at 160. There's a bid at 160, that's as far as I can get.

0:23:350:23:38

160 and going. All done?

0:23:380:23:40

At 160 and gone.

0:23:400:23:43

It's all right.

0:23:430:23:44

-Another Irving lover is out there somewhere.

-Exactly.

0:23:440:23:47

And the Irving lover will love what you've had over the years.

0:23:470:23:50

Perhaps the bidders find Irving's face just a little too daunting

0:23:500:23:54

to raise big bucks.

0:23:540:23:55

But I wonder if we dare to tempt fate with another Irving collection?

0:23:550:24:00

It's a set of five Victorian watercolours

0:24:000:24:03

which John valued at £400-600.

0:24:030:24:06

400? And 10. 420.

0:24:080:24:10

430, 440.

0:24:100:24:12

450, 460.

0:24:120:24:14

470, 480.

0:24:140:24:16

-490, 500.

-It's good.

-Thank you, bidder.

0:24:160:24:19

At £490. At 490. Take five now. At 490. Are we done?

0:24:190:24:22

At 490, your last chance. All done? At 490. All out and gone?

0:24:220:24:26

So 490, is that business class? No, it's not enough for business class.

0:24:260:24:31

Lovely! Joy's starting to get excited

0:24:310:24:34

and with each sale, her trip to Australia flies even closer

0:24:340:24:38

towards becoming a reality.

0:24:380:24:40

Let's hope the final sale clinches it.

0:24:400:24:42

Joy and her husband David bought this picture in 1964,

0:24:420:24:45

a limited edition by the artist, Sir Stanley Spencer.

0:24:450:24:48

Well, it looks like there's telephone interest in this.

0:24:480:24:52

£200 for it. I'm bid £200. 300?

0:24:520:24:55

400? 500.

0:24:550:24:57

600, 620.

0:24:570:24:58

640. 660.

0:24:580:25:01

-680?

-That's the flight already.

0:25:010:25:03

660. 660, we're selling. All done?

0:25:030:25:06

At £660 are we done? Your last chance. It's going at 660 and gone.

0:25:060:25:10

-Thanks. It's your bid and going.

-Wow! Well done.

0:25:100:25:12

-What a surprise!

-Fabulous!

0:25:120:25:14

-Such a surprise.

-So at least you know you're going to Australia, now.

0:25:140:25:18

Well, it's obvious that Joy has done extremely well

0:25:180:25:22

during the last two sales,

0:25:220:25:23

when the bidders went mad for her beautiful artwork.

0:25:230:25:26

Her original target was £1,000 to pay for a flight to Australia,

0:25:260:25:31

so just how close have we come to making it?

0:25:310:25:34

We knew that there were some very important items to come

0:25:340:25:37

and I'm so thrilled to tell you that your final total

0:25:370:25:40

-is £1,773.

-Goodness.

-Oh, my gosh.

0:25:400:25:45

That's fantastic.

0:25:450:25:47

What bumped it up? Those two big items?

0:25:470:25:49

-Those marvellous paintings.

-The Stanley Spencer.

0:25:490:25:51

-Oh, thank you.

-Maybe, Ellen, you can go as well.

0:25:510:25:54

Maybe I can go. I think I'll be in steerage, though.

0:25:540:25:57

A few weeks have gone by since the auction

0:26:020:26:04

and the house is looking just that little bit less cluttered.

0:26:040:26:07

Now's the best bit. Joy's excited to be choosing some outfits

0:26:070:26:10

for her trip Down Under.

0:26:100:26:12

Oh, well, it just has realised the dream and more!

0:26:120:26:17

Because I was looking to see how much to get to Australia

0:26:170:26:21

and it was round about £700, £800

0:26:210:26:25

and I've got it to go and see this sister that I only found,

0:26:250:26:30

what, four years ago, on the other side of the world.

0:26:300:26:33

Joy Cheshire has decided to downsize and find new homes for the memorabilia she collected with her husband David, a theatre historian, over their long marriage. She would also like to visit her half-sister in Australia and has a target of £1,000 to raise. Gloria Hunniford and John Cameron help Joy and her daughter Ellen with the antiques hunt.